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Sample records for cell factory aspergillus

  1. The Cell Factory Aspergillus Enters the Big Data Era: Opportunities and Challenges for Optimising Product Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Vera; Fiedler, Markus; Nitsche, Benjamin; King, Rudibert

    2015-01-01

    Living with limits. Getting more from less. Producing commodities and high-value products from renewable resources including waste. What is the driving force and quintessence of bioeconomy outlines the lifestyle and product portfolio of Aspergillus, a saprophytic genus, to which some of the top-performing microbial cell factories belong: Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus terreus. What makes them so interesting for exploitation in biotechnology and how can they help us to address key challenges of the twenty-first century? How can these strains become trimmed for better growth on second-generation feedstocks and how can we enlarge their product portfolio by genetic and metabolic engineering to get more from less? On the other hand, what makes it so challenging to deduce biological meaning from the wealth of Aspergillus -omics data? And which hurdles hinder us to model and engineer industrial strains for higher productivity and better rheological performance under industrial cultivation conditions? In this review, we will address these issues by highlighting most recent findings from the Aspergillus research with a focus on fungal growth, physiology, morphology and product formation. Indeed, the last years brought us many surprising insights into model and industrial strains. They clearly told us that similar is not the same: there are different ways to make a hypha, there are more protein secretion routes than anticipated and there are different molecular and physical mechanisms which control polar growth and the development of hyphal networks. We will discuss new conceptual frameworks derived from these insights and the future scientific advances necessary to create value from Aspergillus Big Data.

  2. Prevention of melanin formation during aryl alcohol oxidase production under growth-limited conditions using an Aspergillus nidulans cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Planas, Oscar; Prade, Rolf A; Müller, Michael; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Wilkins, Mark R

    2017-11-01

    An Aspergillus nidulans cell factory was genetically engineered to produce an aryl alcohol oxidase (AAO). The cell factory initiated production of melanin when growth-limited conditions were established using stationary plates and shaken flasks. This phenomenon was more pronounced when the strain was cultured in a trickle bed reactor (TBR). This study investigated different approaches to reduce melanin formation in fungal mycelia and liquid medium in order to increase the enzyme production yield. Removal of copper from the medium recipe reduced melanin formation in agar cultures and increased enzyme activities by 48% in agitated liquid cultures. Copper has been reported as a key element for tyrosinase, an enzyme responsible for melanin production. Ascorbic acid (0.44g/L) stopped melanin accumulation, did not affect growth parameters and resulted in AAO activity that was more than two-fold greater than a control treatment with no ascorbic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genome sequencing and analysis of the versatile cell factory Aspergillus niger CBS 513.88

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pel, Herman J.; de Winde, Johannes H.; Archer, David B.

    2007-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is widely exploited by the fermentation industry for the production of enzymes and organic acids, particularly citric acid. We sequenced the 33.9-megabase genome of A. niger CBS 513.88, the ancestor of currently used enzyme production strains. A high level...

  4. Transcription factors as targets for improving Aspergillus niger as cell factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars; Bruno, K.S.; Thykær, Jette

    ). In the present study the effect of modulation of transcription factors in Aspergillus niger, which is an industrially important micro-organism used in various processes including organic acid and enzyme production, was investigated. The strategy described in this work focuses on regulation connected to p...

  5. Cell Factory Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davy, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2017-01-01

    focused on individual strategies or cell types, but collectively they fall under the broad umbrella of a growing field known as cell factory engineering. Here we condense >130 reviews and key studies in the art into a meta-review of cell factory engineering. We identified 33 generic strategies......-review provides general strategy guides for the broad range of applications of rational engineering of cell factories....

  6. Cell Factory Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davy, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2017-01-01

    Rational approaches to modifying cells to make molecules of interest are of substantial economic and scientific interest. Most of these efforts aim at the production of native metabolites, expression of heterologous biosynthetic pathways, or protein expression. Reviews of these topics have largely...... focused on individual strategies or cell types, but collectively they fall under the broad umbrella of a growing field known as cell factory engineering. Here we condense >130 reviews and key studies in the art into a meta-review of cell factory engineering. We identified 33 generic strategies...... in the field, all applicable to multiple types of cells and products, and proven successful in multiple major cell types. These apply to three major categories: production of native metabolites and/or bioactives, heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways, and protein expression. This meta...

  7. Colorful Microbial Cell Factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Pia Damm

    Yeast cell factories are powerful tools used for the production of high-value natural compounds otherwise not easily available. Many bioactive and industrially important plant secondary metabolites can be produced in yeast by engineering their biosynthetic pathways into yeast cells, as these both...... possess the cellular functions to synthesize, express and fold the eukaryotic genes and proteins, as well as many of the precursors needed as substrates for biosynthesis of most classes of plant natural products. Natural colorants represent an important class of food ingredients in industry, as they have...... desirable properties compared to chemically synthetized artificial dyes; one of the most prominent being their health-promoting properties. Several problems in the form of low concentrations in host tissues, seasonal availability, and chemical in stability exist for plant pigments, such as the desirable...

  8. Engineering the Polyketide Cell Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Louise

    produced by plants, fungi and bacteria. However, the natural producers often do not achieve commercial titers of the polyketide therapeutic. Thus the natural production must be improved. This can be done by random mutagenesis or heterologous expression of the polyketide gene cluster resulting in production...... cerevisiae. Both organisms have well-known genetic tools available for gene targeting and heterologous expression. It has been the aim to create a stable expression platform with all genes integrated in the genome. This has been achieved through the use of two advanced genetic engineering systems for A...... phosphopantetheinylase (PPTase). This versatile vector system can easily be used for expression of other polyketides of interest as well as extended to express whole gene clusters. After achieving proof of principle in terms of expression, the polyketide cell factory must be optimized. The optimization can be achieved...

  9. Engineering Robustness of Microbial Cell Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhiwei; Nielsen, Jens; Zhou, Yongjin J

    2017-10-01

    Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology offer great prospects in developing microbial cell factories capable of converting renewable feedstocks into fuels, chemicals, food ingredients, and pharmaceuticals. However, prohibitively low production rate and mass concentration remain the major hurdles in industrial processes even though the biosynthetic pathways are comprehensively optimized. These limitations are caused by a variety of factors unamenable for host cell survival, such as harsh industrial conditions, fermentation inhibitors from biomass hydrolysates, and toxic compounds including metabolic intermediates and valuable target products. Therefore, engineered microbes with robust phenotypes is essential for achieving higher yield and productivity. In this review, the recent advances in engineering robustness and tolerance of cell factories is described to cope with these issues and briefly introduce novel strategies with great potential to enhance the robustness of cell factories, including metabolic pathway balancing, transporter engineering, and adaptive laboratory evolution. This review also highlights the integration of advanced systems and synthetic biology principles toward engineering the harmony of overall cell function, more than the specific pathways or enzymes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Improved premises for cell factory development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karina Marie

    by a differential expression of the lysozyme gene encoded on the same plasmid. These phenomena seem to have been largely overlooked despite the huge popularity of the T7/pet-based systems for bacterial protein production. Additionally, the paradox that standardization comes at the cost of reduced flexibility...... is at the core of biotechnology and numerous molecular tools and bacterial strains have been developed over the past four decades for this purpose. Understanding of the genetic code and our ability to manipulate genetic material, paves the way for the microbial cell factory development that enables production...... of protein in a sustainable, costefficient manner. In this thesis I report the joined efforts of my colleagues and myself, to improve the premises for cell factory development by optimizing the cloning strategies, improving the awareness of unforeseen side-effects in complex bacterial expression systems...

  11. Algal Cell Factories: Approaches, Applications, and Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqi Fu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of modern biotechnology, microorganisms from diverse lineages have been used to produce bio-based feedstocks and bioactive compounds. Many of these compounds are currently commodities of interest, in a variety of markets and their utility warrants investigation into improving their production through strain development. In this review, we address the issue of strain improvement in a group of organisms with strong potential to be productive “cell factories”: the photosynthetic microalgae. Microalgae are a diverse group of phytoplankton, involving polyphyletic lineage such as green algae and diatoms that are commonly used in the industry. The photosynthetic microalgae have been under intense investigation recently for their ability to produce commercial compounds using only light, CO2, and basic nutrients. However, their strain improvement is still a relatively recent area of work that is under development. Importantly, it is only through appropriate engineering methods that we may see the full biotechnological potential of microalgae come to fruition. Thus, in this review, we address past and present endeavors towards the aim of creating productive algal cell factories and describe possible advantageous future directions for the field.

  12. The metabolic productivity of the cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascante, M; Lloréns, M; Meléndez-Hevia, E; Puigjaner, J; Montero, F; Martí, E

    1996-10-07

    It is widely accepted that some performance function has been optimized during the evolution of metabolic pathways. One can study the nature of such a function by analogy with the industrial manufacturing world, in which there have been efforts over recent decades to optimize production chains, and in which it is now accepted that fluxes are not the only important system variables that determine process efficiency, because inventory turnover must also be considered. Inspired by the parallels between living cells and manufacturing factories, we propose that fluxes and transit time may have simultaneously been major targets of natural selection in the optimization of the design, structure and kinetic parameters of metabolic pathways. Accordingly we define the ratio of flux to transit time as a performance index of productivity in metabolic systems: it measures the efficiency with which stocks are administered, and facilitates comparison of a pathway in different steady states or in different tissues or organisms. For a linear chain of two enzymes, at a fixed total equilibrium constant, we have analysed the variation of flux, transit time and productivity index as functions of the equilibrium constants of the two steps. The results show that only the productivity index has a maximum, which represents a good compromise in optimizing flux and transit time. We have extended control analysis to the productivity index and derived the summation theorem that applies to it. For linear chains of different length with maximum productivity index values, the distribution of control coefficients with regard to the three parameters has a characteristic profile independent of the length of the chain. Finally, this control profile changes when other variables are optimized, and we compare the theoretical results with the control profile of the first steps of glycolysis in rat liver.

  13. SYNERGISTIC ACTIVITY OF ENZYMES PRODUCED BY EUPENICILLIUM JAVANICUM AND ASPERGILLUS NIGER NRRL 337 ON PALM OIL FACTORY WASTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TRESNAWATI PURWADARIA

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of palm kernel cake (PKC and palm oil mill effluent (POME, substances from palm oil factory wastes, for monogastric is limited by their high cellulose and mannan contents. Hydrolytic enzymes have been supplemented to increase the nutrient digestibility. The maximal digestibility was obtained in the synergistic action of all enzyme components including B-D-endoglucanase (CMCase, B-D-glucosidase, B-D-mannanase, p-D-mannosidase, and oc-D-galactosidase. Two kinds of enzymes produced by Eupenicillium javanicum and Aspergillus niger NRRL 337 on the submerged culture containing 3% coconut meal were selected to hydrolyze PKC or dry POME. Enzyme from E. javanicum contained higher CMCase, B-D-mannanase, and a-D- galactosidase activities, while that from A. niger NRRL 337 contained more p-D-glucosidase and p-D-mannosidase activities. Saccharification (hydrolytic activities of enzyme mixtures on PKC and POME were determined at pH 5.0, the optimal pH for p-D-mannanase from E. javanicum, and at 5.4 the optimal pH for a-D-galactosidase from E. javanicum and P-D-glucosidase from A. niger NRRL 337. The enzyme proportions of E. javanicum and A. niger NRRL 337 were 100 : 0, 80 : 20, 60 : 40, 40 : 60, and 0 : 100%. The highest Saccharification activity on both substrates was observed on the mixture of 80% A. niger NRRL 337. The pH levels did not significantly affect Saccharification activity. Fiber components in PKC were more digestable than in POME. Further analysis on the reducing sugar components using thin layer chromatography showed that more monomers were produced in the 60 or 80% of A. niger NRRL 337. The glycosidases of A. niger NRRL 337 played more important role in the Saccharification activity.

  14. The Cell as a Candy Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Jane; Sheldon, Pam

    2005-01-01

    How can teachers explain the functioning of something students cannot see with their own eyes? Often, the study of cells is the first exposure that students have to the microscopic world. Even then, they can only make out a few of the details: cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, sometimes a few chloroplasts. How can teachers help students gain an…

  15. Characterizing Yarrowia lipolytica as a cell factory for sustainable bioprocesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubuta, Patrice; Workman, Mhairi

    With current global focus on renewable and sustainable technologies, there is a strong need to develop innovative solutions in industrial biotechnology. The non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has considerable potential as a versatile cell factory, especially when compared to the typically...

  16. Targeting population heterogeneity for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Carlqvist, Magnus; Helmark, S.

    the heterogeneity level of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding of population heterogeneity, Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were constructed which enabled us to perform single cell level......, substrates, and pH are typically observed in many industrial scale fermentation processes. Consequently, the microbial cells experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells and affect their metabolism and consequently affect...

  17. Synthetic biology of cyanobacterial cell factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angermayr, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    In the field of microbial biotechnology rational design approaches are employed for the generation of microbial cells with desired functions, such as the ability to produce precursor molecules for biofuels or bioplastics. In essence, that is the introduction of a (new) biosynthetic pathway into a

  18. Cell factories for a sustainable world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindtler, Jens William

    2016-01-01

    chemicals, fine and specialty chemicals, nutritional supplements. CFB has ongoing research/development activities in the field of: 1. Providing upgraded CHO cells for production of therapeutic proteins and mAb’s, 2. Actinomycetes research program within discovery of natural compounds that are broad...

  19. Healthy human T-Cell Responses to Aspergillus fumigatus antigens.

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    Neelkamal Chaudhary

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with both invasive and allergic pulmonary diseases, in different hosts. The organism is inhaled as a spore, which, if not cleared from the airway, germinates into hyphal morphotypes that are responsible for tissue invasion and resultant inflammation. Hyphae secrete multiple products that function as antigens, evoking both a protective (T(H1-T(H17 and destructive allergic (T(H2 immunity. How Aspergillus allergens (Asp f proteins participate in the development of allergic sensitization is unknown.To determine whether Asp f proteins are strictly associated with T(H2 responses, or represent soluble hyphal products recognized by healthy hosts, human T cell responses to crude and recombinant products were characterized by ELISPOT. While responses (number of spots producing IFN-gamma, IL-4 or IL-17 to crude hyphal antigen preparations were weak, responses to recombinant Asp f proteins were higher. Recombinant allergens stimulated cells to produce IFN-gamma more so than IL-4 or IL-17. Volunteers exhibited a diverse CD4+ and CD8+ T cell antigen recognition profile, with prominent CD4 T(H1-responses to Asp f3 (a putative peroxismal membrane protein, Asp f9/16 (cell wall glucanase, Asp f11 (cyclophilin type peptidyl-prolyl isomerase and Asp f22 (enolase. Strong IFN-gamma responses were reproduced in most subjects tested over 6 month intervals.Products secreted after conidial germination into hyphae are differentially recognized by protective T cells in healthy, non-atopic individuals. Defining the specificity of the human T cell repertoire, and identifying factors that govern early responses may allow for development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for both invasive and allergic Aspergillus diseases.

  20. Healthy human T-Cell Responses to Aspergillus fumigatus antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Neelkamal; Staab, Janet F; Marr, Kieren A

    2010-02-17

    Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with both invasive and allergic pulmonary diseases, in different hosts. The organism is inhaled as a spore, which, if not cleared from the airway, germinates into hyphal morphotypes that are responsible for tissue invasion and resultant inflammation. Hyphae secrete multiple products that function as antigens, evoking both a protective (T(H)1-T(H)17) and destructive allergic (T(H)2) immunity. How Aspergillus allergens (Asp f proteins) participate in the development of allergic sensitization is unknown. To determine whether Asp f proteins are strictly associated with T(H)2 responses, or represent soluble hyphal products recognized by healthy hosts, human T cell responses to crude and recombinant products were characterized by ELISPOT. While responses (number of spots producing IFN-gamma, IL-4 or IL-17) to crude hyphal antigen preparations were weak, responses to recombinant Asp f proteins were higher. Recombinant allergens stimulated cells to produce IFN-gamma more so than IL-4 or IL-17. Volunteers exhibited a diverse CD4+ and CD8+ T cell antigen recognition profile, with prominent CD4 T(H)1-responses to Asp f3 (a putative peroxismal membrane protein), Asp f9/16 (cell wall glucanase), Asp f11 (cyclophilin type peptidyl-prolyl isomerase) and Asp f22 (enolase). Strong IFN-gamma responses were reproduced in most subjects tested over 6 month intervals. Products secreted after conidial germination into hyphae are differentially recognized by protective T cells in healthy, non-atopic individuals. Defining the specificity of the human T cell repertoire, and identifying factors that govern early responses may allow for development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for both invasive and allergic Aspergillus diseases.

  1. Algal omics: unlocking bioproduct diversity in algae cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Michael T; Pienkos, Philip T

    2015-03-01

    Rapid advances in "omic" technologies are helping to unlock the full potential of microalgae as multi-use feedstocks, with utility in an array of industrial biotechnology, biofuel, and biomedical applications. In turn, algae are emerging as highly attractive candidates for development as microbial cell factories. In this review, we examine the wide array of potential algal bioproducts, with a focus upon the role of omic technologies in driving bioproduct discovery and optimization in microalgal systems.

  2. Cell Factory Stability and Genetic Circuits for Improved Strain Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Peter

    . However, all synthetic gene systems -­ including the target metabolic pathways themselves -­ represent a possible fitness burden to the cell and thus constitute a threat to strain stability. In this thesis, several studies served to develop genetic systems for optimizing cell factory development...... systems can challenge the stability of strain designs. A metabolite-­producing Escherichia coli strain was long-­term cultured to study production stability and the dynamic effects of mutations within the cell population. A genetic error landscape of pathway disruptions was identified including particular......, recurring error modes. Driven by a gain in fitness, these errors within 70 generations led to a transformation of the strain to a population of genetic non-­‐producer cells. Knowledge about these mechanisms and the applied simple mathematical model may likely serve to realizemore stable microbial cell...

  3. Tailoring cyanobacterial cell factory for improved industrial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Guodong; Lu, Xuefeng

    2018-01-10

    Photosynthetic biomanufacturing provides a promising solution for sustainable production of biofuels and biochemicals. Cyanobacteria are among the most promising microbial platforms for the construction of photosynthetic cell factories. Metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria has enabled effective photosynthetic synthesis of diverse natural or non-natural metabolites, while commercialization of photosynthetic biomanufacturing is usually restricted by process and economic feasibilities. In actual outdoor conditions, active cell growth and product synthesis is restricted to narrow light exposure windows of the day-night cycles and is threatened by diverse physical, chemical, and biological environmental stresses. For biomass harvesting and bioproduct recovery, energy and cost consuming processing and equipment is required, which further decreases the economic and environmental competitiveness of the entire process. To facilitate scaled photosynthetic biomanufacturing, lots of efforts have been made to engineer cyanobacterial cell properties required by robust & continual cultivation and convenient & efficient recovery. In this review, we specifically summarized recently reported engineering strategies on optimizing industrial properties of cyanobacterial cells. Through systematically re-editing the metabolism, morphology, mutualism interaction of cyanobacterial chassis cells, the adaptabilities and compatibilities of the cyanobacterial cell factories to the industrial process could be significantly improved. Cell growth and product synthesis of the tailored cyanobacterial cells could be expanded and maintained at night and in stressful environments, while convenient biomass harvesting could also be expected. For developing more feasible cyanobacterial photosynthetic biomanufacturing in large scale, we here propose the importance of tailoring industrial properties of cyanobacteria and outline the directions that should be exploited in the future. Copyright © 2018

  4. Novel and improved yeast cell factories for biosustainable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Workman, Mhairi

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of an increasingly diverse range of cheap waste substrates will be an ongoing challenge for the bio-based economy, where the mobilization of nutrients from a variety of waste products will be necessary for realization of biosustainability on an industrial scale. Bioprocesses...... utilizing traditionally applied cell factories are generally based on a limited range of substrates (mainly glucose). However, a wider diversity in substrate range is highly desirable in developing biorefinery scenarios where feed-stocks containing a number of carbon sources are typically employed...

  5. Synthetic yeast based cell factories for vanillin-glucoside production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas

    and controlled expression/overexpression of genes of interest. De novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin-β-glucoside production was employed as a model system for several case studies in this project. In order to construct yeast cell factories fulfilling current demands of industrial biotechnology, methods...... method was further applied for balancing vanillin-β-glucoside production in S. cerevisiae. It was previously demonstrated that de novo biosynthetic pathway is not capable to efficiently convert its precursor metabolite into vanillin-β-glucoside, which resulted in significant accumulation of several...... intermediates. Here, the gene amplification system was used to systematically overexpress individual genes or gene combinations of the biosynthetic pathway. Using this strategy, metabolic bottlenecks were identified and the production yield of vanillin-β-glucoside was 6-fold improved. Several S. cerevisiae...

  6. Reassessing Escherichia coli as a cell factory for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chonglong; Pfleger, Brian F; Kim, Seon-Won

    2017-06-01

    Via metabolic engineering, industrial microorganisms have the potential to convert renewable substrates into a wide range of biofuels that can address energy security and environmental challenges associated with current fossil fuels. The user-friendly bacterium, Escherichia coli, remains one of the most frequently used hosts for demonstrating production of biofuel candidates including alcohol-, fatty acid- and terpenoid-based biofuels. In this review, we summarize the metabolic pathways for synthesis of these biofuels and assess enabling technologies that assist in regulating biofuel synthesis pathways and rapidly assembling novel E. coli strains. These advances maintain E. coli's position as a prominent host for developing cell factories for biofuel production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Production of fatty acid-derived oleochemicals and biofuels by synthetic yeast cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Yongjin J.; Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production of oleochemicals requires establishment of cell factory platform strains. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive cell factory as new strains can be rapidly implemented into existing infrastructures such as bioethanol production plants. Here we show high-level p...

  8. Physiological characterization of secondary metabolite producing Penicillium cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grijseels, Sietske; Nielsen, Jens; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Penicillium species are important producers of bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the immense diversity of the fungal kingdom is only scarcely represented in industrial bioprocesses and the upscaling of compound production remains a costly and labor intensive challenge. In order to facilit......Penicillium species are important producers of bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the immense diversity of the fungal kingdom is only scarcely represented in industrial bioprocesses and the upscaling of compound production remains a costly and labor intensive challenge. In order...... to facilitate the development of novel secondary metabolite producing processes, two routes are typically explored: optimization of the native producer or transferring the enzymatic pathway into a heterologous host. Recent genome sequencing of ten Penicillium species showed the vast amount of secondary...... metabolite gene clusters present in their genomes, and makes them accessible for rational strain improvement. In this study, we aimed to characterize the potential of these ten Penicillium species as native producing cell factories by testing their growth performance and secondary metabolite production...

  9. Interaction of Aspergillus with alveolar Type II cells and phagocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escobar Salazar, N.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus species are worldwide distributed fungi and abundant in nature. Aspergilli are mainly saprotrophic obtaining nutrients by degrading dead organic material in particular that of plants. Currently, around 837 species have been reported. Due to the broad range of compound secreted by

  10. Inflammatory cells and airway defense against Aspergillus fumigatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffman, HF; Tomee, JFC

    The authors offer a summary of the attack strategies of A. fumigatus and interactions with the airway defense system. The possible role of proteolytic enzymes from Aspergillus in the inflammatory response of the airways is also discussed. Evidence is given for the in vivo production of these

  11. Organic acid production in Aspergillus niger and other filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odoni, Dorett I.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to increase the understanding of organic acid production in Aspergillus niger and other filamentous fungi, with the ultimate purpose to improve A. niger as biotechnological production host. In Chapter 1, the use of microbial cell-factories for the

  12. METABOLIC MODELLING IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF CELL FACTORIES BY SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY

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    Paula Jouhten

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell factories are commonly microbial organisms utilized for bioconversion of renewable resources to bulk or high value chemicals. Introduction of novel production pathways in chassis strains is the core of the development of cell factories by synthetic biology. Synthetic biology aims to create novel biological functions and systems not found in nature by combining biology with engineering. The workflow of the development of novel cell factories with synthetic biology is ideally linear which will be attainable with the quantitative engineering approach, high-quality predictive models, and libraries of well-characterized parts. Different types of metabolic models, mathematical representations of metabolism and its components, enzymes and metabolites, are useful in particular phases of the synthetic biology workflow. In this minireview, the role of metabolic modelling in synthetic biology will be discussed with a review of current status of compatible methods and models for the in silico design and quantitative evaluation of a cell factory.

  13. Lighting up yeast cell factories by transcription factor-based biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'ambrosio, Vasil; Jensen, Michael Krogh

    2017-01-01

    process. For this purpose, there is a need to develop new techniques for screening and selection of best-performing cell factory designs in multiplex. Here we review the current status of the sourcing, design and engineering of biosensors derived from allosterically regulated transcription factors applied...... to the biotechnology work-horse budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We conclude by providing a perspective on the most important challenges and opportunities lying ahead in order to harness the full potential of biosensor development for increasing both the throughput of cell factory development and robustness...

  14. Impact of human mesenchymal stromal cells on antifungal host response againstAspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stanislaw; Tramsen, Lars; Schneider, Andreas; Schubert, Ralf; Balan, Ada; Degistirici, Özer; Meisel, Roland; Lehrnbecher, Thomas

    2017-11-10

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are increasingly given as immunotherapy to hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients with refractory graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Whereas the immunosuppressive properties of MSCs seem to be beneficial in GvHD, there is, at the same time, major concern that MSCs increase the risk for infection. We therefore investigated the interplay of human MSCs with Aspergillus fumigatus and the impact of MSCs on different arms of the anti- Aspergillus host response in vitro . Although A. fumigatus hyphae increase mRNA levels of IL6 in MSCs, the extracellular availability of IL-6 and other pro-inflammatory cytokines remains unaffected. Human MSCs are able to phagocyte Aspergillus conidia, but phagocytosis of conidia is not associated with an alteration of the cytokine production by MSCs. In addition, human MSCs do not affect activation and function of A. fumigatus specific CD4 + T cells, and MSCs do not negatively impact the oxidative burst activity of phagocytes. Our in vitro data indicate that administration of human MSCs is not associated with a negative impact on the host response against A. fumigatus and that the fungus does not stimulate MSCs to increase the release of those cytokines which play a central role in the pathophysiology of GvHD.

  15. On the Use of Metabolic Control Analysis in the Optimization of Cyanobacterial Biosolar Cell Factories.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angermayr, S.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis will have a key role in a sustainable future. It is therefore significant that this process can be engineered in organisms such as cyanobacteria to construct cell factories that catalyze the (sun)light-driven conversion of CO2 and water into products like ethanol, butanol, or

  16. Industrial systems biology and its impact on synthetic biology of yeast cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fletcher, Eugene; Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    , microbial cell factories such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be engineered to express synthetic pathways for the production of fuels, biopharmaceuticals, fragrances, and food flavors. However, directing fluxes through these synthetic pathways towards the desired product can be demanding due to complex...

  17. Design, Modeling, and Development of Microbial Cell Factories

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2014-03-26

    Using Metagenomic analysis, computational modeling, single cell and genome editing technologies, we will express desired microbial genes and their networks in suitable hosts for mass production of energy, food, and fine chemicals.

  18. Acceleration of cell factories engineering using CRISPR-based technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronda, Carlotta

    potentially be standardized in an automatable platform and, in the future be integrated with metabolic modeling tools. In particularly it describes the technologies developed in the three widely used organisms: E. coli, S. cerevisiae and CHO mammalian cells using the recent breakthrough CRISPR/ Cas9 system....... These include CRMAGE, a MAGE improved recombineering platform using CRISPR negative selection, CrEdit, a system for multi-loci marker-free simultaneous gene and pathway integrations and CRISPy a platform to accelerate genome editing in CHO cells....

  19. Interaction of the pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus with lung epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir eOsherov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic environmental mold that can cause severe allergic responses in atopic individuals and poses a life-threatening risk for severely immunocompromised patients. Infection is caused by inhalation of fungal spores (conidia into the lungs. The initial point of contact between the fungus and the host is a monolayer of lung epithelial cells. Understanding how these cells react to fungal contact is crucial to elucidating the pathobiology of Aspergillus-related disease states. The experimental systems, both in vitro and in vivo, used to study these interactions, are described. Distinction is made between bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells. The experimental findings suggest that lung epithelial cells are more than just innocent bystanders or a purely physical barrier against infection. They can be better described as an active extension of our innate immune system, operating as a surveillance mechanism that can specifically identify fungal spores and activate an offensive response to block infection. This response includes the internalization of adherent conidia and the release of cytokines, antimicrobial peptides and reactive oxygen species. In the case of allergy, lung epithelial cells can dampen an over-reactive immune response by releasing anti-inflammatory compounds such as kinurenine. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding the interaction of A. fumigatus with lung epithelial cells. A better understanding of the interactions between A. fumigatus and lung epithelial cells has therapeutic implications, as stimulation or inhibition of the epithelial response may alter disease outcome.

  20. Novel Methods for Development of Cell Factories and Laboratory Simultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads

    of thousands of genomic sites simultaneously. We demonstrated the feasibility of the method by inserting T7 promoters upstream of 2587 operons in E. coli, and validating the resulting cell library by deep sequencing. The method makes large-scale mutagenesis projects possible at a cost between 10x to more than...... fluorescence-activated cell sorting and deep DNA sequencing. Based on this data, we developed an algorithm (EMOPEC), which enables efficient modulation of the expression level of any chromosomally encoded gene in E. coli, by changing only a few bases in the SD sequence. We tested the algorithm by modulating 6...... ALE-acquired alleles in random combinations into the ancestral strain, and competition between these engineered strains was used to identify causative mutations by selection at 42 °C and subsequent deep sequencing of several selected clones. Interestingly, most of the identified key genes differed...

  1. Cameo: A Python Library for Computer Aided Metabolic Engineering and Optimization of Cell Factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, Joao G.R.; Jensen, Kristian; Lieven, Christian

    2018-01-01

    on proprietary software, or do not provide documented interfaces, which has precluded their mainstream adoption in the field. In this work we present cameo, a platform-independent software that enables in silico design of cell factories and targets both experienced modelers as well as users new to the field......Computational systems biology methods enable rational design of cell factories on a genome-scale and thus accelerate the engineering of cells for the production of valuable chemicals and proteins. Unfortunately, for the majority of these methods' implementations are either not published, rely....... It is written in Python and implements state-of-the-art methods for enumerating and prioritizing knock-out, knock-in, over-expression, and down-regulation strategies and combinations thereof. Cameo is an open source software project and is freely available under the Apache License 2.0. A dedicated website...

  2. Evaluation of cell factory performance through determination of intracellular metabolites using LC-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magdenoska, Olivera; Martinussen, Jan; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2012-01-01

    combination of sensitivity and specificity of this technique allowed qualitative and quantitative analysis of low metabolite concentrations. The mains steps involved were: (i) metabolite sample preparation by quenching, extraction, sample purification using dispersive Solid Phase Extraction; (ii) quantitative......A major objective in biotechnology is the improvement of the efficiency of host microorganisms used as cell factories. Engineering a strain capable of producing high amounts of a desired biochemical is a multi-step process consisting of design, construction, and analysis of the constructed cell...... factory. In order to address the function or disfunction of the engineered cells,systems biology tools are employed by using the multi “omics” approach (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and fluxomics). Metabolomics is a tool aimed at a quantitative understanding of metabolism...

  3. Modification of Aspergillus niger by conducting polymer, Polypyrrole, and the evaluation of electrochemical properties of modified cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apetrei, Roxana-Mihaela; Carac, Geta; Bahrim, Gabriela; Ramanaviciene, Almira; Ramanavicius, Arunas

    2018-06-01

    The enhancement of bioelectrochemical properties of microorganism by in situ formation of conducting polymer within the cell structures (e.g. cell wall) was performed. The synthesis of polypyrrole (Ppy) within fungi (Aspergillus niger) cells was achieved. Two different Aspergillus niger strains were selected due to their ability to produce glucose oxidase, which initiated the Ppy formation through products of enzymatic reaction. The evolution of Ppy structural features was investigated by absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Increase in mitotic recombination in diploid cells of Aspergillus nidulans in response to ethidium bromide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia C.A. Becker

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethidium bromide (EB is an intercalating inhibitor of topoisomerase II and its activities are related to chemotherapeutic drugs used in anti-cancer treatments. EB promotes several genotoxic effects in exposed cells by stabilising the DNA-enzyme complex. The recombinagenic potential of EB was evaluated in our in vivo study by the loss of heterozygosity of nutritional markers in diploid Aspergillus nidulans cells through Homozygotization Index (HI. A DNA repair mutation, uvsZ and a chromosome duplication DP (II-I were introduced in the genome of tested cells to obtain a sensitive system for the recombinagenesis detection. EB-treated diploid cells had HI values significantly greater than the control at both concentrations (4.0 x 10-3 and 5.0 x 10-3 mM. Results indicate that the intercalating agent is potentially capable of inducing mitotic crossing-over in diploid A. nidulans cells.

  5. Conversion of Food waste to Single Cell Protein using Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2018-03-13

    Mar 13, 2018 ... ABSTRACT: The utilization of food waste into products like single cell protein is an alternative solution to global protein shortage ... as orange, pineapple, banana, watermelon and cucumber waste as growth media for A. niger using standard techniques. ..... Waste to Wealth- Value Recovery from. Agrofood.

  6. Conversion of Food waste to Single Cell Protein using Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The utilization of food waste into products like single cell protein is an alternative solution to global protein shortage and to alleviate pollution problems. This investigation was carried out with food wastes such as orange, pineapple, banana, watermelon and cucumber waste as growth media for A. niger using standard ...

  7. Systems biology of yeast: enabling technology for development of cell factories for production of advanced biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Bouke; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Transportation fuels will gradually shift from oil based fuels towards alternative fuel resources like biofuels. Current bioethanol and biodiesel can, however, not cover the increasing demand for biofuels and there is therefore a need for advanced biofuels with superior fuel properties. Novel cell factories will provide a production platform for advanced biofuels. However, deep cellular understanding is required for improvement of current biofuel cell factories. Fast screening and analysis (-omics) methods and metabolome-wide mathematical models are promising techniques. An integrated systems approach of these techniques drives diversity and quantity of several new biofuel compounds. This review will cover the recent technological developments that support improvement of the advanced biofuels 1-butanol, biodiesels and jetfuels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Choosing the right platform for the right product: Sustainable production of chemicals in microbial cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrgard, Markus

    The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability (CFB) is a new non-profit research center focused on sustainable production of biochemicals and therapeutic proteins using microbial and mammalian cell factories. The work at CFB is organized around an iterative loop where cell factories...... are taken through four stages: 1) In silico design and data analysis, 2) genome engineering, 3) characterization and high throughput screening, and 4) omics based systems analysis. However, before entering this loop, significant two significant decisions need to be made. First, the choice of what products...... should be made should be made considering biological, technical, economic, and ecological factors. Second, the choice which platform strains will be used to develop production hosts should be made based on characterization of both metabolic and process tolerance traits of strains. I will discuss the role...

  9. Synthetic biology approaches for protein production optimization in bacterial cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennig, Maja; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    such sustainable alternative if converted into so-called microbial cell factories. Instead of crude oil, cell factories use renewable resources or waste products as source material. The challenge is, however, that microbial production needs to be economically feasible to compete with the classical chemical...... devices and their fusion to antibiotic selection markers enables subsequent selection of high-expressing constructs. The approach is a simple and inexpensive alternative to advanced screening techniques. In addition, a second synthetic biology approach provides the means for fast and efficient plasmid......Society’s strong dependence on fossil fuels and petroleum-based products leads not only to a rapid decline of natural oil reserves but contributes massively to global warming and environmental damage. This consequently urges society to look into more sustainable alternatives. Microorganisms present...

  10. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering of CHO cell factories: application and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jae Seong; Grav, Lise Marie; Lewis, Nathan E.

    2015-01-01

    repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system enables rapid,easy and efficient engineering of mammalian genomes. It has a wide range of applications frommodification of individual genes to genome-wide screening or regulation of genes. Facile genomeediting using CRISPR/Cas9 empowers...... researchers in the CHO community to elucidate the mechanisticbasis behind high level production of proteins and product quality attributes of interest. Inthis review, we describe the basis of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing and its applicationfor development of next generation CHO cell factories while...... highlighting both future perspectivesand challenges. As one of the main drivers for the CHO systems biology era, genome engineeringwith CRISPR/Cas9 will pave the way for rational design of CHO cell factories....

  11. Production of Useful Terpenoids by Higher-Fungus Cell Factory and Synthetic Biology Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Han; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Higher fungi with greater than 70000 species are regarded as a rich source of various natural compounds including terpenoids, the production of which represents a wide range of interest in pharmaceutical and healthcare industries. This review summarizes the current knowledge of terpenoids synthesized by higher fungi, and highlights the current state-of-the-art regarding genetic manipulation of higher fungi. As the focus, this article will discuss the most recent approaches enabling native hosts and heterologous microbes to efficiently produce various terpenoids, especially with regard to the construction of 'smart' higher-fungus cell factories. The merits and demerits of heterologous versus native hosts as cell factories will also be debated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes by monoculture and co-culture of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus under SSF of banana peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Rehman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous fungi are considered to be the most important group of microorganisms for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE, in solid state fermentations. In this study, two fungal strains Aspergillus niger MS23 and Aspergillus terreus MS105 were screened for plant CWDE such as amylase, pectinase, xylanase and cellulases (β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and filterpaperase using a novel substrate, Banana Peels (BP for SSF process. This is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, to use BP as SSF substrate for plant CWDE production by co-culture of fungal strains. The titers of pectinase were significantly improved in co-culture compared to mono-culture. Furthermore, the enzyme preparations obtained from monoculture and co-culture were used to study the hydrolysis of BP along with some crude and purified substrates. It was observed that the enzymatic hydrolysis of different crude and purified substrates accomplished after 26 h of incubation, where pectin was maximally hydrolyzed by the enzyme preparations of mono and co-culture. Along with purified substrates, crude materials were also proved to be efficiently degraded by the cocktail of the CWDE. These results demonstrated that banana peels may be a potential substrate in solid-state fermentation for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes to be used for improving various biotechnological and industrial processes.

  13. Dynamic immune cell recruitment after murine pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus infection under different immunosuppressive regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajaswamy Kalleda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Humans are continuously exposed to airborne spores of the saprophytic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. However, in healthy individuals pulmonary host defense mechanisms efficiently eliminate the fungus. In contrast, A. fumigatus causes devastating infections in immunocompromised patients. Host immune responses against A. fumigatus lung infections in immunocompromised conditions have remained largely elusive. Given the dynamic changes in immune cell subsets within tissues upon immunosuppressive therapy, we dissected the spatiotemporal pulmonary immune response after A. fumigatus infection to reveal basic immunological events that fail to effectively control invasive fungal disease. In different immunocompromised murine models, myeloid, notably neutrophils and macrophages, but not lymphoid cells were strongly recruited to the lungs upon infection. Other myeloid cells, particularly dendritic cells and monocytes, were only recruited to lungs of corticosteroid treated mice, which developed a strong pulmonary inflammation after infection. Lymphoid cells, particularly CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells and NK cells were highly reduced upon immunosuppression and not recruited after A. fumigatus infection. Moreover, adoptive CD11b+ myeloid cell transfer rescued cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed mice from lethal A. fumigatus infection but not cortisone and cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed mice. Our findings illustrate that CD11b+ myeloid cells are critical for anti-A. fumigatus defense under cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed conditions.

  14. Dynamic Immune Cell Recruitment After Murine Pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus Infection under Different Immunosuppressive Regimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalleda, Natarajaswamy; Amich, Jorge; Arslan, Berkan; Poreddy, Spoorthi; Mattenheimer, Katharina; Mokhtari, Zeinab; Einsele, Hermann; Brock, Matthias; Heinze, Katrin Gertrud; Beilhack, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Humans are continuously exposed to airborne spores of the saprophytic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. However, in healthy individuals pulmonary host defense mechanisms efficiently eliminate the fungus. In contrast, A. fumigatus causes devastating infections in immunocompromised patients. Host immune responses against A. fumigatus lung infections in immunocompromised conditions have remained largely elusive. Given the dynamic changes in immune cell subsets within tissues upon immunosuppressive therapy, we dissected the spatiotemporal pulmonary immune response after A. fumigatus infection to reveal basic immunological events that fail to effectively control invasive fungal disease. In different immunocompromised murine models, myeloid, notably neutrophils, and macrophages, but not lymphoid cells were strongly recruited to the lungs upon infection. Other myeloid cells, particularly dendritic cells and monocytes, were only recruited to lungs of corticosteroid treated mice, which developed a strong pulmonary inflammation after infection. Lymphoid cells, particularly CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells and NK cells were highly reduced upon immunosuppression and not recruited after A. fumigatus infection. Moreover, adoptive CD11b+ myeloid cell transfer rescued cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed mice from lethal A. fumigatus infection but not cortisone and cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed mice. Our findings illustrate that CD11b+ myeloid cells are critical for anti-A. fumigatus defense under cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed conditions. PMID:27468286

  15. ASPERGILLUS NIGER ASPERGILLUS NIGER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Additives such as low molecular weight alcohols, trace metals, phytate, lipids etc have been reported to stimulate citric acid production. Hence the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of stimulating the metabolic activity of activity of Aspergillus niger for the purpose of improved citric acid production from ...

  16. ASPERGILLUS NIGER ASPERGILLUS NIGER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    CITRIC ACID PRODUCTION FROM DILUTE ACID HYDROLYSED CORN STARCH USING ASPERGILLUS NIGER. , N. A. Amenaghawon ..... “The effect of the sugar source on citric acid production by. Aspergillusniger”. Applied. Microbiology and Biotechnology, Vol. 19, Number 6,. 1984, pp. 393-397. [25]. Xu, D.B., Madrid ...

  17. Isolate-dependent growth, virulence, and cell wall composition in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nansalmaa Amarsaikhan

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus is a mediator of allergic sensitization and invasive disease in susceptible individuals. The significant genetic and phenotypic variability between and among clinical and environmental isolates are important considerations in host-pathogen studies of A. fumigatus-mediated disease. We observed decreased radial growth, rate of germination, and ability to establish colony growth in a single environmental isolate of A. fumigatus, Af5517, when compared to other clinical and environmental isolates. Af5517 also exhibited increased hyphal diameter and cell wall β-glucan and chitin content, with chitin most significantly increased. Morbidity, mortality, lung fungal burden, and tissue pathology were decreased in neutropenic Af5517-infected mice when compared to the clinical isolate Af293. Our results support previous findings that suggest a correlation between in vitro growth rates and in vivo virulence, and we propose that changes in cell wall composition may contribute to this phenotype.

  18. Spinal osteomyelitis due to Aspergillus flavus in a child: a rare complication after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beluffi, Giampiero [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico ' S.Matteo' , Section of Paediatric Radiology, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Pavia PV (Italy); Bernardo, Maria E.; Locatelli, Franco [University of Pavia, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico ' S.Matteo' , Department of Paediatric Haematology/Oncology, Pavia (Italy); Meloni, Giulia [University of Pavia, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico ' S.Matteo' , Institute of Radiology, Pavia (Italy); Spinazzola, Angelo [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico ' S.Matteo' , Section of Paediatric Radiology, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Pavia PV (Italy); Ospedale Maggiore, Crema CR (Italy)

    2008-06-15

    We report the case of a child affected by acute myeloid leukaemia who was treated with allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and developed cervicothoracic spinal osteomyelitis due to Aspergillus flavus. The diagnosis was difficult on a clinical basis, but made possible by conventional radiography and MRI. (orig.)

  19. Development of a screening approach for exploring cell factory potential through metabolic flux analysis and physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Thykær, Jette

    2012-01-01

    of the recombinant strains in order to evaluate their potential as fungal cell factories and for guiding further metabolic engineering strategies. To meet the demand for a fast and reliable method for physiological characterisation of fungal strains, a screening approach using a micro titer format was developed...... of the validation, already well described fungal strains were selected and tested using the described method and the developed method was subsequently used to test recombinant fungal strains producing the model polyketide 6-methylsalicylic acid. Diligent application of this strategy significantly reduces the cost...

  20. Evidence for the involvement of cofilin in Aspergillus fumigatus internalization into type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhiyao; Han, Xuelin; Chen, Fangyan; Jia, Xiaodong; Zhao, Jingya; Zhang, Changjian; Yong, Chen; Tian, Shuguang; Zhou, Xin; Han, Li

    2015-08-13

    The internalization of Aspergillus fumigatus into alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) is tightly controlled by host cellular actin dynamics, which require close modulation of the ADF (actin depolymerizing factor)/cofilin family. However, the role of cofilin in A. fumigatus internalization into AECs remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that germinated A. fumigatus conidia were able to induce phosphorylation of cofilin in A549 cells during the early stage of internalization. The modulation of cofilin activity by overexpression, knockdown, or mutation of the cofilin gene in A549 cells decreased the efficacy of A. fumigatus internalization. Reducing the phosphorylation status of cofilin with BMS-5 (LIM kinase inhibitor) or overexpression of the slingshot phosphatases also impeded A. fumigatus internalization. Both the C. botulimun C3 transferase (a specific RhoA inhibitor) and Y27632 (a specific ROCK inhibitor) reduced the internalization of A. fumigatus and the level of phosphorylated cofilin. β-1,3-glucan (the major component of the conidial cell wall) and its host cell receptor dectin-1 did not seem to be associated with cofilin phosphorylation during A. fumigatus infection. These results indicated that cofilin might be involved in the modulation of A. fumigatus internalization into type II alveolar epithelial cells through the RhoA-ROCK-LIM kinase pathway.

  1. Vermamoeba vermiformis-Aspergillus fumigatus relationships and comparison with other phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Elodie; Cateau, Estelle; Kaaki, Sihem; Rodier, Marie-Hélène

    2016-11-01

    Free living amoebae (FLA) are protists ubiquitously present in the environment. Aspergillus fumigatus is a mould responsible for severe deep-seated infections, and that can be recovered in the same habitats as the FLA. By conducting coculture experiments and fungal incubation with amoebal supernatants, we report herein that Vermamoeba vermiformis, a FLA present in hospital water systems, promotes filamentation and growth of A. fumigatus. This finding is of particular importance to institutions whose water systems might harbor FLA and could potentially be used by immunocompromised patients. Also, the relationships between V. vermiformis and A. fumigatus were compared to those between this fungus and two other phagocytic cells: Acanthamoeba castellanii, another FLA, and macrophage-like THP-1 cells. After 4 h of coincubation, the percentages of the three phagocytic cell types with adhered conidia were similar, even though the types of receptors between FLA and macrophagic cell seemed different. However, the percentage of THP-1 with internalized conidia was considerably lower (40 %) in comparison with the two other cell types (100 %). Thus, this study revealed that interactions between A. fumigatus and these three phagocytic cell types show similarities, even though it is premature to extrapolate these results to interpret relationships between A. fumigatus and macrophages.

  2. Aspergillus nidulans cell wall composition and function change in response to hosting several Aspergillus fumigatus UDP-galactopyranose mutase activity mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Kausar Alam

    Full Text Available Deletion or repression of Aspergillus nidulans ugmA (AnugmA, involved in galactofuranose biosynthesis, impairs growth and increases sensitivity to Caspofungin, a β-1,3-glucan synthesis antagonist. The A. fumigatus UgmA (AfUgmA crystal structure has been determined. From that study, AfUgmA mutants with altered enzyme activity were transformed into AnugmA▵ to assess their effect on growth and wall composition in A. nidulans. The complemented (AnugmA::wild type AfugmA strain had wild type phenotype, indicating these genes had functional homology. Consistent with in vitro studies, AfUgmA residues R182 and R327 were important for its function in vivo, with even conservative amino (RK substitutions producing AnugmA? phenotype strains. Similarly, the conserved AfUgmA loop III histidine (H63 was important for Galf generation: the H63N strain had a partially rescued phenotype compared to AnugmA▵. Collectively, A. nidulans strains that hosted mutated AfUgmA constructs with low enzyme activity showed increased hyphal surface adhesion as assessed by binding fluorescent latex beads. Consistent with previous qPCR results, immunofluorescence and ELISA indicated that AnugmA▵ and AfugmA-mutated A. nidulans strains had increased α-glucan and decreased β-glucan in their cell walls compared to wild type and AfugmA-complemented strains. Like the AnugmA▵ strain, A. nidulans strains containing mutated AfugmA showed increased sensitivity to antifungal drugs, particularly Caspofungin. Reduced β-glucan content was correlated with increased Caspofungin sensitivity. Aspergillus nidulans wall Galf, α-glucan, and β-glucan content was correlated in A. nidulans hyphal walls, suggesting dynamic coordination between cell wall synthesis and cell wall integrity.

  3. SWITCH: a dynamic CRISPR tool for genome engineering and metabolic pathway control for cell factory construction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Vanegas, Katherina; Lehka, Beata Joanna; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2017-01-01

    to the pathway control state where production was optimized by downregulating an essential gene TSC13, hence, reducing formation of a byproduct. Conclusions We have successfully integrated two CRISPR tools, one for genetic engineering and one for pathway control, into one system and successfully used it for cell......Background The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is increasingly used as a cell factory. However, cell factory construction time is a major obstacle towards using yeast for bio-production. Hence, tools to speed up cell factory construction are desirable. Results In this study, we have developed a new...... Cas9/dCas9 based system, SWITCH, which allows Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains to iteratively alternate between a genetic engineering state and a pathway control state. Since Cas9 induced recombination events are crucial for SWITCH efficiency, we first developed a technique TAPE, which we have...

  4. A novel screening method for cell wall mutants in Aspergillus niger identifies UDP-galactopyranose mutase as an important protein in fungal cell wall biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damveld, R.A.; Franken, A.; Arentshorst, M.; Punt, P.J.; Klis, F.M.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Ram, A.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    To identify cell wall biosynthetic genes in filamentous fungi and thus potential targets for the discovery of new antifungals, we developed a novel screening method for cell wall mutants. It is based on our earlier observation that the Aspergillus niger agsA gene, which encodes a putative a-glucan

  5. EVALUATION OF CELL CYCLE OF Aspergillus nidulans EXPOSED TO THE EXTRACT OF Copaifera officinalis L PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Jurema Ruggeri Chiuchetta, Uériton Dias de Oliveira e Josy Fraccaro de Marins

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The oil extracted from the Copaifera officinalis L plant has been used in popular medicine to the treatment of several diseases, like cancer. In eukaryotic cells, the process of cellular proliferation follows a standard cycle, named cellular cycle. The transformation of a normal cell in a malignant one requires several steps, in which genes that control normal cellular division or cellular death are modified. Aspergillus nidulans fungus is an excellent system for the study of the cellular differentiation. Its asexual cycle results in the formation of conidia, which are disposed like chains, constituting a structure named conidiophore. This structure consists in an aerial hifae, multinucleate vesicle and uninucleate cells. Current research evaluated the capacity of the C. officinalis L plant extract in promoting alterations in the cellular cycle of A. nidulans diploid strains, by observing macroscopic and microscopic alterations in cellular growth of this fungus. Results shown that no macroscopic alterations were observed in cellular growth of strains exposed to the extract, however, microscopic alterations of conidiophore have been observed in the different extract concentrations analyzed. In this way, the study of the action of C. officinalis L plant extract becomes important considering the fact that this substance is capable to promote alterations in cellular cycle of eukaryotic cells.

  6. Nanoscale biophysical properties of the cell surface galactosaminogalactan from the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussart, Audrey; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Fontaine, Thierry; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-09-01

    Many fungal pathogens produce cell surface polysaccharides that play essential roles in host-pathogen interactions. In Aspergillus fumigatus, the newly discovered polysaccharide galactosaminogalactan (GAG) mediates adherence to a variety of substrates through molecular mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we use atomic force microscopy to unravel the localization and adhesion of GAG on living fungal cells. Using single-molecule imaging with tips bearing anti-GAG antibodies, we found that GAG is massively exposed on wild-type (WT) germ tubes, consistent with the notion that this glycopolymer is secreted by the mycelium of A. fumigatus, while it is lacking on WT resting conidia and on germ tubes from a mutant (Δuge3) deficient in GAG. Imaging germ tubes with tips bearing anti-β-glucan antibodies shows that exposure of β-glucan is strongly increased in the Δuge3 mutant, indicating that this polysaccharide is masked by GAG during hyphal growth. Single-cell force measurements show that expression of GAG on germ tubes promotes specific adhesion to pneumocytes and non-specific adhesion to hydrophobic substrates. These results provide a molecular foundation for the multifunctional adhesion properties of GAG, thus suggesting it could be used as a potential target in anti-adhesion therapy and immunotherapy. Our methodology represents a powerful approach for characterizing the nanoscale organization and adhesion of cell wall polysaccharides during fungal morphogenesis, thereby contributing to increase our understanding of their role in biofilm formation and immune responses.

  7. Cell wall damage and oxidative stress in Candida albicans ATCC10231 and Aspergillus niger caused by palladium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athie-García, Martha Samira; Piñón-Castillo, Hilda Amelia; Muñoz-Castellanos, Laila Nayzzel; Ulloa-Ogaz, Ana Laura; Martínez-Varela, Perla Ivonne; Quintero-Ramos, Armando; Duran, Robert; Murillo-Ramirez, José Guadalupe; Orrantia-Borunda, Erasmo

    2018-04-01

    In this work the toxic effect of Palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) was investigated in two eukaryotic cell models, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. PdNPs were synthesized by chemical reduction method, obtaining spherical NPs with a primary size ranging from 3 to 15 nm. PdNPs showed a hydrodynamic size of 1548 nm in Lee's minimum media. Minimal inhibitory concentration was determined at 200 and 250 ppm for Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger respectively, revealing a significant cell growth inhibition (ANOVA and tukey analysis, α = 0.5). Reactive Oxygen Species levels were increased in both microorganisms. Confocal, scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed cell wall damage and cellular morphology changes, induced by the interaction of PdNPs, in both microorganisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. I-RobCELL: the factory of the future for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozais, D.; Larousse, B.

    2016-01-01

    The I-RobCELL project (Innovative Robotic Center with online Examination) is a concept of a totally automated cell for the production and control of small parts for the high-precision mechanical market. The I-RobCELL will play on 4 fields: 1) a totally digital driving of the fabrication process involving various fabrication processes for the same part, 2) the integration of non-destructive testing technologies based on ultrasound, 3) automated diagnostic of defects through the comparison between real-time measured values given by probes and references values stored in a database, and 4) on-line monitoring of the welding. The technology of ultrasonic testing without couplant substance between the transducer and the part to be tested, is being developed to be integrated to the I-RobCELL, other non-destructive testing like guided waves or X-ray tomography will be implemented in the future versions of the I-RobCELL. The I-RobCELL will occupy a 2-3 m 3 volume allowing a very accurate monitoring of the temperature and a high level of cleanliness. The I-RobCELL concept will prefigure the factory of the future. (A.C.)

  9. A new-generation of Bacillus subtilis cell factory for further elevated scyllo-inositol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kosei; Natsume, Ayane; Ishikawa, Shu; Takenaka, Shinji; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2017-04-21

    A stereoisomer of inositol, scyllo-inositol (SI), has been regarded as a promising therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease. However, this compound is relatively rare, whereas another stereoisomer of inositol, myo-inositol (MI) is abundant in nature. Bacillus subtilis 168 has the ability to metabolize inositol stereoisomers, including MI and SI. Previously, we reported a B. subtilis cell factory with modified inositol metabolism that converts MI into SI in the culture medium. The strain was constructed by deleting all genes related to inositol metabolism and overexpressing key enzymes, IolG and IolW. By using this strain, 10 g/l of MI initially included in the medium was completely converted into SI within 48 h of cultivation in a rich medium containing 2% (w/v) Bacto soytone. When the initial concentration of MI was increased to 50 g/l, conversion was limited to 15.1 g/l of SI. Therefore, overexpression systems of IolT and PntAB, the main transporter of MI in B. subtilis and the membrane-integral nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase in Escherichia coli respectively, were additionally introduced into the B. subtilis cell factory, but the conversion efficiency hardly improved. We systematically determined the amount of Bacto soytone necessary for ultimate conversion, which was 4% (w/v). As a result, the conversion of SI reached to 27.6 g/l within 48 h of cultivation. The B. subtilis cell factory was improved to yield a SI production rate of 27.6 g/l/48 h by simultaneous overexpression of IolT and PntAB, and by addition of 4% (w/v) Bacto soytone in the conversion medium. The concentration of SI was increased even in the stationary phase perhaps due to nutrients in the Bacto soytone that contribute to the conversion process. Thus, MI conversion to SI may be further optimized via identification and control of these unknown nutrients.

  10. Microbial Cell Factories for the Production of Terpenoid Flavor and Fragrance Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempp, Florence M; Drummond, Laura; Buchhaupt, Markus; Schrader, Jens

    2018-03-14

    Terpenoid flavor and fragrance compounds are of high interest to the aroma industry. Microbial production offers an alternative sustainable access to the desired terpenoids independent of natural sources. Genetically engineered microorganisms can be used to synthesize terpenoids from cheap and renewable resources. Due to its modular architecture, terpenoid biosynthesis is especially well suited for the microbial cell factory concept: a platform host engineered for a high flux toward the central C 5 prenyl diphosphate precursors enables the production of a broad range of target terpenoids just by varying the pathway modules converting the C 5 intermediates to the product of interest. In this review typical terpenoid flavor and fragrance compounds marketed or under development by biotech and aroma companies are given, and the specificities of the aroma market are discussed. The main part of this work focuses on key strategies and recent advances to engineer microbes to become efficient terpenoid producers.

  11. The Role of Synthetic Biology in the Design of Microbial Cell Factories for Biofuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Verónica Leticia; Rodríguez, Analía; Cristóbal, Héctor Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Insecurity in the supply of fossil fuels, volatile fuel prices, and major concerns regarding climate change have sparked renewed interest in the production of fuels from renewable resources. Because of this, the use of biodiesel has grown dramatically during the last few years and is expected to increase even further in the future. Biodiesel production through the use of microbial systems has marked a turning point in the field of biofuels since it is emerging as an attractive alternative to conventional technology. Recent progress in synthetic biology has accelerated the ability to analyze, construct, and/or redesign microbial metabolic pathways with unprecedented precision, in order to permit biofuel production that is amenable to industrial applications. The review presented here focuses specifically on the role of synthetic biology in the design of microbial cell factories for efficient production of biodiesel. PMID:22028591

  12. The Role of Synthetic Biology in the Design of Microbial Cell Factories for Biofuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Leticia Colin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Insecurity in the supply of fossil fuels, volatile fuel prices, and major concerns regarding climate change have sparked renewed interest in the production of fuels from renewable resources. Because of this, the use of biodiesel has grown dramatically during the last few years and is expected to increase even further in the future. Biodiesel production through the use of microbial systems has marked a turning point in the field of biofuels since it is emerging as an attractive alternative to conventional technology. Recent progress in synthetic biology has accelerated the ability to analyze, construct, and/or redesign microbial metabolic pathways with unprecedented precision, in order to permit biofuel production that is amenable to industrial applications. The review presented here focuses specifically on the role of synthetic biology in the design of microbial cell factories for efficient production of biodiesel.

  13. Lactobacilli and pediococci as versatile cell factories - Evaluation of strain properties and genetic tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosma, Elleke Fenna; Förster, Jochen; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2017-01-01

    This review discusses opportunities and bottlenecks for cell factory development of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB), with an emphasis on lactobacilli and pediococci, their metabolism and genetic tools. In order to enable economically feasible bio-based production of chemicals and fuels in a biorefinery......, the choice of product, substrate and production organism is important. Currently, the most frequently used production hosts include Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but promising examples are available of alternative hosts such as LAB. Particularly lactobacilli and pediococci can offer benefits...... substantiate the review by including experimental results from screening various lactobacilli and pediococci for transformability, growth temperature range and ability to grow under biotechnologically relevant stress conditions. Since availability of efficient genetic engineering tools is a crucial...

  14. Enantioselective hydrolysis of epichlorohydrin using whole Aspergillus niger ZJB-09173 cells in organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huo-Xi; Hu, Zhong-Ce; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2012-09-01

    The enantioselective hydrolysis of racemic epichlorohydrin for the production of enantiopure (S)-epichlorohydrin using whole cells of Aspergillus niger ZJB-09173 in organic solvents was investigated. Cyclohexane was used as the reaction medium based on the excellent enantioselectivity of epoxide hydrolase from A. niger ZJB- 09173 in cyclohexane. However, cyclohexane had a negative effect on the stability of epoxide hydrolase from A. niger ZJB-09173. In the cyclohexane medium, substrate inhibition, rather than product inhibition of catalysis, was observed in the hydrolysis of racemic epichlorohydrin using A. niger ZJB-09173. The racemic epichlorohydrin concentration was markedly increased by continuous feeding of substrate without significant decline of the yield. Ultimately, 18.5% of (S)-epichlorohydrin with 98 percent enantiomeric excess from 153.6 mM of racemic epichlorohydrin was obtained by the dry cells of A. niger ZJB-09173, which was the highest substrate concentration in the production of enantiopure (S)-epichlorohydrin by epoxide hydrolases using an organic solvent medium among the known reports.

  15. Aspergillus niger whole-cell catalyzed synthesis of caffeic acid phenethyl ester in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapriya, Govindaraju; Morya, Vivek Kumar; Mai, Ngoc Lan; Koo, Yoon-Mo

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis of caffeic acid ester essentially requires an efficient esterification process to produce various kinds of medicinally important ester derivatives. In the present study, a comprehensive and comparative analysis of whole-cell catalyzed caffeic acid esters production in ionic liquids (ILs) media was performed. Olive oil induced mycelial mass of halotolerant Aspergillus niger (A.niger) EXF 4321 was freeze dried and used as a catalyst. To ensure maximum solubilization of caffeic acid for highest substrate loading several ILs were screened and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim][Tf 2 N]) was found to have the maximum solubility and favoured for enzymatic activity of freeze dried mycelia. The whole-cell catalyzed synthesis of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) conditions were optimized and bioconversion up to 84% was achieved at a substrate molar ratio of 1:20 (caffeic acid:2-phenyl ethanol), 30°C for 12h. Results obtained during this study were encouraging and helpful to design a bioreactor system to produce caffeic acid derived esters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A systems-level approach for metabolic engineering of yeast cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il-Kwon; Roldão, António; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-03-01

    The generation of novel yeast cell factories for production of high-value industrial biotechnological products relies on three metabolic engineering principles: design, construction, and analysis. In the last two decades, strong efforts have been put on developing faster and more efficient strategies and/or technologies for each one of these principles. For design and construction, three major strategies are described in this review: (1) rational metabolic engineering; (2) inverse metabolic engineering; and (3) evolutionary strategies. Independent of the selected strategy, the process of designing yeast strains involves five decision points: (1) choice of product, (2) choice of chassis, (3) identification of target genes, (4) regulating the expression level of target genes, and (5) network balancing of the target genes. At the construction level, several molecular biology tools have been developed through the concept of synthetic biology and applied for the generation of novel, engineered yeast strains. For comprehensive and quantitative analysis of constructed strains, systems biology tools are commonly used and using a multi-omics approach. Key information about the biological system can be revealed, for example, identification of genetic regulatory mechanisms and competitive pathways, thereby assisting the in silico design of metabolic engineering strategies for improving strain performance. Examples on how systems and synthetic biology brought yeast metabolic engineering closer to industrial biotechnology are described in this review, and these examples should demonstrate the potential of a systems-level approach for fast and efficient generation of yeast cell factories. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Surfactant Protein-A inhibits Aspergillus fumigatus-induced allergic T-cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo Scott J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pulmonary surfactant protein (SP-A has potent immunomodulatory activities but its role and regulation during allergic airway inflammation is unknown. Methods We studied changes in SP-A expression in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL using a murine model of single Aspergillus fumigatus (Af challenge of sensitized animals. Results SP-A protein levels in the BAL fluid showed a rapid, transient decline that reached the lowest values (25% of controls 12 h after intranasal Af provocation of sensitized mice. Decrease of SP-A was associated with influx of inflammatory cells and increase of IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA and protein levels. Since levels of SP-A showed a significant negative correlation with these BAL cytokines (but not with IFN-γ, we hypothesized that SP-A exerts an inhibitory effect on Th2-type immune responses. To study this hypothesis, we used an in vitro Af-rechallenge model. Af-induced lymphocyte proliferation of cells isolated from sensitized mice was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by addition of purified human SP-A (0.1–10 μg/ml. Flow cytometric studies on Af-stimulated lymphocytes indicated that the numbers of CD4+ (but not CD8+ T cells were significantly increased in the parental population and decreased in the third and fourth generation in the presence of SP-A. Further, addition of SP-A to the tissue culture inhibited Af-induced IL-4 and IL-5 production suggesting that SP-A directly suppressed allergen-stimulated CD4+ T cell function. Conclusion We speculate that a transient lack of this lung collectin following allergen exposure of the airways may significantly contribute to the development of a T-cell dependent allergic immune response.

  18. Particle factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, Rafe

    1989-01-01

    Physicists' attention is increasingly turning to the high luminosity frontier - providing enough collisions to amass sizable numbers of rare events - to complement the traditional quest for higher energies. This month we cover three areas where projects are now being considered: Phi-factory workshop, PSI Planning for B meson factory, Tau-charm factory

  19. Design, Engineering, and Construction of Photosynthetic Microbial Cell Factories for Renewable Solar Fuel Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindblad, Peter; Lindberg, Pia; Stensjoe, Karin (Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Dept. of Chemistry-Aangstroem Laboratory, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)), E-mail: Peter.Lindblad@kemi.uu.se; Oliveira, Paulo (Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Porto (Portugal)); Heidorn, Thorsten (Bioforsk-Norwegian Inst. for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Aas Oslo, (Norway))

    2012-03-15

    There is an urgent need to develop sustainable solutions to convert solar energy into energy carriers used in the society. In addition to solar cells generating electricity, there are several options to generate solar fuels. This paper outlines and discusses the design and engineering of photosynthetic microbial systems for the generation of renewable solar fuels, with a focus on cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are prokaryotic microorganisms with the same type of photosynthesis as higher plants. Native and engineered cyanobacteria have been used by us and others as model systems to examine, demonstrate, and develop photobiological H{sub 2} production. More recently, the production of carbon-containing solar fuels like ethanol, butanol, and isoprene have been demonstrated. We are using a synthetic biology approach to develop efficient photosynthetic microbial cell factories for direct generation of biofuels from solar energy. Present progress and advances in the design, engineering, and construction of such cyanobacterial cells for the generation of a portfolio of solar fuels, e.g., hydrogen, alcohols, and isoprene, are presented and discussed. Possibilities and challenges when introducing and using synthetic biology are highlighted

  20. Ground-up circular Higgs Factory ring design and cell length optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Richard

    2017-02-01

    A “ground-up” Higgs Factory design methodology is described. For concreteness, numerical parameter choices are drawn primarily from CEPC, the Circular Electron Positron Collider. The goals are to find: (i) optimal parameters, (ii) improved understanding , (iii) a tentative lattice design. As illustration of the method, six chromaticity-corrected lattices, with cell lengths ranging from 45 m to 280 m, all with identical βy = 2 mm or βy = 10 mm intersection region optics, are designed and their properties compared. For simplicity only a single “toy ring,” circumference (76 km), with one interaction point, and a single beam energy (120 GeV) is considered. For the cell-length optimization a figure of merit FOM (essentially integrated luminosity) is maximized consistent with a dimensionless “fine tuning penalty function” or figure of demerit FOD not being allowed to exceed a conservatively chosen upper limit. The tentative recommendation from this investigation is that the optimal CEPC route is (except for obvious changes) to simply copy LEP: 80 m cell length and two-in-one single-ring operation. The main luminosity-increasing improvements are increased radius and power, top-off-full-energy-injection, noninterleaved sextupoles, more than 100 beam bunch operation, and improved intersection region design. Local chromaticity compensation (with its inevitable intense hard X-rays incident on the detectors) is found to be unnecessary. With these changes luminosity in excess of 1034cm-2s-1 is projected to be achievable.

  1. Metabolic engineering of ammonium release for nitrogen-fixing multispecies microbial cell-factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Marquez, Juan Cesar Federico; Do Nascimento, Mauro; Curatti, Leonardo

    2014-05-01

    The biological nitrogen fixation carried out by some Bacteria and Archaea is one of the most attractive alternatives to synthetic nitrogen fertilizers. In this study we compared the effect of controlling the maximum activation state of the Azotobacter vinelandii glutamine synthase by a point mutation at the active site (D49S mutation) and impairing the ammonium-dependent homeostatic control of nitrogen-fixation genes expression by the ΔnifL mutation on ammonium release by the cells. Strains bearing the single D49S mutation were more efficient ammonium producers under carbon/energy limiting conditions and sustained microalgae growth at the expense of atmospheric N2 in synthetic microalgae-bacteria consortia. Ammonium delivery by the different strains had implications for the microalga׳s cell-size distribution. It was uncovered an extensive cross regulation between nitrogen fixation and assimilation that extends current knowledge on this key metabolic pathway and might represent valuable hints for further improvements of versatile N2-fixing microbial-cell factories. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as a Phototrophic Cell Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuzhong Zhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae play profound roles in ecology and biogeochemistry. One model cyanobacterial species is the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. This species is highly amenable to genetic modification. Its genome has been sequenced and many systems biology and molecular biology tools are available to study this bacterium. Recently, researchers have put significant efforts into understanding and engineering this bacterium to produce chemicals and biofuels from sunlight and CO2. To demonstrate our perspective on the application of this cyanobacterium as a photosynthesis-based chassis, we summarize the recent research on Synechocystis 6803 by focusing on five topics: rate-limiting factors for cell cultivation; molecular tools for genetic modifications; high-throughput system biology for genome wide analysis; metabolic modeling for physiological prediction and rational metabolic engineering; and applications in producing diverse chemicals. We also discuss the particular challenges for systems analysis and engineering applications of this microorganism, including precise characterization of versatile cell metabolism, improvement of product rates and titers, bioprocess scale-up, and product recovery. Although much progress has been achieved in the development of Synechocystis 6803 as a phototrophic cell factory, the biotechnology for “Compounds from Synechocystis” is still significantly lagging behind those for heterotrophic microbes (e.g., Escherichia coli.

  3. Engineering microbial cell factories for the production of plant natural products: from design principles to industrial-scale production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaonan; Ding, Wentao; Jiang, Huifeng

    2017-07-19

    Plant natural products (PNPs) are widely used as pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, seasonings, pigments, etc., with a huge commercial value on the global market. However, most of these PNPs are still being extracted from plants. A resource-conserving and environment-friendly synthesis route for PNPs that utilizes microbial cell factories has attracted increasing attention since the 1940s. However, at the present only a handful of PNPs are being produced by microbial cell factories at an industrial scale, and there are still many challenges in their large-scale application. One of the challenges is that most biosynthetic pathways of PNPs are still unknown, which largely limits the number of candidate PNPs for heterologous microbial production. Another challenge is that the metabolic fluxes toward the target products in microbial hosts are often hindered by poor precursor supply, low catalytic activity of enzymes and obstructed product transport. Consequently, despite intensive studies on the metabolic engineering of microbial hosts, the fermentation costs of most heterologously produced PNPs are still too high for industrial-scale production. In this paper, we review several aspects of PNP production in microbial cell factories, including important design principles and recent progress in pathway mining and metabolic engineering. In addition, implemented cases of industrial-scale production of PNPs in microbial cell factories are also highlighted.

  4. Recent Progress on Systems and Synthetic Biology Approaches to Engineer Fungi As Microbial Cell Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores, Gerardo Ruiz; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Arruda, Letícia Magalhães; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Filamentous fungi are remarkable organisms naturally specialized in deconstructing plant biomass and this feature has a tremendous potential for biofuel production from renewable sources. The past decades have been marked by a remarkable progress in the genetic engineering of fungi to generate industry-compatible strains needed for some biotech applications. In this sense, progress in this field has been marked by the utilization of high-throughput techniques to gain deep understanding of the molecular machinery controlling the physiology of these organisms, starting thus the Systems Biology era of fungi. Additionally, genetic engineering has been extensively applied to modify wellcharacterized promoters in order to construct new expression systems with enhanced performance under the conditions of interest. In this review, we discuss some aspects related to significant progress in the understating and engineering of fungi for biotechnological applications, with special focus on the construction of synthetic promoters and circuits in organisms relevant for industry. Different engineering approaches are shown, and their potential and limitations for the construction of complex synthetic circuits in these organisms are examined. Finally, we discuss the impact of engineered promoter architecture in the single-cell behavior of the system, an often-neglected relationship with a tremendous impact in the final performance of the process of interest. We expect to provide here some new directions to drive future research directed to the construction of high-performance, engineered fungal strains working as microbial cell factories.

  5. MMS-induced primary aneuploidy and other genotoxic effects in mitotic cells of Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käfer, E

    1988-10-01

    The possibility of more than 1 target for genotoxic effects of methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) was investigated, using mitotic test systems of the fungus Aspergillus. Haploid and diploid strains were exposed, either as dormant conidia or during mitosis, and analysed for induced aneuploidy and effects on genetic segregation. MMS treatment of haploid strains resulted in dose-dependent increases of stable mutants with altered phenotypes and semi-stable unbalanced aberrations (presumably duplications). In addition, but only in dividing cells, MMS induced unstable aneuploids. These mostly were hyperhaploid with few extra chromosomes and could be identified by comparison with standard disomic phenotypes. When well-marked diploids were treated 3 types of effect could be distinguished, using genetic and phenotypic criteria: (1) Clastogenic and mutagenic effects which caused dose-dependent increases of partial aneuploids with various abnormal phenotypes. These showed secondary genetic segregation of all types and produced euploid normal sectors by eliminating damaged chromosome segments. In addition, but only in dividing nuclei, MMS induced 2 types of segregation: (2) Reciprocal crossing-over at high frequency, recognisable as half or quarter colonies of mutant colour and in some cases as 'twin spots' (i.e., complementary pairs); (3) Trisomics and other aneuploids which showed characteristic phenotypes and expected segregation of markers: the types recovered indicate random malsegregation of chromosomes (occasional deviations resulted from coincidence with induced crossing-over). These results suggest that MMS may have 2 (or more) targets for genotoxic effects: DNA, as evident from induced mutations and aberrations, and from induced recombination in dividing cells; some non-DNA target (nucleotide or protein) essential for nuclear division and susceptible to alkylation, resulting in malsegregation and primary aneuploidy.

  6. Melanin is an essential component for the integrity of the cell wall of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeault Sonia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common agent of invasive aspergillosis, a feared complication in severely immunocompromised patients. Despite the recent commercialisation of new antifungal drugs, the prognosis for this infection remains uncertain. Thus, there is a real need to discover new targets for therapy. Particular attention has been paid to the biochemical composition and organisation of the fungal cell wall, because it mediates the host-fungus interplay. Conidia, which are responsible for infections, have melanin as one of the cell wall components. Melanin has been established as an important virulence factor, protecting the fungus against the host's immune defences. We suggested that it might also have an indirect role in virulence, because it is required for correct assembly of the cell wall layers of the conidia. Results We used three A. fumigatus isolates which grew as white or brown powdery colonies, to demonstrate the role of melanin. Firstly, sequencing the genes responsible for biosynthesis of melanin (ALB1, AYG1, ARP1, ARP2, ABR1 and ABR2 showed point mutations (missense mutation, deletion or insertion in the ALB1 gene for pigmentless isolates or in ARP2 for the brownish isolate. The isolates were then shown by scanning electron microscopy to produce numerous, typical conidial heads, except that the conidia were smooth-walled, as previously observed for laboratory mutants with mutations in the PKSP/ALB1 gene. Flow cytometry showed an increase in the fibronectin binding capacity of conidia from mutant isolates, together with a marked decrease in the binding of laminin to the conidial surface. A marked decrease in the electronegative charge of the conidia and cell surface hydrophobicity was also seen by microelectrophoresis and two-phase partitioning, respectively. Ultrastructural studies of mutant isolates detected considerable changes in the organisation of the conidial wall, with the loss of the outermost

  7. Manipulating DNA repair for improved genetic engineering in Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nødvig, Christina Spuur

    Aspergillus is a genus of filamentous fungi, which members includes industrial producers of enzymes, organic acids and secondary metabolites, important pathogens and a model organism. As such no matter the specific area of interest there are many reasons to perform genetic engineering, whether...... it is metabolic engineering to create better performing cell factory, elucidating pathways to study secondary metabolism etc. In this thesis, the main focus is on different ways to manipulate DNA repair for optimizing gene targeting, ultimately improving the methods available for faster and better genetic...... engineering strategies. Chapter 1 gives an introduction to the genus Aspergillus and some of the tools relevant to fungal genetic engineering. It also contains a short introduction to DNA repair and its interplay with gene targeting and finally an overview over the different genome editing technologies...

  8. Characterization of the T-cell-mediated immune response against the Aspergillus fumigatus proteins Crf1 and catalase 1 in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolink, Hetty; Meijssen, Isabelle C; Hagedoorn, Renate S; Arentshorst, Mark; Drijfhout, Jan W; Mulder, Arend; Claas, Frans H J; van Dissel, Jaap T; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M

    2013-09-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is a serious infectious complication after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. One of the strategies to improve the management of aspergillosis is the adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells, the success of which depends on the development of a broad repertoire of antigen-specific T cells. In this study, we identified CD4+ T cells specific for the Aspergillus proteins Crf1 and catalase 1 in 18 of 24 healthy donors by intracellular staining for interferon γ and CD154. Crf1- and catalase 1-specific T cells were selected on the basis of CD137 expression and underwent single-cell expansion. Aspergillus-specific T-cell clones mainly exhibited a T-helper cell 1 phenotype and recognized a broad variety of T-cell epitopes. Five novel Crf1 epitopes, 2 previously described Crf1 epitopes, and 30 novel catalase 1 epitopes were identified. Ultimately, by using overlapping peptides of Aspergillus fumigatus proteins, Aspergillus-specific T-cell lines that have a broad specificity and favorable cytokine profile and are suitable for adoptive T-cell therapy can be generated in vitro.

  9. Complete factorial design experiment for 3D load cell instrumented crank validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Valle-Casas; Rafael, Dalazen; Vinicius, Cene; Alexandre, Balbinot

    2015-08-01

    Developing of instrumentation systems for sport medicine is a promising area, that's why this research evaluates the design of a new instrumented crank arm prototype for a race bicycle projecting an experiment for indoor - outdoor comparison. This study investigated the viability of an instrumentation 3D load cell for force measurement crank, implementing a design of experiment. A Complete factorial design experiment was developed for data validation, with an Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) throwing significant results for controlled factors with response variables rms, mean and variance. A software routine allowed to obtained system variables metrics for Symmetry and Cadence analysis, which came out from Effective force bilateral comparing and speed computation. Characterization allowed achieving calibration curves that were used for data conversion in force projection channels with a linearity error of 0.29% (perpendicular), 0.55% (parallel) and 0.10% (lateral). Interactions of factors resulted significant mainly for indoor tests in symmetry and cadence was significant in interactions generally for outdoor tests. Implemented system was able to generate Effective Force graph for 3D plot symmetry analysis, torque and power symmetry for specialist's analysis.

  10. Model-based design of bistable cell factories for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Shyam; Cluett, William R; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2018-04-15

    Metabolism can exhibit dynamic phenomena like bistability due to the presence of regulatory motifs like the positive feedback loop. As cell factories, microorganisms with bistable metabolism can have a high and a low product flux at the two stable steady states, respectively. The exclusion of metabolic regulation and network dynamics limits the ability of pseudo-steady state stoichiometric models to detect the presence of bistability, and reliably assess the outcomes of design perturbations to metabolic networks. Using kinetic models of metabolism, we assess the change in the bistable characteristics of the network, and suggest designs based on perturbations to the positive feedback loop to enable the network to produce at its theoretical maximum rate. We show that the most optimal production design in parameter space, for a small bistable metabolic network, may exist at the boundary of the bistable region separating it from the monostable region of low product fluxes. The results of our analysis can be broadly applied to other bistable metabolic networks with similar positive feedback network topologies. This can complement existing model-based design strategies by providing a smaller number of feasible designs that need to be tested in vivo. http://lmse.biozone.utoronto.ca/downloads/. krishna.mahadevan@utoronto.ca. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. Prognostic value of insulin- like growth factor-I receptor expression in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sichani Mehrdad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Insulin-Like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR, a tyrosine-kinas receptor over expressed in many tumor cell lines and in some human tumors, plays a critical role in trans-formation, tumorigenicity and metastasis. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of IGF-IR expression as a prognostic factor in RCC. This study was conducted in a historical cohort of 82 patients who had RCC treated with radical nephrectomy from 1994 to 2005. Specimens were reevaluated with regard to histological subtype, nuclear grade, stage and IGF-IR expression. The IGF-IR stain was semi- quantitatively evaluated using the Allred score system. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated a significant positive correlation between Fuhrman nuclear grade and IGF-IR Allred score (P< 0.0001. Survival in patients with score IGF-I ≤ 4 was 90.21 month and in patients with score IGF-1R> 4 was 33.39 month (P Value < 0.0001. Cox regression analysis in-dicated that expression of IGF-IR is a prognostic factor in patients with RCC (P Value < 0.0001, odds Ratio = 2.38. In conclusion, a statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between IGF-IR expression and Fuhrman nuclear grading and survival in patients with RCC. In stage-by-stage and grade-by-grade analysis; however, it seems that we cannot consider IGF-IR as an inde-pendent prognostic factor.

  12. Prognostic value of insulin- like growth factor-I receptor expression in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichani, Mehrdad Mohammadi; Yazdi, Fateme Sarreshtedar; Moghaddam, Noushin Afshar; Chehrei, Ali; Kabiri, Mahmud; Naeimi, Amin; Taheri, Diana

    2010-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR), a tyrosine kinase receptor over expressed in many tumor cell lines and in some human tumors, plays a critical role in transformation, tumorigenicity and metastasis. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of IGF-IR expression as a prognostic factor in RCC. This study was conducted in a historical cohort of 82 patients who had RCC treated with radical nephrectomy from 1994 to 2005. Specimens were reevaluated with regard to histological subtype, nuclear grade, stage and IGF-IR expression. The IGF-IR stain was semi-quantitatively evaluated using the Allred score system. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated a significant positive correlation between Fuhrman nuclear grade and IGF-IR Allred score (P 4 was 33.39 month (P Value < 0.0001). Cox regression analysis indicated that expression of IGF-IR is a prognostic factor in patients with RCC (P Value < 0.0001, odds Ratio = 2.38). In conclusion, a statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between IGF-IR expression and Fuhrman nuclear grading and survival in patients with RCC. In stage-by-stage and grade-by-grade analysis; however, it seems that we cannot consider IGF-IR as an independent prognostic factor.

  13. [Optimization of synthetic pathway and fermentation process of yeast cell factories for production of oleanoic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Wang, Bei-Bei; Liu, Yi; Shi, Ming-Yu; Xiao, Dong-Guang; Huang, Lu-Qi; Dai, Zhu-Bo; Zhang, Xue-Li

    2014-07-01

    To optimize the synthetic pathway and fermentation process of yeast cell factories for production of oleanoic acid. Using the DNA assembler method, one copy of Glycyrrhiza glabra beta-amyrin synthase (GgbAS), Medicago truncatula oleanolic acid synthase (MtOAS) and Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome P450 reductase 1 (AtCPR1) genes were introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY-OA, resulting in strain BY-20A. YPD medium with different glucose concentration were then used to cultivate strain BY-2OA. Increasing gene copies of GgbAS, MtOAS and AtCPR1 resulted in increased beta-amyrin and oleanolic acid production. The strain BY-2OA produced 136.5 mg x L(-1) beta-amyrin and 92.5 mg x L(-1) oleanolic acid, which were 54% and 30% higher than the parent strain BY-OA. Finally, the titer of oleanolic acid increased to 165.7 mg x L(-1) when cultivated in YPD medium with 40 mg x L(-1) glucose. Production of oleanoic acid increased significantly in the yeast strain BY-2OA, which can provide the basis for creating an alternative way for production of oleanoic acid in place of extraction from plant sources.

  14. Dectin-1 agonist curdlan modulates innate immunity to Aspergillus fumigatus in human corneal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Cheng Zhu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the immunomodulatory effects of curdlan on innate immune responses against Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus in cultured human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs, and whether C-type lectin receptor Dectin-1 mediates the immunomodulatory effects of curdlan.METHODS:The HCECs were stimulated by curdlan in different concentrations (50, 100, 200, 400 μg/mL for various time. Then HCECs pretreated with or without laminarin (Dectin-1 blocker, 0.3 mg/mL and curdlan were stimulated by A. fumigatus hyphae. The mRNA and protein production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6 were determined by real-timequantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The protein level of Dectin-1 was measured by Western blot.RESULTS: Curdlan stimulated mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-6 in a dose and time dependent manner in HCECs. Curdlan pretreatment before A. fumigatus hyphae stimulation significantly enhanced the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 at mRNA and protein levels compared with A. fumigatus hyphae stimulation group (P<0.05. Both curdlan and A. fumigatus hyphae up-regulated Dectin-1 protein expression in HCECs, and Dectin-1 expression was elevated to 1.5- to 2-fold by curdlan pretreatment followed hyphaestimulation. The Dectin-1 blocker laminarin suppressed the mRNA expression and protein production of TNF-α and IL-6 induced by curdlan and hyphae (P<0.05.CONCLUSION:These findings demonstrated that curdlan pretreatment enhanced the inflammatory response induced by A. fumigatus hyphae in HCECs. Dectin-1 is essential for the immunomodulatory effects of curdlan. Curdlan may have high clinical application values in fungal keratitis treatment.

  15. Aspergillus Cell Wall Melanin Blocks LC3-Associated Phagocytosis to Promote Pathogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoumianaki, T.; Kyrmizi, I.; Valsecchi, I.; Gresnigt, M.S.; Samonis, G.; Drakos, E.; Boumpas, D.; Muszkieta, L.; Prevost, M.C.; Kontoyiannis, D.P.; Chavakis, T.; Netea, M.G.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Brakhage, A.A.; El-Benna, J.; Beauvais, A.; Latge, J.P.; Chamilos, G.

    2016-01-01

    Concealing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) is a principal strategy used by fungi to avoid immune recognition. Surface exposure of PAMPs during germination can leave the pathogen vulnerable. Accordingly, beta-glucan surface exposure during Aspergillus fumigatus germination activates an

  16. NIGERLYSINTM, HEMOLYSIN PRODUCED BY ASPERGILLUS NIGER, CAUSES LETHALITY OF PRIMARY RAT CORTICAL NEURONAL CELLS IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus niger produced a proteinaceous hemolysin, nigerlysinTM when incubated on sheep's blood agar at both 23° C and 37°C. Nigerlysin was purified from tryptic soy broth culture filtrate. Purified nigerlysin has a molecular weight of approximately 72 kDa, with an...

  17. Baby Factory

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... severe exploitation, such as forced labour, slavery, debt bondage, prostitution, pornography or the unlawful removal of organs”. Kalu (2011) in his report on the issue of 'baby factory' in the South East of Nigeria, described 'baby factory' as a form of child trafficking since the girls are harboured against their ...

  18. beta-1,3-Glucan-Induced Host Phospholipase D Activation Is Involved in Aspergillus fumigatus Internalization into Type II Human Pneumocyte A549 Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Xuelin; Yu, Rentao; Zhen, Dongyu; Tao, Sha; Schmidt, Martina; Han, Li

    2011-01-01

    The internalization of Aspergillus fumigatus into lung epithelial cells is a process that depends on host cell actin dynamics. The host membrane phosphatidylcholine cleavage driven by phospholipase D (PLD) is closely related to cellular actin dynamics. However, little is known about the impact of

  19. New transposon tools tailored for metabolic engineering of Gram-negative microbial cell factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban eMartínez-García

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Re-programming microorganisms to modify their existing functions and/or to bestow bacteria with entirely new-to-Nature tasks have largely relied so far on specialized molecular biology tools. Such endeavors are not only relevant in the burgeoning metabolic engineering arena, but also instrumental to explore the functioning of complex regulatory networks from a fundamental point of view. À la carte modification of bacterial genomes thus calls for novel tools to make genetic manipulations easier. We propose the use of a series of new broad-host-range mini-Tn5 vectors, termed pBAMDs, for the delivery of gene(s into the chromosome of Gram-negative bacteria and for generating saturated mutagenesis libraries in gene function studies. These delivery vectors endow the user with the possibility of easy cloning and subsequent insertion of functional cargoes with three different antibiotic resistance markers (kanamycin, streptomycin, and gentamicin. After validating the pBAMD vectors in the environmental bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440, their use was also illustrated by inserting the entire poly(3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB synthesis pathway from Cupriavidus necator in the chromosome of a phosphotransacetylase mutant of Escherichia coli. PHB is a completely biodegradable polyester with a number of industrial applications that make it attractive as a potential replacement of oil-based plastics. The non-selective nature of chromosomal insertions of the biosynthetic genes was evidenced by a large landscape of PHB synthesis levels in independent clones. One clone was selected and further characterized as a microbial cell factory for PHB accumulation, and it achieved polymer accumulation levels comparable to those of a plasmid-bearing recombinant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the new mini-Tn5 vectors can be used to confer interesting phenotypes in Gram-negative bacteria that would be very difficult to engineer through direct manipulation of the

  20. New Transposon Tools Tailored for Metabolic Engineering of Gram-Negative Microbial Cell Factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-García, Esteban; Aparicio, Tomás; Lorenzo, Víctor de; Nikel, Pablo I.

    2014-01-01

    Re-programming microorganisms to modify their existing functions and/or to bestow bacteria with entirely new-to-Nature tasks have largely relied so far on specialized molecular biology tools. Such endeavors are not only relevant in the burgeoning metabolic engineering arena but also instrumental to explore the functioning of complex regulatory networks from a fundamental point of view. À la carte modification of bacterial genomes thus calls for novel tools to make genetic manipulations easier. We propose the use of a series of new broad-host-range mini-Tn5-vectors, termed pBAMDs, for the delivery of gene(s) into the chromosome of Gram-negative bacteria and for generating saturated mutagenesis libraries in gene function studies. These delivery vectors endow the user with the possibility of easy cloning and subsequent insertion of functional cargoes with three different antibiotic-resistance markers (kanamycin, streptomycin, and gentamicin). After validating the pBAMD vectors in the environmental bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440, their use was also illustrated by inserting the entire poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) synthesis pathway from Cupriavidus necator in the chromosome of a phosphotransacetylase mutant of Escherichia coli. PHB is a completely biodegradable polyester with a number of industrial applications that make it attractive as a potential replacement of oil-based plastics. The non-selective nature of chromosomal insertions of the biosynthetic genes was evidenced by a large landscape of PHB synthesis levels in independent clones. One clone was selected and further characterized as a microbial cell factory for PHB accumulation, and it achieved polymer accumulation levels comparable to those of a plasmid-bearing recombinant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the new mini-Tn5-vectors can be used to confer interesting phenotypes in Gram-negative bacteria that would be very difficult to engineer through direct manipulation of the structural genes.

  1. Superoxide dismutase reduces the inflammatory response to Aspergillus and Alternaria in human sinonasal epithelial cells derived from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Lauren A; Mulligan, Jennifer K; Roach, Catherine; Pasquini, Whitney N; Soler, Zachary M; Banglawala, Sarfaraz M; Karnezis, Tom T; Gudis, David A; Schlosser, Rodney J

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus and Alternaria alternata are ubiquitous environmental fungal allergens that can exacerbate airway inflammation and contribute to the disease process in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). These antigens have been shown to induce human sinonasal epithelial cells (HSNECs) to promote a proinflammatory response, but what is unclear is a means by which to reduce these effects. Inhaled pathogens can induce HSNECs to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that trigger cytokine production. This study aimed to determine whether the free radical scavenger superoxide dismutase (SOD) could reduce HSNEC-derived inflammation, as measured by interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 production, in response to Aspergillus or Alternaria exposure. Sinus tissue explants were collected at the time of surgery from control patients (n = 7) and patients with CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) (n = 9). HSNECs were cultured from the explants and treated with Aspergillus, Alternaria, and SOD for 24 hours. Cell supernatants and lysates were collected, and IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In control and CRSwNP HSNECs, Aspergillus and Alternaria both increased cytokine production (p Alternaria exposure and IL-8 after Aspergillus exposure (p Alternaria, SOD treatment decreases the fungal antigen-induced inflammatory response. The ability to attenuate inflammation induced by common fungal allergens with SOD treatment could provide a novel therapeutic or preventative approach for patients with CRS or other allergic inflammatory airway diseases.

  2. Inhibition of Aspergillus parasiticus and cancer cells by marine actinomycete strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Yan, Peisheng

    2014-12-01

    Ten actinomycete strains isolated from the Yellow Sea off China's coasts were identified as belonging to two genera by 16S rDNA phylogenetic analysis: Streptomyces and Nocardiopsis. Six Streptomyces strains (MA10, 2SHXF01-3, MA35, MA05-2, MA05-2-1 and MA08-1) and one Nocardiopsis strain (MA03) were predicted to have the potential to produce aromatic polyketides based on the analysis of the KSα (ketoacyl-synthase) gene in the type II PKS (polyketides synthase) gene cluster. Four strains (MA03, MA01, MA10 and MA05-2) exhibited significant inhibitory effects on mycelia growth (inhibition rate >50%) and subsequent aflatoxin production (inhibition rate >75%) of the mutant aflatoxigenic Aspergillus parasiticus NFRI-95. The ethyl acetate extracts of the broth of these four strains displayed significant inhibitory effects on mycelia growth, and the IC50 values were calculated (MA03: 0.275 mg mL-1, MA01: 0.106 mg mL-1, MA10: 1.345 mg mL-1 and MA05-2: 1.362 mg mL-1). Five strains (2SHXF01-3, MA03, MA05-2, MA01 and MA08-1) were selected based on their high cytotoxic activities. The ethyl acetate extract of the Nocardiopsis strain MA03 was particularly noted for its high antitumor activity against human carcinomas of the cervix (HeLa), lung (A549), kidney (Caki-1) and liver (HepG2) (IC50: 2.890, 1.981, 3.032 and 2.603 μg mL-1, respectively). The extract also remarkably inhibited colony formation of HeLa cells at an extremely low concentration (0.5 μg mL-1). This study highlights that marine-derived actinomycetes are a huge resource of compounds for the biological control of aflatoxin contamination and the development of novel drugs for human carcinomas.

  3. Comparative analysis of different whole cell immobilized Aspergillus niger catalysts for gluconic acid fermentation using pretreated cane molasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subba Rao, D. (Div. of Biochemical Engineering, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India)); Panda, T. (Div. of Biochemical Engineering, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India))

    1994-10-01

    To compare the efficiency of various whole cell immobilization techniques for the production of gluconic acid by Aspergillus niger were investigated using potassium ferrocyanide-treated cane molasses as the substrate. The techniques followed were: (1) Calcium alginate entrapment, (2) cross-linking with glutaraldehyde after cell permeabilization with (a) acetone, (b) toluene and (c) isopropanol and (3) development of granular catalyst. A comparative analysis of yield has revealed that calcium alginate entrapment was the most suitable technique as it had given the maximum product yield (0.40 g gluconic acid/g total reducing sugar supplied). The properties of immobilized A. niger in sodium alginate gel have been thoroughly investigated and compared with those of free cells under most suitable conditions of fermentation. (orig.)

  4. Voriconazole Exposure and Risk of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Aspergillus Colonization, Invasive Aspergillosis and Death in Lung Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansh, M; Binstock, M; Williams, K; Hafeez, F; Kim, J; Glidden, D; Boettger, R; Hays, S; Kukreja, J; Golden, J; Asgari, M M; Chin-Hong, P; Singer, J P; Arron, S T

    2016-01-01

    Voriconazole is a triazole antifungal used to prevent and treat invasive fungal infections after lung transplantation, but it has been associated with an increased risk of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Despite widespread use, there are no clear guidelines for optimal prophylactic regimens that balance the competing risks and benefits. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all lung transplant recipients at the University of California, San Francisco, who were transplanted between October 1991 and December 2012 (n = 455) to investigate whether voriconazole exposure affected development of SCC, Aspergillus colonization, invasive aspergillosis and all-cause mortality. Voriconazole exposure was associated with a 73% increased risk of developing SCC (hazard ratio [HR] 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-2.88; p = 0.03), with each additional 30-day exposure at the standard dose increasing the risk by 3.0% (HR 1.03; 95% CI: 1.02-1.04; p Voriconazole exposure reduced risk of Aspergillus colonization by 50% (HR 0.50; 95% CI: 0.34-0.72; p Voriconazole exposure significantly reduced all-cause mortality among subjects who developed Aspergillus colonization (HR 0.34; 95% CI: 0.13-0.91; p = 0.03) but had no significant impact on those without colonization. Physicians should consider patient-specific factors that modify the potential risks and benefits of voriconazole for the care of lung transplant recipients. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  5. Internet factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis contributes a novel concept for introducing new network technologies in network infrastructures. The concept, called Internet factories, describes the methodical process to create and manage application-specific networks from application programs, referred to as Netapps. An Internet

  6. Internet Factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis contributes a novel concept for introducing new network technologies in network infrastructures. The concept, called Internet factories, describes the methodical process to create and manage application-specific networks from application programs, referred to as Netapps. An Internet

  7. Factory physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hopp, Wallace J.

    2011-01-01

    After a brief introductory chapter, "Factory Physics 3/e" is divided into three parts: I - The Lessons of History; II - Factory Physics; and III - Principles in Practice. The scientific approach to manufacturing and supply chain management, developed in Part II, is unique to this text. No other text or professional book provides a rigorous, principles-based foundation for manufacturing management. The Third Edition offers tighter connections between Lean Manufacturing, MRP/ERP, Six Sigma, Supply Chain Management, and Factory Physics. In addition to enhancing the historical overview of how these systems evolved, the authors show explicitly how users can achieve Lean Manufacturing objectives (faster response, less inventory) using the integration aspects of MRP/ERP/SCM systems along with the variance analysis methods of Six Sigma. Factory Physics provides the overarching framework that coordinates all of these initiatives into a single-focused strategy.

  8. Stimulation with lysates of Aspergillus terreus, Candida krusei and Rhizopus oryzae maximizes cross-reactivity of anti-fungal T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Shivashni S; Virassamy, Balaji; Halliday, Catriona; Clancy, Leighton; Chen, Sharon; Meyer, Wieland; Sorrell, Tania C; Gottlieb, David J

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases caused by filamentous fungi and yeasts are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in immunosuppressed hematology patients. We previously published a method to expand Aspergillus fumigatus-specific T cells for clinical cell therapy. In the present study, we investigated expansion of T cells specific for other fungal pathogens and creation of a broadly reactive panfungal T-cell product. Fungal strains selected were those frequently observed in the clinical hematology setting and included Aspergillus, Candida, Fusarium, Rhizopus and Lomentospora/Scedosporium. Four T-cell cultures specific to each fungus were established. We selected lysates of Aspergillus terreus, Candida krusei and Rhizopus oryzae to expand panfungal T cells. Allelic restriction of anti-fungal activity was determined through the use of specific major histocompatibility complex class II-blocking antibodies. Individual T-cell cultures specific to each fungus could be expanded in vitro, generating predominantly CD4(+) T cells of which 8% to 20% were fungus-specific. We successfully expanded panfungal T cells from the peripheral blood (n = 8) and granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-primed stem cell products (n = 3) of normal donors by using a combination of lysates from Aspergillus terreus, Candida krusei and Rhizopus oryzae. Anti-fungal activity was mediated through human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR alleles and was maintained when antigen-presenting cells from partially HLA-DRB1-matched donors were used to stimulate T cells. We demonstrate a method to manufacture panfungal T-cell products with specificity against a range of clinical fungal pathogens by use of the blood and stem cells of healthy donors as the starting material. The safety and efficacy of these products will need to be tested clinically. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In vitro assessment of bio-augmented minerals from peanut oil cakes fermented by Aspergillus oryzae through Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadh, Pardeep Kumar; Chawla, Prince; Bhandari, Latika; Kaushik, Ravinder; Duhan, Joginder Singh

    2017-10-01

    Present study was carried out to assess the significances of solid state fermentation of peanut oil cakes (POC) by Aspergillus oryzae on in vitro bioavailability of minerals (iron, zinc and calcium) and cellular transport, retention and uptake from POC through Caco-2 cells. Bioavailability of iron, zinc and calcium of POC was examined by means of a combined simulated gastrointestinal digestion/Caco-2 cell system. Bio-augmentation of minerals of fermented POC attributed a positive, statistically significant increased influence on minerals retention, transport and uptake values when compared with that of respective inorganic salts as reference. Results revealed increased cellular ferritin content from fermented POC digests than the digests of free form of respective inorganic salt. In prospect of the present investigation the fermented POC samples showed significantly higher iron, zinc and calcium bioavailability and enormous possible health benefits.

  10. Aspergillus Cell Wall Chitin Induces Anti- and Proinflammatory Cytokines in Human PBMCs via the Fc-γ Receptor/Syk/PI3K Pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, K. L.; Aimanianda, V.; Wang, X.; Gresnigt, M. S.; Ammerdorffer, A.; Jacobs, C. W.; Gazendam, R. P.; Joosten, L. A. B.; Netea, M. G.; Latgé, J. P.; van de Veerdonk, F. L.

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is an important cell wall component of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia, of which hundreds are inhaled on a daily basis. Previous studies have shown that chitin has both anti- and proinflammatory properties; however the exact mechanisms determining the inflammatory signature of chitin are poorly

  11. Activation of Vitamin D Regulates Response of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells to Aspergillus fumigatus in an Autocrine Fashion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus is one of the most common fungi to cause diseases in humans. Recent evidence has demonstrated that airway epithelial cells play an important role in combating A. fumigatus through inflammatory responses. Human airway epithelial cells have been proven to synthesize the active vitamin D, which plays a key role in regulating inflammation. The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of A. fumigatus infection on the activation of vitamin D and the role of vitamin D activation in A. fumigatus-elicited antifungal immunity in normal human airway epithelial cells. We found that A. fumigatus swollen conidia (SC induced the expression of 1α-hydroxylase, the enzyme catalyzing the synthesis of active vitamin D, and vitamin D receptor (VDR in 16HBE cells and led to increased local generation of active vitamin D. Locally activated vitamin D amplified SC-induced expression of antimicrobial peptides in 16HBE cells but attenuated SC-induced production of cytokines in an autocrine fashion. Furthermore, we identified β-glucan, the major A. fumigatus cell wall component, as the causative agent for upregulation of 1α-hydroxylase and VDR in 16HBE cells. Therefore, activation of vitamin D is inducible and provides a bidirectional regulation of the responses to A. fumigatus in 16HBE cells.

  12. Fumigaclavine C from a Marine-Derived Fungus Aspergillus Fumigatus Induces Apoptosis in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Xin; Himaya, S.W.A.; Dewapriya, Pradeep; Zhang, Chen; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to discovering natural compounds as potent anti-cancer candidates. In the present study, the anti-cancer effects of fumigaclavine C, isolated from a marine-derived fungus, Aspergillus fumigatus, was evaluated in vitro. In order to investigate the impact of fumigaclavine C on inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in breast cancer, MCF-7 cells were treated with various concentrations of fumigaclavine C, and fumigaclavine C showed significant cytotoxicity towards MCF-7 cells. Anti-proliferation was analyzed via cell mobility and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In addition, fumigaclavine C showed potent inhibition on the protein and gene level expressions of MMP-2, -9 in MCF-7 cells which were manifested in Western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results. The apoptosis induction abilities of the fumigaclvine C was studied by analyzing the expression of apoptosis related proteins, cell cycle analysis, DNA fragmentation and molecular docking studies. It was found that fumigaclavine C fragmented the MCF-7 cell DNA and arrested the cell cycle by modulating the apoptotic protein expressions. Moreover, fumigaclavine C significantly down-regulated the NF-kappa-B cell survival pathway. Collectively, data suggest that fumigaclavine C has a potential to be developed as a therapeutic candidate for breast cancer. PMID:24351905

  13. Interactions between cadmium and decabrominated diphenyl ether on blood cells count in rats—Multiple factorial regression analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curcic, Marijana; Buha, Aleksandra; Stankovic, Sanja; Milovanovic, Vesna; Bulat, Zorica; Đukić-Ćosić, Danijela; Antonijević, Evica; Vučinić, Slavica; Matović, Vesna; Antonijevic, Biljana

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess toxicity of Cd and BDE-209 mixture on haematological parameters in subacutely exposed rats and to determine the presence and type of interactions between these two chemicals using multiple factorial regression analysis. Furthermore, for the assessment of interaction type, an isobologram based methodology was applied and compared with multiple factorial regression analysis. Chemicals were given by oral gavage to the male Wistar rats weighing 200–240 g for 28 days. Animals were divided in 16 groups (8/group): control vehiculum group, three groups of rats were treated with 2.5, 7.5 or 15 mg Cd/kg/day. These doses were chosen on the bases of literature data and reflect relatively high Cd environmental exposure, three groups of rats were treated with 1000, 2000 or 4000 mg BDE-209/kg/bw/day, doses proved to induce toxic effects in rats. Furthermore, nine groups of animals were treated with different mixtures of Cd and BDE-209 containing doses of Cd and BDE-209 stated above. Blood samples were taken at the end of experiment and red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets counts were determined. For interaction assessment multiple factorial regression analysis and fitted isobologram approach were used. In this study, we focused on multiple factorial regression analysis as a method for interaction assessment. We also investigated the interactions between Cd and BDE-209 by the derived model for the description of the obtained fitted isobologram curves. Current study indicated that co-exposure to Cd and BDE-209 can result in significant decrease in RBC count, increase in WBC count and decrease in PLT count, when compared with controls. Multiple factorial regression analysis used for the assessment of interactions type between Cd and BDE-209 indicated synergism for the effect on RBC count and no interactions i.e. additivity for the effects on WBC and PLT counts. On the other hand, isobologram based approach showed slight

  14. Neutrino Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M; Tsenov, R; Dracos, M; Bonesini, M; Palladino, V; Tortora, L; Mori, Y; Planche, T; Lagrange, J  B; Kuno, Y; Benedetto, E; Efthymiopoulos, I; Garoby, R; Gilardoini, S; Martini, M; Wildner, E; Prior, G; Blondel, A; Karadzhow, Y; Ellis, M; Kyberd, P; Bayes, R; Laing, A; Soler, F  J  P; Alekou, A; Apollonio, M; Aslaninejad, M; Bontoiu, C; Jenner, L  J; Kurup, A; Long, K; Pasternak, J; Zarrebini, A; Poslimski, J; Blackmore, V; Cobb, J; Tunnell, C; Andreopoulos, C; Bennett, J  R  J; Brooks, S; Caretta, O; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Edgecock, T  R; Fitton, M; Kelliher, D; Loveridge, P; McFarland, A; Machida, S; Prior, C; Rees, G; Rogers, C; Rooney, M; Thomason, J; Wilcox, D; Booth, C; Skoro, G; Back, J  J; Harrison, P; Berg, J  S; Fernow, R; Gallardo, J  C; Gupta, R; Kirk, H; Simos, N; Stratakis, D; Souchlas, N; Witte, H; Bross, A; Geer, S; Johnstone, C; Mokhov, N; Neuffer, D; Popovic, M; Strait, J; Striganov, S; Morfín, J  G; Wands, R; Snopok, P; Bogacz, S  A; Morozov, V; Roblin, Y; Cline, D; Ding, X; Bromberg, C; Hart, T; Abrams, R  J; Ankenbrandt, C  M; Beard, K  B; Cummings, M  A  C; Flanagan, G; Johnson, R  P; Roberts, T  J; Yoshikawa, C  Y; Graves, V  B; McDonald, K  T; Coney, L; Hanson, G

    2014-01-01

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that $\\theta_{13} > 0$. The measured value of $\\theta_{13}$ is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti)neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO$\

  15. On-line study of growth kinetics of single hyphae of Aspergillus oryzae in a flow-through cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Torben; Spohr, Anders Bendsen; Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1999-01-01

    Using image analysis the growth kinetics of the single hyphae of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae has been determined on-line in a flow-through cell at different glucose concentrations in the range from 26 mg L-1 to 20 g L-1. The tip extension rate of the individual hyphae can be described...... with saturation type kinetics with respect to the length of the hyphae. The maximum tip extension rate is constant for all hyphae measured at the same glucose concentration, whereas the saturation constant for the hyphae varies significantly between the hyphae even within the same hyphal element. When apical...... branching occurs, it is observed that the tip extension rate decreases temporarily. The number of branches formed on a hypha is proportional to the length of the hypha that exceeds a certain minimum length required to support the growth of a new branch. The observed kinetics has been used to simulate...

  16. Aspergillus fumigatus Trehalose-Regulatory Subunit Homolog Moonlights To Mediate Cell Wall Homeostasis through Modulation of Chitin Synthase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsa Thammahong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose biosynthesis is found in fungi but not humans. Proteins involved in trehalose biosynthesis are essential for fungal pathogen virulence in humans and plants through multiple mechanisms. Loss of canonical trehalose biosynthesis genes in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus significantly alters cell wall structure and integrity, though the mechanistic link between these virulence-associated pathways remains enigmatic. Here we characterize genes, called tslA and tslB, which encode proteins that contain domains similar to those corresponding to trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase but lack critical catalytic residues for phosphatase activity. Loss of tslA reduces trehalose content in both conidia and mycelia, impairs cell wall integrity, and significantly alters cell wall structure. To gain mechanistic insights into the role that TslA plays in cell wall homeostasis, immunoprecipitation assays coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS were used to reveal a direct interaction between TslA and CsmA, a type V chitin synthase enzyme. TslA regulates not only chitin synthase activity but also CsmA sub-cellular localization. Loss of TslA impacts the immunopathogenesis of murine invasive pulmonary aspergillosis through altering cytokine production and immune cell recruitment. In conclusion, our data provide a novel model whereby proteins in the trehalose pathway play a direct role in fungal cell wall homeostasis and consequently impact fungus-host interactions.

  17. Neutrino factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bogomilov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that θ_{13}>0. The measured value of θ_{13} is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (antineutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EUROν Design Study consortium. EUROν coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF collaboration. The EUROν baseline accelerator facility will provide 10^{21} muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  18. Catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol using gold nanoparticles biosynthesized by cell-free extracts of Aspergillus sp. WL-Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Wenli; Qu, Yuanyuan, E-mail: qyy@dlut.edu.cn; Pei, Xiaofang; Li, Shuzhen; You, Shengnan; Wang, Jingwei; Zhang, Zhaojing; Zhou, Jiti

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • A green process for AuNPs synthesis was achieved by fungus Aspergillus. • Uniform spherical AuNPs with well dispersity and stability were biosynthesized. • The biogenic AuNPs possessed remarkable catalytic activities for 4-NP reduction. - Abstract: A facile one-pot eco-friendly process for synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with high catalytic activity was achieved using cell-free extracts of Aspergillus sp. WL-Au as reducing, capping and stabilizing agents. The surface plasmon resonance band of UV–vis spectrum at 532 nm confirmed the presence of AuNPs. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that quite uniform spherical AuNPs were synthesized and the average size of nanoparticles increased from 4 nm to 29 nm with reaction time. X-ray diffraction analysis verified the formation of nano-crystalline gold particles. Fourier transform infrared spectra showed the presence of functional groups on the surface of biosynthesized AuNPs, such as O−H, N−H, C=O, C−H, C−OH and C−O−C groups, which increased the stability of AuNPs. The biogenic AuNPs could serve as a highly efficient catalyst for 4-nitrophenol reduction. The reaction rate constant was linearly correlated with the concentration of AuNPs, which increased from 0.59 min{sup −1} to 1.51 min{sup −1} with the amount of AuNPs increasing form 1.46 × 10{sup −6} to 17.47 × 10{sup −6} mmol. Moreover, the as-synthesized AuNPs exhibited a remarkable normalized catalytic activity (4.04 × 10{sup 5} min{sup −1} mol{sup −1}), which was much higher than that observed for AuNPs synthesized by other biological and conventional chemical methods.

  19. The stimulatory effect of growth hormone, prolactin, and placental lactogen on beta-cell proliferation is not mediated by insulin-like growth factor-I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1991-01-01

    The effects of GH, PRL, and placental lactogen (PL) on the proliferation of pancreatic beta-cells in vitro were studied as well as the possible effect of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in mediating this effect. Proliferating beta-cells were identified by staining with a monoclonal antibody ...

  20. Skeletal unloading causes resistance of osteoprogenitor cells to parathyroid hormone and to insulin-like growth factor-I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostenuik, P. J.; Harris, J.; Halloran, B. P.; Turner, R. T.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Bikle, D. D.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal unloading decreases bone formation and osteoblast number in vivo and decreases the number and proliferation of bone marrow osteoprogenitor (BMOp) cells in vitro. We tested the ability of parathyroid hormone (PTH) to stimulate BMOp cells in vivo by treating Sprague Dawley rats (n = 32) with intermittent PTH(1-34) (1 h/day at 8 microg/100 g of body weight), or with vehicle via osmotic minipumps during 7 days of normal weight bearing or hind limb unloading. Marrow cells were flushed from the femur and cultured at the same initial density for up to 21 days. PTH treatment of normally loaded rats caused a 2.5-fold increase in the number of BMOp cells, with similar increases in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization, compared with cultures from vehicle-treated rats. PTH treatment of hind limb unloaded rats failed to stimulate BMOp cell number, ALP activity, or mineralization. Hind limb unloading had no significant effect on PTH receptor mRNA or protein levels in the tibia. Direct in vitro PTH challenge of BMOp cells isolated from normally loaded bone failed to stimulate their proliferation and inhibited their differentiation, suggesting that the in vivo anabolic effect of intermittent PTH on BMOp cells was mediated indirectly by a PTH-induced factor. We hypothesize that this factor is insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), which stimulated the in vitro proliferation and differentiation of BMOp cells isolated from normally loaded bone, but not from unloaded bone. These results suggest that IGF-I mediates the ability of PTH to stimulate BMOp cell proliferation in normally loaded bone, and that BMOp cells in unloaded bone are resistant to the anabolic effect of intermittent PTH therapy due to their resistance to IGF-I.

  1. Effect of cell wall integrity stress and RlmA transcription factor on asexual development and autolysis in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Zsuzsanna; Szarka, Máté; Kovács, Szilvia; Boczonádi, Imre; Emri, Tamás; Abe, Keietsu; Pócsi, István; Pusztahelyi, Tünde

    2013-05-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway is responsible for cell wall remodeling and reinforcement upon cell wall stress, which is proposed to be universal in fungal cultures. In Aspergillus nidulans, both the deletion of rlmA encoding the RlmA transcription factor in CWI signaling and low concentrations of the cell wall polymer intercalating agent Congo Red caused significant physiological changes. The gene deletion mutant ΔrlmA strain showed decreased CWI and oxidative stress resistances, which indicated the connection between the CWI pathway and the oxidative stress response system. The Congo Red stress resulted in alterations in the cell wall polymer composition in submerged cultures due to the induction of the biosynthesis of the alkali soluble fraction as well as the hydrolysis of cell wall biopolymers. Both RlmA and RlmA-independent factors induced by Congo Red stress regulated the expression of glucanase (ANID_00245, engA) and chitinase (chiB, chiA) genes, which promoted the autolysis of the cultures and also modulated the pellet sizes. CWI stress and rlmA deletion affected the expression of brlA encoding the early conidiophore development regulator transcription factor BrlA and, as a consequence, the formation of conidiophores was significantly changed in submerged cultures. Interestingly, the number of conidiospores increased in surface cultures of the ΔrlmA strain. The in silico analysis of genes putatively regulated by RlmA and the CWI transcription factors AnSwi4/AnSwi6 in the SBF complex revealed only a few jointly regulated genes, including ugmA and srrA coding for UgmA UDP-galactopyranose mutase and SrrA stress response regulator, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Photon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, J.; Huke, K.; Chikawa, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Photon Factory (PF) was established on April 1, 1978 at KEK. The PF is a synchrotron radiation facility, which has a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring fully dedicated to the SR usage and a 2.5 GeV electron linac supplying electrons and positrons to the PF ring and the accumulation ring of TRISTAN (30 GeV electron-positron colliding machine). The PF consists of three departments, injector linac, light source, and instrumentation department. The facility is described

  3. Enhancing the antitumor cell proliferation and Cu(2+)-chelating effects of black soybeans through fermentation with Aspergillus awamori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Fei; Chiang, Ming-Lun; Chou, Cheng-Chun; Lo, Yi-Chen

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, black soybeans were fermented with Aspergillus awamori at 30°C for 3 days. The effect of fermentation on the antiproliferative effect against human colon cancer cells, Caco-2 and HT-29 as well as Cu(2+)-chelating effect of black soybeans was investigated. It was found that the water, 80% methanol or 80% ethanol extract of fermented black soybeans showed a significantly higher (P soybeans. Generally, the methanol extract and the ethanol extract of fermented black soybeans exerted higher antiproliferative effect on both Caco-2 and HT-29 cells. While water extract of fermented black soybeans showed the highest Cu(2+)-chelating effect among the various extracts examined. Taking into account of extraction yields further revealed that bioactive principles that exhibit Cu(2+)-chelating effect could be extracted to the largest extent with water as the extraction solvent. With same amount of sample, water extract obtained from fermented black soybeans possesses the highest Cu(2+)-chelating abilities. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular tools and protocols for engineering the acid-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii as a potential cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi, Paola; Dato, Laura; Porro, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms offer a tremendous potential as cell factories, and they are indeed used by humans for centuries for biotransformations. Among them, yeasts combine the advantage of unicellular state with a eukaryotic organization, and, in the era of biorefineries, their biodiversity can offer solutions to specific process constraints. Zygosaccharomyces bailii, an ascomycetales budding yeast, is widely known for its peculiar tolerance to various stresses, among which are organic acids. Despite the possibility to apply with this yeast some of the molecular tools and protocols routinely used to manipulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adjustments and optimizations are necessary. Here, we describe in detail protocols for transformation, for target gene disruption or gene integration, and for designing episomal expression plasmids helpful for developing and further studying the yeast Z. bailii.

  5. The Supportive Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I in the Differentiation of Murine Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Corneal-Like Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trošan, Peter; Javorková, Eliška; Zajícová, Alena; Hájková, Michaela; Heřmánková, Barbora; Kössl, Jan; Holáň, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 17 (2016), s. 23156-23169 ISSN 1547-3287 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12580S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1508 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * corneal-like cells * insulin -like growth factor-I * differentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.562, year: 2016

  6. Droplet size influences division of mammalian cell factories in droplet microfluidic cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Periyannan Rajeswari, Prem Kumar; Joensson, Haakan N.; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2017-01-01

    in droplets. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, the most widely used mammalian host cells for biopharmaceuticals production were encapsulated and cultivated in 33, 180 and 320 pL droplets for 3 days. Periodic monitoring of the droplets during incubation showed that the cell divisions in 33 pL droplets stopped...

  7. Smart Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilberg, Arne; Radziwon, Agnieszka; Grube Hansen, David

    2017-01-01

    A large part of Danish Industry is based on Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs), which account for –99% of the companies in Denmark and about two third of the job positions (source: statistikbanken.dk) . That is why, it is so important also to focus research and development at SMEs, and to ......A large part of Danish Industry is based on Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs), which account for –99% of the companies in Denmark and about two third of the job positions (source: statistikbanken.dk) . That is why, it is so important also to focus research and development at SMEs......, and to target their challenges and ensure sustainable growth and business in these enterprises. Therefore the focus of the Smart Factory project was to support the growth and sustainable development of the small and medium sized manufacturing industry in Denmark. The project focused on SMEs and how to improve...... their innovation and competitive advantage by focusing at their competences, strengths and opportunities. The project suggests innovative solutions and business models through collaboration and use of new technologies. In the Smart Factory, SMEs should be able to collaborate on new products, markets and production...

  8. The temporal dynamics of differential gene expression in Aspergillus fumigatus interacting with human immature dendritic cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles O Morton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are the most important antigen presenting cells and play a pivotal role in host immunity to infectious agents by acting as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems. Monocyte-derived immature DCs (iDC were infected with viable resting conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus (Af293 for 12 hours at an MOI of 5; cells were sampled every three hours. RNA was extracted from both organisms at each time point and hybridised to microarrays. iDC cell death increased at 6 h in the presence of A. fumigatus which coincided with fungal germ tube emergence; >80% of conidia were associated with iDC. Over the time course A. fumigatus differentially regulated 210 genes, FunCat analysis indicated significant up-regulation of genes involved in fermentation, drug transport, pathogenesis and response to oxidative stress. Genes related to cytotoxicity were differentially regulated but the gliotoxin biosynthesis genes were down regulated over the time course, while Aspf1 was up-regulated at 9 h and 12 h. There was an up-regulation of genes in the subtelomeric regions of the genome as the interaction progressed. The genes up-regulated by iDC in the presence of A. fumigatus indicated that they were producing a pro-inflammatory response which was consistent with previous transcriptome studies of iDC interacting with A. fumigatus germ tubes. This study shows that A. fumigatus adapts to phagocytosis by iDCs by utilising genes that allow it to survive the interaction rather than just up-regulation of specific virulence genes.

  9. The temporal dynamics of differential gene expression in Aspergillus fumigatus interacting with human immature dendritic cells in vitro.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morton, Charles O

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most important antigen presenting cells and play a pivotal role in host immunity to infectious agents by acting as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems. Monocyte-derived immature DCs (iDC) were infected with viable resting conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus (Af293) for 12 hours at an MOI of 5; cells were sampled every three hours. RNA was extracted from both organisms at each time point and hybridised to microarrays. iDC cell death increased at 6 h in the presence of A. fumigatus which coincided with fungal germ tube emergence; >80% of conidia were associated with iDC. Over the time course A. fumigatus differentially regulated 210 genes, FunCat analysis indicated significant up-regulation of genes involved in fermentation, drug transport, pathogenesis and response to oxidative stress. Genes related to cytotoxicity were differentially regulated but the gliotoxin biosynthesis genes were down regulated over the time course, while Aspf1 was up-regulated at 9 h and 12 h. There was an up-regulation of genes in the subtelomeric regions of the genome as the interaction progressed. The genes up-regulated by iDC in the presence of A. fumigatus indicated that they were producing a pro-inflammatory response which was consistent with previous transcriptome studies of iDC interacting with A. fumigatus germ tubes. This study shows that A. fumigatus adapts to phagocytosis by iDCs by utilising genes that allow it to survive the interaction rather than just up-regulation of specific virulence genes.

  10. Aspergillus oryzae–Saccharomyces cerevisiae Consortium Allows Bio-Hybrid Fuel Cell to Run on Complex Carbohydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin P. Jahnke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Consortia of Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are examined for their abilities to turn complex carbohydrates into ethanol. To understand the interactions between microorganisms in consortia, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is used to follow the concentrations of various metabolites such as sugars (e.g., glucose, maltose, longer chain carbohydrates, and ethanol to optimize consortia conditions for the production of ethanol. It is shown that with proper design A. oryzae can digest food waste simulants into soluble sugars that S. cerevisiae can ferment into ethanol. Depending on the substrate and conditions used, concentrations of 13% ethanol were achieved in 10 days. It is further shown that a direct alcohol fuel cell (FC can be coupled with these A. oryzae-enabled S. cerevisiae fermentations using a reverse osmosis membrane. This “bio-hybrid FC” continually extracted ethanol from an ongoing consortium, enhancing ethanol production and allowing the bio-hybrid FC to run for at least one week. Obtained bio-hybrid FC currents were comparable to those from pure ethanol—water mixtures, using the same FC. The A. oryzae–S. cerevisiae consortium, coupled to a bio-hybrid FC, converted food waste simulants into electricity without any pre- or post-processing.

  11. Aspergillus oryzae–Saccharomyces cerevisiae Consortium Allows Bio-Hybrid Fuel Cell to Run on Complex Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Justin P.; Hoyt, Thomas; LeFors, Hannah M.; Sumner, James J.; Mackie, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Consortia of Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are examined for their abilities to turn complex carbohydrates into ethanol. To understand the interactions between microorganisms in consortia, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is used to follow the concentrations of various metabolites such as sugars (e.g., glucose, maltose), longer chain carbohydrates, and ethanol to optimize consortia conditions for the production of ethanol. It is shown that with proper design A. oryzae can digest food waste simulants into soluble sugars that S. cerevisiae can ferment into ethanol. Depending on the substrate and conditions used, concentrations of 13% ethanol were achieved in 10 days. It is further shown that a direct alcohol fuel cell (FC) can be coupled with these A. oryzae-enabled S. cerevisiae fermentations using a reverse osmosis membrane. This “bio-hybrid FC” continually extracted ethanol from an ongoing consortium, enhancing ethanol production and allowing the bio-hybrid FC to run for at least one week. Obtained bio-hybrid FC currents were comparable to those from pure ethanol—water mixtures, using the same FC. The A. oryzae–S. cerevisiae consortium, coupled to a bio-hybrid FC, converted food waste simulants into electricity without any pre- or post-processing. PMID:27681904

  12. Aspergillus oryzae-Saccharomyces cerevisiae Consortium Allows Bio-Hybrid Fuel Cell to Run on Complex Carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Justin P; Hoyt, Thomas; LeFors, Hannah M; Sumner, James J; Mackie, David M

    2016-02-04

    Consortia of Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are examined for their abilities to turn complex carbohydrates into ethanol. To understand the interactions between microorganisms in consortia, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is used to follow the concentrations of various metabolites such as sugars (e.g., glucose, maltose), longer chain carbohydrates, and ethanol to optimize consortia conditions for the production of ethanol. It is shown that with proper design A. oryzae can digest food waste simulants into soluble sugars that S. cerevisiae can ferment into ethanol. Depending on the substrate and conditions used, concentrations of 13% ethanol were achieved in 10 days. It is further shown that a direct alcohol fuel cell (FC) can be coupled with these A. oryzae-enabled S. cerevisiae fermentations using a reverse osmosis membrane. This "bio-hybrid FC" continually extracted ethanol from an ongoing consortium, enhancing ethanol production and allowing the bio-hybrid FC to run for at least one week. Obtained bio-hybrid FC currents were comparable to those from pure ethanol-water mixtures, using the same FC. The A. oryzae-S. cerevisiae consortium, coupled to a bio-hybrid FC, converted food waste simulants into electricity without any pre- or post-processing.

  13. Transesterification of used edible and non-edible oils to alkyl esters by Aspergillus sp. as a whole cell catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ranjana; Aulakh, Satnam S

    2011-12-01

    Aspergillus sp. (MTCC 5436), isolated from contaminated clarified butter was used as a whole cell catalyst for transesterification of oils from different sources. The strain was observed to be tolerant and grow in 90% oil as carbon source. Oils of Jathropa, karanj and spent cottonseed were used as carbon sources in the study. The product, alkyl ester, was characterized and quantified using (1) H-NMR. The strain was observed to facilitate transesterification in an oil:minimal medium with the ratio of 70:30 resulting in a 98% conversion of oil to ethyl esters within 48 h at 28 °C and 120 rpm. The physico-chemical characteristics of the ethyl ester (>98%) at 70% oil as carbon source were similar to the standards specified for biodiesel as per standards of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS), India. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Kaon factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1983-03-01

    Kaon factories would provide beams 100-1000 times more intense than those available from present accelerators in the 10-30 GeV range. More intense or cleaner secondary beams of kaons, antiprotons and neutrinos would be of particular interest for high precision experiments and studies of rare processes in both particle and nuclear physics, e.g. symmetry violations in K-decay, neutrino scattering, meson and baryon spectroscopy, hypernuclei, exotic atoms, K + studies of nuclear density and resonance propagation in nuclei. The various accelerators proposed include both fast-cycling synchrotrons providing 100 μA proton beams at 15 to 32 GeV and superconducting isochronous ring cyclotrons giving 100-400 μA at up to 15 GeV. This paper describes these designs and the various technical problems associated with them

  15. Displaying Candida antarctica lipase B on the cell surface of Aspergillus niger as a potential food-grade whole-cell catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi-You; Yang, Zhi-Ming; Pan, Li; Zheng, Sui-Ping; Han, Shuang-Yan; Lin, Ying

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillus niger is a recognized workhorse used to produce food processing enzymes because of its extraordinarily high protein-producing capacity. We have developed a new cell surface display system de novo in A. niger using expression elements from generally recognized as safe certified microorganisms. Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB), a widely used hydrolase, was fused to an endogenous cell wall mannoprotein, CwpA, and functionally displayed on the cell surface. Localization of CALB was confirmed by enzymatic assay and immunofluorescence analysis using laser scanning confocal microscopy. After induction by maltose for 45 h, the hydrolytic activity and synthesis activity of A. niger mycelium-surface displayed CALB (AN-CALB) reached 400 and 240 U/g dry cell, respectively. AN-CALB was successfully used as a whole-cell catalyst for the enzymatic production of ethyl esters from a series of fatty acids of different chain lengths and ethanol. In a solvent-free system, AN-CALB showed great synthetic activity and afforded high substrate mole conversions, which amounted to 87 % for ethyl hexanoate after 2 h, 89 % for ethyl laurate after 2 h, and 84 % for ethyl stearate after 3 h. These results suggested that CwpA can act as an efficient anchoring motif for displaying enzyme on A. niger, and AN-CALB is a robust, green, and cost-effective alternative food-grade whole-cell catalyst to commercial lipase.

  16. Targeting population heterogeneity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae batch fermentation for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Lundin, L.

    and affect their metabolism and consequently affect the heterogeneity level of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding of population heterogeneity, Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were......)). Significant gradients of e.g. dissolved oxygen, substrates, and pH are typically observed in many industrial scale fermentation processes. Consequently, the microbial cells experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells...

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Proteome Modulations in Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells in Response to PulmonaryAspergillus fumigatusInfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddigh, Pegah; Bracht, Thilo; Molinier-Frenkel, Válerie; Castellano, Flavia; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Schuster, Marc; Weski, Juliane; Hasenberg, Anja; Kraus, Andreas; Poschet, Gernot; Hager, Thomas; Theegarten, Dirk; Opitz, Christiane A; Brakhage, Axel A; Sitek, Barbara; Hasenberg, Mike; Gunzer, Matthias

    2017-12-01

    The ubiquitous mold Aspergillus fumigatus threatens immunosuppressed patients as inducer of lethal invasive aspergillosis. A. fumigatus conidia are airborne and reach the alveoli, where they encounter alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Previous studies reported the importance of the surfactant-producing AEC II during A. fumigatus infection via in vitro experiments using cell lines. We established a negative isolation protocol yielding untouched primary murine AEC II with a purity >90%, allowing ex vivo analyses of the cells, which encountered the mold in vivo By label-free proteome analysis of AEC II isolated from mice 24h after A. fumigatus or mock infection we quantified 2256 proteins and found 154 proteins to be significantly differentially abundant between both groups (ANOVA p value ≤ 0.01, ratio of means ≥1.5 or ≤0.67, quantified with ≥2 peptides). Most of these proteins were higher abundant in the infected condition and reflected a comprehensive activation of AEC II on interaction with A. fumigatus This was especially represented by proteins related to oxidative phosphorylation, hence energy production. However, the most strongly induced protein was the l-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) Interleukin 4 induced 1 (IL4I1) with a 42.9 fold higher abundance (ANOVA p value 2.91 -10 ). IL4I1 has previously been found in B cells, macrophages, dendritic cells and rare neurons. Increased IL4I1 abundance in AEC II was confirmed by qPCR, Western blot and immunohistology. Furthermore, A. fumigatus infected lungs showed high levels of IL4I1 metabolic products. Importantly, higher IL4I1 abundance was also confirmed in lung tissue from human aspergilloma. Because LAAO are key enzymes for bactericidal product generation, AEC II might actively participate in pathogen defense. We provide insights into proteome changes of primary AEC II thereby opening new avenues to analyze the molecular changes of this central lung cell on infectious threats. Data are available via Proteome

  18. Identification of potentially safe promising fungal cell factories for the production of polyketide natural food colorants using chemotaxonomic rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapari, Sameer As; Meyer, Anne S; Thrane, Ulf; Frisvad, Jens C

    2009-04-27

    extrolites is a rational approach towards selection of fungal polyketide pigment producers considering the enormous chemical diversity and biodiversity of ascomycetous fungi. This rationale could be very handy for the selection of potentially safe fungal cell factories not only for polyketide pigments but also for the other industrially important polyketides; the molecular and genetic basis for the biosynthesis of which has not yet been examined in detail. In addition, 4 out of the 10 chemotaxonomically selected promising Penicillium strains were shown to produce extracellular pigments in the liquid media using a solid support indicating future cell factory possibilities for polyketide natural food colorants.

  19. Identification of potentially safe promising fungal cell factories for the production of polyketide natural food colorants using chemotaxonomic rationale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frisvad Jens C

    2009-04-01

    of chemotaxonomic tools and a priori knowledge of fungal extrolites is a rational approach towards selection of fungal polyketide pigment producers considering the enormous chemical diversity and biodiversity of ascomycetous fungi. This rationale could be very handy for the selection of potentially safe fungal cell factories not only for polyketide pigments but also for the other industrially important polyketides; the molecular and genetic basis for the biosynthesis of which has not yet been examined in detail. In addition, 4 out of the 10 chemotaxonomically selected promising Penicillium strains were shown to produce extracellular pigments in the liquid media using a solid support indicating future cell factory possibilities for polyketide natural food colorants.

  20. Identification of potentially safe promising fungal cell factories for the production of polyketide natural food colorants using chemotaxonomic rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapari, Sameer AS; Meyer, Anne S; Thrane, Ulf; Frisvad, Jens C

    2009-01-01

    a priori knowledge of fungal extrolites is a rational approach towards selection of fungal polyketide pigment producers considering the enormous chemical diversity and biodiversity of ascomycetous fungi. This rationale could be very handy for the selection of potentially safe fungal cell factories not only for polyketide pigments but also for the other industrially important polyketides; the molecular and genetic basis for the biosynthesis of which has not yet been examined in detail. In addition, 4 out of the 10 chemotaxonomically selected promising Penicillium strains were shown to produce extracellular pigments in the liquid media using a solid support indicating future cell factory possibilities for polyketide natural food colorants. PMID:19397825

  1. Interaction of airway epithelial cells (A549) with spores and mycelium of Aspergillus fumigatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, ZH; Liu, RY; Noordhoek, JA; Kauffman, HF

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To study the interaction of airway epithelial cell line A549 with fragments of mycelium, spores of Aspergitlus fumigatus in vitro and to determine if toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in the process. Methods. A549 cells were exposed to fragments of A. fumigatus mycelium, zymosan and

  2. Development of a yeast cell factory for production of aromatic secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Prado, Edith Angelica

    Aromatic secondary metabolites are compounds mainly synthesized by plants and fungi as a response to predators and environmental stresses. These compounds have a broad range of natural properties such as reduction of oxidative damage in cells, antibacterial effects and UV protection. Many of thes...... six different types of flavonoids, and some of the engineered strains produced significant titers of flavonoid compounds such as kaempferol and quercetin. Moreover, for the first time, we synthesized the flavonoids liquiritigenin, resokaempferol and fisetin in yeast....

  3. Development and application of computer-aided design methods for cell factory optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, Joao

    and machine learning. The process of creating strains with commercially relevant titers is time consuming and expensive. Computer-aided design (CAD) software can help scientists build better strains by providing models and algorithms that can be used to generate and test hypotheses before implementing them...... on metabolite targets. MARSI designs can be implemented using ALE or CSI. We used MARSI to enumerate metabolite targets in Escherichia coli that could be used to replace experimentally validated gene knockouts. Genetic variability occurs naturally in cells. However, the effects of those variations...... and machine learning tools, we explored the landscape of kcats using multiple enzyme sequences and their chemical reactions....

  4. Microbioreactor arrays for full factorial screening of exogenous and paracrine factors in human embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew M Titmarsh

    Full Text Available Timed exposure of pluripotent stem cell cultures to exogenous molecules is widely used to drive differentiation towards desired cell lineages. However, screening differentiation conditions in conventional static cultures can become impractical in large parameter spaces, and is intrinsically limited by poor spatiotemporal control of the microenvironment that also makes it impossible to determine whether exogenous factors act directly or through paracrine-dependent mechanisms. We detail here the development of a continuous flow microbioreactor array platform that combines full-factorial multiplexing of input factors with progressive accumulation of paracrine factors through serially-connected culture chambers, and further, the use of this system to explore the combinatorial parameter space of both exogenous and paracrine factors involved in human embryonic stem cell (hESC differentiation to a MIXL1-GFP(+ primitive streak-like population. We show that well known inducers of primitive streak (BMP, Activin and Wnt signals do not simply act directly on hESC to induce MIXL1 expression, but that this requires accumulation of surplus, endogenous factors; and, that conditioned medium or FGF-2 supplementation is able to offset this. Our approach further reveals the presence of a paracrine, negative feedback loop to the MIXL1-GFP(+ population, which can be overcome with GSK-3β inhibitors (BIO or CHIR99021, implicating secreted Wnt inhibitory signals such as DKKs and sFRPs as candidate effectors. Importantly, modulating paracrine effects identified in microbioreactor arrays by supplementing FGF-2 and CHIR in conventional static culture vessels resulted in improved differentiation outcomes. We therefore demonstrate that this microbioreactor array platform uniquely enables the identification and decoding of complex soluble factor signalling hierarchies, and that this not only challenges prevailing strategies for extrinsic control of hESC differentiation, but

  5. A bacterial cell factory for efficient production of ethanol from whey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for homo-ethanol production from lactose using a genetically modified lactic acid bacterium of the invention, where the cells are provided with a substrate comprising dairy waste supplemented with an amino nitrogen source (such as acid hydrolysed corn steep liquo......B) encoding enzymes catalysing the conversion of pyruvate to ethanol. Additionally a number of genes (Idh, pta and adhE) are deleted in order to maximise homo-ethanol production as compared to production of lactate, acetoin and acetate production.......The invention relates to a method for homo-ethanol production from lactose using a genetically modified lactic acid bacterium of the invention, where the cells are provided with a substrate comprising dairy waste supplemented with an amino nitrogen source (such as acid hydrolysed corn steep liquor......). The invention further relates to genetically modified lactic acid bacterium and its use for homo-ethanol production from lactose in dairy waste. The lactic acid bacterium comprises both genes (lacABCD, LacEF, lacG) encoding enzymes catalysing the lactose catabolism pathway; and transgenes (pdc and adh...

  6. Optimization of date syrup for enhancement of the production of citric acid using immobilized cells of Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Yasser S.; Alamri, Saad A.

    2012-01-01

    Date syrup as an economical source of carbohydrates and immobilized Aspergillus niger J4, which was entrapped in calcium alginate pellets, were employed for enhancing the production of citric acid. Maximum production was achieved by pre-treating date syrup with 1.5% tricalcium phosphate to remove heavy metals. The production of citric acid using a pretreated medium was 38.87% higher than an untreated one that consumed sugar. The appropriate presence of nitrogen, phosphate and magnesium appeared to be important in order for citric acid to accumulate. The production of citric acid and the consumed sugar was higher when using 0.1% ammonium nitrate as the best source of nitrogen. The production of citric acid increased significantly when 0.1 g/l of KH2PO4 was added to the medium of date syrup. The addition of magnesium sulfate at the rate of 0.20 g/l had a stimulating effect on the production of citric acid. Maximum production of citric acid was obtained when calcium chloride was absent. One of the most important benefits of immobilized cells is their ability and stability to produce citric acid under a repeated batch culture. Over four repeated batches, the production of citric acid production was maintained for 24 days when each cycle continued for 144 h. The results obtained in the repeated batch cultivation using date syrup confirmed that date syrup could be used as a medium for the industrial production of citric acid. PMID:23961184

  7. Optimization of date syrup for enhancement of the production of citric acid using immobilized cells of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Yasser S; Alamri, Saad A

    2012-04-01

    Date syrup as an economical source of carbohydrates and immobilized Aspergillus niger J4, which was entrapped in calcium alginate pellets, were employed for enhancing the production of citric acid. Maximum production was achieved by pre-treating date syrup with 1.5% tricalcium phosphate to remove heavy metals. The production of citric acid using a pretreated medium was 38.87% higher than an untreated one that consumed sugar. The appropriate presence of nitrogen, phosphate and magnesium appeared to be important in order for citric acid to accumulate. The production of citric acid and the consumed sugar was higher when using 0.1% ammonium nitrate as the best source of nitrogen. The production of citric acid increased significantly when 0.1 g/l of KH2PO4 was added to the medium of date syrup. The addition of magnesium sulfate at the rate of 0.20 g/l had a stimulating effect on the production of citric acid. Maximum production of citric acid was obtained when calcium chloride was absent. One of the most important benefits of immobilized cells is their ability and stability to produce citric acid under a repeated batch culture. Over four repeated batches, the production of citric acid production was maintained for 24 days when each cycle continued for 144 h. The results obtained in the repeated batch cultivation using date syrup confirmed that date syrup could be used as a medium for the industrial production of citric acid.

  8. Use of cell surface protein typing for genotyping of azole-resistant and -susceptible Aspergillus fumigatus isolates in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahatinejad, Mahsa; Vaezi, Afsane; Fakhim, Hamed; Abastabar, Mahdi; Shokohi, Tahereh; Zahedi, Nina; Ansari, Saham; Meis, Jacques F; Badali, Hamid

    2018-02-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the leading cause of mortality in severely immunocompromised individuals. Understanding pathogen dispersion and relatedness is essential for determining the epidemiology of nosocomial infections. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the diversity and putative origins of clinical and environmental azole-susceptible and -resistant A. fumigatus isolates from Iran. In all, 79 isolates, including 64 azole-susceptible and 15 -resistant isolates, were genotyped using the cell surface protein (CSP) gene. Seven distinct repeat types (r01, r02, r03, r04, r05, r06 and r07) and 11 different CSP variants (t01, t02, t03, t04A, t06A, t06B, t08, t10, t18A, t18B and t22) were observed. Interestingly, t06B, t18A and t18B were exclusively present in azole-resistant isolates. The Simpson's index of diversity (D) was calculated at 0.78. Resistant isolates were genetically less diverse than azole-susceptible isolates. However, azole-resistant A. fumigatus without TR 34 /L98H were more diverse than with TR 34 /L98H. The limited CSP type diversity of the TR 34 /L98H isolates versus azole-susceptible isolates suggests that repeated independent emergence of the TR 34 /L98H mechanism is unlikely. It has been suggested that CSP types might have a common ancestor that developed locally and subsequently migrated worldwide. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Engineering propionibacteria as versatile cell factories for the production of industrially important chemicals: advances, challenges, and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ningzi; Zhuge, Xin; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Wu, Jing; Shi, Zhongping; Liu, Long

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacteria are actinobacteria consisting of two principal groups: cutaneous and dairy. Cutaneous propionibacteria are considered primary pathogens to humans, whereas dairy propionibacteria are widely used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Increasing attention has been focused on improving the performance of dairy propionibacteria for the production of industrially important chemicals, and significant advances have been made through strain engineering and process optimization in the production of flavor compounds, nutraceuticals, and antimicrobial compounds. In addition, genome sequencing of several propionibacteria species has been completed, deepening understanding of the metabolic and physiological features of these organisms. However, the metabolic engineering of propionibacteria still faces several challenges owing to the lack of efficient genome manipulation tools and the existence of various types of strong restriction-modification systems. The emergence of systems and synthetic biology provides new opportunities to overcome these bottlenecks. In this review, we first introduce the major species of propionibacteria and their properties and provide an overview of their functions and applications. We then discuss advances in the genome sequencing and metabolic engineering of these bacteria. Finally, we discuss systems and synthetic biology approaches for engineering propionibacteria as efficient and robust cell factories for the production of industrially important chemicals.

  10. Solar cells with one-day energy payback for the factories of the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espinosa Martinez, Nieves; Hösel, Markus; Angmo, Dechan

    2012-01-01

    Scalability is a requirement before any new energy source can be expected to house a possible solution to the challenge that mankind’s increasing energy demand presents. No renewable energy source is as abundant as the Sun and yet efficient and low-cost conversion of solar energy still has not been...... research and developed such technology in the form of a polymer solar cell that presents a significant improvement in energy payback time (EPBT) and found that very short energy payback times on the order of one day are possible, thus potentially presenting a solution to the current energy gap of >14 TW...... developed. We approach the challenge by firstly taking a technology that efficiently addresses the need for daily production of 1 GWp on a global level, which does not employ elements with critically low abundance and has a low thermal budget.Wethen applied life cycle assessment methodologies to direct...

  11. Cell wall α-1,3-glucan prevents α-amylase adsorption onto fungal cell in submerged culture of Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Silai; Sato, Hiroki; Ichinose, Sakurako; Tanaka, Mizuki; Miyazawa, Ken; Yoshimi, Akira; Abe, Keietsu; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2017-07-01

    We have previously reported that α-amylase (Taka-amylase A, TAA) activity disappears in the later stage of submerged Aspergillus oryzae culture as a result of TAA adsorption onto the cell wall. Chitin, one of the major components of the cell wall, was identified as a potential factor that facilitates TAA adsorption. However, TAA adsorption only occurred in the later stage of cultivation, although chitin was assumed to be sufficiently abundant in the cell wall regardless of the submerged culture period. This suggested the presence a factor that inhibits TAA adsorption to the cell wall in the early stage of cultivation. In the current study, we identified α-1,3-glucan as a potential inhibiting factor for TAA adsorption. We constructed single, double, and triple disruption mutants of three α-1,3-glucan synthase genes (agsA, agsB, and agsC) in A. oryzae. Growth characteristics and cell wall component analysis of these disruption strains showed that AgsB plays a major role in α-1,3-glucan synthesis. In the ΔagsB mutant, TAA was adsorbed onto the mycelium in all stages of cultivation (early and later), and the ΔagsB mutant cell walls had a significantly high capacity for TAA adsorption. Moreover, the α-1,3-glucan content of the cell wall prepared from the wild-type strain in the later stage of cultivation was markedly reduced compared with that in the early stage. These results suggest that α-1,3-glucan is a potential inhibiting factor for TAA adsorption onto the cell wall component, chitin, in the early stage of submerged culture in A. oryzae. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pseudomonas putida as a microbial cell factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigneswaran, Vinoth

    The extensive use of fossil fuels has a severe influence on the environment. In order to reduce the dependency on these limited resources and to protect the environment substantial effort is being made to implement renewable resources. One part of this transition is to develop methods for sustain......The extensive use of fossil fuels has a severe influence on the environment. In order to reduce the dependency on these limited resources and to protect the environment substantial effort is being made to implement renewable resources. One part of this transition is to develop methods....... The applicability of glycerol as a substrate was also investigated. Since glycerol is a poor substrate adaptive evolution was made in order to improve the capabilities of P. putida to proliferate on glycerol. The evolved lineages all had significantly increased growth rate, enhanced cell density and reduced lag...... phase. The genomic alterations were identified by genome sequencing and revealed parallel evolution. Glycerol was also shown to be able to support biofilm growth and as a result of this it can be used as an alternative substrate for producing biochemicals in conventional and biofilm reactors. The use...

  13. Cell factory-derived bioactive molecules with polymeric cryogel scaffold enhance the repair of subchondral cartilage defect in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankur; Bhat, Sumrita; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Gupta, Kailash C; Tägil, Magnus; Zheng, Ming Hao; Kumar, Ashok; Lidgren, Lars

    2017-06-01

    We have explored the potential of cell factory-derived bioactive molecules, isolated from conditioned media of primary goat chondrocytes, for the repair of subchondral cartilage defects. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirms the presence of transforming growth factor-β1 in an isolated protein fraction (12.56 ± 1.15 ng/mg protein fraction). These bioactive molecules were used alone or with chitosan-agarose-gelatin cryogel scaffolds, with and without chondrocytes, to check whether combined approaches further enhance cartilage repair. To evaluate this, an in vivo study was conducted on New Zealand rabbits in which a subchondral defect (4.5 mm wide × 4.5 mm deep) was surgically created. Starting after the operation, bioactive molecules were injected at the defect site at regular intervals of 14 days. Histopathological analysis showed that rabbits treated with bioactive molecules alone had cartilage regeneration after 4 weeks. However, rabbits treated with bioactive molecules along with scaffolds, with or without cells, showed cartilage formation after 3 weeks; 6 weeks after surgery, the cartilage regenerated in rabbits treated with either bioactive molecules alone or in combinations showed morphological similarities to native cartilage. No systemic cytotoxicity or inflammatory response was induced by any of the treatments. Further, ELISA was done to determine systemic toxicity, which showed no difference in concentration of tumour necrosis factor-α in blood serum, before or after surgery. In conclusion, intra-articular injection with bioactive molecules alone may be used for the repair of subchondral cartilage defects, and bioactive molecules along with chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds further enhance the repair. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Systems metabolic engineering: the creation of microbial cell factories by rational metabolic design and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that in order to establish sustainable societies, production processes should shift from petrochemical-based processes to bioprocesses. Because bioconversion technologies, in which biomass resources are converted to valuable materials, are preferable to processes dependent on fossil resources, the former should be further developed. The following two approaches can be adopted to improve cellular properties and obtain high productivity and production yield of target products: (1) optimization of cellular metabolic pathways involved in various bioprocesses and (2) creation of stress-tolerant cells that can be active even under severe stress conditions in the bioprocesses. Recent progress in omics analyses has facilitated the analysis of microorganisms based on bioinformatics data for molecular breeding and bioprocess development. Systems metabolic engineering is a new area of study, and it has been defined as a methodology in which metabolic engineering and systems biology are integrated to upgrade the designability of industrially useful microorganisms. This chapter discusses multi-omics analyses and rational design methods for molecular breeding. The first is an example of the rational design of metabolic networks for target production by flux balance analysis using genome-scale metabolic models. Recent progress in the development of genome-scale metabolic models and the application of these models to the design of desirable metabolic networks is also described in this example. The second is an example of evolution engineering with omics analyses for the creation of stress-tolerant microorganisms. Long-term culture experiments to obtain the desired phenotypes and omics analyses to identify the phenotypic changes are described here.

  15. Bioreduction of trivalent aurum to nano-crystalline gold particles by active and inactive cells and cell-free extract of Aspergillus oryzae var. viridis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binupriya, A.R. [Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Sathishkumar, M., E-mail: cvemuthu@nus.edu.sg [Singapore-Delft Water Alliance, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117577 (Singapore); Vijayaraghavan, K. [Singapore-Delft Water Alliance, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117577 (Singapore); Yun, S.-I., E-mail: siyun@chonbuk.ac.kr [Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Bioreduction efficacy of both active (AB) and inactive (IB) cells/biomass of Aspergillus oryzae var. viridis and their respective cell-free extracts (ACE and ICE) to convert trivalent aurum to gold nanoparticles were tested in the present study. Strong plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles was observed between 540 and 560 nm in the samples obtained from AB, IB, ACE and ICE. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were performed to examine the formation of gold nanoparticles. Comparing all four forms of A. oryzae var. viridis, ICE showed high gold nanoparticle productivity. The nanoparticles formed were quite uniform in shape and ranged in size from 10 to 60 nm. In addition some triangle, pentagon and hexagon-shaped nanoplates with size range of 30-400 nm were also synthesized especially at lower pH. Organics from the inactive cells are believed to be responsible for reduction of trivalent aurum to nano-sized gold particles. Organic content of the ICE was found to be double the amount of ACE. High productivity of gold nanoparticles by metabolic-independent process opens up an interesting area of nanoparticle synthesis using waste fungal biomass from industries.

  16. Cytokine responses and regulation of interferon-gamma release by human mononuclear cells to Aspergillus fumigatus and other filamentous fungi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warris, A.; Netea, M.G.; Verweij, P.E.; Gaustad, P.; Kullberg, B.J.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Abrahamsen, T.G.

    2005-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that the production of proinflammatory cytokines is important in host resistance to invasive aspergillosis. Knowledge of the host response towards other filamentous fungi is scarce, as most studies have focused on Aspergillus fumigatus. In addition, interferon-gamma

  17. Treatment of both native and deamidated gluten peptides with an endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger prevents stimulation of gut-derived gluten-reactive T cells from either children or adults with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Karina Søndergård; Nielsen, Anne Staal

    2014-01-01

    the proliferative response by a gluten-specific CD4+ T cell clone and seven gluten-reactive T cell lines to protease-digested gluten peptides. A proline-specific endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger (AnP2), was particularly efficient at diminishing proliferation after stimulation with cleaved antigen, and could...

  18. The microbial cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cormac D

    2012-03-14

    Microorganisms have been used for decades as sources of antibiotics, vitamins and enzymes and for the production of fermented foods and chemicals. In the 21st century microorganisms will play a vital role in addressing some of the problems faced by mankind. In this article three of the current applications in which microbes have a significant role to play are highlighted: the discovery of new antibiotics, manufacture of biofuels and bioplastics, and production of fine chemicals via biotransformation.

  19. The Microbial Cell Factory

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Cormac D.

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms have been used for decades as sources of antibiotics, vitamins and enzymes and for the production of fermented foods and chemicals. In the 21st century microorganisms will play a vital role in addressing some of the problems faced by mankind. In this article three of the current applications in which microbes have a significant role to play are highlighted: the discovery of new antibiotics, manufacture of biofuels and bioplastics, and production of fine chemicals via biotrans...

  20. Aspergillus fumigatus devoid of cell wall β-1,3-glucan is viable, massively sheds galactomannan and is killed by septum formation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichtl, Karl; Samantaray, Sweta; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Zhu, Zhaojun; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Ebel, Frank; Wagener, Johannes

    2015-02-01

    Echinocandins inhibit β-1,3-glucan synthesis and are one of the few antimycotic drug classes effective against Aspergillus spp. In this study, we characterized the β-1,3-glucan synthase Fks1 of Aspergillus fumigatus, the putative target of echinocandins. Data obtained with a conditional mutant suggest that fks1 is not essential. In agreement, we successfully constructed a viable Δfks1 deletion mutant. Lack of Fks1 results in characteristic growth phenotypes similar to wild type treated with echinocandins and an increased susceptibility to calcofluor white and sodium dodecyl sulfate. In agreement with Fks1 being the only β-1,3-glucan synthase in A. fumigatus, the cell wall is devoid of β-1,3-glucan. This is accompanied by a compensatory increase of chitin and galactosaminogalactan and a significant decrease in cell wall galactomannan due to a massively enhanced galactomannan shedding. Our data furthermore suggest that inhibition of hyphal septation can overcome the limitations of echinocandin therapy. Compounds inhibiting septum formation boosted the antifungal activity of caspofungin. Thus, development of clinically applicable inhibitors of septum formation is a promising strategy to improve existing antifungal therapy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Optimization of date syrup for enhancement of the production of citric acid using immobilized cells of Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa, Yasser S.; Alamri, Saad A.

    2012-01-01

    Date syrup as an economical source of carbohydrates and immobilized Aspergillus niger J4, which was entrapped in calcium alginate pellets, were employed for enhancing the production of citric acid. Maximum production was achieved by pre-treating date syrup with 1.5% tricalcium phosphate to remove heavy metals. The production of citric acid using a pretreated medium was 38.87% higher than an untreated one that consumed sugar. The appropriate presence of nitrogen, phosphate and magnesium appear...

  2. Controlling heterologous gene expression in yeast cell factories on different carbon substrates and across the diauxic shift: a comparison of yeast promoter activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bingyin; Williams, Thomas C; Henry, Matthew; Nielsen, Lars K; Vickers, Claudia E

    2015-06-26

    Predictable control of gene expression is necessary for the rational design and optimization of cell factories. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the promoter is one of the most important tools available for controlling gene expression. However, the complex expression patterns of yeast promoters have not been fully characterised and compared on different carbon sources (glucose, sucrose, galactose and ethanol) and across the diauxic shift in glucose batch cultivation. These conditions are of importance to yeast cell factory design because they are commonly used and encountered in industrial processes. Here, the activities of a series of "constitutive" and inducible promoters were characterised in single cells throughout the fermentation using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. The "constitutive" promoters, including glycolytic promoters, transcription elongation factor promoters and ribosomal promoters, differed in their response patterns to different carbon sources; however, in glucose batch cultivation, expression driven by these promoters decreased sharply as glucose was depleted and cells moved towards the diauxic shift. Promoters induced at low-glucose levels (P(HXT7), P(SSA1) and P(ADH2)) varied in induction strength on non-glucose carbon sources (sucrose, galactose and ethanol); in contrast to the "constitutive" promoters, GFP expression increased as glucose decreased and cells moved towards the diauxic shift. While lower than several "constitutive" promoters during the exponential phase, expression from the SSA1 promoter was higher in the post-diauxic phase than the commonly-used TEF1 promoter. The galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter provided the highest GFP expression on galactose, and the copper-inducible CUP1 promoter provided the highest induced GFP expression following the diauxic shift. The data provides a foundation for predictable and optimised control of gene expression levels on different carbon sources and throughout batch

  3. Aspergillus Cell Wall Chitin Induces Anti- and Proinflammatory Cytokines in Human PBMCs via the Fc-γ Receptor/Syk/PI3K Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, K. L.; Aimanianda, V.; Wang, X.; Gresnigt, M. S.; Ammerdorffer, A.; Jacobs, C. W.; Gazendam, R. P.; Joosten, L. A. B.; Netea, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chitin is an important cell wall component of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia, of which hundreds are inhaled on a daily basis. Previous studies have shown that chitin has both anti- and proinflammatory properties; however the exact mechanisms determining the inflammatory signature of chitin are poorly understood, especially in human immune cells. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with chitin from Aspergillus fumigatus. Transcription and production of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) were measured from the cell culture supernatant by quantitative PCR (qPCR) or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Chitin induced an anti-inflammatory signature characterized by the production of IL-1Ra in the presence of human serum, which was abrogated in immunoglobulin-depleted serum. Fc-γ-receptor-dependent recognition and phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized chitin was identified as a novel IL-1Ra-inducing mechanism by chitin. IL-1Ra production induced by chitin was dependent on Syk kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation. In contrast, costimulation of chitin with the pattern recognition receptor (PRR) ligands lipopolysaccharide, Pam3Cys, or muramyl dipeptide, but not β-glucan, had synergistic effects on the induction of proinflammatory cytokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In conclusion, chitin can have both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties, depending on the presence of pathogen-associated molecular patterns and immunoglobulins, thus explaining the various inflammatory signatures reported for chitin. PMID:27247234

  4. Increasing cell biomass in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases recombinant protein yield: the use of a respiratory strain as a microbial cell factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedfalk Kristina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant protein production is universally employed as a solution to obtain the milligram to gram quantities of a given protein required for applications as diverse as structural genomics and biopharmaceutical manufacture. Yeast is a well-established recombinant host cell for these purposes. In this study we wanted to investigate whether our respiratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, TM6*, could be used to enhance the productivity of recombinant proteins over that obtained from corresponding wild type, respiro-fermentative strains when cultured under the same laboratory conditions. Results Here we demonstrate at least a doubling in productivity over wild-type strains for three recombinant membrane proteins and one recombinant soluble protein produced in TM6* cells. In all cases, this was attributed to the improved biomass properties of the strain. The yield profile across the growth curve was also more stable than in a wild-type strain, and was not further improved by lowering culture temperatures. This has the added benefit that improved yields can be attained rapidly at the yeast's optimal growth conditions. Importantly, improved productivity could not be reproduced in wild-type strains by culturing them under glucose fed-batch conditions: despite having achieved very similar biomass yields to those achieved by TM6* cultures, the total volumetric yields were not concomitantly increased. Furthermore, the productivity of TM6* was unaffected by growing cultures in the presence of ethanol. These findings support the unique properties of TM6* as a microbial cell factory. Conclusions The accumulation of biomass in yeast cell factories is not necessarily correlated with a proportional increase in the functional yield of the recombinant protein being produced. The respiratory S. cerevisiae strain reported here is therefore a useful addition to the matrix of production hosts currently available as its improved biomass

  5. Intra- and inter-individual variability of Aspergillus fumigatus reactive T-cell frequencies in healthy volunteers in dependency of mould exposure in residential and working environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Sebastian; Weis, Philipp; Page, Lukas; Helm, Johanna; Lazariotou, Maria; Einsele, Hermann; Ullmann, Andrew J

    2017-10-01

    Invasive aspergillosis remains a deadly disease in immunocompromised patients, whereas the combination of an exaggerated immune response and continuous exposure lead to various hyperinflammatory diseases. This pilot study aimed to gain an overview of the intra- and inter-individual variability in Aspergillus fumigatus reactive T-helper cells in healthy adults and the correlation with environmental mould exposure. In this flow cytometric study, the frequencies of CD154 + A. fumigatus reactive T cells were evaluated in 70 healthy volunteers. All subjects completed a standardised questionnaire addressing their mould exposure. Subjects with intensive mould exposure in their professional or residential surrounding demonstrated considerably higher mean frequencies of A. fumigatus reactive T-helper and T-memory cells. Comparative evaluation of multiple measurements over time demonstrated relatively conserved reactive T-cell frequencies in the absence of major changes to the exposure profile, whereas those frequently exposed in professional environment or with changes to their risk score demonstrated a marked dependency of antigen reactive T-cell frequencies on recent mould exposure. This pilot study was the first to provide data on the intra-individual variability in A. fumigatus reactive T-cell frequencies and its linkage to mould encounter. Fungus reactive T cells are to be considered a valued tool for the assessment of environmental mould exposure. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. X-ray induced degradation of DNA in Aspergillus nidulans cells comparative analysis of UV- and X-ray induced DNA degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinchenko, V.V.; Babykin, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiating cells of Aspergillus nidulans of the wild type in the logarythmical growth phase with X-rays leads to a certain retention in DNA synthesis. This period is characterized by an insignificant fermentative DNA degradation connected with a process of its repair. There is no direct dependence between the radiation dose and the level of DNA degradation. The investigation of X-ray induced DNA degradation in a number of UVS-mutants permits to show the existence of two branches of DNA degradation - dependent and independent of the exogenic energy source. The dependence of DNA degradation on albumen synthesis prior to irradiation and after it, is demonstrated. It is supposed that the level of X-ray induced DNA degradation is determined by two albumen systems, one of which initiates degradation and the other terminates it. The comparative analysis of UV and X-ray induced DNA degradation is carried out

  7. Comparative Correlation Between Chemical Composition and Cytotoxic Potential of the Coral-Associated Fungus Aspergillus sp. 2C1-EGY Against Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Hady, Faten K; Shaker, Kamel H; Souleman, Ahmed M A; Fayad, Walid; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed S; Hamed, Ahmed A; Iodice, Carmine; Tommonaro, Giuseppina

    2017-11-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death in several countries. In the search for new anticancer drugs, marine organisms have played an important role in the discovery of lead compounds and the development of new pharmaceuticals for their wide diversity of chemical structures and biological activities. In the present study, the cytotoxicity on colorectal cancer cells HCT116 exerted by marine fungus Aspergillus sp. 2C1-EGY extracts associated with the soft coral Sinularia sp. was investigated; the sub-fractions Fr 2c and Fr 2d had significantly high cytotoxic activity (88 and 85%, respectively). Moreover, the major hexadecanoic, octadecanoic, and octadecenoic acids as well as their methyl esters were isolated. GC/MS analysis revealed the identification of 46 major and minor compounds, from which 19 saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and eight fatty acid esters were identified.

  8. Fractional factorial plans

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Aloke

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop reference to fractional factorials and related orthogonal arrays.Presenting one of the most dynamic areas of statistical research, this book offers a systematic, rigorous, and up-to-date treatment of fractional factorial designs and related combinatorial mathematics. Leading statisticians Aloke Dey and Rahul Mukerjee consolidate vast amounts of material from the professional literature--expertly weaving fractional replication, orthogonal arrays, and optimality aspects. They develop the basic theory of fractional factorials using the calculus of factorial arrangements, thereby providing a unified approach to the study of fractional factorial plans. An indispensable guide for statisticians in research and industry as well as for graduate students, Fractional Factorial Plans features: * Construction procedures of symmetric and asymmetric orthogonal arrays. * Many up-to-date research results on nonexistence. * A chapter on optimal fractional factorials not based on orthogonal arrays. * Trend-free plans...

  9. SRF for neutrino factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Neutrino Factory calls for nearly 500 meters of 200 MHz SRF cavities to provide 7.5 GV. Such a facility is more demanding than the largest SRF installation to date, i.e., LEP-II, where 500 m of niobium-coated copper cavities provided more than 3 GV of acceleration. Based on the high real estate gradient desired to minimize muon loss, superconducting cavities are selected to provide active gradients of 15 - 17 MV/m, and a real estate gradient of 7.5 MV/m. At such high gradients, the peak RF power demand for copper cavities would become prohibitively expensive. By virtue of low losses, SC cavities can be filled slowly (rise time 3 ms) reducing the peak power demand to roughly half MW per cell. (author)

  10. Biogenic Synthesis, Characterization and Evaluation of Silver Nanoparticles from Aspergillus niger JX556221 Against Human Colon Cancer Cell Line HT-29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengzheng, Wang; Jiazhi, Wen; Shuangjiang, Chen; Swamy, Mallappa Kumara; Sinniah, Uma Rani; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Umar, Ahmad

    2018-05-01

    Nanobiotechnology has emerged as a promising technology to develop new therapeutically active nanomaterials. The present study was aimed to biosynthesize AgNPs extracellularly using Aspergillus niger JX556221 fungal extract and to evaluate their anticancer potential against colon cancer cell line, HT-29. UV-visible spectral characterization of the synthesized AgNPs showed higher absorption peak at 440 nm wavelength. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed the monodispersed nature of synthesized AgNPs occurring in spherical shape with a size in the range of 20-25 nm. Further, characterization using Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDX) confirmed the face-centred cubic crystalline structure of metallic AgNPs. FTIR data revealed the occurrence of various phytochemicals in the cell free fungal extract which substantiated the fungal extract mediated AgNPs synthesis. The cytotoxic effect of AgNPs was studied by using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results evidenced the cytotoxic effect of AgNPs on HT-29 cell lines in a dose dependent manner. The highest activity was found at 100 μg/ml concentration after 24 h of incubation. Use of propidium iodide staining examination method confirmed the cytotoxic effect of AgNPs through inducing cell apoptosis. AgNPs cytotoxicity was found to be through elevating reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caspase-3 activation resulting in induced apoptosis. Therefore, this research finding provides an insight towards the development of novel anticancer agents using biological sources.

  11. Human primary myeloid dendritic cells interact with the opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus via the C-type lectin receptor Dectin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefter, Maike; Lother, Jasmin; Weiß, Esther; Schmitt, Anna Lena; Fliesser, Mirjam; Einsele, Hermann; Loeffler, Juergen

    2017-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen causing detrimental infections in immunocompromised individuals. Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and recognize the A. fumigatus cell wall component β-1,3 glucan via Dectin-1, followed by DC maturation and cytokine release. Here, we demonstrate that human primary myeloid DCs (mDCs) interact with different morphotypes of A. fumigatus. Dectin-1 is expressed on mDCs and is down-regulated after contact with A. fumigatus, indicating that mDCs recognize A. fumigatus via this receptor. Blocking of Dectin-1, followed by stimulation with depleted zymosan diminished the up-regulation of the T-cell co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, HLA-DR and CCR7 on mDCs and led to decreased release of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-10. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Human and Murine Innate Immune Cell Populations Display Common and Distinct Response Patterns during Their In Vitro Interaction with the Pathogenic Mold Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Anna-Maria; Lother, Jasmin; Wurster, Sebastian; Lutz, Manfred B; Schmitt, Anna Lena; Morton, Charles Oliver; Eyrich, Matthias; Czakai, Kristin; Einsele, Hermann; Loeffler, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the main cause of invasive fungal infections occurring almost exclusively in immunocompromised patients. An improved understanding of the initial innate immune response is key to the development of better diagnostic tools and new treatment options. Mice are commonly used to study immune defense mechanisms during the infection of the mammalian host with A. fumigatus . However, little is known about functional differences between the human and murine immune response against this fungal pathogen. Thus, we performed a comparative functional analysis of human and murine dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages, and polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) using standardized and reproducible working conditions, laboratory protocols, and readout assays. A. fumigatus did not provoke identical responses in murine and human immune cells but rather initiated relatively specific responses. While human DCs showed a significantly stronger upregulation of their maturation markers and major histocompatibility complex molecules and phagocytosed A. fumigatus more efficiently compared to their murine counterparts, murine PMNs and macrophages exhibited a significantly stronger release of reactive oxygen species after exposure to A. fumigatus . For all studied cell types, human and murine samples differed in their cytokine response to conidia or germ tubes of A. fumigatus . Furthermore, Dectin-1 showed inverse expression patterns on human and murine DCs after fungal stimulation. These specific differences should be carefully considered and highlight potential limitations in the transferability of murine host-pathogen interaction studies.

  13. Human and Murine Innate Immune Cell Populations Display Common and Distinct Response Patterns during Their In Vitro Interaction with the Pathogenic Mold Aspergillus fumigatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Maria Hellmann

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus is the main cause of invasive fungal infections occurring almost exclusively in immunocompromised patients. An improved understanding of the initial innate immune response is key to the development of better diagnostic tools and new treatment options. Mice are commonly used to study immune defense mechanisms during the infection of the mammalian host with A. fumigatus. However, little is known about functional differences between the human and murine immune response against this fungal pathogen. Thus, we performed a comparative functional analysis of human and murine dendritic cells (DCs, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs using standardized and reproducible working conditions, laboratory protocols, and readout assays. A. fumigatus did not provoke identical responses in murine and human immune cells but rather initiated relatively specific responses. While human DCs showed a significantly stronger upregulation of their maturation markers and major histocompatibility complex molecules and phagocytosed A. fumigatus more efficiently compared to their murine counterparts, murine PMNs and macrophages exhibited a significantly stronger release of reactive oxygen species after exposure to A. fumigatus. For all studied cell types, human and murine samples differed in their cytokine response to conidia or germ tubes of A. fumigatus. Furthermore, Dectin-1 showed inverse expression patterns on human and murine DCs after fungal stimulation. These specific differences should be carefully considered and highlight potential limitations in the transferability of murine host–pathogen interaction studies.

  14. Factorial experimental design for the culture of human embryonic stem cells as aggregates in stirred suspension bioreactors reveals the potential for interaction effects between bioprocess parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Megan M; Meng, Guoliang; Rancourt, Derrick E; Gates, Ian D; Kallos, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Traditional optimization of culture parameters for the large-scale culture of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as aggregates is carried out in a stepwise manner whereby the effect of varying each culture parameter is investigated individually. However, as evidenced by the wide range of published protocols and culture performance indicators (growth rates, pluripotency marker expression, etc.), there is a lack of systematic investigation into the true effect of varying culture parameters especially with respect to potential interactions between culture variables. Here we describe the design and execution of a two-parameter, three-level (3(2)) factorial experiment resulting in nine conditions that were run in duplicate 125-mL stirred suspension bioreactors. The two parameters investigated here were inoculation density and agitation rate, which are easily controlled, but currently, poorly characterized. Cell readouts analyzed included fold expansion, maximum density, and exponential growth rate. Our results reveal that the choice of best case culture parameters was dependent on which cell property was chosen as the primary output variable. Subsequent statistical analyses via two-way analysis of variance indicated significant interaction effects between inoculation density and agitation rate specifically in the case of exponential growth rates. Results indicate that stepwise optimization has the potential to miss out on the true optimal case. In addition, choosing an optimum condition for a culture output of interest from the factorial design yielded similar results when repeated with the same cell line indicating reproducibility. We finally validated that human ESCs remain pluripotent in suspension culture as aggregates under our optimal conditions and maintain their differentiation capabilities as well as a stable karyotype and strong expression levels of specific human ESC markers over several passages in suspension bioreactors.

  15. Railways Factory in Resita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Iacob-Mare

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an exemption Analysis railway factory in Resita impressed having experience and also provide some technical characteristics of freight wagons representative technology, used to transport products made in factories in ReşiŃa.

  16. PCs in the factory

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a short discount publication.PCs have become as essential to the factory environment as they are to the office environment. This in-depth report examines how specially adapted PCs and peripherals are being established in Factory Process Control and Reporting. The report covers: * Hardware and Software* Typical Applications* Implementation Issues* Case Studies and Real Applications

  17. Gene deletion of cytosolic ATP: citrate lyase leads to altered organic acid production in Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijer, Susan Lisette; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2009-01-01

    With the availability of the genome sequence of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger, the use of targeted genetic modifications has become feasible. This, together with the fact that A. niger is well established industrially, makes this fungus an attractive micro-organism for creating a cell...... factory platform for production of chemicals. Using molecular biology techniques, this study focused on metabolic engineering of A. niger to manipulate its organic acid production in the direction of succinic acid. The gene target for complete gene deletion was cytosolic ATP: citrate lyase (acl), which...... the acl gene. Additionally, the total amount of organic acids produced in the deletion strain was significantly increased. Genome-scale stoichiometric metabolic model predictions can be used for identifying gene targets. Deletion of the acl led to increased succinic acid production by A. niger....

  18. Characterisation of Aspergillus niger prolyl aminopeptidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, E.J.W.; Moers, A.P.H.A.; Ooyen, van A.J.J.; Schaap, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have cloned a gene (papA) that encodes a prolyl aminopeptidase from Aspergillus niger. Homologous genes are present in the genomes of the Eurotiales A. nidulans, A. fumigatus and Talaromyces emersonii, but the gene is not present in the genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cell extracts

  19. Overlapping and Distinct Roles of Aspergillus fumigatus UDP-glucose 4-Epimerases in Galactose Metabolism and the Synthesis of Galactose-containing Cell Wall Polysaccharides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark J.; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Cerone, Robert P.; Baptista, Stefanie D.; Campoli, Paolo V.; Choe, Se-In; Kravtsov, Ilia; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Creuzenet, Carole; Liu, Hong; Berghuis, Albert M.; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Filler, Scott G.; Fontaine, Thierry; Sheppard, Donald C.

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Aspergillus fumigatus contains two galactose-containing polysaccharides, galactomannan and galactosaminogalactan, whose biosynthetic pathways are not well understood. The A. fumigatus genome contains three genes encoding putative UDP-glucose 4-epimerases, uge3, uge4, and uge5. We undertook this study to elucidate the function of these epimerases. We found that uge4 is minimally expressed and is not required for the synthesis of galactose-containing exopolysaccharides or galactose metabolism. Uge5 is the dominant UDP-glucose 4-epimerase in A. fumigatus and is essential for normal growth in galactose-based medium. Uge5 is required for synthesis of the galactofuranose (Galf) component of galactomannan and contributes galactose to the synthesis of galactosaminogalactan. Uge3 can mediate production of both UDP-galactose and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and is required for the production of galactosaminogalactan but not galactomannan. In the absence of Uge5, Uge3 activity is sufficient for growth on galactose and the synthesis of galactosaminogalactan containing lower levels of galactose but not the synthesis of Galf. A double deletion of uge5 and uge3 blocked growth on galactose and synthesis of both Galf and galactosaminogalactan. This study is the first survey of glucose epimerases in A. fumigatus and contributes to our understanding of the role of these enzymes in metabolism and cell wall synthesis. PMID:24257745

  20. Mapping N-linked Glycosylation Sites in the Secretome and Whole Cells of Aspergillus niger Using Hydrazide Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lu; Aryal, Uma K.; Dai, Ziyu; Mason, Alisa C.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Tian, Zhixin; Zhou, Jianying; Su, Dian; Weitz, Karl K.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Scott E.; Qian, Weijun

    2012-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is known to play an essential role in both cellular functions and the secretory pathways; however, little information is available on the dynamics of glycosylated N-linked glycosites of fungi. Herein we present the first extensive mapping of glycosylated N-linked glycosites in industrial strain Aspergillus niger by applying an optimized solid phase enrichment of glycopeptide protocol using hydrazide modified magnetic beads. The enrichment protocol was initially optimized using mouse plasma and A. niger secretome samples, which was then applied to profile N-linked glycosites from both the secretome and whole cell lysates of A. niger. A total of 847 unique N-linked glycosites and 330 N-linked glycoproteins were confidently identified by LC-MS/MS. Based on gene ontology analysis, the identified N-linked glycoproteins in the whole cell lysate were primarily localized in the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, golgi apparatus, lysosome, and storage vacuoles. The identified N-linked glycoproteins are involved in a wide range of biological processes including gene regulation and signal transduction, protein folding and assembly, protein modification and carbohydrate metabolism. The extensive coverage of glycosylated N-linked glycosites along with identification of partial N-linked glycosylation in those enzymes involving in different biochemical pathways provide useful information for functional studies of N-linked glycosylation and their biotechnological applications in A. niger.

  1. Whole transcriptome data of primary human NK cells under hypoxia and interleukin 15 priming: A 2×2 factorial design experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Ana Sofia; Killian, Doreen; Schulte, Jutta; Sticht, Carsten; Lindner, Holger A

    2017-10-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells mediate innate immunity against cancer and intracellular infection, at that, operating in often oxygen-deprived environments. We performed a microarray experiment with a 2×2 factorial design to profile gene expression in human NK cells (Velasquez et al., 2016) [1]. In this experiment, NK cells from 5 healthy volunteers were primed or not for 6 h with the survival factor and inflammatory cytokine interleukin 15 (IL-15) under hypoxic or normoxic culture conditions (20 samples in total). Here, we provide details on the culture setup that govern the actual O 2 partial pressure (pO 2 ) experienced by the cells, as well as on the RNA extraction procedure used, which we optimized from commercial spin column protocols to obtain highly concentrated total RNA. We present a quality control analysis of the normalized microarray data, as well as overviews for differentially regulated genes. These data provide insights into NK cell transcriptional responses to immune stimulation under physiologically relevant low oxygen conditions. This dataset is deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus database (accession number GSE70214).

  2. Gene expression profiles of human dendritic cells interacting with Aspergillus fumigatus in a bilayer model of the alveolar epithelium/endothelium interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Oliver Morton

    Full Text Available The initial stages of the interaction between the host and Aspergillus fumigatus at the alveolar surface of the human lung are critical in the establishment of aspergillosis. Using an in vitro bilayer model of the alveolus, including both the epithelium (human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line, A549 and endothelium (human pulmonary artery epithelial cells, HPAEC on transwell membranes, it was possible to closely replicate the in vivo conditions. Two distinct sub-groups of dendritic cells (DC, monocyte-derived DC (moDC and myeloid DC (mDC, were included in the model to examine immune responses to fungal infection at the alveolar surface. RNA in high quantity and quality was extracted from the cell layers on the transwell membrane to allow gene expression analysis using tailored custom-made microarrays, containing probes for 117 immune-relevant genes. This microarray data indicated minimal induction of immune gene expression in A549 alveolar epithelial cells in response to germ tubes of A. fumigatus. In contrast, the addition of DC to the system greatly increased the number of differentially expressed immune genes. moDC exhibited increased expression of genes including CLEC7A, CD209 and CCL18 in the absence of A. fumigatus compared to mDC. In the presence of A. fumigatus, both DC subgroups exhibited up-regulation of genes identified in previous studies as being associated with the exposure of DC to A. fumigatus and exhibiting chemotactic properties for neutrophils, including CXCL2, CXCL5, CCL20, and IL1B. This model closely approximated the human alveolus allowing for an analysis of the host pathogen interface that complements existing animal models of IA.

  3. A cell factory of Bacillus subtilis engineered for the simple bioconversion of myo-inositol to scyllo-inositol, a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenaka Shinji

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A stereoisomer of inositol, scyllo-inositol, is known as a promising therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease, since it prevents the accumulation of beta-amyloid deposits, a hallmark of the disease. However, this compound is relatively rare in nature, whereas another stereoisomer of inositol, myo-inositol, is abundantly available. Results Bacillus subtilis possesses a unique inositol metabolism involving both stereoisomers. We manipulated the inositol metabolism in B. subtilis to permit the possible bioconversion from myo-inositol to scyllo-inositol. Within 48 h of cultivation, the engineered strain was able to convert almost half of 10 g/L myo-inositol to scyllo-inositol that accumulated in the culture medium. Conclusions The engineered B. subtilis serves as a prototype of cell factory enabling a novel and inexpensive supply of scyllo-inositol.

  4. A cell factory of Bacillus subtilis engineered for the simple bioconversion of myo-inositol to scyllo-inositol, a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A stereoisomer of inositol, scyllo-inositol, is known as a promising therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease, since it prevents the accumulation of beta-amyloid deposits, a hallmark of the disease. However, this compound is relatively rare in nature, whereas another stereoisomer of inositol, myo-inositol, is abundantly available. Results Bacillus subtilis possesses a unique inositol metabolism involving both stereoisomers. We manipulated the inositol metabolism in B. subtilis to permit the possible bioconversion from myo-inositol to scyllo-inositol. Within 48 h of cultivation, the engineered strain was able to convert almost half of 10 g/L myo-inositol to scyllo-inositol that accumulated in the culture medium. Conclusions The engineered B. subtilis serves as a prototype of cell factory enabling a novel and inexpensive supply of scyllo-inositol. PMID:21896210

  5. Intra and extracellular nuclease production by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Adlane V. B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra and extracellular nuclease production by strains of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans was estimated using a modified DNAse test agar and cell-free extract assays. Differences in the production of nucleases by A. niger and A. nidulans were observed. These observations suggest that the DNAse test agar can be helpful for a quick screening for some types of nucleases in filamentous fungi. The assays using cell-free extracts can also be useful for initial characterization of other types of nucleases.

  6. Towards energy transparent factories

    CERN Document Server

    Posselt, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    This monograph provides a methodological approach for establishing demand-oriented levels of energy transparency of factories. The author presents a systematic indication of energy drivers and cost factors, taking into account the interdependencies between facility and production domains. Particular attention is given to energy flow metering and monitoring. Readers will also be provided with an in-depth description of a planning tool which allows for systematically deriving suitable metering points in complex factory environments. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field of factory planning, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  7. Recognition of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae by human plasmacytoid dendritic cells is mediated by dectin-2 and results in formation of extracellular traps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio V Loures

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs were initially considered as critical for innate immunity to viruses. However, our group has shown that pDCs bind to and inhibit the growth of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae and that depletion of pDCs renders mice hypersusceptible to experimental aspergillosis. In this study, we examined pDC receptors contributing to hyphal recognition and downstream events in pDCs stimulated by A. fumigatus hyphae. Our data show that Dectin-2, but not Dectin-1, participates in A. fumigatus hyphal recognition, TNF-α and IFN-α release, and antifungal activity. Moreover, Dectin-2 acts in cooperation with the FcRγ chain to trigger signaling responses. In addition, using confocal and electron microscopy we demonstrated that the interaction between pDCs and A. fumigatus induced the formation of pDC extracellular traps (pETs containing DNA and citrullinated histone H3. These structures closely resembled those of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. The microarray analysis of the pDC transcriptome upon A. fumigatus infection also demonstrated up-regulated expression of genes associated with apoptosis as well as type I interferon-induced genes. Thus, human pDCs directly recognize A. fumigatus hyphae via Dectin-2; this interaction results in cytokine release and antifungal activity. Moreover, hyphal stimulation of pDCs triggers a distinct pattern of pDC gene expression and leads to pET formation.

  8. High efficiency cell-recycle continuous sodium gluconate production by Aspergillus niger using on-line physiological parameters association analysis to regulate feed rate rationally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fei; Li, Chao; Wang, Zejian; Zhao, Wei; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a system of cell-recycle continuous fermentation for sodium gluconate (SG) production by Aspergillus niger (A. niger) was established. Based on initial continuous fermentation result (100.0h) with constant feed rate, an automatic feedback strategy to regulate feed rate using on-line physiological parameters (OUR and DO) was proposed and applied successfully for the first time in the improved continuous fermentation (240.5h). Due to less auxiliary time, highest SG production rate (31.05±0.29gL(-1)h(-1)) and highest yield (0.984±0.067molmol(-1)), overall SG production capacity (975.8±5.8gh(-1)) in 50-L fermentor of improved continuous fermentation increased more than 300.0% compared to that of batch fermentation. Improvement of mass transfer and dispersed mycelia morphology were the two major reasons responsible for the high SG production rate. This system had been successfully applied to industrial fermentation and SG production was greatly improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Virtual Factory Testbed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Factory Testbed (VFT) is comprised of three physical facilities linked by a standalone network (VFNet). The three facilities are the Smart and Wireless...

  10. Super B Factories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . 744. Pramana – J. Phys. ... bound the values of NP parameters and study their effect on the b → s penguin modes. The B factories ..... the magnet power supplies, the RF system, the digital feedback system, and many vacuum components.

  11. Maximum Autocorrelation Factorial Kriging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Pedersen, John L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factorial kriging, and its application to irregularly sampled stream sediment geochemical data from South Greenland. Kriged MAF images are compared with kriged images of varimax rotated factors from...

  12. Cytotoxicity of methanol extracts of 10 Cameroonian medicinal plants towards multi-factorial drug-resistant cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Tchinda, Cedric F; Mambe, Flora T; Beng, Veronique P; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-08-02

    Cancer chemotherapy is still hampered by clinical failures due to multi-drug resistance (MDR) of tumor cells. In the present study, we have investigated the cytotoxicity of 20 methanol extracts from 10 medicinal plants against the sensitive leukemia CCRF-CEM cells. The most cytotoxic extracts were then further tested on a panel of 8 human cancer cell lines, including various MDR phenotypes. The cytotoxicity of the 20 methanol extracts from 10 Cameroonian medicinal plants was determined using a resazurin reduction assay. Meanwhile, flow cytometry was used to measure cell cycle, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the preliminary assay using CCRF-CEM cells, 12 extracts from five plants displayed IC50 values below 80 μg/mL, namely Albizia adianthifolia, Alchornea cordifolia, Alchornea laxiflora, Pennisetum purpureum, and Spathodea campanulata. the four best extracts were from two plants: Albizia adianthifolia roots (AAR) and bark (AAB) as well as Alchornea cordifolia leaves (ACL) and bark (ACB) had respective IC50 values of 0.98 μg/mL, 1.45 μg/mL, 8.02 μg/mL and 12.57 μg/mL in CCRF-CEM cells. They were further tested in 8 other cell lines as well as in normal AML12 hepatocytes. IC50 values ranging from 2.71 μg/mL (towards glioblastoma U87MG.ΔEGFR cells) to 10.30 μg/mL (towards breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231-BCRP cells) for AAB, from 3.43 μg/mL (towards U87MG cells) to 10.77 μg/mL (towards colon carcinoma HCT116 (p53 (-/-) ) cells) for AAR and from 0.11 μg/mL (towards CCRF-CEM cells) to 108 μg/mL (towards leukemia CEM/ADR5000 cells) for doxorubicin (as control drug) were obtained. ACL and ACB extracts displayed selective activities. AAR and ACL extracts induced apoptosis in CCRF-CEM cells, through caspases activation and loss of MMP, while apoptotic cell death was mediated by MMP diruption and increase ROS production for ACL. Some of the tested plants namely Albizia adianthifolia, Alchornea

  13. mutant of Aspergillus niger

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-19

    Jan 19, 2009 ... enzyme glucose oxidase production from mutagenization of A. niger, resistant to a range of ... strain, forward from Department of Microbiology, was used and maintained on potato dextrose agar (PDA) slants, .... (1993). Induction of glucose oxidase, catalase and lactonase in. Aspergillus niger. Curr. Genet.

  14. Cytotoxicity and modes of action of five Cameroonian medicinal plants against multi-factorial drug resistance of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Tankeo, Simplice B; Saeed, Mohamed E M; Wiench, Benjamin; Tane, Pierre; Efferth, Thomas

    2014-04-11

    Beilschmiedia acuta Kosterm, Clausena anisata (Willd) Hook, Fagara tessmannii Engl., Newbouldia laevis Seem., and Polyscias fulva (Hiern) Harms. are medicinal plants used in Cameroonian traditional medicine in the treatment of various types of cancers. The present study aims at investigating 11 methanolic extracts from the above Cameroonian medicinal plants on a panel of human cancer cell lines, including various drug-resistant phenotypes. Possible modes of action were analyzed for two extracts from Beilschmiedia acuta and Polyscia fulva and alpha-hederin, the representative constituent of Polyscia fulva. Cytotoxicity was determined using a resazurin assay. Cell cycle, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by flow cytometry. Cellular response to alpha-hederin was investigated by a mRNA microarray approach. Prescreening of extracts (40µg/mL) showed that three of eleven plant extracts inhibited proliferation of CCRF-CEM cells by more than 50%, i.e. BAL (73.65%), the bark extract of Beilschmiedia acuta (78.67%) and PFR (68.72%). Subsequent investigations revealed IC50 values below or around 30µg/mL of BAL and PFR in 10 cell lines, including drug-resistant models, i.e. P-glycoprotein-overexpressing CEM/ADR5000, breast cancer resistance protein-transfected MDA-MB-231-BCRP, TP53 knockout cells (HCT116 p53(-/-)), and mutation-activated epidermal growth factor receptor-transfected U87MG.ΔEGFR cells. IC50 values below 5µg/mL of BAL were obtained for HCT116 (p53(-/-)) cells. IC50 values below 10µM of alpha-hederin were found for sensitive CCRF-CEM and multidrug-resistant CEM/ADR5000 cells. The BAL and PFR extracts induced cell cycle arrest between G0/G1 and S phases. PFR-induced apoptosis was associated with increased ROS generation and MMP breakdown. Microarray-based cluster analysis revealed a gene expression profile that predicted cellular response to alpha-hederin. BAL, PFL and alpha-hederin, an

  15. Cytotoxicity of anthraquinones from the roots of Pentas schimperi towards multi-factorial drug-resistant cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Donfack, Arno R Nanfack; Mbaveng, Armelle T; Zeino, Maen; Tane, Pierre; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug resistance in cancer represents a major problem in chemotherapy. The present study was designed to assess the cytotoxicity of anthraquinones from Pentas schimperi, namely damnacanthal (1), damnacanthol (2), 3-hydroxy-2-hydroxymethyl anthraquinone (3) and schimperiquinone B (4) against nine drug-sensitive and multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer cell lines. The resazurin reduction assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the above compounds, whilst caspase-Glo assay was used to detect the activation of caspases enzymes by compounds 1 and 2. Cell cycle, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and levels of reactive oxygen species were all analyzed via flow cytometry. Anthraquinones 1 and 2 displayed cytotoxic effects with IC50 values below 81 μM on all the nine tested cancer cell lines whilst 3 and 4 displayed selective activities. The recorded IC50 values for compounds 1 and 2 ranged from 3.12 μM and 12.18 μM (towards leukemia CCRF-CEM cells) and from 30.32 μM and 80.11 μM (towards gliobastoma U87MG.ΔEGFR cells) respectively, and from 0.20 μM (against CCRF-CEM cells) to 195.12 μM (against CEM/ADR5000 cells) for doxorubicin. Compounds 1 and 2 induced apoptosis in CCRF-CEM leukemia cells, mediated by the disruption of the MMP and increase in ROS production. Anthraquinones from Pentas schimperi and mostly 1 and 2 are potential cytotoxic natural products that deserve more investigations to develop novel antineoplastic drugs against multifactorial drug resistant cancers.

  16. Endocytic machinery protein SlaB is dispensable for polarity establishment but necessary for polarity maintenance in hyphal tip cells of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervás-Aguilar, América; Peñalva, Miguel A

    2010-10-01

    The Aspergillus nidulans endocytic internalization protein SlaB is essential, in agreement with the key role in apical extension attributed to endocytosis. We constructed, by gene replacement, a nitrate-inducible, ammonium-repressible slaB1 allele for conditional SlaB expression. Video microscopy showed that repressed slaB1 cells are able to establish but unable to maintain a stable polarity axis, arresting growth with budding-yeast-like morphology shortly after initially normal germ tube emergence. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged secretory v-SNARE SynA, which continuously recycles to the plasma membrane after being efficiently endocytosed, we establish that SlaB is crucial for endocytosis, although it is dispensable for the anterograde traffic of SynA and of the t-SNARE Pep12 to the plasma and vacuolar membrane, respectively. By confocal microscopy, repressed slaB1 germlings show deep plasma membrane invaginations. Ammonium-to-nitrate medium shift experiments demonstrated reversibility of the null polarity maintenance phenotype and correlation of normal apical extension with resumption of SynA endocytosis. In contrast, SlaB downregulation in hyphae that had progressed far beyond germ tube emergence led to marked polarity maintenance defects correlating with deficient SynA endocytosis. Thus, the strict correlation between abolishment of endocytosis and disability of polarity maintenance that we report here supports the view that hyphal growth requires coupling of secretion and endocytosis. However, downregulated slaB1 cells form F-actin clumps containing the actin-binding protein AbpA, and thus F-actin misregulation cannot be completely disregarded as a possible contributor to defective apical extension. Latrunculin B treatment of SlaB-downregulated tips reduced the formation of AbpA clumps without promoting growth and revealed the formation of cortical "comets" of AbpA.

  17. Influence of Platelet-rich Plasma on the immune response of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages stimulated with Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czakai, Kristin; Dittrich, Marcus; Kaltdorf, Martin; Müller, Tobias; Krappmann, Sven; Schedler, Anette; Bonin, Michael; Dühring, Sybille; Schuster, Stefan; Speth, Cornelia; Rambach, Günter; Einsele, Hermann; Dandekar, Thomas; Löffler, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦ) are critical for protection against pathogenic fungi including Aspergillus fumigatus. To analyze the role of platelets in the innate immune response, human DCs and MΦs were challenged with A. fumigatus in presence or absence of human platelet rich plasma (PRP). Gene expression analyses and functional investigations were performed. A systems biological approach was used for initial modelling of the DC - A. fumigatus interaction. DCs in a quiescent state together with different corresponding activation states were validated using gene expression data from DCs and MΦ stimulated with A. fumigatus. To characterize the influence of platelets on the immune response of DCs and MΦ to A. fumigatus, we experimentally quantified their cytokine secretion, phagocytic capacity, maturation, and metabolic activity with or without platelets. PRP in combination with A. fumigatus treatment resulted in the highest expression of the maturation markers CD80, CD83 and CD86 in DCs. Furthermore, PRP enhanced the capacity of macrophages and DCs to phagocytose A. fumigatus conidia. In parallel, PRP in combination with the innate immune cells significantly reduced the metabolic activity of the fungus. Interestingly, A. fumigatus and PRP stimulated MΦ showed a significantly reduced gene expression and secretion of IL6 while PRP only reduced the IL-6 secretion of A. fumigatus stimulated DCs. The in silico systems biological model correlated well with these experimental data. Different modules centrally involved in DC function became clearly apparent, including DC maturation, cytokine response and apoptosis pathways. Taken together, the ability of PRP to suppress IL-6 release of human DCs might prevent local excessive inflammatory hemorrhage, tissue infarction and necrosis in the human lung. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. The identification of a novel Sulfolobus islandicus CAMP-like peptide points to archaeal microorganisms as cell factories for the production of antimicrobial molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notomista, Eugenio; Falanga, Annarita; Fusco, Salvatore; Pirone, Luciano; Zanfardino, Anna; Galdiero, Stefania; Varcamonti, Mario; Pedone, Emilia; Contursi, Patrizia

    2015-09-04

    Pathogenic bacteria easily develop resistance to c onventional antibiotics so that even relatively new molecules are quickly losing efficacy. This strongly encourages the quest of new antimicrobials especially for the treatment of chronic infections. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) are small positively charged peptides with an amphipathic structure, active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, as well as protozoa. A novel (CAMP)-like peptide (VLL-28) was identified in the primary structure of a transcription factor, Stf76, encoded by pSSVx, a hybrid plasmid-virus from the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. VLL-28 displays chemical, physical and functional properties typical of CAMPs. Indeed, it has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and acquires a defined structure in the presence of membrane mimetics. Furthermore, it exhibits selective leakage and fusogenic capability on vesicles with a lipid composition similar to that of bacterial membranes. VLL-28 localizes not only on the cell membrane but also in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and retains the ability to bind nucleic acids. These findings suggest that this CAMP-like peptide could exert its antimicrobial activity both on membrane and intra cellular targets. VLL-28 is the first CAMP-like peptide identified in the archaeal kingdom, thus pointing to archaeal microorganisms as cell factories to produce antimicrobial molecules of biotechnological interest. Furthermore, results from this work show that DNA/RNA-binding proteins could be used as sources of CAMPs.

  19. Production of 10R-hydroxy unsaturated fatty acids from hempseed oil hydrolyzate by recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing PpoC from Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeong-Eun; Seo, Min-Ju; Shin, Kyung-Chul; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2016-09-01

    The first and second preferred substrates of recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing 10R-dioxygenase (PpoC) from Aspergillus nidulans and the purified enzyme were linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid, respectively. PpoC in cells showed higher thermal and reaction stabilities compared to purified PpoC. Thus, 10R-hydroxy unsaturated fatty acids were produced from linoleic acid, α-linolenic acid, and hempseed oil hydrolyzate containing linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid as substrates by whole recombinant cells expressing PpoC. The optimal reaction conditions for the production of 10R-hydroxy-8E,12Z-octadecadienoic acid (10R-HODE) were pH 8.0, 30 °C, 250 rpm, 5 % (v/v) dimethyl sulfoxide, 5 g l(-1) linoleic acid, and 60 g l(-1) cells in 100-ml baffled flask. Under these conditions, whole recombinant cells expressing PpoC produced 2.7 g l(-1) 10R-HODE from 5 g l(-1) linoleic acid for 40 min, with a conversion yield of 54 % (w/w) and a productivity of 4.0 g l(-1) h(-1); produced 2.2 g l(-1) 10R-hydroxy-8E,12Z,15Z-octadecatrienoic acid (10R-HOTrE) from 3 g l(-1) α-linolenic acid for 30 min, with a conversion yield of 72 % (w/w) and a productivity of 4.3 g l(-1) h(-1); and produced 1.8 g l(-1) 10R-HODE and 0.5 g l(-1) 10R-HOTrE from 5 g l(-1) hempseed oil hydrolyzate containing 2.5 g l(-1) linoleic acid and 1.0 g l(-1) α-linolenic acid for 30 min, with a conversion yield of 74 and 51 % (w/w), respectively, and a productivity of 3.6 and 1.0 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the biotechnological production of 10R-hydroxy unsaturated fatty acids.

  20. Rhodococcus aetherivorans BCP1 as cell factory for the production of intracellular tellurium nanorods under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentato, Alessandro; Piacenza, Elena; Anikovskiy, Max; Cappelletti, Martina; Zannoni, Davide; Turner, Raymond J

    2016-12-15

    Tellurite (TeO 3 2- ) is recognized as a toxic oxyanion to living organisms. However, mainly anaerobic or facultative-anaerobic microorganisms are able to tolerate and convert TeO 3 2- into the less toxic and available form of elemental Tellurium (Te 0 ), producing Te-deposits or Te-nanostructures. The use of TeO 3 2- -reducing bacteria can lead to the decontamination of polluted environments and the development of "green-synthesis" methods for the production of nanomaterials. In this study, the tolerance and the consumption of TeO 3 2- have been investigated, along with the production and characterization of Te-nanorods by Rhodococcus aetherivorans BCP1 grown under aerobic conditions. Aerobically grown BCP1 cells showed high tolerance towards TeO 3 2- with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2800 μg/mL (11.2 mM). TeO 3 2- consumption has been evaluated exposing the BCP1 strain to either 100 or 500 μg/mL of K 2 TeO 3 (unconditioned growth) or after re-inoculation in fresh medium with new addition of K 2 TeO 3 (conditioned growth). A complete consumption of TeO 3 2- at 100 μg/mL was observed under both growth conditions, although conditioned cells showed higher consumption rate. Unconditioned and conditioned BCP1 cells partially consumed TeO 3 2- at 500 μg/mL. However, a greater TeO 3 2- consumption was observed with conditioned cells. The production of intracellular, not aggregated and rod-shaped Te-nanostructures (TeNRs) was observed as a consequence of TeO 3 2- reduction. Extracted TeNRs appear to be embedded in an organic surrounding material, as suggested by the chemical-physical characterization. Moreover, we observed longer TeNRs depending on either the concentration of precursor (100 or 500 μg/mL of K 2 TeO 3 ) or the growth conditions (unconditioned or conditioned grown cells). Rhodococcus aetherivorans BCP1 is able to tolerate high concentrations of TeO 3 2- during its growth under aerobic conditions. Moreover, compared to unconditioned

  1. The Smart Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Agnieszka; Bilberg, Arne; Bogers, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays we live in a world, which a decade ago would only be described in the science fiction literature. More and more things become smart and both scientists and engineers strive for developing not only new and innovative devices, but also homes, factories, or even cities. Despite of continuous...... development, many of those concepts are still being just a vision of the future, which still needs a lot of effort to become true. This paper reviews the usage of adjective smart in respect to technology and with a special emphasis on the smart factory concept placement among contemporary studies. Due...... to a lack of a consensus of common understanding of this term, a unified definition is proposed. The conceptualization will not only refer to various smart factory visions reported in the literature, but also link the crucial characteristics of this emerging manufacturing concept to usual manufacturing...

  2. Systemic Administration of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Extracellular Vesicles Ameliorates Aspergillus Hyphal Extract-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in Immunocompetent Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Fernanda F; Borg, Zachary D; Goodwin, Meagan; Sokocevic, Dino; Wagner, Darcy E; Coffey, Amy; Antunes, Mariana; Robinson, Kristen L; Mitsialis, S Alex; Kourembanas, Stella; Thane, Kristen; Hoffman, Andrew M; McKenna, David H; Rocco, Patricia R M; Weiss, Daniel J

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number of studies demonstrate that administration of either conditioned media (CM) or extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow and other sources are as effective as the MSCs themselves in mitigating inflammation and injury. The goal of the current study was to determine whether xenogeneic administration of CM or EVs from human bone marrow-derived MSCs would be effective in a model of mixed Th2/Th17, neutrophilic-mediated allergic airway inflammation, reflective of severe refractory asthma, induced by repeated mucosal exposure to Aspergillus hyphal extract (AHE) in immunocompetent C57Bl/6 mice. Systemic administration of both CM and EVs isolated from human and murine MSCs, but not human lung fibroblasts, at the onset of antigen challenge in previously sensitized mice significantly ameliorated the AHE-provoked increases in airway hyperreactivity (AHR), lung inflammation, and the antigen-specific CD4 T-cell Th2 and Th17 phenotype. Notably, both CM and EVs from human MSCs (hMSCs) were generally more potent than those from mouse MSCs (mMSCs) in most of the outcome measures. The weak cross-linking agent 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride was found to inhibit release of both soluble mediators and EVs, fully negating effects of systemically administered hMSCs but only partly inhibited the ameliorating effects of mMSCs. These results demonstrate potent xenogeneic effects of CM and EVs from hMSCs in an immunocompetent mouse model of allergic airway inflammation and they also show differences in mechanisms of action of hMSCs versus mMSCs to mitigate AHR and lung inflammation in this model. There is a growing experience demonstrating benefit of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based cell therapies in preclinical models of asthma. In the current study, conditioned media (CM) and, in particular, the extracellular vesicle fraction obtained from the CM were as potent as the MSCs

  3. Effect of different physicochemical conditions on the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using fungal cell filtrate of Aspergillus oryzae (MTCC No. 1846) and their antibacterial effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanjom, Probin; Ahmed, Giasuddin

    2017-12-01

    Synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under different physicochemical conditions like concentration of silver nitrate (AgNO3), pH and temperature, using fungal cell filtrate of Aspergillus oryzae (MTCC No. 1846) and its antibacterial properties were demonstrated. When fungal cell filtrate having neutral pH was exposed to different concentrations of aqueous solution AgNO3 (1–10 mM), formation of stable AgNPs of different sizes was observed. The size of the AgNPs decreased with the increase of AgNO3 concentration from 1 mM to 8 mM, however, the particles size increased with the increase of AgNO3 concentration from 9 mM to 10 mM. When fungal cell filtrate exposed to aqueous solution of 1 mM AgNO3 at different pH (4–10), the silver ions (Ag+) were reduced leading to the formation of stable AgNPs of different sizes. The size of the AgNPs decreased with the increase of alkaline conditions. When aqueous solution of 1mM AgNO3 with fungal cell filtrate, having neutral pH, was exposed to different temperatures (10, 30, 50, 70 and 90 °С), formation of stable AgNPs having different sizes were obtained. The size of the AgNPs decreased with the increase of temperature. Synergetic effect with antibiotics and size dependent antibacterial activities were also demonstrated against Escherichia coli (MTCC 1687), Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC 737), Bacillus subtilis (MTCC 441) and Klebseilla pneumoniae (MTCC 4030). The formation AgNPs was characterized by UV–vis spectrophotometer. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) confirmed the sizes of the obtained nanoparticles. X-ray diffractometer (XRD) spectrum confirmed the formation of metallic silver. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the presence of protein as stabilizing agent around AgNPs. Scanning electron microscope (TEM) confirmed the morphological changes in the treated bacterial organisms.

  4. Continuous Production of Isomalto-oligosaccharides by Thermo-inactivated Cells of Aspergillus niger J2 with Coarse Perlite as an Immobilizing Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhihua; Li, Zhihong; Su, Yongjian; Zhu, Yongfeng; Zeng, Wei; Chen, Guiguang; Liang, Zhiqun

    2018-02-13

    The coarse perlite 40-80 mesh was selected as an immobilizing material and put into a packed bed reactor (PBR) to continuously convert maltose to isomalto-oligosaccharides (IMOs). The PBR was prepared by mixing the thermo-inactivated cells (TIC) from Aspergillus niger J2 strain with the coarse perlite, then the mixture was put into an overpressure-resistant column. Compared with diatomite 40-80 mesh and thin perlite 80-120 mesh in PBR, coarse perlite was chosen as the best filtration aid, when the ratio of coarse perlite versus TIC was 1:1. The thermal and pH stability of the free and immobilized TIC and the optimum conditions for the transglycosylation reactions were determined. The results show that approximately 75 and 82% and 87 and 91% of α-glucosidase activity were reserved for free and immobilized TIC at temperatures from 30 to 60 °C and pH from 3.00 to 7.00 for 12 h, respectively. With 30% malt syrup under the conditions of 50 °C and pH 4.00, a mini-scale packed bed reactor (Mi-PBR) and medium-scale packed bed reactor (Me-PBR) could continuously produce IMO over 25 and 34 days with the yield of effective IMO (eIMO) ≥ 35% and total IMO (tIMO) ≥ 50%, respectively. The strategy of mixing the coarse perlite with TIC in PBR is a novel approach to continuously produce IMO and has great application potential in industry.

  5. Analysis of the effects of five factors relevant to in vitro chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells using factorial design and high throughput mRNA-profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Rune B; Østrup, Esben; Zhang, Xiaolan; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Brinchmann, Jan E

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro process of chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering has been shown to require three-dimensional culture along with the addition of differentiation factors to the culture medium. In general, this leads to a phenotype lacking some of the cardinal features of native articular chondrocytes and their extracellular matrix. The factors used vary, but regularly include members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily and dexamethasone, sometimes in conjunction with fibroblast growth factor 2 and insulin-like growth factor 1, however the use of soluble factors to induce chondrogenesis has largely been studied on a single factor basis. In the present study we combined a factorial quality-by-design experiment with high-throughput mRNA profiling of a customized chondrogenesis related gene set as a tool to study in vitro chondrogenesis of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in alginate. 48 different conditions of transforming growth factor β 1, 2 and 3, bone morphogenetic protein 2, 4 and 6, dexamethasone, insulin-like growth factor 1, fibroblast growth factor 2 and cell seeding density were included in the experiment. The analysis revealed that the best of the tested differentiation cocktails included transforming growth factor β 1 and dexamethasone. Dexamethasone acted in synergy with transforming growth factor β 1 by increasing many chondrogenic markers while directly downregulating expression of the pro-osteogenic gene osteocalcin. However, all factors beneficial to the expression of desirable hyaline cartilage markers also induced undesirable molecules, indicating that perfect chondrogenic differentiation is not achievable with the current differentiation protocols.

  6. Analysis of the effects of five factors relevant to in vitro chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells using factorial design and high throughput mRNA-profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune B Jakobsen

    Full Text Available The in vitro process of chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering has been shown to require three-dimensional culture along with the addition of differentiation factors to the culture medium. In general, this leads to a phenotype lacking some of the cardinal features of native articular chondrocytes and their extracellular matrix. The factors used vary, but regularly include members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily and dexamethasone, sometimes in conjunction with fibroblast growth factor 2 and insulin-like growth factor 1, however the use of soluble factors to induce chondrogenesis has largely been studied on a single factor basis. In the present study we combined a factorial quality-by-design experiment with high-throughput mRNA profiling of a customized chondrogenesis related gene set as a tool to study in vitro chondrogenesis of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in alginate. 48 different conditions of transforming growth factor β 1, 2 and 3, bone morphogenetic protein 2, 4 and 6, dexamethasone, insulin-like growth factor 1, fibroblast growth factor 2 and cell seeding density were included in the experiment. The analysis revealed that the best of the tested differentiation cocktails included transforming growth factor β 1 and dexamethasone. Dexamethasone acted in synergy with transforming growth factor β 1 by increasing many chondrogenic markers while directly downregulating expression of the pro-osteogenic gene osteocalcin. However, all factors beneficial to the expression of desirable hyaline cartilage markers also induced undesirable molecules, indicating that perfect chondrogenic differentiation is not achievable with the current differentiation protocols.

  7. Cyanobacterial symbionts diverged in the late Cretaceous towards lineage-specific nitrogen fixation factories in single-celled phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Cabello, Ana M; Salazar, Guillem; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Hingamp, Pascal; Alberti, Adriana; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Raes, Jeroen; Bowler, Chris; Wincker, Patrick; Zehr, Jonathan P; Gasol, Josep M; Massana, Ramon; Acinas, Silvia G

    2016-03-22

    The unicellular cyanobacterium UCYN-A, one of the major contributors to nitrogen fixation in the open ocean, lives in symbiosis with single-celled phytoplankton. UCYN-A includes several closely related lineages whose partner fidelity, genome-wide expression and time of evolutionary divergence remain to be resolved. Here we detect and distinguish UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 lineages in symbiosis with two distinct prymnesiophyte partners in the South Atlantic Ocean. Both symbiotic systems are lineage specific and differ in the number of UCYN-A cells involved. Our analyses infer a streamlined genome expression towards nitrogen fixation in both UCYN-A lineages. Comparative genomics reveal a strong purifying selection in UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 with a diversification process ∼91 Myr ago, in the late Cretaceous, after the low-nutrient regime period occurred during the Jurassic. These findings suggest that UCYN-A diversified in a co-evolutionary process, wherein their prymnesiophyte partners acted as a barrier driving an allopatric speciation of extant UCYN-A lineages.

  8. Medical nutrition therapy: use of sourdough lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for delivering functional biomolecules and food ingredients in gluten free bread

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-08-30

    Abstract Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disease, triggered in genetically susceptible individuals by ingesting gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and other closely related cereal grains. Currently, the estimated prevalence of CD is around 1 % of the population in the western world and medical nutritional therapy (MNT) is the only accepted treatment for celiac disease. To date, the replacement of gluten in bread presents a significant technological challenge for the cereal scientist due to the low baking performance of gluten free products (GF). The increasing demand by the consumer for high quality gluten-free (GF) bread, clean labels and natural products is rising. Sourdough has been used since ancient times for the production of rye and wheat bread, its universal usage can be attributed to the improved quality, nutritional properties and shelf life of sourdough based breads. Consequently, the exploitation of sourdough for the production of GF breads appears tempting. This review will highlight how sourdough LAB can be an efficient cell factory for delivering functional biomolecules and food ingredients to enhance the quality of gluten free bread.

  9. (+)-Geodin from Aspergillus terreus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnest, Mads Holger; Nielsen, Morten Thrane; Leber, Blanka

    2011-01-01

    The fungal metabolite (+)-geodin [systematic name: (2R)-methyl 5,7-dichloro-4-hydroxy-6'-methoxy-6-methyl-3,4'-dioxospiro[benzofuran-2,1'-cyclohexa-2',5'-diene]-2'-carboxylate], C(17)H(12)Cl(2)O(7), was isolated from Aspergillus terreus. The crystal structure contains two independent molecules in...... molecules. The structurally related (+)-griseofulvin has an S configuration at the spiro centre, a difference of potential biological and biosynthetic relevance....

  10. Glucoamylase biosynthesis by cells of Aspergillus niger C sub 58-III immobilized in sintered glass and pumice stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedurek, J.; Lobarzewski, J. (Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej, Lublin (Poland). Inst. Mikrobiologii i Biochemii)

    1990-09-01

    A simple method of A. niger C{sub 58-III} cell immobilization is described. This strain produces extracellular glucoamylase. According to the proposed method A. niger spores were first immobilized by adsorption in sintered glass Rasching rings (RR) or pumice stones (PS). Growing out from spores, A. niger cells produced extracellular glucoamylase. This technique facilitates the culture growth in a filamentous spongy structure of the supports with a continuous accumulation of biomass. After every 24 h it was possible to obtain culture liquid rich in glucoamylase. This procedure can be repeated 30 times using the same sample of immobilized A. niger culture without any loss of glucoamylase activity in the liquid medium. In a 96 h period immobilized A. niger cells produced 300 units . ml{sup -1} whereas a shake culture of this fungus produced only 186 units . ml{sup -1}. (orig.).

  11. Chemodiversity in the genus Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2015-01-01

    to be characterized. The genus Aspergillus is cladistically holophyletic but phenotypically polythetic and very diverse and is associated to quite different sexual states. Following the one fungus one name system, the genus Aspergillus is restricted to a holophyletic clade that include the morphologically different...... biosynthetic family isoextrolites. However, it appears that secondary metabolites from one Aspergillus section have analogous metabolites in other sections (here also called heteroisoextrolites). In this review, we give a genus-wide overview of secondary metabolite production in Aspergillus species. Extrolites...

  12. Protein and DNA technologies for functional expression of membrane-associated cytochromes P450 in bacterial cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez Albacete, Dario

    The heavy dependence and massive consumption of fossil fuels by humans is changing our environment very rapidly. Some of the side effects of industrial activity include the pollution of the natural resources we rely on, and the reduction of biodiversity. Some chemicals found in nature exhibit great....... In most of biosynthetic pathways leading to these chemicals the cytochrome P450 enzyme family (P450s) is responsible for their final functionalization. However, the membrane-bound nature of P450s, makes their expression in microbial hosts a challenge. In order to meet the global demand for these natural......450 engineering guidelines and serves as platform to improve performance of microbial cells, thereby boosting recombinant production of complex plant P450-derived biochemicals. The knowledge generated, could guide future reconstruction of functional plant metabolic pathways leading to high valuable...

  13. Comparative studies on pectinases obtained from Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative studies on pectinases obtained from Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger in submerged fermentation system using pectin extracted from mango, orange and pineapple peels as carbon sources.

  14. Super B Factories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Heavy-flavor physics, in particular B and τ physics results from the B fac- tories, currently provides strong constraints on models of physics beyond the Standard. Model. A new generation of colliders, Super B Factories, with 50 to 100 times the lumi- nosity of existing colliders, can, in a dialog with LHC and ILC, ...

  15. The Clone Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Have humans been cloned? Is it possible? Immediate interest is sparked when students are asked these questions. In response to their curiosity, the clone factory activity was developed to help them understand the process of cloning. In this activity, students reenact the cloning process, in a very simplified simulation. After completing the…

  16. Haiti. Educating factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, H

    1990-04-01

    There are approximately 50,000 workers employed in the light assembly industry in Haiti. About 70% are women, the majority of whom are aged between 25 and 34 years, and are either single or in a nonpermanent relationship with the father of their children. Many live and work in appalling conditions, surviving on very low wages to support several children and an extended family. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is now a visible problem in many factories. In October 1988, the Center for the Promotion of Women Workers (Centre de Promotion des Femmes Ouvriers/CPFO) launched a pilot AIDS education program for factory women. The Center, based in a large industrial zone near the airport, runs a health clinic and courses in literacy, communications skills, health promotion and family planning. The new AIDS program allowed CPFO staff to gain entry into factories for the 1st time. Other courses were held outside working hours and outside factory premises. Staff contacted manages by telephone to arrange a meeting to discuss AIDS and to ask permission to hold educational "round tables" with workers. Of 18 managers in the factories approached over a 12-month period, only 2 refused entry to CPFO staff. Almost all managers reported they had registered between 2 and 5 deaths from AIDS among their employees over the past couple of years. A total of 85 educational sessions, each lasting about 2 hours, were held within 28 different factories, community or labor organizations reaching 3063 workers (male and female). In each session, the presentation was carried out by 2 CPFO trained monitors and included a slide show, flip charts, and the video "Met ko," originally produced for Haitian immigrants in New York. The most important aspect of the program was the training of 38 volunteer factory-based health promoters. These promoters attended the round table sessions, where they facilitated discussion and distributed condoms and were subsequently available for counseling co

  17. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Up-Regulates AKR1C1 Expression Through Nuclear Factor-Y in Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Ding, Shijia; Chen, Ke; Qin, Dongdong; Qu, Jialin; Wang, Sen; Sheng, Yanrui; Zou, Chengcheng; Chen, Limin; Tang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein has long been recognized as an important transcriptional transactivator of several genes. Human aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1 (AKR1C1), a member of the family of AKR1CS, is significantly increased in HBx-expressed cells. This study aimed to investigate the possible mechanism of HBx in regulating AKR1C1 expression in HepG2.2.15 cells and the role of AKR1C1 for HBV-induced HCC. RT-PCR was performed to detect AKR1C1 expression on mRNA level in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 cell. The promoter activity of AKR1C1 was assayed by transient transfection and Dual-luciferase reporter assay system. The AKR1C1 promoter sequence was screened using the TFSEARCH database and the ALIBABA 2.0 software. The potential transcription factors binding sites were identified using 5' functional deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis. In this study, we found that HBx promoted AKR1C1 expression in HepG2.2.15 cells. Knockdown of HBx inhibited AKR1C1 activation. The role of HBx expression in regulating the promoter activity of human AKR1C1 gene was analyzed. The 5'functional deletion analysis identified that the region between -128 and -88 was the minimal promoter region of HBx to activate AKR1C1 gene expression. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggested that nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) plays an important role in this HBx-induced AKR1C1 activation. In HepG2.2.1.5 cell, HBx can promote AKR1C1 promoter activity and thus activates the basal transcription of AKR1C1 gene. This process is mediated by the transcription factor NF-Y. This study explored the mechanism for the regulation of HBV on AKR1C1 expression and has provided a new understanding of HBV-induced HCC.

  18. Engineering the smart factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Robert; Vera, Daniel; Ahmad, Bilal

    2016-10-01

    The fourth industrial revolution promises to create what has been called the smart factory. The vision is that within such modular structured smart factories, cyber-physical systems monitor physical processes, create a virtual copy of the physical world and make decentralised decisions. This paper provides a view of this initiative from an automation systems perspective. In this context it considers how future automation systems might be effectively configured and supported through their lifecycles and how integration, application modelling, visualisation and reuse of such systems might be best achieved. The paper briefly describes limitations in current engineering methods, and new emerging approaches including the cyber physical systems (CPS) engineering tools being developed by the automation systems group (ASG) at Warwick Manufacturing Group, University of Warwick, UK.

  19. SLAC B Factory computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, P.F.

    1992-02-01

    As part of the research and development program in preparation for a possible B Factory at SLAC, a group has been studying various aspects of HEP computing. In particular, the group is investigating the use of UNIX for all computing, from data acquisition, through analysis, and word processing. A summary of some of the results of this study will be given, along with some personal opinions on these topics

  20. EMIR data factory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosich Minguell, Josefina; Barreto, M.; Castro, N.; Garzón, F.; Guerra, D.; Insausti, M.; López-Martín, L.; López, P.; Molgó, J.; Patrón, J.

    2014-07-01

    EMIR (Espectrógrafo Multiobjeto Infrarrojo) is a wide-field, near-infrared, multi-object spectrograph, with image capabilities, which will be located at the Nasmyth focus of GTC (Gran Telescopio Canarias). It will allow observers to obtain many intermediate resolution spectra simultaneously, in the nIR bands Z, J, H, K. A multi-slit mask unit will be used for target acquisition. This paper shows an overview of EMIR Data Factory System which main functionality is to receive raw images from DAS (Data Acquisition system), collect FITS header keywords, store images to database and propagate images to other GCS (GTC Control System) components to produce astronomical data. This system follows the standards defined by the telescope to permit the integration of this software on the GCS. The Data Factory System needs the DAS, the Sequencer, GUI and the Monitor Manager subsystems to operate. DAS generates images and sends them to the Data Factory. Sequencer and GUI (Graphical User Interface) provide information about instrument and observing program. The Monitor Manager supplies information about telescope and instrument state.

  1. Towards stable cyanobacterial cell factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, W.

    2018-01-01

    Irrespective of where we come from, we all share the global responsibility of ensuring that our societies are sustainable. We have been depleting the world’s resources and filling the atmosphere with abnormal levels of CO2. But CO2 can also be used as a resource - plants and certain microbes have

  2. Proteomic analysis of temperature dependent extracellular proteins from Aspergillus fumigatus grown under solid-state culture condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adav, Sunil S; Ravindran, Anita; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2013-06-07

    Fungal species of the genus Aspergillus are filamentous ubiquitous saprophytes that play a major role in lignocellulosic biomass recycling and also are considered as cell factories for the production of organic acids, pharmaceuticals, and industrially important enzymes. Analysis of extracellular secreted biomass degrading enzymes using complex lignocellulosic biomass as a substrate by solid-state fermentation could be a more practical approach to evaluate application of the enzymes for lignocellulosic biorefinery. This study isolated a fungal strain from compost, identified as Aspergillus fumigatus, and further analyzed it for lignocellulolytic enzymes at different temperatures using label free quantitative proteomics. The profile of secretome composition discovered cellulases, hemicellulases, lignin degrading proteins, peptidases and proteases, and transport and hypothetical proteins; while protein abundances and further their hierarchical clustering analysis revealed temperature dependent expression of these enzymes during solid-state fermentation of sawdust. The enzyme activities and protein abundances as determined by exponentially modified protein abundance index (emPAI) indicated the maximum activities at the range of 40-50 °C, demonstrating the thermophilic nature of the isolate A. fumigatus LF9. Characterization of the thermostability of secretome suggested the potential of the isolated fungal strain in the production of thermophilic biomass degrading enzymes for industrial application.

  3. Ultrastructural Characterization of Zika Virus Replication Factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Cortese

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A global concern has emerged with the pandemic spread of Zika virus (ZIKV infections that can cause severe neurological symptoms in adults and newborns. ZIKV is a positive-strand RNA virus replicating in virus-induced membranous replication factories (RFs. Here we used various imaging techniques to investigate the ultrastructural details of ZIKV RFs and their relationship with host cell organelles. Analyses of human hepatic cells and neural progenitor cells infected with ZIKV revealed endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane invaginations containing pore-like openings toward the cytosol, reminiscent to RFs in Dengue virus-infected cells. Both the MR766 African strain and the H/PF/2013 Asian strain, the latter linked to neurological diseases, induce RFs of similar architecture. Importantly, ZIKV infection causes a drastic reorganization of microtubules and intermediate filaments forming cage-like structures surrounding the viral RF. Consistently, ZIKV replication is suppressed by cytoskeleton-targeting drugs. Thus, ZIKV RFs are tightly linked to rearrangements of the host cell cytoskeleton. : Cortese et al. show that ZIKV infection in both human hepatoma and neuronal progenitor cells induces drastic structural modification of the cellular architecture. Microtubules and intermediate filaments surround the viral replication factory composed of vesicles corresponding to ER membrane invagination toward the ER lumen. Importantly, alteration of microtubule flexibility impairs ZIKV replication. Keywords: Zika virus, flavivirus, human neural progenitor cells, replication factories, replication organelles, microtubules, intermediate filaments, electron microscopy, electron tomography, live-cell imaging

  4. Mutants of Aspergillus nidulans affected in asexual development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. The asexual cycle of Aspergillus nidulans is characterized by conidiophore formation, a multicell structure formed by four cell types: foot-cell, stalk, vesicle and sterigmata made up of metullae and phyalides. Conidia, or asexual spores, are formed mitotically by repeated subdivisions of the phyalides.

  5. Effect of gamma radiation on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure and mycotoxin production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, J.; Cavaglieri, L.; Vital, H.; Cristofolini, A.; Merkis, C.; Astoreca, A.; Orlando, J.; Caru, M.; Dalcero, A.; Rosa, C.A.R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of gamma radiation (2 kGy) on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure. Moreover, the influence on aflatoxin B 1 and ochratoxin A production was also observed. Irradiated A. flavus strain showed a dull orangish colony while control strain showed the typical green color. Minor differences were observed on stipes, metulae and conidia size between control and irradiated A. flavus and A. ochraceus strains. Irradiated fungi showed ultrastructural changes on cell wall, plasmalema and cytoplasm levels. The levels of mycotoxins produced by irradiated strains were two times greater than those produced by control strains. Successive transferences of irradiated strains on malt extract agar allowed the fungus to recuperate morphological characteristics. Although minor changes in the fungal morphology were observed, ultrastructural changes at cell wall level and the increase of mycotoxin production ability were observed. Inappropriate storage of irradiated food and feed would allow the development of potentially more toxicogenic fungal propagules.

  6. Aspergillus-Related Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alia Al-Alawi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus is a ubiquitous dimorphic fungus that causes a variety of human diseases ranging in severity from trivial to life-threatening, depending on the host response. An intact host defence is important to prevent disease, but individuals with pre-existing structural lung disease, atopy, occupational exposure or impaired immunity are susceptible. Three distinctive patterns of aspergillus-related lung disease are recognized: saprophytic infestation of airways, cavities and necrotic tissue; allergic disease including extrinsic allergic alveolitis, asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, bronchocentric granulomatosis and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia; and airway and tissue invasive disease -- pseudomembranous tracheobronchitis, acute bronchopneumonia, angioinvasive aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing aspergillosis and invasive pleural disease. A broad knowledge of these clinical presentations and a high index of suspicion are required to ensure timely diagnosis and treatment of the potentially lethal manifestations of aspergillus-related pulmonary disease. In the present report, the clinical, radiographic and pathological aspects of the various aspergillus-related lung diseases are briefly reviewed.

  7. Sustained low-dose growth hormone therapy optimizes bioactive insulin-like growth factor-I level and may enhance CD4 T-cell number in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde; Troensegaard, William

    2010-01-01

    expedient IGF-I levels and improve CD4 T-cell response. Total and free IGF-I increased at week 36 (+97%, P CD4 T-cell number increased at week 36...... (+15%, P cells/microL). Following rhGH dose reduction, total IGF-I and CD4 T-cell number remained increased at week 88 (+44%, P = 0.01 and +33%, P ...High-dose recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) (2-6 mg/day) regimes may facilitate T-cell restoration in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). However, high-dose rhGH regimens increase insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF...

  8. An inventory of the Aspergillus niger secretome by combining in silico predictions with shotgun proteomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martens-Uzunova Elena S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ecological niche occupied by a fungal species, its pathogenicity and its usefulness as a microbial cell factory to a large degree depends on its secretome. Protein secretion usually requires the presence of a N-terminal signal peptide (SP and by scanning for this feature using available highly accurate SP-prediction tools, the fraction of potentially secreted proteins can be directly predicted. However, prediction of a SP does not guarantee that the protein is actually secreted and current in silico prediction methods suffer from gene-model errors introduced during genome annotation. Results A majority rule based classifier that also evaluates signal peptide predictions from the best homologs of three neighbouring Aspergillus species was developed to create an improved list of potential signal peptide containing proteins encoded by the Aspergillus niger genome. As a complement to these in silico predictions, the secretome associated with growth and upon carbon source depletion was determined using a shotgun proteomics approach. Overall, some 200 proteins with a predicted signal peptide were identified to be secreted proteins. Concordant changes in the secretome state were observed as a response to changes in growth/culture conditions. Additionally, two proteins secreted via a non-classical route operating in A. niger were identified. Conclusions We were able to improve the in silico inventory of A. niger secretory proteins by combining different gene-model predictions from neighbouring Aspergilli and thereby avoiding prediction conflicts associated with inaccurate gene-models. The expected accuracy of signal peptide prediction for proteins that lack homologous sequences in the proteomes of related species is 85%. An experimental validation of the predicted proteome confirmed in silico predictions.

  9. Deciding WQO for factorial languages

    KAUST Repository

    Atminas, Aistis

    2013-04-05

    A language is factorial if it is closed under taking factors (i.e. contiguous subwords). Every factorial language can be described by an antidictionary, i.e. a minimal set of forbidden factors. We show that the problem of deciding whether a factorial language given by a finite antidictionary is well-quasi-ordered under the factor containment relation can be solved in polynomial time. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  10. Anti-Inflammatory and Cytoprotective Effects of TMC-256C1 from Marine-Derived Fungus Aspergillus sp. SF-6354 via up-Regulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Murine Hippocampal and Microglial Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Cheol Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the course of searching for bioactive secondary metabolites from marine fungi, TMC-256C1 was isolated from an ethyl acetate extract of the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus sp. SF6354. TMC-256C1 displayed anti-neuroinflammatory effect in BV2 microglial cells induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS as well as neuroprotective effect against glutamate-stimulated neurotoxicity in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells. TMC-256C1 was shown to develop a cellular resistance to oxidative damage caused by glutamate-induced cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in HT22 cells, and suppress the inflammation process in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells. Furthermore, the neuroprotective and anti-neuroinflammatory activities of TMC-256C1 were associated with upregulated expression of heme oxygenase (HO-1 and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 in HT22 and BV2 cells. We also found that TMC-256C1 activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling pathways in HT22 and BV2 cells. These results demonstrated that TMC-256C1 activates HO-1 protein expression, probably by increasing nuclear Nrf2 levels via the activation of the p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways.

  11. Pyrophen Produced by Endophytic Fungi Aspergillus sp Isolated from Piper crocatum Ruiz and Pav Exhibits Cytotoxic Activity and Induces S Phase Arrest in T47D Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Puji; Erden, Willy; Wahyono; Wahyuono, Subagus; Hertiani, Triana

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl acetate extracts obtained from culture of endophytic fungi Aspergillus sp isolated from Piper crocatum Ruiz and Pav, have been shown to possess cytotoxic activity against T47D breast cancer cells. Investigations were here conducted to determine bioactive compounds responsible for the activity. Bioassay guided fractionation was employed to obtain active compounds. Structure elucidation was performed based on analysis of LC-MS, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, COSY, DEPT, HMQC, HMBC data. Cytotoxity assays were conducted in 96 well plates against T47D and Vero cell lines. Bioassay guided isolation and chemical investigation led to the isolation of pyrophen, a 4-methoxy-6-(1'-acetamido-2'-phenylethyl)-2H-pyran-2-one. Further analysis of its activity against T47D and Vero cells showed an ability to inhibit the growth of T47D cells with IC50 values of 9.2 μg/mL but less cytotoxicity to Vero cells with an IC50 of 109 μg/mL. This compound at a concentration of 400 ng/mL induced S-phase arrest in T47D cells.

  12. Mutants of Aspergillus nidulans affected in asexual development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    medium (CM) was made by adding (in g/l) glucose 10, pep- tone 2, yeast extract 2, hydrolysed casein 1, and (in /g/l) in- ositol 4000, choline chloride 2000, ..... Genet. Res. 6, 352–359. Mirabito P. M. and Osmani S. A. 1994 Interaction between the developmental program and cell cycle regulation of Aspergillus nidulans. Dev.

  13. Production of Aspergillus niger biomass from aqueous extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    single cell protein) production was investigated. Aspergillus niger was grown in unsupplemented and supplemented (glucose or nitrogen sources [(NH4)2SO4, NaNO3, NH4Cl, NH4NO3 and KNO3]) BSG liquor by submerge fermentation on rotary ...

  14. Protective role of Aspergillus fumigatus melanin against ultraviolet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Melanin protects pigmented cells from physical and biological stresses which are associated with virulence in several important human pathogens, but little is known about the immune response to this ubiquitous biologic compound. Melanin content increased in Aspergillus fumigatus mycelium exposed to ultraviolet for 10 ...

  15. General B factory design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    We describe the general considerations that go into the design of an asymmetric B factory collider. Justification is given for the typical parameters of such a facility, and the physics and technology challenges that arise from these parameter choices are discussed. Cost and schedule issues for a B factory are discussed briefly. A summary of existing proposals is presented, noting their similarities and differences

  16. The nearby supernova factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Aldering, G.; Lee, B.C.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Siegrist, J.; Wang, L.; Antilogus, P.; Astier, P.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Copin, Y.; Smadja, G.; Gangler, E.; Castera, A.; Adam, G.; Bacon, R.; Lemonnier, J.-P.; Pecontal, A.; Pecontal, E.; Kessler, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an ambitious project to find and study in detail approximately 300 nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at redshifts 0.03 < z < 0.08. This program will provide an exceptional data set of well-studied SNe in the nearby smooth Hubble flow that can be used as calibration for the current and future programs designed to use SNe to measure the cosmological parameters. The first key ingredient for this program is a reliable supply of Hubble-flow SNe systematically discovered in unprecedented numbers using the same techniques as those used in distant SNe searches. In 2002, 35 SNe were found using our test-bed pipeline for automated SN search and discovery. The pipeline uses images from the asteroid search conducted by the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking group at JPL. Improvements in our subtraction techniques and analysis have allowed us to increase our effective SN discovery rate to ∼12 SNe/month in 2003

  17. The eldercare factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Noel; Sharkey, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Rapid advances in service robotics together with dramatic shifts in population demographics have led to the notion that technology may be the answer to our eldercare problems. Robots are being developed for feeding, washing, lifting, carrying and mobilising the elderly as well as monitoring their health. They are also being proposed as a substitute for companionship. While these technologies could accrue major benefits for society and empower the elderly, we must balance their use with the ethical costs. These include a potential reduction in human contact, increased feeling of objectification and loss of control, loss of privacy and personal freedom as well as deception and infantilisation. With appropriate guidelines in place before the introduction of robots en masse into the care system, robots could improve the lives of the elderly, reducing their dependence and creating more opportunities for social interaction. Without forethought, the elderly may find themselves in a barren world of machines, a world of automated care: a factory for the elderly. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The TRIUMF KAON Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1990-11-01

    The TRIUMF KAON Factory is designed to produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, other hadrons and neutrinos 100 times more intense, or cleaner, than are available now, for a broad range of experiments in particle and nuclear physics. This will require a 100 μA beam of 30 GeV protons, to be produced by an interleaved sequence of two fast-cycling synchrotrons and three storage rings, with the existing TRIUMF H - cyclotron as injector. An $11-million preconstruction study has enabled the overall design to be reviewed and prototypes of various accelerator components to be built and evaluated. Environmental, industrial and economic impact studies have also been completed. Payment of one-third of the total cost of $708 million (Canadian) has been approved by the government of British Columbia; a further third is expected from international sources, on the basis of inter-governmental consultations. A decision on the final third is expected from the government of Canada before the end of 1990. (Author) (15 refs., 7 figs.)

  19. The TRIUMF KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1991-05-01

    The TRIUMF KAON Factory is designed to produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, other hadrons and neutrinos 100 times more intense, or cleaner, than are available now, for a broad range of particle and nuclear physics experiments. This will require a 100 μA beam of 30 GeV protons, to be produced by an interleaved sequence of two fast-cycling synchrotrons and three storage rings, with the existing TRIUMF H - cyclotron as injector. An $11-million preconstruction study has enabled the overall design to be reviewed and prototypes of various components to be built and evaluated -fast-cycling dipole and quadrupole magnets, a dual-frequency magnet power supply, ceramic beam pipes with internal RF shields, an RF cavity (using perpendicular bias), an extraction kicker, and RF beam chopper, and production targets. Environmental, industrial and economic impact studies have also been completed and the cost estimates and schedule updated. The total cost of $708 million (Canadian) will be shared equally between Canada, British Columbia (already approved) and international contributors. The federal decision is expected shortly. (Author) 29 refs., 5 figs

  20. Treatment of both native and deamidated gluten peptides with an endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger prevents stimulation of gut-derived gluten-reactive T cells from either children or adults with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Karina S; Staal, Anne; Roggen, Erwin L; Sollid, Ludvig M; Lillevang, Søren T; Barington, Torben; Husby, Steffen

    2014-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by an inappropriate immunological reaction against gluten driven by gluten-specific CD4+ T cells. We screened 25 proteases and tested 10 for their potential to degrade gluten in vitro. Five proteases were further tested for their ability to prevent the proliferative response by a gluten-specific CD4+ T cell clone and seven gluten-reactive T cell lines to protease-digested gluten peptides. A proline-specific endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger (AnP2) was particularly efficient at diminishing proliferation after stimulation with cleaved antigen, and could completely block the response against both native and deamidated gluten peptides. We found that AnP2 was efficient down to a 1:64 protease:substrate ratio (w:w). When AnP2 was tested in assays using seven gluten-reactive T cell lines from individual CD patients (three adults and four children), the response to gluten was diminished in all cases. Our study indicates a therapeutic benefit of AnP2 to CD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of simulated microgravity on Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Jeffrey J.

    2005-08-01

    A rotating bioreactor was developed to simulate microgravity and its influence was studied on fungal growth. The reactor was designed to simulate microgravity using 'free fall' principle, which creates an apparent weightlessness for a brief period of time. In this experiment, a sealed vertically rotating tube is the reactor in which the cells are grown. For the first time vertically rotating tubes were used to obtain 'free fall' thereby simulating microgravity. Simulated microgravity served significant in the alteration of growth and productivity of Aspergillus niger, a common soil fungi. Two other sets of similar cultures were maintained as still and shake control cultures to compare with the growth and productivity of cells in rotating culture. It was found increased growth and productivity occurred in simulated microgravity. Since this experiment involves growth of cells in a liquid medium, the fluidic effects must also be studied which is a limitation.

  2. AutoPyFactory: A Scalable Flexible Pilot Factory Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, J; Hover, J; Love, P; Stewart, G A

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC is one of the largest users of grid computing infrastructure, which is a central part of the experiment's computing operations. Considerable efforts have been made to use grid technology in the most efficient and effective way, including the use of a pilot job based workload management framework. In this model the experiment submits ‘pilot’ jobs to sites without payload. When these jobs begin to run they contact a central service to pick-up a real payload to execute. The first generation of pilot factories were usually specific to a single Virtual Organization (VO), and were bound to the particular architecture of that VO's distributed processing. A second generation provides factories which are more flexible, not tied to any particular VO, and provide new and improved features such as monitoring, logging, profiling, etc. In this paper we describe this key part of the ATLAS pilot architecture, a second generation pilot factory, AutoPyFactory. AutoPyFactory has a modular design and is highly configurable. It is able to send different types of pilots to sites and exploit different submission mechanisms and queue characteristics. It is tightly integrated with the PanDA job submission framework, coupling pilot flow to the amount of work the site has to run. It gathers information from many sources in order to correctly configure itself for a site and its decision logic can easily be updated. Integrated into AutoPyFactory is a flexible system for delivering both generic and specific job wrappers which can perform many useful actions before starting to run end-user scientific applications, e.g., validation of the middleware, node profiling and diagnostics, and monitoring. AutoPyFactory also has a robust monitoring system that has been invaluable in establishing a reliable pilot factory service for ATLAS.

  3. AutoPyFactory: A Scalable Flexible Pilot Factory Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J.; Hover, J.; Love, P.; Stewart, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC is one of the largest users of grid computing infrastructure, which is a central part of the experiment's computing operations. Considerable efforts have been made to use grid technology in the most efficient and effective way, including the use of a pilot job based workload management framework. In this model the experiment submits ‘pilot’ jobs to sites without payload. When these jobs begin to run they contact a central service to pick-up a real payload to execute. The first generation of pilot factories were usually specific to a single Virtual Organization (VO), and were bound to the particular architecture of that VO's distributed processing. A second generation provides factories which are more flexible, not tied to any particular VO, and provide new and improved features such as monitoring, logging, profiling, etc. In this paper we describe this key part of the ATLAS pilot architecture, a second generation pilot factory, AutoPyFactory. AutoPyFactory has a modular design and is highly configurable. It is able to send different types of pilots to sites and exploit different submission mechanisms and queue characteristics. It is tightly integrated with the PanDA job submission framework, coupling pilot flow to the amount of work the site has to run. It gathers information from many sources in order to correctly configure itself for a site and its decision logic can easily be updated. Integrated into AutoPyFactory is a flexible system for delivering both generic and specific job wrappers which can perform many useful actions before starting to run end-user scientific applications, e.g., validation of the middleware, node profiling and diagnostics, and monitoring. AutoPyFactory also has a robust monitoring system that has been invaluable in establishing a reliable pilot factory service for ATLAS.

  4. Tailoring fungal morphology of Aspergillus niger MYA 135 by altering the hyphal morphology and the conidia adhesion capacity: biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Verónica Leticia; Baigorí, Mario Domingo; Pera, Licia María

    2013-05-20

    Current problems of filamentous fungi fermentations and their further successful developments as microbial cell factories are dependent on control fungal morphology. In this connection, this work explored new experimental procedures in order to quantitatively check the potential of some culture conditions to induce a determined fungal morphology by altering both hyphal morphology and conidia adhesion capacity. The capacity of environmental conditions to modify hyphal morphology was evaluated by examining the influence of some culture conditions on the cell wall lytic potential of Aspergillus niger MYA 135. The relative value of the cell wall lytic potential was determined by measuring a cell wall lytic enzyme activity such as the mycelium-bound β-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase (Mb-NAGase). On the other hand, the quantitative value of conidia adhesion was considered as an index of its aggregation capacity. Concerning microscopic morphology, a highly negative correlation between the hyphal growth unit length (lHGU) and the specific Mb-NAGase activity was found (r = -0.915, P morphology, a low conidia adhesion capacity was followed by a dispersed mycelial growth. In fact, this study showed that conidia adhesion units per ml equal to or higher than 0.50 were necessary to afford pellets formation. In addition, it was also observed that once the pellet was formed the lHGU had an important influence on its final diameter. Finally, the biotechnological significance of such results was discussed as well.

  5. A new and efficient approach for construction of uridine/uracil auxotrophic mutants in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khuyen Thi; Ho, Quynh Ngoc; Do, Loc Thi Binh Xuan; Mai, Linh Thi Dam; Pham, Duc-Ngoc; Tran, Huyen Thi Thanh; Le, Diep Hong; Nguyen, Huy Quang; Tran, Van-Tuan

    2017-06-01

    Aspergillus oryzae is a filamentous fungus widely used in food industry and as a microbial cell factory for recombinant protein production. Due to the inherent resistance of A. oryzae to common antifungal compounds, genetic transformation of this mold usually requires auxotrophic mutants. In this study, we show that Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) method is very efficient for deletion of the pyrG gene in different Aspergillus oryzae wild-type strains to generate uridine/uracil auxotrophic mutants. Our data indicated that all the obtained uridine/uracil auxotrophic transformants, which are 5- fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA) resistant, exist as the pyrG deletion mutants. Using these auxotrophic mutants and the pyrG selectable marker for genetic transformation via A. tumefaciens, we could get about 1060 transformants per 10 6 fungal spores. In addition, these A. oryzae mutants were also used successfully for expression of the DsRed fluorescent reporter gene under control of the A. oryzae amyB promoter by the ATMT method, which resulted in obvious red transformants on agar plates. Our work provides a new and effective approach for constructing the uridine/uracil auxotrophic mutants in the importantly industrial fungus A. oryzae. This strategy appears to be applicable to other filamentous fungi to develop similar genetic transformation systems based on auxotrophic/nutritional markers for food-grade recombinant applications.

  6. Uptake and efflux kinetics, and intracellular activity of voriconazole against Aspergillus fumigatus in human pulmonary epithelial cells: a new application for the prophylaxis and early treatment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taotao; Yang, Qianting; Chen, Lu; Li, Ying; Meng, Ti; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Tao; Lei, Jin'e; Xing, Jianfeng; Dong, Yalin

    2017-06-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), most caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, is a serious life-threatening infection in immunocompromised patients. Voriconazole is used to prevent and treat IPA. However, little is known about the pharmacological characteristics of voriconazole in pulmonary epithelial cells, which are the target site for the prophylaxis and early treatment of IPA. The aim of the study was to evaluate the kinetics and activity of voriconazole against A. fumigatus in A549 cells. High-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and time-kill method were used to study the cellular pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics of voriconazole. Voriconazole exerted a concentration-dependent toxic effect on A549 cells and could penetrate into cells, reaching plateau concentrations of 1.14 ± 0.64, 3.72 ± 1.38 and 6.36 ± 0.95 ng/mg protein after A549 cells were exposed to voriconazole at extracellular concentrations of 2, 8 and 16 mg/L for 2 h, respectively. The efflux of voriconazole was rapid, with a half-life of 10.2 min. Voriconazole can decrease the A. fumigatus conidia invade cells, and the number of viable A. fumigatus conidia in cells can be decreased 2.1- to 20.6-fold when A549 cells were cultured in medium containing voriconazole. After 24-h incubation, 75.6% and 80.5% of intracellular A. fumigatus were killed when extracellular voriconazole concentration was 8 and 16 mg/L, respectively. This study illustrated a new application for the prophylaxis and early treatment of IPA from the cellular pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and emphasized the importance of monitoring concentrations of voriconazole in epithelial lining fluid in immunocompromised patients receiving voriconazole therapy. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  7. JINR tau-charm factory design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perel'shtejn, E.; Aleksandrov, V.; Antropov, V.

    1993-01-01

    The review on tau-charm factory in JINR (Dubna) is presented. The structure scheme of tau-charm factory is described. The problems on injection complex are discussed: the composition, the working regime and parameters. The magnetic lattice of a booster is described. A versatile magnet lattice is used in tau-charm collider. It can realize both conventional flat beam scheme and monochromatization scheme. The results of chromaticity correction in high emittance lattice are presented. The list of parameters of tau-charm collider is given. The technical proposal of magnetic elements of booster and collider and their power supplies is made, as well as RF power supply in collider and vacuum system in its periodic cell. 12 refs.; 12 figs.; 3 tabs

  8. Photon factory activity report, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This issue is the annual report of the Photon Factory, National laboratory of High Energy Physics. First, the outline of the Photon Factory is presented. Injector linac, light source, beamlines and instrumentation, the Tristan synchrotron radiation facility at the accumulation ring, and the Tristan super light facility are described in detail. The facility is open to researchers. The user's reports are collected as well. (J.P.N.) (435 refs.)

  9. Atomic Energy (factories) rules: 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These rules are made by the Central Government under the Factories Act, 1948 and extend to all factories engaged in carrying out the purposes of the Atomic Energy Act, 1962. The rules cover the requirements of inspecting staff, health aspects, personnel safety, personnel welfare, working hours, employment of young persons, special provisions in case of dangerous manufacturing processes or operations, supplemental rules for administrative aspects and special powers of competent authority. (M.G.B.)

  10. Photon factory activity report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This issue is the annual report of the Photon Factory, National Laboratory of High Energy Physics. First the outline of the Photon Factory is presented. Injector linac, light source, beamlines and instrumentation, synchrotron radiation facility at the Tristan accumulation ring, and the Tristan super light facility are described in detail. The facility is open to researchers. The user's reports are collected as well. (J.P.N.)

  11. Selection arena in Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggeman, J.; Debets, A.J.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2004-01-01

    The selection arena hypothesis states that overproduction of zygotes-a widespread phenomenon in animals and plants-can be explained as a mechanism of progeny choice. As a similar mechanism, the ascomycetous fungus Aspergillus nidulans may overproduce dikaryotic fruit initials, hereafter called

  12. The Aspergillus Mine - publishing bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo; Theobald, Sebastian

    with the Joint Genome Institute. The Aspergillus Mine is not intended as a genomic data sharing service but instead focuses on creating an environment where the results of bioinformatic analysis is made available for inspection. The data and code is public upon request and figures can be obtained directly from...

  13. Nitrile biotransformation by Aspergillus niger

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šnajdrová, Radka; Kristová, Veronika; Crestia, D.; Nikolaou, K.; Kuzma, Marek; Lemaire, M.; Gallienne, E.; Bolte, J.; Bezouška, K.; Křen, Vladimír; Martínková, Ludmila

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 29, - (2004), s. 227-232 ISSN 1381-1177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC D25.002; GA AV ČR IAA4020213 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : aspergillus niger * nitrile-converting enzymes * nitrile hydratase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.547, year: 2004

  14. Long-term insulin-like growth factor-I expression in skeletal muscles attenuates the enhanced in vitro proliferation ability of the resident satellite cells in transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Schwartz, R. J.; Booth, F. W.

    2001-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) overexpression for 1-month in mouse skeletal muscle increases satellite cell proliferation potential. However, it is unknown whether this beneficial enhancement by IGF-I expression would persist over a longer-term duration in aged mice. This is an important issue to address if a prolonged course of IGF-I is to be used clinically in muscle-wasting conditions where satellite cells may become limiting. Using the IGF-I transgenic (IGF-I Tg) mouse that selectively expresses the IGF-I transgene in striated muscles, we found that 18-months of continuous IGF-I overexpression led to a loss in the enhanced in vitro proliferative capacity of satellite cells from Tg skeletal muscles. Also 18-month-old IGF-I Tg satellite cells lost the enhanced BrdU incorporation, greater pRb and Akt phosphorylations, and decreased p27(Kip1) levels initially observed in cells from 1-month-old IGF-I Tg mice. The levels of those biochemical markers reverted to similar values seen in the 18-months WT littermates. These findings, therefore, suggest that there is no further beneficial effect on enhancing satellite cell proliferation ability with persistent long-term expression of IGF-I in skeletal muscles of these transgenic mice.

  15. The tau-charm factory: Experimental perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, M.L.; Schindler, R.H.

    1991-09-01

    This report discusses the Tau-Charm Factory Concept; D and D S Physics at the Tau-Charm Factory; τ and ν τ Physics at the Tau-Charm Factory; and Charmonium, Gluonium and Light Quark Spectroscopy at the Tau-Charm Factory

  16. Three-dimensional structure of Rubella virus factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, Juan; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Tzeng, Wen-Ping; Frey, Teryl K.; Fernandez, Jose J.; Risco, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Viral factories are complex structures in the infected cell where viruses compartmentalize their life cycle. Rubella virus (RUBV) assembles factories by recruitment of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), mitochondria and Golgi around modified lysosomes known as cytopathic vacuoles or CPVs. These organelles contain active replication complexes that transfer replicated RNA to assembly sites in Golgi membranes. We have studied the structure of RUBV factory in three dimensions by electron tomography and freeze-fracture. CPVs contain stacked membranes, rigid sheets, small vesicles and large vacuoles. These membranes are interconnected and in communication with the endocytic pathway since they incorporate endocytosed BSA-gold. RER and CPVs are coupled through protein bridges and closely apposed membranes. Golgi vesicles attach to the CPVs but no tight contacts with mitochondria were detected. Immunogold labelling confirmed that the mitochondrial protein p32 is an abundant component around and inside CPVs where it could play important roles in factory activities.

  17. Involvement of the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus tubingensis in osteomyelitis of the maxillary bone: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bathoorn, E.; Escobar Salazar, N.; Sepehrkhouy, S.; Meijer, M.; de Cock, H.; Haas, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aspergillus tubingensis is a black Aspergillus belonging to the Aspergillus section Nigri, which includes species that morphologically resemble Aspergillus niger. Recent developments in species determination have resulted in clinical isolates presumed to be Aspergillus niger being

  18. Photon Factory activity report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Photon Factory is a national synchrotron radiation research facility affiliated with the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics located in Tsukuba Science City. The Photon Factory consists of a 2.5 GeV electron/positron linear accelerator, a 2.5 GeV electron/positron storage ring, beam lines and experimental stations. All the facilities for synchrotron radiation research are open to scientists. A part of the accumulation ring of the TRISTAN main ring has been used as a synchrotron radiation source in the energy range from 5.8 to 6.5 GeV. The Photon Factory is composed of three divisions of Injector Linac, Light Source and Instrumentation. The researches of each divisions are reviewed, and the users' short reports are collected. The list of published papers with author index is also included in the publication. (K.I.) 233 refs

  19. Math for the digital factory

    CERN Document Server

    Hömberg, Dietmar; Landry, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    This volume provides a unique collection of mathematical tools and industrial case studies in digital manufacturing. It addresses various topics, ranging from models of single production technologies, production lines, logistics and workflows to models and optimization strategies for energy consumption in production. The digital factory represents a network of digital models and simulation and 3D visualization methods for the holistic planning, realization, control and ongoing improvement of all factory processes related to a specific product. In the past ten years, all industrialized countries have launched initiatives to realize this vision, sometimes also referred to as Industry 4.0 (in Europe) or Smart Manufacturing (in the United States). Its main goals are • reconfigurable, adaptive and evolving factories capable of small-scale production • high-performance production, combining flexibility, productivity, precision and zero defects • energy and resource efficiency in manufacturing None of these...

  20. Possible experiments at neutrino factories

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, T O

    2001-01-01

    There are currently plans to construct neutrino factories based on muon storage rings. Such projects are parts of large programmes for the production, cooling, acceleration and storage of muons for dedicated muon colliders, and the lower-energy neutrino factories are perceived as a first step towards the colliders at a much higher energy. We shall explore possible experiments at the projected high- intensity neutrino beams. Among these experiments the measurement of the nuclear coherent scattering cross section would be based on the use of thermal calorimetric detectors segmented so that self-vetoing would supplement the surrounding veto detectors. (4 refs).

  1. Atypical Aspergillus parasiticus isolates from pistachio with aflR gene nucleotide insertion identical to Aspergillus sojae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxins are the most toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites produced primarily by the filamentous fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. The toxins cause devastating economic losses because of strict regulations on distribution of contaminated products. Aspergillus sojae are...

  2. Iatrogenic aspergillus infection of the central nervous system in a pregnant woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokuhetty Menaka

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A healthy postnatal woman succumbed to fulminant iatrogenic Aspergillus infection of the central nervous system, following accidental inoculation into the subarachnoid space at spinal anesthesia, during an outbreak of Aspergillus meningitis in Sri Lanka. Autopsy revealed extensive Aspergillus meningitis and culture confirmed Aspergillus fumigatus. The thalamic parenchyma in the brain was invaded by fungal hyphae producing necrotizing angitis with thrombosis, thalamic infarcts and fungal abscesses. The directional growth of fungal hyphae from the extra-luminal side of blood vessels towards the lumen favored extension from the brain parenchyma over hematogenous spread. The spinal parenchyma was resistant to fungal invasion in spite of the heavy growth within the spinal meninges and initial inoculation at spinal level. Modulation of the immune response in pregnancy with depression of selective aspects of cell-mediated immunity probably contributed to rapid spread within the subarachnoid space, to involve the brain parenchyma leading to clinical deterioration and death.

  3. Transcriptional profiling of Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Veen, van der, D.

    2009-01-01

    The industrially important fungus Aspergillus niger feeds naturally on decomposing plant material, of which a significant proportion is lipid. Examination of the A. niger genome sequence suggested that all proteins required for metabolic conversion of lipids are present, including 63 predicted lipases. In contrast to polysaccharide-degrading enzyme networks, not much is known about the signaling and regulatory processes that control lipase expression and activity in fungi. This project was ai...

  4. Hyphal heterogeneity in Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    de Bekker, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Mycelial fungi use hyphae to colonize substrates. These hyphae secrete enzymes that convert complex polymers into breakdown products that can be taken up to serve as nutrients. Using GFP as a reporter it has been shown that exploring hyphae of Aspergillus niger are heterogenic with respect to expression of the glucoamylase gene glaA; some hyphae strongly express the glucoamylase gene glaA, while others express it lowly. This was a surprising finding considering the fact that all hyphae were e...

  5. Germination of Aspergillus niger conidia

    OpenAIRE

    Hayer, Kimran

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus niger is a black-spored filamentous fungus that forms asexual spores called conidospores (‘conidia’). Germination of conidia, leading to the formation of hyphae, is initiated by conidial swelling and mobilisation of endogenous carbon and energy stores, followed by polarisation and emergence of a hyphal germ tube. These morphological and biochemical changes which define the model of germination have been studied with the aim of understanding how conidia sense and utilise different...

  6. Regulatory processes in Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Poulsen, Lars; Thykær, Jette; Eliasson Lantz, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are extensively used in the fermentation industry for synthesis of numerous products. One of the most important, is the fungus Aspergillus niger, used industrially for production of organic acids, and homologous as well as heterologous enzymes. This fungus has numerous of advantages, including tolerance for low pH, which is important for acid production. Furthermore, it has the capability of metabolizing a wide variety of carbon sources, possesses an exceptional efficient pr...

  7. Occurrence of Aspergillus sp., Fusarium sp., and aflatoxins in corn hybrids with different systems of storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Sbardelotto Di Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess alternatives for viable corn storage for small rural properties in two annual storage experiments. A 4×5 factorial design was used with four types of storage (conventional bags, hermetic bags, metal silos and corncobs and five periods of storage (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. We used corn hybrids 2B688RR and 30K73Hx cultivated in winter 2012 and summer 2012/2013 in the city of Dois Vizinhos, Paraná, Brazil. The moisture contents, counts of Aspergillus sp. and Fusarium sp., and the occurrence of aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2 were assessed. The kernels stored in hermetic bags had lower moisture contents. Aspergillus sp. and Fusarium sp. were observed in 20.37 and 86.11% of winter storage samples, respectively, and in 83.3 and 91.6% of summer storage samples, respectively. The storage system and time of storage had no influence on the occurrence of Aspergillus sp. and aflatoxins in the winter crop samples. The corncobs from the summer crop samples had the lowest counts of Aspergillus sp. and did not have aflatoxins. We detected aflatoxins at concentrations of 2.8-14.5 and 3-197.5 µg kg-1 in the winter and summer crop samples, respectively.

  8. Effect of gamma radiation on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure and mycotoxin production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, J. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia Veterinaria, Universidad Federal Rural de Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ) (Brazil); Cavaglieri, L., E-mail: lcavaglieri@arnet.com.a [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto (UNRC), Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Member of Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CIC-CONICET) (Argentina); Vital, H. [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx), Secao de Defesa Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Cristofolini, A.; Merkis, C. [Departamento de Microscopia Electronica, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto. Ruta 36 km 601 (5800) Rio Cuarto (Argentina); Astoreca, A. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto (UNRC), Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Member of Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CIC-CONICET) (Argentina); Orlando, J.; Caru, M. [Departamento de Ciencias Ecologicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Dalcero, A. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto (UNRC), Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Member of Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CIC-CONICET) (Argentina); Rosa, C.A.R. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Inmunologia Veterinaria, Universidad Federal Rural de Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ) (Brazil); Member of Consejo Nacional de Pesquisas (CNPq) (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of gamma radiation (2 kGy) on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure. Moreover, the influence on aflatoxin B{sub 1} and ochratoxin A production was also observed. Irradiated A. flavus strain showed a dull orangish colony while control strain showed the typical green color. Minor differences were observed on stipes, metulae and conidia size between control and irradiated A. flavus and A. ochraceus strains. Irradiated fungi showed ultrastructural changes on cell wall, plasmalema and cytoplasm levels. The levels of mycotoxins produced by irradiated strains were two times greater than those produced by control strains. Successive transferences of irradiated strains on malt extract agar allowed the fungus to recuperate morphological characteristics. Although minor changes in the fungal morphology were observed, ultrastructural changes at cell wall level and the increase of mycotoxin production ability were observed. Inappropriate storage of irradiated food and feed would allow the development of potentially more toxicogenic fungal propagules.

  9. Cytotoxicity of methanol extracts of Annona muricata, Passiflora edulis and nine other Cameroonian medicinal plants towards multi-factorial drug-resistant cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Kuete, Victor; Dzotam, Joachim K.; Voukeng, Igor K.; Fankam, Aim? G.; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer cells rapidly acquire resistance leading to treatment failures. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytotoxicity of 17 methanol extracts from 11 Cameroonian medicinal plants against the sensitive leukemia CCRF?CEM cells and the best ones were further tested on a panel of 8 other human cancer cell lines, including various MDR phenotypes as well as against the normal AML12 hepatocytes. Methods The cytotoxicity of the extracts was determined using a resazurin reduction ...

  10. Mathematical model of gluconic acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamatsu, T.; Shioya, S.; Furuya, T.

    1981-11-01

    A mathematical model for the study of gluconic acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger has been developed. The model has been deduced from the basic biological concept of multicellular filamentous microorganisms, i.e. cell population balance. It can be used to explain the behaviour of both batch and continuous cultures, even when in a lag phase. A new characteristic, involving the existence of dual equilibrium stages during fermentation, has been predicted using this mathematical model. (Refs. 6).

  11. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.

    2015-01-01

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme...... with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype...... was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production...

  12. Cytotoxicity of methanol extracts of Annona muricata, Passiflora edulis and nine other Cameroonian medicinal plants towards multi-factorial drug-resistant cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Dzotam, Joachim K; Voukeng, Igor K; Fankam, Aimé G; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells rapidly acquire resistance leading to treatment failures. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytotoxicity of 17 methanol extracts from 11 Cameroonian medicinal plants against the sensitive leukemia CCRF-CEM cells and the best ones were further tested on a panel of 8 other human cancer cell lines, including various MDR phenotypes as well as against the normal AML12 hepatocytes. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was determined using a resazurin reduction assay meanwhile flow cytometry was used to measure cell cycle, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and reactive oxygen species. In an initial screening using leukemia CCRF-CEM cells, ten extracts from five plants namely Alchornea floribunda , Annona muricata , Euphorbia prostata , Pachypodanthium staudtii and Passiflora edulis displayed IC 50 values below 20 µg/mL. They were further tested in 8 other cell lines as well as in normal AML12 hepatocytes. All selected extracts were active against leukemia CEM/ADR5000 cells with IC 50 value below 40 µg/mL. IC 50 values ranging from 10.13 µg/mL (towards CEM/ADR5000 cells) to 72.01 µg/mL [towards resistant colon carcinoma HCT116 ( p53 - / - ) cells] for Pachypodanthium staudtii roots and from 0.11 µg/mL (towards CCRF-CEM cells) to 108 µg/mL (towards P-glycoprotein-over-expressing CEM/ADR5000 cells) for doxorubicin were obtained in the eight other cancer cell lines studied. Extracts from Annona muricata leaves (AML) and seeds (AMS), and Passiflora edulis fruit (PEF) had IC 50 values below 1 µg/mL against CCRF-CEM cells and below 10 µg/mL against its MDR subline CEM/ADR5000 cells. AML, AMS and PEF induced MMP-loss-mediated apoptosis in CCRF-CEM cells. Results of the present study suggest that some of the tested plants namely Alchornea floribunda , Annona muricata , Euphorbia prostata , Pachypodanthium staudtii and Passiflora edulis represent a source of anticancer drugs. Annona muricata and Passiflora edulis are good

  13. A Review of "Infinity Factory."

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Inc., Reston, VA.

    Following a discussion of the historical background of the TV series "Infinity Factory," the goals of the television project are listed. A general description of the television series, an evaluation of the entertainment value, and an evaluation of children's attitude change are briefly presented. The program's presentation of mathematics…

  14. The stimulatory effect of growth hormone, prolactin, and placental lactogen on beta-cell proliferation is not mediated by insulin-like growth factor-I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1991-01-01

    to bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) after cells were incubated for 1 h in the presence of 10 microM BrdU. By double staining with insulin antibodies it was found that 6.3% of the beta-cells had incorporated BrdU when cultured for 7 days in the presence of 1 microgram/ml human GH (hGH) compared to 0.6% when cultured...... in the absence of hGH. Similar results were obtained using rat GH. The half-maximal effect of hGH on beta-cell proliferation was observed at 10 ng/ml, and the maximal effect at 100 ng/ml. Islet cells cultured in the presence of PRL or PL caused a dose-dependent increase in beta-cell proliferation similar...... to that caused by hGH. GH, PRL, and PL had no effect on the proliferation of glucagon- or somatostatin-producing cells. The addition of 100 ng/ml IGF-I to either control or GH-stimulated islet cells did not affect the labeling index. When GH-stimulated proliferation of beta-cells was measured in the presence...

  15. Modulation of antimicrobial metabolites production by the fungus Aspergillus parasiticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracarense, Adriana A P; Takahashi, Jacqueline A

    2014-01-01

    Biosynthesis of active secondary metabolites by fungi occurs as a specific response to the different growing environments. Changes in this environment alter the chemical and biological profiles leading to metabolites diversification and consequently to novel pharmacological applications. In this work, it was studied the influence of three parameters (fermentation length, medium composition and aeration) in the biosyntheses of antimicrobial metabolites by the fungus Aspergillus parasiticus in 10 distinct fermentation periods. Metabolism modulation in two culturing media, CYA and YES was evaluated by a 2(2) full factorial planning (ANOVA) and on a 2(3) factorial planning, role of aeration, medium composition and carbohydrate concentration were also evaluated. In overall, 120 different extracts were prepared, their HPLC profiles were obtained and the antimicrobial activity against A. flavus, C. albicans, E. coli and S. aureus of all extracts was evaluated by microdilution bioassay. Yield of kojic acid, a fine chemical produced by the fungus A. parasiticus was determined in all extracts. Statistical analyses pointed thirteen conditions able to modulate the production of bioactive metabolites by A. parasiticus. Effect of carbon source in metabolites diversification was significant as shown by the changes in the HPLC profiles of the extracts. Most of the extracts presented inhibition rates higher than that of kojic acid as for the extract obtained after 6 days of fermentation in YES medium under stirring. Kojic acid was not the only metabolite responsible for the activity since some highly active extracts showed to possess low amounts of this compound, as determined by HPLC.

  16. Liver injury in invasive aspergillus. Echographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero Fernandez, R.; Garcia Revillo, J.; Paez Moreno, J.; Zurera Tendero, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    Aspergillus is the second most common mycoses in immuno compromised patients. The invasive form is associated with a mortality of approximately 100%. We present a case of invasive aspergillus in a heart transplant recipient in whom ultrasound disclosed the presence of liver injury which was later confirmed by necropsy. We review the available literature. (Author) 15 refs

  17. Infectious keratitis caused by Aspergillus tubingensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kredics, L.; Varga, J.; Kocsube, S.; Rajaraman, R.; Raghavan, A.; Doczi, I.; Bhaskar, M.; Nemeth, T.M.; Antal, Z.; Venkatapathy, N.; Vagvolgyi, C.; Samson, R.A.; Chockaiya, M.; Palanisamy, M.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report 2 cases of keratomycosis caused by Aspergillus tubingensis. METHODS: The therapeutic courses were recorded for 2 male patients, 52 and 78 years old, with fungal keratitis caused by black Aspergillus strains. Morphological examination of the isolates was carried out on malt extract

  18. Sporulation inhibited secretion in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijgsheld, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus niger is abundantly found in nature. It degrades dead material of plants and animals but can also be a pathogen of these organisms. Aspergillus niger is also important for mankind because it is one of the main organisms used for the industrial production of enzymes. These enzymes are

  19. Photon Factory Activity Report, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Photon Factory Activity Report no.12 deals with our activities in the period from October 1993 through September 1994. We operate two light sources at the Photon Factory; the 2.5-GeV Photon Factory storage ring, which is a dedicated light source, and the 6.5-GeV TRISTAN Accumulation Ring, which is parasitically used as a light source. We keep more than seventy experimental stations at two facilities, and accept experiments primarily according to approval by the Program Advisory Committee. The number of proposals to the Photon Factory has been still growing. Three-hundred eighty two proposals were approved by the PAC in FY1994, which is an increase by thirteen percent compared to the previous year. Remarkable was growth in biology proposals, particularly proposals in protein crystallography. In FY 1994, we accepted approximately 20,000 man-days as general users, and almost ten percent of them were from abroad. We always open the facility to users, not only domestic but also international. Recently we have been concentrating our effort to upgrading of the light sources and reconstruction of the experimental stations to keep the Photon Factory an attractive research facility in the forthcoming years. We have already started a program of reducing the emittance of the 2.5-GeV storage ring, which now operates with an emittance of 110 nm-rad, to 27 nm-rad by modifying the lattice, with the goal of operation at the reduced emittance in the fall of 1997. We also have conceived of a conversion of the TRISTAN Accumulation Ring to a dedicated light source of high energies. The on-going TRISTAN project will terminate by the end of 1995, and the TRISTAN Main Ring will be converted to a new B-Factory. At this moment, the TRISTAN Accumulation Ring will be disused as the injector to the Main Ring, and conversion of the AR to a dedicated light source becomes possible. (J.P.N.)

  20. Photon Factory Activity Report, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Photon Factory Activity Report no.12 deals with our activities in the period from October 1993 through September 1994. We operate two light sources at the Photon Factory; the 2.5-GeV Photon Factory storage ring, which is a dedicated light source, and the 6.5-GeV TRISTAN Accumulation Ring, which is parasitically used as a light source. We keep more than seventy experimental stations at two facilities, and accept experiments primarily according to approval by the Program Advisory Committee. The number of proposals to the Photon Factory has been still growing. Three-hundred eighty two proposals were approved by the PAC in FY1994, which is an increase by thirteen percent compared to the previous year. Remarkable was growth in biology proposals, particularly proposals in protein crystallography. In FY 1994, we accepted approximately 20,000 man-days as general users, and almost ten percent of them were from abroad. We always open the facility to users, not only domestic but also international. Recently we have been concentrating our effort to upgrading of the light sources and reconstruction of the experimental stations to keep the Photon Factory an attractive research facility in the forthcoming years. We have already started a program of reducing the emittance of the 2.5-GeV storage ring, which now operates with an emittance of 110 nm-rad, to 27 nm-rad by modifying the lattice, with the goal of operation at the reduced emittance in the fall of 1997. We also have conceived of a conversion of the TRISTAN Accumulation Ring to a dedicated light source of high energies. The on-going TRISTAN project will terminate by the end of 1995, and the TRISTAN Main Ring will be converted to a new B-Factory. At this moment, the TRISTAN Accumulation Ring will be disused as the injector to the Main Ring, and conversion of the AR to a dedicated light source becomes possible. (J.P.N.)

  1. Environmental dimensionality controls the interaction of phagocytes with the pathogenic fungi Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnsen, Judith; Narang, Priyanka; Hasenberg, Mike; Gunzer, Frank; Bilitewski, Ursula; Klippel, Nina; Rohde, Manfred; Brock, Matthias; Brakhage, Axel A; Gunzer, Matthias

    2007-02-01

    The fungal pathogens Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans are major health threats for immune-compromised patients. Normally, macrophages and neutrophil granulocytes phagocytose inhaled Aspergillus conidia in the two-dimensional (2-D) environment of the alveolar lumen or Candida growing in tissue microabscesses, which are composed of a three-dimensional (3-D) extracellular matrix. However, neither the cellular dynamics, the per-cell efficiency, the outcome of this interaction, nor the environmental impact on this process are known. Live imaging shows that the interaction of phagocytes with Aspergillus or Candida in 2-D liquid cultures or 3-D collagen environments is a dynamic process that includes phagocytosis, dragging, or the mere touching of fungal elements. Neutrophils and alveolar macrophages efficiently phagocytosed or dragged Aspergillus conidia in 2-D, while in 3-D their function was severely impaired. The reverse was found for phagocytosis of Candida. The phagocytosis rate was very low in 2-D, while in 3-D most neutrophils internalized multiple yeasts. In competitive assays, neutrophils primarily incorporated Aspergillus conidia in 2-D and Candida yeasts in 3-D despite frequent touching of the other pathogen. Thus, phagocytes show activity best in the environment where a pathogen is naturally encountered. This could explain why "delocalized" Aspergillus infections such as hematogeneous spread are almost uncontrollable diseases, even in immunocompetent individuals.

  2. Environmental dimensionality controls the interaction of phagocytes with the pathogenic fungi Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Behnsen

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The fungal pathogens Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans are major health threats for immune-compromised patients. Normally, macrophages and neutrophil granulocytes phagocytose inhaled Aspergillus conidia in the two-dimensional (2-D environment of the alveolar lumen or Candida growing in tissue microabscesses, which are composed of a three-dimensional (3-D extracellular matrix. However, neither the cellular dynamics, the per-cell efficiency, the outcome of this interaction, nor the environmental impact on this process are known. Live imaging shows that the interaction of phagocytes with Aspergillus or Candida in 2-D liquid cultures or 3-D collagen environments is a dynamic process that includes phagocytosis, dragging, or the mere touching of fungal elements. Neutrophils and alveolar macrophages efficiently phagocytosed or dragged Aspergillus conidia in 2-D, while in 3-D their function was severely impaired. The reverse was found for phagocytosis of Candida. The phagocytosis rate was very low in 2-D, while in 3-D most neutrophils internalized multiple yeasts. In competitive assays, neutrophils primarily incorporated Aspergillus conidia in 2-D and Candida yeasts in 3-D despite frequent touching of the other pathogen. Thus, phagocytes show activity best in the environment where a pathogen is naturally encountered. This could explain why "delocalized" Aspergillus infections such as hematogeneous spread are almost uncontrollable diseases, even in immunocompetent individuals.

  3. Pterocarpenes elicited by Aspergillus caelatus in peanut (Arachis hypogaea) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Victor S; Neff, Scott A; Gloer, James B; Khan, Shabana I; Tabanca, Nurhayat; De Lucca, Anthony J; Wedge, David E

    2010-12-01

    The substituted pterocarpenes named aracarpene-1 (1) and aracarpene-2 (2) were isolated from wounded peanut seeds challenged by a strain of Aspergillus caelatus. The structures of these putative phytoalexins were determined by interpretation of NMR and MS data. The aracarpenes were investigated for their antifungal and antibacterial activities as well as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cytotoxic activities in mammalian cells. Aracarpene-2 demonstrated high antibacterial properties against tested gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, whereas aracarpene-1 displayed low antibacterial properties against the same bacteria. Both compounds had no antifungal activity against Aspergillus flavus. Together with peanut stilbenoids that are also produced in the challenged seeds, these compounds may represent a class of low-molecular weight peanut metabolites with a defensive role(s) against pathogenic microorganisms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Biosynthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles by Aspergillus Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamiar Zomorodian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, researchers turn to natural processes such as using biological microorganisms in order to develop reliable and ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. In this study, we have investigated extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using four Aspergillus species including A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, A. niger, and A. flavus. We have also analyzed nitrate reductase activity in the studied species in order to determine the probable role of this enzyme in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. The formation of silver nanoparticles in the cell filtrates was confirmed by the passage of laser light, change in the color of cell filtrates, absorption peak at 430 nm in UV-Vis spectra, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. There was a logical relationship between the efficiencies of studied Aspergillus species in the production of silver nanoparticles and their nitrate reductase activity. A. fumigatus as the most efficient species showed the highest nitrate reductase activity among the studied species while A. flavus exhibited the lowest capacity in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles which was in accord with its low nitrate reductase activity. The present study showed that Aspergillus species had potential for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles depending on their nitrate reductase activity.

  5. Biosynthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles by Aspergillus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourshahid, Seyedmohammad; Mehryar, Pouyan; Pakshir, Keyvan; Rahimi, Mohammad Javad; Arabi Monfared, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Currently, researchers turn to natural processes such as using biological microorganisms in order to develop reliable and ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. In this study, we have investigated extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using four Aspergillus species including A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, A. niger, and A. flavus. We have also analyzed nitrate reductase activity in the studied species in order to determine the probable role of this enzyme in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. The formation of silver nanoparticles in the cell filtrates was confirmed by the passage of laser light, change in the color of cell filtrates, absorption peak at 430 nm in UV-Vis spectra, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). There was a logical relationship between the efficiencies of studied Aspergillus species in the production of silver nanoparticles and their nitrate reductase activity. A. fumigatus as the most efficient species showed the highest nitrate reductase activity among the studied species while A. flavus exhibited the lowest capacity in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles which was in accord with its low nitrate reductase activity. The present study showed that Aspergillus species had potential for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles depending on their nitrate reductase activity. PMID:27652264

  6. Biosynthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles by Aspergillus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Pourshahid, Seyedmohammad; Sadatsharifi, Arman; Mehryar, Pouyan; Pakshir, Keyvan; Rahimi, Mohammad Javad; Arabi Monfared, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Currently, researchers turn to natural processes such as using biological microorganisms in order to develop reliable and ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. In this study, we have investigated extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using four Aspergillus species including A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, A. niger, and A. flavus. We have also analyzed nitrate reductase activity in the studied species in order to determine the probable role of this enzyme in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. The formation of silver nanoparticles in the cell filtrates was confirmed by the passage of laser light, change in the color of cell filtrates, absorption peak at 430 nm in UV-Vis spectra, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). There was a logical relationship between the efficiencies of studied Aspergillus species in the production of silver nanoparticles and their nitrate reductase activity. A. fumigatus as the most efficient species showed the highest nitrate reductase activity among the studied species while A. flavus exhibited the lowest capacity in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles which was in accord with its low nitrate reductase activity. The present study showed that Aspergillus species had potential for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles depending on their nitrate reductase activity.

  7. Factory Outlet Stores - ein Trend in Deutschland?

    OpenAIRE

    Nufer, Gerd; Sieber, Dorothea

    2009-01-01

    Der Factory Outlet Store stellt einen neuen Vertriebskanal dar, der es Herstellern ermöglicht, Kunden Markenprodukte zu vergleichsweise günstige Preisen anzubieten. Der vorliegende Beitrag befasst sich mit dem Konzept Factory Outlet Store und der Frage, ob es sich hierbei um einen aktuellen Marketing-Trend handelt bzw. welche Mittel unternommen werden müssen, um Factory Outlet Stores nachhaltig zu etablieren. Hierzu werden Factory Outlet Stores aus der Marketing-Perspektive analysiert, bei de...

  8. RIKEN RI Beam Factory project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Yasushige; Goto, Akira; Katayama, Takeshi [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    The RARF proposes `RIKEN RI Beam Factory` as a next facility-expanding project. The factory makes it the primary aim to provide RI (Radioactive Isotope) beams covering over the whole atomic-mass range with the world-highest intensity in a wide energy range up to several hundreds MeV/nucleon. These RI beams are generated by the fragmentation of high-intensity heavy-ion beams. For the efficient production heavy-ion energies will be boosted up to over 100 MeV/nucleon even for very heavy ions by a K2500-MeV superconducting ring cyclotron serving as a post accelerator of the existing K540-MeV ring cyclotron. A new type of experimental installation called `MUSES` (Multi-USe Experimental Storage rings) will be constructed as well. With MUSES, various types of unique colliding experiments will become possible. (author)

  9. Handbook factory planning and design

    CERN Document Server

    Wiendahl, Hans-Peter; Nyhuis, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This handbook introduces a methodical approach and pragmatic concept for the planning and design of changeable factories that act in strategic alliances to supply the ever-changing needs of the global market. In the first part, the change drivers of manufacturing enterprises and the resulting new challenges are considered in detail with focus on an appropriate change potential. The second part concerns the design of the production facilities and systems on the factory levels work place, section, building and site under functional, organisational, architectural and strategic aspects keeping in mind the environmental, health and safety aspects including corporate social responsibility. The third part is dedicated to the planning and design method that is based on a synergetic interaction of process and space. The accompanying project management of the planning and construction phase and the facility management for the effective utilization of the built premises close the book. -        Concise overview o...

  10. Aspergillus infections of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, V.; Hottenrott, K.; Hossfeld, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    In this article the three different manifestations of pulmonary aspergillosis are compared with each other: Bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, aspergilloma and invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, and their different clinical and radiological manifestations. In particular, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis - being a severe complication in immuno-suppressed patients whose defenses are weak - often presents diagnostic problems due to its initially mostly unspecific clinical and radiological signs. The late signs of a pulmonary aspergillus infection, such as formation of a cavern or the manifestation of the 'air crescent' sign, however, are seen only when the patient is just beginning to convalesce. (orig.) [de

  11. Lysine aminopeptidase of Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Basten, D.E.J.W.; Visser, J.; Schaap, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    Conserved regions within the M1 family of metallo-aminopeptidases have been used to clone a zinc aminopeptidase from the industrially used fungus Aspergillus niger. The derived amino acid sequence of ApsA is highly similar to two yeast zinc aminopeptidases, LAPI and AAPI (53.3 and 50.9␘verall similarity, respectively), two members of the M1 family of metallo-aminopeptidases. The encoding gene was successfully overexpressed in A. niger and the overexpressed product was purified and characteriz...

  12. A kaon factory for TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measday, D.F.

    1988-11-01

    The design study for the TRIUMF Kaon Factory has recently been funded. A short discussion of the scientific motivation is given first, followed by a brief description of the 30 GeV synchrotron which is being proposed. There will be five rings altogether using the present TRIUMF 500 MeV cyclotron as an injector. If the project is funded in 1990 the accelerators would be completed in 1995 or so, and the experimental programme would start a year later

  13. Apiary B Factory lattice design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald, M.H.R.; Garren, A.A.

    1991-04-01

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper will present the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent. 8 figs. 1 tab

  14. MUON STORAGE RINGS - NEUTRINO FACTORIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The concept of a muon storage ring based Neutrino Source (Neutrino Factory) has sparked considerable interest in the High Energy Physics community. Besides providing a first phase of a muon collider facility, it would generate more intense and well collimated neutrino beams than currently available. The BNL-AGS or some other proton driver would provide an intense proton beam that hits a target, produces pions that decay into muons. The muons must be cooled, accelerated and injected into a storage ring with a long straight section where they decay. The decays occurring in the straight sections of the ring would generate neutrino beams that could be directed to detectors located thousands of kilometers away, allowing studies of neutrino oscillations with precisions not currently accessible. For example, with the neutrino source at BNL, detectors at Soudan, Minnesota (1,715 km), and Gran Sasso, Italy (6,527 km) become very interesting possibilities. The feasibility of constructing and operating such a muon-storage-ring based Neutrino-Factory, including geotechnical questions related to building non-planar storage rings (e.g. at 8degree angle for BNL-Soudan, and 3degree angle for BNL-Gran Sasso) along with the design of the muon capture, cooling, acceleration, and storage ring for such a facility is being explored by the growing Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC). The authors present overview of Neutrino Factory concept based on a muon storage ring, its components, physics opportunities, possible upgrade to a full muon collider, latest simulations of front-end, and a new bowtie-muon storage ring design

  15. Hadronic research at kaon factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvey, G.T.

    1985-01-01

    Future experiments in strong-interaction physics that are especially suited for kaon factories, such as the proposed LAMPF II, are discussed. The need to focus on the issue of confinement of light quarks (u,d,s) is stressed. Experiments to search for the H dibaryon and glueballs, as well as to pursue the sea-quark distribution in nuclei using the Drell-Yan process, are featured. A brief discussion of the LAMPF II facility and its costs is also presented

  16. Heterologous expression of Gaeumannomyces graminis lipoxygenase in Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heshof, R.; Schayck, van J.P.; Tamayo Ramos, J.A.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus sp. contain ppo genes coding for Ppo enzymes that produce oxylipins from polyunsaturated fatty acids. These oxylipins function as signal molecules in sporulation and influence the asexual to sexual ratio of Aspergillus sp. Fungi like Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus niger contain

  17. Photon Factory activity report, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Photon Factory at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics is a national facility for scientific research utilizing synchrotron radiation. Although the Photon Factory operator the linear injector, two light sources including the 2.5 GeV storage ring and the 6.5 GeV TRISTAN accumulation Ring as well as a major fraction of their beamlines and experimental station. This report is covered the period from October 1994 to September 1995. The total number of proposals by this PAC was 399 in 1995. Facility development projects currently in progress include the following, TRISTAN Super Light Facility (TSLF) project, VUV-FEL project, KEKB project and Slow-positron Source. This report contents outline of the Photon Factory, introduction, scientific disciplines, electronic properties of condensed matters, atomic and molecular science, X-ray imaging, radiobiology using synchrotron radiation, structural properties of condensed matters, structural properties of solid surfaces and adsorbates, structure and function of proteins, theoretical researches, experimental facilities, beamlines, new instrumentation, AR Upgrade, collaborations, projects, user`s short reports, list of published papers 1994/95. (S.Y.)

  18. Photon Factory activity report, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Photon Factory at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics is a national facility for scientific research utilizing synchrotron radiation. Although the Photon Factory operator the linear injector, two light sources including the 2.5 GeV storage ring and the 6.5 GeV TRISTAN accumulation Ring as well as a major fraction of their beamlines and experimental station. This report is covered the period from October 1994 to September 1995. The total number of proposals by this PAC was 399 in 1995. Facility development projects currently in progress include the following, TRISTAN Super Light Facility (TSLF) project, VUV-FEL project, KEKB project and Slow-positron Source. This report contents outline of the Photon Factory, introduction, scientific disciplines, electronic properties of condensed matters, atomic and molecular science, X-ray imaging, radiobiology using synchrotron radiation, structural properties of condensed matters, structural properties of solid surfaces and adsorbates, structure and function of proteins, theoretical researches, experimental facilities, beamlines, new instrumentation, AR Upgrade, collaborations, projects, user's short reports, list of published papers 1994/95. (S.Y.)

  19. Photon Factory activity report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Photon Factory has grown at a considerable rate, and 600 experiments are carried out in 1991, while the number of users is now 2300 including about 500 from industrial sectors. The use of synchrotron radiation increased from fundamental research to industrial development. The development at the Photon Factory is supported by the capability of the accelerators. At present, the 2.5 GeV PF ring is operated with positrons at the initial beam current of 350 mA. The total operation time was 3500 hours in the fiscal year 1990. The development of an avalanche mode photodiode, the observation of quantum beat in the experiment of nuclear Bragg scattering, the measurement of photo-electron and photo-ion spectroscopy were carried out. The conversion of TRISTAN main ring to an ultrahigh brilliance and high coherence source is planned for the future. The annual PF Symposium was held, and Professor H. Winick gave the lecture 'Ultrahigh brightness and coherent radiation from large storage rings'. In this report, the outline of the Photon Factory and the activities in Divisions of Injector Linac, Light Source and Instrumentation are described. (K.I.)

  20. The Aspergillus niger RmsA protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkwitz, Susann; Schütze, Tabea; van den Hondel, Cees A.M.J.J; Ram, Arthur F.J

    2010-01-01

    Many cells and organisms go through polarized growth phases during their life. Cell polarization is achieved by local accumulation of signaling molecules which guide the cytoskeleton and vesicular trafficking to specific parts of the cell and thus ensure polarity establishment and maintenance. Polarization of signaling molecules is also fundamental for the lifestyle of filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus niger and essential for their morphogenesis, development and survival under environmental stress conditions. Considerable advances in our understanding on the protagonists and processes mediating polarized growth in filamentous fungi have been made over the past years. However, how the interplay of different signaling pathways is coordinated has yet to be determined. We found that the A. niger RmsA protein is central for the polarization of actin at the hyphal tip but also of vital importance for the metabolism, viability and stress resistance of A. niger. This suggests that RmsA could occupy an important position in the global network of pathways that balance growth, morphogenesis and survival of A. niger. PMID:20585521

  1. Aspergillus niger contains the cryptic phylogenetic species A. awamori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrone, Giancarlo; Stea, Gaetano; Epifani, Filomena

    2011-01-01

    Aspergillus section Nigri is an important group of species for food and medical mycology, and biotechnology. The Aspergillus niger ‘aggregate’ represents its most complicated taxonomic subgroup containing eight morphologically indistinguishable taxa: A. niger, Aspergillus tubingensis, Aspergillus...... acidus, Aspergillus brasiliensis, Aspergillus costaricaensis, Aspergillus lacticoffeatus, Aspergillus piperis, and Aspergillus vadensis. Aspergillus awamori, first described by Nakazawa, has been compared taxonomically with other black aspergilli and recently it has been treated as a synonym of A. niger....... Phylogenetic analyses of sequences generated from portions of three genes coding for the proteins β-tubulin (benA), calmodulin (CaM), and the translation elongation factor-1 alpha (TEF-1α) of a population of A. niger strains isolated from grapes in Europe revealed the presence of a cryptic phylogenetic species...

  2. Effects of phorbol ester and staurosporine on the actions of insulin-like growth factor-I on rat ovarian granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, H; Herington, A C; Roupas, P

    1995-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is able to stimulate ovarian granulosa cell steroidogenesis induced by gonadotopins. This gonadotropin-induced potentiation of IGF-I action appears to be due, at least in part, to a gonadotropin-induced increase in membrane-bound IGF-I receptor number and/or decrease in extracellular IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). Protein kinase C (PKC) has recently been reported to inhibit gonadotropin-induced steroidogenesis in rat ovarian granulosa cells. The role of PKC in the effects of IGF-I on gonadotropin action, however, is unknown. In this study, the effects of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, a PKC activator) and staurosporine (ST, a PKC inhibitor) on IGF-I action were studied using immature rat ovarian granulosa cells. Activation of PKC by PMA did not affect steroidogenesis or cAMP secretion in cells treated with or without IGF-I. On the other hand, inhibition of PKC by ST alone (10(-9)-10(-7)m) led to an increase in progesterone production in a dose- and time-dependent manner without affecting cAMP secretion. In the presence, but not absence, of ST, IGF-I was able to stimulate progesterone production in the absence of any gonadotropin. PMA decreased ST-induced steroidogenesis and essentially abolished ST-potentiated IGF-I stimulation of steroidogenesis, suggesting the effects of ST on IGF-I action involved a PKC-dependent mechanism. Unlike gonadotropin, ST did not change IGF-I receptor binding. However, ST significantly decreased a major IGF binding protein (IGFBP, ∼30kDa) which is likely to be IGFBP-5, whereas it increased a minor IGFBP (∼24kDa) which is likely to be IGFBP-4. Both effects of ST were dose- and time-dependent. Furthermore, ST inhibited the expression of mRNA for IGFBP-5 suggesting that ST decreased IGFBP-5 levels by inhibiting its transcription and/or decreasing the stability of its mRNA. Interestingly, ST also decreased mRNA levels of IGFBP-4 despite a significant increase in secreted IGFBP-4 levels. The

  3. Detection of Aspergillus flavus and A. fumigatus in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Specimens of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants and Hematological Malignancies Patients by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Nested PCR and Mycological Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrinfar, Hossein; Mirhendi, Hossein; Fata, Abdolmajid; Khodadadi, Hossein; Kordbacheh, Parivash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary aspergillosis (PA) is one of the most serious complications in immunocompromised patients, in particular among hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT) and patients with hematological malignancies. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the incidence of PA and utility of molecular methods in HSCT and patients with hematological malignancies, four methods including direct examination, culture, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR were performed on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens in Tehran, Iran. Patients and Methods: During 16 months, 46 BAL specimens were obtained from individuals with allogeneic HSCT (n = 18) and patients with hematological malignancies (n = 28). Direct wet mounts with 20% potassium hydroxide (KOH) and culture on mycological media were performed. The molecular detection of Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus was done by amplifying the conserved sequences of internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) ribosomal DNA by nested-PCR and the β-tubulin gene by TaqMan real-time PCR. Results: Seven (15.2%) out of 46 specimens were positive in direct examination and showed branched septate hyphae; 11 (23.9%) had positive culture including eight (72.7%) A. flavus and three (27.3%) A. fumigatus; 22 (47.8%) had positive nested-PCR and eight (17.4%) had positive real-time PCR. The incidence of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in these patients included proven IPA in 1 (2.2%), probable IPA in 10 (21.7%), possible IPA in 19 (41.3%) and not IPA in 16 cases (34.8%). Conclusions: The incidence of IPA in allogeneic HSCT and patients with hematological malignancies was relatively high and A. flavus was the most common cause of PA. As molecular methods had higher sensitivity, it may be useful as screening methods in HSCT and patients with hematological malignancies, or to determine when empirical antifungal therapy can be withheld. PMID:25763133

  4. Effects of organic solvent, water activity, and salt hydrate pair on the sn-1,3 selectivity and activity of whole-cell lipase from Aspergillus niger GZUF36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiqin; Zhang, Fuhao; Gao, Zexin; He, Laping; Zeng, Xuefeng; Zhu, Qiujin; Yu, Lijuan

    2018-01-01

    We previously screened a whole-cell lipase EC 3.1.1.3 from the novel strain Aspergillus niger GZUF36, which exhibited 1,3-selectivity in the synthesis of 1,3-diacylglycerol via glycerolysis. However, the mechanism of lipase selectively in catalyzing the sn-1,3 position remains ambiguous. This work was performed to investigate the 1,3-selective mechanism of lipase using glycerolysis to synthesize 1,3-diacylglycerol (1,3-DG) as a model reaction by changing solvent(s) and water activity (a w ), and addition of salt hydrate pair. The measured diacylglycerol yield was also used to examine lipase activity. Results indicated that not only organic solvent and a w have strong effect on the sn-1,3 selectivity, but also ions of salt hydrate pair also affected selectivity. Lipase conformation was altered by hydrophobic interactions of the solvent, a w , or ions of salt hydrate, resulting in distinct sn-1,3 selectivity of the lipase. The salt hydrate pair changed the lipase conformation and selectivity not only by a w but also by static interactions, which was rarely reported. These parameters also affected lipase activity. The lipase displayed the highest selectivity (about 88%) and activity in solvents of t-butanol and n-hexane (1:29, v/v) at a w 0.43. The results demonstrated that the sn-1,3 selectivity and activity of the lipase from A. niger GZUF36 may be improved by control of some crucial factors. This work laid a foundation for the application of lipase in the synthesis of 1,3-DG and other structural and functional lipids.

  5. Ribonuclease Production by Aspergillus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Eleni

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribonuclease production by Aspergillus flavipes, A. sulphureus and A. fischeri in semi-synthetic medium, after 24-144 hours at 30ºC under shaking, was studied. After cultivation, the medium was separated from micelia by filtration and the resultant solution was used as enzymatic extract. The highest amount of biomass and RNase was obtained after 96 hours of cultivation. The enzymes produced by three species presented similar characteristics, with optimum temperature at 55ºC and two peaks of activity at pH 4.5 and 7.0. A. flavipes RNases were more sensitive to temperature: 50% of the initial activity was lost after 1 hour at 70ºC. After this heat treatment, RNase of A. sulphureus lost 30% of this activity and that of A. fischeri only 16%. The nucleotides released by enzimatic hydrolysis of RNA were separated by ion exchange chromatography in a AG-1X8-formiate column and identified by paper chromatography. This procedure indicated that the raw enzymatic extract of Aspergillus flavipes is able to hydrolyze RNA, releasing 3'-nucleotides monophosphate at pH 4.5 and 3' and 5'-nucleotides monophosphate at pH 7.0 and 8.5. This result suggests that this strain produces two different types of RNase, one acidic and other alcaline, with different specificities.

  6. Production and Preliminary Characterization of Alkaline Protease from Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus terreus

    OpenAIRE

    Chellapandi, P.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases are being an industrial candidate, which are widely used in food, bakery, and beverage and detergent industry. In leather industry, alkaline proteases are exhibiting a prominent role in unhairing and bating processes. An extensive use of filamentous fungi, especially Aspergillus species has been studied elaborately. Although, the significant application of alkaline protease produced from these strains in leather industry is being limited. Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus terreus f...

  7. Degradation of melanin by Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, J P; Lipke, H

    1980-07-01

    A strain of Aspergillus fumigatus from composted coffee and garden wastes utilized natural deproteinized insect, banana, hair, octopus, and synthetic tyrosine and dopa melanins as sole sources of carbon. With a sucrose supplement, degradation was essentially complete after 50 days in Czapek medium pH 6.5 at 30 degrees C. The catabolic rate differed for each substrate pigment, as did the molecular weight distribution of products accumulating in the medium. After incubation with L-[U-14C]melanin, over 50% was recovered in a dark fungal pigment, the remainder appearing as cell protein, chitin, lipid, CO2, and polar metabolites. When grown on melanin, the normally pale mycelia darkened with the production of a fungal allomelanin, with infrared spectrum and alkali fusion products differing from those of the substrate pigment. Isotope distribution in amino acids for A. fumigatus grown on labeled melanin supplemented with sucrose suggested separate pools for synthesis of cell proteins and melanoproteins. Deposition of allomelanin increased resistance of conidia, sterigma, and conidiophores to lytic carbohydrases as judged by scanning electron microscopy.

  8. Role of Hydrophobins in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Valsecchi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to desiccation and their capacity to reach the alveoli are partly due to the presence of a hydrophobic layer composed of a protein from the hydrophobin family, called RodA, which covers the conidial surface. In A. fumigatus there are seven hydrophobins (RodA–RodG belonging to class I and III. Most of them have never been studied. We constructed single and multiple hydrophobin-deletion mutants until the generation of a hydrophobin-free mutant. The phenotype, immunogenicity, and virulence of the mutants were studied. RODA is the most expressed hydrophobin in sporulating cultures, whereas RODB is upregulated in biofilm conditions and in vivo Only RodA, however, is responsible for rodlet formation, sporulation, conidial hydrophobicity, resistance to physical insult or anionic dyes, and immunological inertia of the conidia. None of the hydrophobin plays a role in biofilm formation or its hydrophobicity. RodA is the only needed hydrophobin in A. fumigatus, conditioning the structure, permeability, hydrophobicity, and immune-inertia of the cell wall surface in conidia. Moreover, the defect of rodlets on the conidial cell wall surface impacts on the drug sensitivity of the fungus.

  9. Ultrastructural Characterization of Zika Virus Replication Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Mirko; Goellner, Sarah; Acosta, Eliana Gisela; Neufeldt, Christopher John; Oleksiuk, Olga; Lampe, Marko; Haselmann, Uta; Funaya, Charlotta; Schieber, Nicole; Ronchi, Paolo; Schorb, Martin; Pruunsild, Priit; Schwab, Yannick; Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Ruggieri, Alessia; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2017-02-28

    A global concern has emerged with the pandemic spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections that can cause severe neurological symptoms in adults and newborns. ZIKV is a positive-strand RNA virus replicating in virus-induced membranous replication factories (RFs). Here we used various imaging techniques to investigate the ultrastructural details of ZIKV RFs and their relationship with host cell organelles. Analyses of human hepatic cells and neural progenitor cells infected with ZIKV revealed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane invaginations containing pore-like openings toward the cytosol, reminiscent to RFs in Dengue virus-infected cells. Both the MR766 African strain and the H/PF/2013 Asian strain, the latter linked to neurological diseases, induce RFs of similar architecture. Importantly, ZIKV infection causes a drastic reorganization of microtubules and intermediate filaments forming cage-like structures surrounding the viral RF. Consistently, ZIKV replication is suppressed by cytoskeleton-targeting drugs. Thus, ZIKV RFs are tightly linked to rearrangements of the host cell cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Aspergillus uvarum sp. nov., an uniseriate black Aspergillus species isolated from grapes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrone, Giancarlo; Varga, János; Susca, Antonia

    2008-01-01

    A novel species, Aspergillus uvarum sp. nov., is described within Aspergillus section Nigri. This species can be distinguished from other black aspergilli based on internal transcribed spacers (ITS), beta-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences, by AFLP analysis and by extrolite profiles. Aspergill...... atypical strains of Aspergillus aculeatus, CBS 114.80 and CBS 620.78, and was isolated from grape berries in Portugal, Italy, France, Israel, Greece and Spain. The type strain of Aspergillus uvarum sp. nov. is IMI 388523(T)=CBS 127591(T)= ITEM 4834(T)= IBT26606(T)....

  11. Circadian variation in biochemical markers of bone cell activity and insulin-like growth factor-I in two-year-old horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, B F; Blumsohn, A; Goodship, A E; Wilson, A M; Price, J S

    2003-11-01

    Studies in humans have found circadian changes to be one of the most important sources of controllable preanalytical variability when evaluating bone cell activity using biochemical markers. It remains unclear whether similar circadian changes influence bone marker concentrations in the horse. The aim of this study was to characterize changes in serum concentrations of three biochemical markers of bone cell activity over a 24-h period in six 2-yr-old Thoroughbred mares, and to determine circadian variability in IGF-I, which regulates bone turnover. Three bone markers were measured in serum: osteocalcin, a marker of bone formation, the carboxy-terminal propeptide of type-I collagen (a marker of bone formation), and the carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type-I collagen (a marker of bone resorption). Data were analyzed using the cosinor technique, which fits a 24-h cycle to each dataset. A significant circadian rhythm was observed for osteocalcin (P = 0.028), with an estimated amplitude of 7.6% of the mean (95% confidence interval 1.3% to 16.3%), and an estimated peak time of 0900. However, the observed rhythm for the carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type-I collagen (amplitude = 7.4%) was not significant (P = 0.067), and there were no significant changes in concentrations of the carboxy-terminal propeptide of type-I collagen over the 24-h study period (P = 0.44). There was a small but significant circadian rhythm for IGF-I (P = 0.04), with an estimated amplitude of 3.4% (95% confidence interval 0.2 to 7.1%) and peak at 1730. Further studies are now required to determine the potential association between circadian changes in IGF-I and osteocalcin in the horse. Although no significant circadian variation was found in concentrations of the car-boxy-terminal propeptide of type-I collagen and the carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type-I collagen, this may in part be a result of the age of the animals that were still skeletally immature. Future studies should aim to determine

  12. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel M. [IIT, Chicago

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  13. Aqueous extracts of Tulbaghia violacea inhibit germination of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus conidia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somai, Benesh Munilal; Belewa, Vuyokazi

    2011-06-01

    Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus are important plant pathogens and causal agents of pre- and postharvest rots of corn, peanuts, and tree nuts. These fungal pathogens cause significant crop losses and produce aflatoxins, which contaminate many food products and contribute to liver cancer worldwide. Aqueous preparations of Tulbaghia violacea (wild garlic) were antifungal and at 10 mg/ml resulted in sustained growth inhibition of greater than 50% for both A. flavus and A. parasiticus. Light microscopy revealed that the plant extract inhibited conidial germination in a dose-dependent manner. When exposed to T. violacea extract concentrations of 10 mg/ml and above, A. parasiticus conidia began germinating earlier and germination was completed before that of A. flavus, indicating that A. parasiticus conidia were more resistant to the antifungal effects of T. violacea than were A. flavus conidia. At a subinhibitory extract dose of 15 mg/ml, hyphae of both fungal species exhibited increased granulation and vesicle formation, possibly due to increased reactivity between hyphal cellular components and T. violacea extract. These hyphal changes were not seen when hyphae were formed in the absence of the extract. Transmission electron microscopy revealed thickening of conidial cell walls in both fungal species when grown in the presence of the plant extract. Cell walls of A. flavus also became considerably thicker than those of A. parasiticus, indicating differential response to the extract. Aqueous preparations of T. violacea can be used as antifungal treatments for the control of A. flavus and A. parasiticus. Because the extract exhibited a more pronounced effect on A. flavus than on A. parasiticus, higher doses may be needed for control of A. parasiticus infections.

  14. Strategies for the production of difficult-to-express full-length eukaryotic proteins using microbial cell factories: production of human alpha-galactosidase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzueta, Ugutz; Vázquez, Felicitas; Accardi, Giulia; Mendoza, Rosa; Toledo-Rubio, Verónica; Giuliani, Maria; Sannino, Filomena; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Abasolo, Ibane; Schwartz, Simo; Tutino, Maria L; Villaverde, Antonio; Corchero, José L; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2015-07-01

    Obtaining high levels of pure proteins remains the main bottleneck of many scientific and biotechnological studies. Among all the available recombinant expression systems, Escherichia coli facilitates gene expression by its relative simplicity, inexpensive and fast cultivation, well-known genetics and the large number of tools available for its biotechnological application. However, recombinant expression in E. coli is not always a straightforward procedure and major obstacles are encountered when producing many eukaryotic proteins and especially membrane proteins, linked to missing posttranslational modifications, proteolysis and aggregation. In this context, many conventional and unconventional eukaryotic hosts are under exploration and development, but in some cases linked to complex culture media or processes. In this context, alternative bacterial systems able to overcome some of the limitations posed by E. coli keeping the simplicity of prokaryotic manipulation are currently emerging as convenient hosts for protein production. We have comparatively produced a "difficult-to-express" human protein, the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (hGLA) in E. coli and in the psychrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 cells (P. haloplanktis TAC125). While in E. coli the production of active hGLA was unreachable due to proteolytic instability and/or protein misfolding, the expression of hGLA gene in P. haloplanktis TAC125 allows obtaining active enzyme. These results are discussed in the context of emerging bacterial systems for protein production that represent appealing alternatives to the regular use of E. coli and also of more complex eukaryotic systems.

  15. Towards Biocontained Cell Factories: An Evolutionarily Adapted Escherichia coli Strain Produces a New-to-nature Bioactive Lantibiotic Containing Thienopyrrole-Alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthning, Anja; Durkin, Patrick; Oehm, Stefan; Hoesl, Michael G; Budisa, Nediljko; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2016-09-16

    Genetic code engineering that enables reassignment of genetic codons to non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) is a powerful strategy for enhancing ribosomally synthesized peptides and proteins with functions not commonly found in Nature. Here we report the expression of a ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide (RiPP), the 32-mer lantibiotic lichenicidin with a canonical tryptophan (Trp) residue replaced by the ncAA L-β-(thieno[3,2-b]pyrrolyl)alanine ([3,2]Tpa) which does not sustain cell growth in the culture. We have demonstrated that cellular toxicity of [3,2]Tpa for the production of the new-to-nature bioactive congener of lichenicidin in the host Escherichia coli can be alleviated by using an evolutionarily adapted host strain MT21 which not only tolerates [3,2]Tpa but also uses it as a proteome-wide synthetic building block. This work underscores the feasibility of the biocontainment concept and establishes a general framework for design and large scale production of RiPPs with evolutionarily adapted host strains.

  16. Lipase production by recombinant strains of Aspergillus niger expressing a lipase-encoding gene from Thermomyces lanuginosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prathumpai, Wai; Flitter, S.J.; Mcintyre, Mhairi

    2004-01-01

    Two recombinant strains of Aspergillus niger (NW 297-14 and NW297-24) producing a heterologous lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus were constructed. The heterologous lipase was expressed using the TAKA amylase promoter from Aspergillus oryzae. The production kinetics of the two strains on differe...... shows that it is possible to obtain high productivities of heterologous fungal enzymes in A. niger. However, SDS-PAGE analysis showed that most of the produced lipase was bound to the cell wall....

  17. Methionine and glucose transport by isolated intestinal brush border membrane vesicles from pigs and lambs fed an Aspergillus product

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Insurk

    1993-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether feeding an Aspergillus product would influence growth or feed utilization and intestinal mucosal cell function as indicated by uptake of methionine and glucose by isolated intestinal brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). In Experiment 1, 24 weanling pigs were paired by sex, BW, and litter and were allotted, within pairs, to either an 18% CP corn-soy diet (control) or the same diet supplemented (.15%) with an Aspergillus product. There were no diff...

  18. New species in Aspergillus section Terrei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, R. A.; Peterson, S. W.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2011-01-01

    . clade including the type isolate of A. niveus (CBS 115.27) constitutes a lineage closely related to A. carneus. Fennellia nivea, the hypothesized teleomorph is not related to this clade. Aspergillus allahabadii, A. niveus var. indicus, and two species originally placed in section Versicolores, A......Section Terrei of Aspergillus was studied using a polyphasic approach including sequence analysis of parts of the beta-tubulin and calmodulin genes and the ITS region, macro- and micromorphological analyses and examination of extrolite profiles to describe three new species in this section. Based....... floccosus, A. terreus var. africanus, A. terreus var. aureus, while Aspergillus hortai is recognised at species level. Aspergillus terreus NRRL 4017 is described as the new species A. pseudoterreus. Also included in section Terrei are some species formerly placed in sections Flavipedes and Versicolores. A...

  19. A prospective international Aspergillus terreus survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risslegger, B; Zoran, T; Lackner, M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A prospective international multicentre surveillance study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and amphotericin B susceptibility of Aspergillus terreus species complex infections. METHODS: A total of 370 cases from 21 countries were evaluated. RESULTS: The overall prevalence o...

  20. RIKEN RI Beam Factory project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Y.; Katayama, T.

    1996-01-01

    The RARF has a heavy-ion accelerator complex consisting of a K540-MeV ring cyclotron as a booster accelerator and two different types of injectors. The facility provides not only nuclear physicists but also researchers of atomic physics, nuclear chemistry, material science, radiobiology and others with various kinds of heavy-ion beams of an energy range of 10 MeV/nucleon to 100 MeV/nucleon. One of remarkable features of this facility is capability of supplying RI (radioactive isotope) beams with the world-highest level of intensities. In these several years the RI beam has opened up a quite new and fascinating heavy-ion science. In order to further promote this new science, we propose open-quote open-quote RIKEN RI Beam Factory close-quote close-quote as a future project of the RARF: The existing facility will be expanded into the open-quote open-quote Factory close-quote close-quote where high-intensity RI beams of the whole mass range will become available in a wide energy range up to several hundred MeV/nucleon. The concept of this new proposal as well as currently-running upgrade programs relevant to the project will be presented. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  1. Photon Factory activity report, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Since the foundation of Photon Factory a decade age, it has played an important role as a unique synchrotron X-ray radiation source in Japan. Installation of various insertion devices, storage of intense positron beam and reduction of beam emittance were the substantial achievements in the last several years. The exploitation of the TRISTAN Accumulation Ring as a synchrotron radiation source has paved the way for a new potential of development. All these activities have brought about the increase of beamlines and the expansion of scientific fronts. Third International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation held in Tsukuba was one of the most highlighted events for the facility. In coming years, it is intended to open new research fields using the promising single bunch beam and circularly polarized wiggler radiation. The TRISTAN Main Ring also will be applied to synchrotron radiation research. The Photon Factory in a national synchrotron radiation research facility affiliated to the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, and it consists of a 2.5 GeV electron linac, a 2.5 GeV storage ring as a synchrotron light source, beam lines and experimental stations. The operation, improvement and development in respective departments are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Three new species of Aspergillus section Flavi isolated from almonds and maize in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three new aflatoxin-producing species belonging to Aspergillus section Flavi are described, Aspergillus mottae, Aspergillus sergii and Aspergillus transmontanensis. These species were isolated from Portuguese almonds and maize. An investigation examining morphology, extrolites and molecular data was...

  3. Post-genomic insights into the plant polysaccharide degradation potential of Aspergillus nidulans and comparison to Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coutinho, Pedro M; Andersen, Mikael R; Kolenova, Katarina; vanKuyk, Patricia A; Benoit, Isabelle; Gruben, Birgit S; Trejo-Aguilar, Blanca; Visser, Hans; van Solingen, Piet; Pakula, Tiina; Seiboth, Bernard; Battaglia, Evy; Aguilar-Osorio, Guillermo; de Jong, Jan F; Ohm, Robin A; Aguilar, Mariana; Henrissat, Bernard; Nielsen, Jens; Stålbrand, Henrik; de Vries, Ronald P

    The plant polysaccharide degradative potential of Aspergillus nidulans was analysed in detail and compared to that of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae using a combination of bioinformatics, physiology and transcriptomics. Manual verification indicated that 28.4% of the A. nidulans ORFs

  4. WQO is Decidable for Factorial Languages

    KAUST Repository

    Atminas, Aistis

    2017-08-08

    A language is factorial if it is closed under taking factors, i.e. contiguous subwords. Every factorial language can be described by an antidictionary, i.e. a minimal set of forbidden factors. We show that the problem of deciding whether a factorial language given by a finite antidictionary is well-quasi-ordered under the factor containment relation can be solved in polynomial time. We also discuss possible ways to extend our solution to permutations and graphs.

  5. Biosorption of uranium with Aspergillus niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakubu, N.A.; Dudeney, A.W.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper considers interactions of uranium with the microfilamentous fungus Aspergillus niger grown as pellets 4 mm in diameter for column application. Adsorption and desorption isotherms, a range of physical measurements, and a derived mechanistic model, indicated that a simple ion exchange process predominates in which uranyl cations reversibly replace protons on the amino acid groups of proteins and glycoproteins within the cell wall structure. Under the conditions employed uranium adsorbed onto A. niger (CMI 296409) some fourteen times more efficiently at pH 4 than onto the ion exchange resin IRA-400, and was readily desorbed at pH 1. The fungus had inferior selectivity and wet volume/dry weight ratio. Uranium was adsorbed semi-continuously by heat-killed A. niger pellets fluidised in a compartmentalised column. When operated with an intermittent countercurrent flow of the biomass, uranium concentrations of 100 g/m 3 and 5 g/m 3 at pH 4 could be reduced to less than 10 g/m 3 and 1 g/m 3 , respectively. (author)

  6. Asymmetric energy B factory at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yasushi

    1994-01-01

    An introductory review is given on the project of the Asymmetric Energy B factory at KEK. First, the motivation for B factory is discussed. The most interesting and important topic there is the measurement of CP violation in other than the K-system. Thus, CP violation in the B decays is reviewed rather extensively, especially on how the angles of the unitarity triangle can be measured at an asymmetric energy B factory. Then the B factory project at KEK is briefly reviewed. (author)

  7. Identification and toxigenic potential of the industrially important fungi, Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus sojae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas R

    2007-01-01

    Mold strains belonging to the species Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus sojae are highly valued as koji molds in the traditional preparation of fermented foods, such as miso, sake, and shoyu, and as protein production hosts in modern industrial processes. A. oryzae and A. sojae are relatives...

  8. Variability in Galactomannan detection by platelia Aspergillus EIA™ according to the Aspergillus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Orzechowski Xavier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we investigate the extent to which different Aspergillus species release galactomannan (GM in vitro. Marked variability was observed in GM reactivity between and within Aspergillus species, with A. terreus strains showing the highest GM indexes. The in vivo significance of these findings remains to be determined.

  9. The Transcriptional Repressor TupA in Aspergillus niger Is Involved in Controlling Gene Expression Related to Cell Wall Biosynthesis, Development, and Nitrogen Source Availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schachtschabel, Doreen; Arentshorst, Mark; Nitsche, Benjamin M

    2013-01-01

    very similar to the phenotypes of a tupA deletion strain. Further analysis of the tupA-17 mutant and the ΔtupA mutant revealed that TupA is also required for normal growth and morphogenesis. The production of the pigment at 37°C is nitrogen source-dependent and repressed by ammonium. Genome...... of the agsA gene. The agsA gene encodes a putative alpha-glucan synthase, which is induced in response to cell wall stress in A. niger. Apart from the constitutive expression of agsA, the selected mutant was also found to produce an unknown pigment at high temperatures. Complementation analysis...... with a genomic library showed that the tupA gene could complement the phenotypes of the mutant. Screening of a collection of 240 mutants with constitutive expression of agsA identified sixteen additional pigment-secreting mutants, which were all mutated in the tupA gene. The phenotypes of the tupA mutants were...

  10. Integrated use of residues from olive mill and winery for lipase production by solid state fermentation with Aspergillus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, José Manuel; Abrunhosa, Luís; Venâncio, Armando; Domínguez, José Manuel; Belo, Isabel

    2014-02-01

    Two-phase olive mill waste (TPOMW) is presently the major waste produced by the olive mill industry. This waste has potential to be used as substrate for solid state fermentation (SSF) despite of its high concentration of phenolic compounds and low nitrogen content. In this work, it is demonstrated that mixtures of TPOMW with winery wastes support the production of lipase by Aspergillus spp. By agar plate screening, Aspergillus niger MUM 03.58, Aspergillus ibericus MUM 03.49, and Aspergillus uvarum MUM 08.01 were chosen for lipase production by SSF. Plackett-Burman experimental design was employed to evaluate the effect of substrate composition and time on lipase production. The highest amounts of lipase were produced by A. ibericus on a mixture of TPOMW, urea, and exhausted grape mark (EGM). Urea was found to be the most influent factor for the lipase production. Further optimization of lipase production by A. ibericus using a full factorial design (3(2)) conducted to optimal conditions of substrate composition (0.073 g urea/g and 25 % of EGM) achieve 18.67 U/g of lipolytic activity.

  11. Lumazine Peptides from the Marine-Derived Fungus Aspergillus terreus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjung You

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Terrelumamides A (1 and B (2, two new lumazine-containing peptides, were isolated from the culture broth of the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus terreus. From the results of combined spectroscopic and chemical analyses, the structures of these compounds were determined to be linear assemblies of 1-methyllumazine-6-carboxylic acid, an amino acid residue and anthranilic acid methyl ester connected by peptide bonds. These new compounds exhibited pharmacological activity by improving insulin sensitivity, which was evaluated in an adipogenesis model using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. In addition, the compounds exhibited fluorescence changes upon binding to DNA, demonstrating their potential applications to DNA sequence recognition.

  12. Photon Factory activity report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Photon Factory made great strides in 1987. The low emittance operation of the PF ring was achieved in March, and resulted favorably in the increase of brilliance from 2 to 20 times for all the beam lines with high beam stability. At the same time, the installation of inserted devices was under way for all available straight sections of the ring. A 54-pole wiggler-undulator has been commissioned at BL-16. The devices to be inserted in the near future are a multipole wiggler for BL-13, an undulator for BL-19, and an undulator for circular polarized radiation at BL-28. The construction of beam lines continued, and four new beam lines, BL-6, BL-9, BL-16 and BL-17, are now in operation, BL-13 and BL-19 are under construction, and BL-3, BL-5, BL-18, BL-20 and BL-28 are in the design stage. Since its inauguration with four beam lines in 1982, the Photon Factory has grown rapidly, and approaches the goal of operating the PF ring with positrons in full use of its 24 beam ports and the straight sections for inserted devices. The total operation time was limited to 3,000 hours by the budget for fiscal year 1987, and about 80 % of the operation hours were devoted to the experiments of users. The nearly perfect operation of the 400 m long linac has continued in 1987, and has supplied both electrons and positrons to the TRISTAN collision experiment. The light source of a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring was normally operated. (Kako, I.)

  13. Modelling Aspergillus flavus growth and aflatoxins production in pistachio nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Sonia; Ramos, Antonio J; Sanchis, V

    2012-12-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are the main contaminants in pistachio nuts. AFs production in pistachio has been attributed to Aspergillus flavus. The aim of this study was to apply existing models to predict growth and AFs production by an A. flavus isolated from pistachios as a function of moisture content and storage temperature of pistachios in order to test their usefulness and complementarities. A full factorial design was used: the moisture content levels assayed were 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% and incubation temperatures were 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 37 and 42 °C. Both kinetic and probability models were built to predict growth of the strain under the assayed conditions. Among the assayed models, cardinal ones gave a good quality fit for radial growth rate data. Moreover, the progressive approach, which was developed based on a reduced number of experimental points led to an improved prediction in the validation step. This is quite significant as may allow for improved experimental designs, less costly than full factorial ones. Probability model proved to be concordant in 91% of the calibration set observations. Even though the validation set included conditions around the growth/no-growth interface, there was a 100% agreement in the predictions from the data set (n = 16, cut off = 0.5) after 60 days. Similarly, the probability for AF presence was rightly predicted in 89% of the cases. According to our results EC maximum aflatoxin levels would be surpassed in a period as short as 1 month if pistachio nuts reach 20 °C, unless %mc is ≤10%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Yeast cell factories on the horizon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    been engineered to make chemicals at industrial scale (e.g., succinic acid, lactic acid, resveratrol) and advanced biofuels (e.g., isobutanol) (1). On page 1095 of this issue, Galanie et al. (2) demonstrate that yeast can now be engineered to produce opioids (2), a major class of compounds used...... for treating severe pain. Their study represents a tour de force in the metabolic engineering of yeast, as it involved the expression of genes for more than 20 enzymatic activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. It clearly represents a breakthrough advance for making complex natural products...

  15. Secretome data from Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger cultivated in submerged and sequential fermentation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Florencio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation procedure and the fungal strain applied for enzyme production may influence levels and profile of the proteins produced. The proteomic analysis data presented here provide critical information to compare proteins secreted by Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger when cultivated through submerged and sequential fermentation processes, using steam-explosion sugarcane bagasse as inducer for enzyme production. The proteins were organized according to the families described in CAZy database as cellulases, hemicellulases, proteases/peptidases, cell-wall-protein, lipases, others (catalase, esterase, etc., glycoside hydrolases families, predicted and hypothetical proteins. Further detailed analysis of this data is provided in “Secretome analysis of Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger cultivated by submerged and sequential fermentation process: enzyme production for sugarcane bagasse hydrolysis” C. Florencio, F.M. Cunha, A.C Badino, C.S. Farinas, E. Ximenes, M.R. Ladisch (2016 [1]. Keywords: Tricoderma reesei, Aspergillus Niger, Enzyme Production, Secretome

  16. The kinetics of glucose production from rice straw by Aspergillus niger

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-03

    Jun 3, 2008 ... 3Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria. Accepted 2 May, 2008. In this investigation, glucose was produced from rice straw using cells of Aspergillus niger, isolated from maize grain. Glucose yield was found to increase from 43 to 87% as the rice straw particle size.

  17. Regulation of the feruloyl esterase (faeA) gene from Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.P.; Visser, J.

    1999-01-01

    Feruloyl esterases can remove aromatic residues (e.g., ferulic acid) from plant cell wall polysaccharides (xylan, pectin) and are essential for complete degradation of these polysaccharides. Expression of the feruloyl esterase-encoding gene (faeA) from Aspergillus niger depends on D-xylose

  18. Subchronic (13-week) oral toxicity study in rats with fungal chitin-glucan from Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, D.; Kuper, C.F.; Maquet, V.; Nollevaux, G.; Gautier, S.

    2010-01-01

    Chitin-glucan is an insoluble biopolymer, composed of chitin and beta-(1,3)-d-glucan, that is a component of the fungal cell wall. This study was conducted to assess the safety of chitin-glucan from the mycelium of Aspergillus niger (Artinia™ brand) for use as dietary supplement and food ingredient.

  19. Crystallization and Preliminary Crystallographic Characterization of Endo-polygalacturonase II from Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröter, K.-H.; Arkema, A.; Kester, H.C.M.; Visser, J.; Dijkstra, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    The endo-polygalacturonase II from Aspergillus niger has been crystallized from an ammonium sulfate solution by the hanging drop method. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2(1), with cell dimensions a = 60.6 Angstrom, b = 152.6 Angstrom, c = 74.0 Angstrom and beta = 91.2 degrees with

  20. Human platelets attenuate Aspergillus species via granule-dependent mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perkhofer, S.; Kehrel, B.E.; Dierich, M.P.; Donnelly, J.P.; Nussbaumer, W.; Hofmann, J.; Eiff, C. von; Lass-Florl, C.

    2008-01-01

    Using laser scanning microscopy, we investigated whether platelets are capable of internalizing Aspergillus conidia and examined Aspergillus-platelet adherence. The influence of platelets on fungal growth was evaluated by assessing galactomannan (GM) release, hyphal elongation, and colony size. A

  1. A Tau-Charm Factory at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, K.K. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1994-04-01

    It is proposed that a Tau Charm Factory represents a natural extension of CEBAF into higher energy domains. The exciting nature of the physics of charm quarks and tau leptons is briefly reviewed and it is suggested that the concept of a linac-ring collider as a Tau Charm Factory at CEBAF should be seriously studied.

  2. Looking for Exotica at the B Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Gagan B.

    2007-01-25

    Current experiments at the B factories, designed to perform precision measurements of matter-antimatter asymmetry in the B meson system, have a much broader physics reach especially in the sector of quarkonium spectroscopy. Here we present a minireview on the new charmonium-like states observed at the B factories including the X(3872) and Y(4260).

  3. Charged Particle Optics in Circular Higgs Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yunhai [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-26

    Similar to a super B-factory, a circular Higgs factory will require strong focusing systems near the interaction points and a low-emittance lattice in arcs to achieve a factory luminosity. At electron beam energy of 120 GeV, beamstrahlung effects during the collision pose an additional challenge to the collider design. In particular, a large momentum acceptance at 2 percent level is necessary to retain an adequate beam lifetime. This turns out to be the most challenging aspect in the design of circular Higgs factory. In this paper, an example will be provided to illustrate the beam dynamics in circular Higgs factory, emphasizing on the chromatic optics. Basic optical modules and advanced analysis will be presented. Most important, we will show that 2% momentum aperture is achievable

  4. The volatome of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddergott, C; Calvo, A M; Latgé, J P

    2014-08-01

    Early detection of invasive aspergillosis is absolutely required for efficient therapy of this fungal infection. The identification of fungal volatiles in patient breath can be an alternative for the detection of Aspergillus fumigatus that still remains problematic. In this work, we investigated the production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by A. fumigatus in vitro, and we show that volatile production depends on the nutritional environment. A. fumigatus produces a multiplicity of VOCs, predominantly terpenes and related compounds. The production of sesquiterpenoid compounds was found to be strongly induced by increased iron concentrations and certain drugs, i.e., pravastatin. Terpenes that were always detectable in large amounts were α-pinene, camphene, and limonene, as well as sesquiterpenes, identified as α-bergamotene and β-trans-bergamotene. Other substance classes that were found to be present in the volatome, such as 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanone, and pyrazines, were found only under specific growth conditions. Drugs that interfere with the terpene biosynthesis pathway influenced the composition of the fungal volatome, and most notably, a block of sesquiterpene biosynthesis by the bisphosphonate alendronate fundamentally changed the VOC composition. Using deletion mutants, we also show that a terpene cyclase and a putative kaurene synthase are essential for the synthesis of volatile terpenes by A. fumigatus. The present analysis of in vitro volatile production by A. fumigatus suggests that VOCs may be used in the diagnosis of infections caused by this fungus. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Photon Factory activity report, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    At the Photon Factory about 500 experiments are now running annually with about 50 experimental stations, the total operation time of the 2.5 GeV storage ring was 3400 hour in 1989, and the number of users was more than 2000, including 300 scientists from industry. This wide usage of synchrotron radiation has been supported by good performance of the accelerators. The positron beam current of the linac was increased for rapid injection (injection time: 20 min). The entire roof of the Light Source building was covered with thermal insulator (urethane-foam). This has greatly improved the beam stability of the ring. It has been operated at an initial ring current of 350 mA with a life time of 20 hours. Distinctive instrumentation at the Photon Factory has expanded to various fields such as angle-resolved ion-spectroscopy, dispersive EXAFS, trace impurity X-ray fluorescence analysis, plane-wave topography, structure analysis under high pressure, and imaging plates. Recently, experiments of protein structure analysis have been carried out extensively; Sakabe developed a new type of Weissenberg camera for protein crystallography, and about 50 experiments have been done for the past six months by a combination of Sakabe camera and imaging plates. The 2.5 GeV light source is now at an entrance of its harvest season. The TRISTAN Accumulation Ring has been used throughout this year in a time sharing basis with the TRISTAN experiment; twenty minutes for injection to TRISTAN Main Ring and 2 hours for SR experiment. The main subject has been magnetic Compton scattering with circularly polarized wiggler radiation. Such experiences enable us to expand our perspective for research in the following decade; we are investigating the possibility of operating the TRISTAN Main Ring at 6-8 GeV with 6000-pole undulaters, resulting in an extremely brilliant radiation source (Emittance: 0.1 nm·rad at 5 GeV with damping rings). (J.P.N.)

  6. RF system design for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.; Rimmer, R.

    1994-06-01

    The paper presents an overview of the design of the RF system for the PEP-II B Factory. An RF station consists of either two or four single-cell cavities driven by a 1.2 MW klystron through a waveguide distribution network. A variety of feedback loops stabilize the RF and its interaction with the beam. System parameters and all the relevant parameters of klystron and cavities are given

  7. Evaluation of the detection techniques of toxigenic Aspergillus isolates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, our results showed that use of these techniques were not sufficiently sensitive for all Aspergillus species and suggested a simple thin layer chromatography (TLC) as a sensitive and reliable technique for detection of aflatoxins and OTA produced by Aspergillus and Eurotium species. Key words: Aspergillus ...

  8. The KAON Factory at TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1992-08-01

    The TRIUMF KAON Factory is designed to produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, other hadrons and neutrinos 100 times more intense, or cleaner, than are available now, for a broad range of particle and nuclear physics experiments. This will require a 100 μA beam of 30 GeV protons, to be produced by an interleaved sequence of two fast-cycling synchrotrons and three storage rings, with the existing TRIUMF H - cyclotron as injector. An $11-million preconstruction study has enabled the overall design to be reviewed and prototypes of various components to be built and evaluated -fast-cycling dipole and quadrupole magnets, a dual-frequency magnet power supply, ceramic beam pipes with internal rf shields, and rf cavity (using perpendicular bias), an extraction kicker, and rf beam chopper, and production targets. Environmental, industrial and economic impact studies have also been completed and the cost estimates and schedule updated. The total cost of $708 million (Canadian) will be shared equally between Canada, British Columbia and international contributors: the first two-thirds of this sum have already been approved and negotiations for the remainder are under way. 25 refs., 7 figs

  9. The KAON factory at TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1992-07-01

    The TRIUMF KAON Factory is designed to produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, other hadrons and neutrinos 100 times more intense, or cleaner, than are available now, for a broad range of particle and nuclear physics experiments. This will require a 100 μA beam of 30 GeV protons, to be produced by an interleaved sequence of two fast-cycling synchrotrons and three storage rings, with the existing TRIUMF H - cyclotron as injector. An $11-million pre-construction study has enabled the overall design to be reviewed and prototypes of various components to be built and evaluated: fast-cycling dipole and quadrupole magnets, a dual frequency magnet power supply, ceramic beam pipes with internal rf shields, an rf cavity (using perpendicular bias), an extraction kicker, an rf beam chopper, and production targets. Environmental, industrial and economic impact studies have also been completed and the cost estimates and schedule updated. The total cost of $708 million (Canadian) will be shared equally between Canada, British Columbia and international contributors; the first two-thirds of this sum have already been approved and negotiations for the remainder are under way. 26 refs., 6 figs

  10. First case report of isolated aspergillus dacryoadenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishan Acharya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of isolated Aspergillus dacryoadenitis. A 23-year-old male presented with dull ache, diffuse swelling in superolateral quadrant of the right orbit and proptosis for 4 months. Ocular examination showed conjunctival congestion, discharge in the fornix and palpable lacrimal gland (LG mass. Routine hematological investigations followed by computed tomography scan of orbits were done. He did not respond to a course of systemic and topical antibiotics. Lateral orbitotomy with extended lid crease incision was performed with excision biopsy of LG. Abundant blackish material was found in the LG intraoperatively. The specimen was sent for histopathological examination (HPE. HPE report showed Aspergillus. Thorough ENT and systemic evaluation ruled out any other site with the fungus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of Aspergillus infection in LG.

  11. Evaluation of antifungal activity of essential oils against potentially mycotoxigenic Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C. da Silva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The antifungal activity of essential oils of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Apiaceae, ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Zingiberaceae, mint (Mentha piperita L., Lamiaceae and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L., Lamiaceae was evaluated against mycotoxin producers Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. High Resolution Gas Chromatography was applied to analyze chemical constituents of essential oils. The effect of different concentrations of essential oils was determined by solid medium diffusion assay. Mycelial growth and sporulation were determined for each essential oil at the concentrations established by solid medium diffusion assay. At the fifth, seventh and ninth days the mycelial diameter (Ø mm and spore production were also determined. FUN-1 staining was performed to assess cell viability after broth macrodilution assay. Trans-anethole, zingiberene, menthol and thymol are the major component of essential oils of fennel, ginger, mint and thyme, respectively. The effective concentrations for fennel, ginger, mint and thyme were 50, 80, 50 and 50% (oil/DMSO; v/v, respectively. The four essential oils analysed in this study showed antifungal effect. Additionally, FUN-1 staining showed to be a suitable method to evaluate cell viability of potential mycotoxigenic fungi A. flavus and A. parasiticus after treatment with essential oils.

  12. Evaluation of antifungal activity of essential oils against potentially mycotoxigenic Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C. da Silva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The antifungal activity of essential oils of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Apiaceae, ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Zingiberaceae, mint (Mentha piperita L., Lamiaceae and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L., Lamiaceae was evaluated against mycotoxin producers Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. High Resolution Gas Chromatography was applied to analyze chemical constituents of essential oils. The effect of different concentrations of essential oils was determined by solid medium diffusion assay. Mycelial growth and sporulation were determined for each essential oil at the concentrations established by solid medium diffusion assay. At the fifth, seventh and ninth days the mycelial diameter (Ø mm and spore production were also determined. FUN-1 staining was performed to assess cell viability after broth macrodilution assay. Trans-anethole, zingiberene, menthol and thymol are the major component of essential oils of fennel, ginger, mint and thyme, respectively. The effective concentrations for fennel, ginger, mint and thyme were 50, 80, 50 and 50% (oil/DMSO; v/v, respectively. The four essential oils analysed in this study showed antifungal effect. Additionally, FUN-1 staining showed to be a suitable method to evaluate cell viability of potential mycotoxigenic fungi A. flavus and A. parasiticus after treatment with essential oils.

  13. A rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Gupta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus endophthalmitis is a devastating inflammatory condition of the intraocular cavities that may result in irreparable loss of vision and rapid destruction of the eye. Almost all cases in the literature have shown an identified source causing aspergillus endophthalmitis as a result of direct extension of disease. We present a rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis. A 72-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus, congenital Hirschsprung disease, and recent culture-positive candida pyelonephritis with hydronephrosis status post-surgical stent placement presented with difficulty opening her eyes. She complained of decreased vision (20/200 with pain and redness in both eyes – right worse then left. Examination demonstrated multiple white fungal balls in both retinas consistent with bilateral fungal endophthalmitis. Bilateral vitreous taps for cultures and staining were performed. Patient was given intravitreal injections of amphotericin B, vancomycin, ceftazidime, and started on oral fluconazole. Patient was scheduled for vitrectomy to decrease organism burden and to remove loculated areas of infection that would not respond to systemic antifungal agents. Four weeks after initial presentation, the fungal cultures revealed mold growth consistent with aspergillus. Patient was subsequently started on voriconazole and fluconazole was discontinued due to poor efficacy against aspergillus. Further workup was conducted to evaluate for the source of infection and seeding. Transthoracic cardiogram was unremarkable for any vegetation or valvular abnormalities. MRI of the orbits and sinuses did not reveal any mass lesions or bony destruction. CT of the chest was unremarkable for infection. Aspergillus endophthalmitis may occur because of one of these several mechanisms: hematogenous dissemination, direct inoculation by trauma, and contamination during surgery. Our patient's cause of bilateral endophthalmitis was through an

  14. Factorial structure of aerobics athletes’ fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Shepelenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to develop an algorithm of teams’ formation in sport aerobics and to define factorial structure of athletes’ fitness. Material : in the research sport aerobics’ athletes (n=19 participated. All athletes are members of Kharkiv national team (Ukraine. All athletes underwent complete medical examination. The functional condition of an organism (arterial blood pressure, indicators of a variability of the rhythm of the heart, treadbahn testing, psycho-physiological state (time’s determination of simple and complex reaction were defined. The physical development and physical fitness and stability of vestibular system were also defined. The factorial and cluster analysis were used. Results : The algorithm of teams’ formation in sport aerobics is developed for performances in various competitive categories. The algorithm contains all stages of standard procedure of the factorial and cluster analysis. In the factorial analysis the individual factorial values were also defined. Conclusions : The obtained data are recommended to be used at teams’ formation for performances in various competitive categories: team formation for pair and group performances. The general and individual factorial structure of athletes’ complex fitness is defined. It is possible to select athletes with similar qualities and with different qualities for the mixed performances. The determination of individual factorial structure of fitness permits to estimate objectively variants of athletes’ formation in groups.

  15. Genomic Diversity in the Genus of Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo

    Aspergillus is a highly important genus of saprotrophic filamentous fungi. It is a very diverse genus that is inextricably intertwined with human a↵airs on a daily basis, holding species relevant to plant and human pathology, enzyme and bulk chemistry production, food and beverage biotechnology......, and scientific model organisms. The phenotypic diversity in this genus is extraordinary and identifying the genetic basis for this diversity has great potential for academia and industry. When the genomic era began for Aspergillus in 2005 with the genome sequences of A. nidulans, A. oryzae and A. fumigatus...

  16. Optimization of fibrolytic enzyme production by Aspergillus japonicus C03 with potential application in ruminant feed and their effects on tropical forages hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Fernanda D A; Vici, Ana C; Benassi, Vivian M; Freitas, Luiz A P; Reis, Ricardo A; Jorge, João A; Terenzi, Héctor F; Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes T M

    2011-10-01

    Fibrolytic enzyme production by Aspergillus japonicus C03 was optimized in a medium containing agro-industrial wastes, supplemented with peptone and yeast extract. A 2(3) full factorial composite and response surface methodology were used to design the experiments and analysis of results. Tropical forages were hydrolyzed by A. japonicus C03 enzymatic extract in different levels, and they were also tested as enzymatic substrate. Optimal production to xylanase was obtained with soybean bran added to crushed corncob (1:3), 0.01% peptone, and 0.2% yeast extract, initial pH 5.0, at 30 °C under static conditions for 5 days of incubation. Optimal endoglucanase production was obtained with wheat bran added to sugarcane bagasse (3:1), 0.01% peptone, and 0.2% yeast extract, initial pH 4.0, at 30 °C, for 6 days, under static conditions. Addition of nitrogen sources as ammonium salts either inhibited or did not influence xylanase production. This enzymatic extract had a good result on tropical forage hydrolyzes and showed better performance in the Brachiaria genera, due to their low cell wall lignin quantity. These results represent a step forward toward the use of low-cost agricultural residues for the production of valuable enzymes with potential application in animal feed, using fermentation conditions.

  17. [Survival Strategies of Aspergillus in the Human Body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Masato; Izumikawa, Koichi

    2017-01-01

     The human body is a hostile environment for Aspergillus species, which originally live outside the human body. There are lots of elimination mechanisms against Aspergillus inhaled into the human body, such as high body temperature, soluble lung components, mucociliary clearance mechanism, or responses of phagocytes. Aspergillus fumigatus, which is the primary causative agent of human infections among the human pathogenic species of Aspergillus, defend itself from the hostile human body environment by various mechanisms, such as thermotolerance, mycotoxin production, and characteristic morphological features. Here we review mechanisms of defense in Aspergillus against elimination from the human body.

  18. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Strain Inhibits Growth and Decreases Ochratoxin A Biosynthesis by Aspergillus carbonarius and Aspergillus ochraceus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Budroni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to select wine yeast strains as biocontrol agents against fungal contaminants responsible for the accumulation of ochratoxin A (OTA in grape and wine and to dissect the mechanism of OTA detoxification by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (DISAABA1182, which had previously been reported to reduce OTA in a synthetic must. All of the yeast strains tested displayed an ability to inhibit the growth of Aspergillus carbonarius both in vivo and in vitro and addition of culture filtrates from the tested isolates led to complete inhibition of OTA production. S. cerevisiae DISAABA1182 was selected and further tested for its capacity to inhibit OTA production and pks (polyketide synthase transcription in A. carbonarius and Aspergillus ochraceus in vitro. In order to dissect the mechanism of OTA detoxification, each of these two fungi was co-cultured with living yeast cells exposed to yeast crude or to autoclaved supernatant: S. cerevisiae DISAABA1182 was found to inhibit mycelial growth and OTA production in both Aspergilli when co-cultured in the OTA-inducing YES medium. Moreover, a decrease in pks transcription was observed in the presence of living cells of S. cerevisiae DISAABA1182 or its supernatant, while no effects were observed on transcription of either of the constitutively expressed calmodulin and β-tubulin genes. This suggests that transcriptional regulation of OTA biosynthetic genes takes place during the interaction between DISAABA1182 and OTA-producing Aspergilli.

  19. Density and molecular epidemiology of Aspergillus in air and relationship to outbreaks of Aspergillus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.A.P. Leenders (Alexander); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); M.D. Behrendt (Myra); A. Luijendijk (Ad); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAfter five patients were diagnosed with nosocomial invasive aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus, a 14-month surveillance program for pathogenic and nonpathogenic fungal conidia in the air within and outside the University Hospital in

  20. Aspergillus pragensis sp nov discovered during molecular reidentification of clinical isolates belonging to Aspergillus section Candidi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hubka, Vít; Lysková, P.; Frisvad, J.C.; Peterson, S.W.; Skořepová, M.; Kolařík, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 6 (2014), s. 565-576 ISSN 1369-3786 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0055; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Aspergillus candidus * Aspergillus tritici * antifungal susceptibility testing Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.335, year: 2014

  1. HiPER Tritium factory elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Didier

    2011-06-01

    HiPER will include a Tritium target factory. This presentation is an overview. We start from process ideas to go to first sketch passing through safety principles. We will follow the Tritium management process. We need first a gas factory producing the right gas mixture from hydrogen, Deuterium and Tritium storage. Then we could pass through the target factory. It is based on our LMJ single shot experiment and some new development like the injector. Then comes pellet burst and vapour recovery. The Tritium factory has to include the waste recovery, recycling process with gas purification before storage. At least, a nuclear plant is not a classical building. Tritium is also very special... All the design ideas have to be adapted. Many facilities are necessary, some with redundancy. We all have to well known these constraints. Tritium budget will be a major contributor for a material point of view as for a financial one.

  2. Verbal and Nonverbal Communication of Factory Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tway, Patricia

    1976-01-01

    Examines the verbal and nonverbal behavior patterns associated with two speech styles, one formal and the other informal, among factory workers. Available from: Mouton Publishers, Box 482, the Hague, Netherlands. (AM)

  3. Benthic carbonate factories of the Phanerozoic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlager, W.

    2003-01-01

    Marine carbonate precipitation occurs in three basic modes: abiotic (or quasi-abiotic), biotically induced, and biotically controlled. On a geologic scale, these precipitation modes combine to form three carbonate production systems, or "factories" in the benthic environment: (1) tropical

  4. Taxonomic Characterization and Secondary Metabolite Profiling of Aspergillus Section Aspergillus Contaminating Feeds and Feedstuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Greco

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Xerophilic fungal species of the genus Aspergillus are economically highly relevant due to their ability to grow on low water activity substrates causing spoilage of stored goods and animal feeds. These fungi can synthesize a variety of secondary metabolites, many of which show animal toxicity, creating a health risk for food production animals and to humans as final consumers, respectively. Animal feeds used for rabbit, chinchilla and rainbow trout production in Argentina were analysed for the presence of xerophilic Aspergillus section Aspergillus species. High isolation frequencies (>60% were detected in all the studied rabbit and chinchilla feeds, while the rainbow trout feeds showed lower fungal charge (25%. These section Aspergillus contaminations comprised predominantly five taxa. Twenty isolates were subjected to taxonomic characterization using both ascospore SEM micromorphology and two independent DNA loci sequencing. The secondary metabolite profiles of the isolates were determined qualitatively by HPLC-MS. All the isolates produced neoechinulin A, 17 isolates were positive for cladosporin and echinulin, and 18 were positive for neoechinulin B. Physcion and preechinulin were detected in a minor proportion of the isolates. This is the first report describing the detailed species composition and the secondary metabolite profiles of Aspergillus section Aspergillus contaminating animal feeds.

  5. The physics of the B factories

    CERN Document Server

    Bevan, A J; Mannel, Th; Prell, S; Yabsley, B D; Abe, K; Aihara, H; Anulli, F; Arnaud, N; Aushev, T; Beneke, M; Beringer, J; Bianchi, F; Bigi, I I; Bona, M; Brambilla, N; Brodzicka, J; Chang, P; Charles, M J; Cheng, C H; Cheng, H -Y; Chistov, R; Colangelo, P; Coleman, J P; Drutskoy, A; Druzhinin, V P; Eidelman, S; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Faccini, R; Flood, K T; Gambino, P; Gaz, A; Gradl, W; Hayashii, H; Higuchi, T; Hulsbergen, W D; Hurth, T; Iijima, T; Itoh, R; Jackson, P D; Kass, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kou, E; Križan, P; Kronfeld, A; Kumano, S; Kwon, Y J; Latham, T E; Leith, D W G S; Lüth, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Meadows, B T; Mussa, R; Nakao, M; Nishida, S; Ocariz, J; Olsen, S L; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palano, A; Pich, A; Playfer, S; Poluektov, A; Porter, F C; Robertson, S H; Roney, J M; Roodman, A; Sakai, Y; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Sekula, S J; Steinhauser, M; Sumisawa, K; Swanson, E S; Tackmann, F; Trabelsi, K; Uehara, S; Uno, S; van der Water, R; Vasseur, G; Verkerke, W; Waldi, R; Wang, M Z; Wilson, F F; Zupan, J; Zupanc, A; Adachi, I; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Ben-Haim, E; Biassoni, P; Cahn, R N; Cartaro, C; Chauveau, J; Chen, C; Chiang, C C; Cowan, R; Dalseno, J; Davier, M; Davies, C; Dingfelder, J C; Echenard, B; Epifanov, D; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Gary, J W; Godang, R; Graham, M T; Hafner, A; Hamilton, B; Hartmann, T; Hayasaka, K; Hearty, C; Iwasaki, Y; Khodjamirian, A; Kusaka, A; Kuzmin, A; Lafferty, G D; Lazzaro, A; Li, J; Lindemann, D; Long, O; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinelli, M; Miyabayashi, K; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Muller, D R; Nakazawa, H; Ongmongkolkul, P; Pacetti, S; Palombo, F; Pedlar, T K; Piilonen, L E; Pilloni, A; Poireau, V; Prothmann, K; Pulliam, T; Rama, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roudeau, P; Schrenk, S; Schroeder, T; Schubert, K R; Shen, C P; Shwartz, B; Soffer, A; Solodov, E P; Somov, A; Starič, M; Stracka, S; Telnov, A V; Todyshev, K Yu; Tsuboyama, T; Uglov, T; Vinokurova, A; Walsh, J J; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Ye, S; Zhang, C C; Abachi, S; Abashian, A; Abe, N; Abe, R; Abe, T; Abrams, G S; Adam, I; Adamczyk, K; Adametz, A; Adye, T; Agarwal, A; Ahmed, H; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Ahn, B S; Ahn, H S; Aitchison, I J R; Akai, K; Akar, S; Akatsu, M; Akemoto, M; Akhmetshin, R; Akre, R; Alam, M S; Albert, J N; Aleksan, R; Alexander, J P; Alimonti, G; Allen, M T; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Alsmiller, J R G; Altenburg, D; Alwyn, K E; An, Q; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, D; Andreotti, M; Andress, J C; Angelini, C; Anipko, D; Anjomshoaa, A; Anthony, P L; Antillon, E A; Antonioli, E; Aoki, K; Arguin, J F; A, K; Arisaka, K; Asai, K; Asai, M; Asano, Y; Asgeirsson, D J; Asner, D M; Aso, T; Aspinwall, M L; Aston, D; Atmacan, H; Aubert, B; Aulchenko, V; Ayad, R; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Azzolini, V; Azzopardi, D E; Baak, M A; Back, J J; Bagnasco, S; Bahinipati, S; Bailey, D S; Bailey, S; Bailly, P; van Bakel, N; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Balagura, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Ban, Y; Banas, E; Band, H R; Banerjee, S; 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Rozanska, M; Rozen, Y; Rubin, A E; Ruddick, W O; Ruland, A M; Rybicki, K; Ryd, A; Ryu, S; Ryuko, J; Sabik, S; Sacco, R; Saeed, M A; Tehrani, F Safai; Sagawa, H; Sahoo, H; Sahu, S; Saigo, M; Saito, T; Saitoh, S; Sakai, K; Sakamoto, H; Sakaue, H; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvati, E; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Sanders, P; Sandilya, S; Sandrelli, F; Sands, W; Sands, W R; Sanpei, M; Santel, D; Santelj, L; Santoro, V; Santroni, A; Sanuki, T; Sarangi, T R; Saremi, S; Sarti, A; Sasaki, T; Sasao, N; Satapathy, M; Sato, Nobuhiko; Sato, Noriaki; Sato, Y; Satoyama, N; Satpathy, A; Savinov, V; Savvas, N; Saxton, O H; Sayeed, K; Schaffner, S F; Schalk, T; Schenk, S; Schieck, J R; Schietinger, T; Schilling, C J; Schindler, R H; Schmid, S; Schmitz, R E; Schmuecker, H; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schönmeier, P; Schofield, K C; Schott, G; Schröder, H; Schram, M; Schubert, J; Schümann, J; Schultz, J; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwanke, U; Schwarz, H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Scott, I J; Seeman, J; Seiden, A; Seitz, R; Seki, T; Sekiya, A I; Semenov, S; Semmler, D; Sen, S; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Serbo, V V; Serednyakov, S I; Serfass, B; Serra, M; Serrano, J; Settai, Y; Seuster, R; Sevior, M E; Shakhova, K V; Shang, L; Shapkin, M; Sharma, V; Shebalin, V; Shelkov, V G; Shen, B C; Shen, D Z; Shen, Y T; Sherwood, D J; Shibata, T; Shibata, T A; Shibuya, H; Shidara, T; Shimada, K; Shimoyama, M; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J G; Shorthouse, H W; Shpilinskaya, L I; Sibidanov, A; Sicard, E; Sidorov, A; Sidorov, V; Siegle, V; Sigamani, M; Simani, M C; Simard, M; Simi, G; Simon, F; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Singh, H; Singh, J B; Sinha, R; Sitt, S; Skovpen, Yu I; Sloane, R J; Smerkol, P; Smith, A J S; Smith, D; Smith, D S; Smith, J G; Smol, A; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; So, R Y; Sobie, R J; Soderstrom, E; Soha, A; Sohn, Y S; Sokoloff, M D; Sokolov, A; Solagna, P; Solovieva, E; Soni, N; Sonnek, P; Sordini, V; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spencer, E; Speziali, V; Spitznagel, M; 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Thérin, G; Thiebaux, Ch; Thiessen, D; Thomas, E W; Thompson, J M; Thorne, F; Tian, X C; Tibbetts, M; Tikhomirov, I; Tinslay, J S; Tiozzo, G; Tisserand, V; Tocut, V; Toki, W H; Tomassini, E W; Tomoto, M; Tomura, T; Torassa, E; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Toussaint, J C; Tovey, S N; Trapani, P P; Treadwell, E; Triggiani, G; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trischuk, W; Troost, D; Trunov, A; Tsai, K L; Tsai, Y T; Tsujita, Y; Tsukada, K; Tsukamoto, T; Tuggle, J M; Tumanov, A; Tung, Y W; Turnbull, L; Turner, J; Turri, M; Uchida, K; Uchida, M; Uchida, Y; Ueki, M; Ueno, K; Ujiie, N; Ulmer, K A; Unno, Y; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Y; Usseglio, M; Usuki, Y; Uwer, U; Va'vra, J; Vahsen, S E; Vaitsas, G; Valassi, A; Vallazza, E; Vallereau, A; Vanhoefer, P; van Hoek, W C; Van Hulse, C; van Winkle, D; Varner, G; Varnes, E W; Varvell, K E; Vasileiadis, G; Velikzhanin, Y S; Verderi, M; Versillé, S; Vervink, K; Viaud, B; Vidal, P B; Villa, S; Villanueva-Perez, P; Vinograd, E L; Vitale, L; Vitug, G M; Voß, C; 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Bevan, Adrian; Golob, Bostjan; Mannel, Thomas; Prell, Soeren; Yabsley, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    This work is on the Physics of the B Factories. Part A of this book contains a brief description of the SLAC and KEK B Factories as well as their detectors, BaBar and Belle, and data taking related issues. Part B discusses tools and methods used by the experiments in order to obtain results. The results themselves can be found in Part C.

  6. Characterization of Aspergillus species associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results also reveal that only A. flavus showed amplification with all the three aflatoxigenic primers apa-2, ver-1 and omt-1, which means that only A. flavus was identified as aflatoxigenic and other Aspergillus species as non-toxigenic after PCR analysis. Hence, morphological, microscopic and molecular methods are ...

  7. Enhanced lipase production by mutation induced Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the HNO2 mutant (AHN3) and 217% higher than the UV mutant (AUV3) and 276% higher lipase activity than the parent strain. The results indicated that UV, HNO2 and NTG treatment were effective physical and chemical mutagenic agents for strain improvement of Aspergillus japonicus for enhanced lipase productivity.

  8. Mycotic keratitis due to Aspergillus nomius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manikandan, P.; Varga, J.; Kocsube, S.; Samson, R.A.; Anita, R.; Revathi, R.; Doczi, I.; Nemeth, T.M.; Narendran, V.; Vagvolgyi, C.; Manoharan, C.; Kredics, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first known case of fungal keratitis caused by Aspergillus nomius. Ocular injury was known as a predisposing factor. The patient was treated with natamycin and econazole eye drops, itraconazole eye ointment, and oral ketoconazole. A therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was performed 16

  9. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles synthesized by Aspergillus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and its antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities were investigated. Silver nanoparticles were extracellularly synthesized using Aspergillus flavus and the formation of nanoparticles was observed after 72 h of incubation. The results recorded from colour ...

  10. Aspergillus PCR: one step closer to standardization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, P.L.; Bretagne, S.; Klingspor, L.; Melchers, W.J.G.; McCulloch, E.; Schulz, B.; Finnstrom, N.; Mengoli, C.; Barnes, R.A.; Donnelly, J.P.; Loeffler, J.

    2010-01-01

    PCR has been used as an aid in the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis for almost 2 decades. A lack of standardization has limited both its acceptance as a diagnostic tool and multicenter clinical evaluations, preventing its inclusion in disease-defining criteria. In 2006, the European Aspergillus

  11. New taxa in Aspergillus section Usti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, R. A.; Varga, J.; Meijer, M.

    2011-01-01

    National Park in New Mexico. This taxon is related to, but distinct from a dade including A. calidoustus, A. pseudodeflectus, A. insuetus and A. keveii on all trees. This species is also unable to grow at 37 degrees C, and acid production was not observed on CREA. Aspergillus californicus sp. nov...

  12. Phylogeny and subgeneric taxonomy of Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, S.W.; Varga, Janos; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2008-01-01

    The phylogeny of the genus Aspergillus and its teleomorphs is discussed based on multilocus sequence data. DNA sequence analysis was used to formulate a nucleotide sequence framework of the genus and to analyze character changes in relationship to the phylogeny hypothesized from the DNA sequence ...

  13. Polyphasic taxonomy of Aspergillus section Cervini

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, A.J.; Varga, J.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2016-01-01

    Species belonging to Aspergillus section Cervini are characterised by radiate or short columnar, fawn coloured, uniseriate conidial heads. The morphology of the taxa in this section is very similar and isolates assigned to these species are frequently misidentified. In this study, a polyphasic ap...

  14. commercial calf rennet, Aspergillus niger var. awamori

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aysegul

    2013-09-11

    Sep 11, 2013 ... The possibilities of using recombinant chymosin as an alternative coagulant to commercial calf rennet in the production of white pickled cheese was investigated. For this purpose, white pickled cheese produced by using commercial calf rennet, recombinant chymosin (Aspergillus niger var. awamori) and.

  15. GLUCOSIDASE GENE FROM ASPERGILLUS NIGER F321

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Richard Auta

    Enzyme Assay, Cloning and Sequencing of Novel β-Glucosidase Gene From. Aspergillus Niger F321 (Unidentified Nigerian Strain) β-glucosidases are essential components of the cellulase system and are important in the complete enzymatic breakdown of cellulose to glucose. The catalysis of cellobiose is important since.

  16. Chronic necrotising pneumonia caused by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, J; Clark, T J; Corrin, B

    1989-01-01

    A woman with asthma developed chronic necrotising semi-invasive pneumonia due to mixed Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans infection; though not severely immunosuppressed, she may have been predisposed by long term oral corticosteroid and recurrent oral antibiotic treatment. The diagnosis should be considered in patients with chronic airflow limitation who develop cavitating pneumonia. Images PMID:2763249

  17. Biotransformation of Stypotriol triacetate by Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areche, Carlos; Vaca, Inmaculada; Labbe, Pamela; Soto-Delgado, Jorge; Astudillo, Luis; Silva, Mario; Rovirosa, Juana; San-Martin, Aurelio

    2011-07-01

    Biological transformation of the meroditerpenoid, stypotriol triacetate ( 1) by the fungi Aspergillus niger, Cunninghamella elegans, Gibberella fujikuroi and Mucor plumbeus was studied. The incubation of 1 with A. niger yielded the new compound 6',14-diacetoxy-stypol-4,5-dione ( 2) whose structure was established by 1H, 13C and 2D NMR and supported by DFT/GIAO.

  18. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles synthesized by Aspergillus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and its antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities were investigated. Silver nanoparticles were extracellularly synthesized using Aspergillus flavus and the formation of nanoparticles was observed after 72 h of incubation. The results recorded from colour ...

  19. Aspergillus section Nidulantes (formerly Emericella: Polyphasic taxonomy, chemistry and biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus section Nidulantes includes species with striking morphological characters, such as biseriate conidiophores with brown-pigmented stipes, and if present, the production of ascomata embedded in masses of Hülle cells with often reddish brown ascospores. The majority of species in this section have a sexual state, which were named Emericella in the dual name nomenclature system. In the present study, strains belonging to subgenus Nidulantes were subjected to multilocus molecular phylogenetic analyses using internal transcribed spacer region (ITS, partial β-tubulin (BenA, calmodulin (CaM and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2 sequences. Nine sections are accepted in subgenus Nidulantes including the new section Cavernicolus. A polyphasic approach using morphological characters, extrolites, physiological characters and phylogeny was applied to investigate the taxonomy of section Nidulantes. Based on this approach, section Nidulantes is subdivided in seven clades and 65 species, and 10 species are described here as new. Morphological characters including colour, shape, size, and ornamentation of ascospores, shape and size of conidia and vesicles, growth temperatures are important for identifying species. Many species of section Nidulantes produce the carcinogenic mycotoxin sterigmatocystin. The most important mycotoxins in Aspergillus section Nidulantes are aflatoxins, sterigmatocystin, emestrin, fumitremorgins, asteltoxins, and paxillin while other extrolites are useful drugs or drug lead candidates such as echinocandins, mulundocandins, calbistrins, varitriols, variecolins and terrain. Aflatoxin B1 is produced by four species: A. astellatus, A. miraensis, A. olivicola, and A. venezuelensis.

  20. Cadmium biosorption by Aspergillus niger; Biossorcao de cadmio pelo Aspergillus niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, E.P.; Barros Junior, L.M.; Duarte, M.M.L.; Macedo, G.R. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil)]. E-mail: edmilson@eq.ufrn.br

    2003-07-01

    Biosorption is a property of certain types of inactive, dead, microbial biomass to bind and concentrate heavy metals from even very dilute aqueous solutions. Biomass exhibits this property, acting just as a chemical substance, as an ion exchanger of biological origin. It is particularly the cell wall structure of certain algae, fungi and bacteria which was found responsible for this phenomenon. Some of the biomass types come as a waste by-product of large-scale industrial fermentations (the mold Rhizopus or the bacterium Bacillus subtilis). Other metal-binding biomass types, certain abundant seaweeds (particularly brown algae e.g. Sargassum, Ecklonia), can be readily collected from the oceans. These biomass types, serving as a basis for metal biosorption processes, can accumulate in excess of 25% of their dry weight in deposited heavy metals: Pb, Cd, U, Cu, Zn, even Cr and others. Sorption experiments using the Aspergillus niger fungus for cadmium removal were carried out to study the factors influencing and optimizing the biosorption of this metal. The effects of pH, time, biomass concentration, and initial concentration of the heavy metal on the rate of metallic biosorption were examined. (author)

  1. Response of furniture factory workers to work-related airborne allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skórska, Czesława; Krysińska-Traczyk, Ewa; Milanowski, Janusz; Cholewa, Grazyna; Sitkowska, Jolanta; Góra, Anna; Dutkiewicz, Jacek

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the reactivity of furniture factory workers to microbial allergens associated with wood dust. Allergological examinations by skin and precipitin tests were performed in 48 workers employed in a factory producing furniture from fibreboards and chipboards, and in 32 healthy urban dwellers not exposed to organic dusts (referents). The skin test was performed by the intradermal method with the saline extracts of the cultures of 3 microbial species (Rahnella sp., Arthrobacter globiformis, Aspergillus fumigatus) associated with wood dust. Skin reactions were recorded after 20 minutes, 8 hours and 24 hours and graded 1-4, depending on the diameter of the reaction. The agar-gel test for the presence of precipitins in serum was performed with the extracts of 15 microbial isolates. The furniture factory workers showed a high skin response to the extracts of environmental microbes. The frequency of early grade 2 reactions (diameter 10 mm) to the extract of Rahnella sp. was 64.6% among furniture workers, being significantly higher (p furniture workers were also found with the extracts of A. globiformis and A. fumigatus (52.1% and 62.5%, respectively). The frequencies of grade 2 delayed (after 8 h) and late (after 24 h) reactions to Rahnella sp. in furniture workers were non-specifically high (97.9%/93.7%) while the response rates to A. globiformis and A. fumigatus were much lower (10.4%/25.0%, and 4.2%/37.5%, respectively). In agar-gel test for detection of precipitins, in most cases very low percentages of positive reactions (0-2.1%) were noted in furniture factory workers. The only exception was a high percentage of positive reactions (27.1%) to the antigen of Pseudomonas maltophilia, which was significantly greater in furniture workers compared to the reference group (p furniture industry, which may increase a potential risk of work-related disease in this occupational group.

  2. Aspergillus flavus: the major producer of aflatoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klich, Maren A

    2007-11-01

    SUMMARY Aspergillus flavus is an opportunistic pathogen of crops. It is important because it produces aflatoxin as a secondary metabolite in the seeds of a number of crops both before and after harvest. Aflatoxin is a potent carcinogen that is highly regulated in most countries. In the field, aflatoxin is associated with drought-stressed oilseed crops including maize, peanut, cottonseed and tree nuts. Under the right conditions, the fungus will grow and produce aflatoxin in almost any stored crop seed. In storage, aflatoxin can be controlled by maintaining available moisture at levels below that which will support growth of A. flavus. A number of field control measures are being utilized or explored, including: modification of cultural practices; development of resistant crops through molecular and proteomic techniques; competitive exclusion using strains that do not produce aflatoxin; and development of field treatments that would block aflatoxin production. Aspergillus flavus Link (teleomorph unknown) kingdom Fungi, phyllum Ascomycota, order Eurotiales, class Eurotiomycetes, family Trichocomaceae, genus Aspergillus, species flavus. Aspergillus flavus has a broad host range as an opportunistic pathogen/saprobe. It is an extremely common soil fungus. The major concern with this fungus in agriculture is that it produces highly carcinogenic toxins called aflatoxins which are a health hazard to animals. In the field, A. flavus is predominantly a problem in the oilseed crops maize, peanuts, cottonseed and tree nuts. Under improper storage conditions, A. flavus is capable of growing and forming aflatoxin in almost any crop seed. It also is a pathogen of animals and insects. In humans it is predominantly an opportunistic pathogen of immunosuppressed patients. http://www.aspergillusflavus.org, http://www.aflatoxin.info/health.asp, plantpathology.tamu.edu/aflatoxin, http://www.aspergillus.org.uk.

  3. The Multifaceted Role of T-Helper Responses in Host Defense against Aspergillus fumigatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intan M. W. Dewi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus rarely causes infections in immunocompetent individuals. A healthy functional innate immune system plays a crucial role in preventing Aspergillus-infection. This pivotal role for the innate immune system makes it a main research focus in studying the pathogenesis of aspergillosis. Although sometimes overshadowed by the innate immune response, the adaptive immune response, and in particular T-helper responses, also represents a key player in host defense against Aspergillus. Virtually all T-helper subsets have been described to play a role during aspergillosis, with the Th1 response being crucial for fungal clearance. However; morbidity and mortality of aspergillosis can also be partly attributed to detrimental immune responses resulting from adaptive immune activation. Th2 responses benefit fungal persistence; and are the foundation of allergic forms of aspergillosis. The Th17 response has two sides; although crucial for granulocyte recruitment, it can be involved in detrimental immunopathology. Regulatory T-cells, the endogenous regulators of inflammatory responses, play a key role in controlling detrimental inflammatory responses during aspergillosis. The current knowledge of the adaptive immune response against A. fumigatus is summarized in this review. A better understanding on how T-helper responses facilitate clearance of Aspergillus-infection and control inflammation can be the fundamental basis for understanding the pathogenesis of aspergillosis and for the development of novel host-directed therapies.

  4. Factorials of real negative and imaginary numbers - A new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thukral, Ashwani K

    2014-01-01

    Presently, factorials of real negative numbers and imaginary numbers, except for zero and negative integers are interpolated using the Euler's gamma function. In the present paper, the concept of factorials has been generalised as applicable to real and imaginary numbers, and multifactorials. New functions based on Euler's factorial function have been proposed for the factorials of real negative and imaginary numbers. As per the present concept, the factorials of real negative numbers, are complex numbers. The factorials of real negative integers have their imaginary part equal to zero, thus are real numbers. Similarly, the factorials of imaginary numbers are complex numbers. The moduli of the complex factorials of real negative numbers, and imaginary numbers are equal to their respective real positive number factorials. Fractional factorials and multifactorials have been defined in a new perspective. The proposed concept has also been extended to Euler's gamma function for real negative numbers and imaginary numbers, and beta function.

  5. Immunological aspects of Candida and Aspergillus systemic fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Loebnitz, Christoph; Ostermann, Helmut; Franzke, Anke; Loeffler, Juergen; Uharek, Lutz; Topp, Max; Einsele, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Patients with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) have a high risk of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) even after neutrophil regeneration. Immunological aspects might play a very important role in the IFI development in these patients. Some data are available supporting the identification of high-risk patients with IFI for example patients receiving stem cells from TLR4 haplotype S4 positive donors. Key defense mechanisms against IFI include the activation of neutrophils, the phagocytosis of germinating conidia by dendritic cells, and the fight of the cells of the innate immunity such as monocytes and natural killer cells against germlings and hyphae. Furthermore, immunosuppressive drugs interact with immune effector cells influencing the specific fungal immune defense and antimycotic drugs might interact with immune response. Based on the current knowledge on immunological mechanism in Aspergillus fumigatus, the first approaches of an immunotherapy using human T cells are in development. This might be an option for the future of aspergillosis patients having a poor prognosis with conventional treatment.

  6. Immunological Aspects of Candida and Aspergillus Systemic Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Mueller-Loebnitz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT have a high risk of invasive fungal infections (IFIs even after neutrophil regeneration. Immunological aspects might play a very important role in the IFI development in these patients. Some data are available supporting the identification of high-risk patients with IFI for example patients receiving stem cells from TLR4 haplotype S4 positive donors. Key defense mechanisms against IFI include the activation of neutrophils, the phagocytosis of germinating conidia by dendritic cells, and the fight of the cells of the innate immunity such as monocytes and natural killer cells against germlings and hyphae. Furthermore, immunosuppressive drugs interact with immune effector cells influencing the specific fungal immune defense and antimycotic drugs might interact with immune response. Based on the current knowledge on immunological mechanism in Aspergillus fumigatus, the first approaches of an immunotherapy using human T cells are in development. This might be an option for the future of aspergillosis patients having a poor prognosis with conventional treatment.

  7. Baby factories taint surrogacy in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, Olusesan Ayodeji; Makinde, Olufunmbi Olukemi; Olaleye, Olalekan; Brown, Brandon; Odimegwu, Clifford O

    2016-01-01

    The practice of reproductive medicine in Nigeria is facing new challenges with the proliferation of 'baby factories'. Baby factories are buildings, hospitals or orphanages that have been converted into places for young girls and women to give birth to children for sale on the black market, often to infertile couples, or into trafficking rings. This practice illegally provides outcomes (children) similar to surrogacy. While surrogacy has not been well accepted in this environment, the proliferation of baby factories further threatens its acceptance. The involvement of medical and allied health workers in the operation of baby factories raises ethical concerns. The lack of a properly defined legal framework and code of practice for surrogacy makes it difficult to prosecute baby factory owners, especially when they are health workers claiming to be providing services to clients. In this environment, surrogacy and other assisted reproductive techniques urgently require regulation in order to define when ethico-legal lines have been crossed in providing surrogacy or surrogacy-like services. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The production and activity test of cellulases using bagasse substrate on Aspergillus niger isolated from Clove field, Kare, Madiun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhi, Muh. Waskito; Sulistyarsi, Ani; Pujiati

    2017-06-01

    Aspergillus sp is a microorganism which has a high ability to produce cellulase enzymes. In producing Cellulase enzymes requires appropriate concentration and incubation time to obtain optimum enzyme activity. This study aimed to determine the effect of inoculum concentration and incubation time towards production and activity of cellulases from Aspergillus sp substrate bagasse. This research used experiments method; completely randomized design with 2 factorial repeated 2 times. The treatment study include differences inoculum (K) 5% (K1), 15% (K2) 25%, (K3) and incubation time (F) that is 3 days (F1), 6 days (F2), 9 days (F3), 12 days (F4). The data taken from the treatment are glucose reduction and protein levels of crude cellulase enzyme activity that use Nelson Somogyi and Biuret methods. Analysis of variance ANOVA data used two paths with significance level of 5% then continued with LSD test. The results showed that: Fhit>Ftab. Thus, there is effect of inoculum concentrations and incubation time toward activity of crude cellulases of Aspergillus sp. The highest glucose reduction of treatment is K3F4 (concentration of inoculum is 25% with 12 days incubation time) amount 12.834 g / ml and the highest protein content is K3F4 (concentration of inoculum is 25% with with 12 days incubation time) amount 0.740 g / ml.

  9. Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noonim, Paramee; Mahakarnchanakul, Warapa; Varga, Janos

    2008-01-01

    Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans are described as Aspergillus aculeatinus sp. nov. and Aspergillus sclerotiicarbonarius sp. nov. Their taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach with phenotypic (morphology and extrolite profiles...

  10. Simulating A Factory Via Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, Bernard J.; Zhang, Shou X.; Tseng, Fan T.

    1990-01-01

    Software system generates simulation program from user's responses to questions. AMPS/PC system is simulation software tool designed to aid user in defining specifications of manufacturing environment and then automatically writing code for target simulation language, GPSS/PC. Domain of problems AMPS/PC simulates is that of manufacturing assembly lines with subassembly lines and manufacturing cells. Written in Turbo Pascal Version 4.

  11. Mitotic catastrophe is the mechanism of lethality for mutations that confer mutagen sensitivity in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denison, S H; May, G S

    1994-01-16

    We have examined the consequences of treatment with DNA-damaging agents of uvs mutants and the bimD6 mutant of Aspergillus nidulans. We first established that wild-type Aspergillus undergoes a cell cycle delay following treatment with the DNA-damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or ultraviolet light (UV). We have also determined that strains carrying the bimD6, uvsB110, uvsH77, uvsF201 and the uvsC114 mutations, all of which cause an increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, undergo a cell-cycle delay following DNA damage. These mutations therefore do not represent nonfunctional checkpoints in Aspergillus. However, all of the mutant strains accumulated nuclear defects after a period of delay following mutagen treatment. The nuclear defects in the uvsB110 and bimD6 strains following MMS treatment were shown to be dependent on passage through mitosis after DNA damage, as the defects were prevented with benomyl. Checkpoint controls responding to DNA damage thus only temporarily halt cell-cycle progression in response to DNA damage. The conditional bimD6 mutation also results in a defective mitosis at restrictive temperatures. This mitotic defect is similar to that seen with MMS treatment at temperatures permissive for the mitotic defect. Thus the bimD gene product may perform dual roles, one in DNA repair and the other during the mitotic cell cycle in the absence of damage.

  12. Low-energy neutrino factory design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ankenbrandt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The design of a low-energy (4 GeV neutrino factory (NF is described, along with its expected performance. The neutrino factory uses a high-energy proton beam to produce charged pions. The π^{±} decay to produce muons (μ^{±}, which are collected, accelerated, and stored in a ring with long straight sections. Muons decaying in the straight sections produce neutrino beams. The scheme is based on previous designs for higher energy neutrino factories, but has an improved bunching and phase rotation system, and new acceleration, storage ring, and detector schemes tailored to the needs of the lower energy facility. Our simulations suggest that the NF scheme we describe can produce neutrino beams generated by ∼1.4×10^{21} μ^{+} per year decaying in a long straight section of the storage ring, and a similar number of μ^{-} decays.

  13. A conceptual design of circular Higgs factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yunhai

    2016-11-30

    Similar to a super B-factory, a circular Higgs factory (CHF) will require strong focusing systems near the interaction points and a low-emittance lattice in the arcs to achieve a factory luminosity. At electron beam energy of 125 GeV, beamstrahlung effects during the collision pose an additional challenge to the collider design. In particular, a large momentum acceptance at the 2% level is necessary to retain an adequate beam lifetime. This turns out to be the most challenging aspect in the design of a CHF. In this paper, an example will be provided to illustrate the beam dynamics in a CHF, emphasizing the chromatic optics. Basic optical modules and advanced analysis will be presented. Most importantly, we will show that 2% momentum aperture is achievable.

  14. Phylogeny, identification and nomenclature of the genus Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, R.A.; Visagie, C.M.; Houbraken, J.

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus comprises a diverse group of species based on morphological, physiological and phylogenetic characters, which significantly impact biotechnology, food production, indoor environments and human health. Aspergillus was traditionally associated with nine teleomorph genera, but phylogenetic...... data suggest that together with genera such as Polypaecilum, Phialosimplex, Dichotomomyces and Cristaspora, Aspergillus forms a monophyletic clade closely related to Penicillium. Changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants resulted in the move to one name per species...

  15. Aspergillus bertholletius sp. nov. from Brazil nuts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta H Taniwaki

    Full Text Available During a study on the mycobiota of brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa in Brazil, a new Aspergillus species, A. bertholletius, was found, and is described here. A polyphasic approach was applied using morphological characters, extrolite data as well as partial β-tubulin, calmodulin and ITS sequences to characterize this taxon. A. bertholletius is represented by nineteen isolates from samples of brazil nuts at various stages of production and soil close to Bertholletia excelsa trees. The following extrolites were produced by this species: aflavinin, cyclopiazonic acid, kojic acid, tenuazonic acid and ustilaginoidin C. Phylogenetic analysis using partial β-tubulin and camodulin gene sequences showed that A. bertholletius represents a new phylogenetic clade in Aspergillus section Flavi. The type strain of A. bertholletius is CCT 7615 ( = ITAL 270/06 = IBT 29228.

  16. Aspergillus triggers phenazine production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib

    Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen, commonly infecting cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Aspergilli, especially Aspergillus fumigatus, are also frequently isolated from CF patients. Our aim was to examine the possible interaction between P. aeruginosa and different...... in the contact area of A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, but not A. fumigatus. In addition, other metabolites with UV chromophores similar to the phenazines were only found in the contact zone between Aspergillus and Pseudomonas. No change in secondary metabolite profiles were seen for the Aspergilli, when...... comparing with or without the presence of Pseudomonas. Conclusion: All Aspergilli tested, with the exception of A. fumigatus, triggered the upregulation of phenazine-1-carboxamide and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid production by P. aeruginosa. Surprisingly no changes in secondary metabolite profiles were...

  17. New pathway for the biodegradation of indole in Aspergillus niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, A.; Vaidyanathan, C.S. (Indiana Institute of Science, Bangalore (India))

    1990-01-01

    Indole and its derivatives form a class of toxic recalcitrant environmental pollutants. The growth of Aspergillus niger was inhibited by very low concentrations (0.005 to 0.02%) of indole, even when 125- to 500-fold excess glucose was present in the medium. When 0.02% indole was added, the fungus showed a lag phase for about 30 h and the uptake of glucose was inhibited. Indole was metabolized by a new pathway via indoxyl (3-hydroxyindole), N-formylanthranilic acid, anthranilic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and catechol, which was further degraded by an ortho cleavage. The enzymes N-formylanthranilate deformylase, anthranilate hydroxylase, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate decarboxylase, and catechol dioxygenase were induced by indole as early as after 5 h of growth, and their activities were demonstrated in a cell-free system.

  18. Catalytical Properties of Free and Immobilized Aspergillus niger Tannase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abril Flores-Maltos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A fungal tannase was produced, recovered, and immobilized by entrapment in calcium alginate beads. Catalytical properties of the immobilized enzyme were compared with those of the free one. Tannase was produced intracellularly by the xerophilic fungus Aspergillus niger GH1 in a submerged fermentation system. Enzyme was recovered by cell disruption and the crude extract was partially purified. The catalytical properties of free and immobilized tannase were evaluated using tannic acid and methyl gallate as substrates. KM and Vmax values for free enzyme were very similar for both substrates. But, after immobilization, KM and Vmax values increased drastically using tannic acid as substrate. These results indicated that immobilized tannase is a better biocatalyst than free enzyme for applications on liquid systems with high tannin content, such as bioremediation of tannery or olive-mill wastewater.

  19. Purification and properties of beta-galactosidase from Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, M; Pedregosa, A M; de Lucas, J R; Torralba, S; Monistrol, I F; Laborda, F

    1996-12-01

    Beta-Galactosidase from mycelial extract of Aspergillus nidulans has been purified by substrate affinity chromatography and used to obtain anti-beta-galactosidase polyclonal antibodies. A. nidulans growing in lactose as carbon source synthesizes one active form of beta-galactosidase which seems to be a multimeric enzyme of 450 kDa composed of monomers with 120 and 97 kDa. Although the enzyme was not released to the culture medium, some enzymatic activity was detected in a cell-wall extract, thus suggesting that it can be an extracellular enzyme. Beta-Galactosidase of A. nidulans is a very unstable enzyme with an optimum pH value of 7.5 and an optimum temperature of 30 degrees C. It was only active against beta-galactoside substrates like lactose and p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactoside (PNPG).

  20. The potential of Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-10-31

    Oct 31, 2015 ... ABSTRACT. Objectives: Bioaccumulation of heavy metals by fungi has been a major focus of most bioremediation studies owing to the excellent metal binding properties of the fungal cell wall. The capability of fungi isolated from sediments of the Chemu Lagoon to bioaccumulate heavy metals in lagoon ...

  1. A Rare Cause of Headache: Aspergillus Sinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şehnaz Arıcı

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fungal sinusitis are mostly seen in immunosuppressive individuals and somtimes which can be mortal. Most frequently species of Aspergillus were isolated from, clinical forms of mycotic sinonasal disease.Surgical debridement,sinus ventilation and medical therapy in treatment of fungal sinusitis, are recommended. In this article, a case of healthy immune patient with fungal sinusitis who peresent with headache was repoted.

  2. Optimization of extracellular catalase production from Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    Aspergillus phoenicis K30 by a linear regression method using date flour as single carbon source and purification of the enzyme. Kacem Chaouche N.1*, Destain J.2, Meraihi Z.1, Dehimat L.1, Haddoum T.3, Wathelet J. P.3 and. Thonart Ph2. 1LaMyBAM, Département de Biochimie – Microbiologie, Faculté des Sciences de ...

  3. Nuclear physics at the KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitching, R.

    1989-05-01

    The author surveys the range of nuclear physics issues which can be addressed with a high intensity hadron facility such as the KAON factory. He discusses hadron spectroscopy, kaon scattering, hypernuclear physics, spin physics, and nuclear physics with neutrinos. Nuclear Physics is defined rather broadly, encompassing the study of strongly interacting systems, and including the structure of individual hadrons, hadron-hadron interactions, hadronic weak and electromagnetic currents (in nuclei too), conventional nuclear structure, and exotic nuclei. The basic theme is how the KAON Factory can shed light on non-perturbative QCD and its relation to conventional nuclear physics

  4. Particle physics prospects for the KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryman, D.

    1989-05-01

    The Kaon Factory at TRIUMF will produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, neutrinos and other particles with a hundred-fold increase in intensity over existing machines in the 30 GeV region. This will make possible new high precision experiments designed to test current ideas as well as high sensitivity measurements which could potentially reveal new effects. A sample of particle physics experiments involving rare kaon decays, CP and T violation studies, neutrino properties and reactions and light quark spectroscopy which might take advantage of the new opportunities presented by the Kaon Factory is discussed

  5. Biosolubilization of poorly soluble rock phosphates by Aspergillus tubingensis and Aspergillus niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M.S.; Kumar, S.; Babita, K. [Thapar Institute of Engineering and Technology, Patiala (India). School of Biotechnology; Reddy, M.S. [Auburn University, AL (United States). Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology

    2002-09-01

    Three isolates of Aspergillus tubingensis and two isolates of Aspergillus niger isolated from rhizospheric soils were tested on solubilization of different rock phosphates. All the isolates of Aspergillus were capable of solubilizing all the natural rock phosphates. A. tubingensis (AT1) showed maximum percent solubilization in all the rock phosphates tested in this study when compared to other isolates. This isolate also showed highest phosphorus (P) solubilization when grown in the presence of 2% of rock phosphate. A. tubingensis (AT1) seems to be more efficient in solubilization of rock phosphates compared to other isolates reported elsewhere. This is the first report of rock phosphate solubilization by A. tubingensis and might provide an efficient large scale biosolubilization of rock phosphates intended for P fertilizer. (author)

  6. Triazole resistance surveillance in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendiz Sharpe, Agustin; Lagrou, Katrien; Meis, Jacques F; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Lockhart, Shawn R; Verweij, Paul E

    2018-04-01

    Triazole resistance is an increasing concern in the opportunistic mold Aspergillus fumigatus. Resistance can develop through exposure to azole compounds during azole therapy or in the environment. Resistance mutations are commonly found in the Cyp51A-gene, although other known and unknown resistance mechanisms may be present. Surveillance studies show triazole resistance in six continents, although the presence of resistance remains unknown in many countries. In most countries, resistance mutations associated with the environment dominate, but it remains unclear if these resistance traits predominately migrate or arise locally. Patients with triazole-resistant aspergillus disease may fail to antifungal therapy, but only a limited number of cohort studies have been performed that show conflicting results. Treatment failure might be due to diagnostic delay or due to the limited number of alternative treatment options. The ISHAM/ECMM Aspergillus Resistance Surveillance working group was set up to facilitate surveillance studies and stimulate international collaborations. Important aims are to determine the resistance epidemiology in countries where this information is currently lacking, to gain more insight in the clinical implications of triazole resistance through a registry and to unify nomenclature through consensus definitions.

  7. Comparative Reannotation of 21 Aspergillus Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamov, Asaf; Riley, Robert; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-03-08

    We used comparative gene modeling to reannotate 21 Aspergillus genomes. Initial automatic annotation of individual genomes may contain some errors of different nature, e.g. missing genes, incorrect exon-intron structures, 'chimeras', which fuse 2 or more real genes or alternatively splitting some real genes into 2 or more models. The main premise behind the comparative modeling approach is that for closely related genomes most orthologous families have the same conserved gene structure. The algorithm maps all gene models predicted in each individual Aspergillus genome to the other genomes and, for each locus, selects from potentially many competing models, the one which most closely resembles the orthologous genes from other genomes. This procedure is iterated until no further change in gene models is observed. For Aspergillus genomes we predicted in total 4503 new gene models ( ~;;2percent per genome), supported by comparative analysis, additionally correcting ~;;18percent of old gene models. This resulted in a total of 4065 more genes with annotated PFAM domains (~;;3percent increase per genome). Analysis of a few genomes with EST/transcriptomics data shows that the new annotation sets also have a higher number of EST-supported splice sites at exon-intron boundaries.

  8. Aspergillus on tree nuts: incidence and associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayman, Paul; Baker, James L; Mahoney, Noreen E

    2002-01-01

    California exports tree nuts to countries where they face stringent standards for aflatoxin contamination. Trade concerns have stimulated efforts to eliminate aflatoxins and Aspergillus flavus from almonds, pistachios and walnuts. Incidence of fungi on tree nuts and associations among fungi on tree nuts were studied. Eleven hundred pistachios, almonds, walnuts and brazil nuts without visible insect damage were plated on salt agar and observed for growth of fungi. Samples came both from California nut orchards and from supermarkets. To distinguish internal fungal colonization of nuts from superficial colonization, half the nuts were surface-sterilized before plating. The most common genera found were Aspergillus, Rhizopus and Penicillium. Each species of nut had a distinct mycoflora. Populations of most fungi were reduced by surface sterilization in all except brazil nuts, suggesting that they were present as superficial inoculum on (rather than in) the nuts. In general, strongly positive associations were observed among species of Aspergillus; nuts infected by one species were likely to be colonized by other species as well. Presence of Penicillium was negatively associated with A. niger and Rhizopus in some cases. Results suggest that harvest or postharvest handling has a major influence on nut mycoflora, and that nuts with fungi are usually colonized by several fungi rather than by single species.

  9. The kinetics of glucose production from rice straw by Aspergillus niger

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this investigation, glucose was produced from rice straw using cells of Aspergillus niger, isolated from maize grain. Glucose yield was found to increase from 43 to 87% as the rice straw particle size decreased from 425 to 75 ìm, while the optimal temperature and pH were found within the range of 45 - 50°C and 4.5 - 5 ...

  10. Production of cellulase and xylanase in a bubble gum column using immobilized Aspergillus niger KKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seong-Woo; Kim, Seung-Woo [Univ. of Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin-Suk [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-01

    Aspergillus niger KKS, isolated from a farmland near Suwon, was immobilized on Celite and polyurethane foams. Enzyme activities produced by the immobilized cell system in a bubble column were higher than that of shake-flask culture. The enzyme productivities were twice as high. {Beta}-Glucosidase, {Beta}-xylosidase, and xylanase activities obtained in a bubble column were significant when the ground rice straw was used as a substrate. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. 68Ga-triacetylfusarinine C and 68Ga-ferrioxamine E for Aspergillus infection imaging: uptake specificity in various microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrik, M.; Haas, H. de; Laverman, P.; Schrettl, M.; Franssen, G.M.; Blatzer, M.; Decristoforo, C.

    2014-01-01

    (68)Ga-triacetylfusarinine C ((68)Ga-TAFC) and (68)Ga-ferrioxamine E ((68)Ga-FOXE) showed excellent targeting properties in Aspergillus fumigatus rat infection model. Here, we report on the comparison of specificity towards different microorganisms and human lung cancer cells (H1299).The in vitro

  12. Identification of thermostable β-xylosidase activities produced by Aspergillus brasiliensis and Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads; Lauritzen, Henrik Klitgaard; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    Twenty Aspergillus strains were evaluated for production of extracellular cellulolytic and xylanolytic activities. Aspergillus brasiliensis, A. niger and A. japonicus produced the highest xylanase activities with the A. brasiliensis and A. niger strains producing thermostable beta......-xylosidases. The beta-xylosidase activities of the A. brasiliensis and A. niger strains had similar temperature and pH optima at 75 degrees C and pH 5 and retained 62% and 99%, respectively, of these activities over 1 h at 60 degrees C. At 75 degrees C, these values were 38 and 44%, respectively. Whereas A. niger...

  13. Antibiotic Extraction as a Recent Biocontrol Method for Aspergillus Niger andAspergillus Flavus Fungi in Ancient Egyptian mural paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemdan, R. Elmitwalli; Fatma, Helmi M.; Rizk, Mohammed A.; Hagrassy, Abeer F.

    Biodeterioration of mural paintings by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus Fungi has been proved in different mural paintings in Egypt nowadays. Several researches have studied the effect of fungi on mural paintings, the mechanism of interaction and methods of control. But none of these researches gives us the solution without causing a side effect. In this paper, for the first time, a recent treatment by antibiotic "6 penthyl α pyrone phenol" was applied as a successful technique for elimination of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. On the other hand, it is favorable for cleaning Surfaces of Murals executed by tembera technique from the fungi metabolism which caused a black pigments on surfaces.

  14. Notable fibrolytic enzyme production by Aspergillus spp. isolates from the gastrointestinal tract of beef cattle fed in lignified pastures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrão, Flávia Oliveira; Pessoa, Moisés Sena; dos Santos, Vera Lúcia; de Freitas Júnior, Luiz Fernando; Barros, Katharina de Oliveira; Hughes, Alice Ferreira da Silva; Silva, Thiago Dias; Rodriguez, Norberto Mário

    2017-01-01

    Fungi have the ability to degrade vegetal cell wall carbohydrates, and their presence in the digestive tract of ruminants can minimize the effects of lignified forage on ruminal fermentation. Here, we evaluated enzyme production by Aspergillus spp. isolates from the digestive tracts of cattle grazed in tropical pastures during the dry season. Filamentous fungi were isolated from rumen and feces by culture in cellulose-based medium. Ninety fungal strains were isolated and identified by rDNA sequence analysis, microculture, or both. Aspergillus terreus was the most frequently isolated species, followed by Aspergillus fumigatus. The isolates were characterized with respect to their cellulolytic, xylanolytic, and lignolytic activity through qualitative evaluation in culture medium containing a specific corresponding carbon source. Carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) activity was quantified by the reducing sugar method. In the avicel and xilan degradation test, the enzyme activity (EA) at 48 h was significantly higher other periods (P < 0.05). Intra- and inter-specific differences in EA were verified, and high levels of phenoloxidases, which are crucial for lignin degradation, were observed in 28.9% of the isolates. Aspergillus terreus showed significantly higher EA for avicelase (3.96 ±1.77) and xylanase (3.13 ±.091) than the other Aspergillus species at 48 h of incubation. Isolates AT13 and AF69 showed the highest CMCase specific activity (54.84 and 33.03 U mg-1 protein, respectively). Selected Aspergillus spp. isolates produced remarkable levels of enzymes involved in vegetal cell wall degradation, suggesting their potential as antimicrobial additives or probiotics in ruminant diets. PMID:28850605

  15. Notable fibrolytic enzyme production by Aspergillus spp. isolates from the gastrointestinal tract of beef cattle fed in lignified pastures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Oliveira Abrão

    Full Text Available Fungi have the ability to degrade vegetal cell wall carbohydrates, and their presence in the digestive tract of ruminants can minimize the effects of lignified forage on ruminal fermentation. Here, we evaluated enzyme production by Aspergillus spp. isolates from the digestive tracts of cattle grazed in tropical pastures during the dry season. Filamentous fungi were isolated from rumen and feces by culture in cellulose-based medium. Ninety fungal strains were isolated and identified by rDNA sequence analysis, microculture, or both. Aspergillus terreus was the most frequently isolated species, followed by Aspergillus fumigatus. The isolates were characterized with respect to their cellulolytic, xylanolytic, and lignolytic activity through qualitative evaluation in culture medium containing a specific corresponding carbon source. Carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase activity was quantified by the reducing sugar method. In the avicel and xilan degradation test, the enzyme activity (EA at 48 h was significantly higher other periods (P < 0.05. Intra- and inter-specific differences in EA were verified, and high levels of phenoloxidases, which are crucial for lignin degradation, were observed in 28.9% of the isolates. Aspergillus terreus showed significantly higher EA for avicelase (3.96 ±1.77 and xylanase (3.13 ±.091 than the other Aspergillus species at 48 h of incubation. Isolates AT13 and AF69 showed the highest CMCase specific activity (54.84 and 33.03 U mg-1 protein, respectively. Selected Aspergillus spp. isolates produced remarkable levels of enzymes involved in vegetal cell wall degradation, suggesting their potential as antimicrobial additives or probiotics in ruminant diets.

  16. SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND ASPERGILLUS NIGER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    more importantly as an alternative source of liquid fuel for automobiles. .... The growth (cell density) of the test microorganisms was also observed to increase steadily during the fermentation period ... 0.06. 0.34. 0.26. 0.40. SM = Synthetic medium with glucose, CM = Complex medium with corn cobs, OD = Optical density ...

  17. Roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodal gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peijiang; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Huang, Lifang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2015-06-01

    Some gene regulatory systems can exhibit bimodal distributions of mRNA or protein although the deterministic counterparts are monostable. This noise-induced bimodality is an interesting phenomenon and has important biological implications, but it is unclear how different sources of expression noise (each source creates so-called factorial noise that is defined as a component of the total noise) contribute separately to this stochastic bimodality. Here we consider a minimal model of gene regulation, which is monostable in the deterministic case. Although simple, this system contains factorial noise of two main kinds: promoter noise due to switching between gene states and transcriptional (or translational) noise due to synthesis and degradation of mRNA (or protein). To better trace the roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodality, we also analyze two limit models, continuous and adiabatic approximations, apart from the exact model. We show that in the case of slow gene switching, the continuous model where only promoter noise is considered can exhibit bimodality; in the case of fast switching, the adiabatic model where only transcriptional or translational noise is considered can also exhibit bimodality but the exact model cannot; and in other cases, both promoter noise and transcriptional or translational noise can cooperatively induce bimodality. Since slow gene switching and large protein copy numbers are characteristics of eukaryotic cells, whereas fast gene switching and small protein copy numbers are characteristics of prokaryotic cells, we infer that eukaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced mainly by promoter noise, whereas prokaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced primarily by transcriptional or translational noise.

  18. Employment and Training Problems in New Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    Does management in newly established factories using highly advanced technology meet special problems in recruitment and training of their workers? Are the traditional training systems supplying the skilled manpower required for running highly sophisticated plants? These were the basic questions asked when the present study was started in seven…

  19. Plant factories; crop transpiration and energy balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graamans, Luuk; Dobbelsteen, van den Andy; Meinen, Esther; Stanghellini, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Population growth and rapid urbanisation may result in a shortage of food supplies for cities in the foreseeable future. Research on closed plant production systems, such as plant factories, has attempted to offer perspectives for robust (urban) agricultural systems. Insight into the explicit role

  20. The Idea Factory: An Interactive Intergroup Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosh, Lisa; Leach, Evan

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines the Idea Factory exercise, an interactive exercise designed to help participants examine group, individual, and organizational factors that affect intergroup conflict. Specific emphasis is placed on exploring the relationship between intra- and intergroup dynamics and identifying managerial practices that foster effective…

  1. Factory Downtime Minimization through Tracking of Maintenance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The front factory comprises two tandems: tandem A and B. The total downtime records for the first six months of 2013/14 sugar production season for tandem A show that the downtime was mainly due to mechanical failures, lack of canes, preventive maintenance activities, cleanings due to blockages, and electrical failures, ...

  2. Permanent-Magnet Quadrupoles for Neutrino Factories

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    2000-01-01

    Using permanent-magnet quadrupoles for the long straight sections of the recirculating linear accelerators and in the muon storage ring proper of a neutrino factory is proposed. The parameters needed for such quadrupoles are compared to the parameters of the permanent-magnet quadrupoles that are used in the Recycler Ring at Fermilab. Using such quadrupoles for ELFE at CERN is also considered.

  3. Predictors of Organizational Commitment of Factory Employees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This survey research investigated the predictive influence of organizational climate, self-efficacy and emotional intelligence on organizational commitment. Data were collected from 200randomly selected employees of Cocacola Factory who served as participants in this study using structured questionnaire. Results of the ...

  4. Factorial and reduced K-means reconsidered

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Marieke E.; Ceulemans, Eva; Kiers, Henk A. L.; Vichi, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Factorial K-means analysis (FKM) and Reduced K-means analysis (RKM) are clustering methods that aim at simultaneously achieving a clustering of the objects and a dimension reduction of the variables. Because a comprehensive comparison between FKM and RKM is lacking in the literature so far, a

  5. SuperB, the super flavor factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitlin, D. G.

    2009-06-01

    Heavy flavor physics measurements, in particular B and τ physics results from the B Factories, currently provide strong constraints on models of physics beyond the Standard Model. SuperB, a next generation asymmetric collider with 50 to 100 times the luminosity of existing colliders, can, in a dialog with LHC and ILC, provide unique insights into New Physics phenomena seen at those machines.

  6. The Energy Factory; EnergieFabriek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Boomen, M.; Van den Dungen, G.J.; Elias, T.; Jansen, M. [Universiteit van Amsterdam UvA, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15

    The Energy Factory is a collaboration of 26 Dutch local water boards in which options for energy saving and energy production are examined. According to the authors, the initiative of the Energy Factory will lead to a reframing of the role of the water boards. Moreover, they explain how the PPP concept (People, Planet, Profit) may act as platform for negotiations between actors who are involved in the Energy Factory. In addition, the PPP concept is used to demonstrate that the Energy Factory will lead to larger social involvement, social entrepreneurship and growing profits [Dutch] De Energiefabriek is een samenwerkingsverband van 26 waterschappen in Nederland waarin wordt gezocht naar mogelijkheden om energie te besparen en zelf energie te produceren. Volgens de auteurs van deze notitie leidt het initiatief van de Energiefabriek tot een reframing van de rol van waterschappen. Daarnaast leggen ze uit hoe het PPP-concept (People, Profit, Planet) kan fungeren als platform voor onderhandelingen tussen de actoren die betrokken zijn bij de Energiefabriek. Verder wordt met het PPP-concept aangetoond dat de Energiefabriek leidt tot ruimere maatschappelijke betrokkenheid, maatschappelijk ondernemen en winstvergroting.

  7. Undergraduate Students' Initial Conceptions of Factorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Elise; Erickson, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Counting problems offer rich opportunities for students to engage in mathematical thinking, but they can be difficult for students to solve. In this paper, we present a study that examines student thinking about one concept within counting, factorials, which are a key aspect of many combinatorial ideas. In an effort to better understand students'…

  8. A tau -- charm -- factory at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, E.; Fields, T.; Grosnick, D.; Norem, J.; Repond, J.; Schoessow, P.

    1994-01-01

    Depending on the beam energy setting, the τ -- charm -- factory will be optimized to study physics with τ leptons, with charmed mesons, or with charmonium states. This report gives a short overview of the physics of these topics. Also discussed are the detectors and the costs associated with this project

  9. Science achievement determinants: factorial structure of family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of. Family Psychotherapy, 1:29-38. Science achievement determinants: factorial structure of family variables. Elias Oupa Mashile. Faculty of Education ... children themselves have about such involvement and support. Most researchers only ascribe a few of these variables to familial influence in their studies. Also ...

  10. Business plan Feed Factory Zambezi Valley, Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooij, A.G.; Wilschut, S.

    2015-01-01

    This business plan focuses on the establishment of a poultry feed factory, one of the essential elements of a sustainable and profitable poultry meat value chain. There is a growing demand for poultry meat in the Tete Province, and currently a large part of the consumed broilers come from other

  11. An Epiphany in a Toilet Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Catlin

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experiences of the universality of art making and artistic experience of being a dancer and teaching artist. She describes her performance at Kohler, a worldwide leader in plumbing products in Spartanburg, South Carolina, where she had an epiphany dancing in a toilet factory--a sudden, intuitive moment of…

  12. Aspergillus fumigatus in ovine lung in Brazil - Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Rizzo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Rizzo H., Silva Júnior V., Mota R.A., Rocha L.L.L., Ono M.S.B., Cruz J.A.L. de O., de Torres S.M., Coutinho L.C. de A., Guimarães J.A. & Dantas A.C. [Aspergillus fumigatus in ovine lung in Brazil - Case report.] Aspergillus fumigatus em pulmão de ovino no Brasil - Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(4:413-419, 2016. Departamento de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Rua Dom Manoel de Medeiros s/n, Recife, PE 52171-900, Brasil. E-mail: hubervet@gmail.com Its described a case of mycotic pneumonia caused by Aspergillus fumigatus in a three months old sheep, that died during the treatment period at the AGA/DMV/UFRPE consequence of skin lesions caused by dog attack. The animal did not respond to antibiotic treatment base on florafenicol, keeping high leukometric values. Macroscopically the lungs showed multifocal areas of cheesy aspect, varing shape and sizes, with yellowish tinge to the center and red at the edges. Microscopically were found granulomatous lesion with extensive dystrophic calcification area, presence of fibrin exudate in the bronchi, inflammatory infiltration of mononuclear diffuse, fibroblast proliferation delimiting a capsule around the inflammatory foci, epiteliodida robe with negative images of hyphae in the lung parenchyma, foamy macrophages, but no giant cells were seen. The blood culture on agar revealed the development of filamentous fungus with grayish color and lots of aerial hyphae, and the culture on Sabouraud media were seen colonies of dark green color with whitish borders both compatible with macromorphology colonies of A. fumigatus . The micromorphology of fungal growth revealed vesicles stick format with sporulation begins in the upper half of the vesicles. The imprints of nodular lesions of the lungs on slides, through panotic dye, showed septate hyphae and branched invading the tissue. Pulmonary infection by A. fumigatus, showed fatal and

  13. MODEL PENGELOLAAN TEACHING FACTORY SEKOLAH MENENGAH KEJURUAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Burhan R Wijaya

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify and develop management models Factory Teaching Vocational School through a series of tests and validation of the model with the approach of reasearch and Development. Teaching Factory Management Models at Vocational Schools is a concept that combines learning management approach learning Competency Based Training (CBT and Production Based Training (PBT in the real atmosphere so that the process of achieving competence or skill skills life skills (life skills in accordance with the standards of graduate work in the industrial world. In particular, this study aims to formulate design management model development Teaching Factory Vocational School. To achieve the research objectives above using the approach of Research and Development, through preliminary studies, design development models, testing and validation. Preliminary study phase is planned to take the flow / stage as follows: the study of literature, study / collection of field data, and a description and analysis of field findings (factual, namely: (1 the description of the characteristics of vocational school with a standard performance indicators that can be poured as the content of the development of Teaching Factory, (2 description of the characteristics and potential development group management model Tefa as an outcome groups to develop and implement management models Tefa for Vocational Schools (3 description of the characteristics of potential stakeholders to support the development and implementation TEFA management model, and (4 preparation of the management model TEFA for Vocational Schools excellence and innovative. Trial design done on a limited scale model group. Then the model was accompanied by outcome group to develop and implement a model TEFA for Vocational Schools to determine whether the model developed can be applied correctly. Data analysis in this study, the preliminary study stage, the findings or the facts about productive learning

  14. Simultaneous amyloglucosidase and exo-polygalacturonase production by Aspergillus niger using solid-state fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alberto Vieira Costa

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyloglucosidase (AMG and exo-polygalacturonase (exo-PG were simultaneously produced by two different strains of Aspergillus niger in solid-state fermentation (SSF using defatted rice-bran as substrate. The effect of Aspergillus niger strain (t0005/007-2 and/or CCT 3312, inoculum type (spore suspension or fermented bran and addition of inducers (pectin and/or starch to the culture media was studied using a 3² x 2¹ factorial experimental design. The production of AMG and exo-PG was significantly affected by fungal strain and inoculum type but inducers had no effect. The maximum yields obtained were 1310 U/g dm for AMG using a spore suspension of A. niger CCT 3312 and 50.2 U/g dm for exo-PG production, using A. niger t0005/007-2 and fermented bran as inoculum. The yields obtained represented acceptable values in comparison with data available in the literature and indicated that defatted rice-bran was a good nutrient source.As enzimas amiloglicosidase (AMG e exo-poligalacturonase (exo-PG foram produzidas simultaneamente por duas cepas de Aspergillus niger, através de fermentação em estado sólido usando farelo de arroz desengordurado como substrato. Foram avaliados os efeitos da cepa de Aspergillus niger, tipo de inóculo e adição de indutores no meio de cultura, utilizando-se um planejamento experimental fracionário 3² x 2¹. O máximo rendimento obtido foi 1310 U/g ms para a produção de AMG e 50,2 U/g ms para a exo-PG. Comparando-se estes resultados com dados da literatura pode-se dizer que os rendimentos obtidos foram aceitáveis e indicam que o farelo de arroz desengordurado é uma boa fonte de nutrientes. A produção de AMG e exo-PG foi significativamente afetada pelas variáveis cepa de A. niger e tipo de inóculo, enquanto a variável indutor não apresentou influência significativa na produção destas enzimas.

  15. Post-genomic insights into the plant polysaccharide degradation potential of Aspergillus nidulans and comparison to Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Pedro M.; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Kolenova, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    The plant polysaccharide degradative potential of Aspergillus nidulans was analysed in detail and compared to that of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae using a combination of bioinformatics, physiology and transcriptomics. Manual verification indicated that 28.4% of the A. nidulans ORFs...... between the Aspergilli in the presence Of putative regulatory sequences in the promoters of the ORFs Of this Study and correlation of the presence Of putative XlnR binding sites to induction by xylose was detected for A. niger. These data demonstrate differences at genome content, Substrate specificity...

  16. screening and improvement of local isolates of aspergillus niger

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The study involved the screening of fourteen isolates of Aspergillus niger for citric acid production from glucose. The study was aimed at screening and improving local strains of Aspergillus niger with potential for citric acid production. All the isolates screened produced varying amounts of citric acid, the highest ...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040 Section 866.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... the genus Aspergillus. Aspergillosis is a disease marked by inflammatory granulomatous (tumor-like...

  18. Assessment of Aspergillus niger biofilm growth kinetics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... assessed by evaluating the CO2 released during the fermentation in minibioreactors. Key words: Aspergillus niger, biofilm, mathematical modeling, endogenous respiration, Cryo-SEM. INTRODUCTION. Aspergillus niger is currently one of the microbial species of main biotechnological importance because ...

  19. Evaluation of Aspergillus PCR Protocols for Testing Serum Specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, P.L.; Mengoli, C.; Bretagne, S.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Finnstrom, N.; Klingspor, L.; Melchers, W.J.G.; McCulloch, E.; Barnes, R.A.; Donnelly, J.P.; Loeffler, J.

    2011-01-01

    A panel of human serum samples spiked with various amounts of Aspergillus fumigatus genomic DNA was distributed to 23 centers within the European Aspergillus PCR Initiative to determine analytical performance of PCR. Information regarding specific methodological components and PCR performance was

  20. Specific detection of Aspergillus fumigatus in sputum sample of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We developed a two-step PCR assay that specifically amplifies a region of the 18S rRNA gene that is highly conserved in Aspergillus fumigatus. This assay allows direct and rapid detection of down to 10 fg of Aspergillus fumigatus DNA corresponding to 1 to 5 colony forming unit (CFU) per ml of sputum sample of pulmonary ...

  1. The Inhibition of aflatoxin production from Aspergillus parasiticus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The inhibition of Aflatoxin production from Aspergillus parasiticus strain NRRL 2999 was investigated using ethanol extracts of Aframommon danielli flower at concentrations of 250ìg/g, 500ìg/g, 750ìg/g and 1000ìg/g with whole wheat bread as a substrate. Aspergillus parasiticus grew abundantly on whole wheat bread; ...

  2. Effect of Environmental Factors on the Growth of Aspergillus Species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    30 o. C and 35 o. C may be susceptible to contamination by Aspergillus species. ... Aspergillus are common contaminants of food and feed stuffs ... Emerging fungal colonies were continuously sub-cultured on potato dextrose agar plates to obtain pure cultures of the isolates. The fungi were identified based on cultural and ...

  3. Aspergillus fumigatus conidial melanin modulates host cytokine response.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, L.; Netea, M.G.; Sugui, J.; Vonk, A.G.; Sande, W.W. van de; Warris, A.; Kwon-Chung, K.J.; Kullberg, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Melanin biopigments have been linked to fungal virulence. Aspergillus fumigatus conidia are melanised and are weakly immunogenic. We show that melanin pigments on the surface of resting Aspergillus fumigatus conidia may serve to mask pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs)-induced cytokine

  4. Aspergillus fumigatus conidial melanin modulates host cytokine response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.Y.A. Chai (Louis); M.G. Netea (Mihai); J. Sugui (Janyce); A.G. Vonk (Alieke); W.W.J. van de Sande (Wendy); A. Warris (Adilia); K.J. Kwon-Chung (Kyung); B. Jan Kullberg (Bart)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMelanin biopigments have been linked to fungal virulence. Aspergillus fumigatus conidia are melanised and are weakly immunogenic. We show that melanin pigments on the surface of resting Aspergillus fumigatus conidia may serve to mask pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs)-induced

  5. Aspergillus Monitoring Project in a Large Educational Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also molecular method, PCR-RFLP using single restriction enzyme as a rapid and available method was performed to investigate environmental sources of Aspergillus infections. Results: Total of 110 clinical fungal isolates included Candida and Aspergillus species and some other opportunistic fungi. Among the clinical

  6. Production of aspartic peptidases by Aspergillus spp. using tuna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The production of extracellular aspartic peptidase by the fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus awamori was carried out in a shake flask and in stirred tank submerged fermentations using tuna cooked wastewater, an industrial effluent, as nitrogen source for culture medium. In stirred tank fermentation, biomass production ...

  7. Spectrophotometric reading of EUCAST antifungal susceptibility testing of Aspergillus fumigatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meletiadis, J.; Mortensen, K.L.; Verweij, P.E.; Mouton, J.W.; Arendrup, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Given the increasing number of antifungal drugs and the emergence of resistant Aspergillus isolates, objective, automated and high-throughput antifungal susceptibility testing is important. The EUCAST E.Def 9.3 reference method for MIC determination of Aspergillus species relies on

  8. Exact Molecular Typing of Aspergillus fumigatus. Methods and Applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk-van Haren, J.A. de

    2008-01-01

    Aspergillus species are widely distributed fungi that release large amounts of airborne conidia that are dispersed in the environment. Aspergillus fumigatus is the species most frequently isolated from human infections. In this thesis a novel assay for fingerprinting A. fumigatus is described and

  9. DECOLORIZATION OF BLUE 13 WITH ASPERGILLUS NIVEUS AND FUSARIUM MONILIFORME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya KARACA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the changing world trends has been increasing interest in colored products. In the textile industry, to give the blue color to the textiles the heavily used Ambifiks Blue H5R (Blue 13 dye. This dye has been given from plants in the environment of the receiving water to results from the toxic effects. For reduction of this toxic effect has been isolated Aspergillus niveus and Fusarium moniliforme from porsuk Stream were invastigated because of decolorizasyon capabilities with different physiological conditions (pH, temprature, agitate condition. For A. niveus results have been obtained up to nearly %95 at pH 3, 35°C and 120-150 rpm. For F. moniliforme results have been obtained up to nearly %95 at pH 7, 20°C ve 120 rpm. For A. niveus decolorisation results were close to dead cells and live cells.Dead cells decolorisation were about %90 for F. moniliforme and live cells decolorisation were about %75.

  10. Arabinase induction and carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der P.

    1995-01-01

    The first aim of this thesis was to get a better understanding of the properties and the induction features of arabinan degrading enzymes and enzymes involved in the intracellular L-arabinose catabolic pathway in Aspergillus niger. The second aim was to understand the

  11. Aspergillus pragensis sp nov discovered during molecular reidentification of clinical isolates belonging to Aspergillus section Candidi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyskova, Pavlina; Hubka, Vit; Kolarik, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    The identity of nine clinical isolates recovered from Czech patients and presumptively identified as Aspergillus sp. section Candidi based on colony morphology was revised using sequences of beta-tubulin, calmodulin gene sequence, and internal transcribed spacer rDNA. Six isolates were from suspe...

  12. SECONDARY METABOLITE FROM ENDOPHYTIC FUNGI Aspergillus niger OF THE STEM BARK OF KANDIS GAJAH (Garcinia griffithii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfita Elfita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Garcinia griffithii are known as kandis gajah including the Garcinia genus. This plant has been traditionally used by local communities Sarasah Bonta, Lembah Arau, West Sumatra, to treat various diseases including gout. Aspergillus niger was isolated from the tissues of the stem bark of Garcinia griffithii. The fungi strain was identified base on colony and cell morphology characteristic. Aspergillus niger cultured in media 5L Potatos Dextose Broth (PDB for 8 weeks and filtered. Media that already contains secondary metabolites are partitioned using ethyl acetate solvent in 5 L (twice, followed by evaporation. Furthermore, the extract is separated by chromatographic techniques to obtain a pure compound of white crystal. The molecular structures of isolated compounds are determined by spectroscopic methods including IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, HMQC, HMBC, and COSY. The compound was determined as phenolic (1.

  13. Asymptotic formulas for sequence factorial of arithmetic progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aṣiru, Muniru A.

    2014-08-01

    This note provides asymptotic formulas for approximating the sequence factorial of members of a finite arithmetic progression by using Stirling, Burnside and other more accurate asymptotic formulas for large factorials that have appeared in the literature.

  14. Production of Tetraquark State Tcc at B-Factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidin, Reyima

    2013-12-01

    We study production of the tetraquark state Tcc via virtual photon at the B-factories in the QCD factorization framework. We predict the cross section of tetraquark state production in the leading order at the B-factories.

  15. Reduction of aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus in interaction with Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheecke, C; Liboz, T; Anson, P; Diaz, R; Mathieu, F

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate aflatoxin gene expression during Streptomyces-Aspergillus interaction. Aflatoxins are carcinogenic compounds produced mainly by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. A previous study has shown that Streptomyces-A. flavus interaction can reduce aflatoxin content in vitro. Here, we first validated this same effect in the interaction with A. parasiticus. Moreover, we showed that growth reduction and aflatoxin content were correlated in A. parasiticus but not in A. flavus. Secondly, we investigated the mechanisms of action by reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR. As microbial interaction can lead to variations in expression of household genes, the most stable [act1, βtub (and cox5 for A. parasiticus)] were chosen using geNorm software. To shed light on the mechanisms involved, we studied during the interaction the expression of five genes (aflD, aflM, aflP, aflR and aflS). Overall, the results of aflatoxin gene expression showed that Streptomyces repressed gene expression to a greater level in A. parasiticus than in A. flavus. Expression of aflR and aflS was generally repressed in both Aspergillus species. Expression of aflM was repressed and was correlated with aflatoxin B1 content. The results suggest that aflM expression could be a potential aflatoxin indicator in Streptomyces species interactions. Therefore, we demonstrate that Streptomyces can reduce aflatoxin production by both Aspergillus species and that this effect can be correlated with the repression of aflM expression. © 2015 The Authors.

  16. Mycotoxin production and predictive modelling kinetics on the growth of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus isolates in whole black peppercorns (Piper nigrum L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogendrarajah, Pratheeba; Vermeulen, An; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Mavromichali, Evangelia; De Saeger, Sarah; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Devlieghere, Frank

    2016-07-02

    The growth and mycotoxin production of three Aspergillus flavus isolates and an Aspergillus parasiticus isolate were studied in whole black peppercorns (Piper nigrum L.) using a full factorial design with seven water activity (aw) (0.826-0.984) levels and three temperatures (22, 30 and 37°C). Growth rates and lag phases were estimated using linear regression. Diverse secondary models were assessed for their ability to describe the radial growth rate as a function of individual and combined effect of aw and temperature. Optimum radial growth rate ranged from 0.75±0.04 to 2.65±0.02mm/day for A. flavus and 1.77±0.10 to 2.50±0.10mm/day for A. parasiticus based on the Rosso cardinal estimations. Despite the growth failure of some isolates at marginal conditions, all the studied models showed good performance to predict the growth rates. Validation of the models was performed on independently derived data. The bias factors (0.73-1.03), accuracy factors (0.97-1.36) and root mean square error (0.050-0.278) show that the examined models are conservative predictors of the colony growth rate of both fungal species in black peppers. The Rosso cardinal model can be recommended to describe the individual aw effect while the extended Gibson model was the best model for describing the combined effect of aw and temperature on the growth rate of both fungal species in peppercorns. Temperature optimum ranged from 30 to 33°C, while aw optimum was 0.87-0.92 as estimated by multi-factorial cardinal model for both species. The estimated minimum temperature and aw for A. flavus and A. parasiticus for growth were 11-16°C and 0.73-0.76, respectively, hence, achieving these conditions should be considered during storage to prevent the growth of these mycotoxigenic fungal species in black peppercorns. Following the growth study, production of mycotoxins (aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, sterigmatocystin and O-methyl sterigmatocystin (OMST)) was quantified using LC-MS/MS. Very small

  17. Constitutive expression of fluorescent protein by Aspergillus var. niger and Aspergillus carbonarius to monitor fungal colonization in maize plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus niger and A. carbonarius are two species in the Aspergillus section Nigri (black-spored aspergilli) frequently associated with peanut (Arachis hypogea), maize (Zea mays), and other plants as pathogens. These infections are symptomless and as such are major concerns since some black aspe...

  18. An Interactive Simulation Tool for Production Planning in Bacon Factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard

    1994-01-01

    The paper describes an interactive simulation tool for production planning in bacon factories. The main aim of the tool is to make it possible to combine the production plans of all parts of the factory......The paper describes an interactive simulation tool for production planning in bacon factories. The main aim of the tool is to make it possible to combine the production plans of all parts of the factory...

  19. Retting of Flax by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De França, F P; Rosemberg, J A; De Jesus, A M

    1969-01-01

    In this study, retting was carried out by Aspergillus niger. The pH, galacturonic acid (GA), and total reducing sugar were determined; the end point was identified by the classic empirical processes and by the maximal GA content of the retting water. The process gave clear and resistent fibers, and the retting time was similar to that of current industrial processes with bacterial enzymes. Control of total acidity was not required, since the pH remained close to neutrality throughout the entire process.

  20. Aspergillus Sydowi Infection of Human Finger Nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Barde

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Aspergillus sydowi infection of left middle finger nail is described ′ The presence of fungal hypae with phialids and spores on direct microscopy as well as in culture, the colour of the sub-ungual mass of the nail resembling the colour of the fungus in, culture′ repeated isolations of A sydowi from the diseased tissue along with the absence of any established pathogenic species in the specimen are taken as evidences that this fungus was invading the nail tissue.

  1. Aspergillus bertholletius sp. nov. from Brazil Nuts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taniwaki, Marta H.; Pitt, John I.; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.

    2012-01-01

    During a study on the mycobiota of brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) in Brazil, a new Aspergillus species, A. bertholletius, was found, and is described here. A polyphasic approach was applied using morphological characters, extrolite data as well as partial beta-tubulin, calmodulin and ITS...... sequences to characterize this taxon. A. bertholletius is represented by nineteen isolates from samples of brazil nuts at various stages of production and soil close to Bertholletia excelsa trees. The following extrolites were produced by this species: aflavinin, cyclopiazonic acid, kojic acid, tenuazonic...

  2. Retting of Flax by Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    De França, F. P.; Rosemberg, J. A.; De Jesus, A. M.

    1969-01-01

    In this study, retting was carried out by Aspergillus niger. The pH, galacturonic acid (GA), and total reducing sugar were determined; the end point was identified by the classic empirical processes and by the maximal GA content of the retting water. The process gave clear and resistent fibers, and the retting time was similar to that of current industrial processes with bacterial enzymes. Control of total acidity was not required, since the pH remained close to neutrality throughout the entire process. PMID:16349835

  3. Identificação de Aspergillus spp: toxigênico em arroz Identification of toxigenic Aspergillus spp: in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ívina Catarina de Oliveira Guimarães

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A composição química e o modo de cultivo do arroz o tornam susceptível à contaminação fúngica e, consequentemente, por micotoxinas. Considerando-se o expressivo consumo de arroz e a possibilidade de ser potencial fonte de micotoxinas, especial atenção deve ser dispensada quanto à qualidade do produto adquirido. Assim, o presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar espécies do gênero Aspergillus quanto à capacidade toxigênica, em diferentes subgrupos de arroz. As amostras constituíram-se de 31 marcas de arroz referentes aos subgrupos branco polido (21 e parboilizado (10, mais comumente comercializadas na cidade de Lavras - MG. Ao contrário dos outros subgrupos, a incidência de Aspergillus flavus e Aspergillus niger em amostras de arroz branco polido aumentou significativamente após a desinfecção. Pôde-se observar que, 50% dos Aspergillus flavus e 50% dos Aspergillus niger encontrados, foram considerados toxigênicos para o subgrupo branco polido. Na amostra de arroz parboilizado, 67% dos Aspergillus flavus eram potenciais produtores. O Aspergillus ochraceus não se revelou como toxigênico. Este estudo permitiu concluir que, apesar de trabalhos isolados, a presença de fungos toxigênicos em arroz é verídico, o que se torna relevante por se tratar de um cereal importante no cenário mundial.The chemical composition and its methods of cultivation, make rice plants susceptible to fungi and consequently to mycotoxins contamination. Considering the expressive rice consumption and given the possibility that it maybe a potential source of mycotoxins, special attention should be devoted to its quality. Thus, this study was carried out to evaluate the Aspergillus species as to its toxigenic capacities in different rice subgroups. Thirty one and rice brands among the most popular brands sold in the city of Lavras - MG, were collected as samples, (21 polished white and (10 parboiled, respectively. Unlike other subgroups, the

  4. A comparison of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and protoplast-mediated transformation with CRISPR-Cas9 and bipartite gene targeting substrates, as effective gene targeting tools for Aspergillus carbonarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyda, István; Yang, Lei; Vang, Jesper; Ahring, Birgitte K; Lübeck, Mette; Lübeck, Peter S

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, versatile genetic tools have been developed and applied to a number of filamentous fungi of industrial importance. However, the existing techniques have limitations when it comes to achieve the desired genetic modifications, especially for efficient gene targeting. In this study, we used Aspergillus carbonarius as a host strain due to its potential as a cell factory, and compared three gene targeting techniques by disrupting the ayg1 gene involved in the biosynthesis of conidial pigment in A. carbonarius. The absence of the ayg1 gene leads to phenotypic change in conidia color, which facilitated the analysis on the gene targeting frequency. The examined transformation techniques included Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) and protoplast-mediated transformation (PMT). Furthermore, the PMT for the disruption of the ayg1 gene was carried out with bipartite gene targeting fragments and the recently adapted CRISPR-Cas9 system. All three techniques were successful in generating Δayg1 mutants, but showed different efficiencies. The most efficient method for gene targeting was AMT, but further it was shown to be dependent on the choice of Agrobacterium strain. However, there are different advantages and disadvantages of all three gene targeting methods which are discussed, in order to facilitate future approaches for fungal strain improvements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of noise in furniture factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Petusk Filipe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Work safety is of great importance in all industrial activities. The Norm NR15 of the Brazilian law determines that the work environment be tailored to employees to minimize biological, ergonomic, physical, chemical risks and accidents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the exposure of intermittent noise in a daily dose to workers in furniture factories. Measurements were made with a sound level meter and dosimeter in a workday of eight hours in 14 furniture factories located in the South of Minas Gerais. Noise values ranged from 66.0 to 117.4 dB(A. At a dose of 8 working hours it was observed that the values exceed the tolerance limit of a unit, being from 2.76 to 30.52 for minimum and maximum units, respectively. Both noises and daily doses were superior than the values set by the NR-15-Annex 01 (BRASIL, 2008.

  6. Portable Material Culture and Death Factory Auschwitz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian T. Myers

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Like any other factory, the death factory of Auschwitz consumed primary materials and produced secondary products. Unique to Auschwitz, though, is that the primary material consumed was human life; not just the life of the breathing human body, but also the material possessions associated with that life. The detritus of this most efficient genocide – clothing, jewellery, food, corpses – was appropriated and put to new uses by the SS and the prisoners. Others have recognised the various postwar material cultural outcomes of the camp: the writing, the film, the theatre, the art, the tourism. This article, however, demonstrates that the material culture of Auschwitz is not a phenomenon exclusive to the postwar era. It focuses on the fact that inside the camp during the war, despite the landscape of death and deprivation, intimate interaction between humans and material culture continued.

  7. The Physics of the B Factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevan, A.J.; Golob, B.; Mannel, T.

    2014-01-01

    The inspiration for this book came from Fran@cois le Diberder. During his term as spokesperson for BABAR he laid down a vision for the two B Factory detector collaborations, BABAR and Belle, to work together on a book that would describe the methodologies used and physics results obtained by those experiments. A key ideal emphasized from the outset was that this book should be written from a pedagogical perspective; it should be of interest to the student and expert alike. This vision was presented during a BABAR collaboration meeting on the island of Elba in May 2008 and a follow up Belle collaboration meeting at KEK, with visiting colleagues from the BABAR collaboration, and was embraced by the community. A number of workshops involving people from the theoretical community as well as the two collaborations were held on four continents over the following years. The resulting book, ''The Physics of the B Factories'', is a testament to the way that this concept captured the zeitgeist on both sides of the Pacific Ocean. This book is divided into three parts, the first of which provides a brief description of the B Factories, including a short (though not exhaustive) historical perspective, as well as descriptions of the detectors, ancillary data acquisition systems and data (re)processing systems that were built by the two detector collaborations in the late 1990's. The second part of the book discusses tools and methods that are frequently used when analyzing the data collected. These range from details of low level reconstruction algorithms and abstract summaries of statistical methods to high level prescriptions used when evaluating systematic uncertainties on measurements of observables. The third part of the book is devoted to physics results. This includes sufficient theoretical discussion in order for the reader to understand the context of the work being described. We are indebted to our colleagues from the theoretical community who have helped us achieve

  8. Physics at e+e- factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.; MacFarlane, D.B.

    1991-02-01

    Feasible designs are well advanced for high-luminosity e + e - storage rings which produce B 0 bar B 0 pairs either at rest or, in what appears to be a more promising option, boosted in the detector frame. Facilities which could provide samples of 30--100 fb -1 per year on the Υ(4S) will be proposed in early 1991. Here we examine the principal physics goal of such B Factories, namely CP violation in the b system. Methods in a variety of channels, estimated event samples, and detector requirements are all considered. We conclude that the physics argument for an e + e - B Factory is well documented, and compelling. 50 refs., 22 figs., 10 tabs

  9. Software Development Factories, the Project Management Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a software factory, the applications are developed in the same way Henri Ford started manufacturing cars. In such a way, a customized solution could be obtained within a reasonable budget and within the foreseen timeframe. This development method offers a flexible solution that can be readapted rapidly and automatically to the changing business needs, so the Project Management becomes a real challenge.

  10. Muon front end for the neutrino factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. Rogers

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the neutrino factory, muons are produced by firing high-energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons and pass through a capture channel known as the muon front end, before acceleration to 12.6 GeV. The muon front end comprises a variable frequency rf system for longitudinal capture and an ionization cooling channel. In this paper we detail recent improvements in the design of the muon front end.

  11. LAMPF: the meson factory. A LASL monograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, J.C.

    1977-08-01

    A general and simplified introduction to the entire concept of LAMPF is given in terms of its experimental capabilities. Parts of the current experimental program are used as illustrative examples. Topics discussed include: (1) the evolution of the meson factory; (2) accelerator construction; (3) strong focusing; (4) accelerator innovations at LAMPF; (5) photons and pions; (6) muons as nuclear probes; (7) nuclear chemistry; (8) radiobiology and medical applications; (9) radioisotope production; (10) materials testing; and (11) LAMPF management and users group

  12. LAMPF: the meson factory. A LASL monograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C.

    1977-08-01

    A general and simplified introduction to the entire concept of LAMPF is given in terms of its experimental capabilities. Parts of the current experimental program are used as illustrative examples. Topics discussed include: (1) the evolution of the meson factory; (2) accelerator construction; (3) strong focusing; (4) accelerator innovations at LAMPF; (5) photons and pions; (6) muons as nuclear probes; (7) nuclear chemistry; (8) radiobiology and medical applications; (9) radioisotope production; (10) materials testing; and (11) LAMPF management and users group. (PMA)

  13. Proteome analysis of Aspergillus ochraceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Miller, Ingrid; Tasneem, Fareeha; Böhm, Josef; Gemeiner, Manfred; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim

    2010-08-01

    Genome sequencing for many important fungi has begun during recent years; however, there is still some deficiency in proteome profiling of aspergilli. To obtain a comprehensive overview of proteins and their expression, a proteomic approach based on 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was used to investigate A. ochraceus. The cell walls of fungi are exceptionally resistant to destruction, therefore two lysis protocols were tested: (1) lysis via manual grinding using liquid nitrogen, and (2) mechanical lysis via rapid agitation with glass beads using MagNalyser. Mechanical grinding with mortar and pestle using liquid nitrogen was found to be a more efficient extraction method for our purpose, resulting in extracts with higher protein content and a clear band pattern in SDS-PAGE. Two-dimensional electrophoresis gave a complex spot pattern comprising proteins of a broad range of isoelectric points and molecular masses. The most abundant spots were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis. We could identify 31 spots representing 26 proteins, most of them involved in metabolic processes and response to stress. Seventeen spots were identified by de novo sequencing due to a lack of DNA and protein database sequences of A. ochraceus. The proteins identified in our study have been reported for the first time in A. ochraceus and this represents the first proteomic approach with identification of major proteins, when the fungus was grown under submerged culture.

  14. A biophysical model for transcription factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canals-Hamann, Ana Z; Neves, Ricardo Pires das; Reittie, Joyce E; Iñiguez, Carlos; Soneji, Shamit; Enver, Tariq; Buckle, Veronica J; Iborra, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factories are nuclear domains where gene transcription takes place although the molecular basis for their formation and maintenance are unknown. In this study, we explored how the properties of chromatin as a polymer may contribute to the structure of transcription factories. We found that transcriptional active chromatin contains modifications like histone H4 acetylated at Lysine 16 (H4K16ac). Single fibre analysis showed that this modification spans the entire body of the gene. Furthermore, H4K16ac genes cluster in regions up to 500 Kb alternating active and inactive chromatin. The introduction of H4K16ac in chromatin induces stiffness in the chromatin fibre. The result of this change in flexibility is that chromatin could behave like a multi-block copolymer with repetitions of stiff-flexible (active-inactive chromatin) components. Copolymers with such structure self-organize through spontaneous phase separation into microdomains. Consistent with such model H4K16ac chromatin form foci that associates with nascent transcripts. We propose that transcription factories are the result of the spontaneous concentration of H4K16ac chromatin that are in proximity, mainly in cis

  15. Factorial complexity and Morally Debatable Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimaldo Muchotrigo, Mirian P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, from the scientific and professional practice point of view, comes out the necessity to know more about moral permissiveness, as it seems to be an increase in “moral relativism”.. Because it, it this is important to have tools to collect valid and reliable information about moral in social situations defined as social and personal behavior issue. This paper presents a technical note of The Morally Debatable Behaviors Scale (MDBS from Harding & Phillips (1986, which was developed in USA and mainly focused on young people and adults. This technical note makes direct reference to a recent Latin American study (Merino & Grimaldo, 2010; this article focuses on the internal structure and the problems associated with evidences of factorial complexity among items of the MDBS. This means that the interpretation of scores is not factorially simple and could not be achieved by a conceptual distinction between the latent constructs applied to the study sample.. The results in the previous study of the factorial complexity leads the researcher to decide whether an instrument for measuring this aspect may contain a reasonable amount of complexity that is consistent with what is in reality, or look for the unidimensional and simple structure.

  16. Backgrounds at e+e- B factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    B-factory designers and prospective users have learned that the viability of such facilities is crucially dependent upon control of machine-related backgrounds in the interaction region (IR). Photons from synchrotron radiation (SR), and the debris that follows loss of stored beam, can compromise the performance and thwart the mission of the elaborate and expensive experimental detectors. This danger is relevant to taucharm and phi factories as well. My goal is to make clear to non-experts why this is so, and to explicate the underlying physical processes and important defensive measures. We shall stay close to reality by comparing simulation to actual experience at the CLEOII detector - CESR storage ring complex at Cornell. Why should one expect background difficulties at B factories? First, backgrounds are not negligible now, at luminosities of 2.10 32 cm 2 sec -1 ; future facilities will require currents and luminosity 10 to 50 times greater. Second, backgrounds rise faster than linearly with beam current; since gas evolution is driven by SR, the beam-gas backgrounds will grow quadratically with current. High beam energies (for asymmetric colliders) and the very strong quadrupole fields required for small β * and rapid beam separation exacerbate the problems posed by SR from magnets near the IR. The experiments will employ thin beryllium beampipes at (typically) 2.5 cm radius, with little inherent resistance to penetration by x rays. Finally, the HEP physics is ''high-precision physics,'' especially vulnerable to corruption by backgrounds. (orig.)

  17. An asymmetric B factory based on PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    In this report we describe a design for a high-luminosity Asymmetric B Factory to be built in the PEP tunnel on the SLAC site. This proposal, a collaborative effort SLAC, LBL, and LLNL, is the culmination of more than two years of effort aimed at the design and construction of an asymmetric e + e - collider capable of achieving a luminosity of L = 3 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 . The configuration adopted utilizes two storage rings, and electron ring operating at 9 GeV and a positron ring at 3.1 GeV, each with a circumference of 2200 m. The high-energy ring is an upgrade of the PEP storage ring at SLAC; all PEP magnets and most power supplies will be reused. The upgrade consists primarily of replacing the PEP vacuum chamber and RF system with newly designed versions optimized for the high-current environment of the B Factory. The low-energy ring will be newly constructed and will be situated atop the high-energy ring in the PEP tunnel. Utilities already installed in the PEP tunnel are largely sufficient to operate the two B Factory storage rings

  18. Neutrinos: from the Workshop to the Factory

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Over the next 5 years much work will be done to reach a theoretical and practical description of a neutrino factory. How could this project turn out to be an interesting future option for CERN? Neutrino beams travelling from CERN to the Canary Islands? And to the Svalbard archipelago in Norway? Or even to the Pyhaesalmi Mine in Finland? Why neutrinos? And why so far? The answers provide one of CERN's next challenging options: the construction of a high-energy muon storage ring to provide neutrino beams. This project, nicknamed 'neutrino factory', now figures in CERN's middle term plan as a recognized and supported research and development project. International collaborations, with other European laboratories and also with America and Japan, are now being set up. Long baseline locations for neutrino oscillations studies at a CERN based neutrino factory. Early in its history, LEP established that there exist just three kinds of light neutrinos, those associated with the electron, muon, and tau leptons. For a...

  19. Detection of polymorphism of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular genetic selection on individual genes is a promising method to genetically improve economically important traits in chickens. The insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) gene may play important roles in growth of multiple tissues, including muscle cells, cartilage and bone. In the present study, polymorphism of the ...

  20. Transformation of Litchi Pericarp-Derived Condensed Tannin with Aspergillus awamori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Condensed tannin is a ubiquitous polyphenol in plants that possesses substantial antioxidant capacity. In this study, we have investigated the polyphenol extraction recovery and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH scavenging activity of the extracted polyphenol after litchi pericarp is treated with Aspergillus awamori, Aspergillus sojae or Aspergillus oryzae. We have further explored the activity of A. awamori in the formation of condensed tannin. The treatment of A. awamori appeared to produce the highest antioxidant activity of polyphenol from litchi pericarp. Further studies suggested that the treatment of A. awamori releases the non-extractable condensed tannin from cell walls of litchi pericarp. The total extractable tannin in the litchi pericarp residue after a six-time extraction with 60% ethanol increased from 199.92 ± 14.47–318.38 ± 7.59 μg/g dry weight (DW after the treatment of A. awamori. The ESI-TOF-MS and HPLC-MS2 analyses further revealed that treatment of A. awamori degraded B-type condensed tannin (condensed flavan-3-ol via C4–C8 linkage, but exhibited a limited capacity to degrade the condensed tannin containing A-type linkage subunits (C4–C8 coupled C2–O–C7 linkage. These results suggest that the treatment of A. awamori can significantly improve the production of condensed tannin from litchi pericarp.

  1. Transformation of Litchi Pericarp-Derived Condensed Tannin with Aspergillus awamori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sen; Li, Qing; Yang, Bao; Duan, Xuewu; Zhang, Mingwei; Shi, John; Jiang, Yueming

    2016-07-12

    Condensed tannin is a ubiquitous polyphenol in plants that possesses substantial antioxidant capacity. In this study, we have investigated the polyphenol extraction recovery and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity of the extracted polyphenol after litchi pericarp is treated with Aspergillus awamori, Aspergillus sojae or Aspergillus oryzae. We have further explored the activity of A. awamori in the formation of condensed tannin. The treatment of A. awamori appeared to produce the highest antioxidant activity of polyphenol from litchi pericarp. Further studies suggested that the treatment of A. awamori releases the non-extractable condensed tannin from cell walls of litchi pericarp. The total extractable tannin in the litchi pericarp residue after a six-time extraction with 60% ethanol increased from 199.92 ± 14.47-318.38 ± 7.59 μg/g dry weight (DW) after the treatment of A. awamori. The ESI-TOF-MS and HPLC-MS² analyses further revealed that treatment of A. awamori degraded B-type condensed tannin (condensed flavan-3-ol via C4-C8 linkage), but exhibited a limited capacity to degrade the condensed tannin containing A-type linkage subunits (C4-C8 coupled C2-O-C7 linkage). These results suggest that the treatment of A. awamori can significantly improve the production of condensed tannin from litchi pericarp.

  2. Methylthio-Aspochalasins from a Marine-Derived Fungus Aspergillus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two novel aspochalasins, 20-β-methylthio-aspochalsin Q (named as aspochalasin V, (1 and aspochalasin W (2, were isolated from culture broth of Aspergillus sp., which was found in the gut of a marine isopod Ligia oceanica. The structures were determined on the basis of NMR and mass spectral data analysis. This is the first report about methylthio-substituted aspochalasin derivatives. Cytotoxicity against the prostate cancer PC3 cell line and HCT116 cell line was assayed using the MTT method. Apochalasin V showed moderate activity at IC50 values of 30.4 and 39.2 μM, respectively.

  3. Copper removal from aqueous solution using Aspergillus niger mycelia in free and polyurethane-bound form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsekova, K.; Ilieva, S. [Inst. of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2001-07-01

    This study assesses the ability of mycelia of Aspergillus niger B-77 (both free and immobilized on polyurethane foam) to remove copper from single-ion solution. All experiments were conducted using 0.5 mM solutions of CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2} O. Mycelia immobilized on polyurethane foam cells showed a three-fold increase in uptake, compared with that of free cells. The efficiency of copper removal (mg Cu{sup 2+} removed/mg Cu{sup 2+} added) in a column system reached more than 99% before the break-through point was attained. (orig.)

  4. [Utility of Aspergillus-LFD: first experience in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    The diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis remains a challenge. Detection of galactomannan in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage is a useful tool; however due to methodological and economic reasons, the test frequencies of galactomannan assays vary from daily to weekly, which constitute a risk to the patient. In this study, we aimed to evaluate and correlate the performance of the new kit Aspergillus-LFD with the GM-EIA. Aspergillus-LFD kit represents a fast, economical and simple test; showed a good performance and excellent correlation with GM-EIA kit. Given the above, the Aspergillus-LFD is emerging as an alternative to consider in the early diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis.

  5. In-Factory Learning - Qualification For The Factory Of The Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quint, Fabian; Mura, Katharina; Gorecky, Dominic

    2015-07-01

    The Industry 4.0 vision anticipates that internet technologies will find their way into future factories replacing traditional components by dynamic and intelligent cyber-physical systems (CPS) that combine the physical objects with their digital representation. Reducing the gap between the real and digital world makes the factory environment more flexible, more adaptive, but also more complex for the human workers. Future workers require interdisciplinary competencies from engineering, information technology, and computer science in order to understand and manage the diverse interrelations between physical objects and their digital counterpart. This paper proposes a mixed-reality based learning environment, which combines physical objects and visualisation of digital content via Augmented Reality. It uses reality-based interaction in order to make the dynamic interrelations between real and digital factory visible and tangible. We argue that our learning system does not work as a stand-alone solution, but should fit into existing academic and advanced training curricula.

  6. Confirmatory factorial analysis of TEOSQp / Análise factorial confirmatória do TEOSQp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder M. Fernandes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research assessed the reliability, factorial validity and measurement invariance (by gender of the Portuguese version of TEOSQ –Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (Fonseca & Biddle, 2001. Data were collected from 1010 physical education students with a mean age of 15.42 ( SD=1.91. Factorial and invariance measurements were tested via confirmatory factorial analysis. Results supported internal consistency for the two proposed subscales (task and ego. Based on modification indices and theoretical justification the TEOSQ p was reduced to 12 items with better goodness-of-fit indices for the oblique model. The results of gender invariance did not provide full empirical support to the multi-group equivalence assumption, being suggested that TEOSQ p does not measure in the same way goal orientations for boys (orthogonal model and girls (oblique model. In light of these results, conceptual, empirical and practical issues were discussed.

  7. Polyphasic taxonomy of Aspergillus section Aspergillus (formerly Eurotium), and its occurrence in indoor environments and food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, A.J.; Hubka, Vit; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus section Aspergillus (formerly the genus Eurotium) includes xerophilic species with uniseriate conidiophores, globose to subglobose vesicles, green conidia and yellow, thin walled eurotium-like ascomata with hyaline, lenticular ascospores. In the present study, a polyphasic approach...... using morphological characters, extrolites, physiological characters and phylogeny was applied to investigate the taxonomy of this section. Over 500 strains from various culture collections and new isolates obtained from indoor environments and a wide range of substrates all over the world were......, epiheveadrides, auroglaucins and anthraquinone bisanthrons, and to be consistent in strains of nearly all species. Other extrolites are species-specific, and thus valuable for identification. Several extrolites show antioxidant effects, which may be nutritionally beneficial in food and beverages. Important...

  8. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Hijacks RNA Polymerase II To Create a Viral Transcriptional Factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christopher Phillip; Lyu, Yuanzhi; Chuang, Frank; Nakano, Kazushi; Izumiya, Chie; Jin, Di; Campbell, Mel; Izumiya, Yoshihiro

    2017-06-01

    Locally concentrated nuclear factors ensure efficient binding to DNA templates, facilitating RNA polymerase II recruitment and frequent reutilization of stable preinitiation complexes. We have uncovered a mechanism for effective viral transcription by focal assembly of RNA polymerase II around Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genomes in the host cell nucleus. Using immunofluorescence labeling of latent nuclear antigen (LANA) protein, together with fluorescence in situ RNA hybridization (RNA-FISH) of the intron region of immediate early transcripts, we visualized active transcription of viral genomes in naturally infected cells. At the single-cell level, we found that not all episomes were uniformly transcribed following reactivation stimuli. However, those episomes that were being transcribed would spontaneously aggregate to form transcriptional "factories," which recruited a significant fraction of cellular RNA polymerase II. Focal assembly of "viral transcriptional factories" decreased the pool of cellular RNA polymerase II available for cellular gene transcription, which consequently impaired cellular gene expression globally, with the exception of selected ones. The viral transcriptional factories localized with replicating viral genomic DNAs. The observed colocalization of viral transcriptional factories with replicating viral genomic DNA suggests that KSHV assembles an "all-in-one" factory for both gene transcription and DNA replication. We propose that the assembly of RNA polymerase II around viral episomes in the nucleus may be a previously unexplored aspect of KSHV gene regulation by confiscation of a limited supply of RNA polymerase II in infected cells. IMPORTANCE B cells infected with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) harbor multiple copies of the KSHV genome in the form of episomes. Three-dimensional imaging of viral gene expression in the nucleus allows us to study interactions and changes in the physical distribution of

  9. The nucleation of microtubules in Aspergillus nidulans germlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-Monteiro Cristina de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are filaments composed of dimers of alpha- and beta-tubulins, which have a variety of functions in living cells. In fungi, the spindle pole bodies usually have been considered to be microtubule-organizing centers. We used the antimicrotubule drug Benomyl in block/release experiments to depolymerize and repolymerize microtubules in Aspergillus nidulans germlings to learn more about the microtubule nucleation process in this filamentous fungus. Twenty seconds after release from Benomyl short microtubules were formed from several bright (immunofluorescent dots distributed along the germlings, suggesting that microtubule nucleation is randomly distributed in A. nidulans germlings. Since nuclear movement is dependent on microtubules in A. nidulans we analyzed whether mutants defective in nuclear distribution along the growing hyphae (nud mutants have some obvious microtubule defect. Cytoplasmic, astral and spindle microtubules were present and appeared to be normal in all nud mutants. However, significant changes in the percentage of short versus long mitotic spindles were observed in nud mutants. This suggests that some of the nuclei of nud mutants do not reach the late stage of cell division at normal temperatures.

  10. Aspergillus baeticus sp. nov. and Aspergillus thesauricus sp. nov., two species in section Usti from Spanish caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Alena; Hubka, Vit; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Kolarik, Miroslav

    2012-11-01

    Two novel species of Aspergillus that are clearly distinct from all known species in section Usti were revealed during a study of microfungal communities in Spanish caves. The novel species identified in this study and additional species of Aspergillus section Usti are associated with places and substrates related to human activities in caves. Novel species are described using data from four loci (ITS, benA, caM and rpb2), morphology and basic chemical and physiological analyses. Members of the species Aspergillus thesauricus sp. nov. were isolated from various substrates, including decaying organic matter, cave air and cave sediment of the Cueva del Tesoro Cave (the Treasure cave); the species is represented by twelve isolates and is most closely related to the recently described Aspergillus germanicus. Members of the species Aspergillus baeticus sp. nov. were isolated from cave sediment in the Gruta de las Maravillas Cave (the Grotto of the Marvels); the species is represented by two isolates. An additional isolate was found in the Cueva del Tesoro Cave and in the Demänovská Peace Cave (Slovakia), suggesting a potentially wide distribution of this micro-organism. The species is related to Aspergillus ustus and Aspergillus pseudoustus. Both species were unable to grow at 37 °C, and a weakly positive, light greenish yellow Ehrlich reaction was observed in A. thesauricus. Unique morphological features alone are sufficient to distinguish both species from related taxa.

  11. The Tau-Charm Factory in the ERA of B-Factories and CESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beers, L.V.; Perl, M.L.

    1994-10-01

    This paper is a collection of presentations made at a conference on tau-charm factories, held at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and Stanford University on August 15-16, 1994. The papers presented summarize the physics which can be learned from such a facility, the advantages it would present over planned B-factories and large centers such as CESR, and the types of decay modes which could be observed. More detailed studies of tau physics are opened up, as well as charmonium and charmed systems. Seperate presentations to the proceedings are indexed individually into the database

  12. Development of novel real-time PCR assays for detection and differentiation of eleven medically important Aspergillus and Candida species in clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabereiter-Gurtner, Claudia; Selitsch, Brigitte; Rotter, Manfred L; Hirschl, Alexander M; Willinger, Birgit

    2007-03-01

    In the present study, novel real-time PCR assays targeting the fungal ITS2 region were developed for the detection and differentiation of medically important Aspergillus species (Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus terreus) and Candida species (Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis) using a LightCycler instrument. The combination of a group-specific and a universal primer with five Aspergillus or six Candida species-specific biprobes in one reaction mixture facilitated rapid screening and species differentiation by the characteristic peak melting temperatures of the biprobes. Both assays can be performed either as single assays or simultaneously in the same LightCycler run. The analytical sensitivity using pure cultures and EDTA-anticoagulated blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and tissue samples spiked with A. fumigatus and C. albicans cell suspensions was shown to be at least 1 CFU per PCR, corresponding to 5 to 10 CFU/ml blood and 10 CFU/200 microl CSF or 0.02 g tissue. To assess the clinical applicability, 26 respiratory samples, 4 tissue samples from the maxillary sinus, and 1 blood sample were retrospectively tested and real-time PCR results were compared with results from culture, histology, or a galactomannan enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Twenty samples (64.5%) were both culture positive and positive by real-time PCR. Six samples (19.4%) showed no growth of fungi but were positive by real-time PCR. However, all of the tissue samples were positive by both PCR and histology. The blood sample showed no growth of Aspergillus, but aspergillosis was confirmed by positive galactomannan ELISA, histology, and PCR results. The remaining samples (16.1%) were culture and PCR negative; also, no other signs indicating fungal infection were observed. Our data suggest that the Aspergillus and Candida assays may be

  13. Diamond Growth in the Subduction Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, H.; Frost, D. J.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Leroy, C.; Estève, I.

    2014-12-01

    Natural diamonds are fabulous probes of the deep Earth Interior. They are the evidence of the deep storage of volatile elements, carbon at first, but also hydrogen and chlorine trapped as hydrous fluids in inclusions. The study of diamond growth processes in the lithosphere and mantle helps for our understanding of volatile elements cycling between deep reservoirs. We know now that inclusion-bearing diamonds similar to diamonds found in nature (i.e. polycrystalline, fibrous and coated diamonds) can grow in hydrous fluids or melts (Bureau et al., GCA 77, 202-214, 2012). Therefore, we propose that the best environment to promote such diamonds is the subduction factory, where highly hydrous fluids or melts are present. When oceanic plates are subducted in the lithosphere, they carry an oceanic crust soaked with seawater. While the slabs are traveling en route to the mantle, dehydration processes generate saline fluids highly concentrated in NaCl. In the present study we have experimentally shown that diamonds can grow from the saline fluids (up to 30 g/l NaCl in water) generated in subducted slabs. We have performed multi-anvil press experiments at 6-7 GPa and from 1300 to 1400°C during 6:00 hours to 30:00 hours. We observed large areas of new diamond grown in epitaxy on pure diamond seeds in salty hydrous carbonated melts, forming coated gems. The new rims are containing multi-component primary inclusions. Detailed characterizations of the diamonds and their inclusions have been performed and will be presented. These experimental results suggest that multi-component salty fluids of supercritical nature migrate with the slabs, down to the deep mantle. Such fluids may insure the first stage of the deep Earth's volatiles cycling (C, H, halogen elements) en route to the transition zone and the lower mantle. We suggest that the subduction factory may also be a diamond factory.

  14. Biotransformation of two furanocoumarins by the fungi species Aspergillus sp. PTCC 5266 and Aspergillus niger PTCC 5010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Saba; Habibi, Zohreh; Mohajeri, Maryam; Yousefi, Maryam

    2018-02-22

    The microbial transformations of peucedanin and oreoselon by the fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus sp. were investigated for the first time. Incubation of peucedanin with A. niger yielded a new hydroxylated metabolite with high yield (56%), which was characterized as 2-(1-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-3-methoxy-7H-furo[3,2-g]chromen-7-one. Oreoselon was converted to a new reduced metabolite methyl 3-(2,3-dihydro-6-hydroxy-2-isopropyl-3-oxobenzofuran-5-yl)propanoate in biotransformation by Aspergillus sp. The structures of the metabolites were determined by spectroscopic methods including IR, EI-MS, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, and elemental analysis.

  15. FASER Rescue Equipment and Mining Lamp Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubala, L.

    1984-12-01

    The history of the FASER Rescue Equipment and Mining Lamp Factory founded in 1924 is discussed. Plant development from 1924 to 1939 and from 1947 to 1984 is evaluated. The FASER Plant has been subordinated to the EMAG Center for Research and Production of Electrical Engineering and Mine Automation since 1980. Equipment manufactured by the plant is discussed: oxygen respirators, canisters, protective clothing, control systems and measuring instruments used in mine rescue, medical equipment, lighting systems and light bulbs for underground mines. Some problems associated with manufacturing processes are evaluated: manufacturing equipment, manufacturing technologies, quality of rescue equipment, innovation and its economic significance, etc.

  16. The Personal Software Process: Downscaling the factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Daniel M.

    1994-01-01

    It is argued that the next wave of software process improvement (SPI) activities will be based on a people-centered paradigm. The most promising such paradigm, Watts Humphrey's personal software process (PSP), is summarized and its advantages are listed. The concepts of the PSP are shown also to fit a down-scaled version of Basili's experience factory. The author's data and lessons learned while practicing the PSP are presented along with personal experience, observations, and advice from the perspective of a consultant and teacher for the personal software process.

  17. Advanced manufacturing: optimising the factories of tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippon, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Faced with competition Patrick Philippon - Les Defis du CEA no.179 - April 2013 from the emerging countries, the competitiveness of the industrialised nations depends on the ability of their industries to innovate. This strategy necessarily entails the reorganisation and optimisation of the production systems. This is the whole challenge for 'advanced manufacturing', which relies on the new information and communication technologies. Interactive robotics, virtual reality and non-destructive testing are all technological building blocks developed by CEA, now approved within a cross-cutting programme, to meet the needs of industry and together build the factories of tomorrow. (author)

  18. Tau/Charm Factory Accelerator Report

    OpenAIRE

    M. E. BiaginiINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; R. BoniINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; M. BoscoloINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; A. ChiarucciINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; R. CiminoINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; A. ClozzaINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; A. DragoINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; S. GuiducciINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; C. LigiINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; G. MazzitelliINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; R. RicciINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; C. SanelliINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; M. SerioINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; A. StellaINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; S. TomassiniINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy

    2014-01-01

    The present Report concerns the current status of the Italian Tau/Charm accelerator project and in particular discusses the issues related to the lattice design, to the accelerators systems and to the associated conventional facilities. The project aims at realizing a variable energy Flavor Factory between 1 and 4.6 GeV in the center of mass, and succeeds to the SuperB project from which it inherits most of the solutions proposed in this document. The work comes from a cooperation involving t...

  19. Recent developments at the TRIUMF meson factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1976-10-01

    The TRIUMF meson factory, which is based on a 6-sector isochronous cyclotron accelerating H - ions to 520 MeV, has been operating since December 1974. Two proton beams are extracted simultaneously to feed the two experimental areas. Characteristics of the beams and beam lines are given. Work is also proceeding on (i) additional beam lines, (ii) a 180 kW beam dump and thermal neutron source, (iii) a medium resolution proton spectrometer, and (iv) adding third harmonic flat-topping to the RF to permit separation of the internal orbits and reduction of the energy spread of the extracted beam to 0.1 MeV. (author)

  20. Racetrack lattices for the TRIUMF KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servranckx, R.V.; Craddock, M.K.

    1989-05-01

    Separated-function racetrack lattices have been developed for the KAON Factory accelerators that have more flexibility than the old circular lattices. The arcs of the large rings have a regular FODO structure with a superimposed six-fold symmetric modulation of the betafunction in order to raise γ t to infinity. In the small rings, γ t is kept high enough by choosing a sufficiently large phase advance in the arcs. Straight sections with zero dispersion are provided for rf cavities and fast injection and extraction, and with controlled dispersion for H - injection and slow extraction. The ion-optical properties of the lattices and the results from tracking studies are discussed