WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell labeling research

  1. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs

  2. Clinical applications of cells labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood cells labelled with radionuclides are reviewed and main applications are described. Red blood cell labelling by both random and specific principle. A table with most important clinical uses, 99mTc labelling of RBC are described pre tinning and in vivo reduction of Tc, in vitro labelling and administration of labelled RBC and in vivo modified technique. Labelled leucocytes with several 99mTc-complex radiopharmaceuticals by in vitro technique and specific monoclonal s for white cells(neutrofiles). Labelled platelets for clinical use and research by in vitro technique and in vivo labelling

  3. Blood cell labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The labelling of blood cells in vitro for subsequent in vivo studies was one of the earliest applications of radioactive tracers in clinical medicine and laid the foundations for many important contributions to the advancement of knowledge of human blood cell pathophysiology. The characteristics required for satisfactory clinical studies, the mechanisms of cell labelling, the problems of radiation or chemical damage to the labelled cells and some examples of modern clinical applications are described and discussed. (Author)

  4. Tritium labeling for bio-med research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very large fraction of what we know about biochemical pathways in the living cell has resulted from the use of radioactively-labeled tracer compounds; the use of tritium-labeled compounds has been particularly important. As research in biochemistry and biology has progressed the need has arisen to label compounds of higher specific activity and of increasing molecular complexity - for example, oligo-nucleotides, polypeptides, hormones, enzymes. Our laboratory has gradually developed special facilities for handling tritium at the kilocurie level. These facilities have already proven extremely valuable in producing labeled compounds that are not available from commercial sources. The principal ways employed for compound labeling are: (1) microwave discharge labeling, (2) catalytic tritio-hydrogenation, (3) catalytic exchange with T2O, and (4) replacement of halogen atoms by T. Studies have also been carried out on tritiation by the replacement of halogen atoms with T atoms. These results indicate that carrier-free tritium-labeled products, including biomacromolecules, can be produced in this way

  5. Label-Free Biosensors for Cell Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Ye Fang

    2011-01-01

    Label-free biosensors for studying cell biology have finally come of age. Recent developments have advanced the biosensors from low throughput and high maintenance research tools to high throughput and low maintenance screening platforms. In parallel, the biosensors have evolved from an analytical tool solely for molecular interaction analysis to powerful platforms for studying cell biology at the whole cell level. This paper presents historical development, detection principles, and applicat...

  6. Labelled molecules, modern research implements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Details of the synthesis of carbon 14- and tritium-labelled molecules are examined. Although the methods used are those of classical organic chemistry the preparation of carbon 14-labelled molecules differs in some respects, most noticeably in the use of 14CO2 which requires very special handling techniques. For the tritium labelling of organic molecules the methods are somewhat different, very often involving exchange reactions. The following are described in turn: the so-called Wilzbach exchange method; exchange by catalysis in solution; catalytic hydrogenation with tritium; reductions with borotritides. Some applications of labelled molecules in organic chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology are listed

  7. Progress on research of radioisotope-labeled porphyrin derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porphyrin derivatives can be taken up by tumor cells and accumulated there for a long time. Since 1960's, radioactive isotope-labeled porphyrins have been under extensive researches around the world. The progress of labeled porphyrins with various radioactive isotopes includes 3H, 11C, 123I, 131I, 99mTc, 188Re, 117,113mSn, 153Sm, 109Pd, 111In, 57Co, 58Co, 65Zn, 64,67Cu, 90Y, 166Ho is reviewed here. Among them, we studied the labeling conditions, chemical and biochemical properties of 188Re-labeled, 117,113mSn-labeled and 153Sm-labeled T3,4CPP and TPPS4. We also studied the bio-distribution of 188Re-labeled T3,4CPP and TPPS4 in mice with transplanted liver tumor and melanoma. Other researches in porphyrins which could affect the research of radioisotope-labeled porphyrins are introduced in the end. This review could provide a reference for design of better radioisotope-labeled porphyrins. (authors)

  8. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  9. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  10. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  11. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated

  12. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated

  13. Label-free quantitative cell division monitoring of endothelial cells by digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Bauwens, Andreas; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Müthing, Johannes; Karch, Helge; von Bally, Gert

    2010-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables quantitative multifocus phase contrast imaging for nondestructive technical inspection and live cell analysis. Time-lapse investigations on human brain microvascular endothelial cells demonstrate the use of DHM for label-free dynamic quantitative monitoring of cell division of mother cells into daughter cells. Cytokinetic DHM analysis provides future applications in toxicology and cancer research.

  14. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A. [and others

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  15. Research on consumer reactions to nutrition labelling (FLABEL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.

    Nutrition labels are potentially a major instrument for enabling consumers to make healthier food choices, but current insights into how nutrition labels are used by consumers in real-world shopping situations are limited, making the science-based formulation of new labelling policies...... and the evaluation of existing ones difficult. Recent and ongoing research, including research in the European Union (EU)-funded FP7 project FLABEL (Food Labelling to Advance Better Education for Life), is accumulating evidence not only on consumer liking of labels and on self-reported use, but also on labels......' attention-getting potential, on the way consumers draw inferences on product healthiness from them, and on how they actually affect choices. Based on the findings from this project, best practice guidelines will be developed for use of nutrition labelling in EU policy and the food industry, especially SMEs...

  16. Aptamer-mediated indirect quantum dot labeling and fluorescent imaging of target proteins in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein labeling for dynamic living cell imaging plays a significant role in basic biological research, as well as in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. We have developed a novel strategy in which the dynamic visualization of proteins within living cells is achieved by using aptamers as mediators for indirect protein labeling of quantum dots (QDs). With this strategy, the target protein angiogenin was successfully labeled with fluorescent QDs in a minor intactness model, which was mediated by the aptamer AL6-B. Subsequent living cell imaging analyses indicated that the QDs nanoprobes were selectively bound to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, gradually internalized into the cytoplasm, and mostly localized in the lysosome organelle, indicating that the labeled protein retained high activity. Compared with traditional direct protein labeling methods, the proposed aptamer-mediated strategy is simple, inexpensive, and provides a highly selective, stable, and intact labeling platform that has shown great promise for future biomedical labeling and intracellular protein dynamic analyses. (paper)

  17. A Chemical Probe that Labels Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Hirata

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A small-molecule fluorescent probe specific for human pluripotent stem cells would serve as a useful tool for basic cell biology research and stem cell therapy. Screening of fluorescent chemical libraries with human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and subsequent evaluation of hit molecules identified a fluorescent compound (Kyoto probe 1 [KP-1] that selectively labels human pluripotent stem cells. Our analyses indicated that the selectivity results primarily from a distinct expression pattern of ABC transporters in human pluripotent stem cells and from the transporter selectivity of KP-1. Expression of ABCB1 (MDR1 and ABCG2 (BCRP, both of which cause the efflux of KP-1, is repressed in human pluripotent stem cells. Although KP-1, like other pluripotent markers, is not absolutely specific for pluripotent stem cells, the identified chemical probe may be used in conjunction with other reagents.

  18. Carboxyfluorescein Diacetate Succinimidyl Ester Fluorescent Dye for Cell Labeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Qi WANG; Xiu-Mei DUAN; Li-Hua LIU; Yan-Qiu FANG; Yan TAN

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to study the properties of the carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFDA-SE) and the methodology of cell labeling using CFDA-SE fluorescent dye. First, we analyzed the kinetics of CFDA-SE fluorescent dye intensity over time. Second, we determined the optimal concentration of CFDA-SE fluorescent dye for cell labeling. Third, we tested the toxicity of CFDA-SE fluorescent dye on labeled cells. Finally, we determined the optimal staining time of CFDA-SE fluorescent dye for cell labeling.The results show that the optimal concentration of CFDA-SE fluorescent dye for cell labeling varies according to different cell types. CFDA-SE fluorescent dye is non-toxic to cells as the cell death rate caused by CFDASE labeling is below 5%. The optimal cell labeling time was determined to be 8 min of incubation with CFDA-SE fluorescent dye. We concluded that the advantages of using CFDA-SE fluorescent dye for cell labeling are as follows: (1) the binding of CFDA-SE fluorescent dye to cells is stable; (2) CFDA-SE fluorescent dye is not toxic and does not modify the viability of labeled cells; and (3) CFDA-SE fluorescent dye is a suitable fluorochrome for cell labeling.

  19. Current state of the art of blood cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An update on some recent developments in the area of blood cell labeling is provided. Specific topics covered include red cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc, platelet labeling using an antiplatelet monoclonal antibody, and the labeling of leukocytes with /sup 99m/Tc. Mechanistic information, where available, is discussed. A critical evaluation of current techniques, their pitfalls as well as advantages, and the problems that remain to be resolved, is presented. The promise shown by recent results using the antibody approach for cell labeling is emphasized. An assessment of the progress made in these areas is presented. 38 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Immunogold labels: cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Grooth, de Bart G.; Hansma, Paul K.; Hulst, van Niek F.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using immunogold labels as cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy is shown in this paper. The atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to image the surface of immunogold-labeled human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes were isolated from whole blood and labeled by an indirect imm

  1. Nanodiamonds with silicon vacancy defects for non-toxic photostable fluorescent labeling of neural precursor cells

    CERN Document Server

    Merson, Tobias D; Aharonovich, Igor; Turbic, Alisa; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Turnley, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) containing silicon vacancy (SiV) defects were evaluated as a potential biomarker for the labeling and fluorescent imaging of neural precursor cells (NPCs). SiV-containing NDs were synthesized using chemical vapor deposition and silicon ion implantation. Spectrally, SiV-containing NDs exhibited extremely stable fluorescence and narrow bandwidth emission with an excellent signal to noise ratio exceeding that of NDs containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers. NPCs labeled with NDs exhibited normal cell viability and proliferative properties consistent with biocompatibility. We conclude that SiVcontaining NDs are a promising biomedical research tool for cellular labeling and optical imaging in stem cell research.

  2. State of the science of blood cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood cell labeling can be considered a science in as far as it is based on precise knowledge and can be readily reproduced. This benchmark criterion is applied to all current cell labeling modalities and their relative merits and deficiencies are discussed. Mechanisms are given where they are known as well as labeling yields, label stability, and cell functionality. The focus is on the methodology and its suitability to the clinical setting rather than on clinical applications per se. Clinical results are cited only as proof of efficacy of the various methods. The emphasis is on technetium as the cell label, although comparisons are made between technetium and indium, and all blood cells are covered. 52 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  3. Labelling of red blood cells with 99m pertechnetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a method for labelling red blood cells with 99mTc in vitro, using electrolytically generated stannous ions as the reducing agent for 99mTc-pertechnetate. A labelling of 95% was found. A method for the in vivo labelling of red blood cells is also reported. This involves an injection of a stanno-DTPA-complex followed 20 minutes later by a 99mTc-pertechnetate solution scintillation camera images show more background activity when the in vivo method of labelling is used

  4. Instant magnetic labeling of tumor cells by ultrasound in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Runyang; Yang, Jian; Wu, Ed X.; Lin, Shuyu

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic labeling of living cells creates opportunities for numerous biomedical applications. Here we describe an instantly cell magnetic labeling method based on ultrasound. We present a detailed study on the ultrasound performance of a simple and efficient labeling protocol for H-22 cells in vitro. High frequency focus ultrasound was investigated as an alternative method to achieve instant cell labeling with the magnetic particles without the need for adjunct agents or initiating cell cultures. Mean diameter of 168 nm dextran-T40 coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were prepared by means of classical coprecipitation in solution in our laboratory. H-22 tumor cells suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH=7.2) were exposed to ultrasound at 1.37 MHz for up to 120 s in the presence of SPIOs. The cellular uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles was detected by prussion blue staining. The viability of cells was determined by a trypan blue exclusion test. At 2 W power and 60 s ultrasound exposure in presence of 410 μg/ml SPIOs, H-22 cell labeling efficiency reached 69.4±6.3% and the labeled cells exhibited an iron content of 10.38±2.43 pg per cell. Furthermore, 95.2±3.2% cells remained viable. The results indicated that the ultrasound protocol could be potentially applied to label cells with large-sized magnetic particles. We also calculated the shear stress at the 2 W power and 1.37 MHz used in experiments. The results showed that the shear stress threshold for ultrasonically induced H-22 cell reparable sonoporation was 697 Pa. These findings provide a quantitative guidance in designing ultrasound protocols for cell labeling.

  5. CELL RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    REVIEWSInducible resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis in B cells…………………………………ROTHSTEIN Thomas L (245)Executionary pathway for apoptosis: lessons from mutant mice………………………………………WOO Minna, Razqallah Hakem, Tak W Mak (267)The SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase: Signaling mechanisms and biological functions…………………………………QU Cheng Kui (279)REGULAR ARTICLESTemperature dependent expression of cdc2 and cyclin B1 in spermatogenic cells during spermatogenesis…………………………KONG Wei Hua, Zheng GU, Jining LU, Jiake TSO (289)Transgenic mice overexpressing γ-aminobutyric acid transporter subtype I develop obesity…………………………………MA Ying Hua, Jia Hua HU, Xiao Gang ZHOU, Ruo Wang ZENG, Zhen Tong MEI, Jian FEI, Li He GUO (303)Genetic aberration in primary hepatocellular carcinoma: correlation between p53 gene mutation and loss-of-heterozygosity on chromosome 16q21-q23 and 9p21-p23………………………………………WANG Gang, Chang Hui HUANG, Yan ZHAO, Ling CAI, Ying WANG, Shi Jin XIU, Zheng Wen JIANG, Shuang YANG, Xin Tai ZHAO, Wei HUANG, Jian Ren GU (311)Identification and genetic mapping of four novel genes that regulate leaf deve- lopment in Arabidopsis………………………………………………SUN Yue, Wei ZHANG, Feng Ling LI, Ying Li GUO, Tian Lei LIU, Hai HUANG (325)NOTICE FOR CONTRIBUTORS…………………………………(337)CONTENTS of Vol. 10, 2000…………………………………………………(338)

  6. Immunogold labels: cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Grooth, de, B.G.; Hansma, Paul K.; Hulst, van der, R.W.M.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using immunogold labels as cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy is shown in this paper. The atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to image the surface of immunogold-labeled human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes were isolated from whole blood and labeled by an indirect immunolabeling method using the monoclonal antibody anti-CD3 and a secondary antibody (Goat-anti-Mouse) linked to 30 nm colloidal gold particles. Some of the samples were enhanced by silver deposition...

  7. Carbon isotope labelling in graphene research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Otakar; Kavan, Ladislav; Kalbáč, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 12 (2014), s. 6363-6370. ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-07724S; GA MŠk LL1301; GA ČR GA14-15357S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : CHEMICAL-VAPOR-DEPOSITION * STACKED BILAYER GRAPHENE * SENSITIZED SOLAR-CELLS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.394, year: 2014

  8. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Claire Lifan Chen; Ata Mahjoubfar; Li-Chia Tai; Ian K. Blaby; Allen Huang; Kayvan Reza Niazi; Bahram Jalali

    2016-01-01

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitati...

  9. The transport pathway of labelled Mycena osmundicola and assimilated labelled materials in the embryonic cells of Gastrodia elata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mycena osmundicola Lange. was labelled by 3H-glucose and the seeds of Gastrodia elata B1. were sown on the saprophytic leaves of labelled M. osmundicola. By means of autoradiography, it is found that the labelled M. osmundicola infected embryonic cells of G. elata only through the suspensor cells. In the embryonic cells of G. elata the assimilated labelled materials entered into the cells by the wall of cell. After the protocorm formed, the assimilated labelled materials were transferred by the vascular tissue of G. elata

  10. Accelerated stem cell labeling with ferucarbotran and protamine

    OpenAIRE

    Golovko, Daniel M.; Henning, Tobias; Bauer, Jan S.; Settles, Marcus; Frenzel, Thomas; Mayerhofer, Artur; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop and characterize a clinically applicable, fast and efficient method for stem cell labeling with ferucarbotran and protamine for depiction with clinical MRI. Methods The hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and relaxivities of ferucarbotran and varying concentrations of protamine were measured. Once the optimized ratio was found, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were labeled at varying incubation times (1–24 h). Viability was assessed via Trypan blue exclusion testing....

  11. Instant magnetic labeling of tumor cells by ultrasound in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic labeling of living cells creates opportunities for numerous biomedical applications. Here we describe an instantly cell magnetic labeling method based on ultrasound. We present a detailed study on the ultrasound performance of a simple and efficient labeling protocol for H-22 cells in vitro. High frequency focus ultrasound was investigated as an alternative method to achieve instant cell labeling with the magnetic particles without the need for adjunct agents or initiating cell cultures. Mean diameter of 168 nm dextran-T40 coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were prepared by means of classical coprecipitation in solution in our laboratory. H-22 tumor cells suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH=7.2) were exposed to ultrasound at 1.37 MHz for up to 120 s in the presence of SPIOs. The cellular uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles was detected by prussion blue staining. The viability of cells was determined by a trypan blue exclusion test. At 2 W power and 60 s ultrasound exposure in presence of 410 μg/ml SPIOs, H-22 cell labeling efficiency reached 69.4±6.3% and the labeled cells exhibited an iron content of 10.38±2.43 pg per cell. Furthermore, 95.2±3.2% cells remained viable. The results indicated that the ultrasound protocol could be potentially applied to label cells with large-sized magnetic particles. We also calculated the shear stress at the 2 W power and 1.37 MHz used in experiments. The results showed that the shear stress threshold for ultrasonically induced H-22 cell reparable sonoporation was 697 Pa. These findings provide a quantitative guidance in designing ultrasound protocols for cell labeling. - Highlights: → High frequency focus ultrasound can be used as a safe method for instant magnetic labeling of cells. → 8-16 times increased efficiency can be gained by ultrasound versus that by transfection agents. → Calculation of shear stress around cells provide a quantitative design for ultrasound protocols.

  12. Instant magnetic labeling of tumor cells by ultrasound in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo Runyang, E-mail: mmrryycn@snnu.edu.cn [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Ultrasonic, College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, No. 199 of South Changan Road, Xi' an 710062 (China); Yang Jian, E-mail: cjr.yangjian@vip.163.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The First Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, No. 277 of West Yanta Road, Shannxi Province, Xi' an 710062 (China); Wu, Ed X. [Laboratory of Biomedical Imaging and Signal Processing, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Lin Shuyu [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Ultrasonic, College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, No. 199 of South Changan Road, Xi' an 710062 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Magnetic labeling of living cells creates opportunities for numerous biomedical applications. Here we describe an instantly cell magnetic labeling method based on ultrasound. We present a detailed study on the ultrasound performance of a simple and efficient labeling protocol for H-22 cells in vitro. High frequency focus ultrasound was investigated as an alternative method to achieve instant cell labeling with the magnetic particles without the need for adjunct agents or initiating cell cultures. Mean diameter of 168 nm dextran-T40 coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were prepared by means of classical coprecipitation in solution in our laboratory. H-22 tumor cells suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH=7.2) were exposed to ultrasound at 1.37 MHz for up to 120 s in the presence of SPIOs. The cellular uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles was detected by prussion blue staining. The viability of cells was determined by a trypan blue exclusion test. At 2 W power and 60 s ultrasound exposure in presence of 410 {mu}g/ml SPIOs, H-22 cell labeling efficiency reached 69.4{+-}6.3% and the labeled cells exhibited an iron content of 10.38{+-}2.43 pg per cell. Furthermore, 95.2{+-}3.2% cells remained viable. The results indicated that the ultrasound protocol could be potentially applied to label cells with large-sized magnetic particles. We also calculated the shear stress at the 2 W power and 1.37 MHz used in experiments. The results showed that the shear stress threshold for ultrasonically induced H-22 cell reparable sonoporation was 697 Pa. These findings provide a quantitative guidance in designing ultrasound protocols for cell labeling. - Highlights: > High frequency focus ultrasound can be used as a safe method for instant magnetic labeling of cells. > 8-16 times increased efficiency can be gained by ultrasound versus that by transfection agents. > Calculation of shear stress around cells provide a quantitative design for ultrasound protocols.

  13. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling. PMID:1030938

  14. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin; Hoss, Mareike; Wong, John Erik; Hieronymus, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3+ DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  15. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3+ DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking

  16. A microfluidics-based technique for automated and rapid labeling of cells for flow cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow cytometry is a powerful technique capable of simultaneous multi-parametric analysis of heterogeneous cell populations for research and clinical applications. In recent years, the flow cytometer has been miniaturized and made portable for application in clinical- and resource-limited settings. The sample preparation procedure, i.e. labeling of cells with antibodies conjugated to fluorescent labels, is a time consuming (∼45 min) and labor-intensive procedure. Microfluidics provides enabling technologies to accomplish rapid and automated sample preparation. Using an integrated microfluidic device consisting of a labeling and washing module, we demonstrate a new protocol that can eliminate sample handling and accomplish sample and reagent metering, high-efficiency mixing, labeling and washing in rapid automated fashion. The labeling module consists of a long microfluidic channel with an integrated chaotic mixer. Samples and reagents are precisely metered into this device to accomplish rapid and high-efficiency mixing. The mixed sample and reagents are collected in a holding syringe and held for up to 8 min following which the mixture is introduced into an inertial washing module to obtain ‘analysis-ready’ samples. The washing module consists of a high aspect ratio channel capable of focusing cells to equilibrium positions close to the channel walls. By introducing the cells and labeling reagents in a narrow stream at the center of the channel flanked on both sides by a wash buffer, the elution of cells into the wash buffer away from the free unbound antibodies is accomplished. After initial calibration experiments to determine appropriate ‘holding time’ to allow antibody binding, both modules were used in conjunction to label MOLT-3 cells (T lymphoblast cell line) with three different antibodies simultaneously. Results confirm no significant difference in mean fluorescence intensity values for all three antibodies labels (p < 0.01) between the

  17. Accelerated stem cell labeling with ferucarbotran and protamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovko, Daniel M.; Henning, Tobias; Bauer, Jan S. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technical University Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Frenzel, Thomas [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Mayerhofer, Artur [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institute of Cell Biology, Munich (Germany); Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF Medical Center, Contrast Agent Research Group, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2010-03-15

    To develop and characterize a clinically applicable, fast and efficient method for stem cell labeling with ferucarbotran and protamine for depiction with clinical MRI. The hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and relaxivities of ferucarbotran and varying concentrations of protamine were measured. Once the optimized ratio was found, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were labeled at varying incubation times (1-24 h). Viability was assessed via Trypan blue exclusion testing. 150,000 labeled cells in Ficoll solution were imaged with T1-, T2- and T2*-weighted sequences at 3 T, and relaxation rates were calculated. Varying the concentrations of protamine allows for easy modification of the physicochemical properties. Simple incubation with ferucarbotran alone resulted in efficient labeling after 24 h of incubation while assisted labeling with protamine resulted in similar results after only 1 h. Cell viability remained unaffected. R2 and R2* relaxation rates were drastically increased. Electron microscopy confirmed intracellular iron oxide uptake in lysosomes. Relaxation times correlated with results from ICP-AES. Our results show internalization of ferucarbotran can be accelerated in MSCs with protamine, an approved heparin antagonist and potentially clinically applicable uptake-enhancing agent. (orig.)

  18. Accelerated stem cell labeling with ferucarbotran and protamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop and characterize a clinically applicable, fast and efficient method for stem cell labeling with ferucarbotran and protamine for depiction with clinical MRI. The hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and relaxivities of ferucarbotran and varying concentrations of protamine were measured. Once the optimized ratio was found, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were labeled at varying incubation times (1-24 h). Viability was assessed via Trypan blue exclusion testing. 150,000 labeled cells in Ficoll solution were imaged with T1-, T2- and T2*-weighted sequences at 3 T, and relaxation rates were calculated. Varying the concentrations of protamine allows for easy modification of the physicochemical properties. Simple incubation with ferucarbotran alone resulted in efficient labeling after 24 h of incubation while assisted labeling with protamine resulted in similar results after only 1 h. Cell viability remained unaffected. R2 and R2* relaxation rates were drastically increased. Electron microscopy confirmed intracellular iron oxide uptake in lysosomes. Relaxation times correlated with results from ICP-AES. Our results show internalization of ferucarbotran can be accelerated in MSCs with protamine, an approved heparin antagonist and potentially clinically applicable uptake-enhancing agent. (orig.)

  19. Interfacial Polymerization for Colorimetric Labeling of Protein Expression in Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Jacob L.; Sheldon, Phillip R.; Hoversten, Liv J.; Romero, Gabriela; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Berron, Brad J.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the location of rare proteins in cells typically requires the use of on-sample amplification. Antibody based recognition and enzymatic amplification is used to produce large amounts of visible label at the site of protein expression, but these techniques suffer from the presence of nonspecific reactivity in the biological sample and from poor spatial control over the label. Polymerization based amplification is a recently developed alternative means of creating an on-sample amplification for fluorescence applications, while not suffering from endogenous labels or loss of signal localization. This manuscript builds upon polymerization based amplification by developing a stable, archivable, and colorimetric mode of amplification termed Polymer Dye Labeling. The basic concept involves an interfacial polymer grown at the site of protein expression and subsequent staining of this polymer with an appropriate dye. The dyes Evans Blue and eosin were initially investigated for colorimetric response in a microarray setting, where both specifically stained polymer films on glass. The process was translated to the staining of protein expression in human dermal fibroblast cells, and Polymer Dye Labeling was specific to regions consistent with desired protein expression. The labeling is stable for over 200 days in ambient conditions and is also compatible with modern mounting medium. PMID:25536421

  20. Quantum dots for labeling adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, Hiroshi; Mizufune, Shogo; Mamori, Chiharu; Kagami, Yukimasa; Oishi, Koichi; Kaji, Noritada; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Takeshi, Manabu; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Baba, Yoshinobu; Hamaguchi, Michinari; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Shuji

    2009-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) have a self-renewing ability and can be induced to differentiate into various types of mesenchymal tissue. Because of their potential for clinical application, it has become desirable to label the cells for tracing transplanted cells and for in vivo imaging. Quantum dots (QDs) are novel inorganic probes that consist of CdSe/ZnS-core/shell semiconductor nanocrystals and have recently been explored as fluorescent probes for stem cell labeling. In this study, negatively charged QDs655 were applied for ASCs labeling, with the cationic liposome, Lipofectamine. The cytotoxicity of QDs655-Lipofectamine was assessed for ASCs. Although some cytotoxicity was observed in ASCs transfected with more than 2.0 nM of QDs655, none was observed with less than 0.8 nM. To evaluate the time dependency, the fluorescent intensity with QDs655 was observed until 24 h after transfection. The fluorescent intensity gradually increased until 2 h at the concentrations of 0.2 and 0.4 nM, while the intensity increased until 4 h at 0.8 nM. The ASCs were differentiated into both adipogenic and osteogenic cells with red fluorescence after transfection with QDs655, thus suggesting that the cells retain their potential for differentiation even after transfected with QDs655. These data suggest that QDs could be utilized for the labeling of ASCs. PMID:19775521

  1. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K.; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-01

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individual cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. This system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells.

  2. Clinical applications of indium-111-acetylacetone-labelled blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method permitting red-cell labelling with 111In-acetylacetone was reported in 1974 for evaluating intestinal blood loss, the liver-spleen ratio and the red-cell volume. White blood cells can be tagged similarly. In white-cell labelling, simultaneous red-cell or platelet tagging is avoided. Several procedures (dextran separation and gradient centrifugations) have been combined, to develop a highly selective cell separation. In osteomyelitis it may not be as advantageous to use 67Ga-citrate, as in inflammatory soft tissue processes. The detection of inflammatory processes with labelled leukocytes could be of great importance for the scintigraphic diagnosis of osteomyelitidies. A group of 97 patients with suspected osteomyelitis have been examined using 111In-acetylacetone-labelled leukocytes (111In-AAL) immediately following positive routine skeletal scintigraphy. Images obtained 24 h post injection usually were the most satisfactory. In the followup group of 70 patients 21 true positives, 43 true negatives, 21 false negatives and 3 false positives were observed. These findings result in a specificity of 92%, sensitivity of 50% and accuracy of 70% with 111In-AAL for osteomyelitis. Preliminary investigations using 111In-acetylacetone-labelled thrombocytes (111In-AAT) were carried out to detect rejection of transplanted kidneys. The platelets were separated by means of additional special density gradient centrifugations but no dextran from 15-20 ml of autologous whole blood. Scans have been obtained 15 min, 2.5 h and 24 h post injection in an initial group of 10 patients. In acute rejection, a high transplant uptake has been detected, whereas patients without acute rejection showed no or only a minimum activity accumulation. Patients with chronic rejection have intermediate uptakes

  3. Detection of pulmonary hemorrhage with technetium-labeled red cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winzelberg, G.G.; Laman, D.; Sachs, M.; Miller, W.H.

    1981-10-01

    Noninvasive techniques to aid in the diagnosis of massive pulmonary hemoptysis would be helpful in guiding more-invasive procedures such as bronchial artery angiography, which carries a risk of transverse myelitis. A patient was studied with technetium-labeled red cells and successfully detected a site of intermittent hemorrhage from the lung.

  4. Detection of pulmonary hemorrhage with technetium-labeled red cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noninvasive techniques to aid in the diagnosis of massive pulmonary hemoptysis would be helpful in guiding more-invasive procedures such as bronchial artery angiography, which carries a risk of transverse myelitis. A patient was studied with technetium-labeled red cells and successfully detected a site of intermittent hemorrhage from the lung

  5. Labels discover physics: the development of new labelling methods as a promising research field for applied physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia

    2008-01-01

    Labels and tags are accompanying us in almost each moment of our life and everywhere we are going, in the form of electronic keys or money, or simply as labels on products we are buying in shops and markets. The label diffusion, rapidly increasing for logistic reasons in the actual global market, carries huge amount of information but it is demanding security and anti-fraud systems. The first crucial point, for the consumer and producer safety, is to ensure the authenticity of the labelled products with systems against counterfeiting and piracy. Recent anti-fraud techniques are based on a sophisticated use of physical effects, from holograms till magnetic resonance or tunnel transitions between atomic sublevels. In this paper we will discuss labels and anti-fraud technologies as a new and very promising research field for applied physics.

  6. Labelling of live cells using fluorescent aptamers: binding reversal with DNA nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Terazono Hideyuki; Anzai Yu; Soloviev Mikhail; Yasuda Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A reversible cell labelling method has been developed for non-destructive and non-invasive cell labelling and purification. Our method uses high affinity single strand DNA (ssDNA) aptamers against surface exposed target molecules on cells. The aptamers are subsequently removed from the cell surface using DNase nuclease treatment. We exemplified our method by labelling human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells with Qdot-ssDNA aptamers, and restoring them to the label-free condition by ...

  7. Investigations into agents for improving cell labeling with positron- and gamma-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was possible to label leukocytes with Co-oxine, but a large proportion of the radioactivity was eluted from the cells upon washing. Ruthenium oxine labeled platelets efficiently in plasma while negligible proportion of radioactivity was eluted from the cells. Three factors influence the labeling efficiency of the cells: duration of the incubation periods; cell concentration; and ACD concentration

  8. Labeling of mesenchymal stem cells for MRI with single-cell sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza de Schellenberger A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Angela Ariza de Schellenberger,1 Harald Kratz,1 Tracy D Farr,2,3 Norbert Löwa,4 Ralf Hauptmann,1 Susanne Wagner,1 Matthias Taupitz,1 Jörg Schnorr,1 Eyk A Schellenberger1 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Experimental Neurology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Medical School, Nottingham, UK; 4Department of Biomagnetic Signals, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Berlin, Berlin, Germany Abstract: Sensitive cell detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an important tool for the development of cell therapies. However, clinically approved contrast agents that allow single-cell detection are currently not available. Therefore, we compared very small iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP and new multicore carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (multicore particles, MCP designed by our department for magnetic particle imaging (MPI with discontinued Resovist® regarding their suitability for detection of single mesenchymal stem cells (MSC by MRI. We achieved an average intracellular nanoparticle (NP load of >10 pg Fe per cell without the use of transfection agents. NP loading did not lead to significantly different results in proliferation, colony formation, and multilineage in vitro differentiation assays in comparison to controls. MRI allowed single-cell detection using VSOP, MCP, and Resovist® in conjunction with high-resolution T2*-weighted imaging at 7 T with postprocessing of phase images in agarose cell phantoms and in vivo after delivery of 2,000 NP-labeled MSC into mouse brains via the left carotid artery. With optimized labeling conditions, a detection rate of ~45% was achieved; however, the experiments were limited by nonhomogeneous NP loading of the MSC population. Attempts should be made to achieve better cell separation for homogeneous NP loading and to thus improve NP

  9. Information on Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Information on Stem Cell Research Research @ NINDS Stem Cell Highlights Submit a hESC ... found here: Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells NINDS Stem Cell Research on Campus The Intramural Research Program of NINDS ...

  10. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Hoss, Mareike [Institute of Pathology, Electron Microscopy Facility, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Wong, John Erik, E-mail: John.Wong@avt.rwth-aachen.de [Chemical Process Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Turmstrasse 46, 52056 Aachen (Germany); DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials Research, Forckenbeckstrasse 50, Aachen (Germany); Hieronymus, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.hieronymus@rwth-aachen.de [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3{sup +} DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  11. Adeno associated viral-mediated intraosseous labeling of bone marrow derived cells for CNS tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenica, Maj-Linda B; Reid, Patrick; Pena, Gabriela; Alvarez, Jennifer; Hunt, Jerry B; Nash, Kevin R; Morgan, Dave; Gordon, Marcia N; Lee, Daniel C

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation, including microglial activation in the CNS, is an important hallmark in many neurodegenerative diseases. Microglial stimuli not only impact the brain microenvironment by production and release of cytokines and chemokines, but also influence the activity of bone marrow derived cells and blood born macrophage populations. In many diseases including brain disorders and spinal cord injury, researchers have tried to harbor the neuroprotective and repair properties of these subpopulations. Hematopoietic bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) are of great interest, especially during gene therapy because certain hematopoietic cell subpopulations traffic to the sites of injury and inflammation. The aim of this study was to develop a method of labeling endogenous bone marrow derived cells through intraosseous impregnation of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) or lentivirus. We utilized rAAV serotype 9 (rAAV-9) or lentivirus for gene delivery of green florescence protein (GFP) to the mouse bone marrow cells. Flow cytometry showed that both viruses were able to efficiently transduce mouse bone marrow cells in vivo. However, the rAAV9-GFP viral construct transduced BMDCs more efficiently than the lentivirus (11.2% vs. 6.8%), as indicated by cellular GFP expression. We also demonstrate that GFP labeled cells correspond to bone marrow cells of myeloid origin using CD11b as a marker. Additionally, we characterized the ability of bone marrow derived, GFP labeled cells to extravasate into the brain parenchyma upon acute and subchronic neuroinflammatory stimuli in the mouse CNS. Viral mediated over expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) or intracranial injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recruited GFP labeled BMDCs from the periphery into the brain parenchyma compared to vehicle treated mice. Altogether our findings demonstrate a useful method of labeling endogenous BMDCs via viral transduction and the ability to track subpopulations throughout the body

  12. Sulforhodamine 101 selectively labels human astrocytoma cells in an animal model of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Joseph F; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Nichols, Joshua; Tissot, Maya; Preul, Mark C; Feuerstein, Burt; Anderson, Trent; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a useful tool for immediate staining of astrocytes. We hypothesized that if the selectivity of SR101was maintained in astrocytoma cells, it could prove useful for glioma research. Cultured astrocytoma cells and acute slices from orthotopic human glioma (n=9) and lymphoma (n=6) xenografts were incubated with SR101 and imaged with confocal microscopy. A subset of slices (n=18) were counter-immunostained with glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD20 for stereological assessment of SR101 co-localization. SR101 differentiated astrocytic tumor cells from lymphoma cells. In acute slices, SR101 labeled 86.50% (±1.86; p<0.0001) of astrocytoma cells and 2.19% (±0.47; p<0.0001) of lymphoma cells. SR101-labeled astrocytoma cells had a distinct morphology when compared with in vivo astrocytes. Immediate imaging of human astrocytoma cells in vitro and in ex vivo rodent xenograft tissue labeled with SR101 can identify astrocytic tumor cells and help visualize the tumor margin. These features are useful in studying astrocytoma in the laboratory and may have clinical applications. PMID:24666692

  13. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence studies of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide interacting with individual tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first example of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging of cultured mammalian cells in cyclic peptide research is reported. The study reports the first quantitative analysis of the incorporation of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide and its effects on the biodistribution of endogenous elements (for example, K and Cl) within individual tumor cells. The first example of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging of cultured mammalian cells in cyclic peptide research is reported. The study reports the first quantitative analysis of the incorporation of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide and its effects on the biodistribution of endogenous elements (for example, K and Cl) within individual tumor cells

  14. Adherence of radiopharmaceuticals and labeled cells to intravenous tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of 67 nuclear medicine departments revealed no agreement on which radiolabeled agents could be injected through intravenous lines (IVs) and which required direct venipuncture. Labeled cells and several common radiopharmaceuticals were tested for adherence to intravenous tubing. Residual activity remaining in the tubing after an adequate flush was less than 1% of the injected dose in each case. Administration of radiolabeled agents through existing IVs is an acceptable alternative to direct venipuncture in many cases

  15. Ultra-fast stem cell labelling using cationised magnetoferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Carreira, S.; Armstrong, J. P. K.; Seddon, A. M.; Perriman, A. W.; Hartley-Davies, R.; Schwarzacher, W.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) facilitates many important biotechnological applications, such as cell imaging and remote manipulation. However, to achieve adequate cellular loading of SPIONs, long incubation times (24 hours and more) or laborious surface functionalisation are often employed, which can adversely affect cell function. Here, we demonstrate that chemical cationisation of magnetoferritin produces a highly membrane-active nanoparticle that can magnetise human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) using incubation times as short as one minute. Magnetisation persisted for several weeks in culture and provided significant T2* contrast enhancement during magnetic resonance imaging. Exposure to cationised magnetoferritin did not adversely affect the membrane integrity, proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation capacity of hMSCs, which provides the first detailed evidence for the biocompatibility of magnetoferritin. The combination of synthetic ease and flexibility, the rapidity of labelling and absence of cytotoxicity make this novel nanoparticle system an easily accessible and versatile platform for a range of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine.Magnetic cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) facilitates many important biotechnological applications, such as cell imaging and remote manipulation. However, to achieve adequate cellular loading of SPIONs, long incubation times (24 hours and more) or laborious surface functionalisation are often employed, which can adversely affect cell function. Here, we demonstrate that chemical cationisation of magnetoferritin produces a highly membrane-active nanoparticle that can magnetise human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) using incubation times as short as one minute. Magnetisation persisted for several weeks in culture and provided significant T2* contrast enhancement during magnetic resonance imaging. Exposure to cationised

  16. Label-free electronic detection of target cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandyarpour, Rahim; Javanmard, Mehdi; Harris, James; Davis, Ronald W.

    2014-03-01

    In this manuscript we describe an electronic label-free method for detection of target cells, which has potential applications ranging from pathogen detection for food safety all the way to detection of circulating tumor cells for cancer diagnosis. The nanoelectronic platform consists of a stack of electrodes separated by a 30nm thick insulating layer. Cells binding to the tip of the sensor result in a decrease in the impedance at the sensing tip due to an increase in the fringing capacitance between the electrodes. As a proof of concept we demonstrate the ability to detect Saccharomyces Cerevisae cells with high specificity using a sensor functionalized with Concanavalin A. Ultimately we envision using this sensor in conjunction with a technology for pre-concentration of target cells to develop a fully integrated micro total analysis system.

  17. Nutrition labelling: a review of research on consumer and industry response in the global South

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Mandle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To identify peer-reviewed research on consumers’ usage and attitudes towards the nutrition label and the food industry's response to labelling regulations outside Europe, North America, and Australia and to determine knowledge gaps for future research. Design: Narrative review. Results: This review identified nutrition labelling research from 20 countries in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. Consumers prefer that pre-packaged food include nutrition information, although there is a disparity between rates of use and comprehension. Consumer preference is for front-of-pack labelling and for information that shows per serving or portion as a reference unit, and label formats with graphics or symbols. Research on the food and beverage industry's response is more limited but shows that industry plays an active role in influencing legislation and regulation. Conclusions: Consumers around the world share preferences with consumers in higher income countries with respect to labelling. However, this may reflect the research study populations, who are often better educated than the general population. Investigation is required into how nutrition labels are received in emerging economies especially among the urban and rural poor, in order to assess the effectiveness of labelling policies. Further research into the outlook of the food and beverage industry, and also on expanded labelling regulations is a priority. Sharing context-specific research regarding labelling between countries in the global South could be mutually beneficial in evaluating obesity prevention policies and strategies.

  18. Nutrition labelling: a review of research on consumer and industry response in the global South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandle, Jessie; Tugendhaft, Aviva; Michalow, Julia; Hofman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background To identify peer-reviewed research on consumers’ usage and attitudes towards the nutrition label and the food industry's response to labelling regulations outside Europe, North America, and Australia and to determine knowledge gaps for future research. Design Narrative review. Results This review identified nutrition labelling research from 20 countries in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. Consumers prefer that pre-packaged food include nutrition information, although there is a disparity between rates of use and comprehension. Consumer preference is for front-of-pack labelling and for information that shows per serving or portion as a reference unit, and label formats with graphics or symbols. Research on the food and beverage industry's response is more limited but shows that industry plays an active role in influencing legislation and regulation. Conclusions Consumers around the world share preferences with consumers in higher income countries with respect to labelling. However, this may reflect the research study populations, who are often better educated than the general population. Investigation is required into how nutrition labels are received in emerging economies especially among the urban and rural poor, in order to assess the effectiveness of labelling policies. Further research into the outlook of the food and beverage industry, and also on expanded labelling regulations is a priority. Sharing context-specific research regarding labelling between countries in the global South could be mutually beneficial in evaluating obesity prevention policies and strategies. PMID:25623608

  19. Some technetium complexes for labelling red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    A new approach to produce technetium labelled red blood cells, used routinely in diagnostic nuclear medicine, is reported. The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA), present in erythrocytes, is strongly inhibited by primary aromatic sulphonamides, which bind at the enzyme active site. Three types of ligand able to coordinate to technetium and suitable for modification to include a primary aromatic sulphonamide group were studied; bis(thiosemicarbazones), Schiff bases and some propylene amine oximes. The experimental conditions needed to label the ligands were determined. Both the thiosemicarbazone and propyleneamine oxime derivatives were labelled, but under no conditions attempted were the Schiff bases complexed by Technetium. The two major isozymes of Human Carbonic Anhydrase, HCA I and HCA II, were isolated from blood. The strength of binding of the free ligands SET, PN130 and PN135 with each of the isozymes was measured and expressed as the Dissociation Constant K{sub d}. The rate of uptake of the technetium complexes into washed RBCs and whole blood was measured and found to be much slower in whole blood. The biodistribution of both TcPN130 and TcPN135 in rats was determined and scintigraphic images for the TcPN130 complex were recorded. Attempts to synthesise the Tc-99 analogues on the milligram scale to allow chemical characterisation of these complexes were unsuccessful. (author).

  20. Some technetium complexes for labelling red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to produce technetium labelled red blood cells, used routinely in diagnostic nuclear medicine, is reported. The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA), present in erythrocytes, is strongly inhibited by primary aromatic sulphonamides, which bind at the enzyme active site. Three types of ligand able to coordinate to technetium and suitable for modification to include a primary aromatic sulphonamide group were studied; bis(thiosemicarbazones), Schiff bases and some propylene amine oximes. The experimental conditions needed to label the ligands were determined. Both the thiosemicarbazone and propyleneamine oxime derivatives were labelled, but under no conditions attempted were the Schiff bases complexed by Technetium. The two major isozymes of Human Carbonic Anhydrase, HCA I and HCA II, were isolated from blood. The strength of binding of the free ligands SET, PN130 and PN135 with each of the isozymes was measured and expressed as the Dissociation Constant Kd. The rate of uptake of the technetium complexes into washed RBCs and whole blood was measured and found to be much slower in whole blood. The biodistribution of both TcPN130 and TcPN135 in rats was determined and scintigraphic images for the TcPN130 complex were recorded. Attempts to synthesise the Tc-99 analogues on the milligram scale to allow chemical characterisation of these complexes were unsuccessful. (author)

  1. Nanoparticle-labeled stem cells: a novel therapeutic vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir O El-Sadik

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abir O El-Sadik1, Afaf El-Ansary2, Sherif M Sabry31Stem Cell Unit, Anatomy Department, College of Medicine, Health Science Colleges; 2Biochemistry Department, Science College, King Saud University; 3Anatomy Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, EgyptAbstract: Nanotechnology has been described as a general purpose technology. It has already generated a range of inventions and innovations. Development of nanotechnology will provide clinical medicine with a range of new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities such as medical imaging, medical diagnosis, drug delivery, and cancer detection and management. Nanoparticles such as manganese, polystyrene, silica, titanium oxide, gold, silver, carbon, quantum dots, and iron oxide have received enormous attention in the creation of new types of analytical tools for biotechnology and life sciences. Labeling of stem cells with nanoparticles overcame the problems in homing and fixing stem cells to their desired site and guiding extension of stem cells to specific directions. Although the biologic effects of some nanoparticles have already been assessed, information on toxicity and possible mechanisms of various particle types remains inadequate. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the mechanisms of internalization and distribution of nanoparticles inside stem cells, as well as the influence of different types of nanoparticles on stem cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and cytotoxicity, and to assess the role of nanoparticles in tracking the fate of stem cells used in tissue regeneration.Keywords: nanoparticles, stem cells, uptake, differentiation, cytotoxicity, tracking

  2. Creation of Primary Cell Lines from Lineage-Labeled Mouse Models of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Frequently, it is necessary to isolate pure populations of cancer cells for downstream assays, such as transcriptional analysis, signaling studies, and the creation of noncontaminated primary cell lines. Genetic lineage labeling with fluorescent reporter alleles allows for the identification of epithelial-derived cells within tumors. This protocol describes a method to isolate lineage-labeled pancreatic epithelial cells for ex vivo analysis, but it can be adapted for any type of lineage-labeled tumor. PMID:25934932

  3. Creation of Primary Cell Lines from Lineage-Labeled Mouse Models of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rhim, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Frequently, it is necessary to isolate pure populations of cancer cells for downstream assays, such as transcriptional analysis, signaling studies, and the creation of noncontaminated primary cell lines. Genetic lineage labeling with fluorescent reporter alleles allows for the identification of epithelial-derived cells within tumors. This protocol describes a method to isolate lineage-labeled pancreatic epithelial cells for ex vivo analysis, but it can be adapted for any type of lineage-label...

  4. HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum dots emerge as an attractive alternative to small molecule fluorophores as fluorescent tags for in vivo cell labeling and imaging. This communication presents a method for specific labeling of live cells using quantum dots. The labeling is mediated by HaloTag protein expressed at the cell surface which forms a stable covalent adduct with its ligand (HaloTag ligand). The labeling can be performed in one single step with quantum dot conjugates that are functionalized with HaloTag ligand, or in two steps with biotinylated HaloTag ligand first and followed by streptavidin coated quantum dots. Live cell fluorescence imaging indicates that the labeling is specific and takes place at the cell surface. This HaloTag protein-mediated cell labeling method should facilitate the application of quantum dots for live cell imaging

  5. Multiplexed labeling system for high-throughput cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Song, In Hyun; Shin, Woo Jung; Kim, Byung Woo; Kim, Dong-Ik; Um, Soong Ho

    2016-09-01

    Flow cytometry and fluorescence activated cell sorting techniques were designed to realize configurable classification and separation of target cells. A number of cell phenotypes with different functionalities have recently been revealed. Before simultaneous selective capture of cells, it is desirable to label different samples with the corresponding dyes in a multiplexing manner to allow for a single analysis. However, few methods to obtain multiple fluorescent colors for various cell types have been developed. Even when restricted laser sources are employed, a small number of color codes can be expressed simultaneously. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to manifest DNA nanostructure-based multifluorescent colors formed by a complex of dyes. Highly precise self-assembly of fluorescent dye-conjugated oligonucleotides gives anisotropic DNA nanostructures, Y- and tree-shaped DNA (Y-DNA and T-DNA, respectively), which may be used as platforms for fluorescent codes. As a proof of concept, we have demonstrated seven different fluorescent codes with only two different fluorescent dyes using T-DNA. This method provides maximum efficiency for current flow cytometry. We are confident that this system will provide highly efficient multiplexed fluorescent detection for bioanalysis compared with one-to-one fluorescent correspondence for specific marker detection. PMID:27181032

  6. Magnetic nanoparticles as bimodal tools in magnetically induced labelling and magnetic heating of tumour cells: an in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettering, M.; Winter, J.; Zeisberger, M.; Bremer-Streck, S.; Oehring, H.; Bergemann, C.; Alexiou, C.; Hergt, R.; Halbhuber, K. J.; Kaiser, W. A.; Hilger, I.

    2007-05-01

    Localized magnetic heating treatments (hyperthermia, thermal ablation) using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles continue to be an active area of cancer research. The present study uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) as bimodal tools and combines magnetically induced cell labelling and magnetic heating. The main focus was to assess if a selective and higher MNP accumulation within tumour cells due to magnetic labelling (max. 56 and 83 mT) and consequently a larger heating effect occurs after exposure to an alternating magnetic field (magnetic heating: frequency 400 kHz, amplitude 24.6 kA m-1) in order to eliminate labelled tumour cells effectively. The results demonstrate that the magnetically based cellular MNP uptake by human adenocarcinoma cells is due to suitable magnetic field gradients in vitro which intensify the temperature increase generated during magnetic heating. A significantly (P<=0.05) enhanced MNP cell uptake due to 83 mT labelling compared to controls or to 56 mT labelling was observed. Our experiments required the following conditions, namely a cell concentration of 2.5 × 107 cells ml-1, a minimum MNP concentration of 0.32 mg Fe ml-1 culture medium, and an incubation time of 24 h, to reach this effect as well as for the significantly enlarged heating effects to occur.

  7. Efficient in vitro labeling rabbit neural stem cell with paramagnetic Gd-DTPA and fluorescent substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to label rabbit neural stem cells (NSCs) by using standard contrast agents (Gd-DTPA) in combination with PKH26 and in vitro track them with MR imaging. Materials and methods: NSCs from prenatal brains of rabbits were cultured and propagated. Intracellular uptake of Gd-DTPA was achieved by using a non-liposomal lipid transfection reagent (Effectene) as the transfection agent. After labeling with Gd-DTPA, cells were incubated with cellular membrane fluorescent dye PKH26. The labeling effectiveness and the longevity of Gd-DTPA maintenance were measured on a 1.5 T MR scanner. The influence of labeling on the cellular biological behaviors was assessed by cellular viability, proliferation and differentiation assessment. Results: The labeling efficiency of Gd-DTPA was up to 90%. The signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging and T1 values of labeled cells were significantly higher than those of unlabeled cells (P 3. Cellular uptake of Gd-DTPA was maintained until 15 days after initially labeling. There was no significant difference in the cellular viability and proliferation between the labeled and unlabeled NSCs (P > 0.05). Normal glial and neuronal differentiation remained in labeled NSCs like unlabeled NSCs. Conclusion: Highly efficient labeling NSCs with Gd-DTPA could be achieved by using Effectene. This method of labeling NSCs allows for tracking cells with MR imaging, and without alterations of cellular biological behaviors.

  8. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and quantitative comparison of the membrane proteomes of self-renewing and differentiating human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokhorova, Tatyana A; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Johansen, Pia T;

    2009-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is a powerful quantitative proteomics platform for comprehensive characterization of complex biological systems. However, the potential of SILAC-based approaches has not been fully utilized in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research...

  9. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for direct labeling of stem cells and in vivo MRI tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Saejeong J; Lewis, Bobbi; Steiner, Mark-Steven; Bissa, Ursula V; Dose, Christian; Frank, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    To develop effective stem cell therapies, it is important to track therapeutic cells non-invasively and monitor homing to areas of pathology. The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate the labeling efficiency of commercially available dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, FeraTrack Direct (FTD), in various stem and immune cells; assess the cytotoxicity and tolerability of the FTD in stem cells; and monitor stem cell homing using FTD-labeled bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs) in a tumor model by in vivo MRI. BMSCs, NSCs, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), T-lymphocytes, and monocytes were labeled effectively with FTD without the need for transfection agents, and Prussian blue (PB) staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed intracellular uptake of the agent. The viability, proliferation, and functionality of the labeled cells were minimally or not affected after labeling. When 10(6) FTD-labeled BMSCs or NSCs were injected into C6 glioma bearing nude mice, the cells homing to the tumors were detected as hypointense regions within the tumor using 3 T clinical MRI up to 10 days post injection. Histological analysis confirmed the homing of injected cells to the tumor by the presence of PB positive cells that are not macrophages. Labeling of stem cells or immune cells with FTD was non-toxic, and should facilitate the translation of this agent to clinical trials for evaluation of trafficking of cells by MRI. PMID:26234504

  10. Reception and research of medical and biologic properties labelled tecnetium-99M ciprofloxacin of the hydlochloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The researches are carried out on creation of a reagent for reception labeled technetium-99m antimicrobial preparations. An estimation of influence of components of a reactionary mix on radiochemical cleanliness received preparations spent a method thinlayer chromatography in various environments. Formation colloid the tin absorbing more of 70 percent of a radioactive label is noted

  11. Effect of labeling with iron oxide particles or nanodiamonds on the functionality of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinead P Blaber

    Full Text Available Stem cells are increasingly the focus of translational research as well as having emerging roles in human cellular therapy. To support these uses there is a need for improved methods for in vivo cell localization and tracking. In this study, we examined the effects of cell labeling on the in vitro functionality of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Our results provide a basis for future in vivo studies investigating implanted cell fate and longevity. In particular, we investigated the effects of two different particles: micron-sized (~0.9 µm fluorescently labeled (Dragon Green superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (M-SPIO particles; and, carboxylated nanodiamonds of ~0.25 µm in size. The effects of labeling on the functionality of adipose-derived MSCs were assessed by in vitro morphology, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential, CD marker expression, cytokine secretion profiling and quantitative proteomics of the intra-cellular proteome. The differentiation and CD marker assays for stem-like functionality were not altered upon label incorporation and no secreted or intra-cellular protein changes indicative of stress or toxicity were detected. These in vitro results indicate that the M-SPIO particles and nanodiamonds investigated in this study are biocompatible with MSCs and therefore would be suitable labels for cell localization and tracking in vivo.

  12. Fuel Cell Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Peter M. [Brown University

    2014-03-30

    Executive Summary In conjunction with the Brown Energy Initiative, research Projects selected for the fuel cell research grant were selected on the following criteria: They should be fundamental research that has the potential to significantly impact the nation’s energy infrastructure. They should be scientifically exciting and sound. They should synthesize new materials, lead to greater insights, explore new phenomena, or design new devices or processes that are of relevance to solving the energy problems. They involve top-caliper senior scientists with a record of accomplishment, or junior faculty with outstanding promise of achievement. They should promise to yield at least preliminary results within the given funding period, which would warrant further research development. They should fit into the overall mission of the Brown Energy Initiative, and the investigators should contribute as partners to an intellectually stimulating environment focused on energy science. Based on these criteria, fourteen faculty across three disciplines (Chemistry, Physics and Engineering) and the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory were selected to participate in this effort.1 In total, there were 30 people supported, at some level, on these projects. This report highlights the findings and research outcomes of the participating researchers.

  13. Retrograde Labeling of Adult Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells with the Flurogold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WeiHuang; YannianHui; 等

    2002-01-01

    Purpose:To study the densities and distribution of retinal ganglion cells(RGC) in adult rat retinae with flurogold(FG) labeling retogradely.Methods:FG was injected to the superior colliculid(SC) and dorsal lateral geniculate nuclei(dLGN) in adult rats and the retinae were examined by fluorescence microscopy at various periods of time.Results:FG-labelled RGC were observed in the retina as early as 3 days after application of FG.The labeled cells gradually increased in density,reached 95% of the maximal number on days 7 and the maximal nuber on days 30.The density of labeled cells was higher in the posterior pole than in the peripheral area.The fluorescence intensity in labeled cells maintained up to 60 days.Conclusion:The FG retrograde labeling method is reliable and effective for quantity of RGC.Eye Science 2000;46:29-33.

  14. Stable-isotope labeling using an inducible viral infection system in suspension-cultured plant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We established a novel strategy for preparing uniformly stable isotope-labeled proteins by using suspension-cultured plant cells and an inducible virus vector encoding the research target. By using this new method, we demonstrated the expression of three proteins, namely, Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), chicken calmodulin (CaM), and porcine protein kinase C-dependent protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor with a molecular mass of 17-kDa (CPI-17). In addition, we successfully expressed bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), which contains three pairs of disulfide bonds, as the soluble form. In the most efficient case, as little as 50 ml culture yielded 3-4 mg 15N-labeled protein suitable for NMR experiments. The 1H-15N HSQC spectra of all of these proteins clearly indicated that their structures were identical to those of their counterparts reported previously. Thus, the present results suggest that our novel protocol is a potential method for NMR sample preparation

  15. Detection of the cancer marker CD146 expression in melanoma cells with semiconductor quantum dot label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Chen, Guangchun; DeLouise, Lisa A; Lou, Ziyang

    2010-08-01

    The use of highly specific and highly sensitive quantum dots immunofluorescent label is a promising approach for biomedical imaging in cancer cells. Human melanoma cell adhesion molecule CD146, overexpressed on the surface of melanoma cells, is an important target for melanoma diagnostics. We synthesized PEG-COOH capped highly fluorescent CdSe/ZnS QDs and conjugated them with streptavidin to prepare QD-SA label. Then, we used QD-SA to link with biotinylated goat anti-mouse IgG and mouse anti-human CD146 to label CD146 overexpressed on live and fixed cells by FACS and Confocal microscopy. Labeling of target cells was shown to have high brightness, photostability, and specificity. Advantages of QD conjugates over FITC conjugates are discussed. The results indicate that construction based on QD-SA label, biotinylated IgG and CD146 antibody can be successfully used for detection of melanoma cells for biomedical applications. PMID:21323102

  16. Understanding Consumer Behaviour: a Qualitative Research of Eco-Labelling in the Cosmetic Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Pelissier, Camille

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation aims at investigating the way ethical and traditional consumers manage their eco-labelled cosmetics purchases. In this qualitative research, six participants have been interviewed around different topics drawn upon the research questions and the literature review: cosmetics purchases patterns, understanding of the eco-label concept, cosmetics buying criteria and price premium. Then, a discourse analysis method has been used to explore the data collected. The main findings...

  17. Tomographic sensing and localization of fluorescently labeled circulating cells in mice in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettergren, Eric; Swamy, Tushar; Runnels, Judith; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark

    2012-07-01

    Sensing and enumeration of specific types of circulating cells in small animals is an important problem in many areas of biomedical research. Microscopy-based fluorescence in vivo flow cytometry methods have been developed previously, but these are typically limited to sampling of very small blood volumes, so that very rare circulating cells may escape detection. Recently, we described the development of a ‘diffuse fluorescence flow cytometer’ (DFFC) that allows sampling of much larger blood vessels and therefore circulating blood volumes in the hindlimb, forelimb or tail of a mouse. In this work, we extend this concept by developing and validating a method to tomographically localize circulating fluorescently labeled cells in the cross section of a tissue simulating optical flow phantom and mouse limb. This was achieved using two modulated light sources and an array of six fiber-coupled detectors that allowed rapid, high-sensitivity acquisition of full tomographic data sets at 10 Hz. These were reconstructed into two-dimensional cross-sectional images using Monte Carlo models of light propagation and the randomized algebraic reconstruction technique. We were able to obtain continuous images of moving cells in the sample cross section with 0.5 mm accuracy or better. We first demonstrated this concept in limb-mimicking optical flow photons with up to four flow channels, and then in the tails of mice with fluorescently labeled multiple myeloma cells. This approach increases the overall diagnostic utility of our DFFC instrument.

  18. Tomographic sensing and localization of fluorescently labeled circulating cells in mice in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensing and enumeration of specific types of circulating cells in small animals is an important problem in many areas of biomedical research. Microscopy-based fluorescence in vivo flow cytometry methods have been developed previously, but these are typically limited to sampling of very small blood volumes, so that very rare circulating cells may escape detection. Recently, we described the development of a ‘diffuse fluorescence flow cytometer’ (DFFC) that allows sampling of much larger blood vessels and therefore circulating blood volumes in the hindlimb, forelimb or tail of a mouse. In this work, we extend this concept by developing and validating a method to tomographically localize circulating fluorescently labeled cells in the cross section of a tissue simulating optical flow phantom and mouse limb. This was achieved using two modulated light sources and an array of six fiber-coupled detectors that allowed rapid, high-sensitivity acquisition of full tomographic data sets at 10 Hz. These were reconstructed into two-dimensional cross-sectional images using Monte Carlo models of light propagation and the randomized algebraic reconstruction technique. We were able to obtain continuous images of moving cells in the sample cross section with 0.5 mm accuracy or better. We first demonstrated this concept in limb-mimicking optical flow photons with up to four flow channels, and then in the tails of mice with fluorescently labeled multiple myeloma cells. This approach increases the overall diagnostic utility of our DFFC instrument. (paper)

  19. Advances in stem cell research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@In 1998, biologists Thomson and Gearhart successfully derived stem cells from human embryos. One year later, several researchers discovered that adult stem cells still retain the ability to be differentiated into unrelated types of cells. Advances in stem cell research open a promising direction for applied medical science. Moreover, it may also force scientists to reconsider the fundamental theory about how cells grow up. Stem cell research was considered by Science as the top of the ten breakthroughs of science of the year[1]. This paper gives a survey of recent advances in stem cell research. 1 Overview In the 1980s, embryonic stem cell and/or embryonic germ cell line (ES cell line, EG cell line) of multifarious mammalian animals, especially those of non-human pri-mates, had been established. In 1998, Thomson and Shamblott obtained ES, EG cell lines from human blasto-cysts and gonad ridges of early human embryos, respec-tively. Their research brought up an ethical debate about whether human embryos can be used as experimental materials. It was not appeased until 1999 when research-ers discovered that stem cells from adults still retain the ability to become different kinds of tissue cells. For in-stance, brain cells can become blood cells[2], and cells from bone marrow can become cells in liver. Scientists believe, for a long time, that cells can only be developed from early pluripotent embryo cells; the differentiation potential of stem cells from mature tissues is restricted to only one of the cell types of the tissue where stem cells are obtained. Recent stem cell researches, however, sub-verted the traditional view of stem cells. These discoveries made scientists speed ahead with the work on adult stem cells, hoping to discover whether their promise will rival that of ES cells.

  20. Preparation of labelled lipids by the use of plant cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of some radioacitvely labelled lipids by the use of plant cell cultures is discussed and further applications of the new method are suggested. Cell suspension cultures of rape (Brassica napus) and soya (Glycine max) have been used for the preparation of lipids labelled with radioisotopes. Radioactive acetic acid as well as various long-chain fatty acids are readily incorporated into the neutral and ionic lipids of plant cell cultures. In addition, 14C-labelled glycerol, ethanolamine and choline are well utilized by the cells. Randomly labelled lipids have been obtained by incubating cell suspension cultures of rape and soya with [1-14C] acetic acid, and uniformly labelled lipids have been isolated from cultures that had been incubated with a mixture of [1-14C] acetic acid plus [2-14C] acetic acid. The use of techniques of plant cell cultures for the preparation of lipds labelled with stable or radioactive isotopesappears particularly rewarding because the uptake of precursors by the cells and their incorporation into various lipid compounds proceeds rapidly and often quanitatively.This new approach should be useful also for the biosynthesis of lipids whose acyl moieties contain a spn radical, a fluorescent group, or a light-sensitive label. Thus, plant cell cultures constitute valuable new tools for the biosynthetic preparation of a great variety of labelled lipids. (A.G.)

  1. Dielectrophoresis: A Review of Applications for Stem Cell Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Pethig

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dielectrophoresis can discriminate distinct cellular identities in heterogeneous populations, and monitor cell state changes associated with activation and clonal expansion, apoptosis, and necrosis, without the need for biochemical labels. Demonstrated capabilities include the enrichment of haematopoetic stem cells from bone marrow and peripheral blood, and adult stem cells from adipose tissue. Recent research suggests that this technique can predict the ultimate fate of neural stem cells after differentiation before the appearance of specific cell-surface proteins. This review summarises the properties of cells that contribute to their dielectrophoretic behaviour, and their relevance to stem cell research and translational applications.

  2. Immunofluorescent labeling of tissues and free cells via QD-protein conjugates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lišková, Marcela; Voráčová, Ivona; Hezinová, Věra; Klepárník, Karel; Foret, František

    Ostrava : Tanger, 2011, s. 203-208. ISBN 978-80-87294-19-2. [NANOCON 2010. International Conference /2./. Olomouc (CZ), 12.10.2010-14.10.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400310651; GA ČR GA203/08/1680; GA MŠk LC06023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : quantum dots * cell labeling * conjugation Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation http:// apps .webofknowledge.com:80/full_record.do?product=WOS&search_mode=GeneralSearch&qid=1&SID=P2Oi8fFA@5oGMGKN8cg&page=1&doc=3

  3. Labeling of human mesenchymal stem cell: Comparison between paramagnetic and superparamagnetic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chung-Yi; Tai, Ming-Fong; Chen, Shin-Tai; Wang, Yi-Ting; Chen, Ya-Fang; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Wang, Jaw-Lin; Liu, Hon-Man

    2009-04-01

    Paramagnetic and superparamagnetic substances are used to trace stem cell in living organisms under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared paramagnetic and superparamagnetic substance for their labeling efficiency by using clinically widely used gadolinium chelates and iron oxide nanoparticles. Without the aid of transfection agent, human mesenchymal stem cells were labeled with each agent separately in different concentration and the optimized concentration was determined by maintaining same cell viability as unlabeled cells. Iron oxide nanoparticle labeling has a detecting threshold of 12 500 cells in vitro, while gadolinium chelates labeling could be detected for at least 50 000 cells. In life animal study, we found there is an eightfold sensitivity in cells labeled with iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles; however, the magnetic susceptibility artifact would obscure the detail of adjacent anatomical structures. We conclude that labeling stem cells with superparamagnetic substance is more efficacious. However, the cells labeled by superparamagnetic nanoparticles might interfere with the interpretation of anatomical structure. These findings would be beneficial to applications of magnetic substances toward stem cell biology and tissue engineering.

  4. Monitoring Protein Synthesis in Living Cells with Fluorescent Labeled tRNA FRET Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoom, Sima; Farrel, Ian; Dahary, Dvir; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Cooperman, Barry S.; Elroy-Stein, Orna; Smilansky, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    We introduce Protein Synthesis Monitoring (PSM) – a technique to monitor protein synthesis in live cells. In PSM, we transfect cells with tRNA labeled as FRET donors and acceptors. A FRET signal is generated only when a donor- and an acceptor-labeled tRNA come in close contact (< 7nM), as they do on the ribosome during elongation. The intensity of the FRET signal correlates with the number of ribosomes engaged in protein synthesis, providing a real-time, live-cell assay for measuring rates of protein synthesis. PSM can be used to monitor the rate of either total protein synthesis (overall PSM), using bulk tRNAs, or of the synthesis of a specific protein (specific PSM), using specific pairs of tRNA to mark the protein of interest. PSM has sub-micron spatial and sub-second temporal resolutions. Cells continue to live and grow normally, and the synthesized proteins are unchanged since the labeling is on the tRNA itself and not on the amino acid. We have demonstrated specific PSM for monitoring synthesis of a viral protein during viral infection using Isoleucine tRNA, and for monitoring synthesis of collagen during fibrosis in mouse fibroblasts using tRNA-Gly and tRNA-Pro, as collagen is distinguished by many repeats of Gly-Pro dipeptides. We will discuss these results as well as additional applications of PSM in basic research, drug discovery, cell sorting, neurobiology, cancer, biomanufacturing, viral infections, and various protein-synthesis specific diseases.

  5. Uptake of Retrograde Tracers by Intact Optic Nerve Axons: A New Way to Label Retinal Ganglion Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Yu-Xiang; Yang, Jian; Yuan, Ti-Fei; So, Kwok-Fai

    2015-01-01

    Retrograde labelling of retinal ganglion cells with optic nerve transection often leads to degeneration of ganglion cells in prolonged experiments. Here we report that an intact optic nerve could uptake retrograde tracers applied onto the surface of the nerve, leading to high efficiency labelling of ganglion cells in the retina with long-term survival of cells. This method labelled a similar number of ganglion cells (2289±174 at 2 days) as the retrograde labeling technique from the superior c...

  6. Dielectrophoresis: A Review of Applications for Stem Cell Research

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald Pethig; Anoop Menachery; Steve Pells; Paul De Sousa

    2010-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis can discriminate distinct cellular identities in heterogeneous populations, and monitor cell state changes associated with activation and clonal expansion, apoptosis, and necrosis, without the need for biochemical labels. Demonstrated capabilities include the enrichment of haematopoetic stem cells from bone marrow and peripheral blood, and adult stem cells from adipose tissue. Recent research suggests that this technique can predict the ultimate fate of neural stem cells aft...

  7. Electrostatically Stabilized Magnetic Nanoparticles - An Optimized Protocol to Label Murine T Cells for in vivo MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerfel, Eva; Smyth, Maureen; Millward, Jason M; Schellenberger, Eyk; Glumm, Jana; Prozorovski, Timour; Aktas, Orhan; Schulze-Topphoff, Ulf; Schnorr, Jörg; Wagner, Susanne; Taupitz, Matthias; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Wuerfel, Jens

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel highly efficient protocol to magnetically label T cells applying electrostatically stabilized very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP). Our long-term aim is to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate T cell dynamics in vivo during the course of neuroinflammatory disorders such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Encephalitogenic T cells were co-incubated with VSOP, or with protamine-complexed VSOP (VProt), respectively, at different conditions, optimizing concentrations and incubation times. Labeling efficacy was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry as well as histologically, and evaluated on a 7 T MR system. Furthermore, we investigated possible alterations of T cell physiology caused by the labeling procedure. T cell co-incubation with VSOP resulted in an efficient cellular iron uptake. T2 times of labeled cells dropped significantly, resulting in prominent hypointensity on T2*-weighted scans. Optimal labeling efficacy was achieved by VProt (1 mM Fe/ml, 8 h incubation; T2 time shortening of ∼80% compared to untreated cells). Although VSOP promoted T cell proliferation and altered the ratio of T cell subpopulations toward a CD4(+) phenotype, no effects on CD4 T cell proliferation or phenotypic stability were observed by labeling in vitro differentiated Th17 cells with VProt. Yet, high concentrations of intracellular iron oxide might induce alterations in T cell function, which should be considered in cell tagging studies. Moreover, we demonstrated that labeling of encephalitogenic T cells did not affect pathogenicity; labeled T cells were still capable of inducing EAE in susceptible recipient mice. PMID:22203815

  8. Adhesion of endometrial cells labeled with 111 Indium-tropolonate to peritoneum: a novel in vitro model to study endometriosis

    OpenAIRE

    Beliard, Aude; Noël, Agnès; Goffin, Frédéric; Frankenne, Francis; Foidart, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate, in a new original in vitro assay, putative factors that could modulate the adhesion of endometrial cells to peritoneum. Design: Prospective, controlled in vitro study. Setting: Academic research laboratory. Patient(s): Fourteen nonmenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy or laparoscopy for benign gynecologic indication. Intervention(s): Endometrial cells obtained from women with regular cycles without endometriosis were labeled with (111)Indium and confronted in vitro ...

  9. Labeling embryonic stem cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein on the hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕路; 孟国良; 刑阳; 尚克刚; 王小珂; 顾军

    2003-01-01

    Objective To label embryonic stem (ES) cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGF P) on the hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene locus for t he first time to provide a convenient and efficient way for cell tracking and ma nipulation in the studies of transplantation and stem cell therapy.Methods Homologous fragments were obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), from whic h the gene targeting vector pHPRT-EGFP was constructed. The linearized vector was introduced into ES cells by electroporation. The G418r6TGr cell clones were obtained after selection with G418 and 6TG media. The integration patterns of these resistant cell clones were identified with Southern blotting.Results EGFP expressing ES cells on the locus of HPRT were successfu lly generated. They have normal properties, such as karyotype, viability and di fferentiation ability. The green fluorescence of EGFP expressing cells was main tained in propagation of the ES cells for more than 30 passages and in different iated cells. Cultured in suspension, the "green" ES cells aggregated and forme d embryoid bodies, retaining the green fluorescence at varying developmental sta ges. The "green" embryoid bodies could expand and differentiate into various t ypes of cells, exhibiting ubiquitous green fluorescence. Conclusions This generation of "green" targeted ES cells is described in an efficient proto col for obtaining the homologous fragments by PCR. Introducing the marker gene in the genome of ES cells, we should be able to manipulate them in vitro and use them as vehicles in cell-replacement therapy as well as for other biomedical a nd research purposes.

  10. Labeling of mesenchymal stem cells for MRI with single-cell sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza de Schellenberger, Angela; Kratz, Harald; Farr, Tracy D; Löwa, Norbert; Hauptmann, Ralf; Wagner, Susanne; Taupitz, Matthias; Schnorr, Jörg; Schellenberger, Eyk A

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive cell detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for the development of cell therapies. However, clinically approved contrast agents that allow single-cell detection are currently not available. Therefore, we compared very small iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP) and new multicore carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (multicore particles, MCP) designed by our department for magnetic particle imaging (MPI) with discontinued Resovist(®) regarding their suitability for detection of single mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) by MRI. We achieved an average intracellular nanoparticle (NP) load of >10 pg Fe per cell without the use of transfection agents. NP loading did not lead to significantly different results in proliferation, colony formation, and multilineage in vitro differentiation assays in comparison to controls. MRI allowed single-cell detection using VSOP, MCP, and Resovist(®) in conjunction with high-resolution T2*-weighted imaging at 7 T with postprocessing of phase images in agarose cell phantoms and in vivo after delivery of 2,000 NP-labeled MSC into mouse brains via the left carotid artery. With optimized labeling conditions, a detection rate of ~45% was achieved; however, the experiments were limited by nonhomogeneous NP loading of the MSC population. Attempts should be made to achieve better cell separation for homogeneous NP loading and to thus improve NP-uptake-dependent biocompatibility studies and cell detection by MRI and future MPI. Additionally, using a 7 T MR imager equipped with a cryocoil resulted in approximately two times higher detection. In conclusion, we established labeling conditions for new high-relaxivity MCP, VSOP, and Resovist(®) for improved MRI of MSC with single-cell sensitivity. PMID:27110112

  11. Efficient in vitro labeling rabbit neural stem cell with paramagnetic Gd-DTPA and fluorescent substance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Jun, E-mail: junshenjun@hotmail.co [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Cheng Lina; Zhong Xiaomei; Duan Xiaohui; Guo Ruomi; Hong Guobing [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China)

    2010-09-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to label rabbit neural stem cells (NSCs) by using standard contrast agents (Gd-DTPA) in combination with PKH26 and in vitro track them with MR imaging. Materials and methods: NSCs from prenatal brains of rabbits were cultured and propagated. Intracellular uptake of Gd-DTPA was achieved by using a non-liposomal lipid transfection reagent (Effectene) as the transfection agent. After labeling with Gd-DTPA, cells were incubated with cellular membrane fluorescent dye PKH26. The labeling effectiveness and the longevity of Gd-DTPA maintenance were measured on a 1.5 T MR scanner. The influence of labeling on the cellular biological behaviors was assessed by cellular viability, proliferation and differentiation assessment. Results: The labeling efficiency of Gd-DTPA was up to 90%. The signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging and T1 values of labeled cells were significantly higher than those of unlabeled cells (P < 0.05). The minimal number of detectable cells for T1-weighted imaging was 5 x 10{sup 3}. Cellular uptake of Gd-DTPA was maintained until 15 days after initially labeling. There was no significant difference in the cellular viability and proliferation between the labeled and unlabeled NSCs (P > 0.05). Normal glial and neuronal differentiation remained in labeled NSCs like unlabeled NSCs. Conclusion: Highly efficient labeling NSCs with Gd-DTPA could be achieved by using Effectene. This method of labeling NSCs allows for tracking cells with MR imaging, and without alterations of cellular biological behaviors.

  12. MR imaging features of gadofluorine-labeled matrix-associated stem cell implants in cartilage defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Nejadnik

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of our study was to assess the chondrogenic potential and the MR signal effects of GadofluorineM-Cy labeled matrix associated stem cell implants (MASI in pig knee specimen. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs were labeled with the micelle-based contrast agent GadofluorineM-Cy. Ferucarbotran-labeled hMSCs, non-labeled hMSCs and scaffold only served as controls. Chondrogenic differentiation was induced and gene expression and histologic evaluation were performed. The proportions of spindle-shaped vs. round cells of chondrogenic pellets were compared between experimental groups using the Fisher's exact test. Labeled and unlabeled hMSCs and chondrocytes in scaffolds were implanted into cartilage defects of porcine femoral condyles and underwent MR imaging with T1- and T2-weighted SE and GE sequences. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR between implants and adjacent cartilage were determined and analyzed for significant differences between different experimental groups using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Significance was assigned for p0.017. However, hMSC differentiation into chondrocytes was superior for unlabeled and GadofluorineM-Cy-labeled cells compared with Ferucarbotran-labeled cells, as evidenced by a significantly higher proportion of spindle cells in chondrogenic pellets (p<0.05. GadofluorineM-Cy-labeled hMSCs and chondrocytes showed a positive signal effect on T1-weighted images and a negative signal effect on T2-weighted images while Ferucarbotran-labeled cells provided a negative signal effect on all sequences. CNR data for both GadofluorineM-Cy-labeled and Ferucarbotran-labeled hMSCs were significantly different compared to unlabeled control cells on T1-weighted SE and T2*-weighted MR images (p<0.017. CONCLUSION: hMSCs can be labeled by simple incubation with GadofluorineM-Cy. The labeled cells provide significant MR signal effects and less impaired chondrogenesis compared to Ferucarbotran-labeled h

  13. Modified procedure for labelling target cells in a europium release assay of natural killer cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, R; Di Carlo, S; Bacosi, A; Altieri, I; Pichini, S; Zuccaro, P

    1993-05-01

    Lanthanide europium chelated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (EuDTPA) can be used to label target cells such as tumor cells and lymphocytes (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b; Granberg et al., 1988). This procedure has permitted the development of new non-radioactive methods for the detection of target cell cytolysis by natural killer (NK) cells (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) (Granberg et al., 1988) or complement-mediated cytolysis (Cui et al., 1992). However, we had no success with this method because of a lack of comparability between human NK cell activity simultaneously measured by a classical 51Cr release assay (Seaman et al., 1981) and EuDTPA release assay (Blomberg et al., 1986a). Furthermore, cell division and cell viability were significantly impaired by the suggested concentrations of EuCl3. In this paper, we present a modified non-cytotoxic method for target cell labelling with EuDTPA while cells are growing in culture medium. PMID:8486925

  14. False positive paediatric labelled white blood cell study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: An eight-month-old female presented for a technetium labelled white blood cell study (LWBC) to exclude an intra-abdominal abscess. Born premature, the child had surgery to repair a perforated bowel and had repeated presentations with diarrhoea, fevers, a tender right upper quadrant and a raised leucocyte count. Multiple imaging modalities failed to demonstrate recurrent bowel perforation, ischaemia or an intra-abdominal mass. A LWBC study was performed with whole body imaging at 1 and 5 hours post re-injection of the radiolabelled blood. No abnormal uptake was visualised in the abdomen but abnormal white cell accumulation was noted in the right hind foot and the length of the right lower leg. This activity appeared to lie along the course of the right tibia. Plain X-ray demonstrated no evidence of tibial osteomyelitis. Concern that the LWBC may be falsely negative in a patient on antibiotics, a gallium scan was immediately performed to re-examine the abdomen. The whole body gallium images demonstrated normal physiological uptake in the abdomen and no evidence of infection in the right leg. The patient had no clinical features to support right leg pathology. The abnormal LWBC localisation in the right lower leg/foot was therefore falsely positive. The most likely explanation is increased activation of the autologous LWBC by 'rough' handling during difficult venesection and re-injection through small veins and needles/cannulas. The slow flow through the veins draining the foot injection site would contribute to margination in these vessel walls. This is a potential cause for false positive LWBC studies- with significant implications for patient care. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  15. Variability of the thymidine labeling index in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) labeling is the standard technique for determining the kinetic activity of tumors. This method has been used to label multiple sections of tumor specimens obtained from seven patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Considerable variability was observed in the labeling index in different sites from the same specimen. To reduce the large sampling error due to heterogeneity, we recommend that an average value be determined from multiple sections when employing this technique

  16. Simultaneous measurement of NK cell cytotoxicity against two target cell lines labelled with fluorescent lanthanide chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövgren, J; Blomberg, K

    1994-07-12

    We describe a cytotoxicity assay which permits the simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell activity against two different cell lines. The target cell lines are labelled either with a fluorescent europium chelate or with a fluorescent terbium chelate and cell death is quantified by measuring the chelate release. K-562, Molt4 and Daudi cell lines have been used as targets. The release of the two chelates from the target cells can be detected with the help of time resolved fluorometry. As the measurements are made after background fluorescence has decayed no additional steps are needed to correct for the background from the medium. The assay procedure used for measurement of cytotoxicity against two target cell lines is very similar to the widely used 51Cr release assay. PMID:8034979

  17. The effect of 51Cr-labelling on cell morphology, in vitro, when evaluating the cytotoxicity of endodontic filling materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts and L 929 cell line labelled with chromium 51 were examined byelectron microscope to evaluate the effect of the chromium labeling on the cell ultrastructure. The cells were labeled with chromium 12-20 hours before the start of the experiment. After two and four hours of incubation at 37 degree C and 100% humidity, the cells were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The result showed that the chromium labeling did not cause any morphological changes. (author)

  18. Monoclonal antibodies and coupling reagents to cell membrane proteins for leukocyte labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current gamma-emitting agents for tagging leukocytes, In-111 oxine or tropolone, label all cell types indiscriminantly, and nuclear localization in lymphocytes results in radiation damage. Coupling reagents and murine monoclonal antibodies (Mab) specific for cell surface antigens of human leukocytes were tried as cell labeling agents to avoid nuclear localization. 10/sup 8/ mixed human leukocytes in Hepes buffer were added to tubes coated with 5 mg of dry cyclic dianhydride of DTPA for 15 minutes at room temperature. After washing, 0.1 ml of In-111 Cl in ACD (pH 6.8) was added. After 30 minutes, a cell labeling yield of 23% was obtained. Washing the cells in an elutriation centrifuge showed that this label was irreversible. Mab for cell surface antigens of human granulocytes were labeled with 300 μCi of I-125 using the Iodobead technic and unbound activity was removed by gel column chromatography. 1-10 μg were added to 10/sup 8/ mixed leukocytes in 0.5 ml plasma or saline for 1 hr. With Mab anti-leu M4 (clone G7 E11), an IgM, the cell labeling yield was 21%, irreversible, and specific for granulocytes. With anti-human leukocyte Mab NEI-042 (clone 9.4), and IgG2a, and anti-granulocyte Mab MAS-065 (clone FMCl1) an IgG1, the cell labeling was relatively unstable. Labeling of leukocyte subpopulations with Mab is feasible, and the binding of multivalent IgM is stronger than that of other immunoglobulins. DTPA cyclic anhydride is firmly bound to cell membranes, but the labeling is non-specific

  19. Differentiation of cytotoxicity using target cells labelled with europium and samarium by electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlen, H; Manzke, O; Engert, A; Hertel, M; Hippler-Altenburg, R; Diehl, V; Tesch, H

    1994-07-12

    We report the simultaneous use of europium-DTPA (Eu-DTPA) and samarium-DTPA (Sm-DTPA) in cytotoxicity experiments to analyze simultaneously LAK and NK cell lysis and to differentiate between specific target lysis and bystander killing. The target cells were either labelled with Eu-DTPA or Sm-DTPA chelates by electroporation, which permits the use of target cell lines or primary leukemic B cells (B-CLL) that cannot be labelled by the conventional dextran-sulphate method. The release of europium and samarium reaches a maximum at comparable time intervals (2-3 h). Due to the shorter counting interval within the samarium window the labelling efficiency is about ten times less efficient compared to europium. Using europium as label for the LAK target Daudi and samarium as label for the NK sensitive cell line K562 the differentiation of LAK versus NK activity can be performed in a single culture assay. Also, the killing of B cells and bystander cells by cytotoxic T cells was analyzed in a system where T cells were redirected to B cells through CD3 x CD19 bispecific antibodies. In fact, no bystander killing was noted when bispecific antibodies were used to bridge cytotoxic T cells to the B cells. This approach provides a simple non-radioactive method for evaluating cytotoxicity against two different cells in a single culture well. PMID:8034986

  20. HoloMonitor M4: holographic imaging cytometer for real-time kinetic label-free live-cell analysis of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebesta, Mikael; Egelberg, Peter J.; Langberg, Anders; Lindskov, Jens-Henrik; Alm, Kersti; Janicke, Birgit

    2016-03-01

    Live-cell imaging enables studying dynamic cellular processes that cannot be visualized in fixed-cell assays. An increasing number of scientists in academia and the pharmaceutical industry are choosing live-cell analysis over or in addition to traditional fixed-cell assays. We have developed a time-lapse label-free imaging cytometer HoloMonitorM4. HoloMonitor M4 assists researchers to overcome inherent disadvantages of fluorescent analysis, specifically effects of chemical labels or genetic modifications which can alter cellular behavior. Additionally, label-free analysis is simple and eliminates the costs associated with staining procedures. The underlying technology principle is based on digital off-axis holography. While multiple alternatives exist for this type of analysis, we prioritized our developments to achieve the following: a) All-inclusive system - hardware and sophisticated cytometric analysis software; b) Ease of use enabling utilization of instrumentation by expert- and entrylevel researchers alike; c) Validated quantitative assay end-points tracked over time such as optical path length shift, optical volume and multiple derived imaging parameters; d) Reliable digital autofocus; e) Robust long-term operation in the incubator environment; f) High throughput and walk-away capability; and finally g) Data management suitable for single- and multi-user networks. We provide examples of HoloMonitor applications of label-free cell viability measurements and monitoring of cell cycle phase distribution.

  1. 111Indium labeling of hepatocytes for analysis of short-term biodistribution of transplanted cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Lee, C D; Vemuru, R P; Bhargava, K K

    1994-03-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation is useful for ex vivo gene therapy and liver repopulation. Methods for hepatic reconstitution have recently been developed but optimization of hepatocyte transplantation systems is necessary. To develop systems for noninvasive assessment of the biodistribution of transplanted cells, we labeled hepatocytes with 111indium-oxine. Our initial studies showed that hepatocytes incorporated 111indium-oxine with an efficiency of approximately 20%. After labeling, cell viability was unchanged and 111indium was present in hepatocytes after overnight culture, as well as after intrasplenic transplantation. Transplanted cells were successfully localized by means of scintigraphic imaging. The scintigraphic patterns of cell distribution were different when hepatocytes were transplanted by means of either spleen or internal jugular vein, which deposit cells into separate vascular beds. Quantitative analysis of the biodistribution of 111indium-labeled hepatocytes indicated that within 2 hr of intrasplenic transplantation, cells were predominantly localized in liver and spleen, and occasionally in lungs. To determine whether the rate of intrasplenic cell injection influenced translocation of hepatocytes, we transplanted cells in normal rats. Despite intrasplenic cell injection at a variety of rates, organ-specific distribution of 111indium-labeled hepatocytes remained unchanged. Labeling with 111indium did not affect long-term survival of transplanted hepatocytes. These results indicate that 111indium-labeling of hepatocytes should greatly assist noninvasive analysis in the short-term of the biodistribution of transplanted hepatocytes. PMID:8119703

  2. GABAergic and glycinergic pathways to goldfish retinal ganglion cells: an ultrastructural double label study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrastructural double label has been employed to compare GABAergic and glycinergic systems in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of the goldfish retina. Electron microscope autoradiography of 3H-GABA and 3H-glycine uptake was combined with retrograde HRP-labeling of ganglion cells. When surveyed for distribution, GABAergic and glycinergic synapses were found onto labeled ganglion cells throughout the IPL. This reinforces previous physiological work that described GABAergic and glycinergic influences on a variety of ganglion cells in goldfish and carp; These physiological effects often reflect direct inputs

  3. Indium-111 oxine labelling affects the cellular integrity of haematopoietic progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Bernd; Reinartz, Patrick; Schaefer, Wolfgang M.; Buell, Ulrich [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Weber, Christian; Schober, Andreas; Zeiffer, Ute; Liehn, Elisa A.; Hundelshausen, Philipp von [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Department of Molecular Cardiovascular Research, Aachen (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Cell-based therapy by transplantation of progenitor cells has emerged as a promising development for organ repair, but non-invasive imaging approaches are required to monitor the fate of transplanted cells. Radioactive labelling with {sup 111}In-oxine has been used in preclinical trials. This study aimed to validate {sup 111}In-oxine labelling and subsequent in vivo and ex vivo detection of haematopoietic progenitor cells. Murine haematopoietic progenitor cells (10{sup 6}, FDCPmix) were labelled with 0.1 MBq (low dose) or 1.0 MBq (high dose) {sup 111}In-oxine and compared with unlabelled controls. Cellular retention of {sup 111}In, viability and proliferation were determined up to 48 h after labelling. Labelled cells were injected into the cavity of the left or right cardiac ventricle in mice. Scintigraphic images were acquired 24 h later. Organ samples were harvested to determine the tissue-specific activity. Labelling efficiency was 75 {+-} 14%. Cellular retention of incorporated {sup 111}In after 48 h was 18 {+-} 4%. Percentage viability after 48 h was 90 {+-} 1% (control), 58 {+-} 7% (low dose) and 48 {+-} 8% (high dose) (p<0.0001). Numbers of viable cells after 48 h (normalised to 0 h) were 249 {+-} 51% (control), 42 {+-} 8% (low dose) and 32 {+-} 5% (high dose) (p<0.0001). Cells accumulated in the spleen (86.6 {+-} 27.0% ID/g), bone marrow (59.1 {+-} 16.1% ID/g) and liver (30.3 {+-} 9.5% ID/g) after left ventricular injection, whereas most of the cells were detected in the lungs (42.4 {+-} 21.8% ID/g) after right ventricular injection. Radiolabelling of haematopoietic progenitor cells with {sup 111}In-oxine is feasible, with high labelling efficiency but restricted stability. The integrity of labelled cells is significantly affected, with substantially reduced viability and proliferation and limited migration after systemic transfusion. (orig.)

  4. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  5. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte; Corbeil, Denis; Hoflack, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  6. Label-Free Detection of Rare Cell in Human Blood Using Gold Nano Slit Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Z. Mousavi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Label-free detection of rare cells in biological samples is an important and highly demanded task for clinical applications and various fields of research, such as detection of circulating tumor cells for cancer therapy and stem cells studies. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR as a label-free method is a promising technology for detection of rare cells for diagnosis or research applications. Short detection depth of SPR (400 nm provides a sensitive method with minimum interference of non-targets in the biological samples. In this work, we developed a novel microfluidic chip integrated with gold nanoslit SPR platform for highly efficient immunomagnetic capturing and detection of rare cells in human blood. Our method offers simple yet efficient detection of target cells with high purity. The approach for detection consists of two steps. Target cells are firs captured on functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs with specific antibody I. The suspension containing the captured cells (MNPs-cells is then introduced into a microfluidic chip integrated with a gold nanoslit film. MNPs-cells bind with the second specific antibody immobilized on the surface of the gold nanoslit and are therefore captured on the sensor active area. The cell binding on the gold nanoslit was monitored by the wavelength shift of the SPR spectrum generated by the gold nanoslits.

  7. flowCL: ontology-based cell population labelling in flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtot, Mélanie; Meskas, Justin; Diehl, Alexander D.; Droumeva, Radina; Gottardo, Raphael; Jalali, Adrin; Taghiyar, Mohammad Jafar; Maecker, Holden T.; McCoy, J. Philip; Ruttenberg, Alan; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Finding one or more cell populations of interest, such as those correlating to a specific disease, is critical when analysing flow cytometry data. However, labelling of cell populations is not well defined, making it difficult to integrate the output of algorithms to external knowledge sources. Results: We developed flowCL, a software package that performs semantic labelling of cell populations based on their surface markers and applied it to labelling of the Federation of Clinical Immunology Societies Human Immunology Project Consortium lyoplate populations as a use case. Conclusion: By providing automated labelling of cell populations based on their immunophenotype, flowCL allows for unambiguous and reproducible identification of standardized cell types. Availability and implementation: Code, R script and documentation are available under the Artistic 2.0 license through Bioconductor (http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/devel/bioc/html/flowCL.html). Contact: rbrinkman@bccrc.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25481008

  8. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  9. Labeling Adipose-Derived Stem Cells with Hoechst 33342: Usability and Effects on Differentiation Potential and DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Schendzielorz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs have been extensively studied in the field of stem cell research and possess numerous clinical applications. Cell labeling is an essential component of various experimental protocols and Hoechst 33342 (H33342 represents a cost-effective and easy methodology for live staining. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the labeling of rat ASCs with two different concentrations of H33342 (0.5 μg/mL and 5 μg/mL, with particular regard to usability, interference with cell properties, and potential DNA damage. Hoechst 33342 used at a low concentration of 0.5 μg/mL did not significantly affect cell proliferation, viability, or differentiation potential of the ASCs, nor did it cause any significant DNA damage as measured by the olive tail moment. High concentrations of 5 μg/mL H33342, however, impaired the proliferation and viability of the ASCs, and considerable DNA damage was observed. Undesirable colabeling of unlabeled cocultivated cells was seen in particular with higher concentrations of H33342, independent of varying washing procedures. Hence, H33342 labeling with lower concentrations represents a usable method, which does not affect the tested cell properties. However, the colabeling of adjacent cells is a drawback of the technique.

  10. Labeling Adipose-Derived Stem Cells with Hoechst 33342: Usability and Effects on Differentiation Potential and DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendzielorz, P.; Froelich, K.; Rak, K.; Gehrke, T.; Scherzad, A.; Hagen, R.; Radeloff, A.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have been extensively studied in the field of stem cell research and possess numerous clinical applications. Cell labeling is an essential component of various experimental protocols and Hoechst 33342 (H33342) represents a cost-effective and easy methodology for live staining. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the labeling of rat ASCs with two different concentrations of H33342 (0.5 μg/mL and 5 μg/mL), with particular regard to usability, interference with cell properties, and potential DNA damage. Hoechst 33342 used at a low concentration of 0.5 μg/mL did not significantly affect cell proliferation, viability, or differentiation potential of the ASCs, nor did it cause any significant DNA damage as measured by the olive tail moment. High concentrations of 5 μg/mL H33342, however, impaired the proliferation and viability of the ASCs, and considerable DNA damage was observed. Undesirable colabeling of unlabeled cocultivated cells was seen in particular with higher concentrations of H33342, independent of varying washing procedures. Hence, H33342 labeling with lower concentrations represents a usable method, which does not affect the tested cell properties. However, the colabeling of adjacent cells is a drawback of the technique. PMID:27375746

  11. Influence on bionomics of endothelial progenitor cells labeling with magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the influence of home synthesize magnetic iron oxide (called Fe2O3-PLL) labeling on peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) bionomics to provide experimental foundation for MR imaging ex and in vivo. Methods: Fe2O3 was incubated with PLL for 2 hours to obtain a complex of Fe2O3-PLL. Rabbit peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and EPCs were selected by adherence method. Fe2O3-PLL was used to label EPCs. Prussian blue stain and electron microscope was used for showing intracellular iron. MTF assay was assessed to evaluate the difference of growth curve between unlabeled and labeled with 25 mg/L Fe2O3-PLL. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze cell cycle, cell apoptosis and the expression of surface markers of labeled and unlabeled cells. Expressions of eNOS, KDR and vWF at mRNA levels among unlabeled and labeled EPCs were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Calcium ion channel and membrane fluidity were observed and analyzed by laser confocal microscopy. Statistical analyses were used with ANOVA and t test. Results: Almost 100% cells were labeled by Fe2O3-PLL, iron-containing vesicles were intracytoplasma. There was no statistical difference in cells growth curve, cell life cycle [(93.74±3.52)%, (94.57±3.66)%] and cell apoptosis rate (12.89±1.81)%, (11.67±1.18)%) between labeling with Fe2O3-PLL at a concentration of 25 mg/L and unlabeled cells (t=0.283, P>0.05; t=0.977, P>0.05). There was also no statistical difference in relative amount of eNOS, KDR and vWF at mRNA levels and the expression of surface phenotypic markers (CD34, CD106, CD146 and KDR) between two groups (P>0.05). In addition, Labeling had little influence on calcium ion channel and didn't significantly alter cell membrane fluidity. Conclusions: The rabbit peripheral blood EPCs can be effective labeled with Fe2O3-PLL and without significant influence on cells bionomics at a low concentration of 25 mg/L. Almost every cell can be labeled

  12. Scattering pulse of label free fine structure cells to determine the size scale of scattering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Kaixing; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Scattering pulse is sensitive to the morphology and components of each single label-free cell. The most direct detection result, label free cell's scattering pulse is studied in this paper as a novel trait to recognize large malignant cells from small normal cells. A set of intrinsic scattering pulse calculation method is figured out, which combines both hydraulic focusing theory and small particle's scattering principle. Based on the scattering detection angle ranges of widely used flow cytometry, the scattering pulses formed by cell scattering energy in forward scattering angle 2°-5° and side scattering angle 80°-110° are discussed. Combining the analysis of cell's illuminating light energy, the peak, area, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of label free cells' scattering pulses for fine structure cells with diameter 1-20 μm are studied to extract the interrelations of scattering pulse's features and cell's morphology. The theoretical and experimental results show that cell's diameter and FWHM of its scattering pulse agree with approximate linear distribution; the peak and area of scattering pulse do not always increase with cell's diameter becoming larger, but when cell's diameter is less than about 16 μm the monotone increasing relation of scattering pulse peak or area with cell's diameter can be obtained. This relationship between the features of scattering pulse and cell's size is potentially a useful but very simple criterion to distinguishing malignant and normal cells by their sizes and morphologies in label free cells clinical examinations.

  13. Functional endothelial cells derived from embryonic stem cells labeled with HIV transactivator peptide-conjugated superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Bin; FU Wei-guo; DONG Zhi-hui; FANG Zheng-dong; LIU Zhen-jie; SI Yi; ZHANG Xiang-man; WANG Yu-qi

    2011-01-01

    Background The development of regenerative therapies using derivatives of embryonic stem (ES) cells would be facilitated by a non-invasive method to monitor transplanted cells in vivo,for example,magnetic resonance imaging of cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles.Although ES cells have been labeled with SPIO particles,the potential adverse effects of the label have not been fully examined.The objective of this study was to determine whether SPIO labeling affects murine ES cell viability,proliferation,or ability to differentiate into functional endothelial cells (ECs).Methods Cross-linked iron oxide (CLIO,an SPIO) was conjugated with human immunodeficiency virus transactivator of transcription (HIV-Tat) peptides,and murine ES cells were labeled with either CLiO-Tat,CLIO,or HIV-Tat.After labeling,ES cells were cultured for 4 days and FIk-1+ ES cells identified and sorted by immunocytochemistry and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS).FIk-1+ cells were raplated on fibronectin-coated dishes,and ECs were obtained by culturing these for 4 weeks in endothelial cell growth medium supplemented with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).ES cell viability was determined using trypan blue exclusion,and the proportion of SPIO+ cells was evaluated using Prussian blue staining and transmission electron microscopy.After differentiation,the behavior and phenotype of ECs were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction,flow cytometry,immunocytochemistry,Dil-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL) uptake,and Matrigel tube formation assay.Results CLIO-Tat was a highly effective label for ES cells,with >96% of cells incorporating the particles,and it did not alter the viability of the labeled cells.ECs derived from CLIO-Tat+ ES cells were very similar to murine aortic ECs in their morphology,expression of endothelial cell markers,ability to form vascular-like channels,and scavenging of AcLDL from the culture medium

  14. Stem cell research in China

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Lianming; Li, Lingsong; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2007-01-01

    In the past 5 years, China has increased its efforts in the field of stem cell research and practice. Basic research mainly focuses on bone marrow and embryonic stem cells. Clinical applications of stem cells in the treatment of acute heart failure, acute liver failure and lower limb ischaemia have been reported by many hospitals. China enacted its ‘Ethical Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research’ in 2003. At present, China has the most liberal and favourable environments for human ...

  15. Measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity by post-labeling surviving target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 51Cr release assay (CRA) is the commonly accepted technique for measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity. This assay shows some disadvantages when mononucleated cells of human peripheral blood (MNC) are used as effector and target cells. The uptake of 51Cr by PHA stimulated lymphocytes is low compared to the spontaneous release. In an attempt to develop a cytotoxicity assay suitable for human lymphocytes we used 14C-TdR to label target cells surviving after contact with effector cells. Cytotoxic lymphocytes were generated by incubation of MNC with irradiated allogeneic MNC for 6 days. On day 6 the effector cells are irradiated and cocultured with PHA stimulated target cells. Twenty-four hours later 14C-TdR is added. After an additional 24 h the cultures are harvested and 14C-TdR taken up by target cells is measured. It is shown that the effector cells are still cytotoxic after irradiation. These cells do not take up 14C-TdR. Cell-free supernatants do not influence the uptake of 14C-TdR by target cells. The results obtained with this assay correlate very well those obtained by the CRA, if the spontaneous release does not exceed 30%. (author)

  16. Explicit kinetic heterogeneity: mathematical models for interpretation of deuterium labeling of heterogeneous cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly V Ganusov

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of division and death rates of lymphocytes in different conditions is vital for quantitative understanding of the immune system. Deuterium, in the form of deuterated glucose or heavy water, can be used to measure rates of proliferation and death of lymphocytes in vivo. Inferring these rates from labeling and delabeling curves has been subject to considerable debate with different groups suggesting different mathematical models for that purpose. We show that the three most common models, which are based on quite different biological assumptions, actually predict mathematically identical labeling curves with one parameter for the exponential up and down slope, and one parameter defining the maximum labeling level. By extending these previous models, we here propose a novel approach for the analysis of data from deuterium labeling experiments. We construct a model of "kinetic heterogeneity" in which the total cell population consists of many sub-populations with different rates of cell turnover. In this model, for a given distribution of the rates of turnover, the predicted fraction of labeled DNA accumulated and lost can be calculated. Our model reproduces several previously made experimental observations, such as a negative correlation between the length of the labeling period and the rate at which labeled DNA is lost after label cessation. We demonstrate the reliability of the new explicit kinetic heterogeneity model by applying it to artificially generated datasets, and illustrate its usefulness by fitting experimental data. In contrast to previous models, the explicit kinetic heterogeneity model 1 provides a novel way of interpreting labeling data; 2 allows for a non-exponential loss of labeled cells during delabeling, and 3 can be used to describe data with variable labeling length.

  17. Comparison of designed and commercial magnetic cell labels: relaxivity, cell uptake, cell viability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herynek, V.; Glogarová, Kateřina; Horák, Daniel; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva; Hájek, M.

    Warsawa : ESMRMB, 2006. s. 283-284. [Congress of European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology /23./. 21.09.2006-23.09.2006, Warsawa] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/06/1594; GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Cell * MR Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  18. Lentivirus-mediated bifunctional cell labeling for in vivo melanoma study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Chi-Ping; Carter, John; Bonomi, Carrie; Esposito, Dominic; Crise, Bruce; Ortiz-Conde, Betty; Hollingshead, Melinda; Merlino, Glenn

    2009-06-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are capable of labeling a broad spectrum of cell types, achieving stable expression of transgenes. However, for in vivo studies, the duration of marker gene expression has been highly variable. We have developed a series of LVs harboring different promoters for expressing reporter gene in mouse cells. Long-term culture and colony formation of several LV-labeled mouse melanoma cells showed that promoters derived from mammalian house-keeping genes, especially those encoding RNA polymerase II (Pol2) and ferritin (FerH), provided the highest consistency for reporter expression. For in vivo studies, primary B16BL6 mouse melanoma were infected with LVs whose luciferase-green fluorescence protein fusion gene (Luc/GFP) was driven by either Pol2 or FerH promoters. When transplanted into syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, Luc/GFP-labeled B16BL6 mouse melanoma cells can be monitored by bioluminescence imaging in vivo, and GFP-positive cells can be isolated from the tumors by fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Pol2-Luc/GFP labeling, while lower in activity, was more sustainable than FerH-Luc/GFP labeling in B16BL6 over consecutive passages into mice. We conclude that Pol-2-Luc/GFP labeling allows long-term in vivo monitoring and tumor cell isolation in immunocompetent mouse melanoma models. PMID:19175523

  19. Magnetic targeting of iron-oxide-labeled fluorescent hepatoma cells to the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an external magnet field can induce preferential trafficking of magnetically labeled Huh7 hepatoma cells to the liver following liver cell transplantation. Huh7 hepatoma cells were labeled with anionic magnetic nanoparticles (AMNP) and tagged with a fluorescent membrane marker (PKH67). Iron-uptake was measured by magnetophoresis. Twenty C57Bl6 mice received an intrasplenic injection of 2 x 106 labeled cells. An external magnet (0.29 T; 25 T/m) was placed over the liver of 13 randomly selected animals (magnet group), while the remaining 7 animals served as controls. MRI (1.5 T) and confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) were performed 10 days post-transplantation. The presence and location of labeled cells within the livers were compared in the magnet group and controls, and confronted with histological analysis representing the standard of reference. Mean iron content per cell was 6 pg. Based on histology, labeled cells were more frequently present within recipient livers in the magnet group (p < 0.01) where their distribution was preferentially peri-vascular (p<0.05). MRI and CFM gave similar results for the overall detection of transplanted cells (kappa=0.828) and for the identification of peri-vascular cells (kappa=0.78). Application of an external magnet can modify the trafficking of transplanted cells, especially by promoting the formation of perivascular aggregates. (orig.)

  20. Stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture for human embryonic stem cell proteomic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Prokhorova, Tatyana A; Kassem, Moustapha;

    2012-01-01

    The identification and quantitative measurements of proteins in human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is a fast growing interdisciplinary area with an enormous impact on understanding the biology of hESC and the mechanism controlling self-renewal and differentiation. Using a quantitative mass...... spectroscopic method of stable isotope labelling with amino acids during cell culture (SILAC), we are able to analyse differential expression of proteins from different cellular compartments and to identify intracellular signalling pathways involved in self-renewal and differentiation. In this chapter, we...

  1. Concentrator silicon cell research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Solar Photovoltaic Lab.

    1992-04-01

    This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

  2. Multicolor protein labeling in living cells using mutant β-lactamase-tag technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shuji; Mizukami, Shin; Hori, Yuichiro; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2010-12-15

    Protein labeling techniques using small molecule probes have become important as practical alternatives to the use of fluorescent proteins (FPs) in live cell imaging. These labeling techniques can be applied to more sophisticated fluorescence imaging studies such as pulse-chase imaging. Previously, we reported a novel protein labeling system based on the combination of a mutant β-lactamase (BL-tag) with coumarin-derivatized probes and its application to specific protein labeling on cell membranes. In this paper, we demonstrated the broad applicability of our BL-tag technology to live cell imaging by the development of a series of fluorescence labeling probes for this technology, and the examination of the functions of target proteins. These new probes have a fluorescein or rhodamine chromophore, each of which provides enhanced photophysical properties relative to coumarins for the purpose of cellular imaging. These probes were used to specifically label the BL-tag protein and could be used with other small molecule fluorescent probes. Simultaneous labeling using our new probes with another protein labeling technology was found to be effective. In addition, it was also confirmed that this technology has a low interference with respect to the functions of target proteins in comparison to GFP. Highly specific and fast covalent labeling properties of this labeling technology is expected to provide robust tools for investigating protein functions in living cells, and future applications can be improved by combining the BL-tag technology with conventional imaging techniques. The combination of probe synthesis and molecular biology techniques provides the advantages of both techniques and can enable the design of experiments that cannot currently be performed using existing tools. PMID:20961132

  3. AGE AND SEX CHARACTERISTICS OF MELATONIN-POSITIVE-LABELED CELLS OF THE GASTRIC MUCOSA IN DESYNCHRONOSIS IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatiuk, V; Kononenko, N; Kozub, T; Chikitkina, V; Galiy, L

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the research was to study the state of melatonin-positive-labeled cells (MPLC) of GM in desynchronosis in rats of different age and gender. 780 sections of the pyloric part of the gastric mucosa were studied in rats of both genders at the age of 9, 15 and 20 months. Animals were divided into intact control groups and the groups of the animals kept under the conditions of continuous light for 14 days - desynchronosis. The study was performed by the method of immunohistochemical staining with the primary antibodies to melatonin (Biorbyt, UK) and the secondary Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated antibody (Abcam, UK). In the course of the research it was found that MPLC in all experimental groups were mainly located in the basal and middle segments of the tubular glands of gastric mucosa and were represented by three types of cells. In desynchronosis the number of melatonin-positive-labeled cells significantly reduced in almost every age group, with the exception of females at the age of 20 months. Thus in elderly males and females the number of melatonin-positive-labeled cells of type III increases, whereas in young and mature males it decreases, and cells of type I predominate. PMID:27441544

  4. Red Cell Volume Can Be Accurately Determined in Sheep Using a Non-radioactive Biotin Label

    OpenAIRE

    Mock, Donald M.; Mock, Nell I.; Lankford, Gary L.; Burmeister, Leon F.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Widness, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The sheep has served as an informative animal model for investigation of human fetal and newborn erythropoiesis and red blood cell (RBC) kinetics. We previously validated the permanent label (14C)cyanate for measuring red cell volume (RCV) in sheep. Here we validate biotin labeling of RBCs as a nonradioactive method for measuring RCV in sheep with the anticipation that it can be applied in studies of human infants. The RCV was determined simultaneously using two techniques for quantitation of...

  5. A trend analysis of private label research between 2000 and 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Molinillo Jiménez, Sebastián; Ekinci, Yuksel; Whyatt, Georgina; Occhiocupo, Nicolettta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the state of empirical and theoretical research about Private Label (PL) and to identify gaps and future research avenues. This paper uses a bibliometric approach of recent advances in the research of PL; it focuses on the period of greatest scientific output (2000-2012) and includes all international publications on PL in marketing journals ranked by the Academic Journal Quality Guide. The analysis systematically considers main authors and universities, cou...

  6. Fine structure of reactive cells in injured nervous tissue labeled with 3H-thymidine injected before injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the fine structure of blood mononuclear cells in injured nervous tissue, mice were given repeated injections of 3H-thymidine. Under ether anesthesia the animals either were given a stab wound to the spinal cord or had their left hypoglossal nerve transected. Tissue sections were prepared for electron microscopic radioautography, and all labeled cells were photographed. About half the labeled cells in the injured spinal cords and almost all the labeled cells in the nuclei of the injured hypoglossal nerves had nuclei with dark staining peripheral heterochromatin, dark cytoplasm with long cisternae of granular endoplasmic reticulum, and other ultrastructural features characteristic of the cells usually identifed as microglia. The remaining labeled cells in the injured spinal cords were macrophages, fibroblasts, and vascular cells. Since uninjured nervous tissue has extremely few labeled cells, most of the labeled cells in this experiment should be derived from blood mononuclear cells

  7. In vivo ultrasound and photoacoustic monitoring of mesenchymal stem cells labeled with gold nanotracers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Yun Nam

    Full Text Available Longitudinal monitoring of cells is required in order to understand the role of delivered stem cells in therapeutic neovascularization. However, there is not an imaging technique that is capable of quantitative, longitudinal assessment of stem cell behaviors with high spatial resolution and sufficient penetration depth. In this study, in vivo and in vitro experiments were performed to demonstrate the efficacy of ultrasound-guided photoacoustic (US/PA imaging to monitor mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs labeled with gold nanotracers (Au NTs. The Au NT labeled MSCs, injected intramuscularly in the lower limb of the Lewis rat, were detected and spatially resolved. Furthermore, our quantitative in vitro cell studies indicate that US/PA imaging is capable of high detection sensitivity (1×10⁴ cells/mL of the Au NT labeled MSCs. Finally, Au NT labeled MSCs captured in the PEGylated fibrin gel system were imaged in vivo, as well as in vitro, over a one week time period, suggesting that longitudinal cell tracking using US/PA imaging is possible. Overall, Au NT labeling of MSCs and US/PA imaging can be an alternative approach in stem cell imaging capable of noninvasive, sensitive, quantitative, longitudinal assessment of stem cell behaviors with high spatial and temporal resolutions at sufficient depths.

  8. The use of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for cell labeling in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have evaluated the potential of in vivo cell surface labeling using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) directed against their surface antigens. Two MoAbs, a specific antibody (anti-Thy-1 OX7) and a nonspecific control antibody (anti-CEA) were coupled with DTPA, labeled with /sup 111/In and evaluated against rat thymocytes, marrow cells, and lymphoma cells (all known to be Thy-1 positive) both in vitro and in vivo. Enumeration of the cells which bound the radiolabeled MoAb was done by detecting the antibody on the cell surface with a Fl-F(ab')/sub 2/ goat anti-mouse IgG and analyzing fluorescence (F1) in a flow cytometer (FACS). The thymocytes, which could be labeled in whole blood, showed a labeling efficiency of 80-100%. The labeling, which could be inhibited by cold antibody, was stable up to 72 hours and did not interfere with either cell viability or functional integrity. Following IV injection of the MoAbs in normal rats, there was very good visualization of the bone marrow not seen with the control. Analysis of the marrow cells on the FACS showed that at two hours over 60% of the marrow cells were specifically labeled as against 2% for the control. Within 15 minutes of injecting /sup 111/In-OX7 into rats with lymphoma, 70% of the activity in blood was bound to circulating lymphoma cells. The ability to stably label, rapidly target, and image specific cell populations in vivo has wide ranging diagnostic and therapeutic implications

  9. Study of T cell subsets in patients with chronic glomerulonephritis by immuno-labelling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the developing of nuclear industry science, the possibility of nuclear radiation has increased rapidly. Treatments of diseases caused by radiation, especially acute radiation injury, rely heavily on bone marrow transplantation. The usage of immunology inhibitors is crucial to successfully carrying out bone marrow transplantation. So it is important to find out and research on immunology inhibitors. Using the changes of T cell subsets as a marker of immunology function before and after treatment of chronic glomerulonephritis, the authors observed the effect of Tripterygium wilfordii (TW)--an Chinese traditional drug which may probably become an important immunology inhibitor--on the treatment of chronic glomerulonephritis. Methods: immuno-labelling technique was used to measure the changes of T cell subsets in 77 CGN patients before and after treated with TW. Results: CD3+ and CD4+ cells in CGN patients were lower than those in healthy control (p + to CD8+ (CD4+/CD8+) cells reduced significantly (p+, CD4+ cells and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ in most of the patients with CGN were further reduced. In patients with uremia, only CD3+ cell level was lower than the level before treatment, while the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ (CD4+/CD8+) did not change markedly. Conclusion: The imbalance of various T cell subsets and dysfunction of these T cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of CGN. the increase in γδT cells may be related with the development of CGN. The pharmacological mechanism of TW in the treatment of CGN patients may involve regulation of balance of T cell subsets and inhibition of the T helper functions

  10. Controllable labelling of stem cells with a novel superparamagnetic iron oxide-loaded cationic nanovesicle for MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the feasibility of highly efficient and controllable stem cell labelling for cellular MRI. A new class of cationic, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION)-loaded nanovesicles was synthesised to label rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells without secondary transfection agents. The optimal labelling conditions and controllability were assessed, and the effect of labelling on cell viability, proliferation activity and multilineage differentiation was determined. In 18 rats, focal ischaemic cerebral injury was induced and the rats randomly injected with 1 x 106 cells labelled with 0-, 8- or 20-mV nanovesicles (n = 6 each). In vivo MRI was performed to follow grafted cells in contralateral striata, and results were correlated with histology. Optimal cell labelling conditions involved a concentration of 3.15 μg Fe/mL nanovesicles with 20-mV positive charge and 1-h incubation time. Labelling efficiency showed linear change with an increase in the electric potentials of nanovesicles. Labelling did not affect cell viability, proliferation activity or multilineage differentiation capacity. The distribution and migration of labelled cells could be detected by MRI. Histology confirmed that grafted cells retained the label and remained viable. Stem cells can be effectively and safely labelled with cationic, SPION-loaded nanovesicles in a controllable way for cellular MRI. (orig.)

  11. Tracking of iron-labeled human neural stem cells by magnetic resonance imaging in cell replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milagros Ramos-Gmez; Alberto Martnez-Serrano

    2016-01-01

    Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) derived from the ventral mesencephalon are powerful research tools and candidates for cell therapies in Parkinson’s disease. However, their clinical translation has not been fully realized due, in part, to the limited ability to track stem cell regional localization and survival over long periods of time afterin vivo transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging provides an excellent non-invasive method to study the fate of transplanted cellsin vivo. For magnetic resonance imaging cell tracking, cells need to be labeled with a contrast agent, such as magnetic nanoparticles, at a concentration high enough to be easily detected by magnetic resonance imaging. Grafting of human neural stem cells labeled with magnetic nanoparticles allows cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging without impairment of cell survival, prolif-eration, self-renewal, and multipotency. However, the results reviewed here suggest that in long term grafting, activated microglia and macrophages could contribute to magnetic resonance imaging signal by engulifng dead labeled cells or iron nanoparticles dispersed freely in the brain parenchyma over time.

  12. Labeling and Imaging Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, adipose and muscle cells. Adult derived MSCs are being actively investigated because of their potential to be utilized for therapeutic cell-based transplantation. Methods...

  13. 111In)oxine labelling of polymorphonuclear leucocytes: doubts concerning elution and effects on cell behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehan, N.J.; Brown, K.A.; Camacho, A.; Dumonde, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) from normal human subjects were labelled with (111In)oxine (20 muCi 10(8) cells). In the presence of 20% autologous serum (AS), dissociation of 111In from the cells resulted in mean losses of radioactivity of 13% at 3 h and 30% at 24 h. Adherence of 111In-labelled PMN to cultured porcine endothelial monolayers was increased by 40.7 +/- 31.6% after 60 min incubation in 20% AS at 37 degrees C when compared with unlabelled cells. Phagocytosis and intracellular killing of Candida albicans were unaltered by labelling. Elution of 111In from labelled PMN together with enhanced adhesiveness may have important implications for the study of PMN kinetics and the investigation of inflammatory disease.

  14. Bioprinting for stem cell research

    OpenAIRE

    Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest to apply bioprinting techniques to stem cell research. Several bioprinting methods have been developed utilizing acoustics, piezoelectricity, and lasers to deposit living cells onto receiving substrates. Using these technologies, spatially defined gradients of immobilized proteins can be engineered to direct stem cell differentiation into multiple subpopulations of different lineages. Stem cells can also be patterned in a high-throughput manner onto...

  15. In vivo MRI discrimination between live and lysed iron-labelled cells using balanced steady state free precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability of balanced steady state free precession (b-SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging sequence to distinguish between live and lysed iron-labelled cells. Human breast cancer cells were labelled with iron oxide nanoparticles. Cells were lysed using sonication. Imaging was performed at 3 T. The timing parameters for b-SSFP and the number of iron-labelled cells in samples were varied to optimise the b-SSFP signal difference between live and lysed iron-labelled cell samples. For in vivo experiments, cells were mixed with Matrigel and implanted into nude mice. Three mice implanted with live labelled cancer cells were irradiated to validate this method. Lysed iron-labelled cells have a significantly higher signal compared with live, intact iron-labelled cells in bSSFP images. The contrast between live and dead cells can be maximised by careful optimisation of timing parameters. A change in the b-SSFP signal was measured 6 days after irradiation, reflecting cell death in vivo. Histology confirmed the presence of dead cells in the implant. Our results show that the b-SSFP sequence can be optimised to allow for the discrimination of live iron-labelled cells and lysed iron-labelled cells in vitro and in vivo. (orig.)

  16. The migration of synthetic magnetic nanoparticle labeled dendritic cells into lymph nodes with optical imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su H

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hang Su,1,* Yongbin Mou,1,* Yanli An,2 Wei Han,1 Xiaofeng Huang,1 Guohua Xia,3 Yanhong Ni,1 Yu Zhang,4 Jianmin Ma,1 Qingang Hu1,5 1Center Laboratory of Stomatology, Stomatological Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 2Jiangsu Key Lab of Molecular and Function Imaging, Department of Radiology; 3Department of Hematology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, 4State Key Laboratory of Molecule and Bimolecular Electronics, Jiangsu Provincial Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices; Southeast University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 5Leeds Dental Institute, Faculty of Medicine and health, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The successful biotherapy of carcinoma with dendritic cell (DC vaccines pivotally relies on DCs’ migratory capability into lymph tissues and activation of T cells. Accurate imaging and evaluation of DC migration in vivo have great significance during antitumor treatment with DC vaccine. We herein examined the behavior of DCs influenced by synthetic superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticle labeling.Methods: γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were prepared and DCs, which were induced from bone marrow monocytes of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP transgenic mice, were labeled. The endocytosis of the SPIO, surface molecules, cell apoptosis and fluorescence intensity of EGFP-DCs were displayed by Prussian blue staining and flow cytometry (FCM, respectively. After EGFP-DCs, labeled with SPIO, were injected into footpads (n = 5 for 24 hours, the mice were examined in vivo by optical imaging (OPI. Meanwhile, confocal imaging and FCM were applied, respectively, to detect the migration of labeled DCs into draining lymph nodes.Results: Nearly 100% of cells were labeled by the SPIO, in which the intracellular blue color gradually deepened and the iron contents rose with the increase of labeling iron concentrations

  17. Self-Assembled Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoclusters for Universal Cell Labeling and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuzhen; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Shengwei; Lin, Gan; Luo, Bing; Yao, Huan; Lin, Yuchun; He, Chengyong; Liu, Gang; Lin, Zhongning

    2016-05-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have been widely used in a variety of biomedical applications, especially as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cell labeling. In this study, SPIO nanoparticles were stabilized with amphiphilic low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI) in an aqueous phase to form monodispersed nanocomposites with a controlled clustering structure. The iron-based nanoclusters with a size of 115.3 ± 40.23 nm showed excellent performance on cellular uptake and cell labeling in different types of cells, moreover, which could be tracked by MRI with high sensitivity. The SPIO nanoclusters presented negligible cytotoxicity in various types of cells as detected using MTS, LDH, and flow cytometry assays. Significantly, we found that ferritin protein played an essential role in protecting stress from SPIO nanoclusters. Taken together, the self-assembly of SPIO nanoclusters with good magnetic properties provides a safe and efficient method for universal cell labeling with noninvasive MRI monitoring capability.

  18. Labeling human embryonic stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes for tracking with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) can generate cardiomyocytes (CM), which offer promising treatments for cardiomyopathies in children. However, challenges for clinical translation result from loss of transplanted cell from target sites and high cell death. An imaging technique that noninvasively and repetitively monitors transplanted hESC-CM could guide improvements in transplantation techniques and advance therapies. To develop a clinically applicable labeling technique for hESC-CM with FDA-approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) by examining labeling before and after CM differentiation. Triplicates of hESC were labeled by simple incubation with 50 μg/ml of ferumoxides before or after differentiation into CM, then imaged on a 7T MR scanner using a T2-weighted multi-echo spin-echo sequence. Viability, iron uptake and T2-relaxation times were compared between groups using t-tests. hESC-CM labeled before differentiation demonstrated significant MR effects, iron uptake and preserved function. hESC-CM labeled after differentiation showed no significant iron uptake or change in MR signal (P < 0.05). Morphology, differentiation and viability were consistent between experimental groups. hESC-CM should be labeled prior to CM differentiation to achieve a significant MR signal. This technique permits monitoring delivery and engraftment of hESC-CM for potential advancements of stem cell-based therapies in the reconstitution of damaged myocardium. (orig.)

  19. Labeling human embryonic stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes for tracking with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, Rosalinda T.; Daldrup-Link, Heike [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford School of Medicine, Pediatric Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Boddington, Sophie; Wendland, Mike; Mandrussow, Lydia [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Henning, Tobias D. [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Cologne (Germany); Liu, Siyuan [National Institutes of Health, Language Section, Voice, Speech and Language Branch, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) can generate cardiomyocytes (CM), which offer promising treatments for cardiomyopathies in children. However, challenges for clinical translation result from loss of transplanted cell from target sites and high cell death. An imaging technique that noninvasively and repetitively monitors transplanted hESC-CM could guide improvements in transplantation techniques and advance therapies. To develop a clinically applicable labeling technique for hESC-CM with FDA-approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) by examining labeling before and after CM differentiation. Triplicates of hESC were labeled by simple incubation with 50 {mu}g/ml of ferumoxides before or after differentiation into CM, then imaged on a 7T MR scanner using a T2-weighted multi-echo spin-echo sequence. Viability, iron uptake and T2-relaxation times were compared between groups using t-tests. hESC-CM labeled before differentiation demonstrated significant MR effects, iron uptake and preserved function. hESC-CM labeled after differentiation showed no significant iron uptake or change in MR signal (P < 0.05). Morphology, differentiation and viability were consistent between experimental groups. hESC-CM should be labeled prior to CM differentiation to achieve a significant MR signal. This technique permits monitoring delivery and engraftment of hESC-CM for potential advancements of stem cell-based therapies in the reconstitution of damaged myocardium. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic labeling and in vitro MR imaging of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To label rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with feridex combined with poly-l-lysine (PLL), and to determine the feasibility of detection of magnetically labeled stem cells with MR imaging. Methods: Feridex were incubated with PLL for 1 hour to obtain a complex of feridex-PLL. Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the bone marrows of Wistar rats were cultured and expanded. By the 4th passage, cells were co-incubated overnight with the feridex-PLL complex. Prussian blue staining for demonstrating intracytoplastic nanoparticles and trypan-blue exclusion test for cell viability were performed respectively at 24 h, 1 w, 2 w, 3 w after labeling. MR imaging of cell suspensions was performed by using T1WI, T2WI and T2* WI sequences at a clinical 1.5 T MR system. Results: Numerous intracytoplastic iron particles were stained with Prussian blue. With division of stern cells, the stained particles were seen decreased gradually. Trypan blue exclusion test at 24 h, 1 w, 2 w and 3 w showed that the viability of the labeled cells was 91.00%, 93.00%, 91.75%, and 92.50%, not significantly different with that of nonlabeled cells (P>0.05). For 103, 104 and l05 cells, T2 signal intensity decreased by 63.75%, 82.31% and 91.92% respectively, T2* signal intensity decreased by 68.24%, 83.01%, and 93.94% respectively. For 105 labeled cells, T2* signal intensity decreased by 93.75%, 75.92%, 41.75% and 8.83 % respectively at 24 h, 1 w, 2 w and 3 w after labeling. Conclusion: Magnetic labeling of rat bone marrow stem cells with feridex-PLL complex is feasible, efficient and safe. T2* WI is the most sensitive sequence to detect the labeled cells. The degree of T2 signal decreasing may be related to the cell count and division phase. (authors)

  1. Variability of the thymidine labeling index in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, B.; Woo, L.; Blatchford, S.; Aguirre, M.; Garewal, H.

    1988-06-01

    Tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/HTdR) labeling is the standard technique for determining the kinetic activity of tumors. This method has been used to label multiple sections of tumor specimens obtained from seven patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Considerable variability was observed in the labeling index in different sites from the same specimen. To reduce the large sampling error due to heterogeneity, we recommend that an average value be determined from multiple sections when employing this technique.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled exosomes from stem cells: a new method to obtain labeled exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busato, Alice; Bonafede, Roberta; Bontempi, Pietro; Scambi, Ilaria; Schiaffino, Lorenzo; Benati, Donatella; Malatesta, Manuela; Sbarbati, Andrea; Marzola, Pasquina; Mariotti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent findings indicate that the beneficial effects of adipose stem cells (ASCs), reported in several neurodegenerative experimental models, could be due to their paracrine activity mediated by the release of exosomes. The aim of this study was the development and validation of an innovative exosome-labeling protocol that allows to visualize them with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods At first, ASCs were labeled using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO, 4–6 nm), and optimal parameters to label ASCs in terms of cell viability, labeling efficiency, iron content, and magnetic resonance (MR) image contrast were investigated. Exosomes were then isolated from labeled ASCs using a standard isolation protocol. The efficiency of exosome labeling was assessed by acquiring MR images in vitro and in vivo as well as by determining their iron content. Transmission electron microscopy images and histological analysis were performed to validate the results obtained. Results By using optimized experimental parameters for ASC labeling (200 µg Fe/mL of USPIO and 72 hours of incubation), it was possible to label 100% of the cells, while their viability remained comparable to unlabeled cells; the detection limit of MR images was of 102 and 2.5×103 ASCs in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Exosomes isolated from previously labeled ASCs retain nanoparticles, as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy images. The detection limit by MRI was 3 µg and 5 µg of exosomes in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Conclusion We report a new approach for labeling of exosomes by USPIO that allows detection by MRI while preserving their morphology and physiological characteristics. PMID:27330291

  3. Tc-99m Labeled HMPAO white Blood Cell Scintigraphy in Pediatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Funda Aydın; Arzu Kın Cengiz; Fırat Güngör

    2012-01-01

    Objective: 99mTc labeled hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) white blood cell (WBC) scintigraphy is a frequently used option for acute infection, particularly in pediatric patients. This scintigraphy is applied to detect sites of infection/inflammation in patients with fever of unknown origin, to find and follow up osteomyelitis, and to detect suspicion of acute appendicitis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the value of 99mTc-HMPAO labeled WBC scintigraphy in pediatric...

  4. Procedure for the fluorographic determination of radioactivity of labelled macromolecules and cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention aims at a procedure for the quantitative determination of radioactivity of labelled macromolecules, viruses and cells in water suspensions by means of fluorographic methods. It is applicable to routine diagnosis in medicine and veterinary medicine as well as to studies in molecular biology and biochemistry. The procedure is characterized by fixing the labelled macromolecules as circular spots on the filter as evidenced by film blackening

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell in vitro labeling by hybrid fluorescent magnetic polymeric particles for application in cell tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supokawej, Aungkura; Nimsanor, Natakarn; Sanvoranart, Tanwarat; Kaewsaneha, Chariya; Hongeng, Suradej; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan; Jangpatarapongsa, Kulachart

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cell that contains multi-differentiation and proliferative properties and that shows high treatment implications for many clinical problems. The outcome of stem cell transplantation is still limited due to many factors, especially their survival and their interaction with the microenvironment after transplantation. Molecular imaging is a challenging technique that has been used to overcome this limitation and is based on the concept of labeling cells with tractable, visible, and non-toxic materials to track the cells after transplantation. In this study, magnetic polymeric nanoparticles (MPNPs) were used to directly label Wharton's jelly-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs). After labeling, the growth rate and the viability of the MSCs as well as the time of exposure were determined. The 3D images of WJ-MSCs labeled with MPNPs for 24 h were created using confocal microscopy. The results showed that, after incubation with fluorescent MPNPs for over 8 h, the growth rate and cell viability of the WJ-MSCs was similar to those of the control. Three-dimensional imaging revealed that the fluorescent MPNPs could infiltrate into the cells and spread into the cytoplasm, which suggests that the synthesized fluorescent MPNPs could possibly label MSCs for cell tracking study and be further developed for in vivo applications. PMID:25893425

  6. Labeling cells in microtiter plates for determination of [3H]thymidine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevach, E M

    2001-05-01

    A number of protocols in Current Protocols in Immunology use as their end-point the determination of cell proliferation by determining the incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine into cellular DNA. This appendix presents a protocol in which the radioactive label is added during the last 4 to 24 hr of the culture. A semiautomated cell harvesting apparatus is then used to lyse the cells with water and precipitate the labeled DNA on glass fiber filters. The filter pads are then dried and counted by standard liquid scintillation counting techniques in a scintillation counter. PMID:18432656

  7. Monitoring Protein Synthesis in Living Cells with Fluorescent Labeled tRNA FRET Pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Barhoom, Sima; Farrel, Ian; Dahary, Dvir; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Cooperman, Barry S.; Elroy-Stein, Orna; Smilansky, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    We introduce Protein Synthesis Monitoring (PSM) – a technique to monitor protein synthesis in live cells. In PSM, we transfect cells with tRNA labeled as FRET donors and acceptors. A FRET signal is generated only when a donor- and an acceptor-labeled tRNA come in close contact (< 7nM), as they do on the ribosome during elongation. The intensity of the FRET signal correlates with the number of ribosomes engaged in protein synthesis, providing a real-time, live-cell assay for measuring rates of...

  8. Near-infrared imaging of adoptive immune cell therapy in breast cancer model using cell membrane labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma M Youniss

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this study is to non-invasively image and assess tumor targeting and retention of directly labeled T-lymphocytes following their adoptive transfer in mice. T-lymphocytes obtained from draining lymph nodes of 4T1 (murine breast cancer cell sensitized BALB/C mice were activated in-vitro with Bryostatin/Ionomycin for 18 hours, and were grown in the presence of Interleukin-2 for 6 days. T-lymphocytes were then directly labeled with 1,1-dioctadecyltetramethyl indotricarbocyanine Iodide (DiR, a lipophilic near infrared fluorescent dye that labels the cell membrane. Assays for viability, proliferation, and function of labeled T-lymphocytes showed that they were unaffected by DiR labeling. The DiR labeled cells were injected via tail vein in mice bearing 4T1 tumors in the flank. In some cases labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes were injected a week before 4T1 tumor cell implantation. Multi-spectral in vivo fluorescence imaging was done to subtract the autofluorescence and isolate the near infrared signal carried by the T-lymphocytes. In recipient mice with established 4T1 tumors, labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes showed marked tumor retention, which peaked 6 days post infusion and persisted at the tumor site for up to 3 weeks. When 4T1 tumor cells were implanted 1-week post-infusion of labeled T-lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes responded to the immunologic challenge and accumulated at the site of 4T1 cell implantation within two hours and the signal persisted for 2 more weeks. Tumor accumulation of labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes was absent in mice bearing Meth A sarcoma tumors. When lysate of 4T1 specific labeled T-lymphocytes was injected into 4T1 tumor bearing mice the near infrared signal was not detected at the tumor site. In conclusion, our validated results confirm that the near infrared signal detected at the tumor site represents the DiR labeled 4T1 specific viable T-lymphocytes and their response to immunologic challenge

  9. Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics and N-terminal Analysis of Human Metastatic Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Hophil; Han, Dohyun; Kim, Yikwon; Cho, Jee Yeon; Jin, Jonghwa; Kim, Youngsoo

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis is helpful in identifying cancer-associated proteins that are differentially expressed and fragmented that can be annotated as dysregulated networks and pathways during metastasis. To examine meta-static process in lung cancer, we performed a proteomics study by label-free quantitative analysis and N-terminal analysis in 2 human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines with disparate metastatic potentials—NCI-H1703 (primary cell, stage I) and NCI-H1755 (metastatic cell, stage ...

  10. Rare-cell enrichment by a rapid, label-free, ultrasonic isopycnic technique for medical diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Syed, Abeer; Reboud, Julien; Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa C.; Barrett, Michael P.; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    One significant challenge in medical diagnostics lies in the development of label-free methods to separate different cells within complex biological samples. Here we demonstrate a generic, low-power ultrasonic separation technique, able to enrich different cell types based upon their physical properties. For malaria, we differentiate between infected and non-infected red blood cells in a fingerprick-sized drop of blood. We are able to achieve an enrichment of circulating cells infected by the...

  11. Rare-Cell Enrichment by a Rapid, Label-Free, Ultrasonic Isopycnic Technique for Medical Diagnostics**

    OpenAIRE

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Syed, Abeer; Reboud, Julien; Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa C.; Barrett, Michael P.; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    One significant challenge in medical diagnostics lies in the development of label-free methods to separate different cells within complex biological samples. Here we demonstrate a generic, low-power ultrasonic separation technique, able to enrich different cell types based upon their physical properties. For malaria, we differentiate between infected and non-infected red blood cells in a fingerprick-sized drop of blood. We are able to achieve an enrichment of circulating cells infected by the...

  12. Selective amine labeling of cell surface proteins guided by coiled-coil assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Yoshiaki; Furukawa, Nami; Ono, Satoshi; Takeda, Yuki; Matsuzaki, Katsumi

    2016-11-01

    Covalent labeling of target proteins in living cells is useful for both fluorescence live-cell imaging and the subsequent biochemical analyses of the proteins. Here, we report an efficient method for the amine labeling of membrane proteins on the cell surface, guided by a noncovalent coiled-coil interaction. A carboxyl sulfosuccinimidyl ester introduced at the C-terminus of the coiled-coil probe reacted with target proteins under mild labeling conditions ([probe] = 150 nM, pH 7.4, 25°C) for 20 min. Various fluorescent moieties with different hydrophobicities are available for covalent labeling with high signal/background labeling ratios. Using this method, oligomeric states of glycophorin A (GpA) were compared in mammalian CHO-K1 cells and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. In the cell membranes, no significant self-association of GpA was detected, whereas SDS-PAGE suggested partial dimerization of the proteins. Membrane cholesterol was found to be an important factor that suppressed the dimerization of GpA. Thus, the covalent functionality enables direct comparison of the oligomeric state of membrane proteins under various conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 484-490, 2016. PMID:26285787

  13. Macrophage phagocytosis alters the MRI signal of ferumoxytol-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells in cartilage defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Lenkov, Olga; Gassert, Florian; Fretwell, Deborah; Lam, Isaac; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2016-05-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are a promising tool for cartilage regeneration in arthritic joints. hMSC labeling with iron oxide nanoparticles enables non-invasive in vivo monitoring of transplanted cells in cartilage defects with MR imaging. Since graft failure leads to macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo whether nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs show distinct MR signal characteristics before and after phagocytosis by macrophages. We found that apoptotic nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were phagocytosed by macrophages while viable nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were not. Serial MRI scans of hMSC transplants in arthritic joints of recipient rats showed that the iron signal of apoptotic, nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs engulfed by macrophages disappeared faster compared to viable hMSCs. This corresponded to poor cartilage repair outcomes of the apoptotic hMSC transplants. Therefore, rapid decline of iron MRI signal at the transplant site can indicate cell death and predict incomplete defect repair weeks later. Currently, hMSC graft failure can be only diagnosed by lack of cartilage defect repair several months after cell transplantation. The described imaging signs can diagnose hMSC transplant failure more readily, which could enable timely re-interventions and avoid unnecessary follow up studies of lost transplants.

  14. flowCL: ontology-based cell population labelling in flow cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Courtot, Mélanie; Meskas, Justin; Diehl, Alexander D.; Droumeva, Radina; Gottardo, Raphael; Jalali, Adrin; Taghiyar, Mohammad Jafar; Maecker, Holden T; McCoy, J. Philip; Ruttenberg, Alan; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Brinkman, Ryan R

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Finding one or more cell populations of interest, such as those correlating to a specific disease, is critical when analysing flow cytometry data. However, labelling of cell populations is not well defined, making it difficult to integrate the output of algorithms to external knowledge sources.

  15. Discrimination of bromodeoxyuridine labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells in flow cytometric bromodeoxyuridine/DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Larsen, J K; Christensen, I J;

    1994-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells, respectively, can be discriminated from interphase cells using a new method, based on immunocytochemical staining of BrdUrd and flow cytometric four-parameter analysis of DNA content, BrdUrd incorporation, and forward and orthogona...

  16. Quantum dot labeling using positive charged peptides in human hematopoetic and mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbarvaziri, Sarah; Kiani, Sahar; Akhlaghi, Aliasghar; Vosough, Ahmad; Baharvand, Hossein; Aghdami, Nasser

    2011-08-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), as new and promising fluorescent probes, hold great potential in long term non-invasive bio-imaging, however there are many uncovered issues regarding their competency. In the present study, different QDs (525, 585 and 800 nm) were used to label CD133, CD34, CD14 and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using positively charged peptides. Results demonstrated highly efficient internalization with the possible involvement of macropinocytosis. As indicated by LDH release and the TUNEL assay, no measurable effects on cell viability were detected at a concentration of 10 nM. QDs did not have any deleterious effects on normal cell functionality where both labeled CD133(+) cells and MSCs remarkably differentiated along multiple lineages with the use of the colony forming assay and adipo/osteo induction, respectively. Our results regarding QD maintenance revealed that these nano-particles are not properly stable and various excretion times have been observed depending on particle size and cell type. In vitro co-culture system and transplantation of labeled cells to an animal model showed that QDs leaked out from labeled cells and the released nano-particles were able to re-enter adjacent cells over time. These data suggest that before any utilization of QDs in bio-imaging and related applications, an efficient intra-cellular delivery technique should be considered to preserve QDs for a prolonged time as well as eliminating their leakage. PMID:21549422

  17. Identification of miRNA targets with stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Jeppe; Hedegaard, Mads Marquardt; Gardner, Paul Phillip;

    2006-01-01

    miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression. We have used stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to investigate the effect of miRNA-1 on the HeLa cell proteome. Expression of 12 out of 504 investigated proteins was repressed by miRNA-1 transfection. This ...

  18. Liver Label Retaining Cancer Cells Are Relatively Resistant to the Reported Anti-Cancer Stem Cell Drug Metformin

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Miller, Tyler C.; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Anderson, Andrew J.; Ray, Satyajit; Mullinax, John E.; Hari, Danielle M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Godbout, Jessica D.; Goldsmith, Paul K.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Recently, we reported that liver Label Retaining Cancer Cells (LRCC) can initiate tumors with only 10 cells and are relatively resistant to the targeted drug Sorafenib, a standard of practice in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). LRCC are the only cancer stem cells (CSC) isolated alive according to a stem cell fundamental function, asymmetric cell division. Metformin has been reported to preferentially target many other types of CSC of different organs, including live...

  19. Laser capture microdissection and genetic analysis of carbon-labeled Kupffer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephan Gehring; Edmond Sabo; Maryann E San Martin; Elizabeth M Dickson; Chao-Wen Cheng; Stephen H Gregory

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To develop a method of labeling and microdissecting mouse Kupffer cells within an extraordinarily short period of time using laser capture microdissection (LCM). METHODS: Tissues are complex structures comprised of a heterogeneous population of interconnected cells. LCM offers a method of isolating a single cell type from specific regions of a tissue section. LCM is an essential approach used in conjunction with molecular analysis to study the functional interaction of cells in their native tissue environment. The process of labeling and acquiring cells by LCM prior to mRNA isolation can be elaborate, thereby subjecting the RNA to considerable degradation. Kupffer cell labeling is achieved by injecting India ink intravenously, thus circumventing the need for in vitro staining. The significance of this novel approach was validated using a cholestatic liver injury model. RESULTS: mRNA extracted from the microdissected cell population displayed marked increases in colonystimulating factor-1 receptor and Kupffer cell receptor message expression, which demonstrated Kupffer cell enrichment. Gene expression by Kupffer cells derived from bile-duct-ligated, versus sham-operated, mice was compared. Microarray analysis revealed a significant (2.5-fold, q value < 10) change in 493 genes. Based on this fold-change and a standardized PubMed search, 10 genes were identified that were relevant to the ability of Kupffer cells to suppress liver injury.CONCLUSION: The methodology outlined herein provides an approach to isolating high quality RNA from Kupffer cells, without altering the tissue integrity.

  20. In vivo phenotypic characterisation of nucleoside label-retaining cells in mouse periosteum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HM Cherry

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Periosteum is known to contain cells that, after isolation and culture-expansion, display properties of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs. However, the equivalent cells have not been identified in situ mainly due to the lack of specific markers. Postnatally, stem cells are slow-cycling, long-term nucleoside-label-retaining cells. This study aimed to identify and characterise label-retaining cells in mouse periosteum in vivo. Mice received iodo-deoxy-uridine (IdU via the drinking water for 30 days, followed by a 40-day washout period. IdU+ cells were identified by immunostaining in conjunction with MSC and lineage markers. IdU-labelled cells were detected throughout the periosteum with no apparent focal concentration, and were negative for the endothelial marker von Willebrand factor and the pan-haematopoietic marker CD45. Subsets of IdU+ cells were positive for the mesenchymal/stromal markers vimentin and cadherin-11. IdU+ cells expressed stem cell antigen-1, CD44, CD73, CD105, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α and p75, thereby displaying an MSC-like phonotype. Co-localisation was not detectable between IdU and the pericyte markers CD146, alpha smooth muscle actin or NG2, nor did IdU co-localise with β-galactosidase in a transgenic mouse expressing this reporter gene in pericytes and smooth muscle cells. Subsets of IdU+ cells expressed the osteoblast-lineage markers Runx2 and osteocalcin. The IdU+ cells expressing osteocalcin were lining the bone and were negative for the MSC marker p75. In conclusion, mouse periosteum contains nucleoside-label-retaining cells with a phenotype compatible with MSCs that are distinct from pericytes and osteoblasts. Future studies characterising the MSC niche in vivo could reveal novel therapeutic targets for promoting bone regeneration/repair.

  1. Mechanisms of cell-cell adhesion identified by immunofluorescent labelling with quantum dots: A scanning near-field optical microscopy approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) has been employed to simultaneously acquire high-resolution fluorescence images along with shear-force atomic force microscopy from cell membranes. Implementing such a technique overcomes the limits of optical diffraction found in standard fluorescence microscopy and also yields vital topographic information. The application of the technique to investigate cell-cell adhesion has revealed the interactions of filopodia and their functional relationship in establishing adherens junctions. This has been achieved via the selective tagging of the cell adhesion protein, E-cadherin, by immunofluorescence labelling. Two labelling routes were explored; Alexa Fluor 488 and semiconductor quantum dots. The quantum dots demonstrated significantly enhanced photostability and high quantum yield making them a versatile alternative to the conventional organic fluorophores often used in such a study. Analysis of individual cells revealed that E-cadherin is predominantly located along the cell periphery but is also found to extend throughout their filopodia. We have demonstrated that with a fully optimised sample preparation methodology, quantum dot labelling in conjunction with SNOM imaging can be successfully applied to interrogate biomolecular localisation within delicate cellular membranes. -- Research highlights: → Successful development of protocols for the quantum dot tagging of cell membrane proteins. → Successful implementation of scanning near-field optical microscopy to image cell membranes and accurately define the location of the tagged E-cadherin protein. → Compare and contrast data with that in the literature regarding the role of proteins in cell adhesion mechanisms. → Analysis of the data and our experimental experiences have demonstrated the practical benefits of quantum dots over Alexa 488, a conventional fluorophore. → Data highlights the various stages of cell confluency to illustrate the variation in E

  2. Canine mesenchymal stem cells are effectively labeled with silica nanoparticles and unambiguously visualized in highly autofluorescent tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Han Sei-Myoung; Lee Hee-Woo; Bhang Dong-Ha; Seo Kyoung-Won; Youn Hwa-Young

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Development of a method for long-term labeling of cells is critical to elucidate transplanted cell fate and migration as well as the contribution to tissue regeneration. Silica nanoparticles have been recently developed and demonstrated to be biocompatible with a high labeling capacity. Thus, our study was designed to assess the suitability of silica nanoparticles for labeling canine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and the fluorescence afficiency in highly autofluorescent ti...

  3. Label-free imaging of gold nanoparticles in single live cells by photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chao; Qian, Wei; Shao, Xia; Xie, Zhixing; Cheng, Xu; Liu, Shengchun; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Bing; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored as a model nanostructure in nanomedicine and have been widely used to provide advanced biomedical research tools in diagnostic imaging and therapy. Due to the necessity of targeting AuNPs to individual cells, evaluation and visualization of AuNPs in the cellular level is critical to fully understand their interaction with cellular environment. Currently imaging technologies, such as fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy all have advantages and disadvantages. In this paper, we synthesized AuNPs by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation, modified their surface chemistry through sequential bioconjugation, and targeted the functionalized AuNPs with individual cancer cells. Based on their high optical absorption contrast, we developed a novel, label-free imaging method to evaluate and visualize intracellular AuNPs using photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). Preliminary study shows that the PAM imaging technique is capable of imaging cellular uptake of AuNPs in vivo at single-cell resolution, which provide an important tool for the study of AuNPs in nanomedicine.

  4. A novel in vivo cell-wall labeling approach sheds new light on peptidoglycan synthesis in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.K. Olrichs; M.E.G. Aarsman; J. Verheul; C.J. Arnusch; N.I. Martin; M. Hervé; W. Vollmer; B. de Kruijff; E. Breukink; T. den Blaauwen

    2011-01-01

    Peptidoglycan synthesis and turnover in relation to cell growth and division has been studied by using a new labeling method. This method involves the incorporation of fluorescently labeled peptidoglycan precursors into the cell wall by means of the cell-wall recycling pathway. We show that Escheric

  5. Environmental and individual factors affecting menu labeling utilization: a qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Jennifer; Kiszko, Kamila; Abrams, Courtney; Islam, Nadia; Elbel, Brian

    2013-05-01

    Obesity is a prominent public health concern that disproportionally affects low-income and minority populations. Recent policies mandating the posting of calories on menus in fast-food chain restaurants have not proven to uniformly influence food choice. This qualitative research study used focus groups to study individual and environmental factors affecting the use of these menu labels among low-income minority populations. Ten focus groups targeting low-income residents (n=105) were held at various community organizations throughout New York City over a 9-month period in 2011. The focus groups were conducted in Spanish, English, or a combination of both languages. In late 2011 and early 2012, transcripts were coded through the process of thematic analysis using Atlas.ti for naturally emerging themes, influences, and determinants of food choice. Few participants used menu labels, despite awareness. The most frequently cited as barriers to menu label use included: price and time constraints, confusion and lack of understanding about caloric values, as well as the priority of preference, hunger, and habitual ordering habits. Based on the individual and external influences on food choice that often take priority over calorie consideration, a modified approach may be necessary to make menu labels more effective and user-friendly. PMID:23402695

  6. A novel technique for in-vitro labelling of colonic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this study was to determine a reliable method for labelling human colorectal tumour cells in order to study the movement of tumour cells in real-time during laparoscopic assisted colectomies in an animal model. The radiopharmaceutical technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) was used to radiolabel human colorectal tumour cells. The effects of temperature, incubation time and cell number were examined. Increasing incubation time and temperature showed that 99mTc-HMPAO accumulated more rapidly in cells, reaching a plateau in 15-30 minutes. Accumulation of 99mTc-HMPAO in tumour cells was lower at room temperature than at 37 deg C. 99mTc-HMPAO had the highest labelling efficiency (greater than 85%) with the largest number of cells (7x106) so that the maximum number of cells need to be used. As accumulation of 99mTc-HMPAO within the tumour cells did not greatly increase when incubation time increased from 15-30 minutes, it was concluded that optimal labelling of human colorectal tumour cells with 99mTc-HMPAO occurs at 15 minutes with incubation at 37 deg C. This cell labelling technique has been utilised in a scintigraphic model to determine the real-time movement of human colorectal tumour cells in a porcine model in vivo. This is to aid the evaluation of possible correlation between tumour recurrence at the site of the surgical scar of where the trocars were placed during the procedure via contamination of instruments used by 'spilled' tumour cells. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  7. Site of fluorescent label modifies interaction of melittin with live cells and model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamasbi, Elaheh; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D; Tailhades, Julien; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Ugalde, Cathryn L; Sharples, Robyn A; Patil, Nitin; Wade, John D; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Separovic, Frances

    2015-10-01

    The mechanism of membrane disruption by melittin (MLT) of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and live cells was studied using fluorescence microscopy and two fluorescent synthetic analogues of MLT. The N-terminus of one of these was acylated with thiopropionic acid to enable labeling with maleimido-AlexaFluor 430 to study the interaction of MLT with live cells. It was compared with a second analogue labeled at P14C. The results indicated that the fluorescent peptides adhered to the membrane bilayer of phosphatidylcholine GUVs and inserted into the plasma membrane of HeLa cells. Fluorescence and light microscopy revealed changes in cell morphology after exposure to MLT peptides and showed bleb formation in the plasma membrane of HeLa cells. However, the membrane disruptive effect was dependent upon the location of the fluorescent label on the peptide and was greater when MLT was labeled at the N-terminus. Proline at position 14 appeared to be important for antimicrobial activity, hemolysis and cytotoxicity, but not essential for cell membrane disruption. PMID:26051124

  8. Detection of apoptotic cells by selective precipitation of [3H]thymidine-labelled DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Patki, A H; Lederman, M M

    1996-01-01

    Apoptosis is characterized by systematic fragmentation of high-molecular-weight DNA into oligonucleosome fragments. A sensitive method for detection of apoptotic cells involving [3H]thymidine-labelled DNA is presented. Cells from mid-log-phase cultures were labelled with [3H]thymidine for 15 to 18 h and then exposed to gamma irradiation to induce apoptosis. A modified Hirt method was used to separate low-molecular-weight DNA from high-molecular-weight DNA. The percentage of fragmented DNA and...

  9. Label-free imaging to study phenotypic behavioural traits of cells in complex co-cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Rakesh; Smith, Gabrielle; Hazel, Kathryn E. A.; Kasprowicz, Richard; Coles, Mark; O'Toole, Peter; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2016-02-01

    Time-lapse imaging is a fundamental tool for studying cellular behaviours, however studies of primary cells in complex co-culture environments often requires fluorescent labelling and significant light exposure that can perturb their natural function over time. Here, we describe ptychographic phase imaging that permits prolonged label-free time-lapse imaging of microglia in the presence of neurons and astrocytes, which better resembles in vivo microenvironments. We demonstrate the use of ptychography as an assay to study the phenotypic behaviour of microglial cells in primary neuronal co-cultures through the addition of cyclosporine A, a potent immune-modulator.

  10. Blood loss estimation in Schistosoma incognitum by the use of 51Cr labelled red cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C42 Red blood cells labelled with 51Cr were used to study the pathophysiology of S. incognitum infection. Blood volume, cell volume, faecal blood excretion and the half life of the red cells were determined. It was shown that in rabbits infected with the blood fluke, there was loss of blood, which may result in the development of anaemia in the infected animals. (author)

  11. Cell Labeling and Targeting with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefft, Brandon J; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Harburn, J Jonathan; Klabusay, Martin; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Sandhu, Gurpreet S

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of cells and therapeutic agents would benefit a wide range of biomedical applications by concentrating the therapeutic effect at the target site while minimizing deleterious effects to off-target sites. Magnetic cell targeting is an efficient, safe, and straightforward delivery technique. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are biodegradable, biocompatible, and can be endocytosed into cells to render them responsive to magnetic fields. The synthesis process involves creating magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles followed by high-speed emulsification to form a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) coating. The PLGA-magnetite SPIONs are approximately 120 nm in diameter including the approximately 10 nm diameter magnetite core. When placed in culture medium, SPIONs are naturally endocytosed by cells and stored as small clusters within cytoplasmic endosomes. These particles impart sufficient magnetic mass to the cells to allow for targeting within magnetic fields. Numerous cell sorting and targeting applications are enabled by rendering various cell types responsive to magnetic fields. SPIONs have a variety of other biomedical applications as well including use as a medical imaging contrast agent, targeted drug or gene delivery, diagnostic assays, and generation of local hyperthermia for tumor therapy or tissue soldering. PMID:26554870

  12. A novel in vivo cell-wall labeling approach sheds new light on peptidoglycan synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olrichs, Nick K; Aarsman, Mirjam E G; Verheul, Jolanda; Arnusch, Christopher J; Martin, Nathaniel I; Hervé, Mireille; Vollmer, Waldemar; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2011-05-01

    Peptidoglycan synthesis and turnover in relation to cell growth and division has been studied by using a new labeling method. This method involves the incorporation of fluorescently labeled peptidoglycan precursors into the cell wall by means of the cell-wall recycling pathway. We show that Escherichia coli is able to import exogenous added murein tripeptide labeled with N-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl (AeK-NBD) into the cytoplasm where it enters the peptidoglycan biosynthesis route, resulting in fluorescent labels specifically located in the cell wall. When wild-type cells were grown in the presence of the fluorescent peptide, peptidoglycan was uniformly labeled in cells undergoing elongation. Cells in the process of division displayed a lack of labeled peptidoglycan at mid-cell. Analysis of labeling patterns in cell division mutants showed that the occurrence of unlabeled peptidoglycan is dependent on the presence of FtsZ, but independent of FtsQ and FtsI. Accumulation of fluorescence at the division sites of a triple amidase mutant (ΔamiABC) revealed that AeK-NBD is incorporated into septal peptidoglycan. AmiC was shown to be involved in the rapid removal of labeled peptidoglycan side chains at division sites in wild-type cells. Because septal localization of AmiC is dependent on FtsQ and FtsI, this points to the presence of another peptidoglycan hydrolase activity directly dependent on FtsZ. PMID:21472954

  13. Discrimination of bromodeoxyuridine labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells in flow cytometric bromodeoxyuridine/DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Larsen, J K; Christensen, I J;

    1994-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells, respectively, can be discriminated from interphase cells using a new method, based on immunocytochemical staining of BrdUrd and flow cytometric four-parameter analysis of DNA content, BrdUrd incorporation, and forward and orthogonal...... light scatter. The method was optimized using the human leukemia cell lines HL-60 and K-562. Samples of 10(5) ethanol-fixed cells were treated with pepsin/HCl and stained as a nuclear suspension with anti-BrdUrd antibody, FITC-conjugated secondary antibody, and propidium iodide. Labelled mitoses could...... fluorescence distribution. This interpretation was supported by experiments using mitotic arrest, fluorescence activated cell sorting and microscopy, and comparison with an alternative flow cytometric method for discrimination of mitoses....

  14. Safety and radiation risks in the labelling of blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk in the management of radioactive material and biological exposition to infectious agents. Protocols and normative to observe GOOD RADIOPHARMACY Practices. Main infectious agents that may be transmitted during preparation of a blood cell radiopharmaceutical. Problems of contamination

  15. 18F-Labeled phosphopeptide-cell-penetrating peptide dimers with enhanced cell uptake properties in human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Phosphopeptides represent interesting compounds to study and elucidate cellular protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation processes underlying various signal transduction pathways. However, studies of phosphopeptide action in cells are severely constrained by the negatively charged phosphate moiety of the phosphopeptide resulting in poor transport through the cell membrane. The following study describes the synthesis and radiopharmacological evaluation of two 18F-labeled phosphopeptide-cell-penetrating peptide dimers. The polo-like kinase-1-binding hexaphosphopeptide H-Met-Gln-Ser-pThr-Pro-Leu-OH was coupled to cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), either sC18, a cathelicidin-derived peptide, or the human calcitonin derivative hCT(18-32)-k7. Methods: Radiolabeling was accomplished with the prosthetic group N-succinimidyl 4-[18F]fluorobenzoate ([18F]SFB) using both, conventional and microfluidic-based bioconjugation of [18F]SFB to N-terminal end of phosphopeptide part of the peptide dimers. Cellular uptake studies in human cancer cell lines HT-29 and FaDu cells at 4 °C and 37 °C and small animal PET in BALB/c mice were utilized for radiopharmacological characterization. Results: Isolated radiochemical yields ranged from 2% to 4% for conventional bioconjugation with [18F]SFB. Significantly improved isolated radiochemical yields of up to 26% were achieved using microfluidic technology. Cellular uptake studies of radiolabeled phosphopeptide and phosphopeptide-CPP dimers indicate enhanced internalization of 50% ID/mg protein after 2 h for both phosphopeptide dimers compared to the phosphopeptide alone (18F-labeled peptide dimers was determined with small animal PET revealing a superior biodistribution pattern of sC18-containing peptide dimer MQSpTPL-sC18 [18F]4. Conclusion: [18F]SFB labeling of the phosphopeptide-CPP dimers using a microfluidic system leads to an improved chemoselectivity towards the N-terminal NH2 group compared to the conventional labeling

  16. Targeting aldehyde dehydrogenase: a potential approach for cell labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)], E-mail: ganesan.v@duke.edu; Song, Haijing; Affleck, Donna; McDougald, Darryl L. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Storms, Robert W. [Division of Cellular Therapy, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Zalutsky, Michael R.; Chin, Bennett B. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Introduction: To advance the science and clinical application of stem cell therapy, the availability of a highly sensitive, quantitative and translational method for tracking stem cells would be invaluable. Because hematopoetic stem cells express high levels of the cytosolic enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1), we sought to develop an agent that is specific to ALDH1 and thus to cells expressing the enzyme. Such an agent might be also helpful in identifying tumors that are resistant to cyclophosphomide chemotherapy because ALDH1 is known to be responsible for this resistance. Methods: We developed schemes for the synthesis of two radioiodinated aldehdyes - N-formylmethyl-5-[*I]iodopyridine-3-carboxamide ([*I]FMIC) and 4-diethylamino-3-[*I]iodobenzaldehyde ([*I]DEIBA)-at no-carrier-added levels from their respective tin precursors. These agents were evaluated using pure ALDH1 and tumor cells that expressed the enzyme. Results: The average radiochemical yields for the synthesis of [{sup 125}I]FMIC and [{sup 125}I]DEIBA were 70{+-}5% and 47{+-}14%, respectively. ALDH1 converted both compounds to respective acids suggesting their suitability as ALDH1 imaging agents. Although ability of ALDH1 within the cells to oxidize one of these substrates was shown, specific uptake in ALDH-expressing tumor cells could not be demonstrated. Conclusion: To pursue this approach for ALDH1 imaging, radiolabeled aldehydes need to be designed such that, in addition to being good substrates for ALDH1, the cognate products should be sufficiently polar so as to be retained within the cells.

  17. Targeting aldehyde dehydrogenase: a potential approach for cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: To advance the science and clinical application of stem cell therapy, the availability of a highly sensitive, quantitative and translational method for tracking stem cells would be invaluable. Because hematopoetic stem cells express high levels of the cytosolic enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1), we sought to develop an agent that is specific to ALDH1 and thus to cells expressing the enzyme. Such an agent might be also helpful in identifying tumors that are resistant to cyclophosphomide chemotherapy because ALDH1 is known to be responsible for this resistance. Methods: We developed schemes for the synthesis of two radioiodinated aldehdyes - N-formylmethyl-5-[*I]iodopyridine-3-carboxamide ([*I]FMIC) and 4-diethylamino-3-[*I]iodobenzaldehyde ([*I]DEIBA)-at no-carrier-added levels from their respective tin precursors. These agents were evaluated using pure ALDH1 and tumor cells that expressed the enzyme. Results: The average radiochemical yields for the synthesis of [125I]FMIC and [125I]DEIBA were 70±5% and 47±14%, respectively. ALDH1 converted both compounds to respective acids suggesting their suitability as ALDH1 imaging agents. Although ability of ALDH1 within the cells to oxidize one of these substrates was shown, specific uptake in ALDH-expressing tumor cells could not be demonstrated. Conclusion: To pursue this approach for ALDH1 imaging, radiolabeled aldehydes need to be designed such that, in addition to being good substrates for ALDH1, the cognate products should be sufficiently polar so as to be retained within the cells.

  18. Label-free measuring and mapping of binding kinetics of membrane proteins in single living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Yunze; Wang, Shaopeng; Nagaraj, Vinay J.; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Jie; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-10-01

    Membrane proteins mediate a variety of cellular responses to extracellular signals. Although membrane proteins are studied intensively for their values as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets, in situ investigation of the binding kinetics of membrane proteins with their ligands has been a challenge. Traditional approaches isolate membrane proteins and then study them ex situ, which does not reflect accurately their native structures and functions. We present a label-free plasmonic microscopy method to map the local binding kinetics of membrane proteins in their native environment. This analytical method can perform simultaneous plasmonic and fluorescence imaging, and thus make it possible to combine the strengths of both label-based and label-free techniques in one system. Using this method, we determined the distribution of membrane proteins on the surface of single cells and the local binding kinetic constants of different membrane proteins. Furthermore, we studied the polarization of the membrane proteins on the cell surface during chemotaxis.

  19. Selective Labeling of Proteins on Living Cell Membranes Using Fluorescent Nanodiamond Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Sotoma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The impeccable photostability of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs is an ideal property for use in fluorescence imaging of proteins in living cells. However, such an application requires highly specific labeling of the target proteins with FNDs. Furthermore, the surface of unmodified FNDs tends to adsorb biomolecules nonspecifically, which hinders the reliable targeting of proteins with FNDs. Here, we combined hyperbranched polyglycerol modification of FNDs with the β-lactamase-tag system to develop a strategy for selective imaging of the protein of interest in cells. The combination of these techniques enabled site-specific labeling of Interleukin-18 receptor alpha chain, a membrane receptor, with FNDs, which eventually enabled tracking of the diffusion trajectory of FND-labeled proteins on the membrane surface.

  20. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles label human bone marrow and umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Yan; Zhang De-qing; Chen Le; Wang Jian; Zhang Xue; Hou Yan; Bi Xiao-juan; Yang Rong; Hu An-hua

    2012-01-01

      BACKGROUND: Nowadays, it is becoming more and more important to optimize safety of human derived cel s, label cel s efficiently and track cel s after cel s transplantation both in basic research and clinic application. OBJECTIVE: To compare the cel viability, labeling efficiency and imaging effect of the T2* weight image (WI) magnetic resonance (MR) between the human bone marrow and umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cel s labeled with the superparamaganetic iron oxide nanoparticles, as wel as to optimize their treatment efficiency. METHODS: The third generation of human bone marrow and umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cel s were cultured, and labeled with 5-30 mg/L Feridex Ⅳ and protamine sulfate. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The viability of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cel s was similar with human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cel s (P >0.05). There was no significant difference of labeling rate between the bone marrow msenchymal stem cel s labeled with 5-30 mg/L Feridex Ⅳ(P >0.05); while there was significant difference of labeling rate between the umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cel s labeled with 5 mg/L Feridex Ⅳ and 20 and 30 mg/L Feridex Ⅳ(P <0.05); the positive labeling rate of umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cel s was lower than that of bone marrow msenchymal stem cel s after labeled with 10 mg/L FeridexⅣ(P <0.05). When two sources of cel s were labeled with Feridex Ⅳ more than 2 mg/L, the iron oxide particles were found in the cel suspension and could not be removed by elution and filtration. The signal intensity from 3.0T MR GRE T2*WI scan was decreased with the increasing of Feridex Ⅳ concentration in both cel types. It is safe and effective to label the two tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cel s with 10 mg/L Feridex Ⅳ-protamine sulfate complex, and can be observed with T2*WI MR.

  1. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with 2H, 13C and 15N in insect cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80 % can be achieved for 15N and 13C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For 2H,15N and 2H,13C,15N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73 %, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins

  2. Noninvasive and label-free determination of virus infected cells by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moor, Kamila; Ohtani, Kiyoshi; Myrzakozha, Diyas; Zhanserkenova, Orik; Andriana, Bibin. B.; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    The present study demonstrates that Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the detection of virus-infected cells. Adenovirus infection of human embryonic kidney 293 cells was successfully detected at 12, 24, and 48 h after initiating the infection. The score plot of principal component analysis discriminated the spectra of the infected cells from those of the control cells. The viral infection was confirmed by the conventional immunostaining method performed 24 h after the infection. The newly developed method provides a fast and label-free means for the detection of virus-infected cells.

  3. Quantitative Label-Free Cell Proliferation Tracking with a Versatile Electrochemical Impedance Detection Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Carminati, M; Heiskanen, Arto;

    2012-01-01

    Since the use of impedance measurements for label-free monitoring of cells has become widespread but still the choice of sensing configuration is not unique though crucial for a quantitative interpretation of data, we demonstrate the application of a novel custom multipotentiostat platform to study...... optimal detection strategies. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to monitor and compare adhesion of different cell lines. HeLa cells and 3T3 fibroblasts have been cultured for 12 hours on interdigitated electrode arrays integrated into a tailor-made cell culture platform. Both...... vertical and coplanar interdigitated sensing configuration approaches have been used and compared on the same cell populations....

  4. Immunospecific red cell binding of iodine 125-labeled immunoglobulin G erythrocyte autoantibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary interaction of autoantibodies with red cells has been studied by using labeled autoantibodies. Immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies obtained from IgG antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors were labeled with radioactive iodine and compared with alloanti-D with respect to their properties and binding behavior. Iodine 125-labeled IgG autoantibody migrated as a single homogeneous peak with the same relative mobility as human IgG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric focusing pattern of labeled autoantibodies varied from donor to donor but was similar to that of alloanti-D, consisting of multiple IgG populations with isoelectric points in the neutral to alkaline range. 125I-autoantibody bound to all human red cells of common Rh phenotypes. Evidence for immunospecific antibody binding of the labeled autoantibody was based on variation in equilibrium binding to nonhuman and human red cells of common and rare phenotypes, enhanced binding after red cell protease modification, antiglobulin reactivity of cell-bound IgG comparable to that of cell-bound anti-D, and saturation binding in autoantibody excess. Scatchard analysis of two 125I-autoantibody preparations yielded site numbers of 41,500 and 53,300 with equilibrium constants of 3.7 and 2.1 X 10(8) L X mol-1. Dog, rabbit, rhesus monkey, and baboon red cells were antigen(s) negative by quantitative adsorption studies adsorbing less than 3% of the labeled autoantibody. Reduced ability of rare human D--red blood cells to adsorb the autoantibody and identification of donor autoantibodies that bind to Rh null red blood cells indicated that eluates contained multiple antibody populations of complex specificities in contrast to anti-D, which consists of a monospecific antibody population. Another difference is that less than 70% of the autoantibody IgG was adsorbed by maximum binding red blood cells as compared with greater than 85% for alloanti-D

  5. Immunospecific red cell binding of iodine /sup 125/-labeled immunoglobulin G erythrocyte autoantibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masouredis, S.P.; Branks, M.J.; Garratty, G.; Victoria, E.J.

    1987-09-01

    The primary interaction of autoantibodies with red cells has been studied by using labeled autoantibodies. Immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies obtained from IgG antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors were labeled with radioactive iodine and compared with alloanti-D with respect to their properties and binding behavior. Iodine /sup 125/-labeled IgG autoantibody migrated as a single homogeneous peak with the same relative mobility as human IgG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric focusing pattern of labeled autoantibodies varied from donor to donor but was similar to that of alloanti-D, consisting of multiple IgG populations with isoelectric points in the neutral to alkaline range. /sup 125/I-autoantibody bound to all human red cells of common Rh phenotypes. Evidence for immunospecific antibody binding of the labeled autoantibody was based on variation in equilibrium binding to nonhuman and human red cells of common and rare phenotypes, enhanced binding after red cell protease modification, antiglobulin reactivity of cell-bound IgG comparable to that of cell-bound anti-D, and saturation binding in autoantibody excess. Scatchard analysis of two /sup 125/I-autoantibody preparations yielded site numbers of 41,500 and 53,300 with equilibrium constants of 3.7 and 2.1 X 10(8) L X mol-1. Dog, rabbit, rhesus monkey, and baboon red cells were antigen(s) negative by quantitative adsorption studies adsorbing less than 3% of the labeled autoantibody. Reduced ability of rare human D--red blood cells to adsorb the autoantibody and identification of donor autoantibodies that bind to Rh null red blood cells indicated that eluates contained multiple antibody populations of complex specificities in contrast to anti-D, which consists of a monospecific antibody population. Another difference is that less than 70% of the autoantibody IgG was adsorbed by maximum binding red blood cells as compared with greater than 85% for alloanti-D.

  6. Nestin Reporter Transgene Labels Multiple Central Nervous System Precursor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery S. Walker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic neuroepithelia and adult subventricular zone (SVZ stem and progenitor cells express nestin. We characterized a transgenic line that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP specified to neural tissue by the second intronic enhancer of the nestin promoter that had several novel features. During embryogenesis, the dorsal telencephalon contained many and the ventral telencephalon few eGFP+ cells. eGFP+ cells were found in postnatal and adult neurogenic regions. eGFP+ cells in the SVZ expressed multiple phenotype markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein, Dlx, and neuroblast-specific molecules suggesting the transgene is expressed through the lineage. eGFP+ cell numbers increased in the SVZ after cortical injury, suggesting this line will be useful in probing postinjury neurogenesis. In non-neurogenic regions, eGFP was strongly expressed in oligodendrocyte progenitors, but not in astrocytes, even when they were reactive. This eGFP+ mouse will facilitate studies of proliferative neuroepithelia and adult neurogenesis, as well as of parenchymal oligodendrocytes.

  7. Labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant tumour disease accounts for approximately one third of deaths worldwide. Gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, prostate and breast cancers are among the most frequently appearing tumours. Radiotherapy is an essential mode of treatment of all cancer patients either alone or in conjunction with other modalities like surgery and chemotherapy. In most cases radiotherapy is given using external radiation sources. It is also possible to administer radiotherapy by specifically localizing radioisotopes emitting particulate radiation in the tumour tissue. This targeted therapy has proved to have several advantages over external beam therapy, notably the possibility of selectively delivering higher radiation doses to the targeted tumour cells and treating multiple metastases. Procedures for therapy of thyroid carcinoma and hyper-thyroidism using radioiodine (131I) introduced about five decades ago, have stood the test of time and are still widely used the world over. In addition to the therapeutic nuclides of the first generation 131I, 89Sr, 32P, 90Y, etc., which are still widely utilized and accepted by the medical community, many other beta emitting radionuclides with relatively short half-lives such as 153Sm, 186Re, 188Re, 166Ho, 165Dy, etc. have also been recently made available for therapy and used with promising good results. In spite of the potential of targeted radiotherapy to treat a wide range of malignant conditions, routine clinical use is mostly confined to therapy of thyroid carcinoma, hyperthyroidism, metastatic bone pain and synovectomy. In most of the cases, the limitation is obviously not the availability of suitable radionuclides but rather the lack of suitable carrier molecules that would adequately concentrate these radionuclides in target tissues of interest. Based on the above considerations, the scope of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) has focused on the synthesis of the required BFCAs for MoAbs and peptide labelling, development and

  8. Differential phospholipid-labeling suggests two subtypes of phospholipase D in rat Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, L.; Hansen, Harald S.

    1995-01-01

    Cho). The [H] phosphatidylethanol formation in response to 4ß-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), sphingosine, or Ca-ionophore A23187, was lower when Leydig cells were labeled with 1-O-[H]alkyl lysoPtdCho compared with the responses when [H]myristic acid was employed. In contrast, the results...

  9. Use of indium-111-labeled white blood cells in the diagnosis of diabetic foot infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of bone infection in the patient with nonvirgin bone is a diagnostic dilemma. This is especially true in the diabetic patient with a soft tissue infection and an underlying osteoarthropathy. The authors present a retrospective study using the new scintigraphic technique of indium-111-labeled white blood cells as a method of attempting to solve this diagnostic dilemma

  10. Nutrient depletion and metabolic profiles in breast carcinoma cell lines measured with a label-free platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmel, F; Brischwein, M; Wolf, P; Huber, F; Pfister, C; Wolf, B

    2015-07-01

    The response of two well-characterized human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) to a series of nutrient deficiencies is investigated with a label-free cell assay platform. The motivation of the research is to analyze adaptive responses of tumor cell metabolism and to find limiting conditions for cell survival. The platform measures extracellular values of pH and dissolved oxygen saturation to provide data of extracellular acidification rates and oxygen uptake rates. Additional electric cell substrate impedance sensing and bright-field cell imaging supports the data interpretation by providing information about cell morphological parameters. A sequential administration of nutrient depletions does not cause metabolic reprogramming, since the ratios of oxygen uptake to acidification return to their basal values. While the extracellular acidification drops sharply upon reduction of glucose and glutamine, the oxygen uptake is not affected. In contrast to other published data, cell death is not observed when both glucose and glutamine are depleted and cell proliferation is not inhibited, at least in MCF-7 cultures. It is assumed that residual concentrations of nutrients from the serum component are able to maintain cell viability when delivered regularly by active flow like in the cell assay platform, and, in a similar way, under physiological conditions. PMID:26015442

  11. Label-free quantitative proteomics of CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Sheng-Ta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells, which are characterized by their resistance to conventional chemotherapy and their tumor initiation ability at limited dilutions, have been recognized as a critical target in liver cancer therapeutics. In the current work, we developed a label-free quantitative method to investigate the proteome of CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells for the purpose of identifying unique biomarkers that can be utilized for targeting liver cancer stem cells. Label-free quantitation was performed in combination with ID-based Elution time Alignment by Linear regression Quantitation (IDEAL-Q and MaxQuant. Results Initially, IDEAL-Q analysis revealed that 151 proteins were differentially expressed in the CD133-positive hepatoma cells when compared with CD133-negative cells. We then analyzed these 151 differentially expressed proteins by MaxQuant software and identified 10 significantly up-regulated proteins. The results were further validated by RT-PCR, western blot, flow cytometry or immunofluorescent staining which revealed that prominin-1, annexin A1, annexin A3, transgelin, creatine kinase B, vimentin, and EpCAM were indeed highly expressed in the CD133-positive hepatoma cells. Conclusions These findings confirmed that mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitative proteomics can be used to gain insights into liver cancer stem cells.

  12. Magnetic Decoration and Labeling of Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafařík, Ivo; Maděrová, Zdeňka; Pospišková, K.; Horská, Kateřina; Šafaříková, Miroslava

    Cambridge: Royal society of chemistry, 2014 - (Fakhrullin, R.; Choi, I.; Lvov, Y.), s. 185-215 ISBN 978-1-84973-902-3 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13023; GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/2263 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : eukaryotic cells * nanoparticles * microparticles * organic and inorganic xenobiotics Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of single co-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells after intracardial injection in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to establish co-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for the detection of single MSC in-vivo by MRI and histological validation. Materials and Methods: Mouse MSC were co-labeled with fluorescent iron oxide micro-particles and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE). The cellular iron content was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Cell proliferation and expression of characteristic surface markers were determined by flow cytometry. The chondrogenic differentiation capacity was assessed. Different amounts of cells (n1 = 5000, n2 = 15 000, n3 = 50 000) were injected into the left heart ventricle of 12 mice. The animals underwent sequential MRI on a clinical 3.0T scanner (Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands). For histological validation cryosections were examined by fluorescent microscopy. Results: Magnetic and fluorescent labeling of MSC was established (mean cellular iron content 23.6 ± 3 pg). Flow cytometry showed similar cell proliferation and receptor expression of labeled and unlabeled MSC. Chondrogenic differentiation of labeled MSC was verified. After cell injection MRI revealed multiple signal voids in the brain and fewer signal voids in the kidneys. In the brain, an average of 4.6 ± 1.2 (n1), 9.0 ± 3.6 (n2) and 25.0 ± 1.0 (n3) signal voids were detected per MRI slice. An average of 8.7 ± 3.1 (n1), 22.0 ± 6.1 (n2) and 89.8 ± 6.5 (n3) labeled cells per corresponding stack of adjacent cryosections could be detected in the brain. Statistical correlation of the numbers of MRI signal voids in the brain and single MSC found by histology revealed a correlation coefficient of r = 0.91. Conclusion: The study demonstrates efficient magnetic and fluorescent co-labeling of MSC and their detection on a single cell level in mice by in-vivo MRI and histology. The described techniques may broaden the methods for in-vivo tracking of MSC. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of single co-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells after intracardial injection in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, J.; Adam, G.; Peldschus, K. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Wicklein, D.; Schumacher, U. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. of Anatomy II: Experimental Morphology; Didie, M. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Pharmacology; Lange, C. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Bone Marrow Transplantation

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to establish co-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for the detection of single MSC in-vivo by MRI and histological validation. Materials and Methods: Mouse MSC were co-labeled with fluorescent iron oxide micro-particles and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE). The cellular iron content was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Cell proliferation and expression of characteristic surface markers were determined by flow cytometry. The chondrogenic differentiation capacity was assessed. Different amounts of cells (n1 = 5000, n2 = 15 000, n3 = 50 000) were injected into the left heart ventricle of 12 mice. The animals underwent sequential MRI on a clinical 3.0T scanner (Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands). For histological validation cryosections were examined by fluorescent microscopy. Results: Magnetic and fluorescent labeling of MSC was established (mean cellular iron content 23.6 ± 3 pg). Flow cytometry showed similar cell proliferation and receptor expression of labeled and unlabeled MSC. Chondrogenic differentiation of labeled MSC was verified. After cell injection MRI revealed multiple signal voids in the brain and fewer signal voids in the kidneys. In the brain, an average of 4.6 ± 1.2 (n1), 9.0 ± 3.6 (n2) and 25.0 ± 1.0 (n3) signal voids were detected per MRI slice. An average of 8.7 ± 3.1 (n1), 22.0 ± 6.1 (n2) and 89.8 ± 6.5 (n3) labeled cells per corresponding stack of adjacent cryosections could be detected in the brain. Statistical correlation of the numbers of MRI signal voids in the brain and single MSC found by histology revealed a correlation coefficient of r = 0.91. Conclusion: The study demonstrates efficient magnetic and fluorescent co-labeling of MSC and their detection on a single cell level in mice by in-vivo MRI and histology. The described techniques may broaden the methods for in-vivo tracking of MSC. (orig.)

  15. Novel positively charged nanoparticle labeling for in vivo imaging of adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yukawa

    Full Text Available Stem cell transplantation has been expected to have various applications for regenerative medicine. However, in order to detect and trace the transplanted stem cells in the body, non-invasive and widely clinically available cell imaging technologies are required. In this paper, we focused on magnetic resonance (MR imaging technology, and investigated whether the trimethylamino dextran-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle -03 (TMADM-03, which was newly developed by our group, could be used for labeling adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs as a contrast agent. No cytotoxicity was observed in ASCs transduced with less than 100 µg-Fe/mL of TMADM-03 after a one hour transduction time. The transduction efficiency of TMADM-03 into ASCs was about four-fold more efficient than that of the alkali-treated dextran-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (ATDM, which is a major component of commercially available contrast agents such as ferucarbotran (Resovist, and the level of labeling was maintained for at least two weeks. In addition, the differentiation ability of ASCs labeled with TMADM-03 and their ability to produce cytokines such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, were confirmed to be maintained. The ASCs labeled with TMADM-03 were transplanted into the left kidney capsule of a mouse. The labeled ASCs could be imaged with good contrast using a 1T MR imaging system. These data suggest that TMADM-03 can therefore be utilized as a contrast agent for the MR imaging of stem cells.

  16. Radionuclide imaging of primary renal-cell carcinoma by I-131-labeled antitumor antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A goat antibody against human renal-cell carcinoma reacted on immunofluorescence with renal-cell carcinomas from 20 patients, but not with normal adult human tissues, including kidney. After i.v. administration the I-131-linked antibody showed preferential tumor localization in six of seven patients with primary renal carcinoma. Labeled antitumor antibodies may have the specificity for tumor imaging that current radiopharmaceuticals lack

  17. Kinetics of cell labeling and thymidine replacement after continuous infusion of halogenated pyrimidines in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, R.; Ritter, M.A.; Fowler, J.F.; Kinsella, T.J. (Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States))

    1994-04-30

    The authors present experiments on an in vivo human tumor xenograft continuously exposed to a fixed serum concentration of halogenated pyrimidines so as to study the kinetics of cell labeling and thymidine replacement. Human colon tumor (HCT-116) cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. After 10 days, most animals (>90%) developed measurable tumor nodules with a volume doubling time of 5 [+-] 1 days. Once the tumors reached a cross-sectional area of 0.25-0.30 cm[sup 2], miniosmotic pumps were implanted to deliver a dose of 100 mg/kg/day of IdUrd (iododeoxyuridine) by continuous infusion. After an IdUrd exposure time of 1-7 days, blood and tumor tissue were collected. The steady state serum IdUrd concentration was 0.95 [+-] 0.1 [mu]M, which is a clinically relevant concentration for a prolonged continuous intravenous infusion. The tumor cell potential doubling time (T[sub pot]) was 25. The percent IdUrd thymidine replacement and the fraction of cells labeled followed exponential saturation kinetics with a halflife of 33 and 27 h, respectively. After 5 days of exposure, the thymidine replacement in tumor cells was 2.0% and the fraction of tumor cells labeled was 94%. Immunohistochemical staining of IdUrd labeled tumor tissues showed an exposure-dependent gradient of cellular labeling that was initially highest in regions close to blood vessels. After 4 days of exposure at 100 mg/kg/day, there was an increase in the fraction of cells in G[sub 0] + G[sub 1] and a decrease in the S phase population, suggesting a block between G[sub 1] and S phase. They conclude that the in vivo kinetics of IdUrd thymidine replacement and fraction of cells labeled after continuous exposure followed exponential saturation kinetics with a halflife of approximately the potential doubling time of the tumor cell population. Some form of prolonged, or briefly interrupted, continuous infusion should be considered for clinical administration. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Label-free classification of cultured cells through diffraction imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Ke; Feng, Yuanming; Jacobs, Kenneth M.; Lu, Jun Q.; Brock, R. Scott; Yang, Li V.; Bertrand, Fred E.; Farwell, Mary A.; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Automated classification of biological cells according to their 3D morphology is highly desired in a flow cytometer setting. We have investigated this possibility experimentally and numerically using a diffraction imaging approach. A fast image analysis software based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) algorithm has been developed to extract feature parameters from measured diffraction images. The results of GLCM analysis and subsequent classification demonstrate the potential for ...

  19. Label-free haemogram using wavelength modulated Raman spectroscopy for identifying immune-cell subset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Praveen C.; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Campbell, Elaine C.; Dholakia, Kishan; Powis, Simon J.

    2014-03-01

    Leucocytes in the blood of mammals form a powerful protective system against a wide range of dangerous pathogens. There are several types of immune cells that has specific role in the whole immune system. The number and type of immune cells alter in the disease state and identifying the type of immune cell provides information about a person's state of health. There are several immune cell subsets that are essentially morphologically identical and require external labeling to enable discrimination. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using Wavelength Modulated Raman Spectroscopy (WMRS) with suitable machine learning algorithms as a label-free method to distinguish between different closely lying immune cell subset. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed on WMRS data from single cells, obtained using confocal Raman microscopy for feature reduction, followed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) for binary discrimination of various cell subset, which yielded an accuracy >85%. The method was successful in discriminating between untouched and unfixed purified populations of CD4+CD3+ and CD8+CD3+ T lymphocyte subsets, and CD56+CD3- natural killer cells with a high degree of specificity. It was also proved sensitive enough to identify unique Raman signatures that allow clear discrimination between dendritic cell subsets, comprising CD303+CD45+ plasmacytoid and CD1c+CD141+ myeloid dendritic cells. The results of this study clearly show that WMRS is highly sensitive and can distinguish between cell types that are morphologically identical.

  20. A Selective and Purification-Free Strategy for Labeling Adherent Cells with Inorganic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Lim, Jing; Yeo, David Chen Loong; Liao, Shanshan; Lans, Malin; Wang, Yaqi; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Goh, Bee Tin; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-03-16

    Cellular labeling with inorganic nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, quantum dots, and fluorescent silica nanoparticles is an important method for the noninvasive visualization of cells using various imaging modalities. Currently, this is mainly achieved through the incubation of cultured cells with the nanoparticles that eventually reach the intracellular compartment through specific or nonspecific internalization. This classic method is advantageous in terms of simplicity and convenience, but it suffers from issues such as difficulties in fully removing free nanoparticles (suspended in solution) and the lack of selectivity on cell types. This article reports an innovative strategy for the specific labeling of adherent cells without the concern of freely suspended nanoparticles. This method relies on a nanocomposite film that is prepared by homogeneously dispersing nanoparticles within a biodegradable polymeric film. When adherent cells are seeded on the film, they adhere, spread, and filtrate into the film through the micropores formed during the film fabrication. The pre-embedded nanoparticles are thus internalized by the cells during this infiltration process. As an example, fluorescent silica nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed within a polycaprolactone film by utilizing cryomilling and heat pressing. Upon incubation within physiological buffer, no silica nanoparticles were released from the nanocomposite film even after 20 d of incubation. However, when adherent cells (e.g., human mesenchymal stem cells) were grown on the film, they became fluorescent after 3 d, which suggests internalization of silica nanoparticles by cells. In comparison, the suspension cells (e.g., monocytes) in the medium remained nonfluorescent no matter whether there was the presence of adherent cells or not. This strategy eventually allowed the selective and concomitant labeling of mesenchymal stem cells during their harvest from bone marrow aspiration

  1. Effect of Tc99m Labeling on The Survival Rate of Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabari F

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Human dental pulp stem cells have substantial proliferative and differentiation potential. The isolated stem cells or progenitor cells of the pulp can differentiate into odontoblasts or /and osteoblast-like cells and aid in repair as well as reconstruction of tooth structure. Several ways have been introduced for isolation and tracing of these cells. The aim of this study was to isolate mesenchymal stem cells from deciduous dental pulps as well as labeling them with Technetium (Tc99m to investigate the effect of Tc labeling on the survival rate of stem cells. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, exfoliated deciduous teeth of 6-11 year old children without any history of systemic disease were collected. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic methods were used to expedite cell isolation and isolated cells (10000 from dental pulp were mixed with 25 millicurie of Tc for tracing purposes. Individual cell activity as well as culture medium activation was evaluated separately afterwards. Data was analyzed using ANOVA statistical test. Results: Isolated dental pulp cells formed single cell derived colonies which showed fibroblast-like growth with solo cloning morphology. Specific staining of the cells indicated them to be stem cells and confirmed their differentiation into bone and fat. Moreover, Technetium significantly decreased the activity of cells. The survival rates of the cells in the period of 1,3,6,24,48 hours were reported to be 95.5%, 85.5%, 77.4%, 68.4%, and 57.3% respectively. Conclusion: The dental pulp stem cells have a significant capacity to differentiate into bone and fat. Tracing the cells with Tc M99 will reduce their survival rate over time.

  2. Label-free measurements on cell apoptosis using a terahertz metamaterial-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caihong; Liang, Lanju; Ding, Liang; Jin, Biaobing; Hou, Yayi; Li, Chun; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Weiwei; Hu, Wei; Lu, Yanqing; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2016-06-01

    Label-free, real-time, and in-situ measurement on cell apoptosis is highly desirable in cell biology. We propose here a design of terahertz (THz) metamaterial-based biosensor for meeting this requirement. This metamaterial consists of a planar array of five concentric subwavelength gold ring resonators on a 10 μm-thick polyimide substrate, which can sense the change of dielectric environment above the metamaterial. We employ this sensor to an oral cancer cell (SCC4) with and without cisplatin, a chemotherapy drug for cancer treatment, and find a linear relation between cell apoptosis measured by Flow Cytometry and the relative change of resonant frequencies of the metamaterial measured by THz time-domain spectroscopy. This implies that we can determine the cell apoptosis in a label-free manner. We believe that this metamaterial-based biosensor can be developed into a cheap, label-free, real-time, and in-situ detection tool, which is of significant impact on the study of cell biology.

  3. Label-free detection of anticancer drug paclitaxel in living cells by confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, H.; Derely, L.; Vegh, A.-G.; Durand, J.-C.; Gergely, C.; Larroque, C.; Fauroux, M.-A.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2013-03-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label-free, and high spatial resolution imaging technique is employed to trace the anticancer drug paclitaxel in living Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. The Raman images were treated by K-mean cluster analysis to detect the drug in cells. Distribution of paclitaxel in cells is verified by calculating the correlation coefficient between the reference spectrum of the drug and the whole Raman image spectra. A time dependent gradual diffusion of paclitaxel all over the cell is observed suggesting a complementary picture of the pharmaceutical action of this drug based on rapid binding of free tubulin to crystallized paclitaxel.

  4. Fuel Cell Applied Research Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Richardson

    2006-09-15

    Since November 12, 2003, Northern Alberta Institute of Technology has been operating a 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cell to provide electrical and thermal energy to its campus. The project was made possible by funding from the U.S. Department of Energy as well as by a partnership with the provincial Alberta Energy Research Institute; a private-public partnership, Climate Change Central; the federal Ministry of Western Economic Development; and local natural gas supplier, ATCO Gas. Operation of the fuel cell has contributed to reducing NAIT's carbon dioxide emissions through its efficient use of natural gas.

  5. Kinetics of indium-111-labeled leukemic cells in patients with acute non-lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of autologous leukemic cells labeled with In-111 oxine were studied in 5 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and one patient with acute premyelocytic leukemia (APL), and kinetics of OKM1 monoclonal antibody-treated leukemic cells were studied in one patient with acute monoblastic leukemia (AMoL). Recoveries of 33.7 +- 23.3%(range, 22.0 to 48.1%) were achieved at 10min after injection of In-111 oxine labeled leukemic cells in AML and APL patients. However, in a patient with AMoL recovery of 12.3% was only achieved at 10min after injection of OKM1-treated leukemic cells. Clearance of the activity from blood was rapid up to one in all patients. The clearance curve of the activity in 5 AML patients showed a hump or a plateau from one to 5hr after injection of labeled leukemic cells. In APL patient and AMoL patient, however, this hump or plateau was not noted. In AML and APL patients the activity over the spleen was higher than that of over the liver at from 30min to 3hr after and showed a plateau or gradual rising thereafter. In a patient with AMoL, the hepatic activity was higher than the splenic activity at 30min after, but thereafter the latter became higher than the former. Liver activity curves showed transient fall at 3hr after and then gradual uprising in all patients. In a patient with APL, high activity was noted over the kidneys. This rose to a maximum after 3hr and then decreased rapidly. Since In-111 oxine stays firmly attached to the cells in spite of the possibility of radiation damage in a long-term survey, it seems an ideal label for studying leukemic cell kinetics

  6. The use of dopamine-hyaluronate associate-coated maghemite nanoparticles to label cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babic M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Michal Babic1,2, Daniel Horak1,2, Pavla Jendelova2,3, Vit Herynek2,4, Vladimir Proks1,2, Vaclav Vanecek2,3, Petr Lesny2,3, Eva Sykova2,31Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Sq 2, 2Center for Cell Therapy and Tissue Repair, Charles University, V Uvalu 84, 3Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Videnska 1083, 4Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Videnska 1958, Prague, Czech RepublicAbstract: Sodium hyaluronate (HA was associated with dopamine (DPA and introduced as a coating for maghemite (γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles obtained by the coprecipitation of iron(II and iron(III chlorides and oxidation with sodium hypochlorite. The effects of the DPA anchorage of HA on the γ-Fe2O3 surface on the physicochemical properties of the resulting colloids were investigated. Nanoparticles coated at three different DPA-HA/γ-Fe2O3 and DPA/HA ratios were chosen for experiments with rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and human chondrocytes. The nanoparticles were internalized into rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via endocytosis as confirmed by Prussian Blue staining. The efficiency of mesenchymal stem cell labeling was analyzed. From among the investigated samples, efficient cell labeling was achieved by using DPA-HA-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with DPA-HA/γ-Fe2O3 = 0.45 (weight/weight and DPA/HA = 0.038 (weight/weight ratios. The particles were used as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging for the labeling and visualization of cells.Keywords: nanoparticles, dopamine, hyaluronate, cell labeling, magnetic

  7. Comparison between 125IUdR and 51Cr as cell labels in investigations of tumor cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, P; Hokland, P; Hokland, M

    1991-01-01

    YAC-1 tumor cells double-labeled with Na2[51Cr]O4 [51Cr] and [125I]iododeoxyuridine [125IUdR] were injected intravenously into Balb/c mice in order to investigate their migration and fate 0-4 h after the injection. Whereas the clearance of tumor cells from the lung tissue was similar as judged with...... overestimation of the number of viable tumor cells in these organs. Moreover, a marked spontaneous release (greater than 10% after 12 h) makes 51Cr less suitable as a cell label than 125IUdR. On the other hand, we found that the release of 125I from dead cells in vivo depends at least partially on host factors...... such as macrophages. Consequently, caution must be exerted when tumor cell migration is investigated in animals treated with drugs that might affect the reticuloendothelial system. We conclude that 125IUdR is superior to 51Cr as a cell label for investigation of tumor cell migration in vivo, even...

  8. Label-free recognition of drug resistance via impedimetric screening of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Eker

    Full Text Available We present a novel study on label-free recognition and distinction of drug resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7 DOX from their parental cells (MCF-7 WT via impedimetric measurements. Drug resistant cells exhibited significant differences in their dielectric properties compared to wild-type cells, exerting much higher extracellular resistance (Rextra . Immunostaining revealed that MCF-7 DOX cells gained a much denser F-actin network upon acquiring drug resistance indicating that remodeling of actin cytoskeleton is probably the reason behind higher Rextra , providing stronger cell architecture. Moreover, having exposed both cell types to doxorubicin, we were able to distinguish these two phenotypes based on their substantially different drug response. Interestingly, impedimetric measurements identified a concentration-dependent and reversible increase in cell stiffness in the presence of low non-lethal drug doses. Combined with a profound frequency analysis, these findings enabled distinguishing distinct cellular responses during drug exposure within four concentration ranges without using any labeling. Overall, this study highlights the possibility to differentiate drug resistant phenotypes from their parental cells and to assess their drug response by using microelectrodes, offering direct, real-time and noninvasive measurements of cell dependent parameters under drug exposure, hence providing a promising step for personalized medicine applications such as evaluation of the disease progress and optimization of the drug treatment of a patient during chemotherapy.

  9. The effect of the state of differentiation on labeling of epidermal cell surface glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal cells were grown in a medium in which the Ca++ concentration controlled the stage of differentiation. Cell surface molecules of differentiated and undifferentiated cells were compared by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination, by the interaction with 125I-lectins, and by the metabolic incorporation of L-(3H)-fucose. Molecular weights of the labeled components were determined by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. After lactoperoxidase iodination, most of the radioactivity was found in polypeptide bands of 79,000, 65,000 and 56,000 daltons. The 79,000 band is the most intense for undifferentiated cells but disappears as differentiation proceeds. The 56,000 band is present in normal cells at all stages of differentiation but is absent from neoplastic cells. Glycoproteins reacted with 125I-lectins were found at 180,000, 130,000 and 85,000 daltons. The 130,000 band was the most prominent for differentiated cells labeled with wheat germ agglutinin but was essentially absent from the undifferentiated cells. With Ricinus communis agglutinin, this band was weaker for undifferentiated than for differentiated cells but was the most intense for both. After metabolic incorporation of tritiated fucose, radioactive glycoproteins were found at 130,000 and 85,000 daltons, with comparable intensities for differentiated and undifferentiated cells

  10. A review of European research on consumer response to nutrition information on food labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Wills, Josephine M.

    2007-01-01

    with an earlier review by Cowburn and Stockley (Public Health Nutr 8:21-28, 2005), covering research up to 2002, but provide new insights into consumer liking and understanding of simplified front of pack signposting formats. There is an urgent need for more research studying consumer use of nutritional......The aim of this study was to review research conducted in 2003-2006 in the EU-15 countries on how consumers perceive, understand, like and use nutrition information on food labels. Based on a search of databases on academic publications, Google-based search, and enquiries directed to a range...... of food retailers, food companies, consumer associations and government agencies, a total of 58 studies were identified. These studies were summarised using a standard format guided by a model of consumer information processing, and these summaries were subsequently processed using the MAXqda software...

  11. Cellular penetration and nuclear importation properties of 111In-labeled and 123I-labeled HIV-1 tat peptide immunoconjugates in BT-474 human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Our objective was to compare the cell penetration and nuclear importation properties of 111In-labeled and 123I-labeled immunoconjugates (ICs) composed of 16-mer peptides (GRKKRRQRRRPPQGYG) derived from HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (tat) protein and anti-mouse IgG (mIgG) in BT-474 breast cancer (BC) cells. Methods: [111In]tat ICs were constructed by site-specific conjugation of tat peptides to NaIO4--oxidized carbohydrates in the Fc domain of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic-acid-modified anti-mIgG antibodies. Immunoreactivity against mIgG was assessed in a competition assay. The kinetics of the accumulation of [111In]anti-mIgG-tat IC and [123I]anti-mIgG-tat ICs in BT-474 cells and the elimination of radioactivity from cells, cytoplasm or nuclei were determined. The effects of excess tat peptides or NH4Cl (an inhibitor of endosomal acidification) on cellular uptake and nuclear importation of [111In]anti-mIgG-tat were measured. Results: [111In]anti-mIgG-tat was >97% radiochemically pure and exhibited preserved immunoreactivity with mIgG epitopes. [123I]Anti-mIgG-tat penetrated BT-474 cells more rapidly than [111In]anti-mIgG-tat ICs and achieved a 1.5-fold to a 2-fold higher uptake in cells and nuclei. Cell penetration and nuclear uptake of [111In]anti-mIgG-tat were inhibited by excess tat peptides and NH4Cl. Elimination of radioactivity from BT-474 cells and nuclei was more rapid and complete for 123I-labeled than for 111In-labeled anti-mIgG-tat ICs. Conclusion: Tat peptides derived from HIV-1 tat protein promoted the penetration and nuclear uptake of radioactivity following the incubation of 111In-labeled and 123I-labeled anti-mIgG antibodies with BT-474 human BC cells. 111In-labeled tat ICs are feasible for inserting radionuclides into cancer cells with potential for targeting intracellular and, particularly, nuclear epitopes for imaging and/or radiotherapeutic applications

  12. Genetically-directed, cell type-specific sparse labeling for the analysis of neuronal morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rotolo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In mammals, genetically-directed cell labeling technologies have not yet been applied to the morphologic analysis of neurons with very large and complex arbors, an application that requires extremely sparse labeling and that is only rendered practical by limiting the labeled population to one or a few predetermined neuronal subtypes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present study we have addressed this application by using CreER technology to non-invasively label very small numbers of neurons so that their morphologies can be fully visualized. Four lines of IRES-CreER knock-in mice were constructed to permit labeling selectively in cholinergic or catecholaminergic neurons [choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-IRES-CreER or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-IRES-CreER], predominantly in projection neurons [neurofilament light chain (NFL-IRES-CreER], or broadly in neurons and some glia [vesicle-associated membrane protein2 (VAMP2-IRES-CreER]. When crossed to the Z/AP reporter and exposed to 4-hydroxytamoxifen in the early postnatal period, the number of neurons expressing the human placental alkaline phosphatase reporter can be reproducibly lowered to fewer than 50 per brain. Sparse Cre-mediated recombination in ChAT-IRES-CreER;Z/AP mice shows the full axonal and dendritic arbors of individual forebrain cholinergic neurons, the first time that the complete morphologies of these very large neurons have been revealed in any species. CONCLUSIONS: Sparse genetically-directed, cell type-specific neuronal labeling with IRES-creER lines should prove useful for studying a wide variety of questions in neuronal development and disease.

  13. Electrostatically Stabilized Magnetic Nanoparticles – An Optimized Protocol to Label Murine T Cells for in vivo MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerfel, Eva; Smyth, Maureen; Millward, Jason M.; Schellenberger, Eyk; Glumm, Jana; Prozorovski, Timour; Aktas, Orhan; Schulze-Topphoff, Ulf; Schnorr, Jörg; Wagner, Susanne; Taupitz, Matthias; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Wuerfel, Jens

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel highly efficient protocol to magnetically label T cells applying electrostatically stabilized very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP). Our long-term aim is to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate T cell dynamics in vivo during the course of neuroinflammatory disorders such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Encephalitogenic T cells were co-incubated with VSOP, or with protamine-complexed VSOP (VProt), respectively, at different conditions, optimizing concentrations and incubation times. Labeling efficacy was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry as well as histologically, and evaluated on a 7 T MR system. Furthermore, we investigated possible alterations of T cell physiology caused by the labeling procedure. T cell co-incubation with VSOP resulted in an efficient cellular iron uptake. T2 times of labeled cells dropped significantly, resulting in prominent hypointensity on T2*-weighted scans. Optimal labeling efficacy was achieved by VProt (1 mM Fe/ml, 8 h incubation; T2 time shortening of ∼80% compared to untreated cells). Although VSOP promoted T cell proliferation and altered the ratio of T cell subpopulations toward a CD4+ phenotype, no effects on CD4 T cell proliferation or phenotypic stability were observed by labeling in vitro differentiated Th17 cells with VProt. Yet, high concentrations of intracellular iron oxide might induce alterations in T cell function, which should be considered in cell tagging studies. Moreover, we demonstrated that labeling of encephalitogenic T cells did not affect pathogenicity; labeled T cells were still capable of inducing EAE in susceptible recipient mice. PMID:22203815

  14. Fluorophore-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticle labeling and analysis of engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxwell, Dustin J; Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A;

    2008-01-01

    The use of nanometer-sized iron oxide particles combined with molecular imaging techniques enables dynamic studies of homing and trafficking of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Identifying clinically applicable strategies for loading nanoparticles into primitive HSC requires strictly defined...... culture conditions to maintain viability without inducing terminal differentiation. In the current study, fluorescent molecules were covalently linked to dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (Feridex) to characterize human HSC labeling to monitor the engraftment process. Conjugating fluorophores to the...... vivo. Transplantation of purified primary human cord blood lineage-depleted and CD34(+) cells into immunodeficient mice allowed detection of labeled human HSC in the recipient bones. Flow cytometry was used to precisely quantitate the cell populations that had sequestered the nanoparticles and to...

  15. In vitro preparation of radionuclides labeled blood cells: Status and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labelled blood cells permit nuclear medicine imaging using their physiological behaviours. The radiolabeling must be performed in vitro because of the lack of specific markers and requires several highly technical stages of preparation. Labelled blood cells have not the medication drug status, so that the nuclear physician conducting the nuclear test is fully liable. In most cases, the physician delegates the technical responsibility to radio-pharmacists. Although the status of radiolabelled autologous cells is not legally defined and in the absence of a specific repository, it is essential that their preparation is subject to the requirements of the rules of French Good Manufacturing Practice published by Agence francaise de securite sanitaire des produits de sante (Afssaps). It would be desirable to harmonize the practices of radiolabeling cellular blood components by editing a repository. (authors)

  16. Canine mesenchymal stem cells are effectively labeled with silica nanoparticles and unambiguously visualized in highly autofluorescent tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Sei-Myoung

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of a method for long-term labeling of cells is critical to elucidate transplanted cell fate and migration as well as the contribution to tissue regeneration. Silica nanoparticles have been recently developed and demonstrated to be biocompatible with a high labeling capacity. Thus, our study was designed to assess the suitability of silica nanoparticles for labeling canine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and the fluorescence afficiency in highly autofluorescent tissue. Results We examined the effect of silica nanoparticle labeling on stem cell morphology, viability and differentiation as compared with those of unlabeled control cells. After 4 h of incubation with silica nanoparticles, they were internalized by canine MSCs without a change in the morphology of cells compared with that of control cells. The viability and proliferation of MSCs labeled with silica nanoparticles were evaluated by a WST-1 assay and trypan blue exclusion. No effects on cell viability were observed, and the proliferation of canine MSCs was not inhibited during culture with silica nanoparticles. Furthermore, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of silica nanoparticle-labeled canine MSCs was at a similar level compared with that of unlabeled cells, indicating that silica nanoparticle labeling did not alter the differentiation capacity of canine MSCs. Silica nanoparticle-labeled canine MSCs were injected into the kidneys of BALB/c mice after celiotomy, and then the mice were sacrificed after 2 or 3 weeks. The localization of injected MSCs was closely examined in highly autofluorescent renal tissues. Histologically, canine MSCs were uniformly and completely labeled with silica nanoparticles, and were unambiguously imaged in histological sections. Conclusions The results of the current study showed that silica nanoparticles are useful as an effective labeling marker for MSCs, which can elucidate the distribution and fate of transplanted

  17. Self-Assembled Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoclusters for Universal Cell Labeling and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuzhen; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Shengwei; Lin, Gan; Luo, Bing; Yao, Huan; Lin, Yuchun; He, Chengyong; Liu, Gang; Lin, Zhongning

    2016-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have been widely used in a variety of biomedical applications, especially as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cell labeling. In this study, SPIO nanoparticles were stabilized with amphiphilic low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI) in an aqueous phase to form monodispersed nanocomposites with a controlled clustering structure. The iron-based nanoclusters with a size of 115.3 ± 40.23 nm showed excellent performance on cellular uptake and cell labeling in different types of cells, moreover, which could be tracked by MRI with high sensitivity. The SPIO nanoclusters presented negligible cytotoxicity in various types of cells as detected using MTS, LDH, and flow cytometry assays. Significantly, we found that ferritin protein played an essential role in protecting stress from SPIO nanoclusters. Taken together, the self-assembly of SPIO nanoclusters with good magnetic properties provides a safe and efficient method for universal cell labeling with noninvasive MRI monitoring capability. PMID:27216601

  18. Epithelial Label-Retaining Cells Are Absent during Tooth Cycling in Salmo salar and Polypterus senegalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Sam; Willems, Maxime; Witten, P Eckhard; Hansen, Tom; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Huysseune, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and African bichir (Polypterus senegalus) are both actinopterygian fish species that continuously replace their teeth without the involvement of a successional dental lamina. Instead, they share the presence of a middle dental epithelium: an epithelial tier enclosed by inner and outer dental epithelium. It has been hypothesized that this tier could functionally substitute for a successional dental lamina and might be a potential niche to house epithelial stem cells involved in tooth cycling. Therefore, in this study we performed a BrdU pulse chase experiment on both species to (1) determine the localization and extent of proliferating cells in the dental epithelial layers, (2) describe cell dynamics and (3) investigate if label-retaining cells are present, suggestive for the putative presence of stem cells. Cells proliferate in the middle dental epithelium, outer dental epithelium and cervical loop at the lingual side of the dental organ to form a new tooth germ. Using long chase times, both in S. salar (eight weeks) and P. senegalus (eight weeks and twelve weeks), we could not reveal the presence of label-retaining cells in the dental organ. Immunostaining of P. senegalus dental organs for the transcription factor Sox2, often used as a stem cell marker, labelled cells in the zone of outer dental epithelium which grades into the oral epithelium (ODE transition zone) and the inner dental epithelium of a successor only. The location of Sox2 distribution does not provide evidence for epithelial stem cells in the dental organ and, more specifically, in the middle dental epithelium. Comparison of S. salar and P. senegalus reveals shared traits in tooth cycling and thus advances our understanding of the developmental mechanism that ensures lifelong replacement. PMID:27049953

  19. Epithelial Label-Retaining Cells Are Absent during Tooth Cycling in Salmo salar and Polypterus senegalus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Vandenplas

    Full Text Available The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar and African bichir (Polypterus senegalus are both actinopterygian fish species that continuously replace their teeth without the involvement of a successional dental lamina. Instead, they share the presence of a middle dental epithelium: an epithelial tier enclosed by inner and outer dental epithelium. It has been hypothesized that this tier could functionally substitute for a successional dental lamina and might be a potential niche to house epithelial stem cells involved in tooth cycling. Therefore, in this study we performed a BrdU pulse chase experiment on both species to (1 determine the localization and extent of proliferating cells in the dental epithelial layers, (2 describe cell dynamics and (3 investigate if label-retaining cells are present, suggestive for the putative presence of stem cells. Cells proliferate in the middle dental epithelium, outer dental epithelium and cervical loop at the lingual side of the dental organ to form a new tooth germ. Using long chase times, both in S. salar (eight weeks and P. senegalus (eight weeks and twelve weeks, we could not reveal the presence of label-retaining cells in the dental organ. Immunostaining of P. senegalus dental organs for the transcription factor Sox2, often used as a stem cell marker, labelled cells in the zone of outer dental epithelium which grades into the oral epithelium (ODE transition zone and the inner dental epithelium of a successor only. The location of Sox2 distribution does not provide evidence for epithelial stem cells in the dental organ and, more specifically, in the middle dental epithelium. Comparison of S. salar and P. senegalus reveals shared traits in tooth cycling and thus advances our understanding of the developmental mechanism that ensures lifelong replacement.

  20. Histochemical evidence for the differential surface labeling, uptake, and intracellular transport of a colloidal gold-labeled insulin complex by normal human blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A colloidal gold-labeled insulin-bovine serum albumin (GIA) reagent has been developed for the ultrastructural visualization of insulin binding sites on the cell surface and for tracing the pathway of intracellular insulin translocation. When applied to normal human blood cells, it was demonstrated by both visual inspection and quantitative analysis that the extent of surface labeling, as well as the rate and degree of internalization of the insulin complex, was directly related to cell type. Further, the pathway of insulin (GIA) transport via round vesicles and by tubulo-vesicles and saccules and its subsequent fate in the hemic cells was also related to cell variety. Monocytes followed by neutrophils bound the greatest amount of labeled insulin. The majority of lymphocytes bound and internalized little GIA, however, between 5-10% of the lymphocytes were found to bind considerable quantities of GIA. Erythrocytes rarely bound the labeled insulin complex, while platelets were noted to sequester large quantities of the GIA within their extracellular canalicular system. GIA uptake by the various types of leukocytic cells appeared to occur primarily by micropinocytosis and by the direct opening of cytoplasmic tubulo-vesicles and saccules onto the cell surface in regions directly underlying surface-bound GIA. Control procedures, viz., competitive inhibition of GIA labeling using an excess of unlabeled insulin in the incubation medium, preincubation of the GIA reagent with an antibody directed toward porcine insulin, and the incorporation of 125I-insulin into the GIA reagent, indicated the specificity and selectivity of the GIA histochemical procedure for the localization of insulin binding sites

  1. Label-free separation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and their cardiac derivatives using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J W; Lieu, D K; Huser, T R; Li, R A

    2008-09-08

    Self-renewable, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be differentiated into cardiomyocytes (CMs), providing an unlimited source of cells for transplantation therapies. However, unlike certain cell lineages such as hematopoietic cells, CMs lack specific surface markers for convenient identification, physical separation, and enrichment. Identification by immunostaining of cardiac-specific proteins such as troponin requires permeabilization, which renders the cells unviable and non-recoverable. Ectopic expression of a reporter protein under the transcriptional control of a heart-specific promoter for identifying hESC-derived CMs (hESC-CMs) is useful for research but complicates potential clinical applications. The practical detection and removal of undifferentiated hESCs in a graft, which may lead to tumors, is also critical. Here, we demonstrate a non-destructive, label-free optical method based on Raman scattering to interrogate the intrinsic biochemical signatures of individual hESCs and their cardiac derivatives, allowing cells to be identified and classified. By combining the Raman spectroscopic data with multivariate statistical analysis, our results indicate that hESCs, human fetal left ventricular CMs, and hESC-CMs can be identified by their intrinsic biochemical characteristics with an accuracy of 96%, 98% and 66%, respectively. The present study lays the groundwork for developing a systematic and automated method for the non-invasive and label-free sorting of (i) high-quality hESCs for expansion, and (ii) ex vivo CMs (derived from embryonic or adult stem cells) for cell-based heart therapies.

  2. Hydrodynamic and label-free sorting of circulating tumor cells from whole blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geislinger, Thomas M.; Stamp, Melanie E. M.; Wixforth, Achim; Franke, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate continuous, passive, and label-free sorting of different in vitro cancer cell lines (MV3, MCF7, and HEPG2) as model systems for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from undiluted whole blood employing the non-inertial lift effect as driving force. This purely viscous, repulsive cell-wall interaction is sensitive to cell size and deformability differences and yields highly efficient cell separation and high enrichment factors. We show that the performance of the device is robust over a large range of blood cell concentrations and flow rates as well as for the different cell lines. The collected samples usually contain more than 90% of the initially injected CTCs and exhibit average enrichment factors of more than 20 for sorting from whole blood samples.

  3. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, J; Gleichmann, T; Zimmermann, S; Zengerle, R; Koltay, P

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry. PMID:27596612

  4. Label free cell tracking in 3D tissue engineering constructs with high resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. A.; Lam, K.-P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Mazzocchi-Jones, D.; Richardson, J. B.; Yang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering there is an emphasis on studying 3-D live tissue structures. Consequently, to investigate and identify cellular activities and phenotypes in a 3-D environment for all in vitro experiments, including shape, migration/proliferation and axon projection, it is necessary to adopt an optical imaging system that enables monitoring 3-D cellular activities and morphology through the thickness of the construct for an extended culture period without cell labeling. This paper describes a new 3-D tracking algorithm developed for Cell-IQ®, an automated cell imaging platform, which has been equipped with an environmental chamber optimized to enable capturing time-lapse sequences of live cell images over a long-term period without cell labeling. As an integral part of the algorithm, a novel auto-focusing procedure was developed for phase contrast microscopy equipped with 20x and 40x objectives, to provide a more accurate estimation of cell growth/trajectories by allowing 3-D voxels to be computed at high spatiotemporal resolution and cell density. A pilot study was carried out in a phantom system consisting of horizontally aligned nanofiber layers (with precise spacing between them), to mimic features well exemplified in cellular activities of neuronal growth in a 3-D environment. This was followed by detailed investigations concerning axonal projections and dendritic circuitry formation in a 3-D tissue engineering construct. Preliminary work on primary animal neuronal cells in response to chemoattractant and topographic cue within the scaffolds has produced encouraging results.

  5. Near-Infrared Imaging of Adoptive Immune Cell Therapy in Breast Cancer Model Using Cell Membrane Labeling

    OpenAIRE

    Youniss, Fatma M.; Gobalakrishnan Sundaresan; Graham, Laura J.; Li Wang; Berry, Collin R.; Dewkar, Gajanan K.; Purnima Jose; Bear, Harry D; Jamal Zweit

    2014-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to non-invasively image and assess tumor targeting and retention of directly labeled T-lymphocytes following their adoptive transfer in mice. T-lymphocytes obtained from draining lymph nodes of 4T1 (murine breast cancer cell) sensitized BALB/C mice were activated in-vitro with Bryostatin/Ionomycin for 18 hours, and were grown in the presence of Interleukin-2 for 6 days. T-lymphocytes were then directly labeled with 1,1-dioctadecyltetramethyl indotricarbo...

  6. Cobalt zinc ferrite nanoparticles – a suitable tool for magnetic cell labeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jendelová, Pavla; Novotná, Božena; Turnovcová, Karolína; Žvátora, Pavel; Veverka, Miroslav; Bagryantseva, Yana; Herynek, V.; Syková, Eva

    Leipzig : Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology, 2013. PP-137. [World Conference on Regenerative Medicine 2013 /WCRM 2013/. 23.10.2013-25.10.2013, Leipzig] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1370; GA ČR GAP204/10/0035 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : cobalt-zinc ferrite * cell labeling * magnetic resonance imaging * genotoxicity Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants http://wcrm.future-science-group.com/pdfs/PP-137.pdf#search=%22magnetic%20cell%22

  7. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  8. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei, E-mail: biehzw@nus.edu.sg [Optical Bioimaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-09-08

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  9. Optimization of [67Ga]-oxinate complex formation conditions for white blood cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the effective factors on the preparation of 67Ga-oxinate complex for white blood cell labeling were determined. Gallium-67 was produced at AMIRS 30 MeV cyclotron via 68Zn(p,2n)67Ga reaction in the from of 67GaCl3, and was used for radiolabeling of oxinate complex at optimized conditions. A mixture of 67GaCl3 (3uL, 200uCi) and ethanolic oxine solution (lmg/ml, 100μl) was evaporated and reacted at 25degreeC for 1 h in the presence of NaOAc solution (pH. 5.5). ITLC was performed using a mixture of ammonium acetate and methanol solution (1:1) followed by recording the activity using radio thin layer chromatography scanner. The radiochemical purity of %95.18 at these conditions was obtained (specific activity of 1432 GBq/rnmol). Freshly prepared white blood cells were separated from human volunteers and used for labeling by the above mentioned complex at 37dgreeC. 67Ga- oxinate complex due to it's lipophilicity and suitable gamma rays is a suitable cell labeling agent and available for blood stem cell and microorganism studies.

  10. In vivo MR tracking of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells in rat liver after intrasplenic transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging system to depict and track in vivo of magnetically labeled bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in rat liver after intrasplenic transplantation. Methods: Rat BMSCs were isolated, purified, expanded and then incubated with home synthesized Fe2O3-PLL. Prussian blue stain was performed for showing intracellular irons. Acute liver damage was induced by subcutaneous injection of carbon tetrachloride in 12 recipient rats. The cells allotransplantation was performed by intrasplenic injection with magnetically labeled (experimental group, n=6) or unlabeled BMSCs (control group, n=6). Serial MRI were performed before and 3 hours, 3, 7, 14 days after transplantation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of liver on T2*-weighted MR imaging obtained before and after injection were measured and compared. MR imaging findings were compared histologically with histology. Results: Rats BMSCs could be effectively labeled and the labeling efficiency was almost 100%. Iron-containing intracytoplasmatic vesicles could be observed clearly with prussian blue staining. SNR of rat livers in experimental group and control group before and 3 hours, 3, 7, 14 days after transplantation were 19.53±2.30, 3.28±1.06, 7.34±2.10, 10.25±3.96, 15.50±3.73; 20.20±4.35, 21.20±4.43, 19.13±2.80, 21.43±5.45, 19.07±4.80, respectively. SNR decreased significantly in the experimental group liver 3 hours, 3, 7 days after injection of BMSCs (Dunnett test, P0.05). In control group, SNR demonstrated no significant differences among different time points (ANOVA, P>0.05). Results of histological analysis confirmed homing of labeled BMSCs in liver, primarily distributing in areas around centrolobular vein. Conclusion: The BMSCs can be effectively labeled with Fe2O3-PLL. 1.5-T MR imaging can monitor in vivo of magnetically labeled BMSCs in liver after intrasplenic transplantation. It potentially opens a new area of investigation for delivering stem cells

  11. Autoradiographic study on the incorporation of carbon-14 labeled formate and adenine into nucleic acid in blood-forming cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incorporation of [14C]formate and [8-14C]adenine into nucleic acid in blood-forming cells was studied by the autoradiographic technique. The isotopic markers were injected subcutaneously into young rats weighting from 100 to 150 g three times every 24 hours and the animals were examined 3 hours after the last injection. In the case of [14C]formate injection, erythroblasts exhibited extremely strong labeling in contrast to weaker labeling of other blood-forming cells. In the case of [14C]adenine administration, on the other hand, immature cells of the granuclocytic series as well as immature reticulum cells (proliferating cells of reticular tissue) were much more heavily labeled than were other blood-forming cells, particularly the erythroblasts which revealed weak or no labeling. By digestion or extraction of DNA, RNA or both from cells with DNase, RNase or hot 10% perchloric acid treatment, respectively, it was confirmed that the observed heavy labeling of any type of cells with either [14C]formate or [14C]adenine was due chiefly to incorporation of the radioactive materials into nuclear DNA. The present results are discussed together with the findings of earlier studies on lymphoid cells which indicate that, in certain cell types, the patterns of [3H]deoxycytidine labeling differ considerably from the corresponding patterns of [3H]deoxycytidine labeling. The present and earlier findings provide evidence to substantiate that, among blood-forming cells, there are considerable variations in the labeling patterns of nuclear DNA depending on differences in the radioactive DNA precursors used as well as in the cell types. (author)

  12. Label-free characterization of white blood cells by measuring 3D refractive index maps

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Jonghee; Park, HyunJoo; Choi, Chulhee; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of white blood cells (WBCs) is crucial for blood analyses and disease diagnoses. However, current standard techniques rely on cell labeling, a process which imposes significant limitations. Here we present three-dimensional (3D) optical measurements and the label-free characterization of mouse WBCs using optical diffraction tomography. 3D refractive index (RI) tomograms of individual WBCs are constructed from multiple two-dimensional quantitative phase images of samples illuminated at various angles of incidence. Measurements of the 3D RI tomogram of WBCs enable the separation of heterogeneous populations of WBCs using quantitative morphological and biochemical information. Time-lapse tomographic measurements also provide the 3D trajectory of micrometer-sized beads ingested by WBCs. These results demonstrate that optical diffraction tomography can be a useful and versatile tool for the study of WBCs.

  13. Manganese-impregnated mesoporous silica nanoparticles for signal enhancement in MRI cell labelling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet-Nicolas, Rémy; Laprise-Pelletier, Myriam; Nair, Mahesh M.; Chevallier, Pascale; Lagueux, Jean; Gossuin, Yves; Laurent, Sophie; Kleitz, Freddy; Fortin, Marc-André

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are used in drug delivery and cell tracking applications. As Mn2+ is already implemented as a ``positive'' cell contrast agent in preclinical imaging procedures (in the form of MnCl2 for neurological studies), the introduction of Mn in the porous network of MSNs would allow labelling cells and tracking them using MRI. These particles are in general internalized in endosomes, an acidic environment with high saline concentration. In addition, the available MSN porosity could also serve as a carrier to deliver medical/therapeutic substances through the labelled cells. In the present study, manganese oxide was introduced in the porous network of MCM-48 silica nanoparticles (Mn-M48SNs). The particles exhibit a narrow size distribution (~140 nm diam.) and high porosity (~60% vol.), which was validated after insertion of Mn. The resulting Mn-M48SNs were characterized by TEM, N2 physisorption, and XRD. Evidence was found with H2-TPR, and XPS characterization, that Mn(ii) is the main oxidation state of the paramagnetic species after suspension in water, most probably in the form of Mn-OOH. The colloidal stability as a function of time was confirmed by DLS in water, acetate buffer and cell culture medium. In NMR data, no significant evidence of Mn2+ leaching was found in Mn-M48SNs in acidic water (pH 6), up to 96 hours after suspension. High longitudinal relaxivity values of r1 = 8.4 mM-1 s-1 were measured at 60 MHz and 37 °C, with the lowest relaxometric ratios (r2/r1 = 2) reported to date for a Mn-MSN system. Leukaemia cells (P388) were labelled with Mn-M48SNs and nanoparticle cell internalization was confirmed by TEM. Finally, MRI contrast enhancement provided by cell labelling with escalated incubation concentrations of Mn-M48SNs was quantified at 1 T. This study confirmed the possibility of efficiently confining Mn into M48SNs using incipient wetness, while maintaining an open porosity and relatively high pore volume. Because

  14. Linear patterning of magnetically labeled Dictyostelium cells to display confined development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasca, Guillaume; Raynaud, Franck; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Gazeau, Florence; Wilhelm, Claire [Laboratoire Matiere et Systemes Complexes (MSC), UMR 7057 CNRS et Universite Paris-Diderot, Paris (France)], E-mail: claire.wilhelm@univ-paris-diderot.fr

    2008-05-21

    In severe nutriment conditions, the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum enters a particular life cycle where it forms multicellular patterns to achieve aggregation. Extensively observed from an initial dispersed state, its developmental program can usefully be studied from a confined population to implement theoretical developments regarding biological self-organization. The challenge is then to form a cell assembly of well-defined geometrical dimensions without hindering cell behavior. To achieve this goal, we imposed transient constraints by applying temporary external magnetic gradients to trap magnetically labeled cells. Deposits of various numbers of cells were geometrically characterized for different magnetic exposure conditions. We demonstrated that the cell deposit was organized as a three-dimensional (3D) structure by both stacking layers of cells and extending these layers in the substrate plane. This structure evolves during the aggregation phase, forming periodic aggregative centers along the linear initial pattern.

  15. Mathematical analysis of /sup 51/Cr-labelled red cell survival curves in congenital haemolytic anaemias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasfiki, A.G.; Antipas, S.E.; Dimitriou, P.A.; Gritzali, F.A.; Melissinos, K.G.

    1982-04-01

    The parameters of /sup 51/Cr labelled red cell survival curves were calculated in 26 patients with homozygous ..beta..-thalassaemia, 8 with sickle-cell anaemia and 3 with s-..beta..-thalassaemia, using a non-linear weighted least squares analysis computer program. In thalassaemic children the calculated parameters denote that the shorting of the mean cell life is due to early senescence alone, while there is some evidence that in thalassaemic adults additional extracellular destruction mechanisms participate as well. Red cell survival curves from patients with sickle-cell anaemia and s-..beta..-thalassaemia resemble each other, while their parameters indicate an initial rapid loss of radioactivity, early senescence and the presence of extracellular red cell destruction factors.

  16. Mathematical analysis of 51Cr-labelled red cell survival curves in congenital haemolytic anaemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parameters of 51Cr labelled red cell survival curves were calculated in 26 patients with homozygous β-thalassaemia, 8 with sickle-cell anaemia and 3 with s-β-thalassaemia, using a non-linear weighted least squares analysis computer program. In thalassaemic children the calculated parameters denote that the shorting of the mean cell life is due to early senescence alone, while there is some evidence that in thalassaemic adults additional extracellular destruction mechanisms participate as well. Red cell survival curves from patients with sickle-cell anaemia and s-β-thalassaemia resemble each other, while their parameters indicate an initial rapid loss of radioactivity, early senescence and the presence of extracellular red cell destruction factors. (orig.)

  17. In vivo tracking of {sup 111}In-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in acute brain trauma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joon-Kee [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Research, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bok-Nam [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Woo-Young [Institute for Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Research, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jin Young [Institute for Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Research, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gwang [Institute for Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Research, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Brain Disease Research Center, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Young Hwan [Institute for Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Research, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: yhahn@ajou.ac.kr

    2010-04-15

    Introduction: This study was to evaluate the in vivo distribution of intravenously transplanted bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in an acute brain trauma model by {sup 111}In-tropolone labeling. Methods: Rat BMSCs were labeled with 37 MBq {sup 111}In-tropolone. Their labeling efficiency and in vitro retention rate were measured. The viability and proliferation of labeled BMSCs were evaluated for 14 days after labeling. The biodistribution of {sup 111}In-labeled BMSCs in trauma models was compared with those of sham-operated rats and normal rats on gamma camera images. The migration of {sup 111}In-BMSCs to the traumatic brain was evaluated using confocal microscope. Results: The labeling efficiency of {sup 111}In-BMSCs was 66{+-}5%, and their retention rate was 85.3% at 1 h after labeling. There was no difference in the number of viable cells between {sup 111}In-BMSCs and controls at 48 h after labeling. However, the proliferation of {sup 111}In-BMSCs was inhibited after the third day of labeling, and it did not reach confluency. On gamma camera images, most of the {sup 111}In-BMSCs uptake was observed in the liver and spleen at the second day of injection. The brain uptake of {sup 111}In-BMSCs was detected prominently in trauma models (1.4%) than in sham-operated (0.5%) or normal rats (0.3%). Radiolabeled BMSCs were observed at the traumatic brain on the confocal microscope as they have a homing capacity, although its proliferation capacity was suppressed. Conclusion: Although growth inhibition by {sup 111}In-labeling need to be evaluated further prior to use in humans, {sup 111}In-labeled BMSCs are useful for the tracking of intravenously transplanted mesenchymal stem cells in brain disease models.

  18. Multifocal peritoneal splenosis in Tc-99m-labeled heat-denatured red blood cell scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Min Ki; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Choe, Won Sick [Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    A 44-year-old man with a past medical history of splenectomy came to hospital because of epigastric pain abdominopelvic computed tomography(CT) showed a soft tissue mass and multifocal variable-sized nodules as well as finding suggestive of cholecystitis. Subsequently, he underwent Tc-99m-labeled heat- denatured red blood cell(RBC) scintigraphy to evaluate the mass and nodules. The scintigraphy confirmed multifocal peritoneal splenosis in the abdominopelvic cavity.

  19. Cell proliferation in the Drosophila adult brain revealed by clonal analysis and bromodeoxyuridine labelling

    OpenAIRE

    Brand Andrea H; Egger Boris; von Trotha Jakob W

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The production of new neurons during adulthood and their subsequent integration into a mature central nervous system have been shown to occur in all vertebrate species examined to date. However, the situation in insects is less clear and, in particular, it has been reported that there is no proliferation in the Drosophila adult brain. Results We report here, using clonal analysis and 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labelling, that cell proliferation does occur in the Droso...

  20. Tritiated thymidine-labeled bronchioloalveolar cells and radiation dose following inhalation of plutonium in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study is to show the relationship of inhaled Pu particle distribution and alveolar-bronchiolar target-cell response with respect to the formation of pulmonary carcinoma. The proliferation of type 2 alveolar epithelium and nonciliated bronchiolar epithelium appears critical in the induction of lung tumors associated from inhaled 239PuO2. Female, Wistar rats were either sham-exposed (40 rats) or given a single inhalation to 169Yb-239PuO2 (99 rats, ILB, 3.9 +/- 1.2 kBq) and examined at 20 time intervals from 1 day to 700 days postexposure for Pu particle distribution in airways by SEM quantitative autoradiography and for cell labeling with tritiated thymidine. Initially, deposited Pu particles were rapidly cleared from the surface of the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles within a few days. Thereafter, about 5 times more alpha track exposure to the bronchiolar epithelium was delivered from Pu particles found in peribronchiolar alveoli than from Pu particles being cleared from bronchiolar surfaces. Exposure of bronchiolar epithelium at later times was due mostly to the formation of peribronchiolar Pu particle aggregates. A maximal increase in labeled alveolar wall cells was seen at 60 days after exposure, decreasing gradually to control levels by 400 days. Cell labeling in focal alveolar regions of Pu aggregation was about 5 fold higher. Increased bronchiolar epithelium labeling appeared in two phases. The first phase was seen 15 days after exposure, associated with initial deposition and clearance of Pu particles. The second phase slowly reached a maximum at 250 days and was associated with peribronchiolar Pu aggregate formation. The temporal-spatial dose-distribution pattern for inhaled Pu particles is an important aspect of Pu-induced pulmonary carcinogenesis

  1. A novel approach for scanning electron microscopy of colloidal gold- labeled cell surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for the use of scanning electron microscopy on the surface of gold-labeled cells. It includes the use of 45- or 20-nm colloidal gold marker conjugated with Staphylococcal protein A. The marker is best recognized on the basis of its atomic number contrast by using the backscattered electron imaging mode of the scanning electron microscope. When the backscattered electron signal is mixed with the secondary electron signal, an optimum correlation between the distribution of...

  2. Detection of gastritis by /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red-blood-cell scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastritis is a common condition, with a variety of causes, that is diagnosed most often by barium upper gastrointestinal tract series or endoscopy. The authors report a case in which gastritis without active bleeding was apparent in scintiscans obtained during the evaluation of GI bleeding using /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells (TcRBC). The scintigraphic findings that suggest gastritis are described

  3. 19F MRI Detection of Acute Allograft Rejection with In Vivo Perfluorocarbon Labeling of Immune Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hitchens, T. Kevin; Ye, Qing; Eytan, Danielle F.; Janjic, Jelena M.; Ahrens, Eric T.; Ho, Chien

    2011-01-01

    Current diagnosis of organ rejection following transplantation relies on tissue biopsy, which is not ideal due to sampling limitations and risks associated with the invasive procedure. We have previously shown that cellular MRI of iron-oxide labeled immune-cell infiltration can provide a non-invasive measure of rejection status by detecting areas of hypointensity on T2*-weighted images. In the current study, we tested the feasibility of using a fluorine-based cellular tracer agent to detect m...

  4. Fluorescent labelling of DNA on superparamagnetic nanoparticles by a perylene bisimide derivative for cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N,N′-Bis[tris-(2-aminoethyl) amine]-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PBI-TRIS), nonfluorescent dye was used to fluorescent labelling of DNA. For this aim, (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized to provide a suitable surface for binding of DNA. Amine functionalized nanoparticles showed a high immobilization capacity (82.70%) at 25 mg of nanoparticle concentration for Calf thymus DNA. Binding capacity of PBI-TRIS to DNA-SPION was also found as 1.93 μM on 25 mg of nanoparticles by using UV–vis spectroscopy. Binding of PBI-TRIS to DNA onto nanoparticles was also characterized by scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The confocal images of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION and breast cells were taken at 488 and 561.7 nm of excitation wavelengths. Cell image was also compared with a commercial dye, DAPI at 403.7 nm of excitation wavelength. Results showed that PBI-TRIS can be used for cell staining. - Highlights: • Functionalized SPIONs were synthesized and treated with DNA. • The binding of PBI-TRIS with DNA was studied. • The image of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION was detected by a confocal microscope

  5. Diagnosis of infection by preoperative scintigraphy with indium-labeled white blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintigraphy with indium-labeled white blood cells has been reported to be sensitive and specific in the diagnosis of low-grade sepsis of the musculoskeletal system. We reviewed the records of fifty patients who had suspected osteomyelitis or suspected infection about a total joint prosthesis and who underwent scintigraphy with technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate and scintigraphy with indium-111 oxine-labeled white blood cells before an open surgical procedure. Any patient who received preoperative antibiotics was not included in the study. For all of the patients, gram-stain examination of smears, evaluation of a culture of material from the operative site, and histological examination were done. The patients were divided into two groups. Group I was composed of twenty-four patients, each of whom had a prosthesis in place and complained of pain. Group II was composed of twenty-six patients for whom a diagnosis of chronic osteomyelitis had to be considered. With the indium scans alone, there was only one false-negative result (in Group II), but there were eighteen false-positive results (eight patients in Group II and ten patients in Group I). Although scintigraphy with indium-labeled white blood cells is quite sensitive, it is not specific in detecting chronic osteomyelitis; a negative scan should be considered highly suggestive that osteomyelitis is not present. Specificity can be increased by interpreting the indium scan in conjunction with the technetium scan

  6. Fluorescent labelling of DNA on superparamagnetic nanoparticles by a perylene bisimide derivative for cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltas, Esra, E-mail: maltasesra@gmail.com [Selcuk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, 42075 Konya (Turkey); Malkondu, Sait [Selcuk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, 42075 Konya (Turkey); Uyar, Pembegul [Selcuk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, 42075 Konya (Turkey); Selcuk University, Advanced Technology Research and Application Center, Konya (Turkey); Ozmen, Mustafa [Selcuk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, 42075 Konya (Turkey)

    2015-03-01

    N,N′-Bis[tris-(2-aminoethyl) amine]-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PBI-TRIS), nonfluorescent dye was used to fluorescent labelling of DNA. For this aim, (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized to provide a suitable surface for binding of DNA. Amine functionalized nanoparticles showed a high immobilization capacity (82.70%) at 25 mg of nanoparticle concentration for Calf thymus DNA. Binding capacity of PBI-TRIS to DNA-SPION was also found as 1.93 μM on 25 mg of nanoparticles by using UV–vis spectroscopy. Binding of PBI-TRIS to DNA onto nanoparticles was also characterized by scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The confocal images of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION and breast cells were taken at 488 and 561.7 nm of excitation wavelengths. Cell image was also compared with a commercial dye, DAPI at 403.7 nm of excitation wavelength. Results showed that PBI-TRIS can be used for cell staining. - Highlights: • Functionalized SPIONs were synthesized and treated with DNA. • The binding of PBI-TRIS with DNA was studied. • The image of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION was detected by a confocal microscope.

  7. Preparation and evaluation of [201Tl](III)-DTPA complex for cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to interesting physical properties and wide availability of 201Tl as a SPECT radionuclide, the incorporation of this nuclide into DTPA for cell labeling was targeted. Thallium-201 (T1/2 = 3.04 d) in Tl+ form was converted to Tl3+ cation in the presence of O3/6M HCl and di-isopropyl ether, controlled by RTLC/gel electrophoresis methods. The final evaporated activity reacted with cDTPA in normal saline to yield [201Tl](III)DTPA at room temperature after 0.5 hour, followed by solid phase extraction purification using C18 Sep-Pak column (radiochemical yield >95%). Radiochemical purity of more than 99% was obtained using RTLC with specific activity of about 260 GBq/mmol. The stability of the tracer was checked in the final product in the presence of human serum at 37 deg C up to 3 days. The partition coefficient was also measured. The labeled compound was used in red blood cell (RBC) labeling. The cell uptake ratio was determined at 4, 25 and 37 deg C up to 3 hours. (author)

  8. The effect of an external magnetic force on cell adhesion and proliferation of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamae Toshio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the strategy for tissue regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for transplantation, it is necessary that MSCs be accumulated and kept in the target area. To accumulate MSCs effectively, we developed a novel technique for a magnetic targeting system with magnetically labeled MSCs and an external magnetic force. In this study, we examined the effect of an external magnetic force on magnetically labeled MSCs in terms of cell adhesion and proliferation. Methods Magnetically labeled MSCs were plated at the bottom of an insert under the influence of an external magnetic force for 1 hour. Then the inserts were turned upside down for between 1 and 24 hours, and the number of MSCs which had fallen from the membrane was counted. The gene expression of MSCs affected magnetic force was analyzed with microarray. In the control group, the same procedure was done without the external magnetic force. Results At 1 hour after the inserts were turned upside down, the average number of fallen MSCs in the magnetic group was significantly smaller than that in the control group, indicating enhanced cell adhesion. At 24 hours, the average number of fallen MSCs in the magnetic group was also significantly smaller than that in control group. In the magnetic group, integrin alpha2, alpha6, beta3 BP, intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2, platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 were upregulated. At 1, 2 and 3 weeks after incubation, there was no statistical significant difference in the numbers of MSCs in the magnetic group and control group. Conclusions The results indicate that an external magnetic force for 1 hour enhances cell adhesion of MSCs. Moreover, there is no difference in cell proliferation after using an external magnetic force on magnetically labeled MSCs.

  9. An economic approach to efficient isotope labeling in insect cells using homemade 15N-, 13C- and 2H-labeled yeast extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterologous expression of proteins in insect cells is frequently used for crystallographic structural studies due to the high yields even for challenging proteins requiring the eukaryotic protein processing capabilities of the host. However for NMR studies, the need for isotope labeling poses extreme challenges in eukaryotic hosts. Here, we describe a robust method to achieve uniform protein 15N and 13C labeling of up to 90 % in baculovirus-infected insect cells. The approach is based on the production of labeled yeast extract, which is subsequently supplemented to insect cell growth media. The method also allows deuteration at levels of >60 % without decrease in expression yield. The economic implementation of the labeling procedures into a standard structural biology laboratory environment is described in a step-by-step protocol. Applications are demonstrated for a variety of NMR experiments using the Abelson kinase domain, GFP, and the beta-1 adrenergic receptor as examples. Deuterated expression of the latter provides spectra of very high quality of a eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptor

  10. An economic approach to efficient isotope labeling in insect cells using homemade 15N-, 13C- and 2H-labeled yeast extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Christian; Isogai, Shin; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Heterologous expression of proteins in insect cells is frequently used for crystallographic structural studies due to the high yields even for challenging proteins requiring the eukaryotic protein processing capabilities of the host. However for NMR studies, the need for isotope labeling poses extreme challenges in eukaryotic hosts. Here, we describe a robust method to achieve uniform protein (15)N and (13)C labeling of up to 90 % in baculovirus-infected insect cells. The approach is based on the production of labeled yeast extract, which is subsequently supplemented to insect cell growth media. The method also allows deuteration at levels of >60 % without decrease in expression yield. The economic implementation of the labeling procedures into a standard structural biology laboratory environment is described in a step-by-step protocol. Applications are demonstrated for a variety of NMR experiments using the Abelson kinase domain, GFP, and the beta-1 adrenergic receptor as examples. Deuterated expression of the latter provides spectra of very high quality of a eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptor. PMID:26070442

  11. An economic approach to efficient isotope labeling in insect cells using homemade {sup 15}N-, {sup 13}C- and {sup 2}H-labeled yeast extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opitz, Christian; Isogai, Shin; Grzesiek, Stephan, E-mail: Stephan.Grzesiek@unibas.ch [University of Basel, Focal Area Structural Biology and Biophysics, Biozentrum (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Heterologous expression of proteins in insect cells is frequently used for crystallographic structural studies due to the high yields even for challenging proteins requiring the eukaryotic protein processing capabilities of the host. However for NMR studies, the need for isotope labeling poses extreme challenges in eukaryotic hosts. Here, we describe a robust method to achieve uniform protein {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C labeling of up to 90 % in baculovirus-infected insect cells. The approach is based on the production of labeled yeast extract, which is subsequently supplemented to insect cell growth media. The method also allows deuteration at levels of >60 % without decrease in expression yield. The economic implementation of the labeling procedures into a standard structural biology laboratory environment is described in a step-by-step protocol. Applications are demonstrated for a variety of NMR experiments using the Abelson kinase domain, GFP, and the beta-1 adrenergic receptor as examples. Deuterated expression of the latter provides spectra of very high quality of a eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptor.

  12. Nifedipine effect on the labelling of blood cells and plasma proteins with Tc-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The labeling of red blood cells (RBC) with Tc-99m depends on the presence of stannous ion (Sn) that helps this radionuclide's fixation on the hemoglobin molecule. Nifedipine is an agent capable to block a specific way where calcius (Ca) ion acrosses the cellular membrane and to bind itself on plasma proteins. The effect of nifedipine in the labeling of RBC and plasma proteins with Tc-99m was studied because of similarities between Ca and Sn ions. Blood with anticoagulant was treated with nifedipine concentration of 10-6M for 15 min at 370C. The labeling of RBC with Tc-99m was done incubating with Sn ion solution (3 uM) for different times. The % of radioactivity in RBC was determined. Samples of plasma were precipited with trichloroacetic acid and the % of radiocctivity in insoluble fraction was calculated. The same procedure was done using different nifedipine concentrations and the blood was incubated for 60 min with Sn ion. The determination of the % of Tc-99m labeled in RBC and plasma proteins showed that this drug does not have the capability to alter this incorporation because the results are similar to control. It is suggested that the Sn ions passage across RBC is not altered by nifedipine although this drug could bind to plasma protein, it does not modify the Tc-99m fixation on it. (author)

  13. 78 FR 8446 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research; Prescription Drug Labeling Improvement and Enhancement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... prescription drug labeling in 1979 (44 FR 37434, June 26, 1979). However, over the ensuing 25 years, labeling... discontinued marketing a drug product, but has not requested withdrawal of the NDA, must still comply with... utility of the prescription drug labeling as a communication tool and to discuss strategies for making...

  14. Label-free continuous cell sorter with specifically adhesive oblique micro-grooves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the development of a label-free continuous cell sorting method based on specific adhesivity between cells and surface-immobilized adhesion molecules. The separation of cells is induced by cross-flow adhesive force on micron-sized stripes with adhesion molecules immobilized on the surface. In order to accurately form the adhesive stripes on a microchannel wall, 1 µm wide micro-grooves are fabricated at a certain angle with respect to the flow direction using direct electron-beam lithography. Amino-functionalized parylene is used as the groove surface material, and streptavidin is immobilized on the entire surface, resulting in a surface with periodic adhesive patterns. The effectiveness of the proposed cell sorting principle is verified by flow-through experiments using functionalized particles as model cells. Measurements of the motion of biotin-coated microparticles show that the particles decelerated by specific adhesivity are displaced in the cross-flow direction. The observed cross-flow displacement is around 0.8% of the streamwise travelling distance. It is also shown that the rate of cross-flow displacement is independent of the flow rate or the stripe angle. Finally, it is demonstrated that a mixture of streptavidin- and biotin-coated microparticles can be completely separated after flowing over a 20 mm long patterned surface. The proposed label-free continuous lateral separation scheme has a wide range of potential applications for separation of cells which could not be distinguished by size or separated using dielectric forces

  15. Label-free single cell analysis with a chip-based impedance flow cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Hebeisen, Monika; Mittag, Anja; Di Berardino, Marco; Tarnok, Attila

    2010-02-01

    For description of cellular phenotypes and physiological states new developments are needed. Axetris' impedance flow cytometer (IFC) (Leister) is a new promising label-free alternative to fluorescence-based flow cytometry (FCM). IFC measures single cells at various frequencies simultaneously. The frequencies used for signal acquisition range from 0.1 to 20 MHz. The impedance signal provides information about cell volume (ionophore valinomycin. Changes in membrane potential were detectable at the level of cytoplasm conductivity (>4 MHz) and membrane capacitance (1-4 MHz). Our data indicate that IFC can be a valuable alternative to conventional FCM for various applications in the field of cell death and physiology. The work will be extended to address further potential applications of IFC in biotechnology and biomedical cell analysis, as well as in cell sorting.

  16. Connected components labeling for giga-cell multi-categorical rasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzel, Pawel; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    2013-09-01

    Labeling of connected components in an image or a raster of non-imagery data is a fundamental operation in fields of pattern recognition and machine intelligence. The bulk of effort devoted to designing efficient connected components labeling (CCL) algorithms concentrated on the domain of binary images where labeling is required for a computer to recognize objects. In contrast, in the Geographical Information Science (GIS) a CCL algorithm is mostly applied to multi-categorical rasters in order to either convert a raster to a shapefile, or for statistical characterization of individual clumps. Recently, it has become necessary to label connected components in very large, giga-cell size, multi-categorical rasters but performance of existing CCL algorithms lacks sufficient speed to accomplish such task. In this paper we present a modification to the popular two-scan CCL algorithm that enables labeling of giga-cell size, multi-categorical rasters. Our approach is to apply a divide-and-conquer technique coupled with parallel processing to a standard two-scan algorithm. For specificity, we have developed a variant of a standard CCL algorithm implemented as r.clump in GRASS GIS. We have established optimal values of data blocks (stemming from the divide-and-conquer technique) and optimal number of computational threads (stemming from parallel processing) for a new algorithm called r.clump3p. The performance of the new algorithm was tested on a series of rasters up to 160 Mcells in size; for largest size test raster a speed up over the original algorithm is 74 times. Finally, we have applied the new algorithm to the National Land Cover Dataset 2006 raster with 1.6×1010 cells. Labeling this raster took 39 h using two-processors, 16 cores computer and resulted in 221,718,501 clumps. Estimated speed up over the original algorithm is 450 times. The r.clump3p works within the GRASS environment and is available in the public domain.

  17. Gadolinium and fluorescent bi-functionally labeling and in vitro MRI of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of magnetically labeling and tracking mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro by using a gadolinium and fluorescent bi-functionally transfection agent of polyethylenimine. Methods: A gadolinium bifunctional transfection reagent complex was obtained after the linear polyethylenimine derivative (JetPEI-FluoR) was incubated with Gd-DTPA. Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the bone marrows of SD rats were cultured and expanded. The mesenchymal stem cells were incubated with the bi-functional labeling agents. After labeling, the MSCs were examined with fluoroscope and electron microscope and the biological characters were detected including trypan blue exclusion test, MTT, and apoptosis detection. On a 1.5 T MR system, the labeled MSCs were examined with spin echo T1WI and T2WI and T1 measurement with mixed sequence. After labeling, the cells were cultured and undergone routine passage. Prior MR examinations were repeated for each passage of labeled cells. All data was statistically prolessed with SPSS for Windows. Results: Of 5 x 105 MSCs incubated with the bi-functional agents, 4.25 x 105 MSCs were successfully labeled, the percentage of labeled MSCs was 85% fluoroscopically. The high density electron particles of gadolinium observed electron microscopically existed around cellular apparatuses, especially around Golgi apparatus. In trypan blue exclusion test, the exclusion rate of labeled MSCs with incubation duration of 3,6,12,24 h was (96.55±2.90)%, (94.17± 2.56)%, (97.16±3.12)% and (94.23±2.67)%, respectively. The corresponding exclusion rate of unlabeled MSCs was (95.86±2.67)%, (92.04±2.21)%, (93.38±3.64)% and (92.12±2.53)%, respectively. There was no statistical difference of trypan blue exclusion rate between labeled cells and control unlabeled cells within 24 hours of incubation (F=4.523, P>0.05). In the proliferation test, the optical absorption value of labeled MSC with 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0, 30.0 and 40.0

  18. A New Method for Preparing Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Labeling with Ferumoxytol for Cell Tracking by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Tseng, Lanya; Ye, Qing; Wu, Yijen L; Bain, Daniel J; Ho, Chien

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are among the major stem cells used for cell therapy and regenerative medicine. In-vivo cell-tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is crucial for regenerative medicine, allowing verification that the transplanted cells reach the targeted sites. Cellular MRI combined with superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) contrast agents is an effective cell-tracking method. Here, we are reporting a new "bio-mimicry" method by making use of the "in-vivo environment" of MSCs to prepare native MSCs, so that (i) the phagocytic activity of cultured MSCs can be recovered and expanded MSCs can be ex-vivo labeled with Ferumoxytol, which is currently the only FDA approved SPIO nanoparticles for human use. Using our new method, 7-day cultured MSCs regain the capability to take up Ferumoxytol and exhibit an intracellular iron concentration of 2.50 ± 0.50 pg/MSC, comparable to that obtained by using Ferumoxytol-heparin-protamine nanocomplex; and (ii) cells can be re-sized to more native size, reducing from 32.0 ± 7.2 μm to 19.5 ± 5.2 μm. Our method can be very useful for expanding MSCs and labeling with Ferumoxytol, without the need for transfection agents and/or electroporation, allowing cell-tracking by MRI in both pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:27188664

  19. Metabolic labeling with (14C)-glucose of bloodstream and cell culture trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi from infected mouse blood and from cell culture were metabolically labeled by incubation with D-(14C)-glucose. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of lysates from parasites of two strains (RA and CA1) showed a significantly different pattern. The difference was mainly quantitative when the blood and cell culture trypomastigotes of the RA strain were compared. Analysis of the culture medium by paper electrophoresis showed an anionic exometabolite only in the blood forms of both strains. (Author)

  20. A method for double-labeling sputum cells for p53 and cytokeratin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular and immunological techniques may enhance the usefulness of sputum cytology as a screening tool for lung cancer. These techniques may also be useful in detecting and following the early progression of disease from metaplasia to dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, and finally to invasive carcinoma. Longitudinal information on the evolution of these malignant changes in the respiratory epithelium can be gained by prospective study of populations at high risk for lung cancer. This work is significant because double-labeling of cells in sputum with p53 and cytokeratin antibodies facilitates rapid screening of p53 positive neoplastic and preneoplastic lung cells by brightfield and fluorescence microscopy

  1. A method for double-labeling sputum cells for p53 and cytokeratin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neft, R.E.; Tierney, L.A.; Belinsky, S.A. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Molecular and immunological techniques may enhance the usefulness of sputum cytology as a screening tool for lung cancer. These techniques may also be useful in detecting and following the early progression of disease from metaplasia to dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, and finally to invasive carcinoma. Longitudinal information on the evolution of these malignant changes in the respiratory epithelium can be gained by prospective study of populations at high risk for lung cancer. This work is significant because double-labeling of cells in sputum with p53 and cytokeratin antibodies facilitates rapid screening of p53 positive neoplastic and preneoplastic lung cells by brightfield and fluorescence microscopy.

  2. Report of the research co-ordination meeting on labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CRP's focus is on the preparation of site-specific radiopharmaceuticals labelled with β-emitters for the treatment of cancer. The radiopharmaceuticals should be designed in such a way to deliver the therapeutic doses with high specificity to tumour sites and with minimum dose to other organs. The 2. Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) took place in Mumbai, India from 31 January to 4 February 2000. The present report includes the results of all the participants including the report of the participant from Pakistan who could not attend the meeting. During the second RCM, three main aspects were dealt with viz. the different therapeutic isotopes studied, different carrier molecules like peptides and antibody and the biological aspects of these preparations

  3. Report of the research co-ordination meeting on labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CRP's focus is on the preparation of site-specific radiopharmaceuticals labelled with with β- emitters for the treatment of cancer. The radiopharmaceuticals should be designed in such a way to deliver the therapeutic doses with high specificity to tumour sites and with minimum dose to other organs. The 2nd Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) took place in Mumbai, India from 31 January to 4 February 2000. The present report includes the results of all the participants including the report of the participant from Pakistan who could not attend the meeting. During the second RCM, three main aspects were dealt with viz. the different therapeutic isotopes studied, different carrier molecules like peptides and antibody and the biological aspects of these preparations

  4. International Society for Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQ Stem Cell Glossary Stem Cell Facts Other Societies/Networks Donate For the Public Events Save Save ... 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 International Society for Stem Cell Research 5215 Old Orchard Road, ...

  5. Sickle Cell Research: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease? Are there any restrictions on diet or exercise? Read More "Sickle Cell Disease" Articles "Be Sickle Smart!" / Sickle Cell Research: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow / Sickle Cell Disease: Symptoms, ...

  6. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We detailedly examine temperature effects of Fluo-3 AM labelling in adherent cells. •4 °C Loading and 20 °C de-esterification of Fluo-3 AM yields brighter nuclei. •Brighter nuclei labelling by Fluo-3 AM also depends on cell adhesion quality. •A qualitative model of the brighter nucleus is proposed. -- Abstract: Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca2+]c) and nuclear calcium ([Ca2+]n) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca2+]n detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca2+]n and [Ca2+]c in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells

  7. Initial evaluation of the use of USPIO cell labeling and noninvasive MR monitoring of human tissue-engineered vascular grafts in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, G. N.; Roh, J. D.; Mirensky, T. L.; Y Wang; Yi, T.; Tellides, G.; Pober, J S; Shkarin, P.; Shapiro, E. M.; Saltzman, W M; Papademetris, X.; Fahmy, T. M.; Breuer, C.K.

    2008-01-01

    This pilot study examines noninvasive MR monitoring of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) in vivo using cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles. Human aortic smooth muscle cells (hASMCs) were labeled with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles. The labeled hASMCs, along with human aortic endothelial cells, were incorporated into eight TEVGs and were then surgically implanted as aortic interposition grafts in a C.B-17 SCID/bg mouse host. USPIO-labeled hASMCs p...

  8. Synthesis of water-dispersible zinc oxide quantum dots with antibacterial activity and low cytotoxicity for cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typical photoluminescent semiconductor nanoparticles, called quantum dots (QDs), have potential applications in biological labeling. When used to label stem cells, QDs may impair the differentiation capacity of the stem cells. In this study, we synthesized zinc oxide (ZnO) QDs in methanol with an average size of ∼2 nm. We then employed two different types of polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules (SH-PEG-NH2 and NH2-PEG-NH2) to conjugate ZnO QDs and made them water-dispersible. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra indicated the attachment of PEG molecules on ZnO QDs. No obvious size alteration was observed for ZnO QDs after PEG conjugation. The water-dispersible ZnO QDs still retained the antibacterial activity and fluorescence intensity. The cytotoxicity evaluation revealed that ZnO QDs at higher concentrations decreased cell viability but were generally safe at 30 ppm or below. Cell lines of hepatocytes (HepG2), osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were successfully labeled by the water-dispersible ZnO QDs at 30 ppm. The ZnO QD-labeled MSCs maintained their stemness and differentiation capacity. Therefore, we conclude that the water-dispersible ZnO QDs developed in this study have antibacterial activity, low cytotoxicity, and proper labeling efficiency, and can be used to label a variety of cells including stem cells. (paper)

  9. A novel fluorescent label based on biological fluores-cent nanoparticles and its application in cell recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Uniform-sized fluorescent nanoparticles have been prepared by employing silica as the shell and a highly luminescent dye complex of ruthenium ion and bipyridyl, tris(2,2′-bipyridyl) dichlororuthenium(Ⅱ) hexahydrate as the core of the nanoparticles. A novel fluorescent label method is proposed, which is based on the biological fluorescent nanoparticles on the foundation of nanotechnology, biotechnology and fluorescent label technology. In comparison with the conventional fluorophores as fluorescent labels such as fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) label, this new label shows more superiority in photochemical stability, detection sensitivity and application scope for the biomedicine research. SmIgG+ B lymphocytes isolated from the circulating blood of human beings can be easily recognized by using this new fluorescent label.

  10. Tc-99m Labeled HMPAO white Blood Cell Scintigraphy in Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Aydın

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: 99mTc labeled hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO white blood cell (WBC scintigraphy is a frequently used option for acute infection, particularly in pediatric patients. This scintigraphy is applied to detect sites of infection/inflammation in patients with fever of unknown origin, to find and follow up osteomyelitis, and to detect suspicion of acute appendicitis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the value of 99mTc-HMPAO labeled WBC scintigraphy in pediatric patients. Material and Methods: The study was conducted between January 2006 and December 2008 and included 13 patients (5 boys, 8 girls; mean age 6.9±6.2 years. Those patients who had suspicion of bone infection (n=7, fever of unknown origin (n=3, and suspicion of acute appendicitis (n=3 were evaluated retrospectively. 99mTc-HMPAO labeled WBC scintigraphy imaging was performed to all patients. Diagnosis was done according to operation and pathological results or clinical follow-up. Results: 99mTc-HMPAO labeled WBC scintigraphy has been found to be true positive in 6 cases, true negative in 6 cases, and false negative in one patient who had fewer unknown origin. The false negative case has been found to have encephalitis with MRI. Conclusion: Leukocyte scintigraphy has been described as a useful diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of suspicion of bone infection, fever of unknown origin and suspicion of acute appendicitis. 99mTc-HMPAO labeled WBC scintigraphy is a rapid and very accurate method for detecting those pathologies. Our results showed that WBC scintigraphy might be reliably used for diagnosis of suspected bone infection and acute appendicitis, fever of unknown origin, and acute appendicitis, in pediatric patient population. (MIRT 2012;21:13-18

  11. Effect of paclitaxel, epirubicin and tamoxifen on labelling index in cultured ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of Paclitaxel (PAC), Epirubicin (EPR) and Tamoxifen (TAM) on ''3H-thymidine labelling index (''3H-TdR LI) of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT) was investigated in cultured. In the present study, an estrogen receptor positive ER(+) hyper diploid cell lines were studied. We used optimum doses of PAC, EPR and TAM (12 mg/ml, 12 mg/ml and 2 mg/ml, respectively). Cells were treated with these doses for 0, 4, 8, 16 and 32 hours. At the end of these periods, both control and treated cells were labelled for 5 mCi/ml 3H-thymidine for 30 minutes. The results showed that inhibition of DNA synthesis in cultured EAT cells were increased in the combined treatment of two drugs when compared to the treatment of a single drug (p<0.01). In the treatment of three drugs, however, this effect reached a maximum (p<0.001). As a result, PAC+EPR+TAM treatment's had a maximum synergistic effect at 4 hours treatment

  12. Near-infrared emitting fluorescent nanocrystals-labeled natural killer cells as a platform technology for the optical imaging of immunotherapeutic cells-based cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the development of near-infrared optical imaging technology for the monitoring of immunotherapeutic cell-based cancer therapy using natural killer (NK) cells labeled with fluorescent nanocrystals. Although NK cell-based immunotherapeutic strategies have drawn interest as potent preclinical or clinical methods of cancer therapy, there are few reports documenting the molecular imaging of NK cell-based cancer therapy, primarily due to the difficulty of labeling of NK cells with imaging probes. Human natural killer cells (NK92MI) were labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated quantum dots (QD705) for fluorescence imaging. FACS analysis showed that the NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 have no effect on the cell viability. The effect of anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 labeling on the NK92MI cell function was investigated by measuring interferon gamma (IFN- γ) production and cytolytic activity. Finally, the NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 showed a therapeutic effect similar to that of unlabeled NK92MI cells. Images of intratumorally injected NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated could be acquired using near-infrared optical imaging both in vivo and in vitro. This result demonstrates that the immunotherapeutic cells labeled with fluorescent nanocrystals can be a versatile platform for the effective tracking of injected therapeutic cells using optical imaging technology, which is very important in cell-based cancer therapies.

  13. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals dually doped with fluorescent and paramagnetic labels for bimodal (luminomagnetic) cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (HAp NCs) were prepared that contain both a fluorescent label (fluorescein) and the paramagnetic label Ho3+ ion. Synthesis was performed by a surfactant-free aqueous method using commonly available precursors and dopants. The resulting HAp NCs display a spindle like hexagonal phase morphology. Their average diameter and length are 10 and 60 nm, respectively. The photoluminescence of the HAp NCs displays substantial variation with concentration of the fluorophore. The co-dopant Ho3+ endows the nanocrystals with paramagnetism and has little effect on the luminescence of the fluorescent label. The surface of the nanocrystals was coated with polyethyleneimine and the resulting particles were covalently conjugated to folic acid in order to enable targeting of the folate receptor that is over expressed in cancer cells. The HAp NCs are biocompatible as proven by an MTT assay that revealed no apparent toxicity in doses as high as 800 μg∙mL−1 after a 48 h incubation period. The HAp NCs were used as a fluorescent bioimaging probe for in vitro imaging of HeLa cells. The characterization of the magnetic properties indicates the paramagnetic nature of the nanocrystals with a magnetization of 7.3118 emu∙g−1, and this property makes the system potentially suited for application as a Ho3+ based contrast agent for T2 magnetic resonance imaging.(author)

  14. Tunable coating of gold nanostars: tailoring robust SERS labels for cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, B.; Taglietti, A.; Galinetto, P.; Marchesi, N.; Pascale, A.; Cabrini, E.; Pallavicini, P.; Dacarro, G.

    2016-07-01

    Surface modification of noble metal nanoparticles with mixed molecular monolayers is one of the most powerful tools in nanotechnology, and is used to impart and tune new complex surface properties. In imaging techniques based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), precise and controllable surface modifications are needed to carefully design reproducible, robust and adjustable SERS nanoprobes. We report here the attainment of SERS labels based on gold nanostars (GNSs) coated with a mixed monolayer composed of a poly ethylene glycol (PEG) thiol (neutral or negatively charged) that ensure stability in biological environments, and of a signalling unit 7-Mercapto-4-methylcoumarin as a Raman reporter molecule. The composition of the coating mixture is precisely controlled using an original method, allowing the modulation of the SERS intensity and ensuring overall nanoprobe stability. The further addition of a positively charged layer of poly (allylamine hydrocloride) on the surface of negatively charged SERS labels does not change the SERS response, but it promotes the penetration of GNSs in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. As an example of an application of such an approach, we demonstrate here the internalization of these new labels by means of visualization of cell morphology obtained with SERS mapping.

  15. Probing Xylan-Specific Raman Bands for Label-Free Imaging Xylan in Plant Cell Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Tucker, Melvin P.; Vinzant, Todd; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-06-15

    Xylan constitutes a significant portion of biomass (e.g. 22% in corn stover used in this study). Xylan is also an important source of carbohydrates, besides cellulose, for renewable and sustainable energy applications. Currently used method for the localization of xylan in biomass is to use fluorescence confocal microscope to image the fluorescent dye labeled monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to xylan. With the rapid adoption of the Raman-based label-free chemical imaging techniques in biology, identifying Raman bands that are unique to xylan would be critical for the implementation of the above label-free techniques for in situ xylan imaging. Unlike lignin and cellulose that have long be assigned fingerprint Raman bands, specific Raman bands for xylan remain unclear. The major challenge is the cellulose in plant cell wall, which has chemical units highly similar to that of xylan. Here we report using xylanase to specifically remove xylan from feedstock. Under various degree of xylan removal, with minimum impact to other major cell wall components, i.e. lignin and cellulose, we have identified Raman bands that could be further tested for chemical imaging of xylan in biomass in situ.

  16. Efficient production of isotopically labeled proteins by cell-free synthesis: A practical protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We provide detailed descriptions of our refined protocols for the cell-free production of labeled protein samples for NMR spectroscopy. These methods are efficient and overcome two critical problems associated with the use of conventional Escherichia coli extract systems. Endogenous amino acids normally present in E. coli S30 extracts dilute the added labeled amino acids and degrade the quality of NMR spectra of the target protein. This problem was solved by altering the protocol used in preparing the S30 extract so as to minimize the content of endogenous amino acids. The second problem encountered in conventional E. coli cell-free protein production is non-uniformity in the N-terminus of the target protein, which can complicate the NMR spectra. This problem was solved by adding a DNA sequence to the construct that codes for a cleavable N-terminal peptide tag. Addition of the tag serves to increase the yield of the protein as well as to ensure a homogeneous protein product following tag cleavage. We illustrate the method by describing its stepwise application to the production of calmodulin samples with different stable isotope labeling patterns for NMR analysis

  17. Effect of HSA coated iron oxide labeling on human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanganeria, Purva; Chandra, Sudeshna; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Khanna, Aparna

    2015-03-01

    Human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are known for self-renewal and differentiation into cells of various lineages like bone, cartilage and fat. They have been used in biomedical applications to treat degenerative disorders. However, to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells, there is a requirement of sensitive non-invasive imaging techniques which will offer the ability to track transplanted cells, bio-distribution, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we have analyzed the efficacy of human serum albumin coated iron oxide nanoparticles (HSA-IONPs) on the differentiation of hUC-MSCs. The colloidal stability of the HSA-IONPs was tested over a long period of time (≥20 months) and the optimized concentration of HSA-IONPs for labeling the stem cells was 60 μg ml-1. Detailed in vitro assays have been performed to ascertain the effect of the nanoparticles (NPs) on stem cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay showed minimum release of LDH depicting the least disruptions in cellular membrane. At the same time, mitochondrial impairment of the cells was also not observed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed lesser generation of reactive oxygen species in HSA-IONPs labeled hUC-MSCs in comparison to bare and commercial IONPs. Transmission electron microscopy showed endocytic engulfment of the NPs by the hUC-MSCs. During the process, the gross morphologies of the actin cytoskeleton were found to be intact as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Also, the engulfment of the HSA-IONPs did not show any detrimental effect on the differentiation potential of the stem cells into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, thereby confirming that the inherent properties of stem cells were maintained.

  18. Effect of HSA coated iron oxide labeling on human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are known for self-renewal and differentiation into cells of various lineages like bone, cartilage and fat. They have been used in biomedical applications to treat degenerative disorders. However, to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells, there is a requirement of sensitive non-invasive imaging techniques which will offer the ability to track transplanted cells, bio-distribution, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we have analyzed the efficacy of human serum albumin coated iron oxide nanoparticles (HSA-IONPs) on the differentiation of hUC-MSCs. The colloidal stability of the HSA-IONPs was tested over a long period of time (≥20 months) and the optimized concentration of HSA-IONPs for labeling the stem cells was 60 μg ml−1. Detailed in vitro assays have been performed to ascertain the effect of the nanoparticles (NPs) on stem cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay showed minimum release of LDH depicting the least disruptions in cellular membrane. At the same time, mitochondrial impairment of the cells was also not observed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed lesser generation of reactive oxygen species in HSA-IONPs labeled hUC-MSCs in comparison to bare and commercial IONPs. Transmission electron microscopy showed endocytic engulfment of the NPs by the hUC-MSCs. During the process, the gross morphologies of the actin cytoskeleton were found to be intact as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Also, the engulfment of the HSA-IONPs did not show any detrimental effect on the differentiation potential of the stem cells into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, thereby confirming that the inherent properties of stem cells were maintained. (paper)

  19. Tetrazine-Containing Amino Acid for Peptide Modification and Live Cell Labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqiu Ni

    Full Text Available A novel amino acid derivative 3-(4-(1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine-3-yl phenyl-2-aminopropanoic acid was synthesized in this study. The compound possessed better water-solubility and was synthesized more easily compared with the well-known and commercially available 3-(p-benzylamino-1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine. Tetrazine-containing amino acid showed excellent stability in biological media and might be used for cancer cell labeling. Moreover, the compound remained relatively stable in 50% TFA/DCM with little decomposition after prolonged exposure at room temperature. The compound could be utilized as phenylalanine or tyrosine analogue in peptide modification, and the tetrazine-containing peptide demonstrated more significant biological activity than that of the parent peptide. The combination of tetrazine group and amino acid offered broad development prospects of the bioorthogonal labeling and peptide synthesis.

  20. Suicide of EMT-6 tumor cells by decays from radioactively-labelled sensitizer adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitroaromatic radiosensitizers become metabolically bound preferentially to hypoxic cells and at least 10/sup 9/ adducts/cell can be tolerated as non-toxic. EMT-6 tumor cells have been incubated in hypoxia in the presence of /sup 3/H-Misonidazole and /sup 125/I-Azomycin Riboside for various times and the amount of /sup 3/H or /sup 125/I bound/cell was determined. Cells were stored as monolayers at 250C for up to 96 hr to accumulate radioactive decays and transferred at various times to 370C for colony-forming assays. No radiation inactivation was measured in cells which had incorporated at least 10/sup 6/ /sup 3/H or 10/sup 5/ /sup 125/I atoms. Previous studies had shown that -- 1% of MISO adducts to EMT-6 cells was associated with cellular DNA. These data indicate that the radiation-induced damage produced by these quantities of bound /sup 3/H or /sup 125/I causes little or not cell inactivation. The results of current studies to measure the colony-forming ability of sensitizer-labelled cells which have been stored in liquid nitrogen to facilitate the accumulation of more decays will be reported. These data suggest that a ''sensitizer-adduct suicide technique'' as a hypoxic cell selective adjunct to other cancer therapies is not feasible. These data are also instructive for those who attempt to develop radiolabelled ''tumor specific'' antibodies for therapeutic purposes

  1. Propanolol, Ciclosporine, Adryamicine, nifedipine and the in vitro labelling of red blood cells with 99mtechnetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To evaluate the possible influence of Propanolol, Ciclosporine, Adryamicine and Nifedipine on the labelling in vitro of red blood cells. Materials And Methods: 20 ml of blood were withdrawn from 40 healthy volunteers that have not used drug seven days before of experiments. 2,0ml aliquots of each sample were incubated at 37 deg. C for 30 min with different concentrations of drugs to the two labelling method used. In the simple method 60ml of stannous chloride solution (10,2 m g/ml) were added and the samples centrifuged at 1000g for 5 min and plasma and blood cells were isolated. After that, 2,0ml of saline, 0,2 ml of EDTA (2,2%) and 7,4 MBq of 99mTc were also added. To the hypochlorite method the blood samples were incubated with SnCl2 (10,2m g/ml) for 5 min. After this period of time, 40ml of NaClO solution (1%) and all the reagents mentioned to simple method were added. The samples were centrifuged and labelling yield was calculated to both methods. Conclusions: The analysis of the results shows that using the two methods described there are no significant differences on the in vitro labelling of RBC with 99mTc at the used concentrations of all of these studied drugs. We can speculate that the interferences observed in vivo may be due the presence of active metabolites or interactions among different drugs

  2. Optical painting and fluorescence activated sorting of single adherent cells labelled with photoswitchable Pdots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chun-Ting; Thompson, Alison M; Gallina, Maria Elena; Ye, Fangmao; Johnson, Eleanor S; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Mengxia; Yu, Jiangbo; Wu, I-Che; Fujimoto, Bryant; DuFort, Christopher C; Carlson, Markus A; Hingorani, Sunil R; Paguirigan, Amy L; Radich, Jerald P; Chiu, Daniel T

    2016-01-01

    The efficient selection and isolation of individual cells of interest from a mixed population is desired in many biomedical and clinical applications. Here we show the concept of using photoswitchable semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) as an optical 'painting' tool, which enables the selection of certain adherent cells based on their fluorescence, and their spatial and morphological features, under a microscope. We first develop a Pdot that can switch between the bright (ON) and dark (OFF) states reversibly with a 150-fold contrast ratio on irradiation with ultraviolet or red light. With a focused 633-nm laser beam that acts as a 'paintbrush' and the photoswitchable Pdots as the 'paint', we select and 'paint' individual Pdot-labelled adherent cells by turning on their fluorescence, then proceed to sort and recover the optically marked cells (with 90% recovery and near 100% purity), followed by genetic analysis. PMID:27118210

  3. Transferrin protein nanospheres: a nanoplatform for receptor-mediated cancer cell labeling and gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael A.; Spurlin, Tighe A.; Tona, Alessandro; Elliott, John T.; Halter, Michael; Plant, Anne L.

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents preliminary results on the use of transferrin protein nanospheres (TfpNS) for targeting cancer cells in vitro. Protein nanospheres represent an easily prepared and modifiable nanoplatform for receptor-specific targeting, molecular imaging and gene delivery. Rhodamine B isothiocyanate conjugated TfpNS (RBITC-TfpNS) show significantly enhanced uptake in vitro in SK-MEL-28 human malignant melanoma cells known to overexpress transferrin receptors compared to controls. RBITCTfpNS labeling of the cancer cells is due to transferrin receptor-mediated uptake, as demonstrated by competitive inhibition with native transferrin. Initial fluorescence microscopy studies indicate GFP plasmid can be transfected into melanoma cells via GFP plasmid encapsulated by TfpNS.

  4. Inorganic phosphate nanorods are a novel fluorescent label in cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Priyabrata

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the first use of inorganic fluorescent lanthanide (europium and terbium ortho phosphate [LnPO4·H2O, Ln = Eu and Tb] nanorods as a novel fluorescent label in cell biology. These nanorods, synthesized by the microwave technique, retain their fluorescent properties after internalization into human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, 786-O cells, or renal carcinoma cells (RCC. The cellular internalization of these nanorods and their fluorescence properties were characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy (FS, differential interference contrast (DIC microscopy, confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. At concentrations up to 50 μg/ml, the use of [3H]-thymidine incorporation assays, apoptosis assays (TUNEL, and trypan blue exclusion illustrated the non-toxic nature of these nanorods, a major advantage over traditional organic dyes

  5. Label Free Detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells Using the Optofluidic Ring Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T. Gohring

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated label free detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Lymphocyte whole cells and CD4+ T-Lymphocyte cell lysis using the optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR sensor. The OFRR sensing platform incorporates microfluidics and photonics in a setup that utilizes small sample volume and achieves a fast detection time. In this work, white blood cells were isolated from healthy blood and the concentrations were adjusted to match T-Lymphocyte levels of individuals infected with HIV. Detection was accomplished by immobilizing CD4 and CD8 antibodies on the inner surface of the OFRR. Sensing results show excellent detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Lymphocyte cells at medically significant concentrations with a detection time of approximately 30 minutes. This work will lead to a rapid and low-cost sensing device that can provide a CD4 and CD8 count as a measure of HIV progression.

  6. Human induced pluripotent stem cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and hyperthermia therapy for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells exhibit great potential for generating functional human cells for medical therapies. In this paper, we report for use of human iPS cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) for targeted imaging and synergistic therapy of gastric cancer cells in vivo. Human iPS cells were prepared and cultured for 72 h. The culture medium was collected, and then was co-incubated with MGC803 cells. Cell viability was analyzed by the MTT method. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells were prepared and injected into gastric cancer-bearing nude mice. The mouse model was observed using a small-animal imaging system. The nude mice were irradiated under an external alternating magnetic field and evaluated using an infrared thermal mapping instrument. Tumor sizes were measured weekly. iPS cells and the collected culture medium inhibited the growth of MGC803 cells. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells targeted and imaged gastric cancer cells in vivo, as well as inhibited cancer growth in vivo through the external magnetic field. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells exhibit considerable potential in applications such as targeted dual-mode imaging and synergistic therapy for early gastric cancer

  7. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction.

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    Ting Lu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs.Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela and suspended cells (K562 even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it.These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results.

  8. Cell-free expression and stable isotope labelling strategies for membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane proteins are highly underrepresented in the structural data-base and remain one of the most challenging targets for functional and structural elucidation. Their roles in transport and cellular communication, furthermore, often make over-expression toxic to their host, and their hydrophobicity and structural complexity make isolation and reconstitution a complicated task, especially in cases where proteins are targeted to inclusion bodies. The development of cell-free expression systems provides a very interesting alternative to cell-based systems, since it circumvents many problems such as toxicity or necessity for the transportation of the synthesized protein to the membrane, and constitutes the only system that allows for direct production of membrane proteins in membrane-mimetic environments which may be suitable for liquid state NMR measurements. The unique advantages of the cell-free expression system, including strong expression yields as well as the direct incorporation of almost any combination of amino acids with very little metabolic scrambling, has allowed for the development of a wide-array of isotope labelling techniques which facilitate structural investigations of proteins whose spectral congestion and broad line-widths may have earlier rendered them beyond the scope of NMR. Here we explore various labelling strategies in conjunction with cell-free developments, with a particular focus on α-helical transmembrane proteins which benefit most from such methods.

  9. Photoaffinity labeling demonstrates binding between Ia and antigen on antigen-presenting cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) bind and present antigens to immunocompetent T lymphocytes in the context of Ia molecules: however, the molecular nature of the immunogenic complexes on the surface of these cells is unknown. They have used radioiodinated photoreactive Beef insulin (BI) derivatized in the B29 position with (n-[4-(4'-azido-3'-[125]iodophenylazo)benzoyl]-3-aminopropyl-n-oxy-succinimide) (B29-AZAP) as antigen to examine the nature of these molecular complexes. The probe was reacted with either of two B hybridoma APCs, TA3 (Ia/sup k/d/) and LB(Ia/sup d/b/) which present insulin on I-A/sup d/ and I-A/sub b/ respectively, to appropriately restricted, BI specific T helper lymphocytes (T/sub H/). Samples were photolyzed, solubilized and then analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Two protein bands of 36-kDa and 27-kDa were specifically labeled on TA3 and LB cells. Treatment of these bands with dithiothreitol or endo-N-β-glycosidase F demonstrates that each is composed of a single glycoprotein. These bands are immunoprecipitable with haplotype specific but not control anti-Ia antibodies. This identifies the labeled bands as the α- and β- subunits of class II MHC antigens. They conclude that a molecular complex may form between Ia and antigen on APCs and that formation of this complex does not require the presence of an antigen specific T/sub H/ cell receptor

  10. Quantifying size-dependent interactions between fluorescently labeled polystyrene nanoparticles and mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varela Juan A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanoparticles (NPs are currently used in a wide variety of fields such as technology, medicine and industry. Due to the novelty of these applications and to ensure their success, a precise characterization of the interactions between NPs and cells is essential. Findings The current study explores the uptake of polystyrene NPs by 1321N1 human astrocytoma and A549 human lung carcinoma cell lines. In this work we show for the first time a comparison of the uptake rates of fluorescently labeled carboxylated polystyrene (PS NPs of different sizes (20, 40 and 100 nm in two different cell types, keeping the number of NPs per unit volume constant for all sizes. We propose a reliable methodology to control the dose of fluorescently labeled NPs, by counting individual NPs using automated particle detection from 3D confocal microscopy images. The possibility of detecting individual NPs also allowed us to calculate the size of each nanoparticle and compare the fluorescence of single NPs across different sizes, thereby providing a robust platform for normalization of NP internalization experiments as measured by flow cytometry. Conclusions Our findings show that 40 nm NPs are internalized faster than 20 nm or 100 nm particles in both cell lines studied, suggesting that there is a privileged size gap in which the internalization of NPs is higher.

  11. Label-free nonlinear optical microscopy detects early markers for osteogenic differentiation of human stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofemeier, Arne D.; Hachmeister, Henning; Pilger, Christian; Schürmann, Matthias; Greiner, Johannes F. W.; Nolte, Lena; Sudhoff, Holger; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Huser, Thomas; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Tissue engineering by stem cell differentiation is a novel treatment option for bone regeneration. Most approaches for the detection of osteogenic differentiation are invasive or destructive and not compatible with live cell analysis. Here, non-destructive and label-free approaches of Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy were used to detect and image osteogenic differentiation of human neural crest-derived inferior turbinate stem cells (ITSCs). Combined CARS and SHG microscopy was able to detect markers of osteogenesis within 14 days after osteogenic induction. This process increased during continued differentiation. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy showed significant increases of the PO43‑ symmetric stretch vibrations at 959 cm‑1 assigned to calcium hydroxyapatite between days 14 and 21. Additionally, CARS microscopy was able to image calcium hydroxyapatite deposits within 14 days following osteogenic induction, which was confirmed by Alizarin Red-Staining and RT- PCR. Taken together, the multimodal label-free analysis methods Raman spectroscopy, CARS and SHG microscopy can monitor osteogenic differentiation of adult human stem cells into osteoblasts with high sensitivity and spatial resolution in three dimensions. Our findings suggest a great potential of these optical detection methods for clinical applications including in vivo observation of bone tissue–implant-interfaces or disease diagnosis.

  12. In vivo tracking of magnetically labeled mesenchmal stem cells injected via renal arteries in kidney failure rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate in vivo depiction and tracking for magnetically labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stern cells (MSCs) in a renal failure rat model injected intravascularly using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Methods: Rat MSCs were isolated, purified, expanded and then incubated with home synthesized Fe2O3-PLL. Prussian blue stain was employed for identifying intracellular irons. An acute renal failure in rat was induced by intramuscular injection of glycerol and MSCs were injected into renal arteries of 11 recipients (labeled cells in six, unlabeled cells in five). MR images of kidneys were obtained respectively before injection of MSCs, and immediately, 1, 3, 5, and 8 clays after transplantation. MR imaging findings were analyzed, which were correlated with histological findings. Results: Rat MSCs were successfully labeled, and labeling efficiency was almost 100%. Prussian blue staining of Fe2O3-PLL labeled cells revealed the presence of iron-containing vesicles or endosomes in the cytoplasm. In the renal failure model of rats, the labeled MSCs were demonstrated as signal intensity loss in renal cortex on T2*-weighted MR images. The signal intensity decrease was visualized up to days 8 after transplantation. Histological analyses showed that most Prussian blue staining-positive cells were well correlated with the area where a signal intensity loss was observed in MRI. Signal intensity decrease was not detected after transplantation of unlabeled cells. Conclusion: The rat MSCs can be effectively labeled with Fe2O3-PLL. 1.5-T MR imaging seems to be a good technique to monitor the magnetically labeled MSCs in vivo in renal failure rat model intravascularly administered, which may have much more potential values for studying the engraftment of stem cells in kidneys. (authors)

  13. Relation between clinical mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood and their spatial label free scattering patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Zhenxi; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Li

    2016-07-01

    A single living cell's light scattering pattern (LSP) in the horizontal plane, which has been denoted as the cell's "2D fingerprint," may provide a powerful label-free detection tool in clinical applications. We have recently studied the LSP in spatial scattering planes, denoted as the cell's "3D fingerprint," for mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood. The effects of membrane size, morphology, and the existence of the nucleus on the spatial LSP are discussed. In order to distinguish clinical label-free mature and immature lymphocytes, the special features of the spatial LSP are studied by statistical method in both the spatial and frequency domains. Spatial LSP provides rich information on the cell's morphology and contents, which can distinguish mature from immature lymphocyte cells and hence ultimately it may be a useful label-free technique for clinical leukemia diagnosis.

  14. Receiving fluoroginolones group antibiotics labeled by 99m Tc for diagnostic researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Diagnostics of infectious inflammatory diseases remains one of the most important problems of modern medicine. To solve this problem, one can use radioactive isotope indication methods, which in many cases allow an estimation of physiological changes in the damaged bodies and tissues at early stages of diseases. The researches have been carried out on creation of steady reagents (in the form of a standard set to the generator 99mTc) for reception of fluoroginolones group antibiotics labeled by 99mTc. For carrying out of the researches we used Ciprofloxacine hydrochloride (CFH), tin dichloride, ammonia water, ethyl acetate, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, silica gel plates for thin-layer chromatographies 'Sorbfil', and entered the fluorescent indicator λ= 254 nm in the sorbent. Reagents for a preparation were prepared in the form of dry sterile mixes CFH and reducing agent of SnCl2 with various concentrations. 5 ml of a solution of sodium pertechnetate, 99mTc from the generator 99mTc, were added into the received dry mix. The received mix incubation period was 20 minutes until the CFH is fully dissolved. For definition of the radiochemical impurity (RCI) in a received preparation, we used a method of thin-layer chromatographies in two systems: acetone, and a mix of ethyl acetate, isopropyl alcohol and the concentrated ammonia in a volumetric parity of 12:6:4. With the purpose to decrease formation of colloids, researches in two directions were carried out. The first consisted in changing the pH of environment to make it more acid by introducing a hydrochloric acid, the second - in change of SnCl2 concentration in the mix in order to determine the optimal concentration of a reducer. It is shown, that at SnCl2 concentration of 0.2 mg to 5 mg of ciprofloxacine, the received labeled preparation can be used without a filtration. Study of 'Ciprofloxacine, 99mTc preparation distribution in bodies and tissues of experimental animals (rabbits and rats) and

  15. Cell Wall Growth and Modulation Dynamics in a Model Unicellular Green Alga—Penium margaritaceum: Live Cell Labeling with Monoclonal Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Domozych, David S; Hannah Brechka; Alicia Britton; Marc Toso

    2011-01-01

    Penium margaritaceum is a unicellular charophycean green alga that possesses cell wall polymers similar to those of land plants. Several wall macromolecules of this alga are recognized by monoclonal antibodies specific for wall polymer epitopes of land plants. Immunofluorescence protocols using these antibodies may be employed to label specific cell wall constituents of live cells. Fluorescent labeling persists for several days, and this attribute allows for tracing of wall epitopes in both l...

  16. Thyroid cell lines in research on goitrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, H; Peter, H J; Asmis, L; Studer, H

    1991-12-01

    Thyroid cell lines have contributed a lot to the understanding of goitrogenesis. The cell lines mostly used in thyroid research are briefly discussed, namely the rat thyroid cell lines FRTL and FRTL-5, the porcine thyroid cell lines PORTHOS and ARTHOS, The sheep thyroid cell lines OVNIS 5H and 6H, the cat thyroid cell lines PETCAT 1 to 4 and ROMCAT, and the human thyroid cell lines FTC-133 and HTh 74. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and COS-7 cells, stably transfected with TSH receptor cDNA and expressing a functional TSH receptor, are discussed as examples for non-thyroidal cells, transfected with thyroid genes. PMID:1726925

  17. Tracking of [18F]FDG-labeled natural killer cells to HER2/neu-positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to label the human natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 with [18F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) for subsequent in vivo tracking to HER2/neu-positive tumors. Methods: NK-92 cells were genetically modified to NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, which express a chimeric antigen receptor that is specific to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen. NK-92 and NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells were labeled with [18F]FDG by simple incubation at different settings. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by a gamma counter. Subsequently, [18F]FDG-labeled parental NK-92 or NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells were intravenously injected into mice with implanted HER2/neu-positive NIH/3T3 tumors. Radioactivity in tumors was quantified by digital autoradiography and correlated with histopathology. Results: The NK-92 and NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells could be efficiently labeled with [18F]FDG by simple incubation. Optimal labeling efficiencies (80%) were achieved using an incubation period of 60 min and additional insulin (10 IU/ml). After injection of 5x106 [18F]FDG-labeled NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells into tumor-bearing mice, digital autoradiography showed an increased uptake of radioactivity in HER2/neu-positive tumors at 60 min postinjection. Conversely, injection of 5x106 NK-92 cells not directed against HER2/neu receptors did not result in increased uptake of radioactivity in the tumors. Histopathology confirmed an accumulation of the NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, but not the parental NK cells, in tumor tissues. Conclusion: The human NK cell line NK-92 can be directed against HER2/neu antigens by genetic modification. The genetically modified NK cells can be efficiently labeled with [18F]FDG, and the accumulation of these labeled NK cells in HER2/neu-positive tumors can be monitored with autoradiography

  18. [Rapidly labelled low molecular weight components in nucleic acid preparations from plant cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, G; Grotha, R

    1974-09-01

    After pulse-labelling with [(3)H]nucleosides and [(3)H]orotic acid of freely suspended callus cells of Petroselinum sativum and tissue fragments of the liverwort Riella helicophylla, rapidly labelled low molecular weight components were detected among the total nucleic acids when these were extracted in the presence of Mg(2+) and finally precipitated with alcohol. These highly labelled species could clearly be distinguished from the 5 S- and 4 S-RNA on the basis of their migration in agarose-polyacrylamide gels (2.4%) and their elution from Sephadex G-150 columns. No degradation was obtained with DNase and RNase. By using [(14)C]ATP as a marker it was found that the low molecular components consisted mainly of nucleoside triphosphates. Only small amounts of nucleoside diphosphates were detected, which were obviously formed by degradation of the former. Nucleic acid preparations free of nucleoside phosphates were obtained by using Mg-free extraction buffers containing EDTA. PMID:24458196

  19. Stimulus-dependent labeling of cultured ganglionic cell with [14C]2-deoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors prepared cultures of dissociated cells from the ciliary (CG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of 10-12-day-old chick embryos, and applied [14C]2-deoxyglucose ([14C]2-DG) to the cultured cells to examine the effects of stimulation on the labeling with [14C]2-DG at the single cell level. Electrical current stimulation increased [14C]2-DG uptake in CG and DRG neurons. The increase depended on frequency of the stimulation. These effects were potentiated by the application of tetraethylammonium, but suppressed by tetrodotoxin. Externally applied potassium ions increased the [14C]2-DG uptake in the CG cell, depending logarithmically on the concentration of applied KCl. The concentration-dependent increase agreed with potassium effect on the equilibrium potential. For CG cells, acetylcholine (ACh), glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine induced remarkable increases of the [14C]2-DG uptake, while dopamine did not induce any change. For DRG cells, GABA and glycine facilitated the [14C]2-DG uptake, while ACh, glutamate and dopamine did not have any significant effects on it. These facilitatory actions of neurotransmitters on the [14C]2-DG uptake are mostly consistent with the excitatory effects of the substrates on both CG and DRG cells in culture. The results suggest that the [14C]2-DG uptake in single cells is intimately correlated with action potential generation and change in the resting potential. (Auth.)

  20. A recombinant fungal lectin for labeling truncated glycans on human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric Audfray

    Full Text Available Cell surface glycoconjugates present alterations of their structures in chronic diseases and distinct oligosaccharide epitopes have been associated with cancer. Among them, truncated glycans present terminal non-reducing β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc residues that are rare on healthy tissues. Lectins from unconventional sources such as fungi or algi provide novel markers that bind specifically to such epitopes, but their availability may be challenging. A GlcNAc-binding lectin from the fruiting body of the fungus Psathyrella velutina (PVL has been produced in good yield in bacterial culture. A strong specificity for terminal GlcNAc residues was evidenced by glycan array. Affinity values obtained by microcalorimetry and surface plasmon resonance demonstrated a micromolar affinity for GlcNAcβ1-3Gal epitopes and for biantennary N-glycans with GlcNAcβ1-2Man capped branches. Crystal structure of PVL complexed with GlcNAcβ1-3Gal established the structural basis of the specificity. Labeling of several types of cancer cells and use of inhibitors of glycan metabolism indicated that rPVL binds to terminal GlcNAc but also to sialic acid (Neu5Ac. Analysis of glycosyltransferase expression confirmed the higher amount of GlcNAc present on cancer cells. rPVL binding is specific to cancer tissue and weak or no labeling is observed for healthy ones, except for stomach glands that present unique αGlcNAc-presenting mucins. In lung, breast and colon carcinomas, a clear delineation could be observed between cancer regions and surrounding healthy tissues. PVL is therefore a useful tool for labeling agalacto-glycans in cancer or other diseases.

  1. Label-Free Imaging and Biochemical Characterization of Bovine Sperm Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonietta Ferrara

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A full label-free morphological and biochemical characterization is desirable to select spermatozoa during preparation for artificial insemination. In order to study these fundamental parameters, we take advantage of two attractive techniques: digital holography (DH and Raman spectroscopy (RS. DH presents new opportunities for studying morphological aspect of cells and tissues non-invasively, quantitatively and without the need for staining or tagging, while RS is a very specific technique allowing the biochemical analysis of cellular components with a spatial resolution in the sub-micrometer range. In this paper, morphological and biochemical bovine sperm cell alterations were studied using these techniques. In addition, a complementary DH and RS study was performed to identify X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm cells. We demonstrate that the two techniques together are a powerful and highly efficient tool elucidating some important criterions for sperm morphological selection and sex-identification, overcoming many of the limitations associated with existing protocols.

  2. In vivo tracking of stem cells labeled with a nanoparticle in Alzheimer's disease animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sungji; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Chang, Keun-A.

    2013-05-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of diverse conditions including neurodegenerative diseases. To understand transplanted stem cell biology, in vivo imaging is necessary. Nano material has great potential for in vivo imaging and several noninvasive methods are used such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), Fluorescence imaging (FI) and Near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRFI). However, each method has limitations for in vivo imaging. To overcome these limitations, multimodal nanoprobes have been developed. In the present study, we intravenously injected human adipose derived stem cells (hASCs) that labeled with multimodal nano particle, LEO-LIVETM-Magnoxide 797 or 675, into the Tg2576 mice, Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model. Sequential in vivo tracking was performed with mice injected with hASCs. We could found fluorescence signals until 10 days after injection.

  3. Setting FIRES to Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Roxanne Grietz

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this lesson is to present the basic scientific knowledge about stem cells, the promise of stem cell research to medicine, and the ethical considerations and arguments involved. One of the challenges of discussing stem cell research is that the field is constantly evolving and the most current information changes almost daily. Few…

  4. Indium-111-oxine labeled leukocyte uptake in Ki-1-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, W.; Amodio, J.B.; Scharf, S.C. (New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Rivlin, K.A. (Department of Hematology and Oncology, New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (United States)); Desai, P. (Department of Pathology, Hospital for Joint Diseases-Orthopaedic Inst., New York, NY (United States)); Breuer, F. (Department of Pathology, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY (United States))

    1999-08-01

    Indium-111-oxine labeled leukocyte ([sup 111]In-WBC) scintigraphy is well known for its ability to localize in areas of active infection, but not in areas of lymphomatous involvement. We present a case of Ki-1-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma that was initially thought to be a case of multifocal osteomyelitis because of positive uptake on a [sup 111]In-WBC scan. The areas of abnormal uptake on the indium scan were demonstrated histopathologically to be sites of lymphomatous involvement in bone. (orig.) With 4 figs., 3 refs.

  5. Transplantation of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells improves cardiac function in a swine myocardial infarction model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Chun-mei; JU Sheng-hong; MA Ming; TANG Yao-liang; MA Gen-shan; LIU Nai-feng; SHEN Cheng-xing; CHEN Zhong; LIU Xiao-jun; HU Yao-peng; ZHANG Xiao-li; TENG Gao-jun

    2008-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation provides a new approach for myocardial repair.However,many important fundamental questions about MSCs transplantation remain unanswered.There is an urgent need to identify MSCs from the beating heart and analyze the efficacy of this new approach.This study aimed to localize the magnetically labeled MSCs(MR-MSCs)and monitor the restorative effects of MR-MSCs with magnetic resonance(MR) imaging.Methods Acute myocardial infarction(AMI)was created in swine by a balloon occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery.Cells were delivered via intracoronary infusion after myocardial infarction.Infarct size change and cardiac function were assessed with 3.0T MR scanner.The results were then confirmed by histological and western blot analysis.All statistical procedures were performed with Systat (SPSS version 12.01).Results A total of 26 swine were divided into four groups(sham-operated group,n=6;AMI group with PBS transplantation,n=6;labeled MSCs group,n=7;unlabeled MSCs group,n=7).MSCs,MR-MSCs(107 cells)or PBS were delivered by intracoronary injection after MI and serial cardiac MR imaging studies were performed at 0,4 and 8 weeks after transplantation.MR imaging demonstrated MI size decreased after MSCs transplantation in labeled and unlabeled groups,however,increases were seen in the AMI group at 8 weeks after MI.The left ventricular eiection fraction(LVEF) was slightly increased in the AMI group((41.87±2.45)%vs(39.04±2.80)%,P>0.05),but significantly improved in the MR-MSCs group((56.85±1.29)%vs(40.67±2.00)%,P<0.05)and unlabeled group((55.38±1.07)%vs(41.78±2.08)%,P<0.05) at 8 weeks after treatment.MR-MSCs were further confirmed by Prussian blue and immunofluorescent staining.Western blot analvsis demonstrated that there was an increased expression of cardiomyocyte markers such as myosin heavy chain and troponin T in the MSCs treatment groups and the ratio of matrix metalloproteinase 2 to

  6. Quantitative single cell monitoring of protein synthesis at subcellular resolution using fluorescently labeled tRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Barhoom, Sima; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cooperman, Barry S.; Smorodinsky, Nechama I.; Smilansky, Zeev; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel technique of using fluorescent tRNA for translation monitoring (FtTM). FtTM enables the identification and monitoring of active protein synthesis sites within live cells at submicron resolution through quantitative microscopy of transfected bulk uncharged tRNA, fluorescently labeled in the D-loop (fl-tRNA). The localization of fl-tRNA to active translation sites was confirmed through its co-localization with cellular factors and its dynamic alterations upon inhibitio...

  7. Medical applications of nanoparticles in biological imaging, cell labeling, antimicrobial agents, and anticancer nanodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravina; Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2011-08-01

    This article reviews the applications of nanotechnology in the fields of medical and life sciences. Nanoparticles have shown promising applications from diagnosis to treatment of various types of diseases including cancer. In this review, we discuss the applications of nanostructured materials such as nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanorods, nanowires, and carbon nanotubes in diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labeling, contrast agents for biological imaging, antimicrobial agents, drug delivery systems, and anticancer nanodrugs for treatment of cancer and other infectious diseases. The adverse affects of nanoparticles on human skin from daily use in cosmetics and general toxicology of nanoscale materials are also reviewed. PMID:21870454

  8. Indium-111-oxine labeled leukocyte uptake in Ki-1-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium-111-oxine labeled leukocyte (111In-WBC) scintigraphy is well known for its ability to localize in areas of active infection, but not in areas of lymphomatous involvement. We present a case of Ki-1-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma that was initially thought to be a case of multifocal osteomyelitis because of positive uptake on a 111In-WBC scan. The areas of abnormal uptake on the indium scan were demonstrated histopathologically to be sites of lymphomatous involvement in bone. (orig.)

  9. The nematode stoma: Homology of cell architecture with improved understanding by confocal microscopy of labeled cell boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay Burr, A H; Baldwin, James G

    2016-09-01

    Nematode stomas vary widely in the cuticular structures evolved for different feeding strategies, yet the arrangement of the epithelial cell classes that form these structures may be conserved. This article addresses several issues that have impeded the full acceptance of this hypothesis including controversies arising from the structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans stoma. We investigated fluorescent antibody labeling of cell boundaries in conjunction with confocal microscopy as an alternative to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), using MH27 to label apical junctions in C. elegans and two other species. Accurately spaced optical sections collected by the confocal microscope provide a three-dimensional array of pixels (voxels) that, using image-processing software, can be rotated and sectioned at accurately chosen thicknesses and locations. Ribbons of fluorescence clearly identify cell boundaries along the luminal cuticle in C. elegans and Zeldia punctata and less clearly in Bunonema sp. The patterns render cell classes and their relationships readily identifiable. In the C. elegans stoma they correct a misreading of serial TEMs that was not congruent with architecture in other nematodes-the row of marginal cells is now seen to be continuous as in other nematodes, rather than being interrupted by encircling pm1 cells. Also impeding understanding, the reference to certain cell classes as 'epithelial' and others as "muscle" in the C. elegans literature is at variance with muscle expression in most other taxa. For consistent comparison among species, we propose that these cell class descriptors based on function be replaced by topological terms. With these and other confusing concepts and terminology removed, the homology of the cellular architecture among taxa becomes obvious. We provide a corrected description of the cell architecture of the C. elegans stoma and examples of how it is modified in other taxa with different feeding strategies. J. Morphol. 277

  10. Experimental therapy of disseminated B-Cell lymphoma xenografts with 213Bi-labeled anti-CD74

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 213Bi-labeled antibody to CD74 was evaluated as a therapeutic agent for B-cell lymphoma. The α-particle emission, with a half-life of 46 min, is appropriate for therapy of micrometastases. The labeled Ab retained full immunoreactivity, and was potent at single-cell kill of the Raji B-lymphoma cell line. Approximately 30 decays of cell-bound 213Bi was required for a cell kill of 99%, and dosimetry calculations suggested that the cGy dose delivered was sufficient to produce the level of toxicity observed. A non-reactive control Ab, labeled similarly, also produced toxicity, due to decays occurring in the medium, but was approximately 3-fold less potent than the reactive Ab. In a SCID mouse xenograft micrometastatic model, Ab injection at day 2 or day 5 after tumor inoculation resulted in strong, specific suppression of tumor growth, with some apparent cures

  11. Rapid and label-free separation of Burkitt's lymphoma cells from red blood cells by optically-induced electrokinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Liang

    Full Text Available Early stage detection of lymphoma cells is invaluable for providing reliable prognosis to patients. However, the purity of lymphoma cells in extracted samples from human patients' marrow is typically low. To address this issue, we report here our work on using optically-induced dielectrophoresis (ODEP force to rapidly purify Raji cells' (a type of Burkitt's lymphoma cell sample from red blood cells (RBCs with a label-free process. This method utilizes dynamically moving virtual electrodes to induce negative ODEP force of varying magnitudes on the Raji cells and RBCs in an optically-induced electrokinetics (OEK chip. Polarization models for the two types of cells that reflect their discriminate electrical properties were established. Then, the cells' differential velocities caused by a specific ODEP force field were obtained by a finite element simulation model, thereby established the theoretical basis that the two types of cells could be separated using an ODEP force field. To ensure that the ODEP force dominated the separation process, a comparison of the ODEP force with other significant electrokinetics forces was conducted using numerical results. Furthermore, the performance of the ODEP-based approach for separating Raji cells from RBCs was experimentally investigated. The results showed that these two types of cells, with different concentration ratios, could be separated rapidly using externally-applied electrical field at a driven frequency of 50 kHz at 20 Vpp. In addition, we have found that in order to facilitate ODEP-based cell separation, Raji cells' adhesion to the OEK chip's substrate should be minimized. This paper also presents our experimental results of finding the appropriate bovine serum albumin concentration in an isotonic solution to reduce cell adhesion, while maintaining suitable medium conductivity for electrokinetics-based cell separation. In short, we have demonstrated that OEK technology could be a promising tool for

  12. Effects of stem cell therapy on protein profile of parkinsonian rats using an(18) O-labeling quantitative proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yahui; Liu, Kefu; Qin, Wei; Liu, Chenghao; Zheng, Xiaowei; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The application of neural stem cell (NSC) research to neurodegenerative diseases has led to promising clinical trials. Currently, NSC therapy is most promising for Parkinson's disease (PD). We conducted behavioral tests and immunoassays for the profiling of a PD model in rats to assess the therapeutic effects of NSC treatments. Further, using a multiple sample comparison workflow, combined with (18) O-labeled proteome mixtures, we compared the differentially expressed proteins from control, PD, and NSC-treated PD rats. The results were analyzed bioinformatically and verified by Western blot. Based on our initial findings, we believe that the proteomic approach is a valuable tool in evaluating the therapeutic effects of NSC transplantation on neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26791447

  13. In vivo MR imaging of nanometer magnetically labeled bone marrow stromal cells transplanted via portal vein in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate in vivo magnetic resonance imaging with a conventional 1.5-T system for tracking of intra-portal vein transplantation nanometer magnetically labeled BMSCs in rat liver. Methods: BMSCs were isolated from 5 SD rats bone marrow with the density gradient centrifugation method. Then BMSCs were labeled with nanometer superpara-magnetic iron oxide and transfection agent. Cell labeling efficiency was assessed with determination of the percentage of Peris Prussian blue stain. Then BMSCs transplanted into normal rats' livers via portal vein. The receipts were divided into 5 groups ,including sham control,2 h ,3 d,7 d and 2 w after transplantation. Follow-up serial T1WI,T2WI and T2*-weighted gradient- echo MR imaging were performed at 1.5 T MRI system. MR imaging findings were compared with histology. Results: Cell labeling efficiency was more than 95% by Perls Prussian blue stain. After transplantation of labeled BMSCs via portal vein, liver's had diffuse granular signal intensity appearance in T2* WI MRI. Cells were detected for up to 2 w in receipts' liver's. At histologic analysis, signal intensity loss correlated with iron-loaded cells. Conclusion: MR imaging could aid in monitoring of magnetically labeled BMSCs administered via portal vein in vivo. (authors)

  14. Label-free detection of liver cancer cells by aptamer-based microcantilever biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuejuan; Pan, Yangang; Liu, Huiqing; Bai, Xiaojing; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Bailin

    2016-05-15

    Liver cancer is one of the most common and highly malignant cancers in the world. There are no effective therapeutic options if an early liver cancer diagnosis is not achieved. In this work, detection of HepG2 cells by label-free microcantilever array aptasensor was developed. The sensing microcantilevers were functionalized by HepG2 cells-specific aptamers. Meanwhile, to eliminate the interferences induced by the environment, the reference microcantilevers were modified with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol self-assembled monolayers. The aptasensor exhibits high specificity over not only human liver normal cells, but also other cancer cells of breast, bladder, and cervix tumors. The linear relation ranges from 1×10(3) to 1×10(5)cells/mL, with a detection limit of 300cells/mL (S/N=3). Our work provides a simple method for detection of liver cancer cells with advantages in terms of simplicity and stability. PMID:26735868

  15. Optimized labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and in vivo visualization by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spray David C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising addition to traditional treatments for a number of diseases. However, harnessing the therapeutic potential of stem cells requires an understanding of their fate in vivo. Non-invasive cell tracking can provide knowledge about mechanisms responsible for functional improvement of host tissue. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs have been used to label and visualize various cell types with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. In this study we performed experiments designed to investigate the biological properties, including proliferation, viability and differentiation capacity of mesenchymal cells (MSCs labeled with clinically approved SPIONs. Results Rat and mouse MSCs were isolated, cultured, and incubated with dextran-covered SPIONs (ferumoxide alone or with poly-L-lysine (PLL or protamine chlorhydrate for 4 or 24 hrs. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by dextran immunocytochemistry and MRI. Cell proliferation and viability were evaluated in vitro with Ki67 immunocytochemistry and live/dead assays. Ferumoxide-labeled MSCs could be induced to differentiate to adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes. We analyzed ferumoxide retention in MSCs with or without mitomycin C pretreatment. Approximately 95% MSCs were labeled when incubated with ferumoxide for 4 or 24 hrs in the presence of PLL or protamine, whereas labeling of MSCs incubated with ferumoxide alone was poor. Proliferative capacity was maintained in MSCs incubated with ferumoxide and PLL for 4 hrs, however, after 24 hrs it was reduced. MSCs incubated with ferumoxide and protamine were efficiently visualized by MRI; they maintained proliferation and viability for up to 7 days and remained competent to differentiate. After 21 days MSCs pretreated with mitomycin C still showed a large number of ferumoxide-labeled cells. Conclusions The efficient and long lasting uptake and retention of SPIONs by MSCs using a protocol

  16. Direct in vivo cell lineage analysis in the retrorsine and 2AAF models of liver injury after genetic labeling in adult and newborn rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Pichard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS AND AIMS: When hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, liver regeneration proceeds from the division of non parenchymal hepatocyte progenitors. Oval cells and Small Hepatocyte-like Progenitor Cells (SHPCs represent the two most studied examples of such epithelial cells with putative stem cell capacity. In the present study we wished to compare the origin of SHPCs proliferating after retrorsine administration to the one of oval cells observed after 2-Acetyl-Amino fluorene (2-AAF treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used retroviral-mediated nlslacZ genetic labeling of dividing cells to study the fate of cells in the liver. Labeling was performed either in adult rats before treatment or in newborn animals. Labeled cells were identified and characterised by immunohistochemistry. In adult-labeled animals, labeling was restricted to mature hepatocytes. Retrorsine treatment did not modify the overall number of labeled cells in the liver whereas after 2-AAF administration unlabeled oval cells were recorded and the total number of labeled cells decreased significantly. When labeling was performed in newborn rats, results after retrorsine administration were identical to those obtained in adult-labeled rats. In contrast, in the 2-AAF regimen numerous labeled oval cells were present and were able to generate new labeled hepatocytes. Furthermore, we also observed labeled biliary tracts in 2-AAF treated rats. CONCLUSIONS: Our results strongly suggest that SHPCs are derived from hepatocytes and we confirm that SHPCs and oval cells do not share the same origin. We also show that hepatic progenitors are labeled in newborn rats suggesting future directions for in vivo lineage studies.

  17. Label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Gao, Wenyuan; Tang, Shuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanoma cells have high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC), which is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. We have developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting photoacoustic signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we have constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells, B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals are detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtain the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation.

  18. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Rodighiero, Simona

    2015-03-22

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodighiero, Simona; Torre, Bruno; Sogne, Elisa; Ruffilli, Roberta; Cagnoli, Cinzia; Francolini, Maura; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Falqui, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. PMID:25810353

  20. Non-invasive, label-free cell counting and quantitative analysis of adherent cells using digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, A; Sebesta, M; Gustafsson, M; Gisselson, L; Wingren, A Gjörloff; Alm, K

    2008-11-01

    Manual cell counting is time consuming and requires a high degree of skill on behalf of the person performing the count. Here we use a technique that utilizes digital holography, allowing label-free and completely non-invasive cell counting directly in cell culture vessels with adherent viable cells. The images produced can provide both quantitative and qualitative phase information from a single hologram. The recently constructed microscope Holomonitor (Phase Holographic Imaging AB, Lund, Sweden) combines the commonly used phase contrast microscope with digital holography, the latter giving us the possibility of achieving quantitative information on cellular shape, area, confluence and optical thickness. This project aimed at determining the accuracy and repeatability of cell counting measurements using digital holography compared to the conventional manual cell counting method using a haemocytometer. The collected data were also used to determine cell size and cellular optical thickness. The results show that digital holography can be used for non-invasive automatic cell counting as precisely as conventional manual cell counting. PMID:19017223

  1. Enhancement of Raman light scattering in dye-labeled cell membrane on metal-containing conducting polymer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grushevskaya, H. V.; Krylova, N. G.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Orekhovskaja, T. I.; Egorova, V. P.; Shulitski, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    An enhanced Raman spectroscopy method based on a plasmon resonance in ultrathin metal-containing LB-film deposited on nanoporous anodic alumina supports has been proposed. This material has been utilized to enhance Raman scattering of light in fluorescent-labeled subcellular membrane structures. It has been shown that the plasmon resonance between vibrational modes of the organometallic complexes monolayers and dye-labeled subcellular structures happens. It makes possible to detect interactions between living cell monolayers and an extracellular matrix.

  2. Multiexcitation Fluorogenic Labeling of Surface, Intracellular, and Total Protein Pools in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganbabu, Matharishwan; Perkins, Lydia A; Wang, Yi; Kurish, Jeffery; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2016-06-15

    Malachite green (MG) is a fluorogenic dye that shows fluorescence enhancement upon binding to its engineered cognate protein, a fluorogen activating protein (FAP). Energy transfer donors such as cyanine and rhodamine dyes have been conjugated with MG to modify the spectral properties of the fluorescent complexes, where the donor dyes transfer energy through Förster resonance energy transfer to the MG complex resulting in binding-conditional fluorescence emission in the far-red region. In this article, we use a violet-excitable dye as a donor to sensitize the far-red emission of the MG-FAP complex. Two blue emitting fluorescent coumarin dyes were coupled to MG and evaluated for energy transfer to the MG-FAP complex via its secondary excitation band. 6,8-Difluoro-7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid (Pacific blue, PB) showed the most efficient energy transfer and maximum brightness in the far-red region upon violet (405 nm) excitation. These blue-red (BluR) tandem dyes are spectrally varied from other tandem dyes and are able to produce fluorescence images of the MG-FAP complex with a large Stokes shift (>250 nm). These dyes are cell-permeable and are used to label intracellular proteins. Used together with a cell-impermeable hexa-Cy3-MG (HCM) dye that labels extracellular proteins, we are able to visualize extracellular, intracellular, and total pools of cellular protein using one fluorogenic tag that combines with distinct dyes to effect different spectral characteristics. PMID:27159569

  3. Quantitative single cell monitoring of protein synthesis at subcellular resolution using fluorescently labeled tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoom, Sima; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cooperman, Barry S; Smorodinsky, Nechama I; Smilansky, Zeev; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a novel technique of using fluorescent tRNA for translation monitoring (FtTM). FtTM enables the identification and monitoring of active protein synthesis sites within live cells at submicron resolution through quantitative microscopy of transfected bulk uncharged tRNA, fluorescently labeled in the D-loop (fl-tRNA). The localization of fl-tRNA to active translation sites was confirmed through its co-localization with cellular factors and its dynamic alterations upon inhibition of protein synthesis. Moreover, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals, generated when fl-tRNAs, separately labeled as a FRET pair occupy adjacent sites on the ribosome, quantitatively reflect levels of protein synthesis in defined cellular regions. In addition, FRET signals enable detection of intra-populational variability in protein synthesis activity. We demonstrate that FtTM allows quantitative comparison of protein synthesis between different cell types, monitoring effects of antibiotics and stress agents, and characterization of changes in spatial compartmentalization of protein synthesis upon viral infection. PMID:21795382

  4. Stem cell research in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyi SUN; Shi ZUO

    2008-01-01

    The traditional view that adult human liver tumors, mainly hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), arise from mature cell types has been challenged in recent dec-ades. The results of several studies suggest that HCC can be derived from liver stem cells. There are four levels of cells in the liver stem cell lineage: hepatocytes, hepatic stem cells/oval cells, bone marrow stem cells and hepato-pancreas stem cells. However, whether HCC is resulted from the differentiation block of stem cells and, moreover, which liver stem cell lineage is the source cell of hepatocarcinogenesis remain controversial. In this review, we focus on the current status of liver stem cell research and their roles in carcinogenesis of HCC, in order to explore new approaches for stem cell therapy of HCC.

  5. 14 C labelled compound Laboratory of Radiochemical Research and Production Department in IFIN-HH. Forty years of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first experiments with 14 C in Romania took place in the Institute of Atomic Physics (IFA) in Bucharest. The laboratory for C-14 labelled compounds, with its current structure was conceived by IFA in co-operation with GEC and AERE - England, and designed by IFA and I.P. Carpati. It was built between 1975-1977. The way it was conceived makes it the only laboratory in Romania which can offer various specialized services to interested organizations. The laboratory is able to develop the following types of activity: - primary processing of row materials with 14 C; - chemical syntheses and biosyntheses of labelled organic and inorganic compounds; - production of 14 C tracers; - specific chemical analyses involving 14 C processing. Till now among the most important results the following could be mentioned: over 60 C-14 labelled organic and inorganic compounds; over 20 publications; about 50 certified products and technologies; delivery of C-14 labelled products all over the country, in over 20 research institutes, hospitals and universities; - experiments with tracers for food industry, agriculture and livestock farms; - solutions with C-14 - calibration standards for internal use. Presently the Laboratory is conducting in cooperation with the Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti works for recovering of 14 C from gaseous effluents of CANDU-600 Reactor of NNP-Cernavoda. Also, works are done concerning the synthesis with 13 C and 14 C of miscellaneous organic compounds, i.e., 3N-[1-13 C] Capronylphenylthiourea, trans-derma pharmaceutic systems and N -[1 - 13 C,T] pentadecyl pyridinium bromide (both doubly labelled with T and 14 C with high specific activities at known positions); the last two compounds was certified too. The path ways for labelling and analyses are in agreement with the international techniques adopted in this field. (authors)

  6. Dynamic MRI of ferumoxide-labeled bone mesenchmal stem cells after transplantation in infarcted myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in tracking magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MR-MSCs) in a swine myocardial infarction (MI) model. Methods: Adult Chinese mini-pigs (n=6) were subjected to open-chest experimental MI operation. Their autogeneic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was cultured and doubly labeled with ferumoxides and DAPI. On the 14 th day after MSCs transplantation, the size and location of the myocardial infarction were assessed by using delayed-enhancement MRI (DE-MRI). Then the labeled MSCs were injected intramyocardially into peri-infarct zone and normal myocardium. At 24 hrs and 3 weeks after injection, the contrast and the volume of the MR-MSCs hypointense lesion from the MR images were acquired, and the contrast was determined using the difference in signal intensity between the hypointense and normal myocardium divided by signal intensity of the normal region. After humane euthanasia, the heart was excised and histology corresponding to MRI slices that demonstrated MR-MSCs lesions was performed. Repeated-measures ANOVA and a paired t test were used for comparison of the contrast and the volume of the MR-MSCs hypointense lesion at different time points. Comparisons between independent groups were performed with the standard Student t test. Results: The labeling efficiency of ferumoxides and DAPI was 100%. On the 14 th day after the MI operation, the average percentage of infracted myocardial area was (33.6±8.9)%. Twenty- four hours after MSCs transplantation, MSCs injection sites appeared as ovoid hypointensive lesions with sharp border on T2* images. At 24 h after injection, the signal contrast [(67.00±5.48)% vs (61.92±7.76)%,t=1.65, P=0.1158] and the size [(0.56±0.24) cm2 vs (0.52±0.25) cm2, t=0.39, P=0.7044] of the lesions showed no statistical difference between the peri-infarct zone and the normal myocardium. At 3 weeks after injection, the signal contrast decreased

  7. Functionalized bismuth ferrite harmonic nanoparticles for cancer cells labeling and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passemard, Solène; Staedler, Davide; Sonego, Giona [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering (Switzerland); Magouroux, Thibaud [Université de Genève, GAP-Biophotonics (Switzerland); Schneiter, Guillaume Stéphane [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering (Switzerland); Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne [University Institute of Pathology, CHUV-UNIL (Switzerland); Bonacina, Luigi [Université de Genève, GAP-Biophotonics (Switzerland); Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine, E-mail: Sandrine.Gerber@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    Bismuth ferrite (BFO) harmonic nanoparticles (NPs) display high nonlinear optical efficiency and excellent biocompatibility profile which make them attractive for the development of diagnostic applications as contrast agents. In this study, we present a general method for the functionalization of this material with chemical ligands targeting cancer molecular biomarkers. In particular, a conjugation protocol based on click reaction between alkynyl-containing targeting ligands and poly(ethylene glycol)-coated BFO NPs (67.7 nm) displaying surface reactive azido groups was developed. Copper-free click reaction allowed fast and efficient conjugation of a covalent inhibitor of prolyl-specific endopeptidases to coated BFO NPs. The ability of these functionalized nanomaterials (134.2 nm) to act as imaging probes for cancer cells was demonstrated by the selective labeling of human lung cancer cells.

  8. Highly Luminescent Heterostructured Copper-Doped Zinc Sulfide Nanocrystals for Application in Cancer Cell Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Huixiang; Bosman, Michel; Thamankar, Ramesh; Zulkifli, Muhammad Faizal B; Yen, Swee Kuan; Hariharan, Anushya; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2016-08-18

    The structural characteristics of the seed-mediated synthesis of heterostructured CuS-ZnS nanocrystals (NCs) and Cu-doped ZnS (ZnS:Cu) NCs synthesized by two different protocols are compared and analyzed. At high Cu dopant concentrations, segregated subclusters of ZnS and CuS are observed. The photoluminescence quantum yield of ZnS:Cu NCs is about 50-80 %; a value much higher than that of ZnS NCs (6 %). Finally, these NCs are coated with a thin silica shell by using (3-mercaptopropyl)triethoxysilane in a reverse microemulsion to make them water soluble. Cytotoxicity experiments show that these silica-coated NCs have greatly reduced toxicity on both cancerous HeLa and noncancerous Chinese hamster ovary cells. The labeling of cancerous HeLa cells is also demonstrated. PMID:27146419

  9. Isoflavones in food supplements: chemical profile, label accordance and permeability study in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, I M C; Rodrigues, F; Sarmento, B; Alves, R C; Oliveira, M B P P

    2015-03-01

    Consumers nowadays are playing an active role in their health-care. A special case is the increasing number of women, who are reluctant to use exogenous hormone therapy for the treatment of menopausal symptoms and are looking for complementary therapies. However, food supplements are not clearly regulated in Europe. The EFSA has only recently begun to address the issues of botanical safety and purity regulation, leading to a variability of content, standardization, dosage, and purity of available products. In this study, isoflavones (puerarin, daidzin, genistin, daidzein, glycitein, genistein, formononetin, prunetin, and biochanin A) from food supplements (n = 15) for menopausal symptoms relief are evaluated and compared with the labelled information. Only four supplements complied with the recommendations made by the EC on the tolerable thresholds. The intestinal bioavailability of these compounds was investigated using Caco-2 cells. The apparent permeability coefficients of the selected isoflavonoids across the Caco-2 cells were affected by the isoflavone concentration and product matrix. PMID:25653232

  10. Indirect 125I-labeled protein A assay for monoclonal antibodies to cell surface antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assay for detection of monoclonal hybridoma antibodies against cell surface antigens is described. Samples of spent medium from the hybridoma cultures are incubated in microtest wells with cells, either as adherent monolayers or in suspension. Antibodies bound to surface antigens are detected by successive incubations with rabbit anti-immunoglobulin serum and 125I-labeled protein A from Staphylococcus aureus, followed by autoradiography of the microtest plate or scintillation counting of the individual wells. Particular advantages of this assay for screening hybridomas are: (1) commercially available reagents are used, (2) antibodies of any species and of any immunoglobulin class or subclass can be detected, and (3) large numbers of samples can be screened rapidly and inexpensively. The assay has been used to select hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies to surface antigens of human melanomas and mouse sarcomas. (Auth.)

  11. Labeling of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by hexamethylene diamine modified fluorescent carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei; Dong, Yan; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Shiqi; Ge, Xin; Sui, Lili; Wang, Jingwen

    2013-12-01

    Fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) were synthesized by a solvothermal method with glucose as carbon source and surface-modified with 1,6-hexamethylene diamine. In this hybrid CDs, the modification played important role for improving the fluorescent performance by introducing nitrogenous compound to passivate CD's surface, making the CDs emit strong fluorescence. The as-prepared CDs were linked with mouse anti-human Alpha fetoprotein (AFP) antibody and goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin (IgG) to directly and indirectly label fixed human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, respectively. The cytotoxicity of these CDs were also tested using the human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. No apparent cytotoxicity was observed, which suggested the potential application of the as-prepared CDs in bioimaging.

  12. A Breast Cell Atlas: Organelle analysis of the MDA-MB-231 cell line by density-gradient fractionation using isotopic marking and label-free analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Sandin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein translocation between organelles in the cell is an important process that regulates many cellular functions. However, organelles can rarely be isolated to purity so several methods have been developed to analyse the fractions obtained by density gradient centrifugation. We present an analysis of the distribution of proteins amongst organelles in the human breast cell line, MDA-MB-231 using two approaches: an isotopic labelling and a label-free approach.

  13. Magentic Cell labeling of primary and stem cell-derived pig hepatocytes for MRI-based cell tracking of heptocytes transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this wo...

  14. Integrating Cell Phone Imaging with Magnetic Levitation (i-LEV) for Label-Free Blood Analysis at the Point-of-Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baday, Murat; Calamak, Semih; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-03-01

    There is an emerging need for portable, robust, inexpensive, and easy-to-use disease diagnosis and prognosis monitoring platforms to share health information at the point-of-living, including clinical and home settings. Recent advances in digital health technologies have improved early diagnosis, drug treatment, and personalized medicine. Smartphones with high-resolution cameras and high data processing power enable intriguing biomedical applications when integrated with diagnostic devices. Further, these devices have immense potential to contribute to public health in resource-limited settings where there is a particular need for portable, rapid, label-free, easy-to-use, and affordable biomedical devices to diagnose and continuously monitor patients for precision medicine, especially those suffering from rare diseases, such as sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Here, a magnetic levitation-based diagnosis system is presented in which different cell types (i.e., white and red blood cells) are levitated in a magnetic gradient and separated due to their unique densities. Moreover, an easy-to-use, smartphone incorporated levitation system for cell analysis is introduced. Using our portable imaging magnetic levitation (i-LEV) system, it is shown that white and red blood cells can be identified and cell numbers can be quantified without using any labels. In addition, cells levitated in i-LEV can be distinguished at single-cell resolution, potentially enabling diagnosis and monitoring, as well as clinical and research applications. PMID:26523938

  15. The tumour distribution of bromodeoxyuridine labelled S-phase cells is found to be strongly dose dependant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromodeoxyurdine (BrdU) is used extensively to measure the fraction of S-phase cells in tumours. Unlike endogenous markers of proliferation, such as PCNA and Ki-67, BrdU is exogenously administered and reaches the tumour via vasculature where it must then distribute throughout the tissue in order to label S-phase cells. Interest in using BrdU labelling of histological sections to evaluate the distribution of the effect of different treatment modalities on tumours led us to study the ability of BrdU to distribute within tissue. The study used SiHa (human cervix squamous cell carcinoma) xenografts, a tumour that exhibits cords of cells extending up to 150 μm away from blood vessels. A quantitative microscopy-based technique was employed to determine the distribution of S-phase labelled cells relative to the vasculature over a dose range of 25-2000 mg/kg BrdU. Detection of BrdU incorporation in DNA was carried out immunohistochemically and vasculature was identified using perfusion of carbocyanine, a fluorescent perivascular stain. Analysis of BrdU labelling distribution in the tissue found that a dose of 1000 mg/kg was required to label cells furthest from vasculature. Dosing at lower levels resulted in only the cells close to blood vessels being labelled. This result is surprising since 100 mg/kg BrdU is commonly used in flow cytometry studies. Results were compared with penetration seen in vitro using multilayered cell culture, a three-dimensional tissue culture model of solid tumours. Using multilayered cell culture, an exposure of 100 μM BrdU for 1 hour was required for labelling of S-phase cells 150 μm into the tissue, while cells adjacent to the edge of the tissue could be adequately labelled with just 5 μM BrdU for 1 hour. The AUC for a 100 mg/kg BrdU dose in mice was found to be ∼30 μM x h

  16. Inhibition of certain strains of HIV-1 by cell surface polyanions in the form of cholesterol-labeled oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cholesterol-labeled oligonucleotides were found several years ago to inhibit HIV-1 in tissue culture at nanomolar concentrations. We present evidence that this is mainly due to an electrostatic interaction between polyanionic oligonucleotide concentrated at the cell surface and a positively charged region in the V3 loop of the HIV-1 envelope protein. When added to tissue culture, cholesterol-labeled oligonucleotides became concentrated at the plasma membrane and potently inhibited virus entry and cell fusion mediated by the envelope protein of some X4 strains of HIV-1, but had little effect on fusion mediated by R5 strains of HIV-1, amphotropic MLV envelope protein, or VSV-G protein. Noncholesterol-labeled oligonucleotides did not bind to the cell surface or inhibit fusion. The pattern of susceptibility to cholesterol-labeled oligonucleotides among HIV-1 strains was the same as reported for nonmembrane-associating polyanions such as dextran sulfate, but the cholesterol-labeled oligonucleotides were effective at lower concentrations. Substitution of a basic 33 amino acid V3 loop sequence from the envelope protein of a resistant strain into a susceptible strain made the envelope protein resistant to inhibition. Inhibition by cholesterol-labeled oligonucleotides was abrogated by the polycation DEAE-dextran. Cholesterol-labeled oligonucleotides bound to nonraft regions of the plasma membrane and did not inhibit HIV virus binding to cells. Many infectious agents first associate with target cells via relatively nonspecific charge interactions; our data suggest that molecules that combine a membrane-targeting motif with multiple negative charges might be useful to modify these interactions

  17. Label-free identification of white blood cell using optical diffraction tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Min-hyeok; Kang, Suk-Jo; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    White blood cells (WBC) have crucial roles in immune systems which defend the host against from disease conditions and harmful invaders. Various WBC subsets have been characterized and reported to be involved in many pathophysiologic conditions. It is crucial to isolate a specific WBC subset to study its pathophysiological roles in diseases. Identification methods for a specific WBC population are rely on invasive approaches, including Wright-Gimesa staining for observing cellular morphologies and fluorescence staining for specific protein markers. While these methods enable precise classification of WBC populations, they could disturb cellular viability or functions. In order to classify WBC populations in a non-invasive manner, we exploited optical diffraction tomography (ODT). ODT is a three-dimensional (3-D) quantitative phase imaging technique that measures 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions of individual WBCs. To test feasibility of label-free classification of WBC populations using ODT, we measured four subtypes of WBCs, including B cell, CD4 T cell, CD8 T cell, and natural killer (NK) cell. From measured 3-D RI tomograms of WBCs, we obtain quantitative structural and biochemical information and classify each WBC population using a machine learning algorithm.

  18. Fluorescent Lipids: Functional Parts of Fusogenic Liposomes and Tools for Cell Membrane Labeling and Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kleusch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a rapid and highly efficient method for controlled incorporation of fluorescent lipids into living mammalian cells is introduced. Here, the fluorescent molecules have two consecutive functions: First, they trigger rapid membrane fusion between cellular plasma membranes and the lipid bilayers of their carrier particles, so called fusogenic liposomes, and second, after insertion into cellular membranes these molecules enable fluorescence imaging of cell membranes and membrane traffic processes. We tested the fluorescent derivatives of the following essential membrane lipids for membrane fusion: Ceramide, sphingomyelin, phosphocholine, phosphatidylinositol-bisphosphate, ganglioside, cholesterol, and cholesteryl ester. Our results show that all probed lipids could more efficiently be incorporated into the plasma membrane of living cells than by using other methods. Moreover, labeling occurred in a gentle manner under classical cell culture conditions reducing cellular stress responses. Staining procedures were monitored by fluorescence microscopy and it was observed that sphingolipids and cholesterol containing free hydroxyl groups exhibit a decreased distribution velocity as well as a longer persistence in the plasma membrane compared to lipids without hydroxyl groups like phospholipids or other artificial lipid analogs. After membrane staining, the fluorescent molecules were sorted into membranes of cell organelles according to their chemical properties and biological functions without any influence of the delivery system.

  19. In vitro and in vivo MR imaging of SHU 555A-labelled swine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To detect the feasibility of magnetically labeled swine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with SHU 555A combined with poly-L-arginine (PLL), under MR imaging in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Swine mesenchymal stem cells were isolated and culture-expanded 3 passages in vitro, then magnetically labeled by incubation with SHU 555A (25 μg Fe/ml, Resovist, Schering)for 24 hours with 750 ng/mL poly-L-lysine (PLL; average MW275 kDa) added 1 hour before incubation. Cellular iron incorporation and detention at 0 d, 4 d, 8 d, 12 d, 16 d, 20 d after labeling was qualitatively assessed using Prussian blue and quantified at atomic absorption spectrometry. Cell viability was assessed by trypan-blue exclusion test. Cell suspensions underwent MR imaging with T1-and T2-weighted spin-echo and fast field-echo sequences on a clinical 1.5 T MR system. At last, 1 x 106 SHU 555A labeled and unlabeled MSCs were transextracardially implanted into the infracted and normal myocardium approximately 2 week following the ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery in 1 swine respectively, and finally performed 1.5-T MRI within 1 week after infarction. Results: (1) Intracytoplasmic particles stained with Prussian blue stain were detected for all cells with mean cellular iron content of (13.13±2.30) pg per cell. With division of stem cells, the stained particles decreased gradually with iron content (0.68±0.20) pg per cell.at 16 days after labeling, approximately to the prelabeled baseline values. (0.21±0.06) pg per cell (P>0.05). The viability of the labeled cells at various time points were not significantly different with that of nonlabeled cells (P>0.05). (2) MR images showed signal intensity changed most obviouly in T2*WI in vitro. The percentage change of signal intensity increased with increasing cell numbers, and decreased with the time. As few as 5 x 104 - 1 x l05 cells could be detected by using this approach. (3)Two injected sites containing MR-MSCs were

  20. Distribution of injected technetium(99m)-labeled mesenchymal stem cells in horses with naturally occurring tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Patricia; Valdés Vázquez, Miguel A; Dudhia, Jayesh; Fiske-Jackson, Andrew R; Neves, Francisco; Hartman, Neil G; Smith, Roger K W

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate immediate cell survival and distribution following different administration routes of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into naturally occurring tendon injuries. Ten million MSCs, labeled with technetium-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime, were implanted into 13 horses with naturally occurring tendon or ligament injuries intra-lesionally, intravenously and by regional perfusion, and traced for up to 48 h using planar gamma scintigraphy. Labeling efficiencies varied between 1.8% and 18.5% (mean 9.3%). Cells were retained in the damaged area after intra-lesional administration but only 24% of cells were still present within the tendon after 24 h. After intravenous injection, cells largely distributed to the lung fields, with no detectable cells in the tendon lesions. Significant labeling of the tendon lesions was observed in 11/12 horses following regional perfusion but at a lower level to intra-lesional injection. The highest cell numbers were retained after intra-lesional injection, although with considerable cell loss, while regional perfusion may be a viable alternative for MSC delivery. Cells did not "home" to damaged tendon in large numbers after intravenous administration. Cells were detected in the lungs most frequently after intravascular administration, although with no adverse effects. Low cell retention has important implications for designing effective clinical therapies for human clinical use. PMID:23508674

  1. Selective cell-surface labeling of the molecular motor protein prestin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, Ryan M. [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Silberg, Jonathan J., E-mail: joff@rice.edu [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Pereira, Fred A. [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Huffington Center on Aging, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Raphael, Robert M., E-mail: rraphael@rice.edu [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States)

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Trafficking to the plasma membrane is required for prestin function. {yields} Biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) was fused to prestin through a transmembrane domain. {yields} BAP-prestin can be metabolically labeled with biotin in HEK293 cells. {yields} Biotin-BAP-prestin allows for selective imaging of fully trafficked prestin. {yields} The biotin-BAP-prestin displays voltage-sensitive activity. -- Abstract: Prestin, a multipass transmembrane protein whose N- and C-termini are localized to the cytoplasm, must be trafficked to the plasma membrane to fulfill its cellular function as a molecular motor. One challenge in studying prestin sequence-function relationships within living cells is separating the effects of amino acid substitutions on prestin trafficking, plasma membrane localization and function. To develop an approach for directly assessing prestin levels at the plasma membrane, we have investigated whether fusion of prestin to a single pass transmembrane protein results in a functional fusion protein with a surface-exposed N-terminal tag that can be detected in living cells. We find that fusion of the biotin-acceptor peptide (BAP) and transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) to the N-terminus of prestin-GFP yields a membrane protein that can be metabolically-labeled with biotin, trafficked to the plasma membrane, and selectively detected at the plasma membrane using fluorescently-tagged streptavidin. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a surface detectable tag and a single-pass transmembrane domain to prestin does not disrupt its voltage-sensitive activity.

  2. Plant Cell Lines in Cell Morphogenesis Research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seifertová, Daniela; Klíma, Petr; Pařezová, Markéta; Petrášek, Jan; Zažímalová, Eva; Opatrný, Z.

    Vol. 1080. New York: Humana Press, 2014 - (Žárský, V.; Cvrčková, F.), s. 215-229. (Methods in Molecular Biology). ISBN 978-1-62703-643-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/0797; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2476 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : BY-2 * VBI-0 * Suspension-cultured cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. Synthesis of carbon nanohorns/chitosan/quantum dots nanocomposite and its applications in cells labeling and in vivo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; He, Zhe [Chemistry Department, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Guo, Changrun [College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Wang, Liping, E-mail: wanglp@jlu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Xu, Shukun, E-mail: xushukun46@126.com [Chemistry Department, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Due to the unique optical and chemical features of quantum dots and the special structural advantages of carbon nanohorns, it is highly desirable to synthesize nanohorns/quantum dots nanocompsite which can be applied in cell labeling and in vivo imaging. Here, we report a new method which uses chitosan as connector to synthesize nanohorns/chitosan/quantum dots fluorescent nanocomposite. Further more, the synthesized nanocomposite demonstrated strong red fluorescence and had been successfully used in Hela cells labeling and in vivo imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). -- Highlights: Carbon nanohorn/chitosan/QDs nanocomposite was prepared by covalent linkage The nanocomposite was successfully used in the labeling of HeLa cells The nanocomposite was used for in vivo imaging with C. elegans as animal mode.

  4. Serial in vivo imaging of the porcine heart after percutaneous, intramyocardially injected 111In-labeled human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbaek, Stig; Ripa, Rasmus S; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana;

    2010-01-01

    This pilot trial aimed to investigate the utilization of (111)In-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for in vivo tracking after intramyocardial transplantation in a xenotransplantation model with gender mismatched cells. Human male MSC were expanded ex vivo and labeled with (111)In......-tropolone. Ten female pigs were included. The labeled cells were transplanted intramyocardially using a percutaneous injection system. The (111)In activity was determined using gamma camera imaging. Excised hearts were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and microscopy. Gamma camera imaging...... revealed focal cardiac (111)In accumulations up to 6 days after injection (N = 4). No MSC could be identified with FISH, and microscopy identified widespread acute inflammation. Focal (111)In accumulation, inflammation but no human MSC were similarly seen in pigs (N = 2) after immunosuppression. A...

  5. Serial in vivo imaging of the porcine heart after percutaneous, intramyocardially injected (111)In-labeled human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbæk, Stig; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana;

    2009-01-01

    This pilot trial aimed to investigate the utilization of (111)In-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for in vivo tracking after intramyocardial transplantation in a xenotransplantation model with gender mismatched cells. Human male MSC were expanded ex vivo and labeled with (111)In......-tropolone. Ten female pigs were included. The labeled cells were transplanted intramyocardially using a percutaneous injection system. The (111)In activity was determined using gamma camera imaging. Excised hearts were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and microscopy. Gamma camera imaging...... revealed focal cardiac (111)In accumulations up to 6 days after injection (N = 4). No MSC could be identified with FISH, and microscopy identified widespread acute inflammation. Focal (111)In accumulation, inflammation but no human MSC were similarly seen in pigs (N = 2) after immunosuppression. A...

  6. Efficient nano iron particle-labeling and noninvasive MR imaging of mouse bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Yu Jia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rong Chen*, Hui Yu*, Zhen-Yu Jia, Qun-Li Yao, Gao-Jun TengJiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors have contributed equally to this workAbstract: In this study, we sought to label mouse bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs with Resovist® in vitro and to image them using 7.0 Tesla (T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Mouse bone marrow-derived EPCs were cultured in endothelial basal medium with endothelial growth supplement. They were then characterized by immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Their functions were evaluated by measuring their uptake of 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (Dil-Ac-LDL, binding of fluorine isothiocyanate (FITC-labeled Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA, and formation of capillary-like networks. EPCs were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO and their proliferation was then assessed in a water-soluble tetrazolium (WST-8-based cell proliferation assay. Spin echo sequence (multislice, multiecho [MSME] and gradient echo sequence (2D-FLASH were used to detect differences in the numbers of labeled cells by 7.0 T MRI. The results showed that the cultured cells were of “cobblestone”-like shape and positive for CD133, CD34, CD31, von Willebrand factor, kinase domain receptor, and CD45, but negative for F4/80. They could take up Dil-Ac-LDL, bind FITC-UEA, and form capillary-like networks on Matrigel in vitro. Prussian-blue staining demonstrated that the cells were efficiently labeled with SPIO. The single-cell T2* effect was more obvious in the 2D-FLASH sequence than in the MSME sequence. Further, there were almost no adverse effects on cell vitality and proliferation. In conclusion, mouse bone marrow-derived EPCs can be

  7. Long-term MRI tracking of dual-labeled adipose-derived stem cells homing into mouse carotid artery injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin JB

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Jin-Bao Qin,1,5,* Kang-An Li,2,* Xiang-Xiang Li,1,5 Qing-Song Xie,3 Jia-Ying Lin,4 Kai-Chuang Ye,1,5 Mi-Er Jiang,1,5 Gui-Xiang Zhang,2 Xin-Wu Lu1,51Department of Vascular Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Department of Neurosurgery, Cixi Municipal People's Hospital, Zhejiang Province, China; 4Clinic for Gynecology, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 5Vascular Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China*These two authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Stem cell therapy has shown great promise for regenerative repair of injured or diseased tissues. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs have become increasingly attractive candidates for cellular therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging has been proven to be effective in tracking magnetic-labeled cells and evaluating their clinical relevance after cell transplantation. This study investigated the feasibility of imaging green fluorescent protein-expressing ADSCs (GFP-ADSCs labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles, and tracked them in vivo with noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging after cell transplantation in a model of mouse carotid artery injury.Methods: GFP-ADSCs were isolated from the adipose tissues of GFP mice and labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. Intracellular stability, proliferation, and viability of the labeled cells were evaluated in vitro. Next, the cells were transplanted into a mouse carotid artery injury model. Clinical 3 T magnetic resonance imaging was performed immediately before and 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 30 days after cell transplantation. Prussian blue staining and histological analysis were performed 7 and 30 days after transplantation.Results: GFP-ADSCs were found to be efficiently labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide

  8. Measurement of limb blood flow using technetium-labelled red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkin, A; Robinson, P.J.; Wiggins, P.A.; Leveson, S.H.; Salter, M.C.P.; Matthews, I.F.; Ware, F.M.

    1986-05-01

    A method for measuring blood flow below the knee during reactive hyperaemia induced by 3 min of arterial occlusion has been developed. Subjects are positioned with lower limbs within the field of view of a gamma camera and pneumatic cuffs are placed below the knees to isolate the blood and induce a hyperaemic response. The remaining blood pool is labelled with /sup 99/Tcsup(m)-labelled red cells. Blood flows have been derived from the initial gradients of time-activity curves and from equilibrium blood sampling. The technique has been validated using a tissue-equivalent leg phantom and peristaltic pump. The method has been applied to a small group of patients with peripheral vascular disease and to normal controls. The mean value (+-SD) of limb perfusion for normal controls was found to be 16.4 +- 3.0 ml/100 ml/min and for patients with intermittent claudication was 5.1 +- 2.6 ml/100 ml/min. Flow measurements are found to correlate with clinical findings and with symptoms. Reproducibility (established by repeated measurements) is high. The method is well tolerated even by patients suffering from rest pain.

  9. The measurement of limb blood flow using technetium-labelled red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for measuring blood flow below the knee during reactive hyperaemia induced by 3 min of arterial occlusion has been developed. Subjects are positioned with lower limbs within the field of view of a gamma camera and pneumatic cuffs are placed below the knees to isolate the blood and induce a hyperaemic response. The remaining blood pool is labelled with 99Tcsup(m)-labelled red cells. Blood flows have been derived from the initial gradients of time-activity curves and from equilibrium blood sampling. The technique has been validated using a tissue-equivalent leg phantom and peristaltic pump. The method has been applied to a small group of patients with peripheral vascular disease and to normal controls. The mean value (+-SD) of limb perfusion for normal controls was found to be 16.4+-3.0 ml/100 ml/min and for patients with intermittent claudication was 5.1+-2.6 ml/100 ml/min. Flow measurements are found to correlate with clinical findings and with symptoms. Reproducibility (established by repeated measurements) is high. The method is well tolerated even by patients suffering from rest pain. (author)

  10. Ethical Issues in Stem Cell Research

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell research offers great promise for understanding basic mechanisms of human development and differentiation, as well as the hope for new treatments for diseases such as diabetes, spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s disease, and myocardial infarction. However, human stem cell (hSC) research also raises sharp ethical and political controversies. The derivation of pluripotent stem cell lines from oocytes and embryos is fraught with disputes about the onset of human personhood. The reprogramm...

  11. Rapid kinetic labeling of Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures: Implications for models of lipid export from plastids

    Science.gov (United States)

    T-87 suspension cell cultures are increasingly used in Arabidopsis research, but there are no reports describing their lipid composition or biosynthesis. To evaluate if T-87 cell cultures as a model system for analysis of lipid metabolism, including tests of gene candidate functions, we have deter...

  12. Imaging stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic nanoparticles in brain and spinal cord

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla; Hájek, M.

    Heidlberg : EMBL, 2006. s. 27-27. [International Summer School on Molecular Imaging. 04.09.2006-08.09.2006, Heidlberg] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Marrow stromal cells * Embryonic stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  13. Divergent Label-free Cell Phenotypic Pharmacology of Ligands at the Overexpressed β2-Adrenergic Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrie, Ann M.; Sun, Haiyan; Zaytseva, Natalya; Fang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    We present subclone sensitive cell phenotypic pharmacology of ligands at the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) stably expressed in HEK-293 cells. The parental cell line was transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged β2-AR. Four stable subclones were established and used to profile a library of sixty-nine AR ligands. Dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) profiling resulted in a pharmacological activity map suggesting that HEK293 endogenously expresses functional Gi-coupled α2-AR and Gs-coupled β2-AR, and the label-free cell phenotypic activity of AR ligands are subclone dependent. Pathway deconvolution revealed that the DMR of epinephrine is originated mostly from the remodeling of actin microfilaments and adhesion complexes, to less extent from the microtubule networks and receptor trafficking, and certain agonists displayed different efficacy towards the cAMP-Epac pathway. We demonstrate that receptor signaling and ligand pharmacology is sensitive to the receptor expression level, and the organization of the receptor and its signaling circuitry.

  14. The labeling of stem cells by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles modified with PEG/PVP or PEG/PEI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gao; Ma, Weiqiong; Zhang, Baolin; Xie, Qi

    2016-05-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) co-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) (PEG/PVP-SPIONs), and PEG and poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) co-modified SPIONs (PEG/PEI-SPIONs) synthesized by thermal decomposition have been used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents to label adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Efficient cell labeling was achieved after incubation with PEG/PVP-SPIONs and PEG/PEI-SPIONs for 12h, and the MRI of labeled cells was evaluated. The cell viability tests showed the low cytotoxicity of PEG/PVP-SPIONs and PEG/PEI-SPIONs. The cellular iron content incubated with PEG/PVP-SPIONs at a concentration of 25μg/ml was 6.96pg/cell, the cellular iron contents incubated with PEG/PEI-SPIONs at concentrations of 12 and 25μg/ml were 20.16, 35.4pg/cell, respectively. The SPIONs were located predominantly in the intracellular vesicles. The cellular iron oxide uptake was significantly high after incubation with PEG/PEI-SPIONs as compared with the commercial iron oxide agents (Feridex, Feridex@PLL, Resovist and Resovist@PLL) reported. This work demonstrates that PEG/PEI-SPIONs are the competent agents for the labeling of ADSCs. PMID:26952437

  15. Use of chromium-50 as a label for red blood cells in studies with pregnant women and premature infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique is described in which non-radioactive chromium-50 is used as a label for red blood cells in patients for whom radioactive labels are not permissible. The chromium-50, adsorbed on to donor blood in vitro, is infused in the circulatory system and measured, following collection, using neutron activation analyses and a high resolution germanium (lithium) diode gamma-ray spectrometer. The application of this technique to the measurement of blood cell survival time in pregnant women suspected of having haemolytic anaemia and to the measurement of intracranial bleeding in premature infants is described. (author)

  16. Development of a Label-Free Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Platform Applicable to Non-Cell Culture Biological Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, M W; Thompson, J. W.; Moseley, M.A.; Soderblom, E.

    2011-01-01

    The most commonly employed LC-MS based quantitative phosphoproteomics experiments are performed using cultured cell lines with incorporated stable-isotope labeled amino acids. Although these systems simplify experimental manipulation and provide relatively large amounts of soluble protein, they do not account for the complexity of signal regulation from other factors or cell types present in the cell's native physiological environment. Here we describe the general analytical and informatic me...

  17. Optimization of the magnetic labeling of human neural stem cells and MRI visualization in the hemiparkinsonian rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Gómez, Milagros; Seiz, Emma G; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging is the ideal modality for non-invasive in vivo cell tracking allowing for longitudinal studies over time. Cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been shown to induce sufficient contrast for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging enabling the in vivo analysis of the final location of the transplanted cells. For magnetic nanoparticles to be useful, a high internalization efficiency of the particles is required without compromising ce...

  18. Spermatogonial stem cell renewal in the mouse as revealed by 3H-thymidine labeling and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures are described for sectioning and staining mouse testes, x-irradiation of mice, and classification of developing sperm cells. Tables are presented to show frequency of labeled cells following exposure to various doses of x radiation. A discussion is presented of types of spermatogonia surviving various radiation doses and times of incorporation of 3H-TdR in the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. Models of stem cell renewal systems are described

  19. Radioactively labelled DNA probes for crop improvement. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of DNA molecular marker technology in the 1980s plant breeding had a new and powerful tool with which to increase its efficacy. Such markers are abundant and directly reveal information about the genotype and therefore are more useful than simple phenotypic markers. In plant breeding applications, molecular markers reveal information about variability and genetic relationships, and enable genetic mapping, which greatly assists the breeder in selection of parents and progeny, as well as in management of breeding strategies. Furthermore, molecular markers linked to phenotypic traits permit very early selection of superior progenies from breeding populations, therefore significantly reducing the need for field testing and greatly increasing efficiency of plant breeding programmes. For this to occur the oligonucleotide probes for labelling genetic markers and/or the primers for polymerase chain reactions to amplify genetic markers needed to be also accessible to scientists in developing Member States. In addition, technical information, training and troubleshooting were needed to support the utilization of DNA markers. In the early 1990s there was a dramatic increase in requests for access to this technology. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) facilitated the transfer of molecular marker technology, in terms of both material and information, from advanced laboratories to assist breeding programmes in developing countries. Two other CRPs were conducted concurrently in order to assist developing Member States to utilise molecular markers - Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants, and Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterisation of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops (IAEA-TECDOC-1010 and IAEA-TECDOC-1047, respectively). The present CRP built upon the success of the former projects by ensuring the availability of probes

  20. C d 1a-labeled Langerhans Cells in Gingival Pyogenic Granuloma and Fibroma Lesions: An Immunohistochemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpan K Shah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Role of Langerhans cells is well investigated in pathological conditions of oral tissues. No studies have been reported so far describing possible role of Langerhans cells in reactive gingival overgr owths. This study aims at evaluation of density of Langerhans cells in common localized gingival overgrowths. Materials and methods: Thirty-two specimens of localized gingival overgrowth s (19 fibromas and 13 pyogenic granulo - mas were subjected to immunohistochemistry with anti-CD1a antibody for demonstration of Langerhans cells. Langerhans cells in each specimen were counted as number of cells/high power field. The density of Langerhans cells thus obtained in study groups was compar ed. It was also compared with the same in control group. Results: Mean number of CD1a-labeled cells in control group was 2.24 ± 1.11 cells/HPF. The mean number of CD1a-labeled cells was 2.39 ± 1.80 cells/HPF in pyogenic granuloma group, while in irritation fibroma group the mean number was as 1.71 ± 1.96 cells/HPF. The difference in the density of Langerhans cells among two stud y groups was not significant. Conclusion: Langerhans cells were an integral component of epithelium in both types of reactive lesions. A wide range in density of Langerhans cells was observed in both groups.

  1. Clinical impact of ki-67 labeling index in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2013-01-01

    The ki-67 index is a marker of proliferation in malignant tumors. Studies from the period 2000 to 2012 on the prognostic and predictive value of ki-67 labeling index (LI) in non-small cell cancer (NSCLC) are reviewed. Twenty-eight studies reported on the prognostic value of ki-67 index with various...... endpoints. No consensus on the prognostic value of ki-67 LI was found among the published studies neither according to disease stage nor histological subtype. Comparison of studies is hampered by differences in patient populations, methodologies and cut-off values. Five studies explored the predictive value...... of ki-67 to chemotherapy and none revealed significant influence. Ki-67 index seems to be of prognostic influence in NSCLC although largely variable cut-off levels have been used in the various studies and standardization of methodology is required. The relative importance of ki-67 compared to newer...

  2. Technetium-99m labeled antisense probes uptake in vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the arterial wall, smooth muscle cells (SMC) normally exist in a quiescent, differentiated state, representing the contractile phenotype. During the development of atherosclerosis SMC change towards the synthetic phenotype going along with proliferation, chemotactic response and increased monocyte binding. The Fas/Fas ligand/caspase death-signaling pathway, Bcl-2 protein family/mitochondria, the tumor suppressive gene p53, and the proto-oncogene c-myc may be activated in atherosclerotic lesions, and mediates vascular apoptosis during the development of atherosclerosis. The atherosclerotic plaques contained 3-4 fold more c-myc mRNA than those in the normal aortic arteries, while increased Bax and Bak coupled with lack/paucity of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL are associated with SMC apoptosis in advanced lesions. Methods: 1 Oligonucleotide Conjugation: A solution of single stranded amine-derivatized DNA (100-1000μg) was prepared at a concentration of 2 mg/ml in 0.25M sodium bicarbonate, 1 M sodium chloride, 1mM EDTA, pH8.5. Cell uptake studies: 99mTc- MAG3-DNA radioactivity incorporation into porcine coronary smooth muscle cells in the log and plateau phases, respectively, was determined after different times of incubation at 37. The influence of extracellular 99mTc- MAG3-DNA concentration on SMC uptake was also analyzed. [Results] Essentially complete conjugation was achieved by reverse-phase Sep-Pak C18 chromatography analysis. The MAG3-DNA was labeled with 99mTc at room temperature and neutral pH, with a mean labeling efficiency of 80.11%(s.d=2.96%,n=4). The labeled antisense DNA still remained the ability to hybridize with its complementary DNA. After labeling, the stability of the DNA in saline or serum was retained as determined by reverse-phase Sep-Pak C18 chromatography analysis, except a shift at 30 min in serum incubation that suggesting a short time serum protein binding. 99mTc-MAG3-c-myc uptake plateaued at 60 min and was directly proportional to the ex

  3. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-06-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging.

  4. Optimal labeling dose, labeling time, and magnetic resonance imaging detection limits of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticle labeled mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Hansen, Louise; Friis, Tina;

    2013-01-01

    Background. Regenerative therapy is an emerging treatment modality. To determine migration and retention of implanted cells, it is crucial to develop noninvasive tracking methods. The aim was to determine ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection limits of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron...

  5. Tissue distribution of adoptively transferred adherent lymphokine-activated killer cells assessed by different cell labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, P; Herberman, R B; Hokland, M;

    1992-01-01

    alternative direct visual methods for identification of the injected cells, such as fluorescent dyes (rhodamine and H33342) or immunohistochemical staining of asialo-GM1-positive cells. The number of i.v. injected A-LAK cells found in the liver by all visual methods ranged from 1% to 5% of the injected dose...... staining of asialo-GM1-positive cells appear to be reliable and essentially equivalent methods for investigations of the fate of adoptively transferred A-LAK cells. Using these methods, we found that only few A-LAK cells redistribute to the liver upon i.v., i.e. systemic, injection, whereas 40%-50% of......Assessment of the tissue distribution of adoptively transferred adherent lymphokine-activated killer A-LAK) cells by use of 51Cr indicated that these effector cells, after an initial phase in the lungs, distributed in high numbers to liver and spleen (30% and 10% of injected dose, respectively...

  6. The effect of varying type and volume of sedimenting agents on leukocyte harvesting and labelling in sickle cell patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leukocyte labelling in patients with sickle cell anaemia has been reported as difficult if not impossible due to the slow erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in these patients. This study investigated standard sedimentation methods in patients with sickle cell disease (n=16) and compared the results obtained with those following changes in the amount and type of sedimenting agent used. Labelling with either 111In-oxine or 99Tcm-exametazime was attempted in only five patients. Replacement of the commonly used 6% Hetastarch (Hespan) with Dextran or Haemaccel did not improve leukocyte harvesting, even when the proportions used of these agents were increased. In most cases where standard procedures for leukocyte collection did not lead to harvesting of viable samples, it was possible to collect reasonably pure samples by increasing the proportion of Hespan used. It is possible to obtain adequate leukocyte labelling in the majority of sickle cell patients using a minor modification of standard techniques. In this group of patients a ratio of 8 ml of Hespan to 16 ml of blood should be used for cell separation. If this fails then donor cells, anti-granulocyte antibody labelling or HIG should be considered. (author)

  7. The effect of cryoprotection on the use of PLGA encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic PLGA nanoparticles are a significant advancement in the quest to translate MRI-based cell tracking to the clinic. The benefits of these types of particles are that they encapsulate large amounts of iron oxide nanocrystals within an FDA-approved polymer matrix, combining the best aspects of inert micron-sized iron oxide particles, or MPIOs, and biodegradable small particles of iron oxide, or SPIOs. Practically, PLGA nanoparticle fabrication and storage requires some form of cryoprotectant to both protect the particle during freeze drying and to promote resuspension. While this is a commonly employed procedure in the fabrication of drug loaded PLGA nanoparticles, it has yet to be investigated for magnetic particles and what effect this might have on internalization of magnetic particles. As such, in this study, magnetic PLGA nanoparticles were fabricated with various concentrations of two common cryoprotectants, dextrose and sucrose, and analyzed for their ability to magnetically label cells. It was found that cryoprotection with either sugar significantly enhanced the ability to resuspend nanoparticles without aggregation. Magnetic cell labeling was impacted by sugar concentration, with higher sugar concentrations used during freeze drying more significantly reducing magnetic cell labeling than lower concentrations. These studies suggest that cryoprotection with 1% dextrose is an optimal compromise that preserves monodispersity following resuspension and high magnetic cell labeling. (paper)

  8. The effect of cryoprotection on the use of PLGA encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic cell labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kevin S.; Hashmi, Sarah M.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic PLGA nanoparticles are a significant advancement in the quest to translate MRI-based cell tracking to the clinic. The benefits of these types of particles are that they encapsulate large amounts of iron oxide nanocrystals within an FDA-approved polymer matrix, combining the best aspects of inert micron-sized iron oxide particles, or MPIOs, and biodegradable small particles of iron oxide, or SPIOs. Practically, PLGA nanoparticle fabrication and storage requires some form of cryoprotectant to both protect the particle during freeze drying and to promote resuspension. While this is a commonly employed procedure in the fabrication of drug loaded PLGA nanoparticles, it has yet to be investigated for magnetic particles and what effect this might have on internalization of magnetic particles. As such, in this study, magnetic PLGA nanoparticles were fabricated with various concentrations of two common cryoprotectants, dextrose and sucrose, and analyzed for their ability to magnetically label cells. It was found that cryoprotection with either sugar significantly enhanced the ability to resuspend nanoparticles without aggregation. Magnetic cell labeling was impacted by sugar concentration, with higher sugar concentrations used during freeze drying more significantly reducing magnetic cell labeling than lower concentrations. These studies suggest that cryoprotection with 1% dextrose is an optimal compromise that preserves monodispersity following resuspension and high magnetic cell labeling.

  9. Iron labeling and pre-clinical MRI visualization of therapeutic human neural stem cells in a murine glioma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mya S Thu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Treatment strategies for the highly invasive brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme, require that cells which have invaded into the surrounding brain be specifically targeted. The inherent tumor-tropism of neural stem cells (NSCs to primary and invasive tumor foci can be exploited to deliver therapeutics to invasive brain tumor cells in humans. Use of the strategy of converting prodrug to drug via therapeutic transgenes delivered by immortalized therapeutic NSC lines have shown efficacy in animal models. Thus therapeutic NSCs are being proposed for use in human brain tumor clinical trials. In the context of NSC-based therapies, MRI can be used both to non-invasively follow dynamic spatio-temporal patterns of the NSC tumor targeting allowing for the optimization of treatment strategies and to assess efficacy of the therapy. Iron-labeling of cells allows their presence to be visualized and tracked by MRI. Thus we aimed to iron-label therapeutic NSCs without affecting their cellular physiology using a method likely to gain United States Federal Drug Administration (FDA approval. METHODOLOGY: For human use, the characteristics of therapeutic Neural Stem Cells must be clearly defined with any pertubation to the cell including iron labeling requiring reanalysis of cellular physiology. Here, we studied the effect of iron-loading of the therapeutic NSCs, with ferumoxide-protamine sulfate complex (FE-Pro on viability, proliferation, migratory properties and transgene expression, when compared to non-labeled cells. FE-Pro labeled NSCs were imaged by MRI at tumor sites, after intracranial administration into the hemisphere contralateral to the tumor, in an orthotopic human glioma xenograft mouse model. CONCLUSION: FE-Pro labeled NSCs retain their proliferative status, tumor tropism, and maintain stem cell character, while allowing in vivo cellular MRI tracking at 7 Tesla, to monitor their real-time migration and distribution at brain tumor sites

  10. Investigation of therapeutic efficiency of phenytoin (PHT) labeled with radioactive 131I in the cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to determine the incorporations of PHT radiolabeled with 131I (131I-PHT) on U-87 MG, Daoy and A549 cancerous cell lines. For this, cold and radio-labeling studies were carried out. The radiolabeling yield of 131I-PHT was obtained about 95 %. Subsequently, cell culture studies were carried out and radio-labeling yields of 131I, 131I-PHT on U-87 MG, Daoy and A549 cancerous cells were investigated. Cell culture studies demonstrated that the incorporation values of 131IPHT on the three cell lines decreased with increasing radioactivity. Consequently, 131I-PHT may be a good radiopharmaceutical for targeting radionuclide therapy of Central Nervous System Tumors. (author)

  11. Isolation and (111)In-Oxine Labeling of Murine NK Cells for Assessment of Cell Trafficking in Orthotopic Lung Tumor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malviya, Gaurav; Nayak, Tapan; Gerdes, Christian; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Signore, Alberto; de Vries, Erik F J

    2016-04-01

    A noninvasive in vivo imaging method for NK cell trafficking is essential to gain further understanding of the pathogenesis of NK cell mediated immune response to the novel cancer treatment strategies, and to discover the homing sites and physiological distribution of NK cells. Although human NK cells can be labeled for in vivo imaging, little is known about the murine NK cell labeling and its application in animal models. This study describes the isolation and ex vivo radiolabeling of murine NK cells for the evaluation of cell trafficking in an orthotopic model of human lung cancer in mice. Scid-Tg(FCGR3A)Blt transgenic SCID mice were used to isolate NK cells from mouse splenocytes using the CD49b (DX5) MicroBeads positive selection method. The purity and viability of the isolated NK cells were confirmed by FACS analysis. Different labeling buffers and incubation times were evaluated to optimize (111)In-oxine labeling conditions. Functionality of the radiolabeled NK cell was assessed by (51)Cr-release assay. We evaluated physiological distribution of (111)In-oxine labeled murine NK cells in normal SCID mice and biodistribution in irradiated and nonirradiated SCID mice with orthotopic A549 human lung tumor lesions. Imaging findings were confirmed by histology. Results showed that incubation with 0.011 MBq of (111)In-oxine per million murine NK cells in PBS (pH 7.4) for 20 min is the best condition that provides optimum labeling efficiency without affecting cell viability and functionality. Physiological distribution in normal SCID mice demonstrated NK cells homing mainly in the spleen, while (111)In released from NK cells was excreted via kidneys into urine. Biodistribution studies demonstrated a higher lung uptake in orthotopic lung tumor-bearing mice than control mice. In irradiated mice, lung tumor uptake of radiolabeled murine NK cells decreased between 24 h and 72 h postinjection (p.i.), which was accompanied by tumor regression, while in nonirradiated mice

  12. Research of commercial bifacial silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Tiantian; Li, Hongbo [Shanghai Solar Energy Research Center (China); Li, Wennan; Guo, Wenlin [Shanghai Perfect Energy (China); Chen, Mingbo [Shanghai Institute of Space Power-Sources (China)

    2008-07-01

    Because of the special finger shape and junction structure, bifacial silicon solar cells could receive sunlight from both sides. So the cells can absorb much sunlight, have less strict require for installation, and have higher conversion efficiency. We have done research in commercial bifacial silicon solar cells. We designed the bifacial silicon solar cells with realizable structure and high conversion efficiency. We designed and realized proper technics path, which are used to fabricate these bifacial solar cells. The boron backfield is used. The anti-reflection coating and finger contact are fabricated on both surfaces of the solar cells, so the cells have different contact structure. Meanwhile, we realized ohmic contact between finger contacts and surface of solar cells on both sides. We successfully produced the bifacial silicon solar cells with the front and rear efficiencies exceed 15% and 9%(AM1.5, 25 C), respectively, and which can be produced in large-scale. (orig.)

  13. In Vivo Serial Evaluation of Super-Paramagnetic Iron-Oxide Labeled Stem Cells by Off-Resonance Positive Contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoriyasu; Cunningham, Charles H.; Noguchi, Ken-ichiro; Chen, Ian Y.; Weissman, Irving L.; Yeung, Alan C.; Robbins, Robert C.; Yang, Phillip C.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a diagnostic modality to track iron-oxide labeled stem cells. This study investigates whether an off-resonance (OR) pulse sequence designed to generate positive contrast at 1.5-Tesla can assess location, quantity and viability of delivered stem cells in vivo. Using mouse embryonic stem cell transfected with luciferase reporter gene (luc-mESC), multimodality validation of OR signal was conducted to determine whether engraftment parameters of superparamagnetic iron-oxide labeled luc-mESC (SPIO-luc-mESC) could be determined after cell transplantation into the mouse hind limb. A significant increase in signal- and contrast-to-noise of the SPIO-luc-mESC was achieved by OR technique when compared to GRE sequence. A significant correlation between the quantity of SPIO-luc-mESC and OR signal was observed immediately after transplantation (R2=0.74, p<0.05). The assessment of transplanted cell viability by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) showed significant increase of luciferase activities by day 16 while MRI signal showed no difference. No significant correlation between BLI and MRI signals of cell viability was observed. In conclusion, using off-resonance sequence, the precise localization and quantitation of SPIO-labeled stem cells in both space and time were possible. However, off-resonance sequence did not allow evaluation of cell viability. PMID:19030159

  14. In vivo/in vitro labeling of red blood cells with sup(99m)Tc and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reliable and stabile in vivo/in vitro labeling technique of red blood cells (RBC) is described. The patients are injected 20% of the content of an unlabeled kit used for bone scintigraphy (TechneScan PYP, Byk-Mallinckrodt). 15 minutes later 3 ml blood are sampled in a heparinized syringe. The blood is incubated together with 30-40 mCi (1-1.5 GBq) sup(99m)Tc for 10 minutes in a water bath at 35-370C. After centrifugation at 500 g a dose of 15-25 mCi (0.6-1 GBq) sup(99m)Tc labeled RBC may be withdrawn in a volume of 1-1.5 ml. Mean labeling efficiency is 88%, without using the first eluat of a Tc-generator the yield is as high as 92%. Due to the small volume, the labeled RBC may be reinjected as bolus and first pass radionuclide angiocardiography can be performed. Using labeled RBC, scintigraphy of the intravasal space is possible up to 20 hours without deterioration in contrast or accumulation of radioactivity in the extravasal space or in other organs. Evaluation of heart function can be performed up to 10 hours. In addition, labeled RBC are useful in detecting unknown gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  15. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N in insect cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D., E-mail: alvar.gossert@novartis.com [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80 % can be achieved for {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For {sup 2}H,{sup 15}N and {sup 2}H,{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73 %, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins.

  16. Detection of homing-in of stem cells labeled with technetium-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime in infarcted myocardium after intracoronary injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone marrow stem cells having myogenic potential are promising candidates for various cell-based therapies for myocardial disease. We present here images showing homing of technetium-99m (Tc-99m) hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) labeled stem cells in the infarcted myocardium from a pilot study conducted to radio-label part of the stem cells in patients enrolled in a stem cell clinical trial for recent myocardial infarction

  17. Research perspectives and role of lactose uptake rate revealed by its study using 14C-labelled lactose in whey fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golfinopoulos, Aristidis; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Tsaousi, Konstantina; Koutinas, Athanasios A; Soupioni, Magdalini

    2011-03-01

    The present investigation examines the effect of pH, temperature and cell concentration on lactose uptake rate, in relation with kinetics of whey fermentation using kefir and determines the optimum conditions of these parameters. Lactose uptake rate was measured by adding (14)C-labelled lactose in whey. The results reveal the role of lactose uptake rate, being the main factor that affects the rate of fermentation, in contrast to the activity of the enzymes involved in lactose bioconversion process. Lactose uptake rate results discussion showed that mainly Ca(2+) is responsible for the reduced whey fermentation rate in comparison with fermentations using synthetic media containing lactose. Likewise, the results draw up perspectives on whey fermentation research to improve whey fermentation rate. Those perspectives are research to remove Ca(2+) from whey, the use of nano and microtubular biopolymers and promoters such as γ-alumina pellets and volcan foaming rock kissiris in order to accelerate whey fermentation. PMID:21232943

  18. Location of tumour cells in colon tissue by Texas red labelled pentosan polysulphate, an inhibitor of a cell surface protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anees, M

    1996-01-01

    Pentosan polysulphate (PPS), a highly negatively charged polysaccharide, is a significant inhibitor of an isoenzymic form of a cell surface protease referred to as guanidinobenzoatase GB, associated with colonic carcinoma tissues in frozen sections and free GB in solution, in a concentration-dependent manner. However PPS failed to recognise and bind to the isoenzymic form of GB associated with normal colon epithelial cell surfaces. Texas red labelled PPS (TR-PPS) binds to the tumour cell surfaces of colonic carcinoma and colonic polyps and these cells fluoresce red, whilst the normal colon cell surfaces failed to bind the TR-PPS, and hence lacked red fluorescence. Polysulphonated suramin also selectively recognised and inhibited the colonic carcinoma GB isoenzyme. The kinetic data indicated that this inhibition was not caused by a mere polyanionic effect, since highly sulphated heparin failed to show a significant inhibition of colonic carcinoma GB, however trypan blue did show 50% inhibition. Kinetic studies have also shown that PPS is a non-competitive, reversible inhibitor of colonic carcinoma GB, with an apparent Km 6.8 x 10(-7) M. Gel analysis has shown that PPS binds to another site, distinct from the active centre, and after binding PPS changed the conformation of GB. These studies suggest that TR-PPS is a potent inhibitor of colonic carcinoma GB, and can be used as a novel fluorescent probe for the location of tumour cells in frozen sections of human colon tissues. PSS could also have potential as a vehicle for the transport of cytotoxic compounds to carcinoma cells of the colon. PMID:8835946

  19. Detection of clonal T cell populations by high resolution PCR using fluorescently labelled nucleotides; evaluation using conventional LIS-SSCP

    OpenAIRE

    Wickham, C L; Lynas, C; Ellard, S

    2000-01-01

    Aims—To detect clonal T cell populations by high resolution polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using fluorescently labelled nucleotides and analysis on an ABI 377 DNA sequencer, and to evaluate this method using low ionic strength single strand conformation polymorphism (LIS-SSCP) analysis.

  20. Gallbladder Activity on 99mTc-Labeled Red Cell Scintigraphy Confirmed by SPECT/CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Jing, Hongli; Chen, Libo; Wang, Zhenghua; Li, Fang

    2016-09-01

    Tc-labeled red cell (Tc-RBC) scintigraphy is commonly used to detect gastrointestinal bleeding. Gallbladder visualization on Tc-RBC scintigraphy is not common. We present a case of gallbladder visualization on Tc-RBC scintigraphy confirmed by SPECT/CT imaging in a patient with chronic renal failure and anemia. PMID:27405034

  1. A Novel PET Imaging Using 64Cu-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody against Mesothelin Commonly Expressed on Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Kobayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesothelin (MSLN is a 40-kDa cell differentiation-associated glycoprotein appearing with carcinogenesis and is highly expressed in many human cancers, including the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas, ovarian cancers, and mesotheliomas, while its expression in normal tissue is limited to mesothelial cells lining the pleura, pericardium, and peritoneum. Clone 11-25 is a murine hybridoma secreting monoclonal antibody (mAb against human MSLN. In this study, we applied the 11-25 mAb to in vivo imaging to detect MSLN-expressing tumors. In in vitro and ex vivo immunochemical studies, we demonstrated specificity of 11-25 mAb to membranous MSLN expressed on several pancreatic cancer cells. We showed the accumulation of Alexa Fluor 750-labeled 11-25 mAb in MSLN-expressing tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. Then, 11-25 mAb was labeled with 64Cu via a chelating agent DOTA and was used in both in vitro cell binding assay and in vivo positron emission tomography (PET imaging in the tumor-bearing mice. We confirmed that 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb highly accumulated in MSLN-expressing tumors as compared to MSLN-negative ones. The 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb is potentially useful as a PET probe capable of being used for wide range of tumors, rather than 18F-FDG that occasionally provides nonspecific accumulation into the inflammatory lesions.

  2. Label-Free Digital Quantification of Lipid Droplets in Single Cells by Stimulated Raman Microscopy on a Microfluidic Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chen; Zhou, Dong; Chen, Tao; Streets, Aaron M; Huang, Yanyi

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative characterization of a single-cell phenotype remains challenging. We combined a scalable microfluidic array of parallel cell culture chambers and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy to quantitatively characterize the response of lipid droplet (LD) formation to free-fatty-acid stimuli with single-LD resolution at the single-cell level. By enabling the systematic live-cell imaging with SRS microscopy in a microfluidic device, we were able to quantify the morphology of over a thousand live cells in 10 different chemical environments and with 8 replicates for each culture condition, in a single experiment, and without relying on fluorescent labeling. We developed an image processing pipeline for cell segmentation and LD morphology quantification using dual-channel SRS images. This allows us to construct distributions of the morphological parameters of LDs in the cellular population and expose the vast phenotypic heterogeneity among genetically similar cells. Specifically, this approach provides an analytical tool for quantitatively investigating LD morphology in live cells in situ. With this high-throughput, high-resolution, and label-free method, we found that LD growth dynamics showed considerable cell to cell variation. Lipid accumulation in nonadipocyte cells is mainly reflected in the increase of LD number, as opposed to an increase in their size or lipid concentration. Our method allows statistical single-cell quantification of the LD distribution for further investigation of lipid metabolism and dynamic behavior, and also extends the possibility to couple with other "omics" technologies in the future. PMID:27041129

  3. MR tracking of stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic nanoparticles in ischemic brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jendelová, Pavla; Glogarová, Kateřina; Urdzíková, Lucia; Kroupová, Jana; Herynek, V.; Dvořák, Petr; Hájek, M.; Syková, Eva

    č. 2 (2003), s. 35. ISSN 0894-1491. [European Meeting on Glial Cell Function in Health and Disease /6./. Berlín, 03.09.2003-06.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065; GA ČR GA304/03/1189 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:MSM 111300004 Keywords : Stem cells * Nanoparticles Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.677, year: 2003

  4. Stem Cell Research and Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eve, David J.; Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.; Klasko, Stephen K.; Sanberg, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells are being touted as the greatest discovery for the potential treatment of a myriad of diseases in the new millennium, but there is still much research to be done before it will be known whether they can live up to this description. There is also an ethical debate over the production of one of the most valuable types of stem cell: the…

  5. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, SILAC, as a simple and accurate approach to expression proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ong, S.E.; Blagoev, B.; Kratchmarova, I.;

    2002-01-01

    . Here we describe a method, termed SILAC, for stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, for the in vivo incorporation of specific amino acids into all mammalian proteins. Mammalian cell lines are grown in media lacking a standard essential amino acid but supplemented with a non......Quantitative proteomics has traditionally been performed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, but recently, mass spectrometric methods based on stable isotope quantitation have shown great promise for the simultaneous and automated identification and quantitation of complex protein mixtures......-radioactive, isotopically labeled form of that amino acid, in this case deuterated leucine (Leu-d3). We find that growth of cells maintained in these media is no different from growth in normal media as evidenced by cell morphology, doubling time, and ability to differentiate. Complete incorporation of Leu-d3 occurred...

  6. Determination of the internalization pathway of photoluminescent nanodiamonds in mammalian cells for biological labeling and optimization of the ?uorescent yield

    CERN Document Server

    Faklaris, Orestis; Irinopoulou, Theano; Tauc, Patrick; Girard, Hugues; Gesset, Celine; Senour, Mohamed; Thorel, Alain; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick A; Treussart, François

    2009-01-01

    Diamond nanoparticles have been recently used as new ?uorescent labels in cells. Their emission relies on color centers embedded in the diamond matrix. In this work we compare the photoluminescence of a single color center embedded in a 30 nm diameter nanodiamond to that to a single dye molecule and demonstrate the perfect photostability of the color centers. We also compare the photoluminescence properties of nanodiamonds prepared under different conditions in order to ?nd the optimal parameters to achieve a high ?uorescence yield. We use these photoluminescent nanodiamonds for HeLa cell labeling and investigate their uptake mechanism. On the one hand by immunostaining the endocytotic vesicles and on the other by transmission electron microscopy observations we study the localization of nanodiamonds in cells. Moreover, by blocking selectively different endocytotic mechanisms we unravel their internalization pathway. We ?nd that nanodiamonds enter the cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. The results of thi...

  7. Identification of Novel GPR55 Modulators Using Cell-Impedance-Based Label-Free Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Paula; Whyte, Lauren S; Chicharro, Roberto; Gómez-Cañas, María; Pazos, M Ruth; Goya, Pilar; Irving, Andrew J; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Ross, Ruth A; Jagerovic, Nadine

    2016-03-10

    The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR55 has been proposed as a novel receptor of the endocannabinoid system. However, the validity of this categorization is still under debate mainly because of the lack of potent and selective agonists and antagonists of GPR55. Binding assays are not yet available for GPR55 screening, and discrepancies in GPR55 mediated signaling pathways have been reported. In this context, we have designed and synthesized novel GPR55 ligands based on a chromenopyrazole scaffold. Appraisal of GPR55 activity was accomplished using a label-free cell-impedance-based assay in hGPR55-HEK293 cells. The real-time impedance responses provided an integrative assessment of the cellular consequence to GPR55 stimulation taking into account the different possible signaling pathways. Potent GPR55 partial agonists (14b, 18b, 19b, 20b, and 21-24) have been identified; one of them (14b) being selective versus classical cannabinoid receptors. Upon antagonist treatment, chromenopyrazoles 21-24 inhibited lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) effect. One of these GPR55 antagonists (21) is fully selective versus classic cannabinoid receptors. Compared to LPI, the predicted physicochemical parameters of the new compounds suggest a clear pharmacokinetic improvement. PMID:26789378

  8. Detection of liver hemangiomas by Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differentiation of hemangiomas and liver cysts (5-15% in adult population) from single metastases, hepatocellular carcinomas, adenomas and focal nodular hyperplasia is important because of the current aggressive surgical approaches to the treatment of single malignant lesions. Very vascular lesions (focal nodular hyperplasia, some adenomas, some hepatocellular carcinomas, and vascular metastases) show radiological contrast in bolus in the first 30 seconds (the arterial dominant phase). During the delayed contrast enhancement phase (from 30 to 180 seconds), some hepatocellular carcinomas, metastases and occasional hemangiomas may be seen. The accumulation of tagged red blood cells in the hemangioma is much slower than of the contrast, and their activity persists for a much longer time (30 minutes - 2 hours). Data from literature show that hemangiomas larger than 2 cm are detected in 95 %% of cases. In our study we have labeled the red blood cells in vivo with Tc-99m-PYP or Tc-99m-DTPA. Planar scintigrams in several projections are made from 3 to 30 minutes, in matrix 256x8. In 11 of 42 cases one or two very vascular lesions, larger than 2 cm, were found. In four cases the increased activity accumulation was marked as suspect, and in others the increased activity accumulation was not detected. (author)

  9. Imaging Alzheimer's disease-related protein aggregates in human cells using a selenium label

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aberrant folding and subsequent aggregation of proteins and peptides is associated with a range of pathological conditions from the systemic amyloidoses to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. While this link is well established there is a lack of understanding of the exact role protein aggregates play in disease pathogenesis. Part of the reason for this is that it has proved extremely challenging to characterise the localisation and structure of amyloid fibrils within the cellular environment due to a lack of contrast between the carbon rich protein aggregates and the carbon rich cell. We report a novel method for visualising Alzheimer's disease-related amyloid fibrils inside human cells without the use of invasive or unreliable stains or tags. The naturally occurring sulfur atom in the amyloid-β peptide is replaced with a selenium atom, a heavier element in the same group of the periodic table of elements. Using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) in a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) the selenium-labelled aggregates can be identified within the cellular environment.

  10. Intrinsic indicator of photodamage during label-free multiphoton microscopy of cells and tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Galli

    Full Text Available Multiphoton imaging has evolved as an indispensable tool in cell biology and holds prospects for clinical applications. When addressing endogenous signals such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS or second harmonic generation, it requires intense laser irradiation that may cause photodamage. We report that increasing endogenous fluorescence signal upon multiphoton imaging constitutes a marker of photodamage. The effect was studied on mouse brain in vivo and ex vivo, on ex vivo human brain tissue samples, as well as on glioblastoma cells in vitro, demonstrating that this phenomenon is common to a variety of different systems, both ex vivo and in vivo. CARS microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy were used to analyze the photodamage. The development of a standard easy-to-use model that employs rehydrated cryosections allowed the characterization of the irradiation-induced fluorescence and related it to nonlinear photodamage. In conclusion, the monitoring of endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence during label-free multiphoton microscopy enables to estimate damage thresholds ex vivo as well as detect photodamage during in vivo experiments.

  11. In vivo tracking of 111In-oxine labeled mesenchymal stem cells following infusion in patients with advanced cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Several animal and few human studies suggest the beneficial role of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in liver cirrhosis. However, little is known about the fate of MSCs after infusion in cirrhotic patients. We evaluated stem cell biodistribution after peripheral infusion of MSCs in four cirrhotic patients. Methods: After three passages of MSCs, the patients received a total of 250-400x106 cells, of which only 50% of the cells were labeled. Specific activities of 0.21-0.67 MBq/106 cells were maintained for the injected labeled MSCs. Planar whole-body acquisitions (anterior/posterior projections) were acquired immediately following infusion as well as at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 24 h, 48 h, 7th and 10th days after cell infusion. Results: After intravenous infusion, the radioactivity was first observed to accumulate in the lungs. During the following hours to days, the radioactivity gradually increased in the liver and spleen, with spleen uptake exceeding that in the liver in all patients. Region-of-interest analysis showed that the percentage of cells homing to the liver (following decay and background corrections and geometric mean calculation) increased from 0.0%-2.8% at immediately post-infusion images to 13.0-17.4% in 10th-day post-infusion. Similarly, the residual activities in the spleen increased from 2.0%-10.2% at immediately post-infusion images to 30.1%-42.2% in 10th-day post-infusion. During the same period, the residual activities in the lungs decreased from 27.0-33.5% to 2.0-5.4%. Conclusion: The infusion of MSCs labeled with 111In-oxine through a peripheral vein is safe in cirrhosis. Cell labeling with 111In-oxine is a suitable method for tracking MSC distribution after infusion.

  12. The research analysis of the green label's impact on the consumer purchase behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, environmental protection has drawn more and more people’s attention. Therefore, many companies take Green Marketing as an important marketing strategy in order to sustain their own advantages in the fiercely competitive market environment. They take use of environmentally protective advertisements, eco-brand and eco-label to remind people’s perception and awareness of green products, make it easier to define the attributes and characteristics of green products, and then consequently...

  13. Correlation between the rate of bioreduction of nitroxide spin label by human tumor cells and their low-dose radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss a correlation observed between the bioreduction of nitroxide spin label by four human tumor cell lines and a normal tissue fibroblast clone and their low-dose radiation response, specifically their DQ. In measurements of the bioreduction rate of several other cell lines, this correlation appears to persist. In order to define the mechanism of this correlation, they have begun by subtly altering the measurement conditions. The original conditions for measurement involved adding the spin label to cells whose culture medium had been changed (the label was added to the new medium). By delaying the addition of the label to the culture medium, they substantially reduced the variation of the bioreduction rate between the cell lines. This implies that the fresh medium provides a nonspecific irritant or disequilibrium to the cultured cell system to which they response variably by accelerating, among other things, the metabolic process responsible for spin label bioreduction

  14. The effect of 125I labeled anti-androgen receptor agent on the proliferation of prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Based on the previous experience of using anti-androgen receptor triple helix forming oligonucleotide (TFO) to inhibit proliferation of prostate cancer cells, a 125I labeled TFO was prepared and tested in this experiment as an androgen receptor targeted antigene radiotherapy. Methods: 125I-TFO was labeled through Iodogen and then transfected LNCaP prostate cancer cells via liposome. The unlabeled TFO, 125I, and naturally cultured cells served as controls. The cellular proliferation was detected by methyl thiazolium tetrazolium (MTT) method, the expression of androgen receptor gene was carried out by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical study. Results: The radiolabeling efficiency, radiochemical purity and specific activity of 125I-TFO were 63.7%, 95.6% and 80.1 kBq/μg, respectively. At the same TFO concentration, the androgen receptor expression level in 125I-TFO treated cells was markedly lower than that of TFO group (P125I-TFO on cellular proliferation was significantly higher (P< 0.01). Conclusion: The inhibitory effect on androgen receptor expression and cell proliferation of prostate cancer cells of antigene therapy with radio-labeled TFO were significantly more obvious than that of classical antigene therapy. (authors)

  15. Labelling of steroid 3-O-sulfates by tritium and their binding to guinea pig cortical cell membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Elbert, Tomáš; Slaninová, Jiřina; Chodounská, Hana; Šaman, David

    Edinburgh : -, 2006. -. [International Symposium on the synthesis and applications of isotopes and isotopically labelled compounds /9./. 16.07.2006-20.07.2006, Edinburgh] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : tritium * tritiated steroid 3-O-sulfates * palladium Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  16. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of EGFP-Labeled Neural Crest Cells From Murine Embryonic Craniofacial Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Singh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During the early stages of embryogenesis, pluripotent neural crest cells (NCC are known to migrate from the neural folds to populate multiple target sites in the embryo where they differentiate into various derivatives, including cartilage, bone, connective tissue, melanocytes, glia, and neurons of the peripheral nervous system. The ability to obtain pure NCC populations is essential to enable molecular analyses of neural crest induction, migration, and/or differentiation. Crossing Wnt1-Cre and Z/EG transgenic mouse lines resulted in offspring in which the Wnt1-Cre transgene activated permanent EGFP expression only in NCC. The present report demonstrates a flow cytometric method to sort and isolate populations of EGFP-labeled NCC. The identity of the sorted neural crest cells was confirmed by assaying expression of known marker genes by TaqMan Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (QRT-PCR. The molecular strategy described in this report provides a means to extract intact RNA from a pure population of NCC thus enabling analysis of gene expression in a defined population of embryonic precursor cells critical to development.

  17. Stem cell research and economic promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    In the context of stem cell research, the promise of economic growth has become a common policy argument for adoption of permissive policies and increased government funding. However, declarations of economic and commercial benefit, which can be found in policy reports, the scientific literature, public funding policies, and the popular press, have arguably created a great deal of expectation. Can stem cell research deliver on the economic promise? And what are the implications of this economic ethos for the researchers who must work under its shadow? PMID:20579253

  18. Scintillation Scanning of the Spleen with Red Cells Labelled with Cr51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satisfactory scintiscans of the spleen have been obtained using chromium-51-labelled red cells, modified by two methods. Initially red cells were sensitized in vitro by coating with incomplete anti-D antibody. In this method the concentration of sensitized red cells in the spleen is proportional to the volume of anti- D serum employed in the sensitization procedure. Satisfactory scintiscans were obtained using 0.50 ml of a 1:128 dilution of anti-D serum, having an original titre of 1: 512/ml of red cells. In spite of good results, the sensitization method, utilizable only in Rh positive patients, has been replaced by the method using red cells modified by heating, which is technically easier and may be used also in Rh negative patients. The image of the spleen is clearly delineated in all the cases, without interference from hepatic radioactivity. The spleen: liver ratio ranges between 5:1 and 10:1. To date scintillation scans of the spleen have been performed in about 60 patients. No immediate or delayed clinical reactions have been observed in the patients after the injection of sensitized or heated red cells. Since the radiation dose delivered to the patient is lower than the dose delivered in many radiological and clinical examinations with radioactive isotopes, the scanning procedure has been widely used in the differential diagnosis of the masses of the left abdomen. Among the cases studied, it is worth while mentioning two cases of splenomegaly associated with a tumour of the left kidney, one case of Banti's disease in a patient, in which a neoplasm of descending colon was suspected and a case of neuroblastomá in a patient two years old, in which the scintiscan of the spleen and that of the kidneys were of great help in making the right diagnosis. Further, the scintiscan has been of unique utility to rule out an accessory spleen and to demonstrate the spleen in congenital malformations, like situs inversus viscerum. In patients affected by chronic leukaemia

  19. Tc-99m Labeled Red Blood Cell by Ultra Tag RBC Kit in Patients Suspected of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty patients suspected of gastrointestinal bleeding who underwent Tc-99m labeled red blood cell (RBC) by ultraTag RBC kit at Division of Nuclear Medicine, Bumrungrad Hospital between January 2000 and December 2002 were studied. The histories of patients together with either endoscopic results or angiographic findings or pathological reports were used as gold standards. Two by Two decision matrix was used for data analysis and the sensitivity together with specificity were calculated. The results show that the sensitivity and specificity of Tc-99m labeled RBC by ultraTag RBC kit are 87.5% and 91.7%, respectively. We conclude that Tc-99m labeled RBC by ultraTag RBC kit gives high percentages of sensitivity and specificity. Moreover, the image quality is improved because of the absence of free Tc-99m pertechnetate uptake in the stomach in all patients

  20. Infrared fluorescent protein 1.4 genetic labeling tracks engrafted cardiac progenitor cells in mouse ischemic hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Chen

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has a potential for regenerating damaged myocardium. However, a key obstacle to cell therapy's success is the loss of engrafted cells due to apoptosis or necrosis in the ischemic myocardium. While many strategies have been developed to improve engrafted cell survival, tools to evaluate cell efficacy within the body are limited. Traditional genetic labeling tools, such as GFP-like fluorescent proteins (eGFP, DsRed, mCherry, have limited penetration depths in vivo due to tissue scattering and absorption. To circumvent these limitations, a near-infrared fluorescent mutant of the DrBphP bacteriophytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans, IFP1.4, was developed for in vivo imaging, but it has yet to be used for in vivo stem/progenitor cell tracking. In this study, we incorporated IFP1.4 into mouse cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs by a lentiviral vector. Live IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were imaged by their near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF using an Odyssey scanner following overnight incubation with biliverdin. A significant linear correlation was observed between the amount of cells and NIRF signal intensity in in vitro studies. Lentiviral mediated IFP1.4 gene labeling is stable, and does not impact the apoptosis and cardiac differentiation of CPC. To assess efficacy of our model for engrafted cells in vivo, IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were intramyocardially injected into infarcted hearts. NIRF signals were collected at 1-day, 7-days, and 14-days post-injection using the Kodak in vivo multispectral imaging system. Strong NIRF signals from engrafted cells were imaged 1 day after injection. At 1 week after injection, 70% of the NIRF signal was lost when compared to the intensity of the day 1 signal. The data collected 2 weeks following transplantation showed an 88% decrease when compared to day 1. Our studies have shown that IFP1.4 gene labeling can be used to track the viability of transplanted cells in vivo.

  1. Labeling of mesenchymal stem cells for MRI with single-cell sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ariza de Schellenberger A; Kratz H; Farr TD; Löwa N; Hauptmann R; Wagner S; Taupitz M; Schnorr J; Schellenberger EA

    2016-01-01

    Angela Ariza de Schellenberger,1 Harald Kratz,1 Tracy D Farr,2,3 Norbert Löwa,4 Ralf Hauptmann,1 Susanne Wagner,1 Matthias Taupitz,1 Jörg Schnorr,1 Eyk A Schellenberger1 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Experimental Neurology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Medical School, Nottingham, UK; 4Department of Biomagnetic Signals, Physikalisch-Technische...

  2. Labeling of mesenchymal stem cells for MRI with single-cell sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ariza de Schellenberger, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Angela Ariza de Schellenberger,1 Harald Kratz,1 Tracy D Farr,2,3 Norbert Löwa,4 Ralf Hauptmann,1 Susanne Wagner,1 Matthias Taupitz,1 Jörg Schnorr,1 Eyk A Schellenberger1 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Experimental Neurology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Medical School, Nottingham, UK; 4Department of Biomagnetic Signals, Phy...

  3. In vivo MRI tracking of iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled human mesenchymal stem cells in limb ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li XX

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiang-Xiang Li,1,2,* Kang-An Li,3,* Jin-Bao Qin,1,2 Kai-Chuang Ye,1,2 Xin-Rui Yang,1,2 Wei-Min Li,1,2 Qing-Song Xie,4 Mi-Er Jiang,1,2 Gui-Xiang Zhang,3 Xin-Wu Lu1,21Department of Vascular Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, 2Vascular Center, Shanghai JiaoTong University, 3Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 4Department of Neurosurgery, Cixi Municipal People's Hospital, Zhejiang Province, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Stem cell transplantation has been investigated for repairing damaged tissues in various injury models. Monitoring the safety and fate of transplanted cells using noninvasive methods is important to advance this technique into clinical applications. Methods: In this study, lower-limb ischemia models were generated in nude mice by femoral artery ligation. As negative-contrast agents, positively charged magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (aminopropyltriethoxysilane-coated Fe2O3 were investigated in terms of in vitro labeling efficiency, effects on human mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC proliferation, and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI visualization. Ultimately, the mice were sacrificed for histological analysis three weeks after transplantation. Results: With efficient labeling, aminopropyltriethoxysilane-modified magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (APTS-MNPs did not significantly affect hMSC proliferation. In vivo, APTS-MNP-labeled hMSCs could be monitored by clinical 3 Tesla MRI for at least three weeks. Histological examination detected numerous migrated Prussian blue-positive cells, which was consistent with the magnetic resonance images. Some migrated Prussian blue-positive cells were positive for mature endothelial cell markers of von Willebrand factor and anti-human proliferating cell

  4. Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues From the Director: Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease Past Issues / Summer ... Zerhouni, NIH Director, described the need for expanding stem cell research. Recently, he spoke about stem cell research with ...

  5. Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues From the Director: Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease Past Issues / ... Zerhouni, NIH Director, described the need for expanding stem cell research. Recently, he spoke about stem cell research ...

  6. Latest Sickle Cell Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Special Section: Sickle Cell Disease Latest Sickle Cell Research Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents ... Complications of sickle cell trait 100 Years of Sickle Cell Research Dr. James B. Herrick Photo: National Library ...

  7. Long-lived labelling of phagocytic cells with analogs of atheroma lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (3H)trioleyl glyceryl ether and (3H)cholesteryl linoleyl ether were bound to intralipid and injected intraperitoneally into mice. About 20% of the injected label was recovered from peritoneal macrophages up to 2 weeks after injection, and there was a gradual appearance of the label in the liver. Following injection of acetylated low density lipoprotein, labelled with (3H)trioleyl glyceryl ether, into rats, about 90% of the label appeared in the liver shortly after injection and all label was retained up to 73 days. These findings indicate that (3H)cholesteryl linoleyl ether and (3H)trioleyl glycerol can serve as non-degradable analogs of atheroma lipids, which are readily taken up by macrophages when presented in the form of appropriate substrates. These preliminary results serve as basis for experiments designed to study the role of macrophages in the transport of atheroma lipids. (author)

  8. Indium-111 labelled white blood cell scintigraphy in cranial and spinal septic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, M.; Lucano, A. [Div. of Neurosurgery, S. Croce e Carle Hospital, Cuneo (Italy); Viglietti, A.L.; Camuzzini, G. [Service of Nuclear Medicine, S. Croce e Carle Hospital, Cuneo (Italy); Gozzoli, L. [Service of Neuroradiology, S. Croce e Carle Hospital, Cuneo (Italy); Ravasi, L.; Lucignani, G. [INB-CNR, Univ. of Milan, H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy)

    2000-10-01

    Cranial and spinal infections are severe events that require timely diagnosis and treatment. Physical and neurological examination, laboratory tests and radiological imaging may be insufficient for assessing cranial and spinal septic lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of indium-111 white blood cell (WBC) scan in assessing the presence of leucocytes in intracranial and spinal lesions, and in the diagnosis, management and follow-up of primary, post-traumatic and post-surgical infections. One hundred and twenty-four subjects were included in the study (48 with post-traumatic or post-surgical lesions, 73 with primary cerebral lesions, and 3 with spinal lesions). All patients underwent a diagnostic work-up including planar scans with {sup 111}In-labelled WBCs, at 4 and 24 h post tracer injection. All subjects underwent surgical treatment. Patients who did not recover from the infection as suggested by clinical evolution underwent further treatment (up to three times) and further WBC scans (up to four times). WBC scintigraphy correctly identified all the areas of leucocyte accumulation, as confirmed after surgery. WBC scintigraphy also correctly excluded the presence of leucocytes in all other lesions, as demonstrated at surgery. The results of this study confirm the accuracy of WBC scan for the assessment of patients with cranial and spinal lesions, in whom the demonstration of leucocyte accumulation can ease the diagnosis of infection, and indicate that the method is also accurate for the follow-up and management of neurosurgical patients. (orig.)

  9. Indium-111 labelled white blood cell scintigraphy in cranial and spinal septic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial and spinal infections are severe events that require timely diagnosis and treatment. Physical and neurological examination, laboratory tests and radiological imaging may be insufficient for assessing cranial and spinal septic lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of indium-111 white blood cell (WBC) scan in assessing the presence of leucocytes in intracranial and spinal lesions, and in the diagnosis, management and follow-up of primary, post-traumatic and post-surgical infections. One hundred and twenty-four subjects were included in the study (48 with post-traumatic or post-surgical lesions, 73 with primary cerebral lesions, and 3 with spinal lesions). All patients underwent a diagnostic work-up including planar scans with 111In-labelled WBCs, at 4 and 24 h post tracer injection. All subjects underwent surgical treatment. Patients who did not recover from the infection as suggested by clinical evolution underwent further treatment (up to three times) and further WBC scans (up to four times). WBC scintigraphy correctly identified all the areas of leucocyte accumulation, as confirmed after surgery. WBC scintigraphy also correctly excluded the presence of leucocytes in all other lesions, as demonstrated at surgery. The results of this study confirm the accuracy of WBC scan for the assessment of patients with cranial and spinal lesions, in whom the demonstration of leucocyte accumulation can ease the diagnosis of infection, and indicate that the method is also accurate for the follow-up and management of neurosurgical patients. (orig.)

  10. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Therapy for Autism: An Open Label Proof of Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy is an emerging therapeutic modality with a great potential for the treatment of autism. Recent findings show that the major underlying pathogenetic mechanisms of autism are hypoperfusion and immune alterations in the brain. So conceptually, cellular therapy which facilitates counteractive processes of improving perfusion by angiogenesis and balancing inflammation by immune regulation would exhibit beneficial clinical effects in patients with autism. This is an open label proof of concept study of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs intrathecal transplantation in 32 patients with autism followed by multidisciplinary therapies. All patients were followed up for 26 months (mean 12.7. Outcome measures used were ISAA, CGI, and FIM/Wee-FIM scales. Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT scan recorded objective changes. Out of 32 patients, a total of 29 (91% patients improved on total ISAA scores and 20 patients (62% showed decreased severity on CGI-I. The difference between pre- and postscores was statistically significant (P<0.001 on Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test. On CGI-II 96% of patients showed global improvement. The efficacy was measured on CGI-III efficacy index. Few adverse events including seizures in three patients were controlled with medications. The encouraging results of this leading clinical study provide future directions for application of cellular therapy in autism.

  11. Preparation of Fluorescent Dye-Doped Biocompatible Nanoparticles for Cell Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Peng, Hongshang; Huang, Shihua; You, Fangtian

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we report a series of fluorescent biocompatible nanoparticles (NPs), prepared by a facile reprecipitation-encapsulation method, for cellular labeling. The as-prepared NPs exhibit a narrow size distribution of 70-110 nm, and a core-shell structure comprised of a hybrid core doped with different dyes and a poly-L-lysine (PLL) shell. With coumarin 6, nile red, and meso- tetraphenylporphyrin as the imaging agents, the fluorescent NPs gave green, orange, and red emissions respectively. Due to the positively charged PLL shell, the fluorescent NPs exhibit neglected cytotoxicity and efficient cellular uptake. After incubation with living cells, the results obtained by laser confocal microscope from green, orange, and red channels all clearly show that the fluores- cent NPs are inhomogenously localized inside the cytoplasm without penetrating into the nucleus. Since such PLL-modified NPs can encapsulate other hydrophobic dyes, a wide spectrum of nanoimaging agents is thus expected. Furthermore, the surface amino groups on the PLL shell afford an anchoring site for further bioconjugation, and targeted imaging is also very promising. PMID:27451673

  12. Fluorescence labeling of carbonylated lipids and proteins in cells using coumarin-hydrazide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venukumar Vemula

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbonylation is a generic term which refers to reactive carbonyl groups present in biomolecules due to oxidative reactions induced by reactive oxygen species. Carbonylated proteins, lipids and nucleic acids have been intensively studied and often associated with onset or progression of oxidative stress related disorders. In order to reveal underlying carbonylation pathways and biological relevance, it is crucial to study their intracellular formation and spatial distribution. Carbonylated species are usually identified and quantified in cell lysates and body fluids after derivatization using specific chemical probes. However, spatial cellular and tissue distribution have been less often investigated. Here, we report coumarin-hydrazide, a fluorescent chemical probe for time- and cost-efficient labeling of cellular carbonyls followed by fluorescence microscopy to evaluate their intracellular formation both in time and space. The specificity of coumarin-hydrazide was confirmed in time- and dose-dependent experiments using human primary fibroblasts stressed with paraquat and compared with conventional DNPH-based immunocytochemistry. Both techniques stained carbonylated species accumulated in cytoplasm with strong perinuclear clustering. Using a complimentary array of analytical methods specificity of coumarin-hydrazide probe towards both protein- and lipid-bound carbonyls has been shown. Additionally, co-distribution of carbonylated species and oxidized phospholipids was demonstrated.

  13. A novel self-powered and sensitive label-free DNA biosensor in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghary, Maryam; Raoof, Jahan Bakhsh; Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Ojani, Reza

    2016-08-15

    In this work, a novel self-powered, sensitive, low-cost, and label-free DNA biosensor is reported by applying a two-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC) as a power supply. A graphite electrode and an Au nanoparticles modified graphite electrode (AuNP/graphite electrode) were used as anode and cathode in the MFC system, respectively. The active biocatalyst in the anodic chamber was a mixed culture of microorganisms. The sensing element of the biosensor was fabricated by the well-known Au-thiol binding the ssDNA probe on the surface of an AuNP/graphite cathode. Electrons produced by microorganisms were transported from the anode to the cathode through an external circuit, which could be detected by the terminal multi-meter detector. The difference between power densities of the ssDNA probe modified cathode in the absence and presence of complementary sequence served as the detection signal of the DNA hybridization with detection limit of 3.1nM. Thereafter, this biosensor was employed for diagnosis and determination of complementary sequence in a human serum sample. The hybridization specificity studies further revealed that the developed DNA biosensor could distinguish fully complementary sequences from one-base mismatched and non-complementary sequences. PMID:27085948

  14. 111In oxine labeled red cells for detection of simulated lower gastrointestinal bleeding in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    111In oxine in vitro labeled red cells were evaluated in rabbits for the ability to detect gastrointestinal (Gl) bleeding. A mean labeling efficiency of 81% (+- 15.5%) was achieved. Biodistribution and translocation data demonstrated 81% of the activity within the blood pool at four hours after intravenous injection, falling to 29% by 72 hours. Peak urine excretion occurred after 60 to 150 minutes. Normal Gl excretion was less than 1% over 72 hours. Simulated lower Gl bleeding was imaged at 4, 12, and 72 hours, and amounts as small as 2 ml (1% blood volume) were seen. In rabbits the total body dose of injected 111In is 0.15 mGy/MBq (0.56 rad/mCi), and the critical organ is the spleen, which received 0.49 mGy/MBq (1.82 rad/mCi). 111In oxine labeled red cells provide a sustained blood pool label wthout significant accumulation in the Gl tract, and may have a potential use in the detection of intermittent Gl bleeding in humans

  15. Estimations of the DNA Synthesis Rate of Bone Marrow Cells after Administration of Labelled Thymidine In Vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone marrow cells are incubated with labelled thymidine under varying in vitro conditions. The incorporation rate of labelled thymidine into DNA is influenced by the condition and duration of. the in vitro incubation. Similar influences operate on the pool size of labelled thymidine phosphates. Up to concentrations of 10-6 M thymidine in the incubation medium there is a linear relation of thymidine concentration and thymidine incorporation into DNA. Concentrations of thymidine exceeding 10-6 M lead to increasing inhibition of the thymidine kinase. The endogenous formation of thymidylate cannot be inhibited entirely by exogenous thymidine supply. Consequently, determinations of the DNA synthesis rate from the incorporated amount of labelled thymidine have to be corrected for the respective endogenous thymidylate contribution. A better procedure is to block the formation of endogenous thymidylate by means of amethopterin. Standard conditions are described, under which an undisturbed synthesis of DNA thymine from exogenous thymidine only takes place. Determinations can be performed by means of autoradiographic or biochemical techniques. By application of the semi-automatic grain counting technique, after sufficient autoradiographic standardization, evaluations of DNA synthesis rates and DNA synthesis times of different cell types in the bone marrow become practicable. (author)

  16. Research progress of adult cardiac stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Nan; Ning-kun ZHANG; Lian-ru GAO

    2013-01-01

    The traditional view is that the heart is a terminal organ. This dogma, however, has been widely questioned with the discovery of adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs). Since CSCs have a highly self-renewal capacity and specific myocardial differentiation potential, nowadays they have been regarded as the most promising type of stem cells used in ischemic heart disease and other replacement therapy of end-stage heart disease. The present paper will focus on current results of scientific research on...

  17. Human amniotic fluid stem cells labeled with up-conversion nanoparticles for imaging-monitored repairing of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunyun; Xiang, Jian; Zhao, He; Liang, Hansi; Huang, Jie; Li, Yan; Pan, Jian; Zhou, Huiting; Zhang, Xueguang; Wang, Jiang Huai; Liu, Zhuang; Wang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Human amniotic fluid stem (hAFS) cells have generated a great deal of excitement in cell-based therapies and regenerative medicine. Here, we examined the effect of hAFS cells labeled with dual-polymer-coated UCNP-PEG-PEI nanoparticles in a murine model of acute lung injury (ALI). We observed hAFS cells migration to the lung using highly sensitive in vivo upconversion luminescence (UCL) imaging. We demonstrated that hAFS cells remained viable and retained their ability to differentiate even after UCNP-PEG-PEI labeling. More importantly, hAFS cells displayed remarkable positive effects on ALI-damaged lung tissue repair compared with mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (mBMSCs), which include recovery of the integrity of alveolar-capillary membrane, attenuation of transepithelial leukocyte and neutrophil migration, and down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression. Our work highlights a promising role for imaging-guided hAFS cell-based therapy in ALI. PMID:27244692

  18. Breast tumors in PyMT transgenic mice expressing mitochondrial catalase have decreased labeling for macrophages and endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sy Fatemie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We show by immunohistochemical labeling that prominent cell types in the tumor microenvironment of PyMT transgenic mice are tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and endothelial cells, and that both populations are decreased in the presence of mitochondrial targeted catalase (mCAT. This observation suggests that mitochondrial ROS can drive tumor invasiveness in conjunction with the presence of TAMs and increased angiogenesis. Since primary PyMT tumor cells expressing mCAT undergo increased apoptosis, mitochondrial antioxidants might be attractive anti-tumor agents.

  19. Noncytotoxic orange and red/green derivatives of DsRed-Express2 for whole-cell labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glick Benjamin S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole-cell labeling is a common application of fluorescent proteins (FPs, but many red and orange FPs exhibit cytotoxicity that limits their use as whole-cell labels. Recently, a tetrameric red FP called DsRed-Express2 was engineered for enhanced solubility and was shown to be noncytotoxic in bacterial and mammalian cells. Our goal was to create derivatives of this protein with different spectral properties. Results Building on previous studies of DsRed mutants, we created two DsRed-Express2 derivatives: E2-Orange, an orange FP, and E2-Red/Green, a dual-color FP with both red and green emission. We show that these new FPs retain the low cytotoxicity of DsRed-Express2. In addition, we show that these new FPs are useful as second or third colors for flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Conclusion E2-Orange and E2-Red/Green will facilitate the production of healthy, stably fluorescent cell lines and transgenic organisms for multi-color labeling studies.

  20. Limited value of technetium 99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy in localization of lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of technetium 99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy in localizing the site of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The outcome of 203 patients undergoing technetium 99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy was reviewed, and the scan result was compared with the true site of bleeding. The true site of bleeding was determined by other methods including angiography and surgical pathology. Fifty-two scans (26%) were positive and indicated a specific site of bleeding. A definitive bleeding site was identified in 22 patients by other means and correlated with the technetium scan in only 9 cases. The nuclear scan was incorrect in the remaining 13 cases, implying a localization error of 25% (13 of 52). A subgroup of 19 patients with a positive scan underwent a surgical procedure directed by the nuclear scan. Eight of these 12 patients had incorrect surgical procedures based upon findings of more definitive tests, indicating a surgical error of 42% (8 of 19). We conclude that the technetium 99m-labeled red cell scan's ability to accurately localize the site of lower gastrointestinal bleeding is limited. Furthermore, performing a surgical procedure that relies exclusively on localization by red cell scintigraphy will produce an undesirable result in at least 42% of patients

  1. Limited value of technetium 99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy in localization of lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, J.M.; Pezim, M.E. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of technetium 99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy in localizing the site of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The outcome of 203 patients undergoing technetium 99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy was reviewed, and the scan result was compared with the true site of bleeding. The true site of bleeding was determined by other methods including angiography and surgical pathology. Fifty-two scans (26%) were positive and indicated a specific site of bleeding. A definitive bleeding site was identified in 22 patients by other means and correlated with the technetium scan in only 9 cases. The nuclear scan was incorrect in the remaining 13 cases, implying a localization error of 25% (13 of 52). A subgroup of 19 patients with a positive scan underwent a surgical procedure directed by the nuclear scan. Eight of these 12 patients had incorrect surgical procedures based upon findings of more definitive tests, indicating a surgical error of 42% (8 of 19). We conclude that the technetium 99m-labeled red cell scan's ability to accurately localize the site of lower gastrointestinal bleeding is limited. Furthermore, performing a surgical procedure that relies exclusively on localization by red cell scintigraphy will produce an undesirable result in at least 42% of patients.

  2. Isolation of Plant Nuclei at Defined Cell Cycle Stages Using EdU Labeling and Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Emily E; Concia, Lorenzo; Brooks, Ashley M; Markham, Emily A; Lee, Tae-Jin; Allen, George C; Thompson, William F; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) is a nucleoside analog of thymidine that can be rapidly incorporated into replicating DNA in vivo and, subsequently, detected by using "click" chemistry to couple its terminal alkyne group to fluorescent azides such as Alexa Fluor 488. Recently, EdU incorporation followed by coupling with a fluorophore has been used to visualize newly synthesized DNA in a wide range of plant species. One particularly useful application is in flow cytometry, where two-parameter sorting can be employed to analyze different phases of the cell cycle, as defined both by total DNA content and the amount of EdU pulse-labeled DNA. This approach allows analysis of the cell cycle without the need for synchronous cell populations, which can be difficult to obtain in many plant systems. The approach presented here, which was developed for fixed, EdU-labeled nuclei, can be used to prepare analytical profiles as well as to make highly purified preparations of G1, S, or G2/M phase nuclei for molecular or biochemical analysis. We present protocols for EdU pulse labeling, tissue fixation and harvesting, nuclei preparation, and flow sorting. Although developed for Arabidopsis suspension cells and maize root tips, these protocols should be modifiable to many other plant systems. PMID:26659955

  3. Investigations into the use of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for selective cell labeling in whole blood: Progress report, January 1986-December 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques to effectively labeling blood cell specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), with In-111 using bifunctional chelating agents such as the cyclic or mixed anhydride of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid have been developed. Conditions for the optimal labeling of blood cells are reported. The specificity (Kd values) of In-111 labeled MAbs for the cell specific antigens are reported. In-111-MAb labeled canine platelets were used to image vascular thrombi. Under the best experimental conditions approximately 70% of the radiolabeled MAbs get incorporated into isolated blood cells. However, only about 35% of the added MAb-associated radioactivity would incorporate into the desired type of blood cells in whole blood. The chemical nature of the radioactivity that does not bind to the cells was investigated. 9 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Are reviewers obstructing stem cell research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Binetruy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bernard BinetruyINSERM U626, Faculté de Médecine La Timone, Marseille, FranceA current controversy in stem cell research was published on the BBC website recently. Some stem cell researchers have said that "they believe a small group of scientists is effectively vetoing high quality science from publication in journals". They strongly suspected some reviewers to be deliberately sending back negative comments or asking for unnecessary experiments. Nature editor, Dr Philip Campbell, has said that "this idea is utterly false".

  5. Failure to label red blood cells adequately in daily practice using an in vivo method: methodological and clinical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency and possible causes of poor red blood cell (RBC) labelling when performing equilibrium gated blood pool (GBP) radionuclide angiography at rest with an in vivo method. The influence of the mode of administration on tagging efficiency was studied. The patients were subclassified into four groups according to the way both molecules involved in the tagging procedure were administered. When poor image quality was found, the labelling efficiency was quantified and the frequency of failed tagging in each group was calculated. A significant association was found between poor labelling and the use of a Teflon catheter or butterfly needle for the injection of the stannous agent. In another 737 patients a strict administration protocol was applied to analyse the frequency of poor tagging and its possible causes. Suboptimal image quality was present in 88 patients. Quantitatively confirmed poor tagging was present in 36 of the 88; the remaining 52 patients showed borderline normal labelling. Drug interference was studied by comparing the medications used by the 36 patients showing poor binding with those used by 44 control patients. A significant relationship was found between the use of heparin or chemotherapy and the tagging. A significant correlation was found between advanced age and poor labelling efficiency. Finally, in 36 patients with poor labelling, a second GBP test was performed. This allowed us to evaluate the accuracy of the obtained ejection fraction value when a suboptimal image set is used, and to assess the feasibility of using the new kit in daily practice. (orig.)

  6. Peptide Biosynthesis with Stable Isotope Labeling from a Cell-free Expression System for Targeted Proteomics with Absolute Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Feng; Zi, Jin; Wang, Quanhui; Lou, Xiaomin; Sun, Haidan; Lin, Liang; Hou, Guixue; Rao, Weiqiao; Yin, Changcheng; Wu, Lin; Li, Shuwei; Liu, Siqi

    2016-08-01

    Because of its specificity and sensitivity, targeted proteomics using mass spectrometry for multiple reaction monitoring is a powerful tool to detect and quantify pre-selected peptides from a complex background and facilitates the absolute quantification of peptides using isotope-labeled forms as internal standards. How to generate isotope-labeled peptides remains an urgent challenge for accurately quantitative targeted proteomics on a large scale. Herein, we propose that isotope-labeled peptides fused with a quantitative tag could be synthesized through an expression system in vitro, and the homemade peptides could be enriched by magnetic beads with tag-affinity and globally quantified based on the corresponding multiple reaction monitoring signals provided by the fused tag. An Escherichia coli cell-free protein expression system, protein synthesis using recombinant elements, was adopted for the synthesis of isotope-labeled peptides fused with Strep-tag. Through a series of optimizations, we enabled efficient expression of the labeled peptides such that, after Strep-Tactin affinity enrichment, the peptide yield was acceptable in scale for quantification, and the peptides could be completely digested by trypsin to release the Strep-tag for quantification. Moreover, these recombinant peptides could be employed in the same way as synthetic peptides for multiple reaction monitoring applications and are likely more economical and useful in a laboratory for the scale of targeted proteomics. As an application, we synthesized four isotope-labeled glutathione S-transferase (GST) peptides and added them to mouse sera pre-treated with GST affinity resin as internal standards. A quantitative assay of the synthesized GST peptides confirmed the absolute GST quantification in mouse sera to be measurable and reproducible. PMID:27234506

  7. Viability of rat and human stromal cells after labeling wirh superparamagnetic iron-oxide nenoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Glogarová, Kateřina; Herynek, V.; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 8, Supplement 1 (2006), s. 203-203. ISSN 1465-3249. [ ISCT 2006. 04.05.2006-07.05.2006, Berlin] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0021620803; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/06/1594; GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Stromal cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  8. NK cell imaging by in vitro and in vivo labelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, F; Histed, S; Aras, O

    2014-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a particular lymphocyte subset with a documented cytotoxic activity against cancer cells. Evidence of NK antitumoral effect led researchers to focus on the development of immunotherapies aimed at augmenting NK recruitment and infiltration into tumor and their anti-cancer functions. Studies in animal models proved that the right combination of drugs, cytokines, chemokines and other factors might be used to enhance or suppress tumor targeting by NK cells. Therefore, it would be necessary to have a tool to non-invasively monitor the efficacy of such novel therapies. Available imaging techniques comprise magnetic resonance, optical and nuclear medicine imaging with a pool of compounds that ranges from radiolabelled nanoparticles and radiopharmaceuticals to fluorescent probes. Each tracer and technique has its own pros and cons, but till now, no one emerged as superior among the others. PMID:25265248

  9. NK cell imaging by in vitro and in vivo labelling approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a particular lymphocyte subset with a documented cytotoxic activity against cancer cells. Evidence of NK antitumoral effect led researchers to focus on the development of immunotherapies aimed at augmenting NK recruitment and infiltration into tumor and their anti-cancer functions. Studies in animal models proved that the right combination of drugs, cytokines, chemokines and other factors might be used to enhance or suppress tumor targeting by NK cells. Therefore, it would be necessary to have a tool to non-invasively monitor the efficacy of such novel therapies. Available imaging techniques comprise magnetic resonance, optical and nuclear medicine imaging with a pool of compounds that ranges from radiolabelled nanoparticles and radiopharmaceuticals to fluorescent probes. Each tracer and technique has its own pros and cons, but till now, no one emerged as superior among the others.

  10. Localization of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Experience with red blood cells labeled in vitro with technetium Tc 99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventy-six patients clinically suspected of having lower gastrointestinal bleeding were studied by scintigraphy utilizing red blood cells labeled in vitro with technetium Tc 99m. Sixteen patients required emergency surgery; bleeding was accurately localized in 15 (94%). One patient (6%) had a normal scan. A 20-month mean follow-up of the 16 patients showed no recurrent bleeding. Of 60 patients not requiring emergency surgery, bleeding was localized in 11, but the bleeding ceased. Forty-nine of the 60 patients had normal scans and had no further hemorrhaging during hospitalization. A 21-month mean follow-up of 38 of the 49 patients showed no further bleeding episodes or surgical procedures in 29 patients; however, eight patients required surgical procedures, including seven for gastrointestinal malignancies. Scanning of red blood cells labeled in vitro with 99mTc is accurate and efficacious in localization of bleeding sites that require emergency surgery for lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage

  11. Macromolecular synthesis in algal cells. A review on the kinetics of incorporation in vivo of radioisotope-labelled compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, M.R.; Kikuchi, T. (Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.)

    1980-11-01

    The present paper is a review of our experimental results obtained previously on the macromolecular biosyntheses in the cells of blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans as a representative species of prokaryote, and also in those of three species of eukaryotic algae, i.e. Euglena gracilis strain Z, Chlamydomonas reinhardi, and Cyanidium caldarium. In these algal cells, the combined methods consisting of pulse-labelling using /sup 32/P, /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-labelled precursors for macromolecules, of their chasing and of the use of inhibitors which block specifically the syntheses of macromolecules such as proteins, RNA and DNA in living cells were very effectively applied for the analyses of the regulatory mechanism in biosyntheses of macromolecules and of the mode of their assembly into the cell structure, especially organelle constituents. Rased on the results obtained thus, the following conclusions are reached: (1) the metabolic pool for syntheses of macromolecules in the cells of prokaryotic blue-green alga is limited to the small extent and such activities couple largely with the photosynthetic mechanism; (2) 70 S ribosomes in the blue-green algal cells are assembled on the surface of thylakoid membranes widely distributed in their cytoplasm; and (3) the cells of eukaryotic unicellular algae used here have biochemical characters specific for already differentiated enzyme system involving in transcription and translation machineries as the same as in higher organisms, but the control mechanism concerning with such macromolecule syntheses are different among each species.

  12. An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay for estimating red cell survival of transfused red cells-validation using CR-51 labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival time of transfused red cells antigenically distinct from the recipient's red cells was determined using an indirect enzyme linked antiglobulin test. These results were then compared to those determined by Cr-51 labeling. Three patients with hypoproliferative anemias and one patient (2 studies) with traumatic hemolytic anemia caused by a prosthetic heart valve were studied. Survival times were performed by transfusing a 5cc aliquot of Cr-51 labeled cells along with the remaining unit. One hour post transfusion, a blood sample was drawn and used as the 100% value. Subsequent samples drawn over a 2-3 week period were then compared to the initial sample to determine percent survival for both methods. The ELISA method for measuring red cell survival in antigenically distinct cells is in close agreement with the Cr-51 method. Although CR-51 labeling is the accepted method for red cell survival determination the ELISA method can be used when radioisotopes are unavailable or contraindicated or when the decision to estimate red cell survival is made after transfusion

  13. Pharmacokinetics on a microscale: visualizing Cy5-labeled oligonucleotide release from poly(n-butylcyanoacrylate nanocapsules in cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomcin S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie Tomcin,1 Grit Baier,1 Katharina Landfester,1 Volker Mailänder1,21Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, 2University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, III Medical Clinic, Mainz, GermanyAbstract: For successful design of a nanoparticulate drug delivery system, the fate of the carrier and cargo need to be followed. In this work, we fluorescently labeled poly(n-butylcyanoacrylate (PBCA nanocapsules as a shell and separately an oligonucleotide (20 mer as a payload. The nanocapsules were formed by interfacial anionic polymerization on aqueous droplets generated by an inverse miniemulsion process. After uptake, the PBCA capsules were shown to be round-shaped, endosomal structures and the payload was successfully released. Cy5-labeled oligonucleotides accumulated at the mitochondrial membrane due to a combination of the high mitochondrial membrane potential and the specific molecular structure of Cy5. The specificity of this accumulation at the mitochondria was shown as the uncoupler dinitrophenol rapidly diminished the accumulation of the Cy5-labeled oligonucleotide. Importantly, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer investigation showed that the dye-labeled cargo (Cy3/Cy5-labeled oligonucleotides reached its target site without degradation during escape from an endosomal compartment to the cytoplasm. The time course of accumulation of fluorescent signals at the mitochondria was determined by evaluating the colocalization of Cy5-labeled oligonucleotides and mitochondrial markers for up to 48 hours. As oligonucleotides are an ideal model system for small interfering RNA PBCA nanocapsules demonstrate to be a versatile delivery platform for small interfering RNA to treat a variety of diseases.Keywords: drug delivery, mitochondria, miniemulsion, colocalization

  14. DNA fragmentation of human infarcted myocardial cells demonstrated by the nick end labeling method and DNA agarose gel electrophoresis.

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, G; Tamura, J; M. Suzuki; Suzuki, Y.; Ikeda, H; Koike, M; Nomura, M; Jie, T; Ito, K

    1995-01-01

    Myocardial tissue taken from 19 autopsy cases of myocardial infarction were examined both by the nick and labeling method (NELM) and by DNA agarose gel electrophoresis in order to demonstrate the localization of cells with fragmented DNA and to confirm the internucleosomal cleavage of DNA biochemically. The nuclei corresponding to those with the histological features of acute myocardial infarction in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections were stained strongly positive with the nick end...

  15. Bright and stable CdSe/CdS@SiO2 nanoparticles suitable for long term cell labeling

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert, Tangi; Wassmuth, Daniel; Soenen, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Hens, Zeger

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) constitute very promising candidates as light emitters for numerous applications in the field of biotechnology, including cell labeling, in vivo imaging and diagnostics.[1] For such applications, semiconductor QDs represent an attractive alternative to classic organic fluorophores as they exhibit a higher brightness thanks to their large absorption cross-sections and high photoluminescence quantum yields. Nevertheless, QDs usually suffer from higly oxidative e...

  16. Fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for cell labeling: flux synthesis of manganite particles and novel functionalization of silica shell

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kačenka, Michal; Kaman, Ondřej; Kikerlová, S.; Pavlů, B.; Jirák, Zdeněk; Jirák, D.; Herynek, Vít; Černý, J.; Chaput, F.; Laurent, S.; Lukeš, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, Jun (2015), s. 97-106. ISSN 0021-9797 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0807; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : manganites * magnetic nanoparticles * molten salt synthesis * silica coating * dual probes * MRI * cell labeling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.368, year: 2014

  17. Medical Research on Stem Cells to Continue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    China will maintain its opposition to human reproductive cloning but will continue to allow closely monitored embryo stem cell research for the treatment and prevention of disease, said Wang Hongguang, president of the China National Center for Biotechnology Development, on February 20 in Beijing.

  18. What Undergraduates Misunderstand about Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Kristy Lynn; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Clark, Catharine G.

    2010-01-01

    As biotechnology-related scientific advances, such as stem cell research (SCR), are increasingly permeating the popular media, it has become ever more important to understand students' ideas about this issue. Very few studies have investigated learners' ideas about biotechnology. Our study was designed to understand the types of alternative…

  19. Web Resources for Stem Cell Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Wei; Xing Peng; Lili Ye; Jiajia Wang; Fuhai Song; Zhouxian Bai; Guangchun Han; Fengmin Ji; Hongxing Lei

    2015-01-01

    In this short review, we have presented a brief overview on major web resources relevant to stem cell research. To facilitate more efficient use of these resources, we have provided a pre-liminary rating based on our own user experience of the overall quality for each resource. We plan to update the information on an annual basis.

  20. Synthesis of novel {sup 68}Ga-labeled amino acid derivatives for positron emission tomography of cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shetty, Dinesh [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Min, E-mail: jmjng@snu.ac.k [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Chang Hwan [Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seo Young [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae Yeon; Yang, Bo Yeun [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    Objectives: We developed amino acid derivatives of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetic acid (DO2A) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,-triacetic acid (DO3A) that can be labeled with {sup 68}Ga, and we investigated their basic biological properties. Materials and methods: Alanine derivatives of DO2A and DO3A were synthesized by regiospecific nucleophilic attack of DO2tBu and DO3tBu on the {beta}-position of Boc-L-serine-{beta}-lactone, followed by acid hydrolysis. Also, homoalanine derivatives were synthesized by reacting with the protected bromo derivative of homoalanine, which was synthesized from N-Cbz-L-homoserine lactone. Further catalytic reduction and acid cleavage of protected groups resulted in the required products. All derivatives were labeled with {sup 68}Ga. Cell uptake assays were carried out in Hep3B (human hepatoma) and U87MG (human glioma) cell lines at 37{sup o}C. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies were performed using balb/c mice xenografted with CT-26 (mouse colon cancer). Results: All compounds were labeled with >97% efficiency. According to in vitro studies, the labeled amino acid derivatives showed significantly greater uptakes than the control ({sup 68}Ga 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) in cancer cells. Small animal PET images for labeled compounds showed high tumor uptake, as well as kidney and bladder uptakes, at 30 min postinjection. {sup 68}Ga-DO3A-homoalanine showed the highest standardized uptake value ratio (3.9{+-}0.3), followed by {sup 68}Ga-DO2A-alanine (3.1{+-}0.2), {sup 68}Ga-DO3A-alanine (2.8{+-}0.2) and {sup 68}Ga-DO2A-homoalanine (2.3{+-}0.2). Conclusion: These derivatives were found to have high labeling efficiencies, high stabilities, high tumor cell uptakes, high tumor/nontumor xenograft uptakes and low nonspecific uptake in normal organs, except for the kidneys. However, the uptake mechanism of these derivatives remains unclear, and uptake via specific amino acid

  1. [Isolation and characterization of rapidly labelled high molecular RNA from freely suspended callus cells of parsley (Petroselinum sativum)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, U; Richter, G

    1970-12-01

    By culturing of callus tissue originating from root explants of Petroselinum sativum in a synthetic liquid medium under aeration, freely suspended single cells and small clusters consisting of mostly five cells were obtained. The rapidly dividing cells did not exhibit any morphogenesis. Their nucleic acid metabolism was investigated by pulse experiments with (32)P-orthophosphate. Rapidly labelled RNA was prominently found associated with high molecular RNA. During the fractionation of the total nucleic acids on MAK columns it was eluted after the ribosomal RNA components. Its base ratio, however, differed from the latter in that the AMP content was higher than the GMP content. Sucrose gradient centrifugation and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis resulted in the separation of the ribosomal RNA from the rapidly labelled RNA, thus proving the higher molecular weight of the latter. Based upon the migration in the gel a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 32S was calculated. The possible function of the heavy rapidly labelled RNA component as precursor of ribosomal RNA is discussed. PMID:24500301

  2. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-01-01

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level 16O and 18O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in ΔgspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-cype cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with previously investigation demonstrating that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system. PMID:20380418

  3. Research progress of adult cardiac stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan ZHENG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view is that the heart is a terminal organ. This dogma, however, has been widely questioned with the discovery of adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs. Since CSCs have a highly self-renewal capacity and specific myocardial differentiation potential, nowadays they have been regarded as the most promising type of stem cells used in ischemic heart disease and other replacement therapy of end-stage heart disease. The present paper will focus on current results of scientific research on human adult CSCs and epicardium-derived cell (EPDC, as well as the treatment strategies in the field of cardiac regeneration, and the problems and prospect disclosed in the research.

  4. Separable Bilayer Microfiltration Device for Viable Label-free Enrichment of Circulating Tumour Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming-Da; Hao, Sijie; Williams, Anthony J.; Harouaka, Ramdane A.; Schrand, Brett; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Brennaman, Randall; Gilboa, Eli; Lu, Bo; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard; Tai, Yu-Chong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in cancer patients could provide important information for therapeutic management. Enrichment of viable CTCs could permit performance of functional analyses on CTCs to broaden understanding of metastatic disease. However, this has not been widely accomplished. Addressing this challenge, we present a separable bilayer (SB) microfilter for viable size-based CTC capture. Unlike other single-layer CTC microfilters, the precise gap between the two layers and the architecture of pore alignment result in drastic reduction in mechanical stress on CTCs, capturing them viably. Using multiple cancer cell lines spiked in healthy donor blood, the SB microfilter demonstrated high capture efficiency (78-83%), high retention of cell viability (71-74%), high tumour cell enrichment against leukocytes (1.7-2 × 103), and widespread ability to establish cultures post-capture (100% of cell lines tested). In a metastatic mouse model, SB microfilters successfully enriched viable mouse CTCs from 0.4-0.6 mL whole mouse blood samples and established in vitro cultures for further genetic and functional analysis. Our preliminary studies reflect the efficacy of the SB microfilter device to efficiently and reliably enrich viable CTCs in animal model studies, constituting an exciting technology for new insights in cancer research.

  5. Fluorescently labeled collagen binding proteins allow specific visualization of collagen in tissues and live cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Katy Nash; Bouten, Carlijn V C; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; van Zandvoort, Marc A M J; Merkx, Maarten

    2006-03-15

    Visualization of the formation and orientation of collagen fibers in tissue engineering experiments is crucial for understanding the factors that determine the mechanical properties of tissues. In this study, collagen-specific fluorescent probes were developed using a new approach that takes advantage of the inherent specificity of collagen binding protein domains present in bacterial adhesion proteins (CNA35) and integrins (GST-alpha1I). Both collagen binding domains were obtained as fusion proteins from an Escherichia coli expression system and fluorescently labeled using either amine-reactive succinimide (CNA35) or cysteine-reactive maleimide (GST-alpha1I) dyes. Solid-phase binding assays showed that both protein-based probes are much more specific than dichlorotriazinyl aminofluorescein (DTAF), a fluorescent dye that is currently used to track collagen formation in tissue engineering experiments. The CNA35 probe showed a higher affinity for human collagen type I than did the GST-alpha1I probe (apparent K(d) values of 0.5 and 50 microM, respectively) and showed very little cross-reactivity with noncollagenous extracellular matrix proteins. The CNA35 probe was also superior to both GST-alpha1I and DTAF in visualizing the formation of collagen fibers around live human venous saphena cells. Immunohistological experiments on rat tissue showed colocalization of the CNA35 probe with collagen type I and type III antibodies. The fluorescent probes described here have important advantages over existing methods for visualization of collagen, in particular for monitoring the formation of collagen in live tissue cultures over prolonged time periods. PMID:16476406

  6. Detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding by means of technetium-99m in vivo labelled red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prognosis of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding depends on the timely and accurate detection of the source of bleeding and sequential surgical or endoscopy therapy. Scintigraphy with red blood cells (RBCs) in vivo labelled by means of technetium-99m hastened detection of source of GI bleeding and improved management of the particular disease. Gastrointestinal endoscopy is the method of choice for the diagnostics of bleeding from upper tract and large bowel. For diagnostics of bleeding from the small bowel we can use scintigraphy with in vivo labelled autological red blood cells if pushenteroscopy, intra-operative enteroscopy or angiography are not available. 31 patients (13 men, 18 women, aged 20-91, mean 56 years) underwent this investigation from 1998 till 2001 at the Department of Nuclear Medicine. All patients had melaena or enterorrhagia associated with acute anaemia. Gastroscopy, colonoscopy, enteroclysis or X-ray angiography did not detect the source of bleeding. Twenty-one patients had positive scintigraphy with in vivo labelled RBCs - 9 patients were already positive on dynamic scintigraphy, and 12 patients were positive on static images. Scintigraphy with in vivo labelled RBCs was negative in 10 patients. GI bleeding stopped spontaneously in these 10 patients with negative scintigraphy. These patients did not undergo intra-operative enteroscopy or surgery. The final diagnosis of the 21 patients with positive scintigraphy was determined in 16 patients by push-enteroscopy (6 patients), intra-operative enteroscopy (6 patients) or by surgery (4 patients). Of these 16 patients the correct place of bleeding was determined by scintigraphy with labelled RBCs in 11 (69%) patients. Final diagnoses of our 16 patients with positive scintigraphy with autological labelled RBCs were: bleeding small bowel arteriovenous malformation (6 patients), uraemic enteritis with bleeding erosions in ileum and jejunum (2 patients), Osler-Rendu- Weber disease (1 patient), pseudocyst of

  7. Assessment of the effect of phytic acid on the labeling of blood cells and plasma proteins with Technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima-Filho, Guilherme L.; Freitas, Rosimeire S.; Moreno, Silvana R.F.; Boasquevisque, Edson M.; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria]. E-mail: gllf@hotmail.com; Lima, Glaydes M.T. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas; Catanho, Maria T.J.A. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia

    2002-07-01

    Blood elements labeled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m} Tc) have been used in various procedures in nuclear medicine. We have investigated if phytic acid (PHY) could alter the labeling of blood elements with {sup 99m} Tc. Blood was incubated with different concentrations of PHY. Stannous chloride and {sup 99m}Tc, as sodium pertechnetate, were added. Blood was centrifuged and plasma (P) and blood cell (BC) were isolated. Samples of P and BC were also precipitated with trichloroacetic acid and centrifuged, and insoluble (IF) and soluble (SF) fractions were separated. The percentages of radioactivity (%ATI) in BC, IF-P and IF-BC were calculated. The %ATI decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in BC (95.08 {+-}1.94 to 80.68 {+-} 3.35), in IF-P (74.42 {+-}4.50 to 39.94{+-} 5.51) and in IF-BC (89.91{+-} 3.91 to 79.54 {+-} 5.42) in presence of PHY. These results suggest that the chelating property of PHY can modify the labeling of the BC, although other effects of PHY could be responsible. As PHY is found in many food and it could alter the labeling of blood elements with {sup 99m} Tc with possible undesirable effects, it is relevant to verify the necessity to repeat the examination and to evaluate the increase of the radiation dose to the patient. (author)

  8. Adaptation of a Commonly Used, Chemically Defined Medium for Human Embryonic Stem Cells to Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liberski, A. R.; Al-Noubi, M. N.; Rahman, Z. H.;

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic labeling with stable isotopes is a prominent technique for comparative quantitative proteomics, and stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is the most commonly used approach. SILAC is, however, traditionally limited to simple tissue culture regimens and only...... amounts required by proteomic work flows. It greatly enhances the usability of quantitative proteomics as a tool for the study of mechanisms underlying hESCs differentiation and self-renewal. Associated data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD000151....

  9. Quantifying the length and variance of the eukaryotic cell cycle phases by a stochastic model and dual nucleoside pulse labelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Serge Weber

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental property of cell populations is their growth rate as well as the time needed for cell division and its variance. The eukaryotic cell cycle progresses in an ordered sequence through the phases G1, S, G2, and M, and is regulated by environmental cues and by intracellular checkpoints. Reflecting this regulatory complexity, the length of each phase varies considerably in different kinds of cells but also among genetically and morphologically indistinguishable cells. This article addresses the question of how to describe and quantify the mean and variance of the cell cycle phase lengths. A phase-resolved cell cycle model is introduced assuming that phase completion times are distributed as delayed exponential functions, capturing the observations that each realization of a cycle phase is variable in length and requires a minimal time. In this model, the total cell cycle length is distributed as a delayed hypoexponential function that closely reproduces empirical distributions. Analytic solutions are derived for the proportions of cells in each cycle phase in a population growing under balanced growth and under specific non-stationary conditions. These solutions are then adapted to describe conventional cell cycle kinetic assays based on pulse labelling with nucleoside analogs. The model fits well to data obtained with two distinct proliferating cell lines labelled with a single bromodeoxiuridine pulse. However, whereas mean lengths are precisely estimated for all phases, the respective variances remain uncertain. To overcome this limitation, a redesigned experimental protocol is derived and validated in silico. The novelty is the timing of two consecutive pulses with distinct nucleosides that enables accurate and precise estimation of both the mean and the variance of the length of all phases. The proposed methodology to quantify the phase length distributions gives results potentially equivalent to those obtained with modern phase

  10. Infected and apoptotic cells in the IBDV-infected bursa of Fabricius, studied by double-labelling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieper, H; Teifke, J P; Jungmann, A; Lohr, C V; Muller, H

    1999-06-01

    Infections of young chickens with infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) result in depletion of lymphoid cells of the bursa of Fabricius (BF) due to necrosis and apoptotic processes. Interactions between IBDV and lymphoid cells were investigated by labelling paraffin-embedded tissue sections of infected BF with combinations of either immunohistochemistry (IHC), in situ hybridization (ISH) or in situ TUNEL reaction (IST). With regard to specificity and sensitivity, results of ISH were comparable to those of IHC. By double-labelling it was shown, for the first time, that viral antigen was present in most of the apoptotic cells. This suggests that IBDV may be directly involved in the induction of the apoptotic process. However, some cells also showed either viral antigen or DNA fragmentation, especially at the early stages of infection. It should be taken into account, therefore, that the apoptotic processes might also be induced by IBDV through indirect interaction between cells. Remarkably, in some of the infected lymphoid cells ISH signals were observed in the nucleolus. PMID:26915384

  11. Label-free and dynamic evaluation of cell-surface epidermal growth factor receptor expression via an electrochemiluminescence cytosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Youyi; Wen, Qingqing; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Peihui

    2016-04-01

    A label-free electrochemiluminescence (ECL) cytosensor was developed for dynamically evaluating of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression on MCF-7 cancer cells based on the specific recognition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) with its receptor (EGFR). EGF-cytosensor was fabricated by in-situ electro-polymerization of polyaniline as substrate, using CdS quantum dots (CdS QDs) as ECL probe and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a carrier for loading of EGF. AuNPs and CdS QDs were jointly attached on polyaniline surface to provide a sensitive and stable sensing interface, as well as a simple and label-free mode for ECL assay. Electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical methods were employed to characterize the multilayer construction process of the sensing interface. The proposed EGF-cytosensor exhibited excellent analytical performance for MCF-7 cancer cells, ranging from 12 to 1.2 × 10(6) cells mL(-1), with a low detection limit of 12 cells mL(-1). Also, it was successfully applied in evaluating EGFR expression of cells surface, which was stimulated by some inhibitors or activator, and the results were confirmed by using flow cytometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy analysis. The proposed ECL cytosensor has potential applications in monitoring the dynamic variation of receptor molecules expression on cell surfaces in response to external stimulation by drugs and screening anti-cancer therapeutic agents. PMID:26838410

  12. In Vivo Imaging and Tracking of Technetium-99m Labeled Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Equine Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhia, Jayesh; Becerra, Patricia; Valdés, Miguel A; Neves, Francisco; Hartman, Neil G; Smith, Roger K W

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the application of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSC) for the treatment of tendon and ligament injuries in the horse suggest improved outcome measures in both experimental and clinical studies. Although the BMMSC are implanted into the tendon lesion in large numbers (usually 10 - 20 million cells), only a relatively small number survive (horses. Tc-99m is a short-lived (t1/2 of 6.01 hr) isotope that emits gamma rays and can be internalized by cells in the presence of the lipophilic compound hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO). These properties make it ideal for use in nuclear medicine clinics for the diagnosis of many different diseases. The fate of the labeled cells can be followed in the short term (up to 36 hr) by gamma scintigraphy to quantify both the number of cells retained in the lesion and distribution of the cells into lungs, thyroid and other organs. This technique is adapted from the labeling of blood leukocytes and could be utilized to image implanted BMMSC in other organs. PMID:26709915

  13. Influence of Momordica charantia L. on the red and white blood cells labeling with 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Momordica charantia L. is popularly known in Brazil as bitter melon and it's commonly used to treat several diseases as cancer, diabetes and to heal skin injuries. Many papers have been published showing the potential radio pharmacological activity of this plant due to its linkage with 99mTc through some protein fractions of the extract. In this study, it was evaluated the influence of Momordica charantia L extract , labeling ( in vitro) of blood elements with sodium pertechnetate (Na 99mTcO4). In the labeling of red blood cells (in vitro), blood samples were obtained from Wistar rats and incubated with different concentrations of M. charantia, for control group was used NaCl 0.9% and added stannous chloride (SnCl2) and 99mTc. The plasma fractions (P) and the cells (C) were separated and, also, precipitated with trichloroacetic acid at 5%, obtaining the soluble (SF) and insoluble (IF) fractions. The radioactivity rate (%ATl) of each fraction was calculated. The same methodology was applied for white blood cells but these cells were separated in advance by centrifugation at 1800 rpm during 15 minutes. There weren't alterations in the labeling of red blood cells in the concentrations tested of the extract when compared with the rate of the control group neither in the insoluble fractions. However, on the white blood cells it was noticed an increase in 99mTc uptake in the presence of M. charantia extract. So its possible to conclude, based on previous results obtained by our group, that the M. charantia L. could be used to evaluate inflammatory processes. (author)

  14. Cell Science and Cell Biology Research at MSFC: Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The common theme of these research programs is that they investigate regulation of gene expression in cells, and ultimately gene expression is controlled by the macromolecular interactions between regulatory proteins and DNA. The NASA Critical Path Roadmap identifies Muscle Alterations and Atrophy and Radiation Effects as Very Serious Risks and Severe Risks, respectively, in long term space flights. The specific problem addressed by Dr. Young's research ("Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Muscle Cell Signaling") is that skeletal muscle loss in space cannot be prevented by vigorous exercise. Aerobic skeletal muscles (i.e., red muscles) undergo the most extensive atrophy during long-term space flight. Of the many different potential avenues for preventing muscle atrophy, Dr. Young has chosen to study the beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) pathway. The reason for this choice is that a family of compounds called betaAR agonists will preferentially cause an increase in muscle mass of aerobic muscles (i.e., red muscle) in animals, potentially providing a specific pharmacological solution to muscle loss in microgravity. In addition, muscle atrophy is a widespread medical problem in neuromuscular diseases, spinal cord injury, lack of exercise, aging, and any disease requiring prolonged bedridden status. Skeletal muscle cells in cell culture are utilized as a model system to study this problem. Dr. Richmond's research ("Radiation & Cancer Biology of Mammary Cells in Culture") is directed toward developing a laboratory model for use in risk assessment of cancer caused by space radiation. This research is unique because a human model will be developed utilizing human mammary cells that are highly susceptible to tumor development. This approach is preferential over using animal cells because of problems in comparing radiation-induced cancers between humans and animals.

  15. 3 CFR - Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of July 30, 2009 Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research..., scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the......

  16. Mn-doped Zinc Sulphide nanocrystals for immunofluorescent labeling of epidermal growth factor receptors on cells and clinical tumor tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    J, Aswathy; V, Seethalekshmy N.; R, Hiran K.; R, Bindhu M.; K, Manzoor; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Menon, Deepthy

    2014-11-01

    The field of molecular detection and targeted imaging has evolved considerably with the introduction of fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Manganese-doped zinc sulphide nanocrystals (ZnS:Mn NCs), which are widely used in electroluminescent displays, have been explored for the first time for direct immunofluorescent (IF) labeling of clinical tumor tissues. ZnS:Mn NCs developed through a facile wet chemistry route were capped using amino acid cysteine, conjugated to streptavidin and thereafter coupled to biotinylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody utilizing the streptavidin-biotin linkage. The overall conjugation yielded stable EGFR antibody conjugated ZnS:Mn NCs (EGFR ZnS:Mn NCs) with a hydrodynamic diameter of 65 ± 15 nm, and having an intense orange-red fluorescence emission at 598 nm. Specific labeling of EGF receptors on EGFR+ve A431 cells in a co-culture with EGFR-ve NIH3T3 cells was demonstrated using these nanoprobes. The primary antibody conjugated fluorescent NCs could also clearly delineate EGFR over-expressing cells on clinical tumor tissues processed by formalin fixation as well as cryopreservation with a specificity of 86% and accuracy of 88%, in comparison to immunohistochemistry. Tumor tissues labeled with EGFR ZnS:Mn NCs showed good fluorescence emission when imaged after storage even at 15 months. Thus, ZnS nanobioconjugates with dopant-dependent and stable fluorescence emission show promise as an efficient, target-specific fluorophore that would enable long term IF labeling of any antigen of interest on clinical tissues.

  17. Migration of 99mTC-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) labeled immature and mature dendritic cells in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate migration of technetium-99 m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO) labeled immature and mature dendritic cells (DC) in the mouse. DC were collected from bone marrow (BM) of tibiae and femurs of mice. Immature and mature CD from BM cells were radiolabeled with 99mTc-HMPAO. To evaluate the functional and phenotypic changes of DC from radiolabeling, the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis were performed before and after labeling with 99mTc-HMPAO. Migration of intravenously injected DC (iv-DC) was assessed by serial gamma camera images of mice with or without subcutaneous tumor. Percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g) was calculated in lungs, liver, spleen, kidneys, and tumor through dissection of each mice after 24 hours of injection. Labeling efficiency of immature and mature DC were 60.4 ± 5.4% and 61.8 ± 6.7%, respectively. Iv-DC initially appeared in the lungs, then redistributed mainly to liver and spleen. Migration of mature DC to spleen was significantly higher than that of immature DC (38.3 ± 4.0% vs 32.2 ± 4.1% in control group, 40.4 ± 4.1% vs 35.9 ± 3.8% in tumor group; ρ 99mTc-HMPAO labeled immature and mature DC. Migration of mature DC to spleen and tumor was higher than that of immature DC when they were i.v. injected

  18. Mn-doped Zinc Sulphide nanocrystals for immunofluorescent labeling of epidermal growth factor receptors on cells and clinical tumor tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of molecular detection and targeted imaging has evolved considerably with the introduction of fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Manganese-doped zinc sulphide nanocrystals (ZnS:Mn NCs), which are widely used in electroluminescent displays, have been explored for the first time for direct immunofluorescent (IF) labeling of clinical tumor tissues. ZnS:Mn NCs developed through a facile wet chemistry route were capped using amino acid cysteine, conjugated to streptavidin and thereafter coupled to biotinylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody utilizing the streptavidin–biotin linkage. The overall conjugation yielded stable EGFR antibody conjugated ZnS:Mn NCs (EGFR ZnS:Mn NCs) with a hydrodynamic diameter of 65 ± 15 nm, and having an intense orange–red fluorescence emission at 598 nm. Specific labeling of EGF receptors on EGFR+ve A431 cells in a co-culture with EGFR−ve NIH3T3 cells was demonstrated using these nanoprobes. The primary antibody conjugated fluorescent NCs could also clearly delineate EGFR over-expressing cells on clinical tumor tissues processed by formalin fixation as well as cryopreservation with a specificity of 86% and accuracy of 88%, in comparison to immunohistochemistry. Tumor tissues labeled with EGFR ZnS:Mn NCs showed good fluorescence emission when imaged after storage even at 15 months. Thus, ZnS nanobioconjugates with dopant-dependent and stable fluorescence emission show promise as an efficient, target-specific fluorophore that would enable long term IF labeling of any antigen of interest on clinical tissues. (paper)

  19. Ultrasensitive detection of human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells using a label-free aptasensor

    OpenAIRE

    Kashefi-Kheyrabadi, Leila; Mehrgardi, Masoud; Wiechec, Emilia; Anthony P. F. Turner; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and has no effective cure, especially in later stages. The development of a tangible protocol for early diagnosis of this disease remains a major challenge. In the present manuscript, an aptamer-based, label-free electrochemical biosensor for the sensitive detection of HepG2, a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, is described. The target cells are captured in a sandwich architecture using TLS11a aptamer covalently attached to a gold ...

  20. Poly (dopamine) coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocluster for noninvasive labeling, tracking, and targeted delivery of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Naishun; Wu, Ming; Pan, Fan; Lin, Jiumao; Li, Zuanfang; Zhang, Da; Wang, Yingchao; Zheng, Youshi; Peng, Jun; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Tracking and monitoring of cells in vivo after transplantation can provide crucial information for stem cell therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with contrast agents is believed to be an effective and non-invasive technique for cell tracking in living bodies. However, commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) applied to label cells suffer from shortages such as potential toxicity, low labeling efficiency, and low contrast enhancing. Herein, the adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were efficiently labeled with SPIONs coated with poly (dopamine) (SPIONs cluster@PDA), without affecting their viability, proliferation, apoptosis, surface marker expression, as well as their self-renew ability and multi-differentiation potential. The labeled cells transplanted into the mice through tail intravenous injection exhibited a negative enhancement of the MRI signal in the damaged liver-induced by carbon tetrachloride, and subsequently these homed ADSCs with SPIONs cluster@PDA labeling exhibited excellent repair effects to the damaged liver. Moreover, the enhanced target-homing to tissue of interest and repair effects of SPIONs cluster@PDA-labeled ADSCs could be achieved by use of external magnetic field in the excisional skin wound mice model. Therefore, we provide a facile, safe, noninvasive and sensitive method for external magnetic field targeted delivery and MRI based tracking of transplanted cells in vivo.

  1. BrdU Pulse Labelling In Vivo to Characterise Cell Proliferation during Regeneration and Repair following Injury to the Airway Wall in Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yahaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of S-phase cells labelled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU in sheep airways undergoing repair in response to endobronchial brush biopsy was investigated in this study. Separate sites within the airway tree of anaesthetised sheep were biopsied at intervals prior to pulse labelling with BrdU, which was administered one hour prior to euthanasia. Both brushed and spatially disparate unbrushed (control sites were carefully mapped, dissected, and processed to facilitate histological analysis of BrdU labelling. Our study indicated that the number and location of BrdU-labelled cells varied according to the age of the repairing injury. There was little evidence of cell proliferation in either control airway tissues or airway tissues examined six hours after injury. However, by days 1 and 3, BrdU-labelled cells were increased in number in the airway wall, both at the damaged site and in the regions flanking either side of the injury. Thereafter, cell proliferative activity largely declined by day 7 after injury, when consistent evidence of remodelling in the airway wall could be appreciated. This study successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of in vivo pulse labelling in tracking cell proliferation during repair which has a potential value in exploring the therapeutic utility of stem cell approaches in relevant lung disease models.

  2. Incorporation of the label from 14C-glucose into cell-wall components during the maturation of cryptomeria tracheids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differentiating tracheids of cryptomeria fed with 14C-glucose for two hours were fractionated successively from the cambium into the mature tracheids. After hydrolyzing each cell-wall fraction, the hydrolyzates were separated from Klason lignin and subjected to further separation by thin-layer chromatography. Then the radioactivity of each sugar and the Klason lignin in each fraction was measured. From this experiment, it is suggested that: (1) In the primary-wall formation stage, the incorporation of the label from 14C-glucose into cellulose is low, whereas the incorporation of the label into hemicelluloses and pectin, which are rich in arabinose and galactose, is high. Large parts of the hemicelluloses and pectin are supplied to the radial walls and contribute to the radial enlargement. (2) The incorporation of the label into cellulose still is low between the S1 deposit stage and the early S2 deposit stage, but the active incorporation takes place from the middle of the S2 deposit stage to the S3 deposit stage. (3) The incorporation of the label into xylan is high from the S1 deposit stage to the early part of the S2 deposit stage. In subsequent stages, it gradually declines, but at the S3 stage it becomes high again. (4) The incorporation of the label into mannan is relatively low at the S1 stage. During the S2 formation, it becomes high, although it temporarily declines at the end of the S2 deposit stage. It is highest in the S3 deposit stage. (author)

  3. On Orbit Immuno-Based, Label-Free, White Blood Cell Counting System with MicroElectroMechanical Sensor (MEMS) Technology (OILWBCS-MEMS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and partner, Draper Laboratory, propose to develop an on-orbit immuno-based label-free white blood cell counting system using...

  4. On Orbit Immuno-Based, Label-Free, White Blood Cell Counting System with MicroElectroMechanical Sensor (MEMS) Technology (OILWBCS-MEMS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and our partner, Draper Laboratory, propose to develop an on orbit immuno-based, label-free, white blood cell counting system for...

  5. The use of oligoperoxide-coated magnetic nanoparticles to label stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šponarová, Daniela; Horák, Daniel; Trchová, Miroslava; Jendelová, Pavla; Herynek, V.; Mitina, N.; Zaichenko, A.; Stoika, R.; Lesný, Petr; Syková, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2011), s. 384-394. ISSN 1550-7033 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1242; GA ČR GAP503/10/0664; GA MŠk 1M0538; GA AV ČR KAN201110651; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN401220801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : magnetic * nanoparticles * stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.216, year: 2011

  6. Nanoparticle Labeling of Bone Marrow-Derived Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Their Use in Differentiation and Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Akhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are promising candidates for cellular therapies due to their ability to migrate to damaged tissue without inducing immune reaction. Many techniques have been developed to trace MSCs and their differentiation efficacy; however, all of these methods have limitations. Conjugated polymer based water-dispersible nanoparticles (CPN represent a new class of probes because they offer high brightness, improved photostability, high fluorescent quantum yield, and noncytotoxicity comparing to conventional dyes and quantum dots. We aimed to use this tool for tracing MSCs’ fate in vitro and in vivo. MSC marker expression, survival, and differentiation capacity were assessed upon CPN treatment. Our results showed that after CPN labeling, MSC markers did not change and significant number of cells were found to be viable as revealed by MTT. Fluorescent signals were retained for 3 weeks after they were differentiated into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro. We also showed that the labeled MSCs migrated to the site of injury and retained their labels in an in vivo liver regeneration model. The utilization of nanoparticle could be a promising tool for the tracking of MSCs in vivo and in vitro and therefore can be a useful tool to understand differentiation and homing mechanisms of MSCs.

  7. Labeling HIV-1 virions with two fluorescent proteins allows identification of virions that have productively entered the target cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GFP-Vpr labeled HIV-1 virions have provided a method to visually examine the interactions between the virus and target cell during infection. However, existing methods to discriminate between virions that have been non-specifically endocytosed from those that have productively entered the host cell cytoplasm have remained problematic. Therefore, we examined the ability of a series of membrane-targeted fluorescent fusion protein constructs to be incorporated into virions. We find that a fluorescent protein fusion targeted to the plasma membrane by the addition of the N-terminal 15 amino acid sequence of c-Src (S15) is efficiently packaged into HIV virions. Using fluorescent proteins fused to this sequence, we have generated virions dually labeled with S15-mCherry and GFP-Vpr. Importantly, we can detect the loss of this S15-mCherry membrane signal following fusion. After infection with VSV-g pseudotyped HIV virions, we find a measurable, specific loss of membrane label during infection. This loss of fluorescence is not observed when fusion is prevented using bafilomycin A. This increased ability to discriminate between non-productively endocytosed virions and those actively undergoing steps in the infectious process will facilitate efforts to examine early steps in infection microscopically

  8. Cellular penetration and nuclear importation properties of {sup 111}In-labeled and {sup 123}I-labeled HIV-1 tat peptide immunoconjugates in BT-474 human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelissen, Bart [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Hu, Meiduo [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); McLarty, Kristin [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Costantini, Dan [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Reilly, Raymond M. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada) and Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada) and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada) and Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada)]. E-mail: raymond.reilly@utoronto.ca

    2007-01-15

    Introduction: Our objective was to compare the cell penetration and nuclear importation properties of {sup 111}In-labeled and {sup 123}I-labeled immunoconjugates (ICs) composed of 16-mer peptides (GRKKRRQRRRPPQGYG) derived from HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (tat) protein and anti-mouse IgG (mIgG) in BT-474 breast cancer (BC) cells. Methods: [{sup 111}In]tat ICs were constructed by site-specific conjugation of tat peptides to NaIO{sub 4} {sup -}-oxidized carbohydrates in the Fc domain of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic-acid-modified anti-mIgG antibodies. Immunoreactivity against mIgG was assessed in a competition assay. The kinetics of the accumulation of [{sup 111}In]anti-mIgG-tat IC and [{sup 123}I]anti-mIgG-tat ICs in BT-474 cells and the elimination of radioactivity from cells, cytoplasm or nuclei were determined. The effects of excess tat peptides or NH{sub 4}Cl (an inhibitor of endosomal acidification) on cellular uptake and nuclear importation of [{sup 111}In]anti-mIgG-tat were measured. Results: [{sup 111}In]anti-mIgG-tat was >97% radiochemically pure and exhibited preserved immunoreactivity with mIgG epitopes. [{sup 123}I]Anti-mIgG-tat penetrated BT-474 cells more rapidly than [{sup 111}In]anti-mIgG-tat ICs and achieved a 1.5-fold to a 2-fold higher uptake in cells and nuclei. Cell penetration and nuclear uptake of [{sup 111}In]anti-mIgG-tat were inhibited by excess tat peptides and NH{sub 4}Cl. Elimination of radioactivity from BT-474 cells and nuclei was more rapid and complete for {sup 123}I-labeled than for {sup 111}In-labeled anti-mIgG-tat ICs. Conclusion: Tat peptides derived from HIV-1 tat protein promoted the penetration and nuclear uptake of radioactivity following the incubation of {sup 111}In-labeled and {sup 123}I-labeled anti-mIgG antibodies with BT-474 human BC cells. {sup 111}In-labeled tat ICs are feasible for inserting radionuclides into cancer cells with potential for targeting intracellular and, particularly, nuclear epitopes for

  9. Combining Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy with quantitative isotopic labeling for differentiation of E. coli cells at community and single cell levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Chisanga, Malama; Subaihi, Abdu; Goodacre, Royston

    2015-04-21

    There is no doubt that the contribution of microbially mediated bioprocesses toward maintenance of life on earth is vital. However, understanding these microbes in situ is currently a bottleneck, as most methods require culturing these microorganisms to suitable biomass levels so that their phenotype can be measured. The development of new culture-independent strategies such as stable isotope probing (SIP) coupled with molecular biology has been a breakthrough toward linking gene to function, while circumventing in vitro culturing. In this study, for the first time we have combined Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, as metabolic fingerprinting approaches, with SIP to demonstrate the quantitative labeling and differentiation of Escherichia coli cells. E. coli cells were grown in minimal medium with fixed final concentrations of carbon and nitrogen supply, but with different ratios and combinations of (13)C/(12)C glucose and (15)N/(14)N ammonium chloride, as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The cells were collected at stationary phase and examined by Raman and FT-IR spectroscopies. The multivariate analysis investigation of FT-IR and Raman data illustrated unique clustering patterns resulting from specific spectral shifts upon the incorporation of different isotopes, which were directly correlated with the ratio of the isotopically labeled content of the medium. Multivariate analysis results of single-cell Raman spectra followed the same trend, exhibiting a separation between E. coli cells labeled with different isotopes and multiple isotope levels of C and N. PMID:25831066

  10. Evaluation of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with dextran and complexed with Poly-L-Lysine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the labeling of umbilical cord vein derived mesenchymal stem cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with dextran and complexed to a non-viral transfector agent transfector poly-L-lysine. Methods: The labeling of mesenchymal stem cells was performed using the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran complexed and not complexed to poly-L-lysine. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran was incubated with poly-L-lysine in an ultrasonic sonicator at 37 deg C for 10 minutes for complex formation superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran/poly-L-lysine by electrostatic interaction. Then, the mesenchymal stem cells were incubated overnight with the complex superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran/poly-L-lysine and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran. After the incubation period the mesenchymal stem cells were evaluated by internalization of the complex superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran/polyL-lysine and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran by Prussian Blue stain. Cellular viability of labeled mesenchymal stem cells was evaluated by cellular proliferation assay using 5,6-carboxyfluorescein-succinimidyl ester method and apoptosis detection by Annexin V- Propidium Iodide assay. Results: mesenchymal stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/ dextran without poly-L-lysine not internalized efficiently the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles due to its low presence detected within cells. Mesenchymal stem cells labeled with the complex superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran/polyL-lysine efficiently internalized the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles due to greater presence in the cells interior. The viability and apoptosis assays demonstrated that the mesenchymal stem cells labeled and not labeled respectively with the superparamagnetic iron oxide

  11. Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Food Labels KidsHealth > For Teens > Food Labels Print A ... have at least 95% organic ingredients. continue Making Food Labels Work for You The first step in ...

  12. Permeability changes and incorporation of labelled thymidine into DNA and whole cells of the fibroblast culture of Chinese hamsters affected by MEA and low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Action of MEA and low temperature (20degC) on the incorporation of labelled thymidine into DNA and whole cells of the fibroblast culture of chinese hamsters has been studied. It has been found that each of the above-mentioned factors equally decreases the label uptake into the cell and DNA. It is concluded that MEA and low temperature do not substantially influence the rate of DNA synthesis

  13. Low molecular weight poly (2-dimethylamino ethylmethacrylate) polymers with controlled.positioned fluorescent labeling: Synthesis, characterization and in vitro interaction with human endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flebus, Luca; Lombart, Francois; Sevrin, Chantal;

    2015-01-01

    ) fluorescent labeled PDMAEMA of low molecular weight (Mw) (below 15 kDa), controlling the position and density of fluorescein.The second goal was to analyze the possible difference in uptake and subcellular distribution of this labeled FF polycation between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and h...... a minor cytotoxicity compared to the higher ones.As main conclusion this study highlights the similitude in cell trafficking of FF PDMAEMA and data previously reported for PDMAEMA/DNA complexes....

  14. A simple protocol for amino acid type selective isotope labeling in insect cells with improved yields and high reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An easy to use and robust approach for amino acid type selective isotope labeling in insect cells is presented. It relies on inexpensive commercial media and can be implemented in laboratories without sophisticated infrastructure. In contrast to previous protocols, where either high protein amounts or high incorporation ratios were obtained, here we achieve both at the same time. By supplementing media with a well considered amount of yeast extract, similar protein amounts as with full media are obtained, without compromising on isotope incorporation. In single and dual amino acid labeling experiments incorporation ratios are consistently ≥90% for all amino acids tested. This enables NMR studies of eukaryotic proteins and their interactions even for proteins with low expression levels. We show applications with human kinases, where protein–ligand interactions are characterized by 2D [15N, 1H]- and [13C, 1H]-HSQC spectra.

  15. Temporal Profiling and Pulsed SILAC Labeling Identify Novel Secreted Proteins during ex vivo Osteoblast Differentiation of Human Stromal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars P; Chen, Li; Nielsen, Maria Overbeck;

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that bone forming cells (osteoblasts) secrete proteins with autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine function. However, the identity and functional role for the majority of these secreted and differentially expressed proteins during the osteoblast (OB) differentiation process, is...... labeling to distinguish genuine secreted proteins from intracellular contaminants. We identified 466 potentially secreted proteins that were quantified at 5 time-points during 14-days ex vivo OB differentiation including 41 proteins known to be involved in OB functions. Among these, 315 proteins exhibited...... more than 2-fold up or down-regulation. The pulsed SILAC method revealed a strong correlation between the fraction of isotope labeling and the subset of proteins known to be secreted and involved in OB differentiation. We verified SILAC data using qRT-PCR analysis of 9 identified potential novel...

  16. Assessment of the effect of phytic acid on the labeling of blood cells and plasma proteins with Technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood elements labeled with technetium-99m (99m Tc) have been used in various procedures in nuclear medicine. We have investigated if phytic acid (PHY) could alter the labeling of blood elements with 99m Tc. Blood was incubated with different concentrations of PHY. Stannous chloride and 99mTc, as sodium pertechnetate, were added. Blood was centrifuged and plasma (P) and blood cell (BC) were isolated. Samples of P and BC were also precipitated with trichloroacetic acid and centrifuged, and insoluble (IF) and soluble (SF) fractions were separated. The percentages of radioactivity (%ATI) in BC, IF-P and IF-BC were calculated. The %ATI decreased significantly (p 99m Tc with possible undesirable effects, it is relevant to verify the necessity to repeat the examination and to evaluate the increase of the radiation dose to the patient. (author)

  17. The labeling of C57BL/6j derived embryonic stem cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕路; 张崇本; 尤洁芳; 尚克刚; 顾军

    2003-01-01

    Objective To labele MESPU35, a embryonic stem (ES) cell line derived from C57BL/6j mouse, with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) for further application.Methods The EGFP gene was controlled by the hybrid CA promoter/enhancer (CMV enhancer/ chicken beta-actin promoter/ beta-actin intron) to construct the vector of the transgene, pCA-EGFP. The vector was transfected into MESPU35 by electroporation.Results We generated EGFP expressing ES cells demonstrating normal properties. The green fluorescence of EGFP expressing cells was maintained in propagation of the ES cells for more than 30 passages as well as in differentiated cells. Cultured in suspension, the "green" ES cells aggregated, and formed embryoid bodies maintaining the green fluorescence at varying developmental stages. The "green" embryoid bodies could expand and differentiate into various types of cells, exhibiting ubiquitous green fluorescence. Conclusions The hybrid CA promoter/enhancer used to control the EGFP expressing ES cells, resulted in more intense and ubiquitous activity. The EGFP transfected cells yield bright green fluorescence, which can be visualized in real time and in situ. In addition, the ES cells, MESPU35, are derived from C57BL/6j mice, which are the most widely used in oncology, physiology and genetics. Compared to 129 substrains, C57BL/6j mice avoid a number of potential problems apparent in the other strains.

  18. The Cerebral Blood Flow Biomedical Informatics Research Network (CBFBIRN) database and analysis pipeline for arterial spin labeling MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, David D; Ozyurt, I Burak; Liu, Thomas T

    2013-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a magnetic resonance imaging technique that provides a non-invasive and quantitative measure of cerebral blood flow (CBF). After more than a decade of active research, ASL is now emerging as a robust and reliable CBF measurement technique with increased availability and ease of use. There is a growing number of research and clinical sites using ASL for neuroscience research and clinical care. In this paper, we present an online CBF Database and Analysis Pipeline, collectively called the Cerebral Blood Flow Biomedical Informatics Research Network (CBFBIRN) that allows researchers to upload and share ASL and clinical data. In addition to serving the role as a central data repository, the CBFBIRN provides a streamlined data processing infrastructure for CBF quantification and group analysis, which has the potential to accelerate the discovery of new scientific and clinical knowledge. All capabilities and features built into the CBFBIRN are accessed online using a web browser through a secure login. In this work, we begin with a general description of the CBFBIRN system data model and its architecture, then devote the remainder of the paper to the CBFBIRN capabilities. The latter part of our work is divided into two processing modules: (1) Data Upload and CBF Quantification Module; (2) Group Analysis Module that supports three types of analysis commonly used in neuroscience research. To date, the CBFBIRN hosts CBF maps and associated clinical data from more than 1,300 individual subjects. The data have been contributed by more than 20 different research studies, investigating the effect of various conditions on CBF including Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, traumatic brain injury, HIV, caffeine usage, and methamphetamine abuse. Several example results, generated by the CBFBIRN processing modules, are presented. We conclude with the lessons learned during implementation and deployment of the CBFBIRN and our

  19. Choice of labeling and cell line influences interactions between the Fab fragment AbD15179 and its target antigen CD44v6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical imaging by use of immunotargeting generally relies on a labeled molecule binding to a specific target on the cell surface. It is important to utilize both cell-based and time-resolved binding assays in order to understand the properties of such molecular interactions in a relevant setting. In this report we describe the detailed characterization of the interaction properties for AbD15179, a promising CD44v6-targeting antibody fragment for radio-immunotargeting. Influence of labeling and cell-line model on the protein interaction kinetics was assessed using three different labeling approaches (111In, 125I and FITC) on three different squamous carcinoma cell lines. Interactions were measured using time-resolved assays on living cells, and further analyzed with Interaction Map®. Results demonstrated a general biphasic appearance of a high- and a low-affinity binding event in all cases. The relative contribution from these two interactions differed between conjugates. For 125I-Fab, the population of low-affinity binders could be significantly increased by extending the chloramine T exposure during labeling, whereas the 111In-labeling predominantly resulted in a high-affinity interaction. Interactions were also shown to be cell line dependent, with e.g. SCC-25 cells generally mediating a faster dissociation of conjugates compared to the other cell lines. In conclusion, we report both cell line dependent and labeling associated variations in interaction kinetics for AbD15179 binding to CD44v6. This has implications for cell-based kinetic assays and applications based on labeled conjugates in general, as well as in a clinical setting, where each individual tumor may create different kinetic profiles for the same conjugate

  20. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient

  1. Analysis of photoaffinity label derivatives to probe thyroid hormone receptor in human fibroblasts, GH1 cells, and soluble receptor preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulation of growth hormone gene expression by thyroid hormone in cultured GH1 cells is mediated by a chromatin-associated receptor. We have previously described a photoaffinity label derivative of 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (L-T3) in which the alanine side chain was modified to form N-2-diazo-3,3,3-trifluoropropionyl-L-T3 (L-[125I]T3-PAL). On exposure to 254 nm UV light, L-[125I]T3-PAL generates a carbene which covalently modifies two thyroid hormone receptor forms in intact GH1 cells; an abundant 47,000 Mr species and a less abundant 57,000 Mr form. We have now synthesized similar photoaffinity label derivatives of 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodo-L-thyronine (L-T4) and 3,3',5'-triiodo-L-thyronine (L-rT3). Both compounds identify the same receptor forms in intact cells and in nuclear extracts in vitro as L-[125I]T3-PAL. Labeling by L-[125I]rT3-PAL was low and consistent with the very low occupancy of receptor by L-rT3. Underivatized L-[125I]T3 and L-[125I]T4 labeled the same receptor forms at 254 nm but at a markedly lower efficiency than their PAL derivatives. In contrast, N-bromoacetyl-L-[125I]T3, a chemical affinity labeling agent, did not derivatize either receptor form in vitro. The relative efficiency of coupling to receptor at 254 nm was L-[125I]T4-PAL greater than L-[125I]T3-PAL greater than L-[125I]T4 greater than L-[125I]T3. Although L-[125I]T4-PAL has a lower affinity for receptor than L-[125I]T3-PAL, its coupling efficiency was 5-10-fold higher. This suggests that the alanine side chain of L-[125I]T4-PAL is positioned in the ligand binding region near a residue which is efficiently modified by photoactivation. With L-[125I]T4-PAL we were able to identify three different molecular weight receptor species in human fibroblast nuclei

  2. 99mTc-besilesomab (Scintimun registered) in peripheral osteomyelitis: comparison with 99mTc-labelled white blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of osteomyelitis is a challenge for diagnostic imaging. Nuclear medicine procedures including white blood cell imaging have been successfully used for the identification of bone infections. This multinational, phase III clinical study in 22 European centres was undertaken to compare anti-granulocyte imaging using the murine IgG antibody besilesomab (Scintimun registered) with 99mTc-labelled white blood cells in patients with peripheral osteomyelitis. A total of 119 patients with suspected osteomyelitis of the peripheral skeleton received 99mTc-besilesomab and 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO)-labelled white blood cells (WBCs) in random order 2-4 days apart. Planar images were acquired at 4 and 24 h after injection. All scintigraphic images were interpreted in an off-site blinded read by three experienced physicians specialized in nuclear medicine, followed by a fourth blinded reader for adjudication. In addition, clinical follow-up information was collected and a final diagnosis was provided by the investigators and an independent truth panel. Safety data including levels of human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) and vital signs were recorded. The agreement in diagnosis across all three readers between Scintimun registered and 99mTc-HMPAO-labelled WBCs was 0.83 (lower limit of the 95% confidence interval 0.8). Using the final diagnosis of the local investigator as a reference, Scintimun registered had higher sensitivity than 99mTc-HMPAO-labelled WBCs (74.8 vs 59.0%) at slightly lower specificity (71.8 vs 79.5%, respectively). All parameters related to patient safety (laboratory data, vital signs) did not provide evidence of an elevated risk associated with the use of Scintimun registered except for two cases of transient hypotension. HAMA were detected in 16 of 116 patients after scan (13.8%). Scintimun registered imaging is accurate, efficacious and safe in the diagnosis of peripheral bone infections and provides comparable information to 99mTc-HMPAO-labelled

  3. Placental localization in abdominal pregnancy using technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a patient with third trimester abdominal pregnancy with fetal demise, technetium-99m-labeled erythrocytes (99mTc-RBCs) localized the placenta preoperatively, after nonvisualization by ultrasonography and arteriography. Extrauterine placental localization by blood-pool imaging may be useful when ultrasound fails

  4. Selective Methyl Labeling of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins Using Cell-Free Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Linser, R.; Gelev, V.; Hagn, F.; Arthanari, H.; Hyberts, S.; Wagner, G.

    2014-01-01

    Structural characterization of membrane proteins and other large proteins with NMR relies increasingly on perdeuteration combined with incorporation of specifically protonated amino acid moieties, such as methyl groups of isoleucines, valines, or leucines. The resulting proton dilution reduces dipolar broadening producing sharper resonance lines, ameliorates spectral crowding, and enables measuring of crucial distances between and to methyl groups. While incorporation of specific methyl label...

  5. Commercial speech and off-label drug uses: what role for wide acceptance, general recognition and research incentives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhooley, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    approval. Distributions of information about unapproved uses should not be acceptable unless experts consider the expanded use to be generally recognized as safe and effective based on adequate studies. The last part of this paper considers the need to develop better research incentives to encourage more testing and post-market risk surveillance by drug makers on off-label uses of their drugs. Violations of the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) can be considered violations of the False Claims Act, which opens the way to fraud and abuse suits. The scale of penalties involved in these suits may lead to more examination of the scope of FDA regulation and commercial speech protections. Thus this symposium's consideration of these issues is timely and important. PMID:21847881

  6. The Cerebral Blood Flow Biomedical Informatics Research Network (CBFBIRN Database and Analysis Pipeline for Arterial Spin Labeling MRI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D. Shin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Arterial spin labeling (ASL is a MRI technique that provides a noninvasive and quantitative measure of cerebral blood flow (CBF. After more than a decade of active research, ASL is now emerging as a robust and reliable CBF measurement technique with increased availability and ease of use. There is a growing number of research and clinical sites using ASL for neuroscience research and clinical care. In this paper, we present an online CBF Database and Analysis Pipeline, collectively called the CBFBIRN that allows researchers to upload and share ASL and clinical data. In addition to serving the role as a central data repository, the CBFBIRN provides a streamlined data processing infrastructure for CBF quantification and group analysis, which has the potential to accelerate the discovery of new scientific and clinical knowledge. All capabilities and features built into the CBFBIRN are accessed online using a web browser through a secure login. In this work, we begin with a general description of the CBFBIRN system data model and its architecture, then devote the remainder of the paper to the CBFBIRN capabilities. The latter part of our work is divided into two processing modules: 1 Data Upload and CBF Quantification Module; 2 Group Analysis Module that supports three types of analysis commonly used in neuroscience research. To date, the CBFBIRN hosts CBF maps and associated clinical data from more than 1300 individual subjects. The data have been contributed by more than 20 different research studies, investigating the effect of various conditions on CBF including Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, traumatic brain injury, HIV, caffeine usage and Methamphetamine abuse. Several example results, generated by the CBFBIRN processing modules, are presented. We conclude with the lessons learned during implementation and deployment of the CBFBIRN and our experience in promoting data sharing.

  7. TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatkowski, P. J.; Landis, D. A.

    2013-04-16

    Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT

  8. In vivo migration of labeled autologous natural killer cells to liver metastases in patients with colon carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satolli Maria A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Besides being the effectors of native anti-tumor cytotoxicity, NK cells participate in T-lymphocyte responses by promoting the maturation of dendritic cells (DC. Adherent NK (A-NK cells constitute a subset of IL-2-stimulated NK cells which show increased expression of integrins and the ability to adhere to solid surface and to migrate, infiltrate, and destroy cancer. A critical issue in therapy of metastatic disease is the optimization of NK cell migration to tumor tissues and their persistence therein. This study compares localization to liver metastases of autologous A-NK cells administered via the systemic (intravenous, i.v. versus locoregional (intraarterial, i.a. routes. Patients and methods A-NK cells expanded ex-vivo with IL-2 and labeled with 111In-oxine were injected i.a. in the liver of three colon carcinoma patients. After 30 days, each patient had a new preparation of 111In-A-NK cells injected i.v. Migration of these cells to various organs was evaluated by SPET and their differential localization to normal and neoplastic liver was demonstrated after i.v. injection of 99mTc-phytate. Results A-NK cells expressed a donor-dependent CD56+CD16+CD3- (NK or CD56+CD16+CD3+ (NKT phenotype. When injected i.v., these cells localized to the lung before being visible in the spleen and liver. By contrast, localization of i.a. injected A-NK cells was virtually confined to the spleen and liver. Binding of A-NK cells to liver neoplastic tissues was observed only after i.a. injections. Conclusion This unique study design demonstrates that A-NK cells adoptively transferred to the liver via the intraarterial route have preferential access and substantial accumulation to the tumor site.

  9. Cell-free synthesis of isotopically labelled peptide ligands for the functional characterization of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joedicke, Lisa; Trenker, Raphael; Langer, Julian D; Michel, Hartmut; Preu, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free systems exploit the transcription and translation machinery of cells from different origins to produce proteins in a defined chemical environment. Due to its open nature, cell-free protein production is a versatile tool to introduce specific labels such as heavy isotopes, non-natural amino acids and tags into the protein while avoiding cell toxicity. In particular, radiolabelled peptides and proteins are valuable tools for the functional characterization of protein-protein interactions and for studying binding kinetics. In this study we evaluated cell-free protein production for the generation of radiolabelled ligands for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors are seven-transmembrane-domain receptors activated by a plethora of extracellular stimuli including peptide ligands. Many GPCR peptide ligands contain disulphide bonds and are thus inherently difficult to produce in bacterial expression hosts or in Escherichia coli-based cell-free systems. Here, we established an adapted E. coli-based cell-free translation system for the production of disulphide bond-containing GPCR peptide ligands and specifically introduce tritium labels for detection. The bacterial oxidoreductase DsbA is used as a chaperone to favour the formation of disulphide bonds and to enhance the yield of correctly folded proteins and peptides. We demonstrate the correct folding and formation of disulphide bonds and show high-affinity ligand binding of the produced radio peptide ligands to the respective receptors. Thus, our system allows the fast, cost-effective and reliable synthesis of custom GPCR peptide ligands for functional and structural studies. PMID:27047736

  10. Boronic acid recognition based-gold nanoparticle-labeling strategy for the assay of sialic acid expression on cancer cell surface by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Zhang, Yuan; Peng, Lu; Hu, Bin

    2016-02-01

    Sialic acids are special sugars widely expressed at the termini of glycan chains on the cell surface, and their expression level on the cancer cell surface is much higher than on the normal cell surface. Herein, we reported an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) based method with elemental tags for the analysis of sialic acids on the cancer cell surface. The method is based on the selective recognition of sialic acids by biotinylated phenylboronic acid (biotin-APBA) at physiological pH and signal enhancement of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in ICP-MS when AuNPs were used as elemental tags labeled on biotin-APBA. A specificity test reveals that the proposed method has high specificity towards cancer cells. Taking HepG2 and MCF-7 cells as two model cancer cells, competitive experiments were performed to estimate the expression level of sialic acids on the cancer cell surface, and it was found that the average numbers of sialic acids expressed on the single MCF-7 and HepG2 cell surface were 7.0 × 10(9) and 5.4 × 10(9), respectively. With sialic acid as the biomarker for cancer cells, the method was further used for cell detection. The limits of detection in terms of cell number for HepG2 and MCF-7 cells were 120 and 64, respectively. And the relative standard deviations for nine replicate determinations of ca. 1000 HepG2 and MCF-7 cells were 9.6% and 8.9%, respectively. The linear ranges for HepG2 cells and MCF-7 cells were 300-10 000 and 170-11 000, respectively. The proposed approach is sensitive as well as selective for the analysis of sialic acids on the cancer cell surface, and is potentially applicable for the study of tumor malignancy and metastasis, which is helpful for biological research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:26811850

  11. Labelling by 3H-N-ethylmaleimide of diamide-oxidized thiol groups in sheep red blood cell (SRBC) membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of SRBC to the thiol oxidant diamide activates K:Cl cotransport, reversed upon metabolic restoration of cellular glutathione suggesting redox control of the K:Cl cotransporter, as well as by subsequent exposure to dithiothreitol (DTT). The thiols crucial for activation may be either on the transporter or on a membrane or cytoplasmic regulator. To test this hypothesis, the authors attempted to label with 3H-N-ethylmaleimide (3H-NEM) the thiols protected by diamide oxidation and reduced subsequently by DTT. SRBC were first treated with a diamide concentration activating K:Cl cotransport, followed by a second exposure to unlabeled (cold) NEM to block any non-oxidized thiol, and then hemolyzed to obtain white ghosts. The ghosts were again treated with cold NEM and after reduction by DTT exposed to 3H-NEM with and without cold NEM. Saturation labelling by 3H-NEM of diamide protected groups occurred in the range of CTT concentrations inactivating the diamide-stimulated K:Cl cotransport. Saturation labelling with 3H-NEM occurred at about 25μM NEM suggesting a Ki of less than 10μM NEM. The number of diamide protected thiols was about 5-10,000/cell membrane. At 100μM 3H-NEM, SRBC not treated with diamide possess at least 100,000 thiols cell and this number is likely to rise by tenfold at higher NEM concentrations. Thus, diamide protected about 1/1,000 of the membrane thiols in both genetically low and high K SRBC, assayed under conditions where K:Cl cotransport is activated in intact cells. Therefore, at least some of the thiols crucial for potential regulation of K:Cl cotransport reside within the plasma membrane

  12. Research on labelling chemistry of o-phenanthroline with 99mTc, 188Re and stable Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With SnCl2 as reductant, tartrate as intermediate ligand, and with the aid of paper chromatography on three kinds of developing agents, the 99mTc, 188Re and stable rhenium labelling chemistry with regard to o-phenanthroline (Phen) have been studied. The labelling ratio of 99mTc-Phen can reach to 95%. For different pH values of media and at different labelling temperatures, the 99mTc-Phen products cna be different, and they can have different paper chromatographic behavior in some developing agents. The labelling of 188Re and stable rhenium is more difficult than that of 99mTc. Even if large quantity of SnCl2 is used, the labelling ratio of 188Re-phen is significantly lower than 99mTc-Phen: the highest labelling ratio is only 50%

  13. Ibrutinib versus temsirolimus in patients with relapsed or refractory mantle-cell lymphoma: an international, randomised, open-label, phase study

    OpenAIRE

    Dreyling, Martin; Jurczak, Wojciech; Jerkeman, Mats; Silva, Rodrigo Santucci; Rusconi, Chiara; Trneny, Marek; Offner, Fritz; Caballero, Dolores; Joao, Cristina; Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Hess, Georg; Bence-Bruckler, Isabelle; Cho, Seok-Goo; Bothos, John; Goldberg, Jenna D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mantle-cell lymphoma is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma with a poor prognosis. Both ibrutinib and temsirolimus have shown single-agent activity in patients with relapsed or refractory mantle-cell lymphoma. We undertook a phase 3 study to assess the efficacy and safety of ibrutinib versus temsirolimus in relapsed or refractory mantle-cell lymphoma. Methods: This randomised, open-label, multicentre, phase 3 clinical trial enrolled patients with relapsed or refractory mantle-cell l...

  14. Effect of Peumus boldus on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with Technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peumus boldus is used in popular medicine in Brazil. The influence of Peumus boldus on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with 99mTc was studied. Stannous chloride and 99mTc pertechnetate were incubated with blood and a tincture of Peumus boldus. Aliquots of plasma and blood cells were isolated from the mixture and treated with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). After separation, analysis of the soluble and insoluble fractions showed a rapid uptake of the radioactivity by blood cells in the presence of the drug, whereas there was a slight decrease in the amount of 99mTc radioactivity in the TCA-insoluble fraction of plasma

  15. Effect of Peumus boldus on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with Technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wancke Reiniger, Ingrid; Fonseca de Oliveira, Joelma; Caldeira-de-Araujo, Adriano [Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Instituto Nacional de Cancer, Centro de Pesquisa Basica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1999-08-01

    Peumus boldus is used in popular medicine in Brazil. The influence of Peumus boldus on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with {sup 99m}Tc was studied. Stannous chloride and {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate were incubated with blood and a tincture of Peumus boldus. Aliquots of plasma and blood cells were isolated from the mixture and treated with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). After separation, analysis of the soluble and insoluble fractions showed a rapid uptake of the radioactivity by blood cells in the presence of the drug, whereas there was a slight decrease in the amount of {sup 99m}Tc radioactivity in the TCA-insoluble fraction of plasma.

  16. Effect of Peumus boldus on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with technetium-99m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiniger, I W; de Oliveira, J F; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Bernardo-Filho, M

    1999-08-01

    Peumus boldus is used in popular medicine in Brazil. The influence of Peumus boldus on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with 99mTc was studied. Stannous chloride and 99mTc pertechnetate were incubated with blood and a tincture of Peumus boldus. Aliquots of plasma and blood cells were isolated from the mixture and treated with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). After separation, analysis of the soluble and insoluble fractions showed a rapid uptake of the radioactivity by blood cells in the presence of the drug, whereas there was a slight decrease in the amount of 99mTc radioactivity in the TCA-insoluble fraction of plasma. PMID:10376326

  17. First automatic radiosynthesis of 11C labeled Telmisartan using a multipurpose synthesizer for clinical research use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telmisartan, a nonpeptide angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonist, is an antihypertensive drug. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with [11C]Telmisartan is expected to provide information about the whole body pharmacokinetics of telmisartan as well as the transport function of hepatic organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B3. We developed a first automatic preparation system of [11C]Telmisartan to applicable clinical research using a new 11C and 18F multipurpose synthesizer. Two milligrams of precursor (1) in 5 μl of 1 M KOH in 0.5 ml of dimethyl sulfoxide was reacted with [11C]CH3I for 5 min at 120 deg C. The resultant solution was hydrolyzed with 1 M NaOH at 100 deg C for 3 min. The neutralization was carried out with acetic acid, followed by purification with high-performance liquid chromatography. The desired radioactive fraction was collected and solvent was replaced by 10 ml saline containing 0.3 ml of EtOH and 0.5 ml of PEG400, and then passed through a sterile 0.22 μm filter (Millex-GV, Millipore) to a pyrogen-free vial as the final product. The yield of [11C]Telmisartan for clinical research use was 16.8±2.9% end of bombardment (EOB) as decay corrected (n=8, mean ± standard deviation (SD) in 32-36 min. The radiochemical purity of [11C]Telmisartan was >97%, and specific activity was higher than 86.3 MBq/nmol. We succeeded in the first synthesis of [11C]Telmisartan for clinical research use by appropriate quality tests. (author)

  18. The appearance of Paget's disease on a 99mTc-HMPAO labelled white blood cell scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A 73 year old female presented with pyrexia of unknown origin despite the use of antibiotics. She recently had a colonoscopic stent inserted to resolve a large bowel obstruction secondary to stage IV sigmoid colon cancer. The procedure complicated by a perforation of the sigmoid colon and the need for Hartmann's procedure. Urine and blood cultures v both clear however the white cell count was elevated. X rays of the chest and abdomen and CT of the abdomen and pe showed no sites of infection. A 99mTc-HMPAO labelled white blood cell scan was performed to localise the site of infection. The whole body and SPECT images showed patchy uptake consistent with the known liver metastases. Reduced bone marrow uptake was seen in the left hemipelvis and a patchy appearance in the right hemipelvis. The appearance of osteomyelitis could not be confirmed and a bone scan was performed. The blood pool images demonstrated hyperaemia in the region of the upper sacrum and superior iliac crests. The delayed images confirmed the presence of Paget's disease involving the right and left iliac crests and the sacrum. CT confirmed these findings. This case demonstrates that conditions such as Paget's disease, which displaces the marrow, may cause reduced uptake on a labelled white cell scan. The cause may be confirmed with other techniques, such as bone scans and x ray.

  19. Paramagnetic particles carried by cell-penetrating peptide tracking of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, a research in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to track the distribution and differentiation of stem cells by high-resolution imaging techniques would have significant clinical and research implications. In this study, a model cell-penetrating peptide was used to carry gadolinium particles for magnetic resonance imaging of the mesenchymal stem cells. The mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from rat bone marrow by Percoll and identified by osteogenic differentiation in vitro. The cell-penetrating peptides labeled with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate and gadolinium were synthesized by a solid-phase peptide synthesis method and the relaxivity of cell-penetrating peptide-gadolinium paramagnetic conjugate