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Sample records for cell factories based

  1. Cell Factory Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davy, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2017-01-01

    focused on individual strategies or cell types, but collectively they fall under the broad umbrella of a growing field known as cell factory engineering. Here we condense >130 reviews and key studies in the art into a meta-review of cell factory engineering. We identified 33 generic strategies......-review provides general strategy guides for the broad range of applications of rational engineering of cell factories....

  2. Synthetic yeast based cell factories for vanillin-glucoside production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas

    and controlled expression/overexpression of genes of interest. De novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin-β-glucoside production was employed as a model system for several case studies in this project. In order to construct yeast cell factories fulfilling current demands of industrial biotechnology, methods...... method was further applied for balancing vanillin-β-glucoside production in S. cerevisiae. It was previously demonstrated that de novo biosynthetic pathway is not capable to efficiently convert its precursor metabolite into vanillin-β-glucoside, which resulted in significant accumulation of several...... intermediates. Here, the gene amplification system was used to systematically overexpress individual genes or gene combinations of the biosynthetic pathway. Using this strategy, metabolic bottlenecks were identified and the production yield of vanillin-β-glucoside was 6-fold improved. Several S. cerevisiae...

  3. Cell Factory Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davy, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2017-01-01

    Rational approaches to modifying cells to make molecules of interest are of substantial economic and scientific interest. Most of these efforts aim at the production of native metabolites, expression of heterologous biosynthetic pathways, or protein expression. Reviews of these topics have largely...... focused on individual strategies or cell types, but collectively they fall under the broad umbrella of a growing field known as cell factory engineering. Here we condense >130 reviews and key studies in the art into a meta-review of cell factory engineering. We identified 33 generic strategies...... in the field, all applicable to multiple types of cells and products, and proven successful in multiple major cell types. These apply to three major categories: production of native metabolites and/or bioactives, heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways, and protein expression. This meta...

  4. Acceleration of cell factories engineering using CRISPR-based technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronda, Carlotta

    potentially be standardized in an automatable platform and, in the future be integrated with metabolic modeling tools. In particularly it describes the technologies developed in the three widely used organisms: E. coli, S. cerevisiae and CHO mammalian cells using the recent breakthrough CRISPR/ Cas9 system....... These include CRMAGE, a MAGE improved recombineering platform using CRISPR negative selection, CrEdit, a system for multi-loci marker-free simultaneous gene and pathway integrations and CRISPy a platform to accelerate genome editing in CHO cells....

  5. Colorful Microbial Cell Factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Pia Damm

    Yeast cell factories are powerful tools used for the production of high-value natural compounds otherwise not easily available. Many bioactive and industrially important plant secondary metabolites can be produced in yeast by engineering their biosynthetic pathways into yeast cells, as these both...... possess the cellular functions to synthesize, express and fold the eukaryotic genes and proteins, as well as many of the precursors needed as substrates for biosynthesis of most classes of plant natural products. Natural colorants represent an important class of food ingredients in industry, as they have...... desirable properties compared to chemically synthetized artificial dyes; one of the most prominent being their health-promoting properties. Several problems in the form of low concentrations in host tissues, seasonal availability, and chemical in stability exist for plant pigments, such as the desirable...

  6. Lighting up yeast cell factories by transcription factor-based biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'ambrosio, Vasil; Jensen, Michael Krogh

    2017-01-01

    process. For this purpose, there is a need to develop new techniques for screening and selection of best-performing cell factory designs in multiplex. Here we review the current status of the sourcing, design and engineering of biosensors derived from allosterically regulated transcription factors applied...... to the biotechnology work-horse budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We conclude by providing a perspective on the most important challenges and opportunities lying ahead in order to harness the full potential of biosensor development for increasing both the throughput of cell factory development and robustness...

  7. Model-based design of bistable cell factories for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Shyam; Cluett, William R; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2018-04-15

    Metabolism can exhibit dynamic phenomena like bistability due to the presence of regulatory motifs like the positive feedback loop. As cell factories, microorganisms with bistable metabolism can have a high and a low product flux at the two stable steady states, respectively. The exclusion of metabolic regulation and network dynamics limits the ability of pseudo-steady state stoichiometric models to detect the presence of bistability, and reliably assess the outcomes of design perturbations to metabolic networks. Using kinetic models of metabolism, we assess the change in the bistable characteristics of the network, and suggest designs based on perturbations to the positive feedback loop to enable the network to produce at its theoretical maximum rate. We show that the most optimal production design in parameter space, for a small bistable metabolic network, may exist at the boundary of the bistable region separating it from the monostable region of low product fluxes. The results of our analysis can be broadly applied to other bistable metabolic networks with similar positive feedback network topologies. This can complement existing model-based design strategies by providing a smaller number of feasible designs that need to be tested in vivo. http://lmse.biozone.utoronto.ca/downloads/. krishna.mahadevan@utoronto.ca. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. Engineering the Polyketide Cell Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Louise

    produced by plants, fungi and bacteria. However, the natural producers often do not achieve commercial titers of the polyketide therapeutic. Thus the natural production must be improved. This can be done by random mutagenesis or heterologous expression of the polyketide gene cluster resulting in production...... cerevisiae. Both organisms have well-known genetic tools available for gene targeting and heterologous expression. It has been the aim to create a stable expression platform with all genes integrated in the genome. This has been achieved through the use of two advanced genetic engineering systems for A...... phosphopantetheinylase (PPTase). This versatile vector system can easily be used for expression of other polyketides of interest as well as extended to express whole gene clusters. After achieving proof of principle in terms of expression, the polyketide cell factory must be optimized. The optimization can be achieved...

  9. Improved premises for cell factory development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karina Marie

    by a differential expression of the lysozyme gene encoded on the same plasmid. These phenomena seem to have been largely overlooked despite the huge popularity of the T7/pet-based systems for bacterial protein production. Additionally, the paradox that standardization comes at the cost of reduced flexibility...... is at the core of biotechnology and numerous molecular tools and bacterial strains have been developed over the past four decades for this purpose. Understanding of the genetic code and our ability to manipulate genetic material, paves the way for the microbial cell factory development that enables production...... of protein in a sustainable, costefficient manner. In this thesis I report the joined efforts of my colleagues and myself, to improve the premises for cell factory development by optimizing the cloning strategies, improving the awareness of unforeseen side-effects in complex bacterial expression systems...

  10. Engineering Robustness of Microbial Cell Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhiwei; Nielsen, Jens; Zhou, Yongjin J

    2017-10-01

    Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology offer great prospects in developing microbial cell factories capable of converting renewable feedstocks into fuels, chemicals, food ingredients, and pharmaceuticals. However, prohibitively low production rate and mass concentration remain the major hurdles in industrial processes even though the biosynthetic pathways are comprehensively optimized. These limitations are caused by a variety of factors unamenable for host cell survival, such as harsh industrial conditions, fermentation inhibitors from biomass hydrolysates, and toxic compounds including metabolic intermediates and valuable target products. Therefore, engineered microbes with robust phenotypes is essential for achieving higher yield and productivity. In this review, the recent advances in engineering robustness and tolerance of cell factories is described to cope with these issues and briefly introduce novel strategies with great potential to enhance the robustness of cell factories, including metabolic pathway balancing, transporter engineering, and adaptive laboratory evolution. This review also highlights the integration of advanced systems and synthetic biology principles toward engineering the harmony of overall cell function, more than the specific pathways or enzymes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Algal Cell Factories: Approaches, Applications, and Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqi Fu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of modern biotechnology, microorganisms from diverse lineages have been used to produce bio-based feedstocks and bioactive compounds. Many of these compounds are currently commodities of interest, in a variety of markets and their utility warrants investigation into improving their production through strain development. In this review, we address the issue of strain improvement in a group of organisms with strong potential to be productive “cell factories”: the photosynthetic microalgae. Microalgae are a diverse group of phytoplankton, involving polyphyletic lineage such as green algae and diatoms that are commonly used in the industry. The photosynthetic microalgae have been under intense investigation recently for their ability to produce commercial compounds using only light, CO2, and basic nutrients. However, their strain improvement is still a relatively recent area of work that is under development. Importantly, it is only through appropriate engineering methods that we may see the full biotechnological potential of microalgae come to fruition. Thus, in this review, we address past and present endeavors towards the aim of creating productive algal cell factories and describe possible advantageous future directions for the field.

  12. Novel and improved yeast cell factories for biosustainable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Workman, Mhairi

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of an increasingly diverse range of cheap waste substrates will be an ongoing challenge for the bio-based economy, where the mobilization of nutrients from a variety of waste products will be necessary for realization of biosustainability on an industrial scale. Bioprocesses...... utilizing traditionally applied cell factories are generally based on a limited range of substrates (mainly glucose). However, a wider diversity in substrate range is highly desirable in developing biorefinery scenarios where feed-stocks containing a number of carbon sources are typically employed...

  13. The metabolic productivity of the cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascante, M; Lloréns, M; Meléndez-Hevia, E; Puigjaner, J; Montero, F; Martí, E

    1996-10-07

    It is widely accepted that some performance function has been optimized during the evolution of metabolic pathways. One can study the nature of such a function by analogy with the industrial manufacturing world, in which there have been efforts over recent decades to optimize production chains, and in which it is now accepted that fluxes are not the only important system variables that determine process efficiency, because inventory turnover must also be considered. Inspired by the parallels between living cells and manufacturing factories, we propose that fluxes and transit time may have simultaneously been major targets of natural selection in the optimization of the design, structure and kinetic parameters of metabolic pathways. Accordingly we define the ratio of flux to transit time as a performance index of productivity in metabolic systems: it measures the efficiency with which stocks are administered, and facilitates comparison of a pathway in different steady states or in different tissues or organisms. For a linear chain of two enzymes, at a fixed total equilibrium constant, we have analysed the variation of flux, transit time and productivity index as functions of the equilibrium constants of the two steps. The results show that only the productivity index has a maximum, which represents a good compromise in optimizing flux and transit time. We have extended control analysis to the productivity index and derived the summation theorem that applies to it. For linear chains of different length with maximum productivity index values, the distribution of control coefficients with regard to the three parameters has a characteristic profile independent of the length of the chain. Finally, this control profile changes when other variables are optimized, and we compare the theoretical results with the control profile of the first steps of glycolysis in rat liver.

  14. Targeting population heterogeneity for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Carlqvist, Magnus; Helmark, S.

    the heterogeneity level of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding of population heterogeneity, Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were constructed which enabled us to perform single cell level......, substrates, and pH are typically observed in many industrial scale fermentation processes. Consequently, the microbial cells experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells and affect their metabolism and consequently affect...

  15. Reassessing Escherichia coli as a cell factory for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chonglong; Pfleger, Brian F; Kim, Seon-Won

    2017-06-01

    Via metabolic engineering, industrial microorganisms have the potential to convert renewable substrates into a wide range of biofuels that can address energy security and environmental challenges associated with current fossil fuels. The user-friendly bacterium, Escherichia coli, remains one of the most frequently used hosts for demonstrating production of biofuel candidates including alcohol-, fatty acid- and terpenoid-based biofuels. In this review, we summarize the metabolic pathways for synthesis of these biofuels and assess enabling technologies that assist in regulating biofuel synthesis pathways and rapidly assembling novel E. coli strains. These advances maintain E. coli's position as a prominent host for developing cell factories for biofuel production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Cell as a Candy Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Jane; Sheldon, Pam

    2005-01-01

    How can teachers explain the functioning of something students cannot see with their own eyes? Often, the study of cells is the first exposure that students have to the microscopic world. Even then, they can only make out a few of the details: cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, sometimes a few chloroplasts. How can teachers help students gain an…

  17. An asymmetric B factory based on PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    In this report we describe a design for a high-luminosity Asymmetric B Factory to be built in the PEP tunnel on the SLAC site. This proposal, a collaborative effort SLAC, LBL, and LLNL, is the culmination of more than two years of effort aimed at the design and construction of an asymmetric e + e - collider capable of achieving a luminosity of L = 3 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 . The configuration adopted utilizes two storage rings, and electron ring operating at 9 GeV and a positron ring at 3.1 GeV, each with a circumference of 2200 m. The high-energy ring is an upgrade of the PEP storage ring at SLAC; all PEP magnets and most power supplies will be reused. The upgrade consists primarily of replacing the PEP vacuum chamber and RF system with newly designed versions optimized for the high-current environment of the B Factory. The low-energy ring will be newly constructed and will be situated atop the high-energy ring in the PEP tunnel. Utilities already installed in the PEP tunnel are largely sufficient to operate the two B Factory storage rings

  18. Characterizing Yarrowia lipolytica as a cell factory for sustainable bioprocesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubuta, Patrice; Workman, Mhairi

    With current global focus on renewable and sustainable technologies, there is a strong need to develop innovative solutions in industrial biotechnology. The non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has considerable potential as a versatile cell factory, especially when compared to the typically...

  19. Synthetic biology of cyanobacterial cell factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angermayr, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    In the field of microbial biotechnology rational design approaches are employed for the generation of microbial cells with desired functions, such as the ability to produce precursor molecules for biofuels or bioplastics. In essence, that is the introduction of a (new) biosynthetic pathway into a

  20. Cell factories for a sustainable world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindtler, Jens William

    2016-01-01

    chemicals, fine and specialty chemicals, nutritional supplements. CFB has ongoing research/development activities in the field of: 1. Providing upgraded CHO cells for production of therapeutic proteins and mAb’s, 2. Actinomycetes research program within discovery of natural compounds that are broad...

  1. An asymmetric B Factory based on PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, A.; Zisman, M.S.

    1990-06-01

    The study of rare and CP-violating B meson decays is well suited to a high-luminosity e + e - collider. For studying certain decay processes there are also substantial benefits associated with asymmetric beam energies, which give a moving center of mass for the B mesons. We describe a design for a 9 GeV x 3.1 GeV B Factory in the PEP tunnel that would operate initially at a luminosity of 3 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 . Technical problems include issues related to high currents (e.g., beam instabilities, feedback systems, lifetime degradation and detector radiation power dissipation) and those related to the hetero-energetic beams (e.g., beam separation, beam-beam interaction and detector requirements). Issues requiring R ampersand D effort are identified. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Algal omics: unlocking bioproduct diversity in algae cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Michael T; Pienkos, Philip T

    2015-03-01

    Rapid advances in "omic" technologies are helping to unlock the full potential of microalgae as multi-use feedstocks, with utility in an array of industrial biotechnology, biofuel, and biomedical applications. In turn, algae are emerging as highly attractive candidates for development as microbial cell factories. In this review, we examine the wide array of potential algal bioproducts, with a focus upon the role of omic technologies in driving bioproduct discovery and optimization in microalgal systems.

  3. Cell Factory Stability and Genetic Circuits for Improved Strain Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Peter

    . However, all synthetic gene systems -­ including the target metabolic pathways themselves -­ represent a possible fitness burden to the cell and thus constitute a threat to strain stability. In this thesis, several studies served to develop genetic systems for optimizing cell factory development...... systems can challenge the stability of strain designs. A metabolite-­producing Escherichia coli strain was long-­term cultured to study production stability and the dynamic effects of mutations within the cell population. A genetic error landscape of pathway disruptions was identified including particular......, recurring error modes. Driven by a gain in fitness, these errors within 70 generations led to a transformation of the strain to a population of genetic non-­‐producer cells. Knowledge about these mechanisms and the applied simple mathematical model may likely serve to realizemore stable microbial cell...

  4. Tailoring cyanobacterial cell factory for improved industrial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Guodong; Lu, Xuefeng

    2018-01-10

    Photosynthetic biomanufacturing provides a promising solution for sustainable production of biofuels and biochemicals. Cyanobacteria are among the most promising microbial platforms for the construction of photosynthetic cell factories. Metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria has enabled effective photosynthetic synthesis of diverse natural or non-natural metabolites, while commercialization of photosynthetic biomanufacturing is usually restricted by process and economic feasibilities. In actual outdoor conditions, active cell growth and product synthesis is restricted to narrow light exposure windows of the day-night cycles and is threatened by diverse physical, chemical, and biological environmental stresses. For biomass harvesting and bioproduct recovery, energy and cost consuming processing and equipment is required, which further decreases the economic and environmental competitiveness of the entire process. To facilitate scaled photosynthetic biomanufacturing, lots of efforts have been made to engineer cyanobacterial cell properties required by robust & continual cultivation and convenient & efficient recovery. In this review, we specifically summarized recently reported engineering strategies on optimizing industrial properties of cyanobacterial cells. Through systematically re-editing the metabolism, morphology, mutualism interaction of cyanobacterial chassis cells, the adaptabilities and compatibilities of the cyanobacterial cell factories to the industrial process could be significantly improved. Cell growth and product synthesis of the tailored cyanobacterial cells could be expanded and maintained at night and in stressful environments, while convenient biomass harvesting could also be expected. For developing more feasible cyanobacterial photosynthetic biomanufacturing in large scale, we here propose the importance of tailoring industrial properties of cyanobacteria and outline the directions that should be exploited in the future. Copyright © 2018

  5. Choosing the right platform for the right product: Sustainable production of chemicals in microbial cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrgard, Markus

    The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability (CFB) is a new non-profit research center focused on sustainable production of biochemicals and therapeutic proteins using microbial and mammalian cell factories. The work at CFB is organized around an iterative loop where cell factories...... are taken through four stages: 1) In silico design and data analysis, 2) genome engineering, 3) characterization and high throughput screening, and 4) omics based systems analysis. However, before entering this loop, significant two significant decisions need to be made. First, the choice of what products...... should be made should be made considering biological, technical, economic, and ecological factors. Second, the choice which platform strains will be used to develop production hosts should be made based on characterization of both metabolic and process tolerance traits of strains. I will discuss the role...

  6. Systems biology of yeast: enabling technology for development of cell factories for production of advanced biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Bouke; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Transportation fuels will gradually shift from oil based fuels towards alternative fuel resources like biofuels. Current bioethanol and biodiesel can, however, not cover the increasing demand for biofuels and there is therefore a need for advanced biofuels with superior fuel properties. Novel cell factories will provide a production platform for advanced biofuels. However, deep cellular understanding is required for improvement of current biofuel cell factories. Fast screening and analysis (-omics) methods and metabolome-wide mathematical models are promising techniques. An integrated systems approach of these techniques drives diversity and quantity of several new biofuel compounds. This review will cover the recent technological developments that support improvement of the advanced biofuels 1-butanol, biodiesels and jetfuels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthetic biology approaches for protein production optimization in bacterial cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennig, Maja; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    such sustainable alternative if converted into so-called microbial cell factories. Instead of crude oil, cell factories use renewable resources or waste products as source material. The challenge is, however, that microbial production needs to be economically feasible to compete with the classical chemical...... devices and their fusion to antibiotic selection markers enables subsequent selection of high-expressing constructs. The approach is a simple and inexpensive alternative to advanced screening techniques. In addition, a second synthetic biology approach provides the means for fast and efficient plasmid......Society’s strong dependence on fossil fuels and petroleum-based products leads not only to a rapid decline of natural oil reserves but contributes massively to global warming and environmental damage. This consequently urges society to look into more sustainable alternatives. Microorganisms present...

  8. Production of fatty acid-derived oleochemicals and biofuels by synthetic yeast cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Yongjin J.; Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production of oleochemicals requires establishment of cell factory platform strains. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive cell factory as new strains can be rapidly implemented into existing infrastructures such as bioethanol production plants. Here we show high-level p...

  9. SWITCH: a dynamic CRISPR tool for genome engineering and metabolic pathway control for cell factory construction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Vanegas, Katherina; Lehka, Beata Joanna; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2017-01-01

    to the pathway control state where production was optimized by downregulating an essential gene TSC13, hence, reducing formation of a byproduct. Conclusions We have successfully integrated two CRISPR tools, one for genetic engineering and one for pathway control, into one system and successfully used it for cell......Background The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is increasingly used as a cell factory. However, cell factory construction time is a major obstacle towards using yeast for bio-production. Hence, tools to speed up cell factory construction are desirable. Results In this study, we have developed a new...... Cas9/dCas9 based system, SWITCH, which allows Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains to iteratively alternate between a genetic engineering state and a pathway control state. Since Cas9 induced recombination events are crucial for SWITCH efficiency, we first developed a technique TAPE, which we have...

  10. Physiological characterization of secondary metabolite producing Penicillium cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grijseels, Sietske; Nielsen, Jens; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Penicillium species are important producers of bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the immense diversity of the fungal kingdom is only scarcely represented in industrial bioprocesses and the upscaling of compound production remains a costly and labor intensive challenge. In order to facilit......Penicillium species are important producers of bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the immense diversity of the fungal kingdom is only scarcely represented in industrial bioprocesses and the upscaling of compound production remains a costly and labor intensive challenge. In order...... to facilitate the development of novel secondary metabolite producing processes, two routes are typically explored: optimization of the native producer or transferring the enzymatic pathway into a heterologous host. Recent genome sequencing of ten Penicillium species showed the vast amount of secondary...... metabolite gene clusters present in their genomes, and makes them accessible for rational strain improvement. In this study, we aimed to characterize the potential of these ten Penicillium species as native producing cell factories by testing their growth performance and secondary metabolite production...

  11. METABOLIC MODELLING IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF CELL FACTORIES BY SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Jouhten

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell factories are commonly microbial organisms utilized for bioconversion of renewable resources to bulk or high value chemicals. Introduction of novel production pathways in chassis strains is the core of the development of cell factories by synthetic biology. Synthetic biology aims to create novel biological functions and systems not found in nature by combining biology with engineering. The workflow of the development of novel cell factories with synthetic biology is ideally linear which will be attainable with the quantitative engineering approach, high-quality predictive models, and libraries of well-characterized parts. Different types of metabolic models, mathematical representations of metabolism and its components, enzymes and metabolites, are useful in particular phases of the synthetic biology workflow. In this minireview, the role of metabolic modelling in synthetic biology will be discussed with a review of current status of compatible methods and models for the in silico design and quantitative evaluation of a cell factory.

  12. Architectural design of experience based factory model for software ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    architectural design. Automation features are incorporated in the design in which workflow system and intelligent agents are integrated, and the facilitation of cloud environment is empowered to further support the automation. Keywords: architectural design; knowledge management; experience factory; workflow;

  13. Novel Methods for Development of Cell Factories and Laboratory Simultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads

    of thousands of genomic sites simultaneously. We demonstrated the feasibility of the method by inserting T7 promoters upstream of 2587 operons in E. coli, and validating the resulting cell library by deep sequencing. The method makes large-scale mutagenesis projects possible at a cost between 10x to more than...... fluorescence-activated cell sorting and deep DNA sequencing. Based on this data, we developed an algorithm (EMOPEC), which enables efficient modulation of the expression level of any chromosomally encoded gene in E. coli, by changing only a few bases in the SD sequence. We tested the algorithm by modulating 6...... ALE-acquired alleles in random combinations into the ancestral strain, and competition between these engineered strains was used to identify causative mutations by selection at 42 °C and subsequent deep sequencing of several selected clones. Interestingly, most of the identified key genes differed...

  14. I-RobCELL: the factory of the future for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozais, D.; Larousse, B.

    2016-01-01

    The I-RobCELL project (Innovative Robotic Center with online Examination) is a concept of a totally automated cell for the production and control of small parts for the high-precision mechanical market. The I-RobCELL will play on 4 fields: 1) a totally digital driving of the fabrication process involving various fabrication processes for the same part, 2) the integration of non-destructive testing technologies based on ultrasound, 3) automated diagnostic of defects through the comparison between real-time measured values given by probes and references values stored in a database, and 4) on-line monitoring of the welding. The technology of ultrasonic testing without couplant substance between the transducer and the part to be tested, is being developed to be integrated to the I-RobCELL, other non-destructive testing like guided waves or X-ray tomography will be implemented in the future versions of the I-RobCELL. The I-RobCELL will occupy a 2-3 m 3 volume allowing a very accurate monitoring of the temperature and a high level of cleanliness. The I-RobCELL concept will prefigure the factory of the future. (A.C.)

  15. Lactobacilli and pediococci as versatile cell factories - Evaluation of strain properties and genetic tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosma, Elleke Fenna; Förster, Jochen; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2017-01-01

    This review discusses opportunities and bottlenecks for cell factory development of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB), with an emphasis on lactobacilli and pediococci, their metabolism and genetic tools. In order to enable economically feasible bio-based production of chemicals and fuels in a biorefinery......, the choice of product, substrate and production organism is important. Currently, the most frequently used production hosts include Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but promising examples are available of alternative hosts such as LAB. Particularly lactobacilli and pediococci can offer benefits...... substantiate the review by including experimental results from screening various lactobacilli and pediococci for transformability, growth temperature range and ability to grow under biotechnologically relevant stress conditions. Since availability of efficient genetic engineering tools is a crucial...

  16. Performance Prediction of a MongoDB-Based Traceability System in Smart Factory Supply Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Yong-Shin; Park, Il-Ha; Youm, Sekyoung

    2016-01-01

    In the future, with the advent of the smart factory era, manufacturing and logistics processes will become more complex, and the complexity and criticality of traceability will further increase. This research aims at developing a performance assessment method to verify scalability when implementing traceability systems based on key technologies for smart factories, such as Internet of Things (IoT) and BigData. To this end, based on existing research, we analyzed traceability requirements and ...

  17. On the Use of Metabolic Control Analysis in the Optimization of Cyanobacterial Biosolar Cell Factories.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angermayr, S.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis will have a key role in a sustainable future. It is therefore significant that this process can be engineered in organisms such as cyanobacteria to construct cell factories that catalyze the (sun)light-driven conversion of CO2 and water into products like ethanol, butanol, or

  18. Industrial systems biology and its impact on synthetic biology of yeast cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fletcher, Eugene; Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    , microbial cell factories such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be engineered to express synthetic pathways for the production of fuels, biopharmaceuticals, fragrances, and food flavors. However, directing fluxes through these synthetic pathways towards the desired product can be demanding due to complex...

  19. Design, Modeling, and Development of Microbial Cell Factories

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2014-03-26

    Using Metagenomic analysis, computational modeling, single cell and genome editing technologies, we will express desired microbial genes and their networks in suitable hosts for mass production of energy, food, and fine chemicals.

  20. Factory physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hopp, Wallace J.

    2011-01-01

    After a brief introductory chapter, "Factory Physics 3/e" is divided into three parts: I - The Lessons of History; II - Factory Physics; and III - Principles in Practice. The scientific approach to manufacturing and supply chain management, developed in Part II, is unique to this text. No other text or professional book provides a rigorous, principles-based foundation for manufacturing management. The Third Edition offers tighter connections between Lean Manufacturing, MRP/ERP, Six Sigma, Supply Chain Management, and Factory Physics. In addition to enhancing the historical overview of how these systems evolved, the authors show explicitly how users can achieve Lean Manufacturing objectives (faster response, less inventory) using the integration aspects of MRP/ERP/SCM systems along with the variance analysis methods of Six Sigma. Factory Physics provides the overarching framework that coordinates all of these initiatives into a single-focused strategy.

  1. Development of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as a Phototrophic Cell Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuzhong Zhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae play profound roles in ecology and biogeochemistry. One model cyanobacterial species is the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. This species is highly amenable to genetic modification. Its genome has been sequenced and many systems biology and molecular biology tools are available to study this bacterium. Recently, researchers have put significant efforts into understanding and engineering this bacterium to produce chemicals and biofuels from sunlight and CO2. To demonstrate our perspective on the application of this cyanobacterium as a photosynthesis-based chassis, we summarize the recent research on Synechocystis 6803 by focusing on five topics: rate-limiting factors for cell cultivation; molecular tools for genetic modifications; high-throughput system biology for genome wide analysis; metabolic modeling for physiological prediction and rational metabolic engineering; and applications in producing diverse chemicals. We also discuss the particular challenges for systems analysis and engineering applications of this microorganism, including precise characterization of versatile cell metabolism, improvement of product rates and titers, bioprocess scale-up, and product recovery. Although much progress has been achieved in the development of Synechocystis 6803 as a phototrophic cell factory, the biotechnology for “Compounds from Synechocystis” is still significantly lagging behind those for heterotrophic microbes (e.g., Escherichia coli.

  2. A method to identify energy efficiency measures for factory systems based on qualitative modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Krones, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Manuela Krones develops a method that supports factory planners in generating energy-efficient planning solutions. The method provides qualitative description concepts for factory planning tasks and energy efficiency knowledge as well as an algorithm-based linkage between these measures and the respective planning tasks. Its application is guided by a procedure model which allows a general applicability in the manufacturing sector. The results contain energy efficiency measures that are suitable for a specific planning task and reveal the roles of various actors for the measures’ implementation. Contents Driving Concerns for and Barriers against Energy Efficiency Approaches to Increase Energy Efficiency in Factories Socio-Technical Description of Factory Planning Tasks Description of Energy Efficiency Measures Case Studies on Welding Processes and Logistics Systems Target Groups Lecturers and Students of Industrial Engineering, Production Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering Practi...

  3. Cameo: A Python Library for Computer Aided Metabolic Engineering and Optimization of Cell Factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, Joao G.R.; Jensen, Kristian; Lieven, Christian

    2018-01-01

    on proprietary software, or do not provide documented interfaces, which has precluded their mainstream adoption in the field. In this work we present cameo, a platform-independent software that enables in silico design of cell factories and targets both experienced modelers as well as users new to the field......Computational systems biology methods enable rational design of cell factories on a genome-scale and thus accelerate the engineering of cells for the production of valuable chemicals and proteins. Unfortunately, for the majority of these methods' implementations are either not published, rely....... It is written in Python and implements state-of-the-art methods for enumerating and prioritizing knock-out, knock-in, over-expression, and down-regulation strategies and combinations thereof. Cameo is an open source software project and is freely available under the Apache License 2.0. A dedicated website...

  4. Evaluation of cell factory performance through determination of intracellular metabolites using LC-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magdenoska, Olivera; Martinussen, Jan; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2012-01-01

    combination of sensitivity and specificity of this technique allowed qualitative and quantitative analysis of low metabolite concentrations. The mains steps involved were: (i) metabolite sample preparation by quenching, extraction, sample purification using dispersive Solid Phase Extraction; (ii) quantitative......A major objective in biotechnology is the improvement of the efficiency of host microorganisms used as cell factories. Engineering a strain capable of producing high amounts of a desired biochemical is a multi-step process consisting of design, construction, and analysis of the constructed cell...... factory. In order to address the function or disfunction of the engineered cells,systems biology tools are employed by using the multi “omics” approach (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and fluxomics). Metabolomics is a tool aimed at a quantitative understanding of metabolism...

  5. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering of CHO cell factories: application and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jae Seong; Grav, Lise Marie; Lewis, Nathan E.

    2015-01-01

    repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system enables rapid,easy and efficient engineering of mammalian genomes. It has a wide range of applications frommodification of individual genes to genome-wide screening or regulation of genes. Facile genomeediting using CRISPR/Cas9 empowers...... researchers in the CHO community to elucidate the mechanisticbasis behind high level production of proteins and product quality attributes of interest. Inthis review, we describe the basis of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing and its applicationfor development of next generation CHO cell factories while...... highlighting both future perspectivesand challenges. As one of the main drivers for the CHO systems biology era, genome engineeringwith CRISPR/Cas9 will pave the way for rational design of CHO cell factories....

  6. Production of Useful Terpenoids by Higher-Fungus Cell Factory and Synthetic Biology Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Han; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Higher fungi with greater than 70000 species are regarded as a rich source of various natural compounds including terpenoids, the production of which represents a wide range of interest in pharmaceutical and healthcare industries. This review summarizes the current knowledge of terpenoids synthesized by higher fungi, and highlights the current state-of-the-art regarding genetic manipulation of higher fungi. As the focus, this article will discuss the most recent approaches enabling native hosts and heterologous microbes to efficiently produce various terpenoids, especially with regard to the construction of 'smart' higher-fungus cell factories. The merits and demerits of heterologous versus native hosts as cell factories will also be debated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Interactions between cadmium and decabrominated diphenyl ether on blood cells count in rats—Multiple factorial regression analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curcic, Marijana; Buha, Aleksandra; Stankovic, Sanja; Milovanovic, Vesna; Bulat, Zorica; Đukić-Ćosić, Danijela; Antonijević, Evica; Vučinić, Slavica; Matović, Vesna; Antonijevic, Biljana

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess toxicity of Cd and BDE-209 mixture on haematological parameters in subacutely exposed rats and to determine the presence and type of interactions between these two chemicals using multiple factorial regression analysis. Furthermore, for the assessment of interaction type, an isobologram based methodology was applied and compared with multiple factorial regression analysis. Chemicals were given by oral gavage to the male Wistar rats weighing 200–240 g for 28 days. Animals were divided in 16 groups (8/group): control vehiculum group, three groups of rats were treated with 2.5, 7.5 or 15 mg Cd/kg/day. These doses were chosen on the bases of literature data and reflect relatively high Cd environmental exposure, three groups of rats were treated with 1000, 2000 or 4000 mg BDE-209/kg/bw/day, doses proved to induce toxic effects in rats. Furthermore, nine groups of animals were treated with different mixtures of Cd and BDE-209 containing doses of Cd and BDE-209 stated above. Blood samples were taken at the end of experiment and red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets counts were determined. For interaction assessment multiple factorial regression analysis and fitted isobologram approach were used. In this study, we focused on multiple factorial regression analysis as a method for interaction assessment. We also investigated the interactions between Cd and BDE-209 by the derived model for the description of the obtained fitted isobologram curves. Current study indicated that co-exposure to Cd and BDE-209 can result in significant decrease in RBC count, increase in WBC count and decrease in PLT count, when compared with controls. Multiple factorial regression analysis used for the assessment of interactions type between Cd and BDE-209 indicated synergism for the effect on RBC count and no interactions i.e. additivity for the effects on WBC and PLT counts. On the other hand, isobologram based approach showed slight

  8. Development of a screening approach for exploring cell factory potential through metabolic flux analysis and physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Thykær, Jette

    2012-01-01

    of the recombinant strains in order to evaluate their potential as fungal cell factories and for guiding further metabolic engineering strategies. To meet the demand for a fast and reliable method for physiological characterisation of fungal strains, a screening approach using a micro titer format was developed...... of the validation, already well described fungal strains were selected and tested using the described method and the developed method was subsequently used to test recombinant fungal strains producing the model polyketide 6-methylsalicylic acid. Diligent application of this strategy significantly reduces the cost...

  9. New transposon tools tailored for metabolic engineering of Gram-negative microbial cell factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban eMartínez-García

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Re-programming microorganisms to modify their existing functions and/or to bestow bacteria with entirely new-to-Nature tasks have largely relied so far on specialized molecular biology tools. Such endeavors are not only relevant in the burgeoning metabolic engineering arena, but also instrumental to explore the functioning of complex regulatory networks from a fundamental point of view. À la carte modification of bacterial genomes thus calls for novel tools to make genetic manipulations easier. We propose the use of a series of new broad-host-range mini-Tn5 vectors, termed pBAMDs, for the delivery of gene(s into the chromosome of Gram-negative bacteria and for generating saturated mutagenesis libraries in gene function studies. These delivery vectors endow the user with the possibility of easy cloning and subsequent insertion of functional cargoes with three different antibiotic resistance markers (kanamycin, streptomycin, and gentamicin. After validating the pBAMD vectors in the environmental bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440, their use was also illustrated by inserting the entire poly(3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB synthesis pathway from Cupriavidus necator in the chromosome of a phosphotransacetylase mutant of Escherichia coli. PHB is a completely biodegradable polyester with a number of industrial applications that make it attractive as a potential replacement of oil-based plastics. The non-selective nature of chromosomal insertions of the biosynthetic genes was evidenced by a large landscape of PHB synthesis levels in independent clones. One clone was selected and further characterized as a microbial cell factory for PHB accumulation, and it achieved polymer accumulation levels comparable to those of a plasmid-bearing recombinant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the new mini-Tn5 vectors can be used to confer interesting phenotypes in Gram-negative bacteria that would be very difficult to engineer through direct manipulation of the

  10. New Transposon Tools Tailored for Metabolic Engineering of Gram-Negative Microbial Cell Factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-García, Esteban; Aparicio, Tomás; Lorenzo, Víctor de; Nikel, Pablo I.

    2014-01-01

    Re-programming microorganisms to modify their existing functions and/or to bestow bacteria with entirely new-to-Nature tasks have largely relied so far on specialized molecular biology tools. Such endeavors are not only relevant in the burgeoning metabolic engineering arena but also instrumental to explore the functioning of complex regulatory networks from a fundamental point of view. À la carte modification of bacterial genomes thus calls for novel tools to make genetic manipulations easier. We propose the use of a series of new broad-host-range mini-Tn5-vectors, termed pBAMDs, for the delivery of gene(s) into the chromosome of Gram-negative bacteria and for generating saturated mutagenesis libraries in gene function studies. These delivery vectors endow the user with the possibility of easy cloning and subsequent insertion of functional cargoes with three different antibiotic-resistance markers (kanamycin, streptomycin, and gentamicin). After validating the pBAMD vectors in the environmental bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440, their use was also illustrated by inserting the entire poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) synthesis pathway from Cupriavidus necator in the chromosome of a phosphotransacetylase mutant of Escherichia coli. PHB is a completely biodegradable polyester with a number of industrial applications that make it attractive as a potential replacement of oil-based plastics. The non-selective nature of chromosomal insertions of the biosynthetic genes was evidenced by a large landscape of PHB synthesis levels in independent clones. One clone was selected and further characterized as a microbial cell factory for PHB accumulation, and it achieved polymer accumulation levels comparable to those of a plasmid-bearing recombinant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the new mini-Tn5-vectors can be used to confer interesting phenotypes in Gram-negative bacteria that would be very difficult to engineer through direct manipulation of the structural genes.

  11. JackEx: The New Digital Manufacturing Resource for Optimization of Exoskeleton-based Factory Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Carmen; Muresan, Paul-Cristian; Simon, Gabriel-Marian

    2016-01-01

    The employment of Exoskeletons for manual handling work in manufacturing industries aims at increased employment, productivity, safety and security at workplace. This paper highlights several challenges, current results and future steps of our work in optimization of Exoskeleton based factory environments. “JackEx” is the enhancement of the standard digital humanoid “Jack” with concepts and elements of passive Exoskeletons. For the development of JackEx, a new digital manufacturing resource, ...

  12. Vacuum system of the high energy ring of an asymmetric B-factory based on PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.; Calderon, M.O.; Wong, R.; Jenkins, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    The multi-ampere currents required for high luminosity operation of an asymmetric B factory leads to extremely stressing requirements on a vacuum system suitable for maintaining long beam-gas lifetimes and acceptable background levels in the detector. We present the design for a Cu alloy vacuum chamber and its associated pumping system for the 9 GeV electron storage ring of the proposed B factory based on PEP. The excellent thermal and photo-desorption properties of Cu allows handling the high proton flux in a conventional, single chamber design with distributed ion pumps. The x-ray opacity of the Cu is sufficiently high that no additional lead shielding is necessary to protect the dipoles from the intense synchrotron radiation generated by the beam. The design allows chamber commissioning in <500 hr of operation. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams (ν factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both ± μ. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider

  14. A new-generation of Bacillus subtilis cell factory for further elevated scyllo-inositol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kosei; Natsume, Ayane; Ishikawa, Shu; Takenaka, Shinji; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2017-04-21

    A stereoisomer of inositol, scyllo-inositol (SI), has been regarded as a promising therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease. However, this compound is relatively rare, whereas another stereoisomer of inositol, myo-inositol (MI) is abundant in nature. Bacillus subtilis 168 has the ability to metabolize inositol stereoisomers, including MI and SI. Previously, we reported a B. subtilis cell factory with modified inositol metabolism that converts MI into SI in the culture medium. The strain was constructed by deleting all genes related to inositol metabolism and overexpressing key enzymes, IolG and IolW. By using this strain, 10 g/l of MI initially included in the medium was completely converted into SI within 48 h of cultivation in a rich medium containing 2% (w/v) Bacto soytone. When the initial concentration of MI was increased to 50 g/l, conversion was limited to 15.1 g/l of SI. Therefore, overexpression systems of IolT and PntAB, the main transporter of MI in B. subtilis and the membrane-integral nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase in Escherichia coli respectively, were additionally introduced into the B. subtilis cell factory, but the conversion efficiency hardly improved. We systematically determined the amount of Bacto soytone necessary for ultimate conversion, which was 4% (w/v). As a result, the conversion of SI reached to 27.6 g/l within 48 h of cultivation. The B. subtilis cell factory was improved to yield a SI production rate of 27.6 g/l/48 h by simultaneous overexpression of IolT and PntAB, and by addition of 4% (w/v) Bacto soytone in the conversion medium. The concentration of SI was increased even in the stationary phase perhaps due to nutrients in the Bacto soytone that contribute to the conversion process. Thus, MI conversion to SI may be further optimized via identification and control of these unknown nutrients.

  15. Biomonitoring Study of Heavy Metals in Blood from a Cement Factory Based Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bank M.S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effects of cement factory pollution, emissions, and kiln dust on contaminant exposure in human populations, including school environments, in close proximity to these point sources. In Ravena, New York, USA and vicinity, environmental pollution from a local cement plant is considered significant and substantial according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Toxic Release Inventory, published in 2006, 2007, and 2010. We hypothesized that cement factory based communities, such as the one in Ravena, NY, may be differentially exposed to heavy metals, including mercury, via dust, soil, and air in addition to any contributions from fish consumption, dental amalgams, smoking habits, and occupational exposures, etc. Here we report measurements of several heavy metals in blood (Pb, Cd, As, Hg, Se and Al and, for comparative purposes, total mercury in hair from a local (six-mile radius population of Caucasian adults and children. We also report and synthesize local atmospheric emissions inventory information and new indoor air data (NYSERDA, 2011 from the local school which is situated directly across the street (within 750 feet from the cement factory and quarry. In addition, to our human and environmental heavy metal results we also discuss scientific outreach coordination, and public health action opportunities that will likely have wide applicability for other community and environmental health studies confronting similar pollution issues.

  16. Microbial Cell Factories for the Production of Terpenoid Flavor and Fragrance Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempp, Florence M; Drummond, Laura; Buchhaupt, Markus; Schrader, Jens

    2018-03-14

    Terpenoid flavor and fragrance compounds are of high interest to the aroma industry. Microbial production offers an alternative sustainable access to the desired terpenoids independent of natural sources. Genetically engineered microorganisms can be used to synthesize terpenoids from cheap and renewable resources. Due to its modular architecture, terpenoid biosynthesis is especially well suited for the microbial cell factory concept: a platform host engineered for a high flux toward the central C 5 prenyl diphosphate precursors enables the production of a broad range of target terpenoids just by varying the pathway modules converting the C 5 intermediates to the product of interest. In this review typical terpenoid flavor and fragrance compounds marketed or under development by biotech and aroma companies are given, and the specificities of the aroma market are discussed. The main part of this work focuses on key strategies and recent advances to engineer microbes to become efficient terpenoid producers.

  17. The Role of Synthetic Biology in the Design of Microbial Cell Factories for Biofuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Verónica Leticia; Rodríguez, Analía; Cristóbal, Héctor Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Insecurity in the supply of fossil fuels, volatile fuel prices, and major concerns regarding climate change have sparked renewed interest in the production of fuels from renewable resources. Because of this, the use of biodiesel has grown dramatically during the last few years and is expected to increase even further in the future. Biodiesel production through the use of microbial systems has marked a turning point in the field of biofuels since it is emerging as an attractive alternative to conventional technology. Recent progress in synthetic biology has accelerated the ability to analyze, construct, and/or redesign microbial metabolic pathways with unprecedented precision, in order to permit biofuel production that is amenable to industrial applications. The review presented here focuses specifically on the role of synthetic biology in the design of microbial cell factories for efficient production of biodiesel. PMID:22028591

  18. The Role of Synthetic Biology in the Design of Microbial Cell Factories for Biofuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Leticia Colin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Insecurity in the supply of fossil fuels, volatile fuel prices, and major concerns regarding climate change have sparked renewed interest in the production of fuels from renewable resources. Because of this, the use of biodiesel has grown dramatically during the last few years and is expected to increase even further in the future. Biodiesel production through the use of microbial systems has marked a turning point in the field of biofuels since it is emerging as an attractive alternative to conventional technology. Recent progress in synthetic biology has accelerated the ability to analyze, construct, and/or redesign microbial metabolic pathways with unprecedented precision, in order to permit biofuel production that is amenable to industrial applications. The review presented here focuses specifically on the role of synthetic biology in the design of microbial cell factories for efficient production of biodiesel.

  19. A systems-level approach for metabolic engineering of yeast cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il-Kwon; Roldão, António; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-03-01

    The generation of novel yeast cell factories for production of high-value industrial biotechnological products relies on three metabolic engineering principles: design, construction, and analysis. In the last two decades, strong efforts have been put on developing faster and more efficient strategies and/or technologies for each one of these principles. For design and construction, three major strategies are described in this review: (1) rational metabolic engineering; (2) inverse metabolic engineering; and (3) evolutionary strategies. Independent of the selected strategy, the process of designing yeast strains involves five decision points: (1) choice of product, (2) choice of chassis, (3) identification of target genes, (4) regulating the expression level of target genes, and (5) network balancing of the target genes. At the construction level, several molecular biology tools have been developed through the concept of synthetic biology and applied for the generation of novel, engineered yeast strains. For comprehensive and quantitative analysis of constructed strains, systems biology tools are commonly used and using a multi-omics approach. Key information about the biological system can be revealed, for example, identification of genetic regulatory mechanisms and competitive pathways, thereby assisting the in silico design of metabolic engineering strategies for improving strain performance. Examples on how systems and synthetic biology brought yeast metabolic engineering closer to industrial biotechnology are described in this review, and these examples should demonstrate the potential of a systems-level approach for fast and efficient generation of yeast cell factories. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fractional factorial plans

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Aloke

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop reference to fractional factorials and related orthogonal arrays.Presenting one of the most dynamic areas of statistical research, this book offers a systematic, rigorous, and up-to-date treatment of fractional factorial designs and related combinatorial mathematics. Leading statisticians Aloke Dey and Rahul Mukerjee consolidate vast amounts of material from the professional literature--expertly weaving fractional replication, orthogonal arrays, and optimality aspects. They develop the basic theory of fractional factorials using the calculus of factorial arrangements, thereby providing a unified approach to the study of fractional factorial plans. An indispensable guide for statisticians in research and industry as well as for graduate students, Fractional Factorial Plans features: * Construction procedures of symmetric and asymmetric orthogonal arrays. * Many up-to-date research results on nonexistence. * A chapter on optimal fractional factorials not based on orthogonal arrays. * Trend-free plans...

  1. Particle factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, Rafe

    1989-01-01

    Physicists' attention is increasingly turning to the high luminosity frontier - providing enough collisions to amass sizable numbers of rare events - to complement the traditional quest for higher energies. This month we cover three areas where projects are now being considered: Phi-factory workshop, PSI Planning for B meson factory, Tau-charm factory

  2. Design, Engineering, and Construction of Photosynthetic Microbial Cell Factories for Renewable Solar Fuel Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindblad, Peter; Lindberg, Pia; Stensjoe, Karin (Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Dept. of Chemistry-Aangstroem Laboratory, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)), E-mail: Peter.Lindblad@kemi.uu.se; Oliveira, Paulo (Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Porto (Portugal)); Heidorn, Thorsten (Bioforsk-Norwegian Inst. for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Aas Oslo, (Norway))

    2012-03-15

    There is an urgent need to develop sustainable solutions to convert solar energy into energy carriers used in the society. In addition to solar cells generating electricity, there are several options to generate solar fuels. This paper outlines and discusses the design and engineering of photosynthetic microbial systems for the generation of renewable solar fuels, with a focus on cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are prokaryotic microorganisms with the same type of photosynthesis as higher plants. Native and engineered cyanobacteria have been used by us and others as model systems to examine, demonstrate, and develop photobiological H{sub 2} production. More recently, the production of carbon-containing solar fuels like ethanol, butanol, and isoprene have been demonstrated. We are using a synthetic biology approach to develop efficient photosynthetic microbial cell factories for direct generation of biofuels from solar energy. Present progress and advances in the design, engineering, and construction of such cyanobacterial cells for the generation of a portfolio of solar fuels, e.g., hydrogen, alcohols, and isoprene, are presented and discussed. Possibilities and challenges when introducing and using synthetic biology are highlighted

  3. Ground-up circular Higgs Factory ring design and cell length optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Richard

    2017-02-01

    A “ground-up” Higgs Factory design methodology is described. For concreteness, numerical parameter choices are drawn primarily from CEPC, the Circular Electron Positron Collider. The goals are to find: (i) optimal parameters, (ii) improved understanding , (iii) a tentative lattice design. As illustration of the method, six chromaticity-corrected lattices, with cell lengths ranging from 45 m to 280 m, all with identical βy = 2 mm or βy = 10 mm intersection region optics, are designed and their properties compared. For simplicity only a single “toy ring,” circumference (76 km), with one interaction point, and a single beam energy (120 GeV) is considered. For the cell-length optimization a figure of merit FOM (essentially integrated luminosity) is maximized consistent with a dimensionless “fine tuning penalty function” or figure of demerit FOD not being allowed to exceed a conservatively chosen upper limit. The tentative recommendation from this investigation is that the optimal CEPC route is (except for obvious changes) to simply copy LEP: 80 m cell length and two-in-one single-ring operation. The main luminosity-increasing improvements are increased radius and power, top-off-full-energy-injection, noninterleaved sextupoles, more than 100 beam bunch operation, and improved intersection region design. Local chromaticity compensation (with its inevitable intense hard X-rays incident on the detectors) is found to be unnecessary. With these changes luminosity in excess of 1034cm-2s-1 is projected to be achievable.

  4. Metabolic engineering of ammonium release for nitrogen-fixing multispecies microbial cell-factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Marquez, Juan Cesar Federico; Do Nascimento, Mauro; Curatti, Leonardo

    2014-05-01

    The biological nitrogen fixation carried out by some Bacteria and Archaea is one of the most attractive alternatives to synthetic nitrogen fertilizers. In this study we compared the effect of controlling the maximum activation state of the Azotobacter vinelandii glutamine synthase by a point mutation at the active site (D49S mutation) and impairing the ammonium-dependent homeostatic control of nitrogen-fixation genes expression by the ΔnifL mutation on ammonium release by the cells. Strains bearing the single D49S mutation were more efficient ammonium producers under carbon/energy limiting conditions and sustained microalgae growth at the expense of atmospheric N2 in synthetic microalgae-bacteria consortia. Ammonium delivery by the different strains had implications for the microalga׳s cell-size distribution. It was uncovered an extensive cross regulation between nitrogen fixation and assimilation that extends current knowledge on this key metabolic pathway and might represent valuable hints for further improvements of versatile N2-fixing microbial-cell factories. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Performance Prediction of a MongoDB-Based Traceability System in Smart Factory Supply Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yong-Shin; Park, Il-Ha; Youm, Sekyoung

    2016-01-01

    In the future, with the advent of the smart factory era, manufacturing and logistics processes will become more complex, and the complexity and criticality of traceability will further increase. This research aims at developing a performance assessment method to verify scalability when implementing traceability systems based on key technologies for smart factories, such as Internet of Things (IoT) and BigData. To this end, based on existing research, we analyzed traceability requirements and an event schema for storing traceability data in MongoDB, a document-based Not Only SQL (NoSQL) database. Next, we analyzed the algorithm of the most representative traceability query and defined a query-level performance model, which is composed of response times for the components of the traceability query algorithm. Next, this performance model was solidified as a linear regression model because the response times increase linearly by a benchmark test. Finally, for a case analysis, we applied the performance model to a virtual automobile parts logistics. As a result of the case study, we verified the scalability of a MongoDB-based traceability system and predicted the point when data node servers should be expanded in this case. The traceability system performance assessment method proposed in this research can be used as a decision-making tool for hardware capacity planning during the initial stage of construction of traceability systems and during their operational phase. PMID:27983654

  6. Performance Prediction of a MongoDB-Based Traceability System in Smart Factory Supply Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Shin Kang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the future, with the advent of the smart factory era, manufacturing and logistics processes will become more complex, and the complexity and criticality of traceability will further increase. This research aims at developing a performance assessment method to verify scalability when implementing traceability systems based on key technologies for smart factories, such as Internet of Things (IoT and BigData. To this end, based on existing research, we analyzed traceability requirements and an event schema for storing traceability data in MongoDB, a document-based Not Only SQL (NoSQL database. Next, we analyzed the algorithm of the most representative traceability query and defined a query-level performance model, which is composed of response times for the components of the traceability query algorithm. Next, this performance model was solidified as a linear regression model because the response times increase linearly by a benchmark test. Finally, for a case analysis, we applied the performance model to a virtual automobile parts logistics. As a result of the case study, we verified the scalability of a MongoDB-based traceability system and predicted the point when data node servers should be expanded in this case. The traceability system performance assessment method proposed in this research can be used as a decision-making tool for hardware capacity planning during the initial stage of construction of traceability systems and during their operational phase.

  7. Performance Prediction of a MongoDB-Based Traceability System in Smart Factory Supply Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yong-Shin; Park, Il-Ha; Youm, Sekyoung

    2016-12-14

    In the future, with the advent of the smart factory era, manufacturing and logistics processes will become more complex, and the complexity and criticality of traceability will further increase. This research aims at developing a performance assessment method to verify scalability when implementing traceability systems based on key technologies for smart factories, such as Internet of Things (IoT) and BigData. To this end, based on existing research, we analyzed traceability requirements and an event schema for storing traceability data in MongoDB, a document-based Not Only SQL (NoSQL) database. Next, we analyzed the algorithm of the most representative traceability query and defined a query-level performance model, which is composed of response times for the components of the traceability query algorithm. Next, this performance model was solidified as a linear regression model because the response times increase linearly by a benchmark test. Finally, for a case analysis, we applied the performance model to a virtual automobile parts logistics. As a result of the case study, we verified the scalability of a MongoDB-based traceability system and predicted the point when data node servers should be expanded in this case. The traceability system performance assessment method proposed in this research can be used as a decision-making tool for hardware capacity planning during the initial stage of construction of traceability systems and during their operational phase.

  8. Engineering microbial cell factories for the production of plant natural products: from design principles to industrial-scale production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaonan; Ding, Wentao; Jiang, Huifeng

    2017-07-19

    Plant natural products (PNPs) are widely used as pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, seasonings, pigments, etc., with a huge commercial value on the global market. However, most of these PNPs are still being extracted from plants. A resource-conserving and environment-friendly synthesis route for PNPs that utilizes microbial cell factories has attracted increasing attention since the 1940s. However, at the present only a handful of PNPs are being produced by microbial cell factories at an industrial scale, and there are still many challenges in their large-scale application. One of the challenges is that most biosynthetic pathways of PNPs are still unknown, which largely limits the number of candidate PNPs for heterologous microbial production. Another challenge is that the metabolic fluxes toward the target products in microbial hosts are often hindered by poor precursor supply, low catalytic activity of enzymes and obstructed product transport. Consequently, despite intensive studies on the metabolic engineering of microbial hosts, the fermentation costs of most heterologously produced PNPs are still too high for industrial-scale production. In this paper, we review several aspects of PNP production in microbial cell factories, including important design principles and recent progress in pathway mining and metabolic engineering. In addition, implemented cases of industrial-scale production of PNPs in microbial cell factories are also highlighted.

  9. Smart Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilberg, Arne; Radziwon, Agnieszka; Grube Hansen, David

    2017-01-01

    A large part of Danish Industry is based on Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs), which account for –99% of the companies in Denmark and about two third of the job positions (source: statistikbanken.dk) . That is why, it is so important also to focus research and development at SMEs, and to ......A large part of Danish Industry is based on Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs), which account for –99% of the companies in Denmark and about two third of the job positions (source: statistikbanken.dk) . That is why, it is so important also to focus research and development at SMEs......, and to target their challenges and ensure sustainable growth and business in these enterprises. Therefore the focus of the Smart Factory project was to support the growth and sustainable development of the small and medium sized manufacturing industry in Denmark. The project focused on SMEs and how to improve...... their innovation and competitive advantage by focusing at their competences, strengths and opportunities. The project suggests innovative solutions and business models through collaboration and use of new technologies. In the Smart Factory, SMEs should be able to collaborate on new products, markets and production...

  10. Recent Progress on Systems and Synthetic Biology Approaches to Engineer Fungi As Microbial Cell Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores, Gerardo Ruiz; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Arruda, Letícia Magalhães; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Filamentous fungi are remarkable organisms naturally specialized in deconstructing plant biomass and this feature has a tremendous potential for biofuel production from renewable sources. The past decades have been marked by a remarkable progress in the genetic engineering of fungi to generate industry-compatible strains needed for some biotech applications. In this sense, progress in this field has been marked by the utilization of high-throughput techniques to gain deep understanding of the molecular machinery controlling the physiology of these organisms, starting thus the Systems Biology era of fungi. Additionally, genetic engineering has been extensively applied to modify wellcharacterized promoters in order to construct new expression systems with enhanced performance under the conditions of interest. In this review, we discuss some aspects related to significant progress in the understating and engineering of fungi for biotechnological applications, with special focus on the construction of synthetic promoters and circuits in organisms relevant for industry. Different engineering approaches are shown, and their potential and limitations for the construction of complex synthetic circuits in these organisms are examined. Finally, we discuss the impact of engineered promoter architecture in the single-cell behavior of the system, an often-neglected relationship with a tremendous impact in the final performance of the process of interest. We expect to provide here some new directions to drive future research directed to the construction of high-performance, engineered fungal strains working as microbial cell factories.

  11. Complete factorial design experiment for 3D load cell instrumented crank validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Valle-Casas; Rafael, Dalazen; Vinicius, Cene; Alexandre, Balbinot

    2015-08-01

    Developing of instrumentation systems for sport medicine is a promising area, that's why this research evaluates the design of a new instrumented crank arm prototype for a race bicycle projecting an experiment for indoor - outdoor comparison. This study investigated the viability of an instrumentation 3D load cell for force measurement crank, implementing a design of experiment. A Complete factorial design experiment was developed for data validation, with an Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) throwing significant results for controlled factors with response variables rms, mean and variance. A software routine allowed to obtained system variables metrics for Symmetry and Cadence analysis, which came out from Effective force bilateral comparing and speed computation. Characterization allowed achieving calibration curves that were used for data conversion in force projection channels with a linearity error of 0.29% (perpendicular), 0.55% (parallel) and 0.10% (lateral). Interactions of factors resulted significant mainly for indoor tests in symmetry and cadence was significant in interactions generally for outdoor tests. Implemented system was able to generate Effective Force graph for 3D plot symmetry analysis, torque and power symmetry for specialist's analysis.

  12. Prognostic value of insulin- like growth factor-I receptor expression in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sichani Mehrdad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Insulin-Like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR, a tyrosine-kinas receptor over expressed in many tumor cell lines and in some human tumors, plays a critical role in trans-formation, tumorigenicity and metastasis. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of IGF-IR expression as a prognostic factor in RCC. This study was conducted in a historical cohort of 82 patients who had RCC treated with radical nephrectomy from 1994 to 2005. Specimens were reevaluated with regard to histological subtype, nuclear grade, stage and IGF-IR expression. The IGF-IR stain was semi- quantitatively evaluated using the Allred score system. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated a significant positive correlation between Fuhrman nuclear grade and IGF-IR Allred score (P< 0.0001. Survival in patients with score IGF-I ≤ 4 was 90.21 month and in patients with score IGF-1R> 4 was 33.39 month (P Value < 0.0001. Cox regression analysis in-dicated that expression of IGF-IR is a prognostic factor in patients with RCC (P Value < 0.0001, odds Ratio = 2.38. In conclusion, a statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between IGF-IR expression and Fuhrman nuclear grading and survival in patients with RCC. In stage-by-stage and grade-by-grade analysis; however, it seems that we cannot consider IGF-IR as an inde-pendent prognostic factor.

  13. Prognostic value of insulin- like growth factor-I receptor expression in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichani, Mehrdad Mohammadi; Yazdi, Fateme Sarreshtedar; Moghaddam, Noushin Afshar; Chehrei, Ali; Kabiri, Mahmud; Naeimi, Amin; Taheri, Diana

    2010-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR), a tyrosine kinase receptor over expressed in many tumor cell lines and in some human tumors, plays a critical role in transformation, tumorigenicity and metastasis. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of IGF-IR expression as a prognostic factor in RCC. This study was conducted in a historical cohort of 82 patients who had RCC treated with radical nephrectomy from 1994 to 2005. Specimens were reevaluated with regard to histological subtype, nuclear grade, stage and IGF-IR expression. The IGF-IR stain was semi-quantitatively evaluated using the Allred score system. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated a significant positive correlation between Fuhrman nuclear grade and IGF-IR Allred score (P 4 was 33.39 month (P Value < 0.0001). Cox regression analysis indicated that expression of IGF-IR is a prognostic factor in patients with RCC (P Value < 0.0001, odds Ratio = 2.38). In conclusion, a statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between IGF-IR expression and Fuhrman nuclear grading and survival in patients with RCC. In stage-by-stage and grade-by-grade analysis; however, it seems that we cannot consider IGF-IR as an independent prognostic factor.

  14. [Optimization of synthetic pathway and fermentation process of yeast cell factories for production of oleanoic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Wang, Bei-Bei; Liu, Yi; Shi, Ming-Yu; Xiao, Dong-Guang; Huang, Lu-Qi; Dai, Zhu-Bo; Zhang, Xue-Li

    2014-07-01

    To optimize the synthetic pathway and fermentation process of yeast cell factories for production of oleanoic acid. Using the DNA assembler method, one copy of Glycyrrhiza glabra beta-amyrin synthase (GgbAS), Medicago truncatula oleanolic acid synthase (MtOAS) and Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome P450 reductase 1 (AtCPR1) genes were introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY-OA, resulting in strain BY-20A. YPD medium with different glucose concentration were then used to cultivate strain BY-2OA. Increasing gene copies of GgbAS, MtOAS and AtCPR1 resulted in increased beta-amyrin and oleanolic acid production. The strain BY-2OA produced 136.5 mg x L(-1) beta-amyrin and 92.5 mg x L(-1) oleanolic acid, which were 54% and 30% higher than the parent strain BY-OA. Finally, the titer of oleanolic acid increased to 165.7 mg x L(-1) when cultivated in YPD medium with 40 mg x L(-1) glucose. Production of oleanoic acid increased significantly in the yeast strain BY-2OA, which can provide the basis for creating an alternative way for production of oleanoic acid in place of extraction from plant sources.

  15. Development and Application of the STARS-based Beamline Control System at the Photon Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuge, Takashi; Nigorikawa, Kazuyuki; Nagatani, Yasuko; Saito, Yuuki

    2010-06-01

    STARS[1-2] (Simple Transmission and Retrieval System) is a message transferring software for small-scale control systems with TCP/IP sockets, originally developed at the Photon Factory (PF). Because it has a server-client architecture using TCP/IP sockets and can work on various types of operating systems, the design and application are quite flexible. We have developed a common low-level beamline control system based on the STARS technology. Many kinds of useful STARS clients (device drivers, data acquisitions, user interfaces etc.) are available now, and so far, the system has been installed at 22 PF beamlines. We will describe the development and generalize of the STARS-based beamline control system at the PF.

  16. Identification of potentially safe promising fungal cell factories for the production of polyketide natural food colorants using chemotaxonomic rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapari, Sameer As; Meyer, Anne S; Thrane, Ulf; Frisvad, Jens C

    2009-04-27

    extrolites is a rational approach towards selection of fungal polyketide pigment producers considering the enormous chemical diversity and biodiversity of ascomycetous fungi. This rationale could be very handy for the selection of potentially safe fungal cell factories not only for polyketide pigments but also for the other industrially important polyketides; the molecular and genetic basis for the biosynthesis of which has not yet been examined in detail. In addition, 4 out of the 10 chemotaxonomically selected promising Penicillium strains were shown to produce extracellular pigments in the liquid media using a solid support indicating future cell factory possibilities for polyketide natural food colorants.

  17. Identification of potentially safe promising fungal cell factories for the production of polyketide natural food colorants using chemotaxonomic rationale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frisvad Jens C

    2009-04-01

    of chemotaxonomic tools and a priori knowledge of fungal extrolites is a rational approach towards selection of fungal polyketide pigment producers considering the enormous chemical diversity and biodiversity of ascomycetous fungi. This rationale could be very handy for the selection of potentially safe fungal cell factories not only for polyketide pigments but also for the other industrially important polyketides; the molecular and genetic basis for the biosynthesis of which has not yet been examined in detail. In addition, 4 out of the 10 chemotaxonomically selected promising Penicillium strains were shown to produce extracellular pigments in the liquid media using a solid support indicating future cell factory possibilities for polyketide natural food colorants.

  18. Identification of potentially safe promising fungal cell factories for the production of polyketide natural food colorants using chemotaxonomic rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapari, Sameer AS; Meyer, Anne S; Thrane, Ulf; Frisvad, Jens C

    2009-01-01

    a priori knowledge of fungal extrolites is a rational approach towards selection of fungal polyketide pigment producers considering the enormous chemical diversity and biodiversity of ascomycetous fungi. This rationale could be very handy for the selection of potentially safe fungal cell factories not only for polyketide pigments but also for the other industrially important polyketides; the molecular and genetic basis for the biosynthesis of which has not yet been examined in detail. In addition, 4 out of the 10 chemotaxonomically selected promising Penicillium strains were shown to produce extracellular pigments in the liquid media using a solid support indicating future cell factory possibilities for polyketide natural food colorants. PMID:19397825

  19. Baby Factory

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... severe exploitation, such as forced labour, slavery, debt bondage, prostitution, pornography or the unlawful removal of organs”. Kalu (2011) in his report on the issue of 'baby factory' in the South East of Nigeria, described 'baby factory' as a form of child trafficking since the girls are harboured against their ...

  20. A Bayesian-based multilevel factorial analysis method for analyzing parameter uncertainty of hydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. R.; Li, Y. P.; Huang, G. H.; Zhang, J. L.; Fan, Y. R.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a Bayesian-based multilevel factorial analysis (BMFA) method is developed to assess parameter uncertainties and their effects on hydrological model responses. In BMFA, Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) algorithm is employed to approximate the posterior distributions of model parameters with Bayesian inference; factorial analysis (FA) technique is used for measuring the specific variations of hydrological responses in terms of posterior distributions to investigate the individual and interactive effects of parameters on model outputs. BMFA is then applied to a case study of the Jinghe River watershed in the Loess Plateau of China to display its validity and applicability. The uncertainties of four sensitive parameters, including soil conservation service runoff curve number to moisture condition II (CN2), soil hydraulic conductivity (SOL_K), plant available water capacity (SOL_AWC), and soil depth (SOL_Z), are investigated. Results reveal that (i) CN2 has positive effect on peak flow, implying that the concentrated rainfall during rainy season can cause infiltration-excess surface flow, which is an considerable contributor to peak flow in this watershed; (ii) SOL_K has positive effect on average flow, implying that the widely distributed cambisols can lead to medium percolation capacity; (iii) the interaction between SOL_AWC and SOL_Z has noticeable effect on the peak flow and their effects are dependent upon each other, which discloses that soil depth can significant influence the processes of plant uptake of soil water in this watershed. Based on the above findings, the significant parameters and the relationship among uncertain parameters can be specified, such that hydrological model's capability for simulating/predicting water resources of the Jinghe River watershed can be improved.

  1. Prevention of melanin formation during aryl alcohol oxidase production under growth-limited conditions using an Aspergillus nidulans cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Planas, Oscar; Prade, Rolf A; Müller, Michael; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Wilkins, Mark R

    2017-11-01

    An Aspergillus nidulans cell factory was genetically engineered to produce an aryl alcohol oxidase (AAO). The cell factory initiated production of melanin when growth-limited conditions were established using stationary plates and shaken flasks. This phenomenon was more pronounced when the strain was cultured in a trickle bed reactor (TBR). This study investigated different approaches to reduce melanin formation in fungal mycelia and liquid medium in order to increase the enzyme production yield. Removal of copper from the medium recipe reduced melanin formation in agar cultures and increased enzyme activities by 48% in agitated liquid cultures. Copper has been reported as a key element for tyrosinase, an enzyme responsible for melanin production. Ascorbic acid (0.44g/L) stopped melanin accumulation, did not affect growth parameters and resulted in AAO activity that was more than two-fold greater than a control treatment with no ascorbic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Does a population-based multi-factorial lifestyle intervention increase social inequality in dietary habits?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Ulla; Jakobsen, Iris Marie; Aadahl, Mette

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether the effect of an individualised multi-factorial lifestyle intervention on dietary habits differs across socioeconomic groups.......To investigate whether the effect of an individualised multi-factorial lifestyle intervention on dietary habits differs across socioeconomic groups....

  3. The Cell Factory Aspergillus Enters the Big Data Era: Opportunities and Challenges for Optimising Product Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Vera; Fiedler, Markus; Nitsche, Benjamin; King, Rudibert

    2015-01-01

    Living with limits. Getting more from less. Producing commodities and high-value products from renewable resources including waste. What is the driving force and quintessence of bioeconomy outlines the lifestyle and product portfolio of Aspergillus, a saprophytic genus, to which some of the top-performing microbial cell factories belong: Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus terreus. What makes them so interesting for exploitation in biotechnology and how can they help us to address key challenges of the twenty-first century? How can these strains become trimmed for better growth on second-generation feedstocks and how can we enlarge their product portfolio by genetic and metabolic engineering to get more from less? On the other hand, what makes it so challenging to deduce biological meaning from the wealth of Aspergillus -omics data? And which hurdles hinder us to model and engineer industrial strains for higher productivity and better rheological performance under industrial cultivation conditions? In this review, we will address these issues by highlighting most recent findings from the Aspergillus research with a focus on fungal growth, physiology, morphology and product formation. Indeed, the last years brought us many surprising insights into model and industrial strains. They clearly told us that similar is not the same: there are different ways to make a hypha, there are more protein secretion routes than anticipated and there are different molecular and physical mechanisms which control polar growth and the development of hyphal networks. We will discuss new conceptual frameworks derived from these insights and the future scientific advances necessary to create value from Aspergillus Big Data.

  4. A coupled factorial-analysis-based interval programming approach and its application to air quality management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Huang, G H

    2013-02-01

    In this study, a coupled factorial-analysis-based interval programming (CFA-IP) approach is developed through incorporating factorial analysis within an interval-parameter linear programming framework. CFA-IP can tackle uncertainties presented as intervals that exist in the objective function and the left- and right-hand sides of constraints, as well as robustly reflect interval information in the solutions for the objective-function value and decision variables. Moreover CFA-IP has the advantage of investigating the potential interactions among input parameters and their influences on lower- and upper-bound solutions, which is meaningful for supporting an in-depth analysis of uncertainty. A regional air quality management problem is studied to demonstrate applicability of the proposed CFA-IP approach. The results indicate that useful solutions have been generated for planning the air quality management practices. They can help decision makers identify desired pollution mitigation strategies with minimized total cost and maximized environmental efficiency, as well as screen out dominant parameters and explore the valuable information that may be veiled beneath their interrelationships. The CFA-IP approach can not only tackle uncertainties presented as intervals that exist in the objective function and the left- and right-hand sides of constraints, but also investigate their interactive effects on model outputs, which is meaningful for supporting an in-depth analysis of uncertainty. Thus CFA-IP would be applicable to air quality management problems under uncertainty. The results obtained from CFA-IP can help decision makers identify desired pollution mitigation strategies, as well as investigate the potential interactions among factors and analyze their consequent effects on modeling results.

  5. Internet factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis contributes a novel concept for introducing new network technologies in network infrastructures. The concept, called Internet factories, describes the methodical process to create and manage application-specific networks from application programs, referred to as Netapps. An Internet

  6. Internet Factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis contributes a novel concept for introducing new network technologies in network infrastructures. The concept, called Internet factories, describes the methodical process to create and manage application-specific networks from application programs, referred to as Netapps. An Internet

  7. Optimization of cardiovascular stent against restenosis: factorial design-based statistical analysis of polymer coating conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri Acharya

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to optimize the physicodynamic conditions of polymeric system as a coating substrate for drug eluting stents against restenosis. As Nitric Oxide (NO has multifunctional activities, such as regulating blood flow and pressure, and influencing thrombus formation, a continuous and spatiotemporal delivery of NO loaded in the polymer based nanoparticles could be a viable option to reduce and prevent restenosis. To identify the most suitable carrier for S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, a NO prodrug, stents were coated with various polymers, such as poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, polyethylene glycol (PEG and polycaprolactone (PCL, using solvent evaporation technique. Full factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of the formulation variables in polymer-based stent coatings on the GSNO release rate and weight loss rate. The least square regression model was used for data analysis in the optimization process. The polymer-coated stents were further assessed with Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis (FTIR, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images and platelet adhesion studies. Stents coated with PCL matrix displayed more sustained and controlled drug release profiles than those coated with PLGA and PEG. Stents coated with PCL matrix showed the least platelet adhesion rate. Subsequently, stents coated with PCL matrix were subjected to the further optimization processes for improvement of surface morphology and enhancement of the drug release duration. The results of this study demonstrated that PCL matrix containing GSNO is a promising system for stent surface coating against restenosis.

  8. SPL-based Proton Driver for a nu-Factory at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, E; Garoby, R; Meddahi, M

    2010-01-01

    The conceptual design and feasibility studies for a nu-Factory Proton Driver based on the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) have been com- pleted. In the proposed scenario, the 4 MW proton beam (H- beam) is acceler- ated with the upgraded High Power (HP)-SPL to 5 GeV, stored in an accumu- lator ring and Þnally transported to a compressor ring, where bunch rotation takes place, in order to achieve the speciÞc time structure. We here summa- rize the choices in terms of lattice, magnet technology and RF manipulations in the two rings. The possible critical issues, such as heating of the foil for the charge-exchange injection, space-charge problems in the compressor and beam stability in the accumulator ring, have been addressed and are shown not to be show-stoppers. The analysis focuses on the baseline scenario, consider- ing 6 bunches in the accumulator, and preliminary studies are discussed for the option of 3 or a single bunch per burst.

  9. A hierarchical NeuroBayes-based algorithm for full reconstruction of B mesons at B factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feindt, M.; Keller, F.; Kreps, M.; Kuhr, T. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Campus Sued, Postfach 69 80, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Neubauer, S., E-mail: neubauer@ekp.uni-karlsruhe.de [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Campus Sued, Postfach 69 80, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Zander, D.; Zupanc, A. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Campus Sued, Postfach 69 80, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-10-21

    We describe a new B-meson full reconstruction algorithm designed for the Belle experiment at the B-factory KEKB, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider that collected a data sample of 771.6x10{sup 6}BB-bar pairs during its running time. To maximize the number of reconstructed B decay channels, it utilizes a hierarchical reconstruction procedure and probabilistic calculus instead of classical selection cuts. The multivariate analysis package NeuroBayes was used extensively to hold the balance between highest possible efficiency, robustness and acceptable consumption of CPU time. In total, 1104 exclusive decay channels were reconstructed, employing 71 neural networks altogether. Overall, we correctly reconstruct one B{sup {+-}} or B{sup 0} candidate in 0.28% or 0.18% of the BB-bar events, respectively. Compared to the cut-based classical reconstruction algorithm used at the Belle experiment, this is an improvement in efficiency by roughly a factor of 2, depending on the analysis considered. The new framework also features the ability to choose the desired purity or efficiency of the fully reconstructed sample freely. If the same purity as for the classical full reconstruction code is desired ({approx}25%), the efficiency is still larger by nearly a factor of 2. If, on the other hand, the efficiency is chosen at a similar level as the classical full reconstruction, the purity rises from {approx}25% to nearly 90%.

  10. Neutrino Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M; Tsenov, R; Dracos, M; Bonesini, M; Palladino, V; Tortora, L; Mori, Y; Planche, T; Lagrange, J  B; Kuno, Y; Benedetto, E; Efthymiopoulos, I; Garoby, R; Gilardoini, S; Martini, M; Wildner, E; Prior, G; Blondel, A; Karadzhow, Y; Ellis, M; Kyberd, P; Bayes, R; Laing, A; Soler, F  J  P; Alekou, A; Apollonio, M; Aslaninejad, M; Bontoiu, C; Jenner, L  J; Kurup, A; Long, K; Pasternak, J; Zarrebini, A; Poslimski, J; Blackmore, V; Cobb, J; Tunnell, C; Andreopoulos, C; Bennett, J  R  J; Brooks, S; Caretta, O; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Edgecock, T  R; Fitton, M; Kelliher, D; Loveridge, P; McFarland, A; Machida, S; Prior, C; Rees, G; Rogers, C; Rooney, M; Thomason, J; Wilcox, D; Booth, C; Skoro, G; Back, J  J; Harrison, P; Berg, J  S; Fernow, R; Gallardo, J  C; Gupta, R; Kirk, H; Simos, N; Stratakis, D; Souchlas, N; Witte, H; Bross, A; Geer, S; Johnstone, C; Mokhov, N; Neuffer, D; Popovic, M; Strait, J; Striganov, S; Morfín, J  G; Wands, R; Snopok, P; Bogacz, S  A; Morozov, V; Roblin, Y; Cline, D; Ding, X; Bromberg, C; Hart, T; Abrams, R  J; Ankenbrandt, C  M; Beard, K  B; Cummings, M  A  C; Flanagan, G; Johnson, R  P; Roberts, T  J; Yoshikawa, C  Y; Graves, V  B; McDonald, K  T; Coney, L; Hanson, G

    2014-01-01

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that $\\theta_{13} > 0$. The measured value of $\\theta_{13}$ is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti)neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO$\

  11. Targeting population heterogeneity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae batch fermentation for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Lundin, L.

    and affect their metabolism and consequently affect the heterogeneity level of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding of population heterogeneity, Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were......)). Significant gradients of e.g. dissolved oxygen, substrates, and pH are typically observed in many industrial scale fermentation processes. Consequently, the microbial cells experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells...

  12. Neutrino factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bogomilov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that θ_{13}>0. The measured value of θ_{13} is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (antineutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EUROν Design Study consortium. EUROν coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF collaboration. The EUROν baseline accelerator facility will provide 10^{21} muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  13. SRF for neutrino factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Neutrino Factory calls for nearly 500 meters of 200 MHz SRF cavities to provide 7.5 GV. Such a facility is more demanding than the largest SRF installation to date, i.e., LEP-II, where 500 m of niobium-coated copper cavities provided more than 3 GV of acceleration. Based on the high real estate gradient desired to minimize muon loss, superconducting cavities are selected to provide active gradients of 15 - 17 MV/m, and a real estate gradient of 7.5 MV/m. At such high gradients, the peak RF power demand for copper cavities would become prohibitively expensive. By virtue of low losses, SC cavities can be filled slowly (rise time 3 ms) reducing the peak power demand to roughly half MW per cell. (author)

  14. Evaluation of the influence of base and alkyl bromide on synthesis of pyrazinoic acid esters through factorial design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Joao Paulo dos Santos; Felli, Veni Maria Andres [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Farmacia

    2009-07-01

    Pyrazinoic acid esters have been synthesized as prodrugs of pyrazinoic acid. In the literature, its preparation is reported through the reaction of pyrazinoyl chloride with alcohols and the reaction with DCC/DMAP. In this work, it is reported a 22 factorial design to evaluate the preparation of these esters through the substitution of alkyl bromides with carboxylate anion. The controlled factors were alkyl chain length of bromides (ethyl and hexyl) and the used base (triethylamine and DBU). Results revealed that the used base used has significant effect on yield, and alkyl bromide used has neither significant influence, nor its interaction effect with base. (author)

  15. Evaluation of the influence of base and alkyl bromide on synthesis of pyrazinoic acid esters through factorial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Joao Paulo dos Santos; Felli, Veni Maria Andres

    2009-01-01

    Pyrazinoic acid esters have been synthesized as prodrugs of pyrazinoic acid. In the literature, its preparation is reported through the reaction of pyrazinoyl chloride with alcohols and the reaction with DCC/DMAP. In this work, it is reported a 22 factorial design to evaluate the preparation of these esters through the substitution of alkyl bromides with carboxylate anion. The controlled factors were alkyl chain length of bromides (ethyl and hexyl) and the used base (triethylamine and DBU). Results revealed that the used base used has significant effect on yield, and alkyl bromide used has neither significant influence, nor its interaction effect with base. (author)

  16. The stimulatory effect of growth hormone, prolactin, and placental lactogen on beta-cell proliferation is not mediated by insulin-like growth factor-I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1991-01-01

    The effects of GH, PRL, and placental lactogen (PL) on the proliferation of pancreatic beta-cells in vitro were studied as well as the possible effect of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in mediating this effect. Proliferating beta-cells were identified by staining with a monoclonal antibody ...

  17. Skeletal unloading causes resistance of osteoprogenitor cells to parathyroid hormone and to insulin-like growth factor-I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostenuik, P. J.; Harris, J.; Halloran, B. P.; Turner, R. T.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Bikle, D. D.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal unloading decreases bone formation and osteoblast number in vivo and decreases the number and proliferation of bone marrow osteoprogenitor (BMOp) cells in vitro. We tested the ability of parathyroid hormone (PTH) to stimulate BMOp cells in vivo by treating Sprague Dawley rats (n = 32) with intermittent PTH(1-34) (1 h/day at 8 microg/100 g of body weight), or with vehicle via osmotic minipumps during 7 days of normal weight bearing or hind limb unloading. Marrow cells were flushed from the femur and cultured at the same initial density for up to 21 days. PTH treatment of normally loaded rats caused a 2.5-fold increase in the number of BMOp cells, with similar increases in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization, compared with cultures from vehicle-treated rats. PTH treatment of hind limb unloaded rats failed to stimulate BMOp cell number, ALP activity, or mineralization. Hind limb unloading had no significant effect on PTH receptor mRNA or protein levels in the tibia. Direct in vitro PTH challenge of BMOp cells isolated from normally loaded bone failed to stimulate their proliferation and inhibited their differentiation, suggesting that the in vivo anabolic effect of intermittent PTH on BMOp cells was mediated indirectly by a PTH-induced factor. We hypothesize that this factor is insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), which stimulated the in vitro proliferation and differentiation of BMOp cells isolated from normally loaded bone, but not from unloaded bone. These results suggest that IGF-I mediates the ability of PTH to stimulate BMOp cell proliferation in normally loaded bone, and that BMOp cells in unloaded bone are resistant to the anabolic effect of intermittent PTH therapy due to their resistance to IGF-I.

  18. Photon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, J.; Huke, K.; Chikawa, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Photon Factory (PF) was established on April 1, 1978 at KEK. The PF is a synchrotron radiation facility, which has a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring fully dedicated to the SR usage and a 2.5 GeV electron linac supplying electrons and positrons to the PF ring and the accumulation ring of TRISTAN (30 GeV electron-positron colliding machine). The PF consists of three departments, injector linac, light source, and instrumentation department. The facility is described

  19. Molecular tools and protocols for engineering the acid-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii as a potential cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi, Paola; Dato, Laura; Porro, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms offer a tremendous potential as cell factories, and they are indeed used by humans for centuries for biotransformations. Among them, yeasts combine the advantage of unicellular state with a eukaryotic organization, and, in the era of biorefineries, their biodiversity can offer solutions to specific process constraints. Zygosaccharomyces bailii, an ascomycetales budding yeast, is widely known for its peculiar tolerance to various stresses, among which are organic acids. Despite the possibility to apply with this yeast some of the molecular tools and protocols routinely used to manipulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adjustments and optimizations are necessary. Here, we describe in detail protocols for transformation, for target gene disruption or gene integration, and for designing episomal expression plasmids helpful for developing and further studying the yeast Z. bailii.

  20. The Supportive Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I in the Differentiation of Murine Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Corneal-Like Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trošan, Peter; Javorková, Eliška; Zajícová, Alena; Hájková, Michaela; Heřmánková, Barbora; Kössl, Jan; Holáň, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 17 (2016), s. 23156-23169 ISSN 1547-3287 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12580S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1508 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * corneal-like cells * insulin -like growth factor-I * differentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.562, year: 2016

  1. Droplet size influences division of mammalian cell factories in droplet microfluidic cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Periyannan Rajeswari, Prem Kumar; Joensson, Haakan N.; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2017-01-01

    in droplets. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, the most widely used mammalian host cells for biopharmaceuticals production were encapsulated and cultivated in 33, 180 and 320 pL droplets for 3 days. Periodic monitoring of the droplets during incubation showed that the cell divisions in 33 pL droplets stopped...

  2. Systems metabolic engineering: the creation of microbial cell factories by rational metabolic design and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that in order to establish sustainable societies, production processes should shift from petrochemical-based processes to bioprocesses. Because bioconversion technologies, in which biomass resources are converted to valuable materials, are preferable to processes dependent on fossil resources, the former should be further developed. The following two approaches can be adopted to improve cellular properties and obtain high productivity and production yield of target products: (1) optimization of cellular metabolic pathways involved in various bioprocesses and (2) creation of stress-tolerant cells that can be active even under severe stress conditions in the bioprocesses. Recent progress in omics analyses has facilitated the analysis of microorganisms based on bioinformatics data for molecular breeding and bioprocess development. Systems metabolic engineering is a new area of study, and it has been defined as a methodology in which metabolic engineering and systems biology are integrated to upgrade the designability of industrially useful microorganisms. This chapter discusses multi-omics analyses and rational design methods for molecular breeding. The first is an example of the rational design of metabolic networks for target production by flux balance analysis using genome-scale metabolic models. Recent progress in the development of genome-scale metabolic models and the application of these models to the design of desirable metabolic networks is also described in this example. The second is an example of evolution engineering with omics analyses for the creation of stress-tolerant microorganisms. Long-term culture experiments to obtain the desired phenotypes and omics analyses to identify the phenotypic changes are described here.

  3. Kaon factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1983-03-01

    Kaon factories would provide beams 100-1000 times more intense than those available from present accelerators in the 10-30 GeV range. More intense or cleaner secondary beams of kaons, antiprotons and neutrinos would be of particular interest for high precision experiments and studies of rare processes in both particle and nuclear physics, e.g. symmetry violations in K-decay, neutrino scattering, meson and baryon spectroscopy, hypernuclei, exotic atoms, K + studies of nuclear density and resonance propagation in nuclei. The various accelerators proposed include both fast-cycling synchrotrons providing 100 μA proton beams at 15 to 32 GeV and superconducting isochronous ring cyclotrons giving 100-400 μA at up to 15 GeV. This paper describes these designs and the various technical problems associated with them

  4. Formulation, evaluation and 3(2) full factorial design-based optimization of ondansetron hydrochloride incorporated taste masked microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharb, Vandana; Saharan, Vikas Anand; Dev, Kapil; Jadhav, Hemant; Purohit, Suresh

    2014-11-01

    Masking the bitter taste of Ondansetron hydrochloride (ONS) may improve palatability, acceptance and compliance of ONS products. ONS-loaded, taste-masked microspheres were prepared with a polycationic pH-sensitive polymer and 3(2) full factorial design (FFD) was applied to optimize microsphere batches. Solvent evaporation, in acetone--methanol/liquid paraffin system, was used to prepare taste-masked ONS microspheres. The effect of varying drug/polymer (D/P) ratios on microspheres characteristics were studied by 3(2) FFD. Desirability function was used to search the optimum formulation. Microspheres were evaluated by FTIR, XRD and DSC to examine interaction and effect of microencapsulation process. In vitro taste assessment approach based on bitterness threshold and drug release was used to assess bitterness scores. Prepared ONS microspheres were spherical and surface was wrinkled. ONS was molecularly dispersed in microspheres without any incompatibility with EE100. In hydrochloric acid buffer pH 1.2, ONS released completely from microsphere in just 10 min. Contrary to this, ONS release at initial 5 min from taste-masked microspheres was less than the bitterness threshold. Full factorial design and in vitro taste assessment approach, coupled together, was successfully applied to develop and optimize batches of ONS incorporated taste-masked microspheres.

  5. Development of a yeast cell factory for production of aromatic secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Prado, Edith Angelica

    Aromatic secondary metabolites are compounds mainly synthesized by plants and fungi as a response to predators and environmental stresses. These compounds have a broad range of natural properties such as reduction of oxidative damage in cells, antibacterial effects and UV protection. Many of thes...... six different types of flavonoids, and some of the engineered strains produced significant titers of flavonoid compounds such as kaempferol and quercetin. Moreover, for the first time, we synthesized the flavonoids liquiritigenin, resokaempferol and fisetin in yeast....

  6. The CERN target and horn concept for a neutrino factory based on muon beams

    CERN Document Server

    Ravn, H L

    2003-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a high-power pion production target and collection system, which is suggested to be used as source for the proposed CERN muon-neutrino factory. A relatively low-energy proton beam of 2.2 GeV which is pulsed at 50 Hz with similar to 10**1**4 ppp and 4 MW average power has been chosen as driver. The deleterious effects of the up to 1 kW/g power densities deposited in the target and its surroundings by the proton beam are a major technical challenge since it seriously limits the lifetime of all solid components. A target, which consists of a free surface mercury- jet with a high axial velocity, allows efficiently to carry the heat away from the production region without need for beam windows. The secondary pions are collected and injected into the pion decay channel by means of a magnetic horn. This horn which has to surround the Hg-jet target is known to be very radiation resistant as well as light and easy to exchange. The suggested mechanical layout and technical parameter...

  7. Haiti. Educating factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, H

    1990-04-01

    There are approximately 50,000 workers employed in the light assembly industry in Haiti. About 70% are women, the majority of whom are aged between 25 and 34 years, and are either single or in a nonpermanent relationship with the father of their children. Many live and work in appalling conditions, surviving on very low wages to support several children and an extended family. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is now a visible problem in many factories. In October 1988, the Center for the Promotion of Women Workers (Centre de Promotion des Femmes Ouvriers/CPFO) launched a pilot AIDS education program for factory women. The Center, based in a large industrial zone near the airport, runs a health clinic and courses in literacy, communications skills, health promotion and family planning. The new AIDS program allowed CPFO staff to gain entry into factories for the 1st time. Other courses were held outside working hours and outside factory premises. Staff contacted manages by telephone to arrange a meeting to discuss AIDS and to ask permission to hold educational "round tables" with workers. Of 18 managers in the factories approached over a 12-month period, only 2 refused entry to CPFO staff. Almost all managers reported they had registered between 2 and 5 deaths from AIDS among their employees over the past couple of years. A total of 85 educational sessions, each lasting about 2 hours, were held within 28 different factories, community or labor organizations reaching 3063 workers (male and female). In each session, the presentation was carried out by 2 CPFO trained monitors and included a slide show, flip charts, and the video "Met ko," originally produced for Haitian immigrants in New York. The most important aspect of the program was the training of 38 volunteer factory-based health promoters. These promoters attended the round table sessions, where they facilitated discussion and distributed condoms and were subsequently available for counseling co

  8. Development and application of computer-aided design methods for cell factory optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, Joao

    and machine learning. The process of creating strains with commercially relevant titers is time consuming and expensive. Computer-aided design (CAD) software can help scientists build better strains by providing models and algorithms that can be used to generate and test hypotheses before implementing them...... on metabolite targets. MARSI designs can be implemented using ALE or CSI. We used MARSI to enumerate metabolite targets in Escherichia coli that could be used to replace experimentally validated gene knockouts. Genetic variability occurs naturally in cells. However, the effects of those variations...... and machine learning tools, we explored the landscape of kcats using multiple enzyme sequences and their chemical reactions....

  9. Microbioreactor arrays for full factorial screening of exogenous and paracrine factors in human embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew M Titmarsh

    Full Text Available Timed exposure of pluripotent stem cell cultures to exogenous molecules is widely used to drive differentiation towards desired cell lineages. However, screening differentiation conditions in conventional static cultures can become impractical in large parameter spaces, and is intrinsically limited by poor spatiotemporal control of the microenvironment that also makes it impossible to determine whether exogenous factors act directly or through paracrine-dependent mechanisms. We detail here the development of a continuous flow microbioreactor array platform that combines full-factorial multiplexing of input factors with progressive accumulation of paracrine factors through serially-connected culture chambers, and further, the use of this system to explore the combinatorial parameter space of both exogenous and paracrine factors involved in human embryonic stem cell (hESC differentiation to a MIXL1-GFP(+ primitive streak-like population. We show that well known inducers of primitive streak (BMP, Activin and Wnt signals do not simply act directly on hESC to induce MIXL1 expression, but that this requires accumulation of surplus, endogenous factors; and, that conditioned medium or FGF-2 supplementation is able to offset this. Our approach further reveals the presence of a paracrine, negative feedback loop to the MIXL1-GFP(+ population, which can be overcome with GSK-3β inhibitors (BIO or CHIR99021, implicating secreted Wnt inhibitory signals such as DKKs and sFRPs as candidate effectors. Importantly, modulating paracrine effects identified in microbioreactor arrays by supplementing FGF-2 and CHIR in conventional static culture vessels resulted in improved differentiation outcomes. We therefore demonstrate that this microbioreactor array platform uniquely enables the identification and decoding of complex soluble factor signalling hierarchies, and that this not only challenges prevailing strategies for extrinsic control of hESC differentiation, but

  10. A bacterial cell factory for efficient production of ethanol from whey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for homo-ethanol production from lactose using a genetically modified lactic acid bacterium of the invention, where the cells are provided with a substrate comprising dairy waste supplemented with an amino nitrogen source (such as acid hydrolysed corn steep liquo......B) encoding enzymes catalysing the conversion of pyruvate to ethanol. Additionally a number of genes (Idh, pta and adhE) are deleted in order to maximise homo-ethanol production as compared to production of lactate, acetoin and acetate production.......The invention relates to a method for homo-ethanol production from lactose using a genetically modified lactic acid bacterium of the invention, where the cells are provided with a substrate comprising dairy waste supplemented with an amino nitrogen source (such as acid hydrolysed corn steep liquor......). The invention further relates to genetically modified lactic acid bacterium and its use for homo-ethanol production from lactose in dairy waste. The lactic acid bacterium comprises both genes (lacABCD, LacEF, lacG) encoding enzymes catalysing the lactose catabolism pathway; and transgenes (pdc and adh...

  11. Engineering propionibacteria as versatile cell factories for the production of industrially important chemicals: advances, challenges, and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ningzi; Zhuge, Xin; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Wu, Jing; Shi, Zhongping; Liu, Long

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacteria are actinobacteria consisting of two principal groups: cutaneous and dairy. Cutaneous propionibacteria are considered primary pathogens to humans, whereas dairy propionibacteria are widely used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Increasing attention has been focused on improving the performance of dairy propionibacteria for the production of industrially important chemicals, and significant advances have been made through strain engineering and process optimization in the production of flavor compounds, nutraceuticals, and antimicrobial compounds. In addition, genome sequencing of several propionibacteria species has been completed, deepening understanding of the metabolic and physiological features of these organisms. However, the metabolic engineering of propionibacteria still faces several challenges owing to the lack of efficient genome manipulation tools and the existence of various types of strong restriction-modification systems. The emergence of systems and synthetic biology provides new opportunities to overcome these bottlenecks. In this review, we first introduce the major species of propionibacteria and their properties and provide an overview of their functions and applications. We then discuss advances in the genome sequencing and metabolic engineering of these bacteria. Finally, we discuss systems and synthetic biology approaches for engineering propionibacteria as efficient and robust cell factories for the production of industrially important chemicals.

  12. Solar cells with one-day energy payback for the factories of the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espinosa Martinez, Nieves; Hösel, Markus; Angmo, Dechan

    2012-01-01

    Scalability is a requirement before any new energy source can be expected to house a possible solution to the challenge that mankind’s increasing energy demand presents. No renewable energy source is as abundant as the Sun and yet efficient and low-cost conversion of solar energy still has not been...... research and developed such technology in the form of a polymer solar cell that presents a significant improvement in energy payback time (EPBT) and found that very short energy payback times on the order of one day are possible, thus potentially presenting a solution to the current energy gap of >14 TW...... developed. We approach the challenge by firstly taking a technology that efficiently addresses the need for daily production of 1 GWp on a global level, which does not employ elements with critically low abundance and has a low thermal budget.Wethen applied life cycle assessment methodologies to direct...

  13. Pseudomonas putida as a microbial cell factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigneswaran, Vinoth

    The extensive use of fossil fuels has a severe influence on the environment. In order to reduce the dependency on these limited resources and to protect the environment substantial effort is being made to implement renewable resources. One part of this transition is to develop methods for sustain......The extensive use of fossil fuels has a severe influence on the environment. In order to reduce the dependency on these limited resources and to protect the environment substantial effort is being made to implement renewable resources. One part of this transition is to develop methods....... The applicability of glycerol as a substrate was also investigated. Since glycerol is a poor substrate adaptive evolution was made in order to improve the capabilities of P. putida to proliferate on glycerol. The evolved lineages all had significantly increased growth rate, enhanced cell density and reduced lag...... phase. The genomic alterations were identified by genome sequencing and revealed parallel evolution. Glycerol was also shown to be able to support biofilm growth and as a result of this it can be used as an alternative substrate for producing biochemicals in conventional and biofilm reactors. The use...

  14. A control strategy for grid-side converter of DFIG under unbalanced condition based on Dig SILENT/Power Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pingping; Zhang, Haitian; Chen, Lingqi; Zhang, Xiaoan

    2018-01-01

    The models of doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) and its grid-side converter (GSC) are established under unbalanced grid condition based on DIgSILENT/PowerFactory. According to the mathematical model, the vector equations of positive and negative sequence voltage and current are deduced in the positive sequence synchronous rotating reference frame d-q-0 when the characteristics of the simulation software are considered adequately. Moreover, the reference value of current component of GSC in the positive sequence frame d-q-0 under unbalanced condition can be obtained to improve the traditional control of GSC when the national issue of unbalanced current limits is combined. The simulated results indicate that the control strategy can restrain negative sequence current and the two times frequency power wave of GSC’s ac side effectively. The voltage of DC bus can be maintained a constant to ensure the uninterrupted operation of DFIG under unbalanced grid condition eventually.

  15. Cell factory-derived bioactive molecules with polymeric cryogel scaffold enhance the repair of subchondral cartilage defect in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankur; Bhat, Sumrita; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Gupta, Kailash C; Tägil, Magnus; Zheng, Ming Hao; Kumar, Ashok; Lidgren, Lars

    2017-06-01

    We have explored the potential of cell factory-derived bioactive molecules, isolated from conditioned media of primary goat chondrocytes, for the repair of subchondral cartilage defects. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirms the presence of transforming growth factor-β1 in an isolated protein fraction (12.56 ± 1.15 ng/mg protein fraction). These bioactive molecules were used alone or with chitosan-agarose-gelatin cryogel scaffolds, with and without chondrocytes, to check whether combined approaches further enhance cartilage repair. To evaluate this, an in vivo study was conducted on New Zealand rabbits in which a subchondral defect (4.5 mm wide × 4.5 mm deep) was surgically created. Starting after the operation, bioactive molecules were injected at the defect site at regular intervals of 14 days. Histopathological analysis showed that rabbits treated with bioactive molecules alone had cartilage regeneration after 4 weeks. However, rabbits treated with bioactive molecules along with scaffolds, with or without cells, showed cartilage formation after 3 weeks; 6 weeks after surgery, the cartilage regenerated in rabbits treated with either bioactive molecules alone or in combinations showed morphological similarities to native cartilage. No systemic cytotoxicity or inflammatory response was induced by any of the treatments. Further, ELISA was done to determine systemic toxicity, which showed no difference in concentration of tumour necrosis factor-α in blood serum, before or after surgery. In conclusion, intra-articular injection with bioactive molecules alone may be used for the repair of subchondral cartilage defects, and bioactive molecules along with chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds further enhance the repair. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The microbial cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cormac D

    2012-03-14

    Microorganisms have been used for decades as sources of antibiotics, vitamins and enzymes and for the production of fermented foods and chemicals. In the 21st century microorganisms will play a vital role in addressing some of the problems faced by mankind. In this article three of the current applications in which microbes have a significant role to play are highlighted: the discovery of new antibiotics, manufacture of biofuels and bioplastics, and production of fine chemicals via biotransformation.

  17. The Microbial Cell Factory

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Cormac D.

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms have been used for decades as sources of antibiotics, vitamins and enzymes and for the production of fermented foods and chemicals. In the 21st century microorganisms will play a vital role in addressing some of the problems faced by mankind. In this article three of the current applications in which microbes have a significant role to play are highlighted: the discovery of new antibiotics, manufacture of biofuels and bioplastics, and production of fine chemicals via biotrans...

  18. Medical nutrition therapy: use of sourdough lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for delivering functional biomolecules and food ingredients in gluten free bread

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-08-30

    Abstract Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disease, triggered in genetically susceptible individuals by ingesting gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and other closely related cereal grains. Currently, the estimated prevalence of CD is around 1 % of the population in the western world and medical nutritional therapy (MNT) is the only accepted treatment for celiac disease. To date, the replacement of gluten in bread presents a significant technological challenge for the cereal scientist due to the low baking performance of gluten free products (GF). The increasing demand by the consumer for high quality gluten-free (GF) bread, clean labels and natural products is rising. Sourdough has been used since ancient times for the production of rye and wheat bread, its universal usage can be attributed to the improved quality, nutritional properties and shelf life of sourdough based breads. Consequently, the exploitation of sourdough for the production of GF breads appears tempting. This review will highlight how sourdough LAB can be an efficient cell factory for delivering functional biomolecules and food ingredients to enhance the quality of gluten free bread.

  19. Predicting the responses of soil nitrite-oxidizers to multi-factorial global change: a trait-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eLE ROUX

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil microbial diversity is huge and a few grams of soil contain more bacterial taxa than there are bird species on Earth. This high diversity often makes predicting the responses of soil bacteria to environmental change intractable and restricts our capacity to predict the responses of soil functions to global change. Here, using a long-term field experiment in a California grassland, we studied the main and interactive effects of three global change factors (increased atmospheric CO2 concentration, precipitation and nitrogen addition, and all their factorial combinations, based on global change scenarios for central California on the potential activity, abundance and dominant taxa of soil nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB. Using a trait-based model, we then tested whether categorizing NOB into a few functional groups unified by physiological traits enables understanding and predicting how soil NOB respond to global environmental change. Contrasted responses to global change treatments were observed between three main NOB functional types. In particular, putatively mixotrophic Nitrobacter, rare under most treatments, became dominant under the ‘High CO2+Nitrogen+Precipitation’ treatment. The mechanistic trait-based model, which simulated ecological niches of NOB types consistent with previous ecophysiological reports, helped predicting the observed effects of global change on NOB and elucidating the underlying biotic and abiotic controls. Our results are a starting point for representing the overwhelming diversity of soil bacteria by a few functional types that can be incorporated into models of terrestrial ecosystems and biogeochemical processes.

  20. Predicting the Responses of Soil Nitrite-Oxidizers to Multi-Factorial Global Change: A Trait-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Xavier; Bouskill, Nicholas J; Niboyet, Audrey; Barthes, Laure; Dijkstra, Paul; Field, Chris B; Hungate, Bruce A; Lerondelle, Catherine; Pommier, Thomas; Tang, Jinyun; Terada, Akihiko; Tourna, Maria; Poly, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Soil microbial diversity is huge and a few grams of soil contain more bacterial taxa than there are bird species on Earth. This high diversity often makes predicting the responses of soil bacteria to environmental change intractable and restricts our capacity to predict the responses of soil functions to global change. Here, using a long-term field experiment in a California grassland, we studied the main and interactive effects of three global change factors (increased atmospheric CO2 concentration, precipitation and nitrogen addition, and all their factorial combinations, based on global change scenarios for central California) on the potential activity, abundance and dominant taxa of soil nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Using a trait-based model, we then tested whether categorizing NOB into a few functional groups unified by physiological traits enables understanding and predicting how soil NOB respond to global environmental change. Contrasted responses to global change treatments were observed between three main NOB functional types. In particular, putatively mixotrophic Nitrobacter, rare under most treatments, became dominant under the 'High CO2+Nitrogen+Precipitation' treatment. The mechanistic trait-based model, which simulated ecological niches of NOB types consistent with previous ecophysiological reports, helped predicting the observed effects of global change on NOB and elucidating the underlying biotic and abiotic controls. Our results are a starting point for representing the overwhelming diversity of soil bacteria by a few functional types that can be incorporated into models of terrestrial ecosystems and biogeochemical processes.

  1. Controlling heterologous gene expression in yeast cell factories on different carbon substrates and across the diauxic shift: a comparison of yeast promoter activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bingyin; Williams, Thomas C; Henry, Matthew; Nielsen, Lars K; Vickers, Claudia E

    2015-06-26

    Predictable control of gene expression is necessary for the rational design and optimization of cell factories. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the promoter is one of the most important tools available for controlling gene expression. However, the complex expression patterns of yeast promoters have not been fully characterised and compared on different carbon sources (glucose, sucrose, galactose and ethanol) and across the diauxic shift in glucose batch cultivation. These conditions are of importance to yeast cell factory design because they are commonly used and encountered in industrial processes. Here, the activities of a series of "constitutive" and inducible promoters were characterised in single cells throughout the fermentation using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. The "constitutive" promoters, including glycolytic promoters, transcription elongation factor promoters and ribosomal promoters, differed in their response patterns to different carbon sources; however, in glucose batch cultivation, expression driven by these promoters decreased sharply as glucose was depleted and cells moved towards the diauxic shift. Promoters induced at low-glucose levels (P(HXT7), P(SSA1) and P(ADH2)) varied in induction strength on non-glucose carbon sources (sucrose, galactose and ethanol); in contrast to the "constitutive" promoters, GFP expression increased as glucose decreased and cells moved towards the diauxic shift. While lower than several "constitutive" promoters during the exponential phase, expression from the SSA1 promoter was higher in the post-diauxic phase than the commonly-used TEF1 promoter. The galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter provided the highest GFP expression on galactose, and the copper-inducible CUP1 promoter provided the highest induced GFP expression following the diauxic shift. The data provides a foundation for predictable and optimised control of gene expression levels on different carbon sources and throughout batch

  2. Increasing cell biomass in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases recombinant protein yield: the use of a respiratory strain as a microbial cell factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedfalk Kristina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant protein production is universally employed as a solution to obtain the milligram to gram quantities of a given protein required for applications as diverse as structural genomics and biopharmaceutical manufacture. Yeast is a well-established recombinant host cell for these purposes. In this study we wanted to investigate whether our respiratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, TM6*, could be used to enhance the productivity of recombinant proteins over that obtained from corresponding wild type, respiro-fermentative strains when cultured under the same laboratory conditions. Results Here we demonstrate at least a doubling in productivity over wild-type strains for three recombinant membrane proteins and one recombinant soluble protein produced in TM6* cells. In all cases, this was attributed to the improved biomass properties of the strain. The yield profile across the growth curve was also more stable than in a wild-type strain, and was not further improved by lowering culture temperatures. This has the added benefit that improved yields can be attained rapidly at the yeast's optimal growth conditions. Importantly, improved productivity could not be reproduced in wild-type strains by culturing them under glucose fed-batch conditions: despite having achieved very similar biomass yields to those achieved by TM6* cultures, the total volumetric yields were not concomitantly increased. Furthermore, the productivity of TM6* was unaffected by growing cultures in the presence of ethanol. These findings support the unique properties of TM6* as a microbial cell factory. Conclusions The accumulation of biomass in yeast cell factories is not necessarily correlated with a proportional increase in the functional yield of the recombinant protein being produced. The respiratory S. cerevisiae strain reported here is therefore a useful addition to the matrix of production hosts currently available as its improved biomass

  3. AutoPyFactory: A Scalable Flexible Pilot Factory Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, J; Hover, J; Love, P; Stewart, G A

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC is one of the largest users of grid computing infrastructure, which is a central part of the experiment's computing operations. Considerable efforts have been made to use grid technology in the most efficient and effective way, including the use of a pilot job based workload management framework. In this model the experiment submits ‘pilot’ jobs to sites without payload. When these jobs begin to run they contact a central service to pick-up a real payload to execute. The first generation of pilot factories were usually specific to a single Virtual Organization (VO), and were bound to the particular architecture of that VO's distributed processing. A second generation provides factories which are more flexible, not tied to any particular VO, and provide new and improved features such as monitoring, logging, profiling, etc. In this paper we describe this key part of the ATLAS pilot architecture, a second generation pilot factory, AutoPyFactory. AutoPyFactory has a modular design and is highly configurable. It is able to send different types of pilots to sites and exploit different submission mechanisms and queue characteristics. It is tightly integrated with the PanDA job submission framework, coupling pilot flow to the amount of work the site has to run. It gathers information from many sources in order to correctly configure itself for a site and its decision logic can easily be updated. Integrated into AutoPyFactory is a flexible system for delivering both generic and specific job wrappers which can perform many useful actions before starting to run end-user scientific applications, e.g., validation of the middleware, node profiling and diagnostics, and monitoring. AutoPyFactory also has a robust monitoring system that has been invaluable in establishing a reliable pilot factory service for ATLAS.

  4. AutoPyFactory: A Scalable Flexible Pilot Factory Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J.; Hover, J.; Love, P.; Stewart, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC is one of the largest users of grid computing infrastructure, which is a central part of the experiment's computing operations. Considerable efforts have been made to use grid technology in the most efficient and effective way, including the use of a pilot job based workload management framework. In this model the experiment submits ‘pilot’ jobs to sites without payload. When these jobs begin to run they contact a central service to pick-up a real payload to execute. The first generation of pilot factories were usually specific to a single Virtual Organization (VO), and were bound to the particular architecture of that VO's distributed processing. A second generation provides factories which are more flexible, not tied to any particular VO, and provide new and improved features such as monitoring, logging, profiling, etc. In this paper we describe this key part of the ATLAS pilot architecture, a second generation pilot factory, AutoPyFactory. AutoPyFactory has a modular design and is highly configurable. It is able to send different types of pilots to sites and exploit different submission mechanisms and queue characteristics. It is tightly integrated with the PanDA job submission framework, coupling pilot flow to the amount of work the site has to run. It gathers information from many sources in order to correctly configure itself for a site and its decision logic can easily be updated. Integrated into AutoPyFactory is a flexible system for delivering both generic and specific job wrappers which can perform many useful actions before starting to run end-user scientific applications, e.g., validation of the middleware, node profiling and diagnostics, and monitoring. AutoPyFactory also has a robust monitoring system that has been invaluable in establishing a reliable pilot factory service for ATLAS.

  5. The beam-beam limit in asymmetric colliders: Optimization of the B-factory parameter base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennyson, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a general theory of the beam-beam limit in symmetric and asymmetric lepton ring colliders. It shows how the beam-beam limit in these accelerators affects the maximum attainable luminosity and presents a specific algorithm for parameter base optimization. It is shown that the special problems inherent in asymmetric colliders derive not from the asymmetry, but from the fact that the two beams must be in different rings. Computer simulation experiments are used to demonstrate the various phenomena discussed in the theory

  6. Surface based factory for the production of life support and technology support products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The presence of a manned space colony on Mars may be expected to involve three phases in the utilization of planetary resources: (1) survival phase in which air, water, and food are produced, (2) self sufficiency phase in which chemicals, fuels, pharmaceuticals, polymers, and metals are produced, and (3) export to earth of materials and technology 1 phase in which the unique advantage of the extraterrestrial environment is fully exploited. The Advanced Design Project is administered as an interdisciplinary effort involving students and faculty throughout the College of Engineering. Senior students from Chemical, Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering are participating as a team. Multi discipline interfacing and coordination are stressed throughout the project. An interdisciplinary senior design course was developed and offered in the Spring of 1987. The first task of the survival phase is that of providing a supply of water and air adequate to support a ten person colony. The project has been divided into three subgroups: (1) design of a manufacturing and storage facility for air, (2) search and drill for water or water-bearing materials, and (3) retrieve, purify, and store potable water. The conceptual design phase has been completed and the project is being documented. The second task of the survival phase is that of providing a replenish able food supply. This task has two requirements: producing a supply of protein and providing an environment for growing plants for food. For the first requirement, we considered the design of a bioreactor system capable of growing beef cells for protein production. For the second, a design must be developed for a manufacturing system to produce materials needed to build a greenhouse farm.

  7. Success stories of natural product-based hybrid molecules for multi-factorial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Shalki; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Verma, Himanshu; Singh, Harpreet; Silakari, Om

    2018-03-24

    Complex diseases comprises of highly complicated etiology resulting in limited applicability of conventional targeted therapies. Consequently, conventional medicinal compounds suffer major failure when used for such disease conditions. Additionally, development of multidrug resistance (MDR), adverse drug reactions and clinical specificity of single targeted drug therapy has increased thrust for novel drug therapy. In this rapidly evolving era, natural product-based discovery of hybrid molecules or multi-targeted drug therapies have shown promising results and are trending now a days. Historically, nature has blessed human with different sources viz. plant, animal, microbial, marine and ethnopharmaceutical sources which has given a wide variety of medicinally active compounds. These compounds from natural origin are always choice of interest of medicinal chemists because of their minimum side effects. Hybrid molecules synthesized by fusing or conjugating different active molecules obtained from these sources are reported to synergistically block different pathways which contribute in the pathogenesis of complex diseases. This review strives to encompass all natural product-derived hybrid molecules which act as multi-targeting agents striking various targets involved in different pathways of complex diseased conditions reported in literature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. The impact of a population-based multi-factorial lifestyle intervention on alcohol intake: the Inter99 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Ulla Marie Nørgaard; Pisinger, Charlotta; Aadahl, Mette

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of screening and five years of multi-factorial lifestyle intervention on changes in alcohol intake in a general population. METHODS: The study was a pre-randomized intervention study on lifestyle, Inter99 (1999-2006), Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants in the int...... in women on total alcohol intake. CONCLUSION: Multi-factorial lifestyle intervention, including low intensity alcohol intervention, improved long-term alcohol habits in a general population.......PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of screening and five years of multi-factorial lifestyle intervention on changes in alcohol intake in a general population. METHODS: The study was a pre-randomized intervention study on lifestyle, Inter99 (1999-2006), Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants...

  9. Cryogenic Hydrogen Fuel for Controlled Inertial Confinement Fusion (Cryogenic Target Factory Concept Based on FST-Layering Method)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R.; Koshelev, I. E.; Krokhin, O. N.; Nikitenko, A. I.; Osipov, I. E.

    2017-12-01

    A central element of a power plant based on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is a target with cryogenic hydrogen fuel that should be delivered to the center of a reactor chamber with a high accuracy and repetition rate. Therefore, a cryogenic target factory (CTF) is an integral part of any ICF reactor. A promising way to solve this problem consists in the FST layering method developed at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI). This method (rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets) is unique, having no analogs in the world. The further development of FST-layering technologies is implemented in the scope of the LPI program for the creation of a modular CTF and commercialization of the obtained results. In this report, we discuss our concept of CTF (CTF-LPI) that exhibits the following distinctive features: using a FST-layering technology for the elaboration of an in-line production of cryogenic targets, using an effect of quantum levitation of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) in magnetic field for noncontacting manipulation, transport, and positioning of the free-standing cryogenic targets, as well as in using a Fourier holography technique for an on-line characterization and tracking of the targets flying into the reactor chamber. The results of original experimental and theoretical investigations performed at LPI indicate that the existing and developing target fabrication capabilities and technologies can be applied to ICF target production. The unique scientific, engineering, and technological base developed in Russia at LPI allows one to make a CTFLPI prototype for mass production of targets and delivery thereof at the required velocity into the ICF reactor chamber.

  10. Cytotoxicity and modes of action of five Cameroonian medicinal plants against multi-factorial drug resistance of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Tankeo, Simplice B; Saeed, Mohamed E M; Wiench, Benjamin; Tane, Pierre; Efferth, Thomas

    2014-04-11

    Beilschmiedia acuta Kosterm, Clausena anisata (Willd) Hook, Fagara tessmannii Engl., Newbouldia laevis Seem., and Polyscias fulva (Hiern) Harms. are medicinal plants used in Cameroonian traditional medicine in the treatment of various types of cancers. The present study aims at investigating 11 methanolic extracts from the above Cameroonian medicinal plants on a panel of human cancer cell lines, including various drug-resistant phenotypes. Possible modes of action were analyzed for two extracts from Beilschmiedia acuta and Polyscia fulva and alpha-hederin, the representative constituent of Polyscia fulva. Cytotoxicity was determined using a resazurin assay. Cell cycle, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by flow cytometry. Cellular response to alpha-hederin was investigated by a mRNA microarray approach. Prescreening of extracts (40µg/mL) showed that three of eleven plant extracts inhibited proliferation of CCRF-CEM cells by more than 50%, i.e. BAL (73.65%), the bark extract of Beilschmiedia acuta (78.67%) and PFR (68.72%). Subsequent investigations revealed IC50 values below or around 30µg/mL of BAL and PFR in 10 cell lines, including drug-resistant models, i.e. P-glycoprotein-overexpressing CEM/ADR5000, breast cancer resistance protein-transfected MDA-MB-231-BCRP, TP53 knockout cells (HCT116 p53(-/-)), and mutation-activated epidermal growth factor receptor-transfected U87MG.ΔEGFR cells. IC50 values below 5µg/mL of BAL were obtained for HCT116 (p53(-/-)) cells. IC50 values below 10µM of alpha-hederin were found for sensitive CCRF-CEM and multidrug-resistant CEM/ADR5000 cells. The BAL and PFR extracts induced cell cycle arrest between G0/G1 and S phases. PFR-induced apoptosis was associated with increased ROS generation and MMP breakdown. Microarray-based cluster analysis revealed a gene expression profile that predicted cellular response to alpha-hederin. BAL, PFL and alpha-hederin, an

  11. RDE-based assessment of a factory bi-fuel CNG/gasoline light-duty vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rašić, Davor; Rodman Oprešnik, Samuel; Seljak, Tine; Vihar, Rok; Baškovič, Urban Žvar; Wechtersbach, Tomaž; Katrašnik, Tomaž

    2017-10-01

    On-road exhaust emissions of a Euro 5 factory bi-fuel CNG/gasoline light-duty vehicle equipped with the TWC were assessed considering the Real Driving Emissions (RDE) guidelines. The vehicle was equipped with a Portable Emission Measurement System (PEMS) that enabled the measurement of THC, CO, NOx, CO2, and CH4. With respect to the characteristics of the vehicle, the appropriate Worldwide Harmonized Light-Duty Vehicle Test Cycles (WLTC) were selected and based on the requirements of the RDE legislation a suitable route was conceived. In addition to the moderate RDE-based route, an extended RDE-based route was also determined. The vehicle was driven along each defined route twice, once with each individual fuel option and with a fully warm vehicle. RDE routes feature a multitude of new driving patterns that are significantly different to those encountered in the NEDC. However, as these driving patterns can greatly influence the cumulative emissions an insight in to local time trace phenomena is crucial to understand, reason and to possibly reduce the cumulative emissions. Original contributions of this paper comprise analyses of the RDE-LDV local time resolved driving emissions phenomena of a CNG-powered vehicle that are benchmarked against the ones measured under the use of gasoline in the same vehicle and under similar operating conditions to reason emission trends through driving patterns and powertrain parameters and exposing the strong cold-start independent interference of CO and N2O infrared absorption bands in the non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer. The paper provides experimental evidence on this interference, which significantly influences on the readings of CO emissions. The paper further provides hypotheses why CO and N2O interference is more pronounced when using CNG in LDVs and supports these hypotheses by PEMS tests. The study reveals that the vehicle's NOx real-world emission values of both conceived RDE-based routes when using both fuels are

  12. Low incidence of syphilis among factory workers in Ethiopia: effect of an intervention based on education and counselling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahlu, T.; Rinke de Wit, T. F.; Tsegaye, A.; Mekonnen, Y.; Beyene, A.; Hailu, B.; Coutinho, R. A.; Fontanet, A.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence and incidence of syphilis infection were examined in a cohort study of factory workers in Ethiopia. METHOD: Between February 1997 and March 1999, 409 men and 348 women were enrolled and followed in the cohort study. RESULTS: The prevalence (95% CI) of past/current syphilis

  13. Possible experiments at neutrino factories

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, T O

    2001-01-01

    There are currently plans to construct neutrino factories based on muon storage rings. Such projects are parts of large programmes for the production, cooling, acceleration and storage of muons for dedicated muon colliders, and the lower-energy neutrino factories are perceived as a first step towards the colliders at a much higher energy. We shall explore possible experiments at the projected high- intensity neutrino beams. Among these experiments the measurement of the nuclear coherent scattering cross section would be based on the use of thermal calorimetric detectors segmented so that self-vetoing would supplement the surrounding veto detectors. (4 refs).

  14. A Group-Based Mobile Application to Increase Adherence in Exercise and Nutrition Programs: A Factorial Design Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Youngblood, Gregory Michael; Ram, Ashwin; Pirolli, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Novel methods of promoting self-monitoring and social support are needed to ensure long-term maintenance of behavior change. In this paper, we directly investigate the effects of group support in an exercise and nutrition program delivered by an mHealth application called Fittle. Objective Our first specific study aim was to explore whether social support improved adherence in wellness programs. Our second specific study aim was to assess whether media types (ePaper vs mobile) were associated with different levels of compliance and adherence to wellness programs. The third aim was to assess whether the use of an mHealth application led to positive changes to participants’ eating behavior, physical activity, and stress level, compared to traditional paper-based programs. Methods A 2 × 2 (eg, Media: Mobile vs ePaper × Group Type: Team vs Solo) factorial design feasibility study was conducted. A sample of 124 volunteers who were interested in improving eating behavior, increasing physical activity, or reducing stress participated in this study. The study duration was 8 weeks. All groups were self-directed with no ongoing human input from the research team. Results Participants in ePaper conditions had higher attrition rates compared to participants in Mobile conditions, χ3 2=9.96, P=.02 (N=124). Participants in Mobile conditions reported their compliance with a much higher frequency closer to the time of challenge activity completion (2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test comparing distributions was highly significant—KS=0.33, PMobile conditions—χ1 2=25.25, Pmobile app allowed a more accurate method to report and track health behaviors over a longer period than traditional ePaper-based diaries or log books. There was a significant difference in the overall compliance score for Mobile-Solo (Mean [SD] 0.30 [0.39]) and Mobile-Team (Mean [SD] 0.49 [0.35]) conditions (t 50.82=1.94, P=.05). This suggests that working in a team increased participants

  15. Factorials of real negative and imaginary numbers - A new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thukral, Ashwani K

    2014-01-01

    Presently, factorials of real negative numbers and imaginary numbers, except for zero and negative integers are interpolated using the Euler's gamma function. In the present paper, the concept of factorials has been generalised as applicable to real and imaginary numbers, and multifactorials. New functions based on Euler's factorial function have been proposed for the factorials of real negative and imaginary numbers. As per the present concept, the factorials of real negative numbers, are complex numbers. The factorials of real negative integers have their imaginary part equal to zero, thus are real numbers. Similarly, the factorials of imaginary numbers are complex numbers. The moduli of the complex factorials of real negative numbers, and imaginary numbers are equal to their respective real positive number factorials. Fractional factorials and multifactorials have been defined in a new perspective. The proposed concept has also been extended to Euler's gamma function for real negative numbers and imaginary numbers, and beta function.

  16. Mars surface-based factory: Computer control of a water treatment system to support a space colony on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, R.; Mosley, J.; Willis, D.; Coleman, K.; Martin, C.; Shelby, L.; Kelley, U.; Renfro, E.; Griffith, G.; Warsame, A.

    1989-01-01

    In a continued effort to design a surface-based factory on Mars for the production of oxygen and water, the Design Group at Prairie View A&M University made a preliminary study of the surface and atmospheric composition on Mars and determined the mass densities of the various gases in the martian atmosphere. Based on the initial studies, the design group determined oxygen and water to be the two products that could be produced economically under the martian conditions. Studies were also made on present production techniques to obtain water and oxygen. Analyses were made to evaluate the current methods of production that were adaptable to the martian conditions. The detailed report was contained in an Interim Report submitted to NASA/USRA in Aug. of 1986. Even though the initial effort was the production of oxygen and water, we found it necessary to produce some diluted gases that can be mixed with oxygen to constitute 'breathable' air. In Phase 2--Task 1A, the Prairie View A&M University team completed the conceptual design of a breathable-air manufacturing system, a means of drilling for underground water, and storage of water for future use. The design objective of the team for the 1987-1988 academic year was the conceptual design of an integrated system for the supply of quality water for biological consumption, farming, and residential and industrial use. The design has also been completed. Phase 2--Task 1C is the present task for the Prairie View Design Team. This is a continuation of the previous task, and the continuation of this effort is the investigation into the extraction of water from beneath the surface and an alternative method of extraction from ice formations on the surface of Mars if accessible. In addition to investigation of water extraction, a system for computer control of extraction and treatment was developed with emphasis on fully automated control with robotic repair and maintenance. It is expected that oxygen- and water-producing plants

  17. Identification of factorial structure of MMSE based on elderly cognitive destiny: the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noale, M; Limongi, F; Minicuci, N

    2006-01-01

    The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is one of the most commonly used instruments in the evaluation of global cognitive status, but only few studies have investigated the relationship among its components in terms of factorial structure. We have considered data from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging (ILSA), carried out in Italy in 1992 on a sample of 5,632 subjects aged 65-84 years, and followed up in 1996. The aim of our study was to investigate static factorial structure in three groups of elderly (subjects with a diagnosis of dementia at baseline; subjects free of dementia at baseline, but incident cases at follow-up; subjects who never developed dementia during the 4-year follow-up). Considering our results, we could hypothesize that MMSE static structure reflects the cognitive profile of elderly, and is thus influenced by subjects' potential to develop dementia. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Managing the Microbial Ecology of a Cyanobacteria-Based Photosynthetic Factory Direct!, Final Report for EE0006100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittmann, Bruce [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Krajmalnik‐Brown, Rosa [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zevin, Alexander [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Nguyen, Binh [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Patel, Megha [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2015-02-28

    The grandest challenge facing human society today is providing large amounts of energy and industrial chemicals that are renewable and carbon-neutral. An outstanding opportunity lies in employing photosynthetic microorganisms, which have the potential to generate energy and chemical feedstock from sunlight and CO2 at rates 10 to 100 times greater than plants. Major challenges for solar-powered production using photosynthetic microorganisms are associated with the harvesting and downstream processing of biomass to yield the usable energy or material feedstock e.g. The technical challenges and costs of downstream processing could be avoided if, powered by solar energy, the photosynthetic microorganisms were to convert CO2 directly to the desired product, which they release for direct harvesting. This approach creates a true photosynthetic factory, our goal for Photosynthetic Factory Direct! Our team is able to genetically modify the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 so that it produces and excretes a range of renewable energy and chemical products directly from CO2 and sunlight. Essential to realizing the potential of the photosynthetic factory is an engineered Advanced Photobioreactor (APBR) for reliable synthesis and harvest of the products.

  19. Factorial experimental design for the culture of human embryonic stem cells as aggregates in stirred suspension bioreactors reveals the potential for interaction effects between bioprocess parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Megan M; Meng, Guoliang; Rancourt, Derrick E; Gates, Ian D; Kallos, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Traditional optimization of culture parameters for the large-scale culture of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as aggregates is carried out in a stepwise manner whereby the effect of varying each culture parameter is investigated individually. However, as evidenced by the wide range of published protocols and culture performance indicators (growth rates, pluripotency marker expression, etc.), there is a lack of systematic investigation into the true effect of varying culture parameters especially with respect to potential interactions between culture variables. Here we describe the design and execution of a two-parameter, three-level (3(2)) factorial experiment resulting in nine conditions that were run in duplicate 125-mL stirred suspension bioreactors. The two parameters investigated here were inoculation density and agitation rate, which are easily controlled, but currently, poorly characterized. Cell readouts analyzed included fold expansion, maximum density, and exponential growth rate. Our results reveal that the choice of best case culture parameters was dependent on which cell property was chosen as the primary output variable. Subsequent statistical analyses via two-way analysis of variance indicated significant interaction effects between inoculation density and agitation rate specifically in the case of exponential growth rates. Results indicate that stepwise optimization has the potential to miss out on the true optimal case. In addition, choosing an optimum condition for a culture output of interest from the factorial design yielded similar results when repeated with the same cell line indicating reproducibility. We finally validated that human ESCs remain pluripotent in suspension culture as aggregates under our optimal conditions and maintain their differentiation capabilities as well as a stable karyotype and strong expression levels of specific human ESC markers over several passages in suspension bioreactors.

  20. Railways Factory in Resita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Iacob-Mare

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an exemption Analysis railway factory in Resita impressed having experience and also provide some technical characteristics of freight wagons representative technology, used to transport products made in factories in ReşiŃa.

  1. PCs in the factory

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a short discount publication.PCs have become as essential to the factory environment as they are to the office environment. This in-depth report examines how specially adapted PCs and peripherals are being established in Factory Process Control and Reporting. The report covers: * Hardware and Software* Typical Applications* Implementation Issues* Case Studies and Real Applications

  2. Whole transcriptome data of primary human NK cells under hypoxia and interleukin 15 priming: A 2×2 factorial design experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Ana Sofia; Killian, Doreen; Schulte, Jutta; Sticht, Carsten; Lindner, Holger A

    2017-10-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells mediate innate immunity against cancer and intracellular infection, at that, operating in often oxygen-deprived environments. We performed a microarray experiment with a 2×2 factorial design to profile gene expression in human NK cells (Velasquez et al., 2016) [1]. In this experiment, NK cells from 5 healthy volunteers were primed or not for 6 h with the survival factor and inflammatory cytokine interleukin 15 (IL-15) under hypoxic or normoxic culture conditions (20 samples in total). Here, we provide details on the culture setup that govern the actual O 2 partial pressure (pO 2 ) experienced by the cells, as well as on the RNA extraction procedure used, which we optimized from commercial spin column protocols to obtain highly concentrated total RNA. We present a quality control analysis of the normalized microarray data, as well as overviews for differentially regulated genes. These data provide insights into NK cell transcriptional responses to immune stimulation under physiologically relevant low oxygen conditions. This dataset is deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus database (accession number GSE70214).

  3. A cell factory of Bacillus subtilis engineered for the simple bioconversion of myo-inositol to scyllo-inositol, a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenaka Shinji

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A stereoisomer of inositol, scyllo-inositol, is known as a promising therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease, since it prevents the accumulation of beta-amyloid deposits, a hallmark of the disease. However, this compound is relatively rare in nature, whereas another stereoisomer of inositol, myo-inositol, is abundantly available. Results Bacillus subtilis possesses a unique inositol metabolism involving both stereoisomers. We manipulated the inositol metabolism in B. subtilis to permit the possible bioconversion from myo-inositol to scyllo-inositol. Within 48 h of cultivation, the engineered strain was able to convert almost half of 10 g/L myo-inositol to scyllo-inositol that accumulated in the culture medium. Conclusions The engineered B. subtilis serves as a prototype of cell factory enabling a novel and inexpensive supply of scyllo-inositol.

  4. A cell factory of Bacillus subtilis engineered for the simple bioconversion of myo-inositol to scyllo-inositol, a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A stereoisomer of inositol, scyllo-inositol, is known as a promising therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease, since it prevents the accumulation of beta-amyloid deposits, a hallmark of the disease. However, this compound is relatively rare in nature, whereas another stereoisomer of inositol, myo-inositol, is abundantly available. Results Bacillus subtilis possesses a unique inositol metabolism involving both stereoisomers. We manipulated the inositol metabolism in B. subtilis to permit the possible bioconversion from myo-inositol to scyllo-inositol. Within 48 h of cultivation, the engineered strain was able to convert almost half of 10 g/L myo-inositol to scyllo-inositol that accumulated in the culture medium. Conclusions The engineered B. subtilis serves as a prototype of cell factory enabling a novel and inexpensive supply of scyllo-inositol. PMID:21896210

  5. Related factors to workers' use of hearing protection device in knitting & ppinning factories of Yazd city based on Protection Motivation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barkhordi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsNoise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL is an important occupational disorder. High percentage of workers in occupational environments did not use the hearing protection device against harmful noise. This study was carried out to study factors related to workers' use of Hearing protection Device in Knitting & spinning factories of Yazd city based on protection motivation theory.MethodsIn this cross-sectional analytical study 280 workers of the knitting & spinning factories of Yazd City who exposed to harmful noise (over 85dB selected among the three factories by cluster sampling. The data gathered via exclusive interviews with selected workers  using the questionnaire designed based on protection motivation theory and were analyzedResults42/5 percent of workers permanently used hearing protection devices, and 20/7 percent of workers never use.There was a significant correlation between the age of workers and the mean score components of PMT; perceived severity, perceived vulnerability, perceived response efficacy and protection motivation. There was also a significant correlation between the work experience and the mean score of PMT factors; perceived severity, perceived response efficacy and perceived vulnerability. Also there was a significant correlation between workers' education level and the mean score of perceived response efficacy and there was a significant correlation between protection motivation and the mean score components of PMT; perceived vulnerability, perceived self-efficacy, perceived response efficacy, perceived costs and behaviorConclusionRegarding the significant correlations between the more constructs of PMT and protection motivation of workers for using hearing protective device, designing educational program based on PMT to increase hearing protection devices usage among workers is recommended.

  6. Towards energy transparent factories

    CERN Document Server

    Posselt, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    This monograph provides a methodological approach for establishing demand-oriented levels of energy transparency of factories. The author presents a systematic indication of energy drivers and cost factors, taking into account the interdependencies between facility and production domains. Particular attention is given to energy flow metering and monitoring. Readers will also be provided with an in-depth description of a planning tool which allows for systematically deriving suitable metering points in complex factory environments. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field of factory planning, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  7. A community-based factorial trial on Alzheimer's disease. Effects of expectancy, recruitment methods, co-morbidity and drug use : The Dementia Study in Northern Norway.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Paper 3 of this thesis is not available in Munin: 3. Fred Andersen, Dag S. Halvorsen, Bjørn Straume, Matti Viitanen, Tom Wilsgaard and Torgeir A Engstad: 'The effect of stimulation therapy and donepezil on cognitive function in Alzheimer’s disease. A community based RCT with a two-by-two factorial design' (submitted to Journal of the American Geriatrics Society) Ni kommuner deltok i studien. I fem av kommunene fikk deltakerne med Alzheimers sykdom (AS) systematisk stimulering (n=103), i de...

  8. Virtual Factory Testbed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Factory Testbed (VFT) is comprised of three physical facilities linked by a standalone network (VFNet). The three facilities are the Smart and Wireless...

  9. Super B Factories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . 744. Pramana – J. Phys. ... bound the values of NP parameters and study their effect on the b → s penguin modes. The B factories ..... the magnet power supplies, the RF system, the digital feedback system, and many vacuum components.

  10. Maximum Autocorrelation Factorial Kriging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Pedersen, John L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factorial kriging, and its application to irregularly sampled stream sediment geochemical data from South Greenland. Kriged MAF images are compared with kriged images of varimax rotated factors from...

  11. Cytotoxicity of methanol extracts of 10 Cameroonian medicinal plants towards multi-factorial drug-resistant cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Tchinda, Cedric F; Mambe, Flora T; Beng, Veronique P; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-08-02

    Cancer chemotherapy is still hampered by clinical failures due to multi-drug resistance (MDR) of tumor cells. In the present study, we have investigated the cytotoxicity of 20 methanol extracts from 10 medicinal plants against the sensitive leukemia CCRF-CEM cells. The most cytotoxic extracts were then further tested on a panel of 8 human cancer cell lines, including various MDR phenotypes. The cytotoxicity of the 20 methanol extracts from 10 Cameroonian medicinal plants was determined using a resazurin reduction assay. Meanwhile, flow cytometry was used to measure cell cycle, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the preliminary assay using CCRF-CEM cells, 12 extracts from five plants displayed IC50 values below 80 μg/mL, namely Albizia adianthifolia, Alchornea cordifolia, Alchornea laxiflora, Pennisetum purpureum, and Spathodea campanulata. the four best extracts were from two plants: Albizia adianthifolia roots (AAR) and bark (AAB) as well as Alchornea cordifolia leaves (ACL) and bark (ACB) had respective IC50 values of 0.98 μg/mL, 1.45 μg/mL, 8.02 μg/mL and 12.57 μg/mL in CCRF-CEM cells. They were further tested in 8 other cell lines as well as in normal AML12 hepatocytes. IC50 values ranging from 2.71 μg/mL (towards glioblastoma U87MG.ΔEGFR cells) to 10.30 μg/mL (towards breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231-BCRP cells) for AAB, from 3.43 μg/mL (towards U87MG cells) to 10.77 μg/mL (towards colon carcinoma HCT116 (p53 (-/-) ) cells) for AAR and from 0.11 μg/mL (towards CCRF-CEM cells) to 108 μg/mL (towards leukemia CEM/ADR5000 cells) for doxorubicin (as control drug) were obtained. ACL and ACB extracts displayed selective activities. AAR and ACL extracts induced apoptosis in CCRF-CEM cells, through caspases activation and loss of MMP, while apoptotic cell death was mediated by MMP diruption and increase ROS production for ACL. Some of the tested plants namely Albizia adianthifolia, Alchornea

  12. Determination of protein and amino acid requirements of lactating sows using a population-based factorial approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strathe, Anja Varmløse; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation techniques. BW, back fat thickness of the sow, litter size (LS), average litter gain (LG), dietary energy density and feed intake were inputs to the model. The model was tested using results from the literature, and the values were all within ±1 s.d. of the estimated requirements...... recommendations for lactating sows using a stochastic modeling approach that integrates population variation and uncertainty of key parameters into establishing nutritional recommendations for lactating sows. The requirement for individual sows was calculated using a factorial approach by adding the requirement...... for maintenance and milk. The energy balance of the sows was either negative or zero depending on feed intake being a limiting factor. Some parameters in the model were sow-specific and others were population-specific, depending on state of knowledge. Each simulation was for 1000 sows repeated 100 times using...

  13. Climatic and basin factors affecting the flood frequency curve: PART II – A full sensitivity analysis based on the continuous simulation approach combined with a factorial experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Franchini

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity analysis described in Hashemi et al. (2000 is based on one-at-a-time perturbations to the model parameters. This type of analysis cannot highlight the presence of parameter interactions which might indeed affect the characteristics of the flood frequency curve (ffc even more than the individual parameters. For this reason, the effects of the parameters of the rainfall, rainfall runoff models and of the potential evapotranspiration demand on the ffc are investigated here through an analysis of the results obtained from a factorial experimental design, where all the parameters are allowed to vary simultaneously. This latter, more complex, analysis confirms the results obtained in Hashemi et al. (2000 thus making the conclusions drawn there of wider validity and not related strictly to the reference set selected. However, it is shown that two-factor interactions are present not only between different pairs of parameters of an individual model, but also between pairs of parameters of different models, such as rainfall and rainfall-runoff models, thus demonstrating the complex interaction between climate and basin characteristics affecting the ffc and in particular its curvature. Furthermore, the wider range of climatic regime behaviour produced within the factorial experimental design shows that the probability distribution of soil moisture content at the storm arrival time is no longer sufficient to explain the link between the perturbations to the parameters and their effects on the ffc, as was suggested in Hashemi et al. (2000. Other factors have to be considered, such as the probability distribution of the soil moisture capacity, and the rainfall regime, expressed through the annual maximum rainfalls over different durations. Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation; factorial experimental design; analysis of variance (ANOVA

  14. Cytotoxicity of anthraquinones from the roots of Pentas schimperi towards multi-factorial drug-resistant cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Donfack, Arno R Nanfack; Mbaveng, Armelle T; Zeino, Maen; Tane, Pierre; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug resistance in cancer represents a major problem in chemotherapy. The present study was designed to assess the cytotoxicity of anthraquinones from Pentas schimperi, namely damnacanthal (1), damnacanthol (2), 3-hydroxy-2-hydroxymethyl anthraquinone (3) and schimperiquinone B (4) against nine drug-sensitive and multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer cell lines. The resazurin reduction assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the above compounds, whilst caspase-Glo assay was used to detect the activation of caspases enzymes by compounds 1 and 2. Cell cycle, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and levels of reactive oxygen species were all analyzed via flow cytometry. Anthraquinones 1 and 2 displayed cytotoxic effects with IC50 values below 81 μM on all the nine tested cancer cell lines whilst 3 and 4 displayed selective activities. The recorded IC50 values for compounds 1 and 2 ranged from 3.12 μM and 12.18 μM (towards leukemia CCRF-CEM cells) and from 30.32 μM and 80.11 μM (towards gliobastoma U87MG.ΔEGFR cells) respectively, and from 0.20 μM (against CCRF-CEM cells) to 195.12 μM (against CEM/ADR5000 cells) for doxorubicin. Compounds 1 and 2 induced apoptosis in CCRF-CEM leukemia cells, mediated by the disruption of the MMP and increase in ROS production. Anthraquinones from Pentas schimperi and mostly 1 and 2 are potential cytotoxic natural products that deserve more investigations to develop novel antineoplastic drugs against multifactorial drug resistant cancers.

  15. MUON STORAGE RINGS - NEUTRINO FACTORIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The concept of a muon storage ring based Neutrino Source (Neutrino Factory) has sparked considerable interest in the High Energy Physics community. Besides providing a first phase of a muon collider facility, it would generate more intense and well collimated neutrino beams than currently available. The BNL-AGS or some other proton driver would provide an intense proton beam that hits a target, produces pions that decay into muons. The muons must be cooled, accelerated and injected into a storage ring with a long straight section where they decay. The decays occurring in the straight sections of the ring would generate neutrino beams that could be directed to detectors located thousands of kilometers away, allowing studies of neutrino oscillations with precisions not currently accessible. For example, with the neutrino source at BNL, detectors at Soudan, Minnesota (1,715 km), and Gran Sasso, Italy (6,527 km) become very interesting possibilities. The feasibility of constructing and operating such a muon-storage-ring based Neutrino-Factory, including geotechnical questions related to building non-planar storage rings (e.g. at 8degree angle for BNL-Soudan, and 3degree angle for BNL-Gran Sasso) along with the design of the muon capture, cooling, acceleration, and storage ring for such a facility is being explored by the growing Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC). The authors present overview of Neutrino Factory concept based on a muon storage ring, its components, physics opportunities, possible upgrade to a full muon collider, latest simulations of front-end, and a new bowtie-muon storage ring design

  16. The identification of a novel Sulfolobus islandicus CAMP-like peptide points to archaeal microorganisms as cell factories for the production of antimicrobial molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notomista, Eugenio; Falanga, Annarita; Fusco, Salvatore; Pirone, Luciano; Zanfardino, Anna; Galdiero, Stefania; Varcamonti, Mario; Pedone, Emilia; Contursi, Patrizia

    2015-09-04

    Pathogenic bacteria easily develop resistance to c onventional antibiotics so that even relatively new molecules are quickly losing efficacy. This strongly encourages the quest of new antimicrobials especially for the treatment of chronic infections. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) are small positively charged peptides with an amphipathic structure, active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, as well as protozoa. A novel (CAMP)-like peptide (VLL-28) was identified in the primary structure of a transcription factor, Stf76, encoded by pSSVx, a hybrid plasmid-virus from the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. VLL-28 displays chemical, physical and functional properties typical of CAMPs. Indeed, it has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and acquires a defined structure in the presence of membrane mimetics. Furthermore, it exhibits selective leakage and fusogenic capability on vesicles with a lipid composition similar to that of bacterial membranes. VLL-28 localizes not only on the cell membrane but also in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and retains the ability to bind nucleic acids. These findings suggest that this CAMP-like peptide could exert its antimicrobial activity both on membrane and intra cellular targets. VLL-28 is the first CAMP-like peptide identified in the archaeal kingdom, thus pointing to archaeal microorganisms as cell factories to produce antimicrobial molecules of biotechnological interest. Furthermore, results from this work show that DNA/RNA-binding proteins could be used as sources of CAMPs.

  17. 'Geant Simulation of Muon Cooling Rings,' 'Ionization Cooling Ring for Muons,' 'Geant Simulation of Six-Dimensional Cooling of Muon Beams in Ring Coolers,' 'Recent Progress in Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Research Within the Muon Collaboration,' 'Towards the Higgs Factory/Muon Collider,' 'Status of R and D on Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders,' 'Feasibility Study-II of a Muon-Based Neutrino Source,' 'A Muon Collider as a Higgs Factory,' 'Higgs Factory Muon Collider,' 'A Muon Collider as a Higgs Factory,' 'A Feasibility Study of a Neutrino Source Based on a Muon Storage Ring,' 'Status of Muon Collider Research and Development and Future Plans,'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. G. Hanson and A. Klier; R. Palmer,; Amit Klier and Gail G. Hanson,; Mohammad M. Alsharo, et al,; G. Hanson,; G. Hanson,; S. Ozaki, R. Palmer, M.S. Zisman, and J. Gallardo, eds.,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; N. Holtkamp and D. Finley, eds.; C.M. Ankenbrandt

    2006-01-01

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT FOR DOE AWARD DE-FG02-03ER41267 NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER FELLOW By providing an intense, well controlled, well characterized, narrow beam of muon neutrinos and electron antineutrinos from the decay of muons in a storage ring, a neutrino factory can advance neutrino physics beyond the current round of approved and proposed experiments using conventional neutrino beams produced from a beam of decaying pions and kaons. There is no other comparable single clean source of electron neutrinos (from the decay of UNKNOWN, UNREADABLE IN ORIGINAL FILE) or antineutrinos. A muon storage ring producing 1019 to 1021 muon decays per year should be feasible. These intense neutrino beams can be used to study neutrino oscillations and possible CP violation. An entry-level muon storage ring that could provide 1019 decays per year would allow a determination of the sign of and a first measurement of sin22(UNKNOWN)±13 for favorable values of this parameter. An improved muon storage ring system that could provide 1020 muon decays per year would allow measurement of sin22(UNKNOWN)±13 to (UNKNOWN). A high performance muon storage ring capable of providing more than 1020 muon decays per year would allow the exciting possibility of a measurement of CP violation in the leptonic sector. An intense cold muon beam at the front end of a neutrino factory could enable a rich variety of precision muon physics, such as a more precise measurement of the muon anomalous magnetic moment (g - 2) and searches for (UNKNOWN, UNREADABLE IN ORIGINAL FILE) N conversion. In addition, colliding beams of (UNKNOWN) and (UNKNOWN) in a muon collider can provide an effective 'Higgs factory' or multi-TeV center-of-mass energy collisions. A muon collider will be the best way to study the Higgs bosons associated with supersymmetric theories and may be necessary to discover them. Two neutrino factory feasibility studies have been carried out in the U.S. International design efforts are

  18. Handbook factory planning and design

    CERN Document Server

    Wiendahl, Hans-Peter; Nyhuis, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This handbook introduces a methodical approach and pragmatic concept for the planning and design of changeable factories that act in strategic alliances to supply the ever-changing needs of the global market. In the first part, the change drivers of manufacturing enterprises and the resulting new challenges are considered in detail with focus on an appropriate change potential. The second part concerns the design of the production facilities and systems on the factory levels work place, section, building and site under functional, organisational, architectural and strategic aspects keeping in mind the environmental, health and safety aspects including corporate social responsibility. The third part is dedicated to the planning and design method that is based on a synergetic interaction of process and space. The accompanying project management of the planning and construction phase and the facility management for the effective utilization of the built premises close the book. -        Concise overview o...

  19. Virtual Planning, Control, and Machining for a Modular-Based Automated Factory Operation in an Augmented Reality Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Yun Suen; Yap, Hwa Jen; Md Dawal, Siti Zawiah; Ramesh, S; Phoon, Sin Ye

    2016-06-07

    This study presents a modular-based implementation of augmented reality to provide an immersive experience in learning or teaching the planning phase, control system, and machining parameters of a fully automated work cell. The architecture of the system consists of three code modules that can operate independently or combined to create a complete system that is able to guide engineers from the layout planning phase to the prototyping of the final product. The layout planning module determines the best possible arrangement in a layout for the placement of various machines, in this case a conveyor belt for transportation, a robot arm for pick-and-place operations, and a computer numerical control milling machine to generate the final prototype. The robotic arm module simulates the pick-and-place operation offline from the conveyor belt to a computer numerical control (CNC) machine utilising collision detection and inverse kinematics. Finally, the CNC module performs virtual machining based on the Uniform Space Decomposition method and axis aligned bounding box collision detection. The conducted case study revealed that given the situation, a semi-circle shaped arrangement is desirable, whereas the pick-and-place system and the final generated G-code produced the highest deviation of 3.83 mm and 5.8 mm respectively.

  20. Virtual Planning, Control, and Machining for a Modular-Based Automated Factory Operation in an Augmented Reality Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Yun Suen; Yap, Hwa Jen; Md Dawal, Siti Zawiah; Ramesh, S.; Phoon, Sin Ye

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a modular-based implementation of augmented reality to provide an immersive experience in learning or teaching the planning phase, control system, and machining parameters of a fully automated work cell. The architecture of the system consists of three code modules that can operate independently or combined to create a complete system that is able to guide engineers from the layout planning phase to the prototyping of the final product. The layout planning module determines the best possible arrangement in a layout for the placement of various machines, in this case a conveyor belt for transportation, a robot arm for pick-and-place operations, and a computer numerical control milling machine to generate the final prototype. The robotic arm module simulates the pick-and-place operation offline from the conveyor belt to a computer numerical control (CNC) machine utilising collision detection and inverse kinematics. Finally, the CNC module performs virtual machining based on the Uniform Space Decomposition method and axis aligned bounding box collision detection. The conducted case study revealed that given the situation, a semi-circle shaped arrangement is desirable, whereas the pick-and-place system and the final generated G-code produced the highest deviation of 3.83 mm and 5.8 mm respectively. PMID:27271840

  1. Rhodococcus aetherivorans BCP1 as cell factory for the production of intracellular tellurium nanorods under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentato, Alessandro; Piacenza, Elena; Anikovskiy, Max; Cappelletti, Martina; Zannoni, Davide; Turner, Raymond J

    2016-12-15

    Tellurite (TeO 3 2- ) is recognized as a toxic oxyanion to living organisms. However, mainly anaerobic or facultative-anaerobic microorganisms are able to tolerate and convert TeO 3 2- into the less toxic and available form of elemental Tellurium (Te 0 ), producing Te-deposits or Te-nanostructures. The use of TeO 3 2- -reducing bacteria can lead to the decontamination of polluted environments and the development of "green-synthesis" methods for the production of nanomaterials. In this study, the tolerance and the consumption of TeO 3 2- have been investigated, along with the production and characterization of Te-nanorods by Rhodococcus aetherivorans BCP1 grown under aerobic conditions. Aerobically grown BCP1 cells showed high tolerance towards TeO 3 2- with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2800 μg/mL (11.2 mM). TeO 3 2- consumption has been evaluated exposing the BCP1 strain to either 100 or 500 μg/mL of K 2 TeO 3 (unconditioned growth) or after re-inoculation in fresh medium with new addition of K 2 TeO 3 (conditioned growth). A complete consumption of TeO 3 2- at 100 μg/mL was observed under both growth conditions, although conditioned cells showed higher consumption rate. Unconditioned and conditioned BCP1 cells partially consumed TeO 3 2- at 500 μg/mL. However, a greater TeO 3 2- consumption was observed with conditioned cells. The production of intracellular, not aggregated and rod-shaped Te-nanostructures (TeNRs) was observed as a consequence of TeO 3 2- reduction. Extracted TeNRs appear to be embedded in an organic surrounding material, as suggested by the chemical-physical characterization. Moreover, we observed longer TeNRs depending on either the concentration of precursor (100 or 500 μg/mL of K 2 TeO 3 ) or the growth conditions (unconditioned or conditioned grown cells). Rhodococcus aetherivorans BCP1 is able to tolerate high concentrations of TeO 3 2- during its growth under aerobic conditions. Moreover, compared to unconditioned

  2. The Smart Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Agnieszka; Bilberg, Arne; Bogers, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays we live in a world, which a decade ago would only be described in the science fiction literature. More and more things become smart and both scientists and engineers strive for developing not only new and innovative devices, but also homes, factories, or even cities. Despite of continuous...... development, many of those concepts are still being just a vision of the future, which still needs a lot of effort to become true. This paper reviews the usage of adjective smart in respect to technology and with a special emphasis on the smart factory concept placement among contemporary studies. Due...... to a lack of a consensus of common understanding of this term, a unified definition is proposed. The conceptualization will not only refer to various smart factory visions reported in the literature, but also link the crucial characteristics of this emerging manufacturing concept to usual manufacturing...

  3. Analysis of the effects of five factors relevant to in vitro chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells using factorial design and high throughput mRNA-profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Rune B; Østrup, Esben; Zhang, Xiaolan; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Brinchmann, Jan E

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro process of chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering has been shown to require three-dimensional culture along with the addition of differentiation factors to the culture medium. In general, this leads to a phenotype lacking some of the cardinal features of native articular chondrocytes and their extracellular matrix. The factors used vary, but regularly include members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily and dexamethasone, sometimes in conjunction with fibroblast growth factor 2 and insulin-like growth factor 1, however the use of soluble factors to induce chondrogenesis has largely been studied on a single factor basis. In the present study we combined a factorial quality-by-design experiment with high-throughput mRNA profiling of a customized chondrogenesis related gene set as a tool to study in vitro chondrogenesis of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in alginate. 48 different conditions of transforming growth factor β 1, 2 and 3, bone morphogenetic protein 2, 4 and 6, dexamethasone, insulin-like growth factor 1, fibroblast growth factor 2 and cell seeding density were included in the experiment. The analysis revealed that the best of the tested differentiation cocktails included transforming growth factor β 1 and dexamethasone. Dexamethasone acted in synergy with transforming growth factor β 1 by increasing many chondrogenic markers while directly downregulating expression of the pro-osteogenic gene osteocalcin. However, all factors beneficial to the expression of desirable hyaline cartilage markers also induced undesirable molecules, indicating that perfect chondrogenic differentiation is not achievable with the current differentiation protocols.

  4. Analysis of the effects of five factors relevant to in vitro chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells using factorial design and high throughput mRNA-profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune B Jakobsen

    Full Text Available The in vitro process of chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering has been shown to require three-dimensional culture along with the addition of differentiation factors to the culture medium. In general, this leads to a phenotype lacking some of the cardinal features of native articular chondrocytes and their extracellular matrix. The factors used vary, but regularly include members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily and dexamethasone, sometimes in conjunction with fibroblast growth factor 2 and insulin-like growth factor 1, however the use of soluble factors to induce chondrogenesis has largely been studied on a single factor basis. In the present study we combined a factorial quality-by-design experiment with high-throughput mRNA profiling of a customized chondrogenesis related gene set as a tool to study in vitro chondrogenesis of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in alginate. 48 different conditions of transforming growth factor β 1, 2 and 3, bone morphogenetic protein 2, 4 and 6, dexamethasone, insulin-like growth factor 1, fibroblast growth factor 2 and cell seeding density were included in the experiment. The analysis revealed that the best of the tested differentiation cocktails included transforming growth factor β 1 and dexamethasone. Dexamethasone acted in synergy with transforming growth factor β 1 by increasing many chondrogenic markers while directly downregulating expression of the pro-osteogenic gene osteocalcin. However, all factors beneficial to the expression of desirable hyaline cartilage markers also induced undesirable molecules, indicating that perfect chondrogenic differentiation is not achievable with the current differentiation protocols.

  5. Cyanobacterial symbionts diverged in the late Cretaceous towards lineage-specific nitrogen fixation factories in single-celled phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Cabello, Ana M; Salazar, Guillem; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Hingamp, Pascal; Alberti, Adriana; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Raes, Jeroen; Bowler, Chris; Wincker, Patrick; Zehr, Jonathan P; Gasol, Josep M; Massana, Ramon; Acinas, Silvia G

    2016-03-22

    The unicellular cyanobacterium UCYN-A, one of the major contributors to nitrogen fixation in the open ocean, lives in symbiosis with single-celled phytoplankton. UCYN-A includes several closely related lineages whose partner fidelity, genome-wide expression and time of evolutionary divergence remain to be resolved. Here we detect and distinguish UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 lineages in symbiosis with two distinct prymnesiophyte partners in the South Atlantic Ocean. Both symbiotic systems are lineage specific and differ in the number of UCYN-A cells involved. Our analyses infer a streamlined genome expression towards nitrogen fixation in both UCYN-A lineages. Comparative genomics reveal a strong purifying selection in UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 with a diversification process ∼91 Myr ago, in the late Cretaceous, after the low-nutrient regime period occurred during the Jurassic. These findings suggest that UCYN-A diversified in a co-evolutionary process, wherein their prymnesiophyte partners acted as a barrier driving an allopatric speciation of extant UCYN-A lineages.

  6. Protein and DNA technologies for functional expression of membrane-associated cytochromes P450 in bacterial cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez Albacete, Dario

    The heavy dependence and massive consumption of fossil fuels by humans is changing our environment very rapidly. Some of the side effects of industrial activity include the pollution of the natural resources we rely on, and the reduction of biodiversity. Some chemicals found in nature exhibit great....... In most of biosynthetic pathways leading to these chemicals the cytochrome P450 enzyme family (P450s) is responsible for their final functionalization. However, the membrane-bound nature of P450s, makes their expression in microbial hosts a challenge. In order to meet the global demand for these natural......450 engineering guidelines and serves as platform to improve performance of microbial cells, thereby boosting recombinant production of complex plant P450-derived biochemicals. The knowledge generated, could guide future reconstruction of functional plant metabolic pathways leading to high valuable...

  7. Utilization and control of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections and community-based microbial cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigneswaran, Vinoth; Amador Hierro, Cristina Isabel; Jelsbak, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Microbial activities are most often shaped by interactions between co-existing microbes within mixed-species communities. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms of species interactions within communities is a central issue in microbial ecology, and our ability to engineer and control microbial...... communities depends, to a large extent, on our knowledge of these interactions. This review highlights the recent advances regarding molecular characterization of microbe-microbe interactions that modulate community structure, activity, and stability, and aims to illustrate how these findings have helped us...

  8. Utilization and control of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections and community-based microbial cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigneswaran, Vinoth; Amador, Cristina Isabel; Jelsbak, Lotte; Sternberg, Claus; Jelsbak, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Microbial activities are most often shaped by interactions between co-existing microbes within mixed-species communities. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms of species interactions within communities is a central issue in microbial ecology, and our ability to engineer and control microbial communities depends, to a large extent, on our knowledge of these interactions. This review highlights the recent advances regarding molecular characterization of microbe-microbe interactions that modulate community structure, activity, and stability, and aims to illustrate how these findings have helped us reach an engineering-level understanding of microbial communities in relation to both human health and industrial biotechnology.

  9. Utilization and control of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections and community-based microbial cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigneswaran, Vinoth; Amador Hierro, Cristina Isabel; Jelsbak, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Microbial activities are most often shaped by interactions between co-existing microbes within mixed-species communities. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms of species interactions within communities is a central issue in microbial ecology, and our ability to engineer and control microbial co...

  10. HiPER Tritium factory elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Didier

    2011-06-01

    HiPER will include a Tritium target factory. This presentation is an overview. We start from process ideas to go to first sketch passing through safety principles. We will follow the Tritium management process. We need first a gas factory producing the right gas mixture from hydrogen, Deuterium and Tritium storage. Then we could pass through the target factory. It is based on our LMJ single shot experiment and some new development like the injector. Then comes pellet burst and vapour recovery. The Tritium factory has to include the waste recovery, recycling process with gas purification before storage. At least, a nuclear plant is not a classical building. Tritium is also very special... All the design ideas have to be adapted. Many facilities are necessary, some with redundancy. We all have to well known these constraints. Tritium budget will be a major contributor for a material point of view as for a financial one.

  11. Super B Factories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Heavy-flavor physics, in particular B and τ physics results from the B fac- tories, currently provides strong constraints on models of physics beyond the Standard. Model. A new generation of colliders, Super B Factories, with 50 to 100 times the lumi- nosity of existing colliders, can, in a dialog with LHC and ILC, ...

  12. The Clone Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Have humans been cloned? Is it possible? Immediate interest is sparked when students are asked these questions. In response to their curiosity, the clone factory activity was developed to help them understand the process of cloning. In this activity, students reenact the cloning process, in a very simplified simulation. After completing the…

  13. Identification of potentially safe promising fungal cell factories for the production of polyketide natural food colorants using chemotaxonomic rationale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mapari, Sameer Shamsuddin; Meyer, Anne S.; Thrane, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    cultivation technology. This approach could secure efficient production of pigments avoiding use of genetic manipulation. Results: Polyketide pigment producing ascomycetous fungi were evaluated for their potential as production organisms based on a priori knowledge on species-specific pigment and potential...... mycotoxin production and BioSafety level (BSL) classification. Based on taxonomic knowledge, we pre-selected ascomycetous fungi belonging to Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium that produced yellow, orange or red pigments while deselecting Penicillium marneffei; a well known human pathogen in addition......Background: Colorants derived from natural sources look set to overtake synthetic colorants in market value as manufacturers continue to meet the rising demand for clean label ingredients-particularly in food applications. Many ascomycetous fungi naturally synthesize and secrete pigments and thus...

  14. A genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Pseudomonas putida KT2440: iJN746 as a cell factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Juan; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Thiele, Ines

    2008-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas putida is the best studied pollutant degradative bacteria and is harnessed by industrial biotechnology to synthesize fine chemicals. Since the publication of P. putida KT2440's genome, some in silico analyses of its metabolic and biotechnology capacities have been published. However, global understanding of the capabilities of P. putida KT2440 requires the construction of a metabolic model that enables the integration of classical experimental data along with genomic and high-throughput data. The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) approach has been successfully used to build and analyze in silico genome-scale metabolic reconstructions. Results We present a genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida KT2440's metabolism, iJN746, which was constructed based on genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. This manually-curated reconstruction accounts for 746 genes, 950 reactions, and 911 metabolites. iJN746 captures biotechnologically relevant pathways, including polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis and catabolic pathways of aromatic compounds (e.g., toluene, benzoate, phenylacetate, nicotinate), not described in other metabolic reconstructions or biochemical databases. The predictive potential of iJN746 was validated using experimental data including growth performance and gene deletion studies. Furthermore, in silico growth on toluene was found to be oxygen-limited, suggesting the existence of oxygen-efficient pathways not yet annotated in P. putida's genome. Moreover, we evaluated the production efficiency of polyhydroxyalkanoates from various carbon sources and found fatty acids as the most prominent candidates, as expected. Conclusion Here we presented the first genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida, a biotechnologically interesting all-surrounder. Taken together, this work illustrates the utility of iJN746 as i) a knowledge-base, ii) a discovery tool, and iii) an engineering platform to explore P. putida's potential in

  15. A genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Pseudomonas putida KT2440: iJN746 as a cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Juan; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Thiele, Ines

    2008-09-16

    Pseudomonas putida is the best studied pollutant degradative bacteria and is harnessed by industrial biotechnology to synthesize fine chemicals. Since the publication of P. putida KT2440's genome, some in silico analyses of its metabolic and biotechnology capacities have been published. However, global understanding of the capabilities of P. putida KT2440 requires the construction of a metabolic model that enables the integration of classical experimental data along with genomic and high-throughput data. The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) approach has been successfully used to build and analyze in silico genome-scale metabolic reconstructions. We present a genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida KT2440's metabolism, iJN746, which was constructed based on genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. This manually-curated reconstruction accounts for 746 genes, 950 reactions, and 911 metabolites. iJN746 captures biotechnologically relevant pathways, including polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis and catabolic pathways of aromatic compounds (e.g., toluene, benzoate, phenylacetate, nicotinate), not described in other metabolic reconstructions or biochemical databases. The predictive potential of iJN746 was validated using experimental data including growth performance and gene deletion studies. Furthermore, in silico growth on toluene was found to be oxygen-limited, suggesting the existence of oxygen-efficient pathways not yet annotated in P. putida's genome. Moreover, we evaluated the production efficiency of polyhydroxyalkanoates from various carbon sources and found fatty acids as the most prominent candidates, as expected. Here we presented the first genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida, a biotechnologically interesting all-surrounder. Taken together, this work illustrates the utility of iJN746 as i) a knowledge-base, ii) a discovery tool, and iii) an engineering platform to explore P. putida's potential in bioremediation and bioplastic

  16. A genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Pseudomonas putida KT2440: iJN746 as a cell factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiele Ines

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas putida is the best studied pollutant degradative bacteria and is harnessed by industrial biotechnology to synthesize fine chemicals. Since the publication of P. putida KT2440's genome, some in silico analyses of its metabolic and biotechnology capacities have been published. However, global understanding of the capabilities of P. putida KT2440 requires the construction of a metabolic model that enables the integration of classical experimental data along with genomic and high-throughput data. The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA approach has been successfully used to build and analyze in silico genome-scale metabolic reconstructions. Results We present a genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida KT2440's metabolism, iJN746, which was constructed based on genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. This manually-curated reconstruction accounts for 746 genes, 950 reactions, and 911 metabolites. iJN746 captures biotechnologically relevant pathways, including polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis and catabolic pathways of aromatic compounds (e.g., toluene, benzoate, phenylacetate, nicotinate, not described in other metabolic reconstructions or biochemical databases. The predictive potential of iJN746 was validated using experimental data including growth performance and gene deletion studies. Furthermore, in silico growth on toluene was found to be oxygen-limited, suggesting the existence of oxygen-efficient pathways not yet annotated in P. putida's genome. Moreover, we evaluated the production efficiency of polyhydroxyalkanoates from various carbon sources and found fatty acids as the most prominent candidates, as expected. Conclusion Here we presented the first genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida, a biotechnologically interesting all-surrounder. Taken together, this work illustrates the utility of iJN746 as i a knowledge-base, ii a discovery tool, and iii an engineering platform to explore P

  17. Cell-Based Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kitada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell transplantation is a strategy with great potential for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and many types of stem cells, including neural stem cells and embryonic stem cells, are considered candidates for transplantation therapy. Mesenchymal stem cells are a great therapeutic cell source because they are easy accessible and can be expanded from patients or donor mesenchymal tissues without posing serious ethical and technical problems. They have trophic effects for protecting damaged tissues as well as differentiation ability to generate a broad spectrum of cells, including dopamine neurons, which contribute to the replenishment of lost cells in Parkinson's disease. This paper focuses mainly on the potential of mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic cell source and discusses their potential clinical application in Parkinson's disease.

  18. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Up-Regulates AKR1C1 Expression Through Nuclear Factor-Y in Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Ding, Shijia; Chen, Ke; Qin, Dongdong; Qu, Jialin; Wang, Sen; Sheng, Yanrui; Zou, Chengcheng; Chen, Limin; Tang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein has long been recognized as an important transcriptional transactivator of several genes. Human aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1 (AKR1C1), a member of the family of AKR1CS, is significantly increased in HBx-expressed cells. This study aimed to investigate the possible mechanism of HBx in regulating AKR1C1 expression in HepG2.2.15 cells and the role of AKR1C1 for HBV-induced HCC. RT-PCR was performed to detect AKR1C1 expression on mRNA level in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 cell. The promoter activity of AKR1C1 was assayed by transient transfection and Dual-luciferase reporter assay system. The AKR1C1 promoter sequence was screened using the TFSEARCH database and the ALIBABA 2.0 software. The potential transcription factors binding sites were identified using 5' functional deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis. In this study, we found that HBx promoted AKR1C1 expression in HepG2.2.15 cells. Knockdown of HBx inhibited AKR1C1 activation. The role of HBx expression in regulating the promoter activity of human AKR1C1 gene was analyzed. The 5'functional deletion analysis identified that the region between -128 and -88 was the minimal promoter region of HBx to activate AKR1C1 gene expression. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggested that nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) plays an important role in this HBx-induced AKR1C1 activation. In HepG2.2.1.5 cell, HBx can promote AKR1C1 promoter activity and thus activates the basal transcription of AKR1C1 gene. This process is mediated by the transcription factor NF-Y. This study explored the mechanism for the regulation of HBV on AKR1C1 expression and has provided a new understanding of HBV-induced HCC.

  19. A Burkholderia sacchari cell factory: production of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate, xylitol and xylonic acid from xylose-rich sugar mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Rodrigo S; de Almeida, M Catarina M D; de Oliveira, M da Conceição M A; da Fonseca, M Manuela; Cesário, M Teresa

    2017-01-25

    Efficient production of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (P(3HB)) based on glucose-xylose mixtures simulating different types of lignocellulosic hydrolysate (LCH) was addressed using Burkholderia sacchari, a wild strain capable of metabolizing both sugars and producing P(3HB). Carbon catabolite repression was avoided by maintaining glucose concentration below 10g/L. Xylose concentrations above 30g/L were inhibitory for growth and production. In fed-batch cultivations, pulse size and feed addition rate were controlled in order to reach high productivities and efficient sugar consumptions. High xylose uptake and P(3HB) productivity were attained with glucose-rich mixtures (glucose/xylose ratio in the feed=1.5w/w) using high feeding rates, while with xylose-richer feeds (glucose/xylose=0.8w/w), a lower feeding rate is a robust strategy to avoid xylose build-up in the medium. Xylitol production was observed with xylose concentrations in the medium above 30-40g/L. With sugar mixtures featuring even lower glucose/xylose ratios, i.e. xylose-richer feeds (glucose/xylose=0.5), xylonic acid (a second byproduct) was produced. This is the first report of the ability of Burkholderia sacchari to produce both xylitol and xylonic acid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Engineering the smart factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Robert; Vera, Daniel; Ahmad, Bilal

    2016-10-01

    The fourth industrial revolution promises to create what has been called the smart factory. The vision is that within such modular structured smart factories, cyber-physical systems monitor physical processes, create a virtual copy of the physical world and make decentralised decisions. This paper provides a view of this initiative from an automation systems perspective. In this context it considers how future automation systems might be effectively configured and supported through their lifecycles and how integration, application modelling, visualisation and reuse of such systems might be best achieved. The paper briefly describes limitations in current engineering methods, and new emerging approaches including the cyber physical systems (CPS) engineering tools being developed by the automation systems group (ASG) at Warwick Manufacturing Group, University of Warwick, UK.

  1. SLAC B Factory computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, P.F.

    1992-02-01

    As part of the research and development program in preparation for a possible B Factory at SLAC, a group has been studying various aspects of HEP computing. In particular, the group is investigating the use of UNIX for all computing, from data acquisition, through analysis, and word processing. A summary of some of the results of this study will be given, along with some personal opinions on these topics

  2. EMIR data factory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosich Minguell, Josefina; Barreto, M.; Castro, N.; Garzón, F.; Guerra, D.; Insausti, M.; López-Martín, L.; López, P.; Molgó, J.; Patrón, J.

    2014-07-01

    EMIR (Espectrógrafo Multiobjeto Infrarrojo) is a wide-field, near-infrared, multi-object spectrograph, with image capabilities, which will be located at the Nasmyth focus of GTC (Gran Telescopio Canarias). It will allow observers to obtain many intermediate resolution spectra simultaneously, in the nIR bands Z, J, H, K. A multi-slit mask unit will be used for target acquisition. This paper shows an overview of EMIR Data Factory System which main functionality is to receive raw images from DAS (Data Acquisition system), collect FITS header keywords, store images to database and propagate images to other GCS (GTC Control System) components to produce astronomical data. This system follows the standards defined by the telescope to permit the integration of this software on the GCS. The Data Factory System needs the DAS, the Sequencer, GUI and the Monitor Manager subsystems to operate. DAS generates images and sends them to the Data Factory. Sequencer and GUI (Graphical User Interface) provide information about instrument and observing program. The Monitor Manager supplies information about telescope and instrument state.

  3. Towards stable cyanobacterial cell factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, W.

    2018-01-01

    Irrespective of where we come from, we all share the global responsibility of ensuring that our societies are sustainable. We have been depleting the world’s resources and filling the atmosphere with abnormal levels of CO2. But CO2 can also be used as a resource - plants and certain microbes have

  4. Ultrastructural Characterization of Zika Virus Replication Factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Cortese

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A global concern has emerged with the pandemic spread of Zika virus (ZIKV infections that can cause severe neurological symptoms in adults and newborns. ZIKV is a positive-strand RNA virus replicating in virus-induced membranous replication factories (RFs. Here we used various imaging techniques to investigate the ultrastructural details of ZIKV RFs and their relationship with host cell organelles. Analyses of human hepatic cells and neural progenitor cells infected with ZIKV revealed endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane invaginations containing pore-like openings toward the cytosol, reminiscent to RFs in Dengue virus-infected cells. Both the MR766 African strain and the H/PF/2013 Asian strain, the latter linked to neurological diseases, induce RFs of similar architecture. Importantly, ZIKV infection causes a drastic reorganization of microtubules and intermediate filaments forming cage-like structures surrounding the viral RF. Consistently, ZIKV replication is suppressed by cytoskeleton-targeting drugs. Thus, ZIKV RFs are tightly linked to rearrangements of the host cell cytoskeleton. : Cortese et al. show that ZIKV infection in both human hepatoma and neuronal progenitor cells induces drastic structural modification of the cellular architecture. Microtubules and intermediate filaments surround the viral replication factory composed of vesicles corresponding to ER membrane invagination toward the ER lumen. Importantly, alteration of microtubule flexibility impairs ZIKV replication. Keywords: Zika virus, flavivirus, human neural progenitor cells, replication factories, replication organelles, microtubules, intermediate filaments, electron microscopy, electron tomography, live-cell imaging

  5. Mars surface based factory. Phase 2, task 1C: Computer control of a water treatment system to support a space colony on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, John; Ali, Warsame; Willis, Danette

    1989-01-01

    In a continued effort to design a surface based factory on Mars for the production of oxygen and water, a preliminary study was made of the surface and atmospheric composition on Mars and determined the mass densities of the various gases in the Martian atmosphere. Based on the initial studies, oxygen and water were determined to be the two products that could be produced economically under the Martian conditions. Studies were also made on present production techniques to obtain water and oxygen. Analyses were made to evaluate the current methods of production that were adaptable to the Martian conditions. Even though the initial effort was the production of oxygen and water, it was found necessary to produce some diluted gases that can be mixed with the oxygen produced to constitute 'breathable' air. The conceptual design of a breathable air manufacturing system, a means of drilling for underground water, and storage of water for future use were completed. The design objective was the conceptual design of an integrated system for the supply of quality water for biological consumption, farming, residential and industrial use.

  6. Perceived control and intrinsic vs. extrinsic motivation for oral self-care: a full factorial experimental test of theory-based persuasive messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Liam; Gellert, Paul; Knittle, Keegan; Sniehotta, Falko F

    2015-04-01

    Correlational evidence suggests that perceived control (PC) and intrinsic motivation (IM), key constructs in social cognitive and self-determination theories, may interact to reinforce behavior change. This proof-of-principle study examines the independent and synergistic effects of interventions to increase PC and IM upon dental flossing frequency. University students (n = 185) were randomized in a 2 × 2 full factorial design to receive two computer-based interventions: one to either increase or decrease PC and another to increase either IM or extrinsic motivation. These constructs were measured immediately post-intervention; flossing behavior was measured 1 week later. The interventions to increase PC and PC/IM had main and interaction effects on flossing, respectively. The PC/IM interaction effect was mediated by increases in PC and IM. Combining interventions to increase PC and IM seems to be a promising avenue of research, which has implications for both theory and intervention development.

  7. Identification of water quality management policy of watershed system with multiple uncertain interactions using a multi-level-factorial risk-inference-based possibilistic-probabilistic programming approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Li, Yongping; Huang, Guohe; Fu, Haiyan; Zhang, Junlong; Cheng, Guanhui

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a multi-level-factorial risk-inference-based possibilistic-probabilistic programming (MRPP) method is proposed for supporting water quality management under multiple uncertainties. The MRPP method can handle uncertainties expressed as fuzzy-random-boundary intervals, probability distributions, and interval numbers, and analyze the effects of uncertainties as well as their interactions on modeling outputs. It is applied to plan water quality management in the Xiangxihe watershed. Results reveal that a lower probability of satisfying the objective function (θ) as well as a higher probability of violating environmental constraints (q i ) would correspond to a higher system benefit with an increased risk of violating system feasibility. Chemical plants are the major contributors to biological oxygen demand (BOD) and total phosphorus (TP) discharges; total nitrogen (TN) would be mainly discharged by crop farming. It is also discovered that optimistic decision makers should pay more attention to the interactions between chemical plant and water supply, while decision makers who possess a risk-averse attitude would focus on the interactive effect of q i and benefit of water supply. The findings can help enhance the model's applicability and identify a suitable water quality management policy for environmental sustainability according to the practical situations.

  8. Predicting the Responses of Soil Nitrite-Oxidizers to Multi-Factorial Global Change: A Trait-Based Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Roux, Xavier; Bouskill, Nicholas J.; Niboyet, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Soil microbial diversity is huge and a few grams of soil contain more bacterial taxa than there are bird species on Earth. This high diversity often makes predicting the responses of soil bacteria to environmental change intractable and restricts our capacity to predict the responses of soil...... change scenarios for central California) on the potential activity, abundance and dominant taxa of soil nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Using a trait-based model, we then tested whether categorizing NOB into a few functional groups unified by physiological traits enables understanding and predicting...... how soil NOB respond to global environmental change. Contrasted responses to global change treatments were observed between three main NOB functional types. In particular, putatively mixotrophic Nitrobacter, rare under most treatments, became dominant under the 'High CO2+Nitrogen...

  9. Pilot factory - a Condor-based system for scalable Pilot Job generation in the Panda WMS framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Po-Hsiang; Potekhin, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    The Panda Workload Management System is designed around the concept of the Pilot Job - a 'smart wrapper' for the payload executable that can probe the environment on the remote worker node before pulling down the payload from the server and executing it. Such design allows for improved logging and monitoring capabilities as well as flexibility in Workload Management. In the Grid environment (such as the Open Science Grid), Panda Pilot Jobs are submitted to remote sites via mechanisms that ultimately rely on Condor-G. As our experience has shown, in cases where a large number of Panda jobs are simultaneously routed to a particular remote site, the increased load on the head node of the cluster, which is caused by the Pilot Job submission, may lead to overall lack of scalability. We have developed a Condor-inspired solution to this problem, which is using the schedd-based glidein, whose mission is to redirect pilots to the native batch system. Once a glidein schedd is installed and running, it can be utilized exactly the same way as local schedds and therefore, from the user's perspective, Pilots thus submitted are quite similar to jobs submitted to the local Condor pool.

  10. The EB factory project. I. A fast, neural-net-based, general purpose light curve classifier optimized for eclipsing binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paegert, Martin; Stassun, Keivan G.; Burger, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new neural-net-based light curve classifier and provide it with documentation as a ready-to-use tool for the community. While optimized for identification and classification of eclipsing binary stars, the classifier is general purpose, and has been developed for speed in the context of upcoming massive surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. A challenge for classifiers in the context of neural-net training and massive data sets is to minimize the number of parameters required to describe each light curve. We show that a simple and fast geometric representation that encodes the overall light curve shape, together with a chi-square parameter to capture higher-order morphology information results in efficient yet robust light curve classification, especially for eclipsing binaries. Testing the classifier on the ASAS light curve database, we achieve a retrieval rate of 98% and a false-positive rate of 2% for eclipsing binaries. We achieve similarly high retrieval rates for most other periodic variable-star classes, including RR Lyrae, Mira, and delta Scuti. However, the classifier currently has difficulty discriminating between different sub-classes of eclipsing binaries, and suffers a relatively low (∼60%) retrieval rate for multi-mode delta Cepheid stars. We find that it is imperative to train the classifier's neural network with exemplars that include the full range of light curve quality to which the classifier will be expected to perform; the classifier performs well on noisy light curves only when trained with noisy exemplars. The classifier source code, ancillary programs, a trained neural net, and a guide for use, are provided.

  11. Sustained low-dose growth hormone therapy optimizes bioactive insulin-like growth factor-I level and may enhance CD4 T-cell number in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde; Troensegaard, William

    2010-01-01

    expedient IGF-I levels and improve CD4 T-cell response. Total and free IGF-I increased at week 36 (+97%, P CD4 T-cell number increased at week 36...... (+15%, P cells/microL). Following rhGH dose reduction, total IGF-I and CD4 T-cell number remained increased at week 88 (+44%, P = 0.01 and +33%, P ...High-dose recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) (2-6 mg/day) regimes may facilitate T-cell restoration in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). However, high-dose rhGH regimens increase insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF...

  12. Low-energy neutrino factory design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ankenbrandt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The design of a low-energy (4 GeV neutrino factory (NF is described, along with its expected performance. The neutrino factory uses a high-energy proton beam to produce charged pions. The π^{±} decay to produce muons (μ^{±}, which are collected, accelerated, and stored in a ring with long straight sections. Muons decaying in the straight sections produce neutrino beams. The scheme is based on previous designs for higher energy neutrino factories, but has an improved bunching and phase rotation system, and new acceleration, storage ring, and detector schemes tailored to the needs of the lower energy facility. Our simulations suggest that the NF scheme we describe can produce neutrino beams generated by ∼1.4×10^{21} μ^{+} per year decaying in a long straight section of the storage ring, and a similar number of μ^{-} decays.

  13. Deciding WQO for factorial languages

    KAUST Repository

    Atminas, Aistis

    2013-04-05

    A language is factorial if it is closed under taking factors (i.e. contiguous subwords). Every factorial language can be described by an antidictionary, i.e. a minimal set of forbidden factors. We show that the problem of deciding whether a factorial language given by a finite antidictionary is well-quasi-ordered under the factor containment relation can be solved in polynomial time. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  14. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  15. General B factory design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    We describe the general considerations that go into the design of an asymmetric B factory collider. Justification is given for the typical parameters of such a facility, and the physics and technology challenges that arise from these parameter choices are discussed. Cost and schedule issues for a B factory are discussed briefly. A summary of existing proposals is presented, noting their similarities and differences

  16. Stem Cell-Based Cell Carrier for Targeted Oncolytic Virotherapy: Translational Opportunity and Open Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer is an innovative therapeutic option where the ability of a virus to promote cell lysis is harnessed and reprogrammed to selectively destroy cancer cells. Such treatment modalities exhibited antitumor activity in preclinical and clinical settings and appear to be well tolerated when tested in clinical trials. However, the clinical success of oncolytic virotherapy has been significantly hampered due to the inability to target systematic metastasis. This is partly due to the inability of the therapeutic virus to survive in the patient circulation, in order to target tumors at distant sites. An early study from various laboratories demonstrated that cells infected with oncolytic virus can protect the therapeutic payload form the host immune system as well as function as factories for virus production and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic virus. While a variety of cell lineages possessed potential as cell carriers, copious investigation has established stem cells as a very attractive cell carrier system in oncolytic virotherapy. The ideal cell carrier desire to be susceptible to viral infection as well as support viral infection, maintain immunosuppressive properties to shield the loaded viruses from the host immune system, and most importantly possess an intrinsic tumor homing ability to deliver loaded viruses directly to the site of the metastasis—all qualities stem cells exhibit. In this review, we summarize the recent work in the development of stem cell-based carrier for oncolytic virotherapy, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of cell carriers, especially focusing on why stem cells have emerged as the leading candidate, and finally propose a future direction for stem cell-based targeted oncolytic virotherapy that involves its establishment as a viable treatment option for cancer patients in the clinical setting.

  17. Effect of Recruitment Methods on Response Rate in a Web-Based Study for Primary Care Physicians: Factorial Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Ryuhei; Shinohara, Kiyomi; Aoki, Takuya; Tsujimoto, Yasushi; Suganuma, Aya M; Furukawa, Toshi A

    2018-02-08

    Low participation rates are one of the most serious disadvantages of Web-based studies. It is necessary to develop effective strategies to improve participation rates to obtain sufficient data. The objective of this trial was to investigate the effect of emphasizing the incentive in the subject line of the invitation email and the day of the week of sending the invitation email on the participation rate in a Web-based trial. We conducted a 2×2 factorial design randomized controlled trial. We contacted 2000 primary care physicians from members of the Japan Primary Care Association in January 2017 and randomly allocated them to 1 of 4 combinations of 2 subject lines (presence or absence of an emphasis on a lottery for an Amazon gift card worth 3000 yen or approximately US $30) and 2 delivery days (sending the invitation email on Tuesday or Friday). The primary outcome was the response rate defined as the number of participants answering the first page of the questionnaire divided by the number of invitation emails delivered. All outcomes were collected between January 17, 2017, and February 8, 2017. We analyzed data from 1943 out of 2000 participants after excluding those whose email addresses were invalid. The overall response rate was 6.3% (123/1943). There was no significant difference in the response rates between the 2 groups regarding incentive in the subject line: the risk ratio was 1.12 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.58) and the risk difference was 0.7% (95% CI -1.5% to 2.9%). Similarly, there was no significant difference in the response rates between the 2 groups regarding sending the email on Tuesday or Friday: the risk ratio was 0.98 (95% CI 0.70 to 1.38) and the risk difference was -0.1% (95% CI -2.3% to 2.1%). Neither emphasizing the incentive in the subject line of the invitation email nor varying the day of the week the invitation email was sent led to a meaningful increase in response rates in a Web-based trial with primary care physicians. University Hospital

  18. The nearby supernova factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Aldering, G.; Lee, B.C.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Siegrist, J.; Wang, L.; Antilogus, P.; Astier, P.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Copin, Y.; Smadja, G.; Gangler, E.; Castera, A.; Adam, G.; Bacon, R.; Lemonnier, J.-P.; Pecontal, A.; Pecontal, E.; Kessler, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an ambitious project to find and study in detail approximately 300 nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at redshifts 0.03 < z < 0.08. This program will provide an exceptional data set of well-studied SNe in the nearby smooth Hubble flow that can be used as calibration for the current and future programs designed to use SNe to measure the cosmological parameters. The first key ingredient for this program is a reliable supply of Hubble-flow SNe systematically discovered in unprecedented numbers using the same techniques as those used in distant SNe searches. In 2002, 35 SNe were found using our test-bed pipeline for automated SN search and discovery. The pipeline uses images from the asteroid search conducted by the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking group at JPL. Improvements in our subtraction techniques and analysis have allowed us to increase our effective SN discovery rate to ∼12 SNe/month in 2003

  19. The eldercare factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Noel; Sharkey, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Rapid advances in service robotics together with dramatic shifts in population demographics have led to the notion that technology may be the answer to our eldercare problems. Robots are being developed for feeding, washing, lifting, carrying and mobilising the elderly as well as monitoring their health. They are also being proposed as a substitute for companionship. While these technologies could accrue major benefits for society and empower the elderly, we must balance their use with the ethical costs. These include a potential reduction in human contact, increased feeling of objectification and loss of control, loss of privacy and personal freedom as well as deception and infantilisation. With appropriate guidelines in place before the introduction of robots en masse into the care system, robots could improve the lives of the elderly, reducing their dependence and creating more opportunities for social interaction. Without forethought, the elderly may find themselves in a barren world of machines, a world of automated care: a factory for the elderly. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. The TRIUMF KAON Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1990-11-01

    The TRIUMF KAON Factory is designed to produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, other hadrons and neutrinos 100 times more intense, or cleaner, than are available now, for a broad range of experiments in particle and nuclear physics. This will require a 100 μA beam of 30 GeV protons, to be produced by an interleaved sequence of two fast-cycling synchrotrons and three storage rings, with the existing TRIUMF H - cyclotron as injector. An $11-million preconstruction study has enabled the overall design to be reviewed and prototypes of various accelerator components to be built and evaluated. Environmental, industrial and economic impact studies have also been completed. Payment of one-third of the total cost of $708 million (Canadian) has been approved by the government of British Columbia; a further third is expected from international sources, on the basis of inter-governmental consultations. A decision on the final third is expected from the government of Canada before the end of 1990. (Author) (15 refs., 7 figs.)

  1. The TRIUMF KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1991-05-01

    The TRIUMF KAON Factory is designed to produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, other hadrons and neutrinos 100 times more intense, or cleaner, than are available now, for a broad range of particle and nuclear physics experiments. This will require a 100 μA beam of 30 GeV protons, to be produced by an interleaved sequence of two fast-cycling synchrotrons and three storage rings, with the existing TRIUMF H - cyclotron as injector. An $11-million preconstruction study has enabled the overall design to be reviewed and prototypes of various components to be built and evaluated -fast-cycling dipole and quadrupole magnets, a dual-frequency magnet power supply, ceramic beam pipes with internal RF shields, an RF cavity (using perpendicular bias), an extraction kicker, and RF beam chopper, and production targets. Environmental, industrial and economic impact studies have also been completed and the cost estimates and schedule updated. The total cost of $708 million (Canadian) will be shared equally between Canada, British Columbia (already approved) and international contributors. The federal decision is expected shortly. (Author) 29 refs., 5 figs

  2. A guide to develop competency-oriented Lean Learning Factories systematically

    OpenAIRE

    Enke, Judith; Tisch, Michael; Metternich, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, various lean learning factories were established in industry and academia around the globe. They are used for experience-based training, education, and practice-oriented research. Learning factories provide a reality-conform production environment as a learning environment. Processes and technologies of the learning factory are based on real industrial sites. Learning factories doesn't only contain single workplaces or machines, but changeable multilink value added chains....

  3. In-Factory Learning - Qualification For The Factory Of The Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quint, Fabian; Mura, Katharina; Gorecky, Dominic

    2015-07-01

    The Industry 4.0 vision anticipates that internet technologies will find their way into future factories replacing traditional components by dynamic and intelligent cyber-physical systems (CPS) that combine the physical objects with their digital representation. Reducing the gap between the real and digital world makes the factory environment more flexible, more adaptive, but also more complex for the human workers. Future workers require interdisciplinary competencies from engineering, information technology, and computer science in order to understand and manage the diverse interrelations between physical objects and their digital counterpart. This paper proposes a mixed-reality based learning environment, which combines physical objects and visualisation of digital content via Augmented Reality. It uses reality-based interaction in order to make the dynamic interrelations between real and digital factory visible and tangible. We argue that our learning system does not work as a stand-alone solution, but should fit into existing academic and advanced training curricula.

  4. MODEL PENGELOLAAN TEACHING FACTORY SEKOLAH MENENGAH KEJURUAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Burhan R Wijaya

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify and develop management models Factory Teaching Vocational School through a series of tests and validation of the model with the approach of reasearch and Development. Teaching Factory Management Models at Vocational Schools is a concept that combines learning management approach learning Competency Based Training (CBT and Production Based Training (PBT in the real atmosphere so that the process of achieving competence or skill skills life skills (life skills in accordance with the standards of graduate work in the industrial world. In particular, this study aims to formulate design management model development Teaching Factory Vocational School. To achieve the research objectives above using the approach of Research and Development, through preliminary studies, design development models, testing and validation. Preliminary study phase is planned to take the flow / stage as follows: the study of literature, study / collection of field data, and a description and analysis of field findings (factual, namely: (1 the description of the characteristics of vocational school with a standard performance indicators that can be poured as the content of the development of Teaching Factory, (2 description of the characteristics and potential development group management model Tefa as an outcome groups to develop and implement management models Tefa for Vocational Schools (3 description of the characteristics of potential stakeholders to support the development and implementation TEFA management model, and (4 preparation of the management model TEFA for Vocational Schools excellence and innovative. Trial design done on a limited scale model group. Then the model was accompanied by outcome group to develop and implement a model TEFA for Vocational Schools to determine whether the model developed can be applied correctly. Data analysis in this study, the preliminary study stage, the findings or the facts about productive learning

  5. The Three-dimensional Digital Factory for Shipbuilding Technology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional digital factory technology research is the hotspot in shipbuilding recently. The three-dimensional digital factory technology not only focus on design the components of the product, but also discuss on the simulation and analyses of the production process.Based on the three-dimensional model, the basic data layer, application control layer and the presentation layer of hierarchical structure are established in the three-dimensional digital factory of shipbuilding in this paper. And the key technologies of three-dimensional digital factory of shipbuilding are analysed. Finally, a case study is applied and the results show that the three-dimensional digital factory will play an important role in the future.

  6. Hollow fiber-based liquid phase microextraction with factorial design optimization and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for determination of cannabinoids in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emídio, Elissandro Soares; de Menezes Prata, Vanessa; de Santana, Fernando José Malagueño; Dórea, Haroldo Silveira

    2010-08-15

    A new method, based on hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MSMS), was developed for determination of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) in samples of human hair. Since hair is a solid matrix, the samples were subjected to alkaline digestion using NaOH. The aqueous solutions obtained were extracted using a 6cm polypropylene fiber (600microm i.d., 200microm wall thickness, 0.2microm pore size) for each extraction. A 2(5-1) fractional factorial design for screening, and a central composite design for optimization of significant variables, was applied during development of the extraction method. The variables evaluated were the type of extraction solvent, pH, stirring speed, extraction time, and acceptor phase volume. The optimized conditions for the proposed extraction procedure were 10mg of hair sample; 20microL of butyl acetate; aqueous (pH 14) donor phase containing 6.8% NaCl; 600rpm stirring speed; 20min extraction time. A linear response was obtained in the ranges 1-500pgmg(-1) (CBD and CBN) and 20-500pgmg(-1) (THC), with regression coefficients >0.99. Precision, determined as the relative standard deviation, was 3.3-8.9% (intra-day) and 4.4-13.7% (inter-day). Absolute recoveries varied in the ranges 4.4-4.8% (CBD), 7.6-8.9% (THC) and 7.7-8.2% (CBN). Limits of detection (LOD, S/N=3) and quantification (LOQ, S/N=10) were 0.5-15pgmg(-1) and 1-20pgmg(-1), respectively. The method was successfully used to determine CBD, THC and CBN in hair samples from patients in a drug dependency rehabilitation center. Concentrations varied in the ranges 1-18pgmg(-1) (CBD), 20-232pgmg(-1) (THC) and 9-107pgmg(-1) (CBN), confirming the suitability of the method for monitoring studies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. JINR tau-charm factory design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perel'shtejn, E.; Aleksandrov, V.; Antropov, V.

    1993-01-01

    The review on tau-charm factory in JINR (Dubna) is presented. The structure scheme of tau-charm factory is described. The problems on injection complex are discussed: the composition, the working regime and parameters. The magnetic lattice of a booster is described. A versatile magnet lattice is used in tau-charm collider. It can realize both conventional flat beam scheme and monochromatization scheme. The results of chromaticity correction in high emittance lattice are presented. The list of parameters of tau-charm collider is given. The technical proposal of magnetic elements of booster and collider and their power supplies is made, as well as RF power supply in collider and vacuum system in its periodic cell. 12 refs.; 12 figs.; 3 tabs

  8. Photon factory activity report, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This issue is the annual report of the Photon Factory, National laboratory of High Energy Physics. First, the outline of the Photon Factory is presented. Injector linac, light source, beamlines and instrumentation, the Tristan synchrotron radiation facility at the accumulation ring, and the Tristan super light facility are described in detail. The facility is open to researchers. The user's reports are collected as well. (J.P.N.) (435 refs.)

  9. Atomic Energy (factories) rules: 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These rules are made by the Central Government under the Factories Act, 1948 and extend to all factories engaged in carrying out the purposes of the Atomic Energy Act, 1962. The rules cover the requirements of inspecting staff, health aspects, personnel safety, personnel welfare, working hours, employment of young persons, special provisions in case of dangerous manufacturing processes or operations, supplemental rules for administrative aspects and special powers of competent authority. (M.G.B.)

  10. Photon factory activity report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This issue is the annual report of the Photon Factory, National Laboratory of High Energy Physics. First the outline of the Photon Factory is presented. Injector linac, light source, beamlines and instrumentation, synchrotron radiation facility at the Tristan accumulation ring, and the Tristan super light facility are described in detail. The facility is open to researchers. The user's reports are collected as well. (J.P.N.)

  11. Confirmatory factorial analysis of TEOSQp / Análise factorial confirmatória do TEOSQp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder M. Fernandes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research assessed the reliability, factorial validity and measurement invariance (by gender of the Portuguese version of TEOSQ –Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (Fonseca & Biddle, 2001. Data were collected from 1010 physical education students with a mean age of 15.42 ( SD=1.91. Factorial and invariance measurements were tested via confirmatory factorial analysis. Results supported internal consistency for the two proposed subscales (task and ego. Based on modification indices and theoretical justification the TEOSQ p was reduced to 12 items with better goodness-of-fit indices for the oblique model. The results of gender invariance did not provide full empirical support to the multi-group equivalence assumption, being suggested that TEOSQ p does not measure in the same way goal orientations for boys (orthogonal model and girls (oblique model. In light of these results, conceptual, empirical and practical issues were discussed.

  12. Application of fiber laser for a Higgs factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, W.

    2014-06-04

    This paper proposes a medium size(~6km) circular Higgs factory based on a photon collider. The recent breakthrough in fiber laser technology by means of a coherent amplifier network makes such a collider feasible and probably also affordable.

  13. Long-term insulin-like growth factor-I expression in skeletal muscles attenuates the enhanced in vitro proliferation ability of the resident satellite cells in transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Schwartz, R. J.; Booth, F. W.

    2001-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) overexpression for 1-month in mouse skeletal muscle increases satellite cell proliferation potential. However, it is unknown whether this beneficial enhancement by IGF-I expression would persist over a longer-term duration in aged mice. This is an important issue to address if a prolonged course of IGF-I is to be used clinically in muscle-wasting conditions where satellite cells may become limiting. Using the IGF-I transgenic (IGF-I Tg) mouse that selectively expresses the IGF-I transgene in striated muscles, we found that 18-months of continuous IGF-I overexpression led to a loss in the enhanced in vitro proliferative capacity of satellite cells from Tg skeletal muscles. Also 18-month-old IGF-I Tg satellite cells lost the enhanced BrdU incorporation, greater pRb and Akt phosphorylations, and decreased p27(Kip1) levels initially observed in cells from 1-month-old IGF-I Tg mice. The levels of those biochemical markers reverted to similar values seen in the 18-months WT littermates. These findings, therefore, suggest that there is no further beneficial effect on enhancing satellite cell proliferation ability with persistent long-term expression of IGF-I in skeletal muscles of these transgenic mice.

  14. The tau-charm factory: Experimental perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, M.L.; Schindler, R.H.

    1991-09-01

    This report discusses the Tau-Charm Factory Concept; D and D S Physics at the Tau-Charm Factory; τ and ν τ Physics at the Tau-Charm Factory; and Charmonium, Gluonium and Light Quark Spectroscopy at the Tau-Charm Factory

  15. Three-dimensional structure of Rubella virus factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, Juan; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Tzeng, Wen-Ping; Frey, Teryl K.; Fernandez, Jose J.; Risco, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Viral factories are complex structures in the infected cell where viruses compartmentalize their life cycle. Rubella virus (RUBV) assembles factories by recruitment of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), mitochondria and Golgi around modified lysosomes known as cytopathic vacuoles or CPVs. These organelles contain active replication complexes that transfer replicated RNA to assembly sites in Golgi membranes. We have studied the structure of RUBV factory in three dimensions by electron tomography and freeze-fracture. CPVs contain stacked membranes, rigid sheets, small vesicles and large vacuoles. These membranes are interconnected and in communication with the endocytic pathway since they incorporate endocytosed BSA-gold. RER and CPVs are coupled through protein bridges and closely apposed membranes. Golgi vesicles attach to the CPVs but no tight contacts with mitochondria were detected. Immunogold labelling confirmed that the mitochondrial protein p32 is an abundant component around and inside CPVs where it could play important roles in factory activities.

  16. Photon Factory activity report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Photon Factory is a national synchrotron radiation research facility affiliated with the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics located in Tsukuba Science City. The Photon Factory consists of a 2.5 GeV electron/positron linear accelerator, a 2.5 GeV electron/positron storage ring, beam lines and experimental stations. All the facilities for synchrotron radiation research are open to scientists. A part of the accumulation ring of the TRISTAN main ring has been used as a synchrotron radiation source in the energy range from 5.8 to 6.5 GeV. The Photon Factory is composed of three divisions of Injector Linac, Light Source and Instrumentation. The researches of each divisions are reviewed, and the users' short reports are collected. The list of published papers with author index is also included in the publication. (K.I.) 233 refs

  17. Math for the digital factory

    CERN Document Server

    Hömberg, Dietmar; Landry, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    This volume provides a unique collection of mathematical tools and industrial case studies in digital manufacturing. It addresses various topics, ranging from models of single production technologies, production lines, logistics and workflows to models and optimization strategies for energy consumption in production. The digital factory represents a network of digital models and simulation and 3D visualization methods for the holistic planning, realization, control and ongoing improvement of all factory processes related to a specific product. In the past ten years, all industrialized countries have launched initiatives to realize this vision, sometimes also referred to as Industry 4.0 (in Europe) or Smart Manufacturing (in the United States). Its main goals are • reconfigurable, adaptive and evolving factories capable of small-scale production • high-performance production, combining flexibility, productivity, precision and zero defects • energy and resource efficiency in manufacturing None of these...

  18. Carbon-based Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven S. C. Chuang

    2005-08-31

    The direct use of coal in the solid oxide fuel cell to generate electricity is an innovative concept for power generation. The C-fuel cell (carbon-based fuel cell) could offer significant advantages: (1) minimization of NOx emissions due to its operating temperature range of 700-1000 C, (2) high overall efficiency because of the direct conversion of coal to CO{sub 2}, and (3) the production of a nearly pure CO{sub 2} exhaust stream for the direct CO{sub 2} sequestration. The objective of this project is to determine the technical feasibility of using a highly active anode catalyst in a solid oxide fuel for the direct electrochemical oxidation of coal to produce electricity. Results of this study showed that the electric power generation from Ohio No 5 coal (Lower Kittanning) Seam, Mahoning County, is higher than those of coal gas and pure methane on a solid oxide fuel cell assembly with a promoted metal anode catalyst at 950 C. Further study is needed to test the long term activity, selectivity, and stability of anode catalysts.

  19. Survivor shielding. Part A. Nagasaki factory worker shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Robert T.; Barnes, John M.; Azmy, Yousry Y.; Kerr, George D.; Egbert, Stephen D.; Cullings, Harry M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent investigations based on conventional chromosome aberration data by the RERF suggest that the DS86 doses received by many Nagasaki factory workers may have been overestimated by as much as 40% relative to those for other survivors in Japanese-type houses and other shielding configurations (Kodama et al. 2001). Since the factory workers represent about 25% of the Nagasaki survivors with DS86 doses in excess of 0.5 Gy (50 rad), systematic errors in their dose estimates can have a major impact on the risk coefficients from RERF studies. The factory worker doses may have been overestimated for a number of reasons. The calculation techniques, including the factory building modeling, weapon source spectra and cross-section data used in the DS86 shielding calculations were not detailed enough to replicate actual conditions. The models used did not take into account local shielding provided by machinery, tools, and the internal structure in the buildings. In addition, changes in the disposition of shielding following collapse of the building by the blast wave were not considered. The location of large factory complexes may be uncertain, causing large numbers of factory survivors, correctly located relative to each other, to be uniformly too close to the hypocenter. Any or all of these reasons are sufficient to result in an overestimate of the factory worker doses. During the DS02 studies, factory worker doses have been reassessed by more carefully modeling the factory buildings, incorporating improved radiation transport methods and cross-section data and using the most recent bomb leakage spectra (Chapter 2). Two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations were carried out initially to estimate the effects of workbenches and tools on worker doses to determine if the inclusion of these components would, in fact, reduce the dose by amounts consistent with the RERF observations (Kodama et al. 2001). (author)

  20. Neutrinos: from the Workshop to the Factory

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Over the next 5 years much work will be done to reach a theoretical and practical description of a neutrino factory. How could this project turn out to be an interesting future option for CERN? Neutrino beams travelling from CERN to the Canary Islands? And to the Svalbard archipelago in Norway? Or even to the Pyhaesalmi Mine in Finland? Why neutrinos? And why so far? The answers provide one of CERN's next challenging options: the construction of a high-energy muon storage ring to provide neutrino beams. This project, nicknamed 'neutrino factory', now figures in CERN's middle term plan as a recognized and supported research and development project. International collaborations, with other European laboratories and also with America and Japan, are now being set up. Long baseline locations for neutrino oscillations studies at a CERN based neutrino factory. Early in its history, LEP established that there exist just three kinds of light neutrinos, those associated with the electron, muon, and tau leptons. For a...

  1. Cytotoxicity of methanol extracts of Annona muricata, Passiflora edulis and nine other Cameroonian medicinal plants towards multi-factorial drug-resistant cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Kuete, Victor; Dzotam, Joachim K.; Voukeng, Igor K.; Fankam, Aim? G.; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer cells rapidly acquire resistance leading to treatment failures. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytotoxicity of 17 methanol extracts from 11 Cameroonian medicinal plants against the sensitive leukemia CCRF?CEM cells and the best ones were further tested on a panel of 8 other human cancer cell lines, including various MDR phenotypes as well as against the normal AML12 hepatocytes. Methods The cytotoxicity of the extracts was determined using a resazurin reduction ...

  2. Cytotoxicity of methanol extracts of Annona muricata, Passiflora edulis and nine other Cameroonian medicinal plants towards multi-factorial drug-resistant cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Dzotam, Joachim K; Voukeng, Igor K; Fankam, Aimé G; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells rapidly acquire resistance leading to treatment failures. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytotoxicity of 17 methanol extracts from 11 Cameroonian medicinal plants against the sensitive leukemia CCRF-CEM cells and the best ones were further tested on a panel of 8 other human cancer cell lines, including various MDR phenotypes as well as against the normal AML12 hepatocytes. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was determined using a resazurin reduction assay meanwhile flow cytometry was used to measure cell cycle, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and reactive oxygen species. In an initial screening using leukemia CCRF-CEM cells, ten extracts from five plants namely Alchornea floribunda , Annona muricata , Euphorbia prostata , Pachypodanthium staudtii and Passiflora edulis displayed IC 50 values below 20 µg/mL. They were further tested in 8 other cell lines as well as in normal AML12 hepatocytes. All selected extracts were active against leukemia CEM/ADR5000 cells with IC 50 value below 40 µg/mL. IC 50 values ranging from 10.13 µg/mL (towards CEM/ADR5000 cells) to 72.01 µg/mL [towards resistant colon carcinoma HCT116 ( p53 - / - ) cells] for Pachypodanthium staudtii roots and from 0.11 µg/mL (towards CCRF-CEM cells) to 108 µg/mL (towards P-glycoprotein-over-expressing CEM/ADR5000 cells) for doxorubicin were obtained in the eight other cancer cell lines studied. Extracts from Annona muricata leaves (AML) and seeds (AMS), and Passiflora edulis fruit (PEF) had IC 50 values below 1 µg/mL against CCRF-CEM cells and below 10 µg/mL against its MDR subline CEM/ADR5000 cells. AML, AMS and PEF induced MMP-loss-mediated apoptosis in CCRF-CEM cells. Results of the present study suggest that some of the tested plants namely Alchornea floribunda , Annona muricata , Euphorbia prostata , Pachypodanthium staudtii and Passiflora edulis represent a source of anticancer drugs. Annona muricata and Passiflora edulis are good

  3. A Review of "Infinity Factory."

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Inc., Reston, VA.

    Following a discussion of the historical background of the TV series "Infinity Factory," the goals of the television project are listed. A general description of the television series, an evaluation of the entertainment value, and an evaluation of children's attitude change are briefly presented. The program's presentation of mathematics…

  4. The stimulatory effect of growth hormone, prolactin, and placental lactogen on beta-cell proliferation is not mediated by insulin-like growth factor-I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1991-01-01

    to bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) after cells were incubated for 1 h in the presence of 10 microM BrdU. By double staining with insulin antibodies it was found that 6.3% of the beta-cells had incorporated BrdU when cultured for 7 days in the presence of 1 microgram/ml human GH (hGH) compared to 0.6% when cultured...... in the absence of hGH. Similar results were obtained using rat GH. The half-maximal effect of hGH on beta-cell proliferation was observed at 10 ng/ml, and the maximal effect at 100 ng/ml. Islet cells cultured in the presence of PRL or PL caused a dose-dependent increase in beta-cell proliferation similar...... to that caused by hGH. GH, PRL, and PL had no effect on the proliferation of glucagon- or somatostatin-producing cells. The addition of 100 ng/ml IGF-I to either control or GH-stimulated islet cells did not affect the labeling index. When GH-stimulated proliferation of beta-cells was measured in the presence...

  5. Fractional factorial design-based optimisation and application of an extraction and UPLC-MS/MS detection method for the quantification of phytosterols in food, feed and beverages low in phytosterols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decloedt, Anneleen I; Van Landschoot, Anita; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2016-11-01

    Phytosterols are ubiquitous in plants, as they play an important role in cell membrane stability and as signal transducers. Over the last few decades, scientific interest in phytosterols has significantly increased. Most of the interest has focused on the cholesterol-lowering properties of phytosterols, but they may also interfere with endogenous steroid hormone synthesis. Despite this dual interest in phytosterols, accurate and fully validated methods for the quantification of phytosterols in food and feed samples are scarce. During this study an extraction and detection method for the main free phytosterols (β-sitosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol and brassicasterol) was optimised using a fractional factorial design. Detection was carried out on a UPLC-MS/MS triple stage quadrupole apparatus. The extraction and UPLC-MS/MS detection method was fully validated according to EU Council Decision 2002/657 guidelines and Association of Analytical Chemists (AOAC) MS criteria, reaching all evaluated performance parameter requirements. The individual recoveries ranged between 95 and 104 %. Good results for repeatability and intralaboratory reproducibility (RSD %) were observed ( 0.99) and lack-of-fit test (F test, alpha = 0.05). The limits of detection (LODs) and lower limits of quantification (LLOQs) in grain matrices were as low as 0.01-0.03 mg per 100 g and 0.02-0.10 mg per 100 g. This method allowed quantification of all main, free phytosterols in different grains (oats, barley, corn, malt) and it was shown that the method can be used for other solid food and feed samples as well, including new matrices such as straw, hay, mustard seeds, grass and yellow peas. Additionally, the method was shown to perform well in liquid samples low in phytosterols such as concentrate-based juices, soft drinks and beers (design. Detection was carried out on a UPLC-MS/MS triple stage quadrupole apparatus. The extraction and UPLC-MS/MS detection method was fully validated

  6. PRALIMAP: study protocol for a high school-based, factorial cluster randomised interventional trial of three overweight and obesity prevention strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrinier Nelly

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the increase in overweight and obesity prevalence in adolescents in the last decade, effective prevention strategies for these conditions in adolescents are urgently needed. The PRALIMAP (Promotion de l'ALImentation et de l'Activité Physique trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness for these conditions of 3 health promotion strategies -- educational, screening and environmental -- applied singly or in combination in high schools over a 2-year intervention period. Methods PRALIMAP is a stratified 2 × 2 × 2 factorial cluster randomised controlled trial including 24 state high schools in Lorraine, northeastern France, in 2 waves: 8 schools in 2006 (wave 1 and 16 in 2007 (wave 2. Students entering the selected high schools in the 4 academic years from 2006 to 2009 are eligible for data collection. Interventional strategies are organized over 2 academic years. The follow-up consists of 3 visits: at the entry of grade 10 (T0, grade 11 (T1 and grade 12 (T2. At T0, 5,458 (85.7% adolescents participated. The educational strategy consists of nutritional lessons, working groups and a final party. The screening strategy consists in detecting overweight/obesity and eating disorders in adolescents and proposing, if necessary, an adapted care management program of 7 group educational sessions. The environmental strategy consists in improving dietary and physical activity offerings in high schools and facilities, especially catering. The main outcomes are body size evolution over time, nutritional behaviour and knowledge, health and quality of life. An evaluation process documents how each intervention strategy is implemented in the schools and estimates the dose of the intervention, allowing for a per protocol analysis after the main intention-to-treat analysis. Discussion PRALIMAP aims at improving the prevention and management of overweight and obesity in adolescents by translating current evidence into public health practice

  7. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Clay, Timothy M; Woo, Christopher Y; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in the induction of antigen-specific T-cell responses, and therefore their use for the active immunotherapy of malignancies has been studied with considerable interest. More than a decade has passed since the publication of the first clinical data of DC-based vaccines, and through this and subsequent studies, a number of important developmental insights have been gleaned. These include the ideal source and type of DCs, the discovery of novel antigens and methods of loading DCs, the role of DC maturation, and the most efficient route of immunization. The generation of immune responses against tumor antigens after DC immunization has been demonstrated, and favorable clinical responses have been reported in some patients; however, it is difficult to pool the results as a whole, and thus the body of data remains inconclusive, in part because of varying DC preparation and vaccination protocols, the use of different forms of antigens, and, most importantly, a lack of rigorous criteria for defining clinical responses. As such, the standardization of clinical and immunologic criteria utilized, as well as DC preparations employed, will allow for the comparison of results across multiple clinical studies and is required in order for future trials to measure the true value and role of this treatment modality. In addition, issues regarding the optimal dose and clinical setting for the application of DC vaccines remain to be resolved, and recent clinical studies have been designed to begin to address these questions.

  8. Photon Factory Activity Report, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Photon Factory Activity Report no.12 deals with our activities in the period from October 1993 through September 1994. We operate two light sources at the Photon Factory; the 2.5-GeV Photon Factory storage ring, which is a dedicated light source, and the 6.5-GeV TRISTAN Accumulation Ring, which is parasitically used as a light source. We keep more than seventy experimental stations at two facilities, and accept experiments primarily according to approval by the Program Advisory Committee. The number of proposals to the Photon Factory has been still growing. Three-hundred eighty two proposals were approved by the PAC in FY1994, which is an increase by thirteen percent compared to the previous year. Remarkable was growth in biology proposals, particularly proposals in protein crystallography. In FY 1994, we accepted approximately 20,000 man-days as general users, and almost ten percent of them were from abroad. We always open the facility to users, not only domestic but also international. Recently we have been concentrating our effort to upgrading of the light sources and reconstruction of the experimental stations to keep the Photon Factory an attractive research facility in the forthcoming years. We have already started a program of reducing the emittance of the 2.5-GeV storage ring, which now operates with an emittance of 110 nm-rad, to 27 nm-rad by modifying the lattice, with the goal of operation at the reduced emittance in the fall of 1997. We also have conceived of a conversion of the TRISTAN Accumulation Ring to a dedicated light source of high energies. The on-going TRISTAN project will terminate by the end of 1995, and the TRISTAN Main Ring will be converted to a new B-Factory. At this moment, the TRISTAN Accumulation Ring will be disused as the injector to the Main Ring, and conversion of the AR to a dedicated light source becomes possible. (J.P.N.)

  9. Photon Factory Activity Report, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Photon Factory Activity Report no.12 deals with our activities in the period from October 1993 through September 1994. We operate two light sources at the Photon Factory; the 2.5-GeV Photon Factory storage ring, which is a dedicated light source, and the 6.5-GeV TRISTAN Accumulation Ring, which is parasitically used as a light source. We keep more than seventy experimental stations at two facilities, and accept experiments primarily according to approval by the Program Advisory Committee. The number of proposals to the Photon Factory has been still growing. Three-hundred eighty two proposals were approved by the PAC in FY1994, which is an increase by thirteen percent compared to the previous year. Remarkable was growth in biology proposals, particularly proposals in protein crystallography. In FY 1994, we accepted approximately 20,000 man-days as general users, and almost ten percent of them were from abroad. We always open the facility to users, not only domestic but also international. Recently we have been concentrating our effort to upgrading of the light sources and reconstruction of the experimental stations to keep the Photon Factory an attractive research facility in the forthcoming years. We have already started a program of reducing the emittance of the 2.5-GeV storage ring, which now operates with an emittance of 110 nm-rad, to 27 nm-rad by modifying the lattice, with the goal of operation at the reduced emittance in the fall of 1997. We also have conceived of a conversion of the TRISTAN Accumulation Ring to a dedicated light source of high energies. The on-going TRISTAN project will terminate by the end of 1995, and the TRISTAN Main Ring will be converted to a new B-Factory. At this moment, the TRISTAN Accumulation Ring will be disused as the injector to the Main Ring, and conversion of the AR to a dedicated light source becomes possible. (J.P.N.)

  10. Cell-Based Therapies for Diabetic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Bernardi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, accumulating experimental evidence supports the notion that diabetic patients may greatly benefit from cell-based therapies, which include the use of adult stem and/or progenitor cells. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells and the circulating pool of endothelial progenitor cells have so far been the most studied populations of cells proposed for the treatment of vascular complications affecting diabetic patients. We review the evidence supporting their use in this setting, the therapeutic benefits that these cells have shown so far as well as the challenges that cell-based therapies in diabetic complications put out.

  11. Factory Outlet Stores - ein Trend in Deutschland?

    OpenAIRE

    Nufer, Gerd; Sieber, Dorothea

    2009-01-01

    Der Factory Outlet Store stellt einen neuen Vertriebskanal dar, der es Herstellern ermöglicht, Kunden Markenprodukte zu vergleichsweise günstige Preisen anzubieten. Der vorliegende Beitrag befasst sich mit dem Konzept Factory Outlet Store und der Frage, ob es sich hierbei um einen aktuellen Marketing-Trend handelt bzw. welche Mittel unternommen werden müssen, um Factory Outlet Stores nachhaltig zu etablieren. Hierzu werden Factory Outlet Stores aus der Marketing-Perspektive analysiert, bei de...

  12. The Personal Software Process: Downscaling the factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Daniel M.

    1994-01-01

    It is argued that the next wave of software process improvement (SPI) activities will be based on a people-centered paradigm. The most promising such paradigm, Watts Humphrey's personal software process (PSP), is summarized and its advantages are listed. The concepts of the PSP are shown also to fit a down-scaled version of Basili's experience factory. The author's data and lessons learned while practicing the PSP are presented along with personal experience, observations, and advice from the perspective of a consultant and teacher for the personal software process.

  13. Recent developments at the TRIUMF meson factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1976-10-01

    The TRIUMF meson factory, which is based on a 6-sector isochronous cyclotron accelerating H - ions to 520 MeV, has been operating since December 1974. Two proton beams are extracted simultaneously to feed the two experimental areas. Characteristics of the beams and beam lines are given. Work is also proceeding on (i) additional beam lines, (ii) a 180 kW beam dump and thermal neutron source, (iii) a medium resolution proton spectrometer, and (iv) adding third harmonic flat-topping to the RF to permit separation of the internal orbits and reduction of the energy spread of the extracted beam to 0.1 MeV. (author)

  14. A CLIC-Prototype Higgs Factory

    OpenAIRE

    Belusevic, Radoje; Higo, Toshiyasu

    2012-01-01

    We propose that a pair of electron linacs with high accelerating gradients and an optical FEL be built at an existing laboratory. The linacs would employ CLIC-type rf cavities and a klystron-based power source; a two-beam scheme could be implemented at a later stage. The proposed facility would serve primarily as an e+e-/gamma-gamma Higgs-boson factory. The rich set of final states in e+e- and gamma-gamma collisions would play an essential role in measuring the mass, spin, parity, two-photon ...

  15. RIKEN RI Beam Factory project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Yasushige; Goto, Akira; Katayama, Takeshi [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    The RARF proposes `RIKEN RI Beam Factory` as a next facility-expanding project. The factory makes it the primary aim to provide RI (Radioactive Isotope) beams covering over the whole atomic-mass range with the world-highest intensity in a wide energy range up to several hundreds MeV/nucleon. These RI beams are generated by the fragmentation of high-intensity heavy-ion beams. For the efficient production heavy-ion energies will be boosted up to over 100 MeV/nucleon even for very heavy ions by a K2500-MeV superconducting ring cyclotron serving as a post accelerator of the existing K540-MeV ring cyclotron. A new type of experimental installation called `MUSES` (Multi-USe Experimental Storage rings) will be constructed as well. With MUSES, various types of unique colliding experiments will become possible. (author)

  16. A kaon factory for TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measday, D.F.

    1988-11-01

    The design study for the TRIUMF Kaon Factory has recently been funded. A short discussion of the scientific motivation is given first, followed by a brief description of the 30 GeV synchrotron which is being proposed. There will be five rings altogether using the present TRIUMF 500 MeV cyclotron as an injector. If the project is funded in 1990 the accelerators would be completed in 1995 or so, and the experimental programme would start a year later

  17. Apiary B Factory lattice design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald, M.H.R.; Garren, A.A.

    1991-04-01

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper will present the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent. 8 figs. 1 tab

  18. Hadronic research at kaon factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvey, G.T.

    1985-01-01

    Future experiments in strong-interaction physics that are especially suited for kaon factories, such as the proposed LAMPF II, are discussed. The need to focus on the issue of confinement of light quarks (u,d,s) is stressed. Experiments to search for the H dibaryon and glueballs, as well as to pursue the sea-quark distribution in nuclei using the Drell-Yan process, are featured. A brief discussion of the LAMPF II facility and its costs is also presented

  19. The Role of Spatial Analysis in Detecting the Consequence of the Factory Sites : Case Study of Assalaya Factory-Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khair, Amar Sharaf Eldin; Purwanto; RyaSunoko, Henna; Abdullah, Omer Adam

    2018-02-01

    Spatial analysis is considered as one of the most important science for identifying the most appropriate site for industrialization and also to alleviate the environmental ramifications caused by factories. This study aims at analyzing the Assalaya sugarcane factory site by the use of spatial analysis to determine whether it has ramification on the White Nile River. The methodology employed for this study is Global Position System (GPS) to identify the coordinate system of the study phenomena and other relative factors. The study will also make use Geographical Information System (GIS) to implement the spatial analysis. Satellite data (LandsatDem-Digital Elevation Model) will be considered for the study area and factory in identifying the consequences by analyzing the location of the factory through several features such as hydrological, contour line and geological analysis. Data analysis reveals that the factory site is inappropriate and according to observation on the ground it has consequences on the White Nile River. Based on the finding, the study recommended some suggestions to avoid the aftermath of any factory in general. We have to take advantage of this new technological method to aid in selecting most apt locations for industries that will create an ambient environment.

  20. Photon Factory activity report, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Photon Factory at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics is a national facility for scientific research utilizing synchrotron radiation. Although the Photon Factory operator the linear injector, two light sources including the 2.5 GeV storage ring and the 6.5 GeV TRISTAN accumulation Ring as well as a major fraction of their beamlines and experimental station. This report is covered the period from October 1994 to September 1995. The total number of proposals by this PAC was 399 in 1995. Facility development projects currently in progress include the following, TRISTAN Super Light Facility (TSLF) project, VUV-FEL project, KEKB project and Slow-positron Source. This report contents outline of the Photon Factory, introduction, scientific disciplines, electronic properties of condensed matters, atomic and molecular science, X-ray imaging, radiobiology using synchrotron radiation, structural properties of condensed matters, structural properties of solid surfaces and adsorbates, structure and function of proteins, theoretical researches, experimental facilities, beamlines, new instrumentation, AR Upgrade, collaborations, projects, user`s short reports, list of published papers 1994/95. (S.Y.)

  1. Photon Factory activity report, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Photon Factory at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics is a national facility for scientific research utilizing synchrotron radiation. Although the Photon Factory operator the linear injector, two light sources including the 2.5 GeV storage ring and the 6.5 GeV TRISTAN accumulation Ring as well as a major fraction of their beamlines and experimental station. This report is covered the period from October 1994 to September 1995. The total number of proposals by this PAC was 399 in 1995. Facility development projects currently in progress include the following, TRISTAN Super Light Facility (TSLF) project, VUV-FEL project, KEKB project and Slow-positron Source. This report contents outline of the Photon Factory, introduction, scientific disciplines, electronic properties of condensed matters, atomic and molecular science, X-ray imaging, radiobiology using synchrotron radiation, structural properties of condensed matters, structural properties of solid surfaces and adsorbates, structure and function of proteins, theoretical researches, experimental facilities, beamlines, new instrumentation, AR Upgrade, collaborations, projects, user's short reports, list of published papers 1994/95. (S.Y.)

  2. Photon Factory activity report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Photon Factory has grown at a considerable rate, and 600 experiments are carried out in 1991, while the number of users is now 2300 including about 500 from industrial sectors. The use of synchrotron radiation increased from fundamental research to industrial development. The development at the Photon Factory is supported by the capability of the accelerators. At present, the 2.5 GeV PF ring is operated with positrons at the initial beam current of 350 mA. The total operation time was 3500 hours in the fiscal year 1990. The development of an avalanche mode photodiode, the observation of quantum beat in the experiment of nuclear Bragg scattering, the measurement of photo-electron and photo-ion spectroscopy were carried out. The conversion of TRISTAN main ring to an ultrahigh brilliance and high coherence source is planned for the future. The annual PF Symposium was held, and Professor H. Winick gave the lecture 'Ultrahigh brightness and coherent radiation from large storage rings'. In this report, the outline of the Photon Factory and the activities in Divisions of Injector Linac, Light Source and Instrumentation are described. (K.I.)

  3. Cell phone based balance trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In their current laboratory-based form, existing vibrotactile sensory augmentation technologies that provide cues of body motion are impractical for home-based rehabilitation use due to their size, weight, complexity, calibration procedures, cost, and fragility. Methods We have designed and developed a cell phone based vibrotactile feedback system for potential use in balance rehabilitation training in clinical and home environments. It comprises an iPhone with an embedded tri-axial linear accelerometer, custom software to estimate body tilt, a "tactor bud" accessory that plugs into the headphone jack to provide vibrotactile cues of body tilt, and a battery. Five young healthy subjects (24 ± 2.8 yrs, 3 females and 2 males) and four subjects with vestibular deficits (42.25 ± 13.5 yrs, 2 females and 2 males) participated in a proof-of-concept study to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Healthy subjects used the system with eyes closed during Romberg, semi-tandem Romberg, and tandem Romberg stances. Subjects with vestibular deficits used the system with both eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions during semi-tandem Romberg stance. Vibrotactile feedback was provided when the subject exceeded either an anterior-posterior (A/P) or a medial-lateral (M/L) body tilt threshold. Subjects were instructed to move away from the vibration. Results The system was capable of providing real-time vibrotactile cues that informed corrective postural responses. When feedback was available, both healthy subjects and those with vestibular deficits significantly reduced their A/P or M/L RMS sway (depending on the direction of feedback), had significantly smaller elliptical area fits to their sway trajectory, spent a significantly greater mean percentage time within the no feedback zone, and showed a significantly greater A/P or M/L mean power frequency. Conclusion The results suggest that the real-time feedback provided by this system can be used to reduce body sway. Its

  4. Cell phone based balance trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Beom-Chan; Kim, Jeonghee; Chen, Shu; Sienko, Kathleen H

    2012-02-08

    In their current laboratory-based form, existing vibrotactile sensory augmentation technologies that provide cues of body motion are impractical for home-based rehabilitation use due to their size, weight, complexity, calibration procedures, cost, and fragility. We have designed and developed a cell phone based vibrotactile feedback system for potential use in balance rehabilitation training in clinical and home environments. It comprises an iPhone with an embedded tri-axial linear accelerometer, custom software to estimate body tilt, a "tactor bud" accessory that plugs into the headphone jack to provide vibrotactile cues of body tilt, and a battery. Five young healthy subjects (24 ± 2.8 yrs, 3 females and 2 males) and four subjects with vestibular deficits (42.25 ± 13.5 yrs, 2 females and 2 males) participated in a proof-of-concept study to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Healthy subjects used the system with eyes closed during Romberg, semi-tandem Romberg, and tandem Romberg stances. Subjects with vestibular deficits used the system with both eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions during semi-tandem Romberg stance. Vibrotactile feedback was provided when the subject exceeded either an anterior-posterior (A/P) or a medial-lateral (M/L) body tilt threshold. Subjects were instructed to move away from the vibration. The system was capable of providing real-time vibrotactile cues that informed corrective postural responses. When feedback was available, both healthy subjects and those with vestibular deficits significantly reduced their A/P or M/L RMS sway (depending on the direction of feedback), had significantly smaller elliptical area fits to their sway trajectory, spent a significantly greater mean percentage time within the no feedback zone, and showed a significantly greater A/P or M/L mean power frequency. The results suggest that the real-time feedback provided by this system can be used to reduce body sway. Its advantages over more complex

  5. Cell phone based balance trainer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Beom-Chan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In their current laboratory-based form, existing vibrotactile sensory augmentation technologies that provide cues of body motion are impractical for home-based rehabilitation use due to their size, weight, complexity, calibration procedures, cost, and fragility. Methods We have designed and developed a cell phone based vibrotactile feedback system for potential use in balance rehabilitation training in clinical and home environments. It comprises an iPhone with an embedded tri-axial linear accelerometer, custom software to estimate body tilt, a "tactor bud" accessory that plugs into the headphone jack to provide vibrotactile cues of body tilt, and a battery. Five young healthy subjects (24 ± 2.8 yrs, 3 females and 2 males and four subjects with vestibular deficits (42.25 ± 13.5 yrs, 2 females and 2 males participated in a proof-of-concept study to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Healthy subjects used the system with eyes closed during Romberg, semi-tandem Romberg, and tandem Romberg stances. Subjects with vestibular deficits used the system with both eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions during semi-tandem Romberg stance. Vibrotactile feedback was provided when the subject exceeded either an anterior-posterior (A/P or a medial-lateral (M/L body tilt threshold. Subjects were instructed to move away from the vibration. Results The system was capable of providing real-time vibrotactile cues that informed corrective postural responses. When feedback was available, both healthy subjects and those with vestibular deficits significantly reduced their A/P or M/L RMS sway (depending on the direction of feedback, had significantly smaller elliptical area fits to their sway trajectory, spent a significantly greater mean percentage time within the no feedback zone, and showed a significantly greater A/P or M/L mean power frequency. Conclusion The results suggest that the real-time feedback provided by this system can be used

  6. The effect of stimulation therapy and donepezil on cognitive function in Alzheimer’s disease. A community based RCT with a two-by-two factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Fred

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progressive neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease (AD induces cognitive deterioration, and there is controversy regarding the optimal treatment strategy in early AD. Stimulation therapy, including physical exercise and cholinesterase inhibitors are both reported to postpone cognitive deterioration in separate studies. We aimed to study the effect of stimulation therapy and the additional effect of donepezil on cognitive function in early AD. Method Design: A two-by-two factorial trial comprising stimulation therapy for one year compared to standard care to which a randomized double-blinded placebo controlled trial with donepezil was added. Setting: Nine rural municipalities in Northern Norway. Participants: 187 participants 65 years and older with a recent diagnosis of mild or moderate AD were included in the study of which 146 completed a one-year follow-up. INTERVENTIONS: In five municipalities the participants received stimulation therapy whereas participants in four received standard care. All participants were randomised double-blindly to donepezil or placebo and tested with three different cognitive tests four times during the one-year study period. Main outcome: Changes in MMSE sum score. Secondary outcome: Changes in ADAS-Cog and Clock Drawing Test. Results MMSE scores remained unchanged amongst AD participants receiving stimulation therapy and those receiving standard care. The results were consistent for ADAS-Cog and Clock Drawing Test. No time trend differences were found during one-year follow-up between groups receiving stimulation therapy versus standard care or between donepezil versus placebo. Conclusion In rural AD patients non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapy did not improve outcome compared with standard care but all groups retained cognitive function during one year follow-up. Other studies are needed to confirm these results. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier: NCT00443014

  7. The effect of stimulation therapy and donepezil on cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease. A community based RCT with a two-by-two factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Fred; Viitanen, Matti; Halvorsen, Dag S; Straume, Bjørn; Wilsgaard, Tom; Engstad, Torgeir A

    2012-07-19

    Progressive neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) induces cognitive deterioration, and there is controversy regarding the optimal treatment strategy in early AD. Stimulation therapy, including physical exercise and cholinesterase inhibitors are both reported to postpone cognitive deterioration in separate studies. We aimed to study the effect of stimulation therapy and the additional effect of donepezil on cognitive function in early AD. A two-by-two factorial trial comprising stimulation therapy for one year compared to standard care to which a randomized double-blinded placebo controlled trial with donepezil was added. Nine rural municipalities in Northern Norway. 187 participants 65 years and older with a recent diagnosis of mild or moderate AD were included in the study of which 146 completed a one-year follow-up. In five municipalities the participants received stimulation therapy whereas participants in four received standard care. All participants were randomised double-blindly to donepezil or placebo and tested with three different cognitive tests four times during the one-year study period. Changes in MMSE sum score.Secondary outcome: Changes in ADAS-Cog and Clock Drawing Test. MMSE scores remained unchanged amongst AD participants receiving stimulation therapy and those receiving standard care. The results were consistent for ADAS-Cog and Clock Drawing Test. No time trend differences were found during one-year follow-up between groups receiving stimulation therapy versus standard care or between donepezil versus placebo. In rural AD patients non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapy did not improve outcome compared with standard care but all groups retained cognitive function during one year follow-up. Other studies are needed to confirm these results. ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier: NCT00443014). EudraCT database (no 2004-002613-37).

  8. Effects of phorbol ester and staurosporine on the actions of insulin-like growth factor-I on rat ovarian granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, H; Herington, A C; Roupas, P

    1995-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is able to stimulate ovarian granulosa cell steroidogenesis induced by gonadotopins. This gonadotropin-induced potentiation of IGF-I action appears to be due, at least in part, to a gonadotropin-induced increase in membrane-bound IGF-I receptor number and/or decrease in extracellular IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). Protein kinase C (PKC) has recently been reported to inhibit gonadotropin-induced steroidogenesis in rat ovarian granulosa cells. The role of PKC in the effects of IGF-I on gonadotropin action, however, is unknown. In this study, the effects of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, a PKC activator) and staurosporine (ST, a PKC inhibitor) on IGF-I action were studied using immature rat ovarian granulosa cells. Activation of PKC by PMA did not affect steroidogenesis or cAMP secretion in cells treated with or without IGF-I. On the other hand, inhibition of PKC by ST alone (10(-9)-10(-7)m) led to an increase in progesterone production in a dose- and time-dependent manner without affecting cAMP secretion. In the presence, but not absence, of ST, IGF-I was able to stimulate progesterone production in the absence of any gonadotropin. PMA decreased ST-induced steroidogenesis and essentially abolished ST-potentiated IGF-I stimulation of steroidogenesis, suggesting the effects of ST on IGF-I action involved a PKC-dependent mechanism. Unlike gonadotropin, ST did not change IGF-I receptor binding. However, ST significantly decreased a major IGF binding protein (IGFBP, ∼30kDa) which is likely to be IGFBP-5, whereas it increased a minor IGFBP (∼24kDa) which is likely to be IGFBP-4. Both effects of ST were dose- and time-dependent. Furthermore, ST inhibited the expression of mRNA for IGFBP-5 suggesting that ST decreased IGFBP-5 levels by inhibiting its transcription and/or decreasing the stability of its mRNA. Interestingly, ST also decreased mRNA levels of IGFBP-4 despite a significant increase in secreted IGFBP-4 levels. The

  9. Microencapsulating and Banking Living Cells for Cell-Based Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wujie Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge to the eventual success of the emerging cell-based medicine such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and cell transplantation is the limited availability of the desired cell sources. This challenge can be addressed by cell microencapsulation to overcome the undesired immune response (i.e., to achieve immunoisolation so that non-autologous cells can be used to treat human diseases, and by cell/tissue preservation to bank living cells for wide distribution to end users so that they are readily available when needed in the future. This review summarizes the status quo of research in both cell microencapsulation and banking the microencapsulated cells. It is concluded with a brief outlook of future research directions in this important field.

  10. [Signaling network-based functional cell design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jianqi; Wei, Ping

    2017-03-25

    Cellular signaling networks act as the central processor to deal with environmental signals and regulate cell function, and determine cell fate. Using synthetic biology approach to engineer cell signaling networks is crucial for ultimately constructing man-made "cell machines". Cellular signaling networks can encode sophisticated cell information by processing quantitatively signaling dynamics, which enables multi-dimensional regulation of functional sub-circuits. Here, we first review the research progresses on the signaling coding mechanisms; and then elaborate the methodologies and applications of cells signaling engineering; finally, we envision that signaling-based cell engineering are important for the increasingly-complicated next generation synthetic biology.

  11. Perfusion based cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures...... and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers....

  12. Ultrastructural Characterization of Zika Virus Replication Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Mirko; Goellner, Sarah; Acosta, Eliana Gisela; Neufeldt, Christopher John; Oleksiuk, Olga; Lampe, Marko; Haselmann, Uta; Funaya, Charlotta; Schieber, Nicole; Ronchi, Paolo; Schorb, Martin; Pruunsild, Priit; Schwab, Yannick; Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Ruggieri, Alessia; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2017-02-28

    A global concern has emerged with the pandemic spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections that can cause severe neurological symptoms in adults and newborns. ZIKV is a positive-strand RNA virus replicating in virus-induced membranous replication factories (RFs). Here we used various imaging techniques to investigate the ultrastructural details of ZIKV RFs and their relationship with host cell organelles. Analyses of human hepatic cells and neural progenitor cells infected with ZIKV revealed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane invaginations containing pore-like openings toward the cytosol, reminiscent to RFs in Dengue virus-infected cells. Both the MR766 African strain and the H/PF/2013 Asian strain, the latter linked to neurological diseases, induce RFs of similar architecture. Importantly, ZIKV infection causes a drastic reorganization of microtubules and intermediate filaments forming cage-like structures surrounding the viral RF. Consistently, ZIKV replication is suppressed by cytoskeleton-targeting drugs. Thus, ZIKV RFs are tightly linked to rearrangements of the host cell cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Circadian variation in biochemical markers of bone cell activity and insulin-like growth factor-I in two-year-old horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, B F; Blumsohn, A; Goodship, A E; Wilson, A M; Price, J S

    2003-11-01

    Studies in humans have found circadian changes to be one of the most important sources of controllable preanalytical variability when evaluating bone cell activity using biochemical markers. It remains unclear whether similar circadian changes influence bone marker concentrations in the horse. The aim of this study was to characterize changes in serum concentrations of three biochemical markers of bone cell activity over a 24-h period in six 2-yr-old Thoroughbred mares, and to determine circadian variability in IGF-I, which regulates bone turnover. Three bone markers were measured in serum: osteocalcin, a marker of bone formation, the carboxy-terminal propeptide of type-I collagen (a marker of bone formation), and the carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type-I collagen (a marker of bone resorption). Data were analyzed using the cosinor technique, which fits a 24-h cycle to each dataset. A significant circadian rhythm was observed for osteocalcin (P = 0.028), with an estimated amplitude of 7.6% of the mean (95% confidence interval 1.3% to 16.3%), and an estimated peak time of 0900. However, the observed rhythm for the carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type-I collagen (amplitude = 7.4%) was not significant (P = 0.067), and there were no significant changes in concentrations of the carboxy-terminal propeptide of type-I collagen over the 24-h study period (P = 0.44). There was a small but significant circadian rhythm for IGF-I (P = 0.04), with an estimated amplitude of 3.4% (95% confidence interval 0.2 to 7.1%) and peak at 1730. Further studies are now required to determine the potential association between circadian changes in IGF-I and osteocalcin in the horse. Although no significant circadian variation was found in concentrations of the car-boxy-terminal propeptide of type-I collagen and the carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type-I collagen, this may in part be a result of the age of the animals that were still skeletally immature. Future studies should aim to determine

  14. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel M. [IIT, Chicago

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  15. Strategies for the production of difficult-to-express full-length eukaryotic proteins using microbial cell factories: production of human alpha-galactosidase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzueta, Ugutz; Vázquez, Felicitas; Accardi, Giulia; Mendoza, Rosa; Toledo-Rubio, Verónica; Giuliani, Maria; Sannino, Filomena; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Abasolo, Ibane; Schwartz, Simo; Tutino, Maria L; Villaverde, Antonio; Corchero, José L; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2015-07-01

    Obtaining high levels of pure proteins remains the main bottleneck of many scientific and biotechnological studies. Among all the available recombinant expression systems, Escherichia coli facilitates gene expression by its relative simplicity, inexpensive and fast cultivation, well-known genetics and the large number of tools available for its biotechnological application. However, recombinant expression in E. coli is not always a straightforward procedure and major obstacles are encountered when producing many eukaryotic proteins and especially membrane proteins, linked to missing posttranslational modifications, proteolysis and aggregation. In this context, many conventional and unconventional eukaryotic hosts are under exploration and development, but in some cases linked to complex culture media or processes. In this context, alternative bacterial systems able to overcome some of the limitations posed by E. coli keeping the simplicity of prokaryotic manipulation are currently emerging as convenient hosts for protein production. We have comparatively produced a "difficult-to-express" human protein, the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (hGLA) in E. coli and in the psychrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 cells (P. haloplanktis TAC125). While in E. coli the production of active hGLA was unreachable due to proteolytic instability and/or protein misfolding, the expression of hGLA gene in P. haloplanktis TAC125 allows obtaining active enzyme. These results are discussed in the context of emerging bacterial systems for protein production that represent appealing alternatives to the regular use of E. coli and also of more complex eukaryotic systems.

  16. Towards Biocontained Cell Factories: An Evolutionarily Adapted Escherichia coli Strain Produces a New-to-nature Bioactive Lantibiotic Containing Thienopyrrole-Alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthning, Anja; Durkin, Patrick; Oehm, Stefan; Hoesl, Michael G; Budisa, Nediljko; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2016-09-16

    Genetic code engineering that enables reassignment of genetic codons to non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) is a powerful strategy for enhancing ribosomally synthesized peptides and proteins with functions not commonly found in Nature. Here we report the expression of a ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide (RiPP), the 32-mer lantibiotic lichenicidin with a canonical tryptophan (Trp) residue replaced by the ncAA L-β-(thieno[3,2-b]pyrrolyl)alanine ([3,2]Tpa) which does not sustain cell growth in the culture. We have demonstrated that cellular toxicity of [3,2]Tpa for the production of the new-to-nature bioactive congener of lichenicidin in the host Escherichia coli can be alleviated by using an evolutionarily adapted host strain MT21 which not only tolerates [3,2]Tpa but also uses it as a proteome-wide synthetic building block. This work underscores the feasibility of the biocontainment concept and establishes a general framework for design and large scale production of RiPPs with evolutionarily adapted host strains.

  17. Chip based electroanalytical systems for cell analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spegel, C.; Heiskanen, A.; Skjolding, L.H.D.

    2008-01-01

    ' measurements of processes related to living cells, i.e., systems without lysing the cells. The focus is on chip based amperometric and impedimetric cell analysis systems where measurements utilizing solely carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFME) and other nonchip electrode formats, such as CFME for exocytosis...

  18. Muon Acceleration: Neutrino Factory and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogacz, Alex [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-03-01

    We summarize the current state of a concept for muon acceleration aimed at a future Neutrino Factory and extendable to Higgs Factory. The main thrust of these studies was to reduce the overall cost while maintaining performance by exploring the interplay between the complexity of the cooling systems and the acceptance of the accelerator complex. To ensure adequate survival for the short-lived muons, acceleration must occur at high average gradient. The need for large transverse and longitudinal acceptances drives the design of the acceleration system to an initially low RF frequency, e.g., 325 MHz, which is then increased to 650 MHz as the transverse size shrinks with increasing energy. High-gradient normal conducting RF cavities at these frequencies require extremely high peak-power RF sources. Hence superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are chosen. We consider an SRF-efficient design based on a multi-pass (4.5) ?dogbone? RLA, extendable to multi-pass FFAG-like arcs.

  19. Solid Acid Based Fuel Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haile, Sossina M

    2005-01-01

    ...) without pressurization. In this configuration, the thin-film fuel cell is supported on a porous stainless steel gas diffusion layer and the electrocatalyst and electrolyte layers are spray-deposited...

  20. RIKEN RI Beam Factory project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Y.; Katayama, T.

    1996-01-01

    The RARF has a heavy-ion accelerator complex consisting of a K540-MeV ring cyclotron as a booster accelerator and two different types of injectors. The facility provides not only nuclear physicists but also researchers of atomic physics, nuclear chemistry, material science, radiobiology and others with various kinds of heavy-ion beams of an energy range of 10 MeV/nucleon to 100 MeV/nucleon. One of remarkable features of this facility is capability of supplying RI (radioactive isotope) beams with the world-highest level of intensities. In these several years the RI beam has opened up a quite new and fascinating heavy-ion science. In order to further promote this new science, we propose open-quote open-quote RIKEN RI Beam Factory close-quote close-quote as a future project of the RARF: The existing facility will be expanded into the open-quote open-quote Factory close-quote close-quote where high-intensity RI beams of the whole mass range will become available in a wide energy range up to several hundred MeV/nucleon. The concept of this new proposal as well as currently-running upgrade programs relevant to the project will be presented. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  1. Photon Factory activity report, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Since the foundation of Photon Factory a decade age, it has played an important role as a unique synchrotron X-ray radiation source in Japan. Installation of various insertion devices, storage of intense positron beam and reduction of beam emittance were the substantial achievements in the last several years. The exploitation of the TRISTAN Accumulation Ring as a synchrotron radiation source has paved the way for a new potential of development. All these activities have brought about the increase of beamlines and the expansion of scientific fronts. Third International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation held in Tsukuba was one of the most highlighted events for the facility. In coming years, it is intended to open new research fields using the promising single bunch beam and circularly polarized wiggler radiation. The TRISTAN Main Ring also will be applied to synchrotron radiation research. The Photon Factory in a national synchrotron radiation research facility affiliated to the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, and it consists of a 2.5 GeV electron linac, a 2.5 GeV storage ring as a synchrotron light source, beam lines and experimental stations. The operation, improvement and development in respective departments are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Operating a production pilot factory serving several scientific domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sfiligoi, I; Würthwein, F; Andrews, W; Dost, J M; MacNeill, I; McCrea, A; Sheripon, E; Murphy, C W

    2011-01-01

    Pilot infrastructures are becoming prominent players in the Grid environment. One of the major advantages is represented by the reduced effort required by the user communities (also known as Virtual Organizations or VOs) due to the outsourcing of the Grid interfacing services, i.e. the pilot factory, to Grid experts. One such pilot factory, based on the glideinWMS pilot infrastructure, is being operated by the Open Science Grid at University of California San Diego (UCSD). This pilot factory is serving multiple VOs from several scientific domains. Currently the three major clients are the analysis operations of the HEP experiment CMS, the community VO HCC, which serves mostly math, biology and computer science users, and the structural biology VO NEBioGrid. The UCSD glidein factory allows the served VOs to use Grid resources distributed over 150 sites in North and South America, in Europe, and in Asia. This paper presents the steps taken to create a production quality pilot factory, together with the challenges encountered along the road.

  3. Study of electroless nickel plating on PerFactoryTM rapid prototype model

    OpenAIRE

    J.C. Rajaguru; C. Au, M. Duke

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of electroless nickel plating on PerFactoryTM rapid prototype model built on PerFactoryTM R05 material. PerFactoryTM R05 is acrylic based photo sensitive resin. It is a popular material in rapid prototyping using PerFactoryTM method which employs addictive manufacturing technique to build prototypes for visual inspection, assembly etc. Metallization of such a prototype can extend the application envelop of the rapid prototyping technique as they can be use...

  4. AutoPyFactory and the Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Love, P

    2013-01-01

    AutoPyFactory (APF) is a next-generation pilot submission framework that has been used as part of the ATLAS workload management system (PANDA) for two years. APF is reliable, scalable, and offers easy and flexible configuration. Using a plugin-based architecture, APF polls for information from configured information and batch systems (including grid sites), decides how many additional pilot jobs are needed, and submits them. With the advent of cloud computing, providing resources goes beyond submitting pilots to grid sites. Now, the resources on which the pilot will run also need to be managed. Handling both pilot submission and controlling the virtual machine life cycle (creation, retirement, and termination) from the same framework allows robust and efficient management of the process. In this paper we describe the design and implementation of these virtual machine management capabilities of APF. Expanding on our plugin-based approach, we allow cascades of virtual resources associated with a job queue. A si...

  5. Moving toward the digital factory in raw material resources area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Zelko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents our concept proposal of objectives to reach the challenges of some new European concepts: The Factoriesof the Future (FoF initiative and The Intelligent Deep Mine (IDM initiative launched to respond to the global economic crisis. Theseconcepts aims at helping EU manufacturing and mining enterprises, to adapt to global competitive pressures by improvingthe technological base of production across a broad range of sectors. The ICT contribution to these initiatives should improvethe efficiency, adaptability and sustainability of production systems as well as their better integration within business processesin an increasingly globalised industrial context. The challenges include the areas of digital factories, virtual factories and enterprisesand finally smart factories. Next research should address these challenges in particular and will encourage international cooperationunder the Intelligent Manufacturing Systems concepts.

  6. WQO is Decidable for Factorial Languages

    KAUST Repository

    Atminas, Aistis

    2017-08-08

    A language is factorial if it is closed under taking factors, i.e. contiguous subwords. Every factorial language can be described by an antidictionary, i.e. a minimal set of forbidden factors. We show that the problem of deciding whether a factorial language given by a finite antidictionary is well-quasi-ordered under the factor containment relation can be solved in polynomial time. We also discuss possible ways to extend our solution to permutations and graphs.

  7. Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration R and D Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) comprises some 140 scientists and engineers located at U.S. National Laboratories and Universities, and at a number of non-U.S. research institutions. In the past year, the MC R and D program has shifted its focus mainly toward the design issues related to the development of a Neutrino Factory based on a muon storage ring. In this paper the status of the various R and D activities is described, and future plans are outlined

  8. Asymmetric energy B factory at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yasushi

    1994-01-01

    An introductory review is given on the project of the Asymmetric Energy B factory at KEK. First, the motivation for B factory is discussed. The most interesting and important topic there is the measurement of CP violation in other than the K-system. Thus, CP violation in the B decays is reviewed rather extensively, especially on how the angles of the unitarity triangle can be measured at an asymmetric energy B factory. Then the B factory project at KEK is briefly reviewed. (author)

  9. Imaging stem cell differentiation for cell-based tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Zhenghong; Dennis, James; Alsberg, Eben; Krebs, Melissa D; Welter, Jean; Caplan, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into a number of tissue lineages and possess great potential in tissue regeneration and cell-based therapy. For bone fracture or cartilage wear and tear, stem cells need to be delivered to the injury site for repair. Assessing engraftment of the delivered cells and their differentiation status is crucial for the optimization of novel cell-based therapy. A longitudinal and quantitative method is needed to track stem cells transplanted/implanted to advance our understanding of their therapeutic effects and facilitate improvements in cell-based therapy. Currently, there are very few effective noninvasive ways to track the differentiation of infused stem cells. A brief review of a few existing approaches, mostly using transgenic animals, is given first, followed by newly developed in vivo imaging strategies that are intended to track implanted MSCs using a reporter gene system. Specifically, marker genes are selected to track whether MSCs differentiate along the osteogenic lineage for bone regeneration or the chondrogenic lineage for cartilage repair. The general strategy is to use the promoter of a differentiation-specific marker gene to drive the expression of an established reporter gene for noninvasive and repeated imaging of stem cell differentiation. The reporter gene system is introduced into MSCs by way of a lenti-viral vector, which allows the use of human cells and thus offers more flexibility than the transgenic animal approach. Imaging osteogenic differentiation of implanted MSCs is used as a demonstration of the proof-of-principle of this differentiation-specific reporter gene approach. This framework can be easily extended to other cell types and for differentiation into any other cell lineage for which a specific marker gene (promoter) can be identified. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A review on Lactococcus lactis: from food to factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Adelene Ai-Lian; In, Lionel L A; Lim, Swee Hua Erin; Rahim, Raha Abdul

    2017-04-04

    Lactococcus lactis has progressed a long way since its discovery and initial use in dairy product fermentation, to its present biotechnological applications in genetic engineering for the production of various recombinant proteins and metabolites that transcends the heterologous species barrier. Key desirable features of this gram-positive lactic acid non-colonizing gut bacteria include its generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status, probiotic properties, the absence of inclusion bodies and endotoxins, surface display and extracellular secretion technology, and a diverse selection of cloning and inducible expression vectors. This have made L. lactis a desirable and promising host on par with other well established model bacterial or yeast systems such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella cerevisiae and Bacillus subtilis. In this article, we review recent technological advancements, challenges, future prospects and current diversified examples on the use of L. lactis as a microbial cell factory. Additionally, we will also highlight latest medical-based applications involving whole-cell L. lactis as a live delivery vector for the administration of therapeutics against both communicable and non-communicable diseases.

  11. Photon Factory activity report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Photon Factory made great strides in 1987. The low emittance operation of the PF ring was achieved in March, and resulted favorably in the increase of brilliance from 2 to 20 times for all the beam lines with high beam stability. At the same time, the installation of inserted devices was under way for all available straight sections of the ring. A 54-pole wiggler-undulator has been commissioned at BL-16. The devices to be inserted in the near future are a multipole wiggler for BL-13, an undulator for BL-19, and an undulator for circular polarized radiation at BL-28. The construction of beam lines continued, and four new beam lines, BL-6, BL-9, BL-16 and BL-17, are now in operation, BL-13 and BL-19 are under construction, and BL-3, BL-5, BL-18, BL-20 and BL-28 are in the design stage. Since its inauguration with four beam lines in 1982, the Photon Factory has grown rapidly, and approaches the goal of operating the PF ring with positrons in full use of its 24 beam ports and the straight sections for inserted devices. The total operation time was limited to 3,000 hours by the budget for fiscal year 1987, and about 80 % of the operation hours were devoted to the experiments of users. The nearly perfect operation of the 400 m long linac has continued in 1987, and has supplied both electrons and positrons to the TRISTAN collision experiment. The light source of a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring was normally operated. (Kako, I.)

  12. Yeast cell factories on the horizon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    been engineered to make chemicals at industrial scale (e.g., succinic acid, lactic acid, resveratrol) and advanced biofuels (e.g., isobutanol) (1). On page 1095 of this issue, Galanie et al. (2) demonstrate that yeast can now be engineered to produce opioids (2), a major class of compounds used...... for treating severe pain. Their study represents a tour de force in the metabolic engineering of yeast, as it involved the expression of genes for more than 20 enzymatic activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. It clearly represents a breakthrough advance for making complex natural products...

  13. Intense muon beams and neutrino factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2000-01-01

    High intensity muon sources are needed in exploring neutrino factories, lepton flavor violating muon processes, and lower energy experiments as the stepping phase towards building higher energy μ + μ - colliders. We present a brief overview, sketch of a neutrino source, and an example of a muon storage ring at BNL with detector(s) at Fermilab, Sudan, etc. Physics with low energy neutrino beams based on muon storage rings (μSR) and conventional Horn Facilities are described and compared. CP violation Asymmetries and a new Statistical Figure of Merit to be used for comparison is given. Improvements in the sensitivity of low energy experiments to study Flavor changing neutral currents are also included

  14. Age-old wisdom concerning cell-based therapies with added knowledge in the stem cell era: our perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethy S

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Senthilkumar Preethy,1,2 Sudhakar John,1 Jegatheesan Saravana Ganesh,1 Thangavelu Srinivasan,1 Hiroshi Terunuma,3 Masaru Iwasaki,4 Samuel J Abraham1,4 1Nichi-In Centre for Regenerative Medicine, 2Hope Foundation Trust, Chennai, India; 3Biotherapy Institute of Japan, Tokyo, 4Yamanashi University School of Medicine, Chuo, Japan Abstract: Among the various strategies providing a cure for illness, cell-based therapies have caught the attention of the world with the advent of the "stem cell" era. Our inherent understanding indicates that stem cells have been in existence since the birth of multicellular organisms. However, the formal discovery of stem cells in the last century, followed by their intricate and extensive analysis, has led to clinical and translational efforts with the aim of using them in the treatment of conditions which don't have a definitive therapeutic strategy, has fueled our interest and expectations. Technological advances in our ability to study their cellular components in depth, along with surface markers and other finer constituents, that were unknown until last century, have improved our understanding, leading to several novel applications. This has created a need to establish guidelines, and in that process, there are expressed understandings and views which describe cell therapy along lines similar to that of biologic products, drugs, and devices. However, the age-old wisdom of using cells as tools for curing illness should not be misled by recent knowledge, to make cell therapy using highly complex stem cells equal to factory-synthesized and reproducible chemical compounds, drugs, or devices. This article analyses the differences between these two entities from various perspectives. Keywords: cell transplantation, drugs, regenerative medicine, stem cells

  15. Variation of a carotenoid-based trait in relation to oxidative stress and endocrine status during the breeding season in the Eurasian kestrel : A multi-factorial study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casagrande, S.; Dell'Omo, G.; Costantini, D.; Tagliavini, J.; Groothuis, T.; Omo, G. Dell'

    Carotenoid-based skin colorations vary seasonally in many bird species and are thought to be honest sexually selected signals. In order to provide more insight in the potential signal function and underlying mechanisms of such colorations we here quantified patterns of variation of leg coloration in

  16. Simulation-based comparisons of four apparel cell production modes of one clothing production line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Pan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This research, by using the SIMIO simulation platform, provides a quantitative and comparative analysis of how the efficiency of four different cell production modes is affected. It is hoped that the outcomes will be of some help for garment factories to optimize their production lines. Design/methodology/approach: The SIMIO simulation platform was employed in the research and comparisons were made of the simulation test results about the four different production modes. Findings: The operation mode, number of operators, and number of buffer areas are key factors affecting the production line efficiency, and need to be reasonably set to achieve the highest efficiency. Originality/value: As most research literature so far is qualitative, this research provided a simulation-based quantitative analysis of the production efficiency under different cell production modes.

  17. Índice de Competitividad Municipal 2013: Metodología para su construcción basada en Análisis Factorial y su aplicación en municipios urbanos en México || Municipal Competitiveness Index 2013: Methodology of definition based on Factorial Analysis and application to Mexican urban municipalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Peón, Sylvia Beatriz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available El documento presenta una descripción detallada de la metodología para construir el Índice de Competitividad Municipal 2013 para México. El índice es calculado utilizando una metodología basada en Análisis Factorial y compara el desempeño de 96 municipios pertenecientes a 24 zonas metropolitanas en diferentes estados de la República Mexicana. El índice incluye 61 variables agrupadas en cuatro dimensiones o subíndices: Económica, Institucional, Socio-demográfica y Urbano Ambiental. El Índice de Competitividad Municipal es el promedio de los cuatro índices. Los resultados muestran evidencia de que los municipios pertenecientes a la zona metropolitana de Monterrey son los que en general tienen más alta posición en el ranking de competitividad y resaltan la necesidad de una mayor cooperación y coordinación intermunicipal para mejorar la competitividad de aquellos municipios que pertenecen a una misma zona metropolitana. El estudio se enfoca particularmente en el análisis de los factores de cada dimensión de la competitividad para los municipios del Estado de Puebla incluidos en la muestra. || This paper presents a detailed explanation of the methodology to construct the Municipal Competitiveness Index 2013 for Mexico. The index is calculated using a methodology based on Factor Analysis and compares the performance of 96 municipalities belonging to 24 metropolitan areas in different States of the Mexican Republic. The index includes 61 variables grouped into four dimensions or sub-indexes: Economic, Institutional, Socio-demographic and Urban-environmental. The Municipal Competitiveness Index is the average of the four indexes. The results show evidence that municipalities of Monterrey metropolitan area are, in general, the ones with higher position in the competitiveness ranking, and highlight the need of inter-municipal cooperation and coordination in order to improve competitiveness of those municipalities belonging to a common

  18. A Tau-Charm Factory at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, K.K. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1994-04-01

    It is proposed that a Tau Charm Factory represents a natural extension of CEBAF into higher energy domains. The exciting nature of the physics of charm quarks and tau leptons is briefly reviewed and it is suggested that the concept of a linac-ring collider as a Tau Charm Factory at CEBAF should be seriously studied.

  19. Looking for Exotica at the B Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Gagan B.

    2007-01-25

    Current experiments at the B factories, designed to perform precision measurements of matter-antimatter asymmetry in the B meson system, have a much broader physics reach especially in the sector of quarkonium spectroscopy. Here we present a minireview on the new charmonium-like states observed at the B factories including the X(3872) and Y(4260).

  20. Charged Particle Optics in Circular Higgs Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yunhai [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-26

    Similar to a super B-factory, a circular Higgs factory will require strong focusing systems near the interaction points and a low-emittance lattice in arcs to achieve a factory luminosity. At electron beam energy of 120 GeV, beamstrahlung effects during the collision pose an additional challenge to the collider design. In particular, a large momentum acceptance at 2 percent level is necessary to retain an adequate beam lifetime. This turns out to be the most challenging aspect in the design of circular Higgs factory. In this paper, an example will be provided to illustrate the beam dynamics in circular Higgs factory, emphasizing on the chromatic optics. Basic optical modules and advanced analysis will be presented. Most important, we will show that 2% momentum aperture is achievable

  1. Protein and cell patterning for cell-based biosensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiseh, Mandana

    Patterned platforms that alternately promote or prevent the attachment of biomolecules promise to advance bio-micro-electro-mechanical systems (Bio-MEMS) and cell-based biosensors (CBBs) for medical diagnostic, therapeutic, and prosthetic applications. When integrated with microelectronic or optical technologies, arrays of cells can be fabricated onto "biochips" to simultaneously process numerous analytes. Among the benefits are rapid and sensitive analysis, portability and ability to obtain functional information from analytes. This integration requires cells to be selectively patterned on platforms composed of more than one material, particularly in an electrode-insulator format. Current cell patterning technologies cannot yet provide effective solutions to patterning cells on desired substrates, largely because most of the techniques pattern cells on substrates of single material. In addition, they generally employ a mechanical device to guide selective protein or cell attachment, which may degrade their biological functionality. The other major challenges, especially in development of CBBs, include long-term cell selectivity and creation of uniform "single-cell" patterns. The central component of this research is to develop novel techniques to pattern multiple and/or single cells with high precision, selectivity, reproducibility, and long-term cell selectivity. First, a novel surface engineering approach was developed to covalently immobilize proteins or peptides on the gold substrates and bio-inert poly(ethylene glycol)-silane molecules on silicon substrates. Next, photolithography and surface engineering were combined to pattern microarrays of cell-adhesive proteins on gold electrodes to mediate cell adhesion. The versatility of this approach for immobilization of various proteins on different types of gold patterns was characterized by florescence microscopy, ToF-SIMS, and AFM. Optical-DIC microscopy illustrated selective attachment of various cells on

  2. Photon Factory activity report, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    At the Photon Factory about 500 experiments are now running annually with about 50 experimental stations, the total operation time of the 2.5 GeV storage ring was 3400 hour in 1989, and the number of users was more than 2000, including 300 scientists from industry. This wide usage of synchrotron radiation has been supported by good performance of the accelerators. The positron beam current of the linac was increased for rapid injection (injection time: 20 min). The entire roof of the Light Source building was covered with thermal insulator (urethane-foam). This has greatly improved the beam stability of the ring. It has been operated at an initial ring current of 350 mA with a life time of 20 hours. Distinctive instrumentation at the Photon Factory has expanded to various fields such as angle-resolved ion-spectroscopy, dispersive EXAFS, trace impurity X-ray fluorescence analysis, plane-wave topography, structure analysis under high pressure, and imaging plates. Recently, experiments of protein structure analysis have been carried out extensively; Sakabe developed a new type of Weissenberg camera for protein crystallography, and about 50 experiments have been done for the past six months by a combination of Sakabe camera and imaging plates. The 2.5 GeV light source is now at an entrance of its harvest season. The TRISTAN Accumulation Ring has been used throughout this year in a time sharing basis with the TRISTAN experiment; twenty minutes for injection to TRISTAN Main Ring and 2 hours for SR experiment. The main subject has been magnetic Compton scattering with circularly polarized wiggler radiation. Such experiences enable us to expand our perspective for research in the following decade; we are investigating the possibility of operating the TRISTAN Main Ring at 6-8 GeV with 6000-pole undulaters, resulting in an extremely brilliant radiation source (Emittance: 0.1 nm·rad at 5 GeV with damping rings). (J.P.N.)

  3. RF system design for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.; Rimmer, R.

    1994-06-01

    The paper presents an overview of the design of the RF system for the PEP-II B Factory. An RF station consists of either two or four single-cell cavities driven by a 1.2 MW klystron through a waveguide distribution network. A variety of feedback loops stabilize the RF and its interaction with the beam. System parameters and all the relevant parameters of klystron and cavities are given

  4. Solar cells based on gallium antimonide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V. M.; Sorokina, S. V.; Timoshina, N. Kh.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Shvarts, M. Z.

    2009-01-01

    Liquid-phase epitaxy and diffusion from the gas phase have been used to create various kinds of GaSb-based solar cell structures intended for use in cascaded solar-radiation converters. A narrow-gap (GaSb) solar cell was studied in tandem based on a combination of semiconductors GaAs-GaSb (two p-n junctions) and GaInP/GaAs-GaSb (three p-n junctions). The maximum efficiency of photovoltaic conversion in GaSb behind the wide-gap cells is η = 6.5% (at sunlight concentration ratio of 275X, AM1.5D Low AOD spectrum).

  5. Variation of a carotenoid-based trait in relation to oxidative stress and endocrine status during the breeding season in the Eurasian kestrel: a multi-factorial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, S; Dell'omo, G; Costantini, D; Tagliavini, J; Groothuis, T

    2011-09-01

    Carotenoid-based skin colorations vary seasonally in many bird species and are thought to be honest sexually selected signals. In order to provide more insight in the potential signal function and underlying mechanisms of such colorations we here quantified patterns of variation of leg coloration in adult male and female Eurasian kestrels (Falco tinnunculus tinnunculus) over the breeding season, and evaluated the relationship between coloration and levels of carotenoids, androgens and estrogens, oxidative damage and plasma non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity. We studied both reproducing wild and non-reproducing captive birds to test for the effect of diet and breeding effort. Males were more colored than females only during mating, and independently of diet, suggesting that leg-color is a sexually selected trait. Seasonal variation in leg color was associated with circulating carotenoids, but concentrations of these molecules were not related to antioxidant capacity, body condition or oxidative damage. These results indicate that carotenoid-based colorations may not be an honest signal of health status in this species. Production of carotenoid rich eggs coincided with low levels of circulating carotenoids in females, indicating that carotenoids might be a limited resource for laying female kestrels. Finally, young rearing males had higher levels of oxidative damage than females, and wild birds of both sexes had higher levels of these parameters than captive birds. These results may indicate that parental effort and physical activity are costly, independently from hormonal status. Since androgens did not explain carotenoid variation we suggest that multiple interacting factors can regulate carotenoid levels along the season. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessing outcomes of enhanced chronic disease care through patient education and a value-based formulary study (ACCESS)-study protocol for a 2×2 factorial randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, David J T; Tonelli, Marcello; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Mitchell, Chad; Tsuyuki, Ross; Ivers, Noah; Campbell, Tavis; Pannu, Raj; Verkerke, Eric; Klarenbach, Scott; King-Shier, Kathryn; Faris, Peter; Exner, Derek; Chaubey, Vikas; Manns, Braden

    2016-09-26

    Chronic diseases result in significant morbidity and costs. Although medications and lifestyle changes are effective for improving outcomes in chronic diseases, many patients do not receive these treatments, in part because of financial barriers, patient and provider-level knowledge gaps, and low patient motivation. The Assessing outcomes of enhanced chronic disease care through patient education and a value-based formulary study (ACCESS) will determine the impact of two interventions: (1) a value-based formulary which eliminates copayment for high-value preventive medications; and (2) a comprehensive self-management support program aimed at promoting health behavior change and medication adherence, combined with relay of information on medication use to healthcare providers, on cardiovascular events and/or mortality in low-income seniors with elevated cardiovascular risk. The ACCESS study will use a parallel, open label, factorial randomized trial design, with blinded endpoint evaluation in 4714 participants who are over age >65 (and therefore have drug insurance provided by Alberta Blue Cross with 30 % co-payment); are at a high risk for cardiovascular events based on a history of any one of the following: coronary heart disease, prior stroke, chronic kidney disease, heart failure, or any two of the following: current cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, or hypercholesterolemia; and have a household income financial and knowledge-related barriers in low-income Albertans, this study will test the impact of providing free high-value preventive medications (i.e., value-based insurance) and a tailored self-management education and facilitated relay strategy on outcomes and costs. By measuring the impact on both health outcomes and costs, as well as the impact on reducing health inequities in this vulnerable population, our study will facilitate informed policy decisions. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02579655 . Registered Oct 15, 2015.

  7. The KAON Factory at TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1992-08-01

    The TRIUMF KAON Factory is designed to produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, other hadrons and neutrinos 100 times more intense, or cleaner, than are available now, for a broad range of particle and nuclear physics experiments. This will require a 100 μA beam of 30 GeV protons, to be produced by an interleaved sequence of two fast-cycling synchrotrons and three storage rings, with the existing TRIUMF H - cyclotron as injector. An $11-million preconstruction study has enabled the overall design to be reviewed and prototypes of various components to be built and evaluated -fast-cycling dipole and quadrupole magnets, a dual-frequency magnet power supply, ceramic beam pipes with internal rf shields, and rf cavity (using perpendicular bias), an extraction kicker, and rf beam chopper, and production targets. Environmental, industrial and economic impact studies have also been completed and the cost estimates and schedule updated. The total cost of $708 million (Canadian) will be shared equally between Canada, British Columbia and international contributors: the first two-thirds of this sum have already been approved and negotiations for the remainder are under way. 25 refs., 7 figs

  8. The KAON factory at TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1992-07-01

    The TRIUMF KAON Factory is designed to produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, other hadrons and neutrinos 100 times more intense, or cleaner, than are available now, for a broad range of particle and nuclear physics experiments. This will require a 100 μA beam of 30 GeV protons, to be produced by an interleaved sequence of two fast-cycling synchrotrons and three storage rings, with the existing TRIUMF H - cyclotron as injector. An $11-million pre-construction study has enabled the overall design to be reviewed and prototypes of various components to be built and evaluated: fast-cycling dipole and quadrupole magnets, a dual frequency magnet power supply, ceramic beam pipes with internal rf shields, an rf cavity (using perpendicular bias), an extraction kicker, an rf beam chopper, and production targets. Environmental, industrial and economic impact studies have also been completed and the cost estimates and schedule updated. The total cost of $708 million (Canadian) will be shared equally between Canada, British Columbia and international contributors; the first two-thirds of this sum have already been approved and negotiations for the remainder are under way. 26 refs., 6 figs

  9. A cell nanoinjector based on carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xing; Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2007-01-30

    Technologies for introducing molecules into living cells are vital for probing the physical properties and biochemical interactions that govern the cell's behavior. Here we report the development of a nanoscale cell injection system-termed the nanoinjector-that uses carbon nanotubes to deliver cargo into cells. A single multi-walled carbon nanotube attached to an atomic force microscope tip was functionalized with cargo via a disulfide-based linker. Penetration of cell membranes with this 'nanoneedle', followed by reductive cleavage of the disulfide bonds within the cell's interior, resulted in the release of cargo inside the cells. The capability of the nanoinjector was demonstrated by injection of protein-coated quantum dots into live human cells. Single-particle tracking was employed to characterize the diffusion dynamics of injected quantum dots in the cytosol. This new technique causes no discernible membrane or cell damage, and can deliver a discrete number of molecules to the cell's interior without the requirement of a carrier solvent.

  10. Cell-based technologies for Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Santoro Haddad

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Huntington's disease (HD is a fatal genetic disorder, which causes the progressive breakdown of neurons in the human brain. HD deteriorates human physical and mental abilities over time and has no cure. Stem cell-based technologies are promising novel treatments, and in HD, they aim to replace lost neurons and/or to prevent neural cell death. Herein we discuss the use of human fetal tissue (hFT, neural stem cells (NSCs of hFT origin or embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs, in clinical and pre-clinical studies. The in vivo use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which are derived from non-neural tissues, will also be discussed. All these studies prove the potential of stem cells for transplantation therapy in HD, demonstrating cell grafting and the ability to differentiate into mature neurons, resulting in behavioral improvements. We claim that there are still many problems to overcome before these technologies become available for HD patient treatment, such as: a safety regarding the use of NSCs and pluripotent stem cells, which are potentially teratogenic; b safety regarding the transplantation procedure itself, which represents a risk and needs to be better studied; and finally c technical and ethical issues regarding cells of fetal and embryonic origin.

  11. Cell-Based Genotoxicity Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifferscheid, Georg; Buchinger, Sebastian

    Genotoxicity test systems that are based on bacteria display an important role in the detection and assessment of DNA damaging chemicals. They belong to the basic line of test systems due to their easy realization, rapidness, broad applicability, high sensitivity and good reproducibility. Since the development of the Salmonella microsomal mutagenicity assay by Ames and coworkers in the early 1970s, significant development in bacterial genotoxicity assays was achieved and is still a subject matter of research. The basic principle of the mutagenicity assay is a reversion of a growth inhibited bacterial strain, e.g., due to auxotrophy, back to a fast growing phenotype (regain of prototrophy). Deeper knowledge of the ­mutation events allows a mechanistic understanding of the induced DNA-damage by the utilization of base specific tester strains. Collections of such specific tester strains were extended by genetic engineering. Beside the reversion assays, test systems utilizing the bacterial SOS-response were invented. These methods are based on the fusion of various SOS-responsive promoters with a broad variety of reporter genes facilitating numerous methods of signal detection. A very important aspect of genotoxicity testing is the bioactivation of ­xenobiotics to DNA-damaging compounds. Most widely used is the extracellular metabolic activation by making use of rodent liver homogenates. Again, genetic engineering allows the construction of highly sophisticated bacterial tester strains with significantly enhanced sensitivity due to overexpression of enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. This provides mechanistic insights into the toxification and detoxification pathways of xenobiotics and helps explaining the chemical nature of hazardous substances in unknown mixtures. In summary, beginning with "natural" tester strains the rational design of bacteria led to highly specific and sensitive tools for a rapid, reliable and cost effective

  12. SECA Coal-Based Systems - FuelCell Energy, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayagh, Hossein [Fuelcell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

    2014-01-31

    The overall goal of this U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project is the development of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cell and stack technology suitable for use in highly-efficient, economically-competitive central generation power plant facilities fueled by coal synthesis gas (syngas). This program incorporates the following supporting objectives: • Reduce SOFC-based electrical power generation system cost to $700 or less (2007 dollars) for a greater than 100 MW Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) power plant, exclusive of coal gasification and CO2 separation subsystem costs. • Achieve an overall IGFC power plant efficiency of at least 50%, from coal (higher heating value or HHV) to AC power (exclusive of CO2 compression power requirement). • Reduce the release of CO2 to the environment in an IGFC power plant to no more than 10% of the carbon in the syngas. • Increase SOFC stack reliability to achieve a design life of greater than 40,000 hours. At the inception of the project, the efforts were focused on research, design and testing of prototype planar SOFC power generators for stationary applications. FuelCell Energy, Inc. successfully completed the initial stage of the project by meeting the program metrics, culminating in delivery and testing of a 3 kW system at National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Subsequently, the project was re-aligned into a three phase effort with the main goal to develop SOFC technology for application in coal-fueled power plants with >90% carbon capture. Phase I of the Coal-based efforts focused on cell and stack size scale-up with concurrent enhancement of performance, life, cost, and manufacturing characteristics. Also in Phase I, design and analysis of the baseline (greater than 100 MW) power plant system—including concept identification, system definition, and cost analysis—was conducted. Phase II efforts focused on development of a ≥25 kW SOFC stack tower incorporating

  13. Solid polymer MEMS-based fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Alan F [Livermore, CA; Morse, Jeffrey D [Pleasant Hill, CA

    2008-04-22

    A micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based thin-film fuel cells for electrical power applications. The MEMS-based fuel cell may be of a solid oxide type (SOFC), a solid polymer type (SPFC), or a proton exchange membrane type (PEMFC), and each fuel cell basically consists of an anode and a cathode separated by an electrolyte layer. The electrolyte layer can consist of either a solid oxide or solid polymer material, or proton exchange membrane electrolyte materials may be used. Additionally catalyst layers can also separate the electrodes (cathode and anode) from the electrolyte. Gas manifolds are utilized to transport the fuel and oxidant to each cell and provide a path for exhaust gases. The electrical current generated from each cell is drawn away with an interconnect and support structure integrated with the gas manifold. The fuel cells utilize integrated resistive heaters for efficient heating of the materials. By combining MEMS technology with thin-film deposition technology, thin-film fuel cells having microflow channels and full-integrated circuitry can be produced that will lower the operating temperature an will yield an order of magnitude greater power density than the currently known fuel cells.

  14. Factorial structure of aerobics athletes’ fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Shepelenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to develop an algorithm of teams’ formation in sport aerobics and to define factorial structure of athletes’ fitness. Material : in the research sport aerobics’ athletes (n=19 participated. All athletes are members of Kharkiv national team (Ukraine. All athletes underwent complete medical examination. The functional condition of an organism (arterial blood pressure, indicators of a variability of the rhythm of the heart, treadbahn testing, psycho-physiological state (time’s determination of simple and complex reaction were defined. The physical development and physical fitness and stability of vestibular system were also defined. The factorial and cluster analysis were used. Results : The algorithm of teams’ formation in sport aerobics is developed for performances in various competitive categories. The algorithm contains all stages of standard procedure of the factorial and cluster analysis. In the factorial analysis the individual factorial values were also defined. Conclusions : The obtained data are recommended to be used at teams’ formation for performances in various competitive categories: team formation for pair and group performances. The general and individual factorial structure of athletes’ complex fitness is defined. It is possible to select athletes with similar qualities and with different qualities for the mixed performances. The determination of individual factorial structure of fitness permits to estimate objectively variants of athletes’ formation in groups.

  15. Implementasi Digital Factory pada Industri Manufaktur Skala Menengah: Studi Pendahuluan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oki Sunardi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Medium-sized manufacturing industry in Indonesia is overwhelmed by certain challenges: high-cost economy, significant changes in information technology, and dynamic market and demand. All of these challenges affect gradually or directly to the sustainability of the industry. This preliminary study aims to conceptualize the importance of ‘digital factory’ implementation to dealing with sustainability issues. Previous studies showed that the implementation of digital factory, in the context of large-sized technological-based manufacturing enterprises, has been proved to increase the efficiency of product development process and production process, in term of time and cost. This study tries to identify several key issues to support the implementation of digital factory: data and information completeness, hardware and software availability, and operators’ skill and experience in conducting simulation. The relationships of the variables are modelled and analyzed using SmartPLS. This preliminary study found that, concurrently, data and information completeness, hardware and software availability, and operators’ skill and experience in conducting simulation have significant effect to digital factory implementation, as well as the enterprise’s sustainability (better product design and improvement (innovativeness, more efficient in design and simulation of production process (efficiency, and better capability to deal with dynamic demand (adaptiveness. Keywords: medium-sized manufacturing enterprise, digital factory, innovativeness, efficiency, adaptiveness

  16. Mobile monitoring and embedded control system for factory environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Kuang-Yow; Hsiao, Sung-Jung; Sung, Wen-Tsai

    2013-12-17

    This paper proposes a real-time method to carry out the monitoring of factory zone temperatures, humidity and air quality using smart phones. At the same time, the system detects possible flames, and analyzes and monitors electrical load. The monitoring also includes detecting the vibrations of operating machinery in the factory area. The research proposes using ZigBee and Wi-Fi protocol intelligent monitoring system integration within the entire plant framework. The sensors on the factory site deliver messages and real-time sensing data to an integrated embedded systems via the ZigBee protocol. The integrated embedded system is built by the open-source 32-bit ARM (Advanced RISC Machine) core Arduino Due module, where the network control codes are built in for the ARM chipset integrated controller. The intelligent integrated controller is able to instantly provide numerical analysis results according to the received data from the ZigBee sensors. The Android APP and web-based platform are used to show measurement results. The built-up system will transfer these results to a specified cloud device using the TCP/IP protocol. Finally, the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach is used to analyze the power loads in the factory zones. Moreover, Near Field Communication (NFC) technology is used to carry out the actual electricity load experiments using smart phones.

  17. Mobile Monitoring and Embedded Control System for Factory Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Yow Lian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a real-time method to carry out the monitoring of factory zone temperatures, humidity and air quality using smart phones. At the same time, the system detects possible flames, and analyzes and monitors electrical load. The monitoring also includes detecting the vibrations of operating machinery in the factory area. The research proposes using ZigBee and Wi-Fi protocol intelligent monitoring system integration within the entire plant framework. The sensors on the factory site deliver messages and real-time sensing data to an integrated embedded systems via the ZigBee protocol. The integrated embedded system is built by the open-source 32-bit ARM (Advanced RISC Machine core Arduino Due module, where the network control codes are built in for the ARM chipset integrated controller. The intelligent integrated controller is able to instantly provide numerical analysis results according to the received data from the ZigBee sensors. The Android APP and web-based platform are used to show measurement results. The built-up system will transfer these results to a specified cloud device using the TCP/IP protocol. Finally, the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT approach is used to analyze the power loads in the factory zones. Moreover, Near Field Communication (NFC technology is used to carry out the actual electricity load experiments using smart phones.

  18. Machine-vision based optofluidic cell sorting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Bañas, Andrew

    In contemporary life science there is an increasing emphasis on sorting rare disease-indicating cells within small dilute quantities such as in the confines of optofluidic lab-on-chip devices. Our approach to this is based on the use of optical forces to isolate red blood cells detected by advanced...... machine vision1. This approach is gentler, less invasive and more economical compared to conventional FACS-systems. As cells are less responsive to plastic or glass objects commonly used in the optical manipulation literature2, and since laser safety would be an issue in clinical use, we develop efficient...... the available light and creating 2D or 3D beam distributions aimed at the positions of the detected cells. Furthermore, the beam shaping freedom provided by GPC can allow optimizations in the beam’s propagation and its interaction with the laser catapulted and sorted cells....

  19. Metabolite profiling of microfluidic cell culture conditions for droplet based screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björk, Sara M.; Sjoström, Staffan L.; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2015-01-01

    , such as directed evolution of yeast, as cell metabolic state directly affects production yields from cell factories. Here, we analyze glucose, pyruvate, ethanol, and glycerol, central metabolites in yeast glucose dissimilation to establish culture formats for screening of respiring as well as fermenting yeast...

  20. The Gamma Factory proposal for CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold

    2015-01-01

    This year, 2015, marks the centenary of the publication of Einsteins Theory of General Relativity and it has been named the International Year of Light and light-based technologies by the UN General Assembly. It is thus timely to discuss the possibility of broadening the present CERN research program by including a new component based on a novel concept of the light source which could pave a way towards a multipurpose Gamma Factory. The proposed light source could be realized at CERN by using the infrastructure of the existing accelerators. It could push the intensity limits of the presently operating light-sources by at least 7 orders of magnitude, reaching the flux of the order of 10^17 photons/s, in the particularly interesting gamma-ray energy domain of 1 < Ephoton < 400 MeV. This domain is out of reach for the FEL-based light sources. The energy-tuned, quasi-monochromatic gamma beams, together with the gamma-beam-driven, high intensity secondary beams of polarized positrons, polarized muons, neutro...

  1. LTCC based bioreactors for cell cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, H.; Welker, T.; Welker, K.; Witte, H.; Müller, J.

    2016-01-01

    LTCC multilayers offer a wide range of structural options and flexibility of connections not available in standard thin film technology. Therefore they are considered as material base for cell culture reactors. The integration of microfluidic handling systems and features for optical and electrical capturing of indicators for cell culture growth offers the platform for an open system concept. The present paper assesses different approaches for the creation of microfluidic channels in LTCC multilayers. Basic functions required for the fluid management in bioreactors include temperature and flow control. Both features can be realized with integrated heaters and temperature sensors in LTCC multilayers. Technological conditions for the integration of such elements into bioreactors are analysed. The temperature regulation for the system makes use of NTC thermistor sensors which serve as real value input for the control of the heater. It allows the adjustment of the fluid temperature with an accuracy of 0.2 K. The tempered fluid flows through the cell culture chamber. Inside of this chamber a thick film electrode array monitors the impedance as an indicator for the growth process of 3-dimensional cell cultures. At the system output a flow sensor is arranged to monitor the continual flow. For this purpose a calorimetric sensor is implemented, and its crucial design parameters are discussed. Thus, the work presented gives an overview on the current status of LTCC based fluid management for cell culture reactors, which provides a promising base for the automation of cell culture processes.

  2. Design and implementation of a factorial randomized controlled trial of methadone maintenance therapy and an evidence-based behavioral intervention for incarcerated people living with HIV and opioid dependence in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazazi, Alexander R; Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Wegman, Martin P; Culbert, Gabriel J; Pillai, Veena; Shrestha, Roman; Al-Darraji, Haider; Copenhaver, Michael M; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2017-08-01

    Incarcerated people living with HIV and opioid dependence face enormous challenges to accessing evidence-based treatment during incarceration and after release into the community, placing them at risk of poor HIV treatment outcomes, relapse to opioid use and accompanying HIV transmission risk behaviors. Here we describe in detail the design and implementation of Project Harapan, a prospective clinical trial conducted among people living with HIV and opioid dependence who transitioned from prison to the community in Malaysia from 2010 to 2014. This trial involved 2 interventions: within-prison initiation of methadone maintenance therapy and an evidence-based behavioral intervention adapted to the Malaysian context (the Holistic Health Recovery Program for Malaysia, HHRP-M). Individuals were recruited and received the interventions while incarcerated and were followed for 12months after release to assess post-release HIV transmission risk behaviors and a range of other health-related outcomes. Project Harapan was designed as a fully randomized 2×2 factorial trial where individuals would be allocated in equal proportions to methadone maintenance therapy and HHRP-M, methadone maintenance therapy alone, HHRP-M alone, or control. Partway through study implementation, allocation to methadone maintenance therapy was changed from randomization to participant choice; randomization to HHRP-M continued throughout. We describe the justification for this study; the development and implementation of these interventions; changes to the protocol; and screening, enrollment, treatment receipt, and retention of study participants. Logistical, ethical, and analytic issues associated with the implementation of this study are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Verbal and Nonverbal Communication of Factory Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tway, Patricia

    1976-01-01

    Examines the verbal and nonverbal behavior patterns associated with two speech styles, one formal and the other informal, among factory workers. Available from: Mouton Publishers, Box 482, the Hague, Netherlands. (AM)

  4. Benthic carbonate factories of the Phanerozoic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlager, W.

    2003-01-01

    Marine carbonate precipitation occurs in three basic modes: abiotic (or quasi-abiotic), biotically induced, and biotically controlled. On a geologic scale, these precipitation modes combine to form three carbonate production systems, or "factories" in the benthic environment: (1) tropical

  5. Feasibility of Injection/Extraction Systems for Muon FFAG Rings in the Neutrino Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasternak, J.; Berg, J.; Aslaninejad, M.; Kelliher, D.; Machida, S.

    2010-01-01

    Non-scaling FFAG rings have been proposed for muon acceleration in a neutrino factory. In order to achieve small orbit excursion and small time of flight variation, lattices with a very compact cell structure and short straight sections are required. The resulting geometry places very challenging constraints on the injection/extraction systems. The feasibility of injection/extraction is discussed and various implementations focusing on minimization of kicker/septum strength are presented. The injection and extraction systems in the nonscaling FFAG for muon acceleration in a neutrino factory were studied in the ring based on FODO lattice. The vertical direction was found to be preferential for both injection and extraction, which allows for lower kicker strengths and facilitates the distribution of kickers due to a lower phase advance per cell in comparison with the horizontal plane. It is possible to design mirror-symmetric schemes in which the kickers can be reused for both signs of muons. The disadvantage of these solutions is a need for special magnets with large aperture in the injection/extraction region due to the large kicked beam oscillations. The strengths of the required kickers are still very challenging and the fields in the septum magnets dictates the need for a superconducting design.

  6. The physics of the B factories

    CERN Document Server

    Bevan, A J; Mannel, Th; Prell, S; Yabsley, B D; Abe, K; Aihara, H; Anulli, F; Arnaud, N; Aushev, T; Beneke, M; Beringer, J; Bianchi, F; Bigi, I I; Bona, M; Brambilla, N; Brodzicka, J; Chang, P; Charles, M J; Cheng, C H; Cheng, H -Y; Chistov, R; Colangelo, P; Coleman, J P; Drutskoy, A; Druzhinin, V P; Eidelman, S; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Faccini, R; Flood, K T; Gambino, P; Gaz, A; Gradl, W; Hayashii, H; Higuchi, T; Hulsbergen, W D; Hurth, T; Iijima, T; Itoh, R; Jackson, P D; Kass, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kou, E; Križan, P; Kronfeld, A; Kumano, S; Kwon, Y J; Latham, T E; Leith, D W G S; Lüth, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Meadows, B T; Mussa, R; Nakao, M; Nishida, S; Ocariz, J; Olsen, S L; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palano, A; Pich, A; Playfer, S; Poluektov, A; Porter, F C; Robertson, S H; Roney, J M; Roodman, A; Sakai, Y; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Sekula, S J; Steinhauser, M; Sumisawa, K; Swanson, E S; Tackmann, F; Trabelsi, K; Uehara, S; Uno, S; van der Water, R; Vasseur, G; Verkerke, W; Waldi, R; Wang, M Z; Wilson, F F; Zupan, J; Zupanc, A; Adachi, I; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Ben-Haim, E; Biassoni, P; Cahn, R N; Cartaro, C; Chauveau, J; Chen, C; Chiang, C C; Cowan, R; Dalseno, J; Davier, M; Davies, C; Dingfelder, J C; Echenard, B; Epifanov, D; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Gary, J W; Godang, R; Graham, M T; Hafner, A; Hamilton, B; Hartmann, T; Hayasaka, K; Hearty, C; Iwasaki, Y; Khodjamirian, A; Kusaka, A; Kuzmin, A; Lafferty, G D; Lazzaro, A; Li, J; Lindemann, D; Long, O; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinelli, M; Miyabayashi, K; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Muller, D R; Nakazawa, H; Ongmongkolkul, P; Pacetti, S; Palombo, F; Pedlar, T K; Piilonen, L E; Pilloni, A; Poireau, V; Prothmann, K; Pulliam, T; Rama, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roudeau, P; Schrenk, S; Schroeder, T; Schubert, K R; Shen, C P; Shwartz, B; Soffer, A; Solodov, E P; Somov, A; Starič, M; Stracka, S; Telnov, A V; Todyshev, K Yu; Tsuboyama, T; Uglov, T; Vinokurova, A; Walsh, J J; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Ye, S; Zhang, C C; Abachi, S; Abashian, A; Abe, N; Abe, R; Abe, T; Abrams, G S; Adam, I; Adamczyk, K; Adametz, A; Adye, T; Agarwal, A; Ahmed, H; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Ahn, B S; Ahn, H S; Aitchison, I J R; Akai, K; Akar, S; Akatsu, M; Akemoto, M; Akhmetshin, R; Akre, R; Alam, M S; Albert, J N; Aleksan, R; Alexander, J P; Alimonti, G; Allen, M T; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Alsmiller, J R G; Altenburg, D; Alwyn, K E; An, Q; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, D; Andreotti, M; Andress, J C; Angelini, C; Anipko, D; Anjomshoaa, A; Anthony, P L; Antillon, E A; Antonioli, E; Aoki, K; Arguin, J F; A, K; Arisaka, K; Asai, K; Asai, M; Asano, Y; Asgeirsson, D J; Asner, D M; Aso, T; Aspinwall, M L; Aston, D; Atmacan, H; Aubert, B; Aulchenko, V; Ayad, R; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Azzolini, V; Azzopardi, D E; Baak, M A; Back, J J; Bagnasco, S; Bahinipati, S; Bailey, D S; Bailey, S; Bailly, P; van Bakel, N; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Balagura, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Ban, Y; Banas, E; Band, H R; Banerjee, S; Baracchini, E; Barate, R; Barberio, E; Barbero, M; Bard, D J; Barillari, T; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartel, W; Bartelt, J; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Battaglia, M; Bauer, J M; Bay, A; Beaulieu, M; Bechtle, P; Beck, T W; Becker, J; Becla, J; Bedny, I; Behari, S; Behera, P K; Behn, E; Behr, L; Beigbeder, C; Beiline, D; Bell, R; Bellini, F; Bellis, M; Bellodi, G; Belous, K; Benayoun, M; Benelli, G; Benitez, J F; Benkebil, M; Berger, N; Bernabeu, J; Bernard, D; Bernet, R; Bernlochner, F U; Berryhill, J W; Bertsche, K; Besson, P; Best, D S; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bhardwaj, V; Bhimji, W; Bhuyan, B; Biagini, M E; Biasini, M; van Bibber, K; Biesiada, J; Bingham, I; Bionta, R M; Bischofberger, M; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, V E; Bloom, E; Bloom, P C; Blount, N L; Blouw, J; Bly, M; Blyth, S; Boeheim, C T; Bomben, M; Bondar, A; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Bonvicini, G; Booke, M; Booth, J; Borean, C; Borgland, A W; Borsato, E; Bosi, F; Bosisio, L; Botov, A A; Bougher, J; Bouldin, K; Bourgeois, P; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyce, R F; Boyd, J T; Bozek, A; Bozzi, C; Bračko, M; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, B; Brau, J; Breon, A B; Breton, D; Brew, C; Briand, H; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brigljević, V; Britton, D I; Brochard, F; Broomer, B; Brose, J; Browder, T E; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D N; Browne, M; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmueller, O L; Bünger, C; Bugg, W; Bukin, A D; Bula, R; Bulten, H; Burchat, P R; Burgess, W; Burke, J P; Button-Shafer, J; Buzykaev, A R; Buzzo, A; Cai, Y; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Camanzi, B; Campagna, E; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carassiti, V; Carpinelli, M; Carroll, M; Casarosa, G; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castelli, G; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Cecchi, A; Cenci, R; Cerizza, G; Cervelli, A; Ceseracciu, A; Chai, X; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chang, M C; Chang, Y H; Chang, Y W; Chao, D S; Chao, M; Chao, Y; Charles, E; Chavez, C A; Cheaib, R; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, E; 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Thérin, G; Thiebaux, Ch; Thiessen, D; Thomas, E W; Thompson, J M; Thorne, F; Tian, X C; Tibbetts, M; Tikhomirov, I; Tinslay, J S; Tiozzo, G; Tisserand, V; Tocut, V; Toki, W H; Tomassini, E W; Tomoto, M; Tomura, T; Torassa, E; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Toussaint, J C; Tovey, S N; Trapani, P P; Treadwell, E; Triggiani, G; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trischuk, W; Troost, D; Trunov, A; Tsai, K L; Tsai, Y T; Tsujita, Y; Tsukada, K; Tsukamoto, T; Tuggle, J M; Tumanov, A; Tung, Y W; Turnbull, L; Turner, J; Turri, M; Uchida, K; Uchida, M; Uchida, Y; Ueki, M; Ueno, K; Ujiie, N; Ulmer, K A; Unno, Y; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Y; Usseglio, M; Usuki, Y; Uwer, U; Va'vra, J; Vahsen, S E; Vaitsas, G; Valassi, A; Vallazza, E; Vallereau, A; Vanhoefer, P; van Hoek, W C; Van Hulse, C; van Winkle, D; Varner, G; Varnes, E W; Varvell, K E; Vasileiadis, G; Velikzhanin, Y S; Verderi, M; Versillé, S; Vervink, K; Viaud, B; Vidal, P B; Villa, S; Villanueva-Perez, P; Vinograd, E L; Vitale, L; Vitug, G M; Voß, C; Voci, C; Voena, C; Volk, A; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Vorobyev, V; Vossen, A; Vuagnin, G; Vuosalo, C O; Wacker, K; Wagner, A P; Wagner, D L; Wagner, G; Wagner, M N; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Walker, D; Walkowiak, W; Wallom, D; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Wang, J G; Wang, K; Wang, L; Wang, L L; Wang, P; Wang, T J; Wang, W F; Wang, X L; Wang, Y F; Wappler, F R; Watanabe, M; Watson, A T; Watson, J E; Watson, N K; Watt, M; Weatherall, J H; Weaver, M; Weber, T; Wedd, R; Wei, J T; Weidemann, A W; W, A J R; Wenzel, W A; West, C A; West, C G; West, T J; White, R M; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Wiechczynski, J; Wienands, U; Wilden, L; Wilder, M; Williams, D C; Williams, G; Williams, J C; Williams, K M; Williams, M I; Willocq, S Y; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Winter, M A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wittlin, J; Wittmer, W; Wixted, R; Woch, A; Wogsland, B J; Wong, Q K; Wray, B C; Wren, A C; Wright, D M; Wu, C H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Wulsin, H W; Xella, S M; Xie, Q L; Xie, Y; Xu, Z Z; Yèche, Ch; Yamada, Y; Yamaga, M; Yamaguchi, A; Yamaguchi, H; Yamaki, T; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, N; Yamamoto, R K; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamaoka, H; Yamaoka, J; Yamaoka, Y; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yan, D S; Yan, Y; Yanai, H; Yanaka, S; Yang, H; Yang, R; Yang, S; Yarritu, A K; Yashchenko, S; Yashima, J; Yasin, Z; Yasu, Y; Ye, S W; Yeh, P; Yi, J I; Yi, K; Yi, M; Yin, Z W; Ying, J; Yocky, G; Yokoyama, K; Yokoyama, M; Yokoyama, T; Yoshida, K; Yoshida, M; Yoshimura, Y; Young, C C; Yu, C X; Yu, Z; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Yumiceva, F X; Yusa, Y; Yushkov, A N; Yuta, H; Zacek, V; Zain, S B; Zallo, A; Zambito, S; Zander, D; Zang, S L; Zanin, D; Zaslavsky, B G; Zeng, Q L; Zghiche, A; Zhang, B; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, L M; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, H W; Zhao, M; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, Y; Zheng, Y H; Zheng, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhou, P; Zhu, R Y; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z M; Zhulanov, V; Ziegler, T; Ziegler, V; Zioulas, G; Zisman, M; Zito, M; Zürcher, D; Zwahlen, N; Zyukova, O; Živko, T; Žontar, D; Bevan, Adrian; Golob, Bostjan; Mannel, Thomas; Prell, Soeren; Yabsley, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    This work is on the Physics of the B Factories. Part A of this book contains a brief description of the SLAC and KEK B Factories as well as their detectors, BaBar and Belle, and data taking related issues. Part B discusses tools and methods used by the experiments in order to obtain results. The results themselves can be found in Part C.

  7. Dual gradients of light intensity and nutrient concentration for full-factorial mapping of photosynthetic productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Brian; Graham, Percival J; Sinton, David

    2016-08-07

    Optimizing bioproduct generation from microalgae is complicated by the myriad of coupled parameters affecting photosynthetic productivity. Quantifying the effect of multiple coupled parameters in full-factorial fashion requires a prohibitively high number of experiments. We present a simple hydrogel-based platform for the rapid, full-factorial mapping of light and nutrient availability on the growth and lipid accumulation of microalgae. We accomplish this without microfabrication using thin sheets of cell-laden hydrogels. By immobilizing the algae in a hydrogel matrix we are able to take full advantage of the continuous spatial chemical gradient produced by a diffusion-based gradient generator while eliminating the need for chambers. We map the effect of light intensities between 0 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and 130 μmol m(-2) s(-1) (∼28 W m(-2)) coupled with ammonium concentrations between 0 mM and 7 mM on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our data set, verified with bulk experiments, clarifies the role of ammonium availability on the photosynthetic productivity Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, demonstrating the dependence of ammonium inhibition on light intensity. Specifically, a sharp optimal growth peak emerges at approximately 2 mM only for light intensities between 80 and 100 μmol m(-2) s(-1)- suggesting that ammonium inhibition is insignificant at lower light intensities. We speculate that this phenomenon is due to the regulation of the high affinity ammonium transport system in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as well as free ammonia toxicity. The complexity of this photosynthetic biological response highlights the importance of full-factorial data sets as enabled here.

  8. Ni-Based Solid Oxide Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Holtappels, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a critical review of the literature on nickel-based electrodes for application in solid oxide cells at temperature from 500 to 1000 _C. The applications may be fuel cells or electrolyser cells. The reviewed literature is that of experimental results on both model electrodes...... and practical composite cermet electrodes. A substantially longer three-phase boundary (TPB) can be obtained per unit area of cell in such a composite of nickel and electrolyte material, provided that two interwoven solid networks of the two solid and one gaseous phases are obtained to provide a three...... such as milling and sintering. The various electrode properties are deeply related to these parameters, but also much related to the atomic scale structure of the Ni-electrolyte interface, which in turn is affected by segregation of electrolyte components and impurities as well as poisons in the gas phase...

  9. High-current proton accelerators-meson factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrievskij, V.P.

    1979-01-01

    A possibility of usage of accelerators of neutron as well as meson factories is considered. Parameters of linear and cyclic accelerators are given, which are employed as meson factories and as base for developing intense neutron generators. It is emphasized that the principal aim of developing neutron generators on the base of high current proton accelerators is production of intense neutron fluxes with a present energy spectrum. Production of tens-and-hundreds milliampere currents at the energy of 800-1000 MeV is considered at present for two types of accelerating facilities viz. linear accelerators under continuous operating conditions and cyclotrons with strong focusing. Quantitative evaluations of developing high-efficiency linear and cyclic accelerators are considered. The basic parameters of an ccelerating complex are given, viz. linear accelerator-injector and 800 MeV isochronous cyclotron. The main problems associated with their realization are listed [ru

  10. Team table: a framework and tool for continuous factory planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihn, Wilfried; Bischoff, Juergen; von Briel, Ralf; Josten, Marcus

    2000-10-01

    Growing market turbulences and shorter product life cycles require a continuous adaptation of factory structures resulting in a continuous factory planning process. Therefore a new framework is developed which focuses on configuration and data management process integration. This enable an online system performance evaluation based on continuous availability of current data. The use of this framework is especially helpful and will guarantee high cost and time savings, when used in the early stages of the planning, called the concept or rough planning phase. The new framework is supported by a planning round table as a tool for team-based configuration processes integrating the knowledge of all persons involved in planning processes. A case study conducted at a German company shows the advantages which can be achieved by implementing the new framework and methods.

  11. Nearby supernova factory announces 34 supernovae in one year'; best Rookie year ever for supernova search

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory), an international collaboration based at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, announced that it had discovered 34 supernovae during the first year of the prototype system's operation (2 pages).

  12. Microfluidic-Based Synthesis of Hydrogel Particles for Cell Microencapsulation and Cell-Based Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiandi Wan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Encapsulation of cells in hydrogel particles has been demonstrated as an effective approach to deliver therapeutic agents. The properties of hydrogel particles, such as the chemical composition, size, porosity, and number of cells per particle, affect cellular functions and consequently play important roles for the cell-based drug delivery. Microfluidics has shown unparalleled advantages for the synthesis of polymer particles and been utilized to produce hydrogel particles with a well-defined size, shape and morphology. Most importantly, during the encapsulation process, microfluidics can control the number of cells per particle and the overall encapsulation efficiency. Therefore, microfluidics is becoming the powerful approach for cell microencapsulation and construction of cell-based drug delivery systems. In this article, I summarize and discuss microfluidic approaches that have been developed recently for the synthesis of hydrogel particles and encapsulation of cells. I will start by classifying different types of hydrogel material, including natural biopolymers and synthetic polymers that are used for cell encapsulation, and then focus on the current status and challenges of microfluidic-based approaches. Finally, applications of cell-containing hydrogel particles for cell-based drug delivery, particularly for cancer therapy, are discussed.

  13. Novel Fuel Cells for Coal Based Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Tao

    2011-12-31

    The goal of this project was to acquire experimental data required to assess the feasibility of a Direct Coal power plant based upon an Electrochemical Looping (ECL) of Liquid Tin Anode Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LTA-SOFC). The objective of Phase 1 was to experimentally characterize the interaction between the tin anode, coal fuel and cell component electrolyte, the fate of coal contaminants in a molten tin reactor (via chemistry) and their impact upon the YSZ electrolyte (via electrochemistry). The results of this work will provided the basis for further study in Phase 2. The objective of Phase 2 was to extend the study of coal impurities impact on fuel cell components other than electrolyte, more specifically to the anode current collector which is made of an electrically conducting ceramic jacket and broad based coal tin reduction. This work provided a basic proof-of-concept feasibility demonstration of the direct coal concept.

  14. THE USE OF A FACTORIAL DESIGN TO EVALUATE THE PHYSICAL STABILITY OF TABLETS PREPARED BY DIRECT COMPRESSION .1. A NEW APPROACH BASED ON THE RELATIVE CHANGE IN TABLET PARAMETERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, C. E.; BOLHUIS, G. K.; LERK, C. F.; de Boer, J. H.; DUINEVELD, C. A. A.; Smilde, A. K.; Doornbos, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    A factorial design has been used to study the influence of disintegrant concentration and compression force as well as storage temperature and relative humidity on the physical stability during storage of alpha-lactose monohydrate/rice starch tablets prepared by direct compression. The tablet

  15. Design Learning of Teaching Factory in Mechanical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, R. C.; Kusumah, I. H.; Komaro, M.; Rahayu, Y.; Asfiyanur, E. P.

    2018-02-01

    The industrial world that is the target of the process and learning outcomes of vocational high school (SMK) has its own character and nuance. Therefore, vocational education institutions in the learning process should be able to make the appropriate learning approach and in accordance with the industrial world. One approach to learning that is based on production and learning in the world of work is by industry-based learning or known as Teaching Factory, where in this model apply learning that involves direct students in goods or service activities are expected to have the quality so it is worth selling and accepted by consumers. The method used is descriptive approach. The purpose of this research is to get the design of the teaching factory based on the competency requirements of the graduates of the spouse industry, especially in the engineering department. The results of this study is expected to be one of the choice of model factory teaching in the field of machinery engineering in accordance with the products and competencies of the graduates that the industry needs.

  16. SuperB: a Linear High-Luminosity B Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, J.; Bettarini, S.; Biagini, M.; Bonneaud, G.; Cai, Y.; Calderini, G.; Ciuchini, M.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.P.; Ecklund, S.; Forti, F.; Gershon, T.J.; Giorgi, M.A.; Hitlin, D.G.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Lusiani, A.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Neri, N.; Novokhatski, A.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; /Caltech /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale

    2006-02-08

    This paper is based on the outcome of the activity that has taken place during the recent workshop on ''SuperB in Italy'' held in Frascati on November 11-12, 2005. The workshop was opened by a theoretical introduction of Marco Ciuchini and was structured in two working groups. One focused on the machine and the other on the detector and experimental issues.. The present status on CP is mainly based on the results achieved by BABAR and Belle. Establishment of the indirect CP violation in B sector in 2001 and of the direct CP violation in 2004 thanks to the success of PEP-II and KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric B Factories operating at the center of mass energy corresponding to the mass of the {Upsilon}(4S ). With the two B Factories taking data, the Unitarity Triangle is now beginning to be over constrained by improving the measurements of the sides and now also of the angles {alpha}, and {gamma}. We are also in presence of the very intriguing results about the measurements of sin2{beta} in the time dependent analysis of decay channels via penguin loops, where b {yields} s{bar s}s and b {yields} s{bar d}d. {tau} physics, in particular LFV search, as well as charm and ISR physics are important parts of the scientific program of a SuperB Factory. The physics case together with possible scenarios for the high luminosity SuperB Factory based on the concepts of the Linear Collider and the related experimental issues are discussed.

  17. Software factory techniques applied to process control at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Dutour, Mathias D

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) requires constant monitoring and control of quantities of parameters to guarantee operational conditions. For this purpose, a methodology called UNICOS (UNIfied Industrial COntrols Systems) has been implemented to standardize the design of process control applications. To further accelerate the development of these applications, we migrated our existing UNICOS tooling suite toward a software factory in charge of assembling project, domain and technical information seamlessly into deployable PLC (Programmable logic Controller) - SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems. This software factory delivers consistently high quality by reducing human error and repetitive tasks, and adapts to user specifications in a cost-efficient way. Hence, this production tool is designed to encapsulate and hide the PLC and SCADA target platforms, enabling the experts to focus on the business model rather than specific syntaxes and grammars. Based on industry standard software, ...

  18. Software factory techniques applied to Process Control at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Dutour, MD

    2007-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) requires constant monitoring and control of quantities of parameters to guarantee operational conditions. For this purpose, a methodology called UNICOS (UNIfied Industrial COntrols Systems) has been implemented to standardize the design of process control applications. To further accelerate the development of these applications, we migrated our existing UNICOS tooling suite toward a software factory in charge of assembling project, domain and technical information seamlessly into deployable PLC (Programmable logic Controller) – SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems. This software factory delivers consistently high quality by reducing human error and repetitive tasks, and adapts to user specifications in a cost-efficient way. Hence, this production tool is designed to encapsulate and hide the PLC and SCADA target platforms, enabling the experts to focus on the business model rather than specific syntaxes and grammars. Based on industry standard software...

  19. Baby factories taint surrogacy in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, Olusesan Ayodeji; Makinde, Olufunmbi Olukemi; Olaleye, Olalekan; Brown, Brandon; Odimegwu, Clifford O

    2016-01-01

    The practice of reproductive medicine in Nigeria is facing new challenges with the proliferation of 'baby factories'. Baby factories are buildings, hospitals or orphanages that have been converted into places for young girls and women to give birth to children for sale on the black market, often to infertile couples, or into trafficking rings. This practice illegally provides outcomes (children) similar to surrogacy. While surrogacy has not been well accepted in this environment, the proliferation of baby factories further threatens its acceptance. The involvement of medical and allied health workers in the operation of baby factories raises ethical concerns. The lack of a properly defined legal framework and code of practice for surrogacy makes it difficult to prosecute baby factory owners, especially when they are health workers claiming to be providing services to clients. In this environment, surrogacy and other assisted reproductive techniques urgently require regulation in order to define when ethico-legal lines have been crossed in providing surrogacy or surrogacy-like services. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Simulating A Factory Via Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, Bernard J.; Zhang, Shou X.; Tseng, Fan T.

    1990-01-01

    Software system generates simulation program from user's responses to questions. AMPS/PC system is simulation software tool designed to aid user in defining specifications of manufacturing environment and then automatically writing code for target simulation language, GPSS/PC. Domain of problems AMPS/PC simulates is that of manufacturing assembly lines with subassembly lines and manufacturing cells. Written in Turbo Pascal Version 4.

  1. A conceptual design of circular Higgs factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yunhai

    2016-11-30

    Similar to a super B-factory, a circular Higgs factory (CHF) will require strong focusing systems near the interaction points and a low-emittance lattice in the arcs to achieve a factory luminosity. At electron beam energy of 125 GeV, beamstrahlung effects during the collision pose an additional challenge to the collider design. In particular, a large momentum acceptance at the 2% level is necessary to retain an adequate beam lifetime. This turns out to be the most challenging aspect in the design of a CHF. In this paper, an example will be provided to illustrate the beam dynamics in a CHF, emphasizing the chromatic optics. Basic optical modules and advanced analysis will be presented. Most importantly, we will show that 2% momentum aperture is achievable.

  2. The Experiment Factory: standardizing behavioral experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa V Sochat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The administration of behavioral and experimental paradigms for psychology research is hindered by lack of a coordinated effort to develop and deploy standardized paradigms. While several frameworks (de Leeuw (2015; McDonnell et al. (2012; Mason and Suri (2011; Lange et al. (2015 have provided infrastructure and methods for individual research groups to develop paradigms, missing is a coordinated effort to develop paradigms linked with a system to easily deploy them. This disorganization leads to redundancy in development, divergent implementations of conceptually identical tasks, disorganized and error-prone code lacking documentation, and difficulty in replication. The ongoing reproducibility crisis in psychology and neuroscience research (Baker (2015; Open Science Collaboration (2015 highlights the urgency of this challenge: reproducible research in behavioral psychology is conditional on deployment of equivalent experiments. A large, accessible repository of experiments for researchers to develop collaboratively is most efficiently accomplished through an open source framework. Here we present the Experiment Factory, an open source framework for the development and deployment of web-based experiments. The modular infrastructure includes experiments, virtual machines for local or cloud deployment, and an application to drive these components and provide developers with functions and tools for further extension. We release this infrastructure with a deployment (http://www.expfactory.org that researchers are currently using to run a set of over 80 standardized web-based experiments on Amazon Mechanical Turk. By providing open source tools for both deployment and development, this novel infrastructure holds promise to bring reproducibility to the administration of experiments, and accelerate scientific progress by providing a shared community resource of psychological paradigms.

  3. Nuclear physics at the KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitching, R.

    1989-05-01

    The author surveys the range of nuclear physics issues which can be addressed with a high intensity hadron facility such as the KAON factory. He discusses hadron spectroscopy, kaon scattering, hypernuclear physics, spin physics, and nuclear physics with neutrinos. Nuclear Physics is defined rather broadly, encompassing the study of strongly interacting systems, and including the structure of individual hadrons, hadron-hadron interactions, hadronic weak and electromagnetic currents (in nuclei too), conventional nuclear structure, and exotic nuclei. The basic theme is how the KAON Factory can shed light on non-perturbative QCD and its relation to conventional nuclear physics

  4. Particle physics prospects for the KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryman, D.

    1989-05-01

    The Kaon Factory at TRIUMF will produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, neutrinos and other particles with a hundred-fold increase in intensity over existing machines in the 30 GeV region. This will make possible new high precision experiments designed to test current ideas as well as high sensitivity measurements which could potentially reveal new effects. A sample of particle physics experiments involving rare kaon decays, CP and T violation studies, neutrino properties and reactions and light quark spectroscopy which might take advantage of the new opportunities presented by the Kaon Factory is discussed

  5. Determinants of Occupational Injury in Kombolcha Textile Factory, North-East Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    S Yessuf Serkalem; G Moges Haimanot; N Ahmed Ansha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Textile factory is among the most common manufacturing industries that has higher rate of work-related injuries. Knowing the associated factors of work-related injuries can be a critical step for improving the working condition of workers in the sector. Objective: To assess the major determinants of occupational injury among workers in Kombolcha textile factory, North-East Ethiopia. Methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from April 1 to 15, 2013...

  6. Carbon-based Fuel Cell. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steven S. C. Chuang

    2005-01-01

    The direct use of coal in the solid oxide fuel cell to generate electricity is an innovative concept for power generation. The C-fuel cell (carbon-based fuel cell) could offer significant advantages: (1) minimization of NOx emissions due to its operating temperature range of 700-1000 C, (2) high overall efficiency because of the direct conversion of coal to CO 2 , and (3) the production of a nearly pure CO 2 exhaust stream for the direct CO 2 sequestration. The objective of this project is to determine the technical feasibility of using a highly active anode catalyst in a solid oxide fuel for the direct electrochemical oxidation of coal to produce electricity. Results of this study showed that the electric power generation from Ohio No 5 coal (Lower Kittanning) Seam, Mahoning County, is higher than those of coal gas and pure methane on a solid oxide fuel cell assembly with a promoted metal anode catalyst at 950 C. Further study is needed to test the long term activity, selectivity, and stability of anode catalysts

  7. Roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodal gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peijiang; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Huang, Lifang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2015-06-01

    Some gene regulatory systems can exhibit bimodal distributions of mRNA or protein although the deterministic counterparts are monostable. This noise-induced bimodality is an interesting phenomenon and has important biological implications, but it is unclear how different sources of expression noise (each source creates so-called factorial noise that is defined as a component of the total noise) contribute separately to this stochastic bimodality. Here we consider a minimal model of gene regulation, which is monostable in the deterministic case. Although simple, this system contains factorial noise of two main kinds: promoter noise due to switching between gene states and transcriptional (or translational) noise due to synthesis and degradation of mRNA (or protein). To better trace the roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodality, we also analyze two limit models, continuous and adiabatic approximations, apart from the exact model. We show that in the case of slow gene switching, the continuous model where only promoter noise is considered can exhibit bimodality; in the case of fast switching, the adiabatic model where only transcriptional or translational noise is considered can also exhibit bimodality but the exact model cannot; and in other cases, both promoter noise and transcriptional or translational noise can cooperatively induce bimodality. Since slow gene switching and large protein copy numbers are characteristics of eukaryotic cells, whereas fast gene switching and small protein copy numbers are characteristics of prokaryotic cells, we infer that eukaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced mainly by promoter noise, whereas prokaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced primarily by transcriptional or translational noise.

  8. Employment and Training Problems in New Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    Does management in newly established factories using highly advanced technology meet special problems in recruitment and training of their workers? Are the traditional training systems supplying the skilled manpower required for running highly sophisticated plants? These were the basic questions asked when the present study was started in seven…

  9. Plant factories; crop transpiration and energy balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graamans, Luuk; Dobbelsteen, van den Andy; Meinen, Esther; Stanghellini, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Population growth and rapid urbanisation may result in a shortage of food supplies for cities in the foreseeable future. Research on closed plant production systems, such as plant factories, has attempted to offer perspectives for robust (urban) agricultural systems. Insight into the explicit role

  10. The Idea Factory: An Interactive Intergroup Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosh, Lisa; Leach, Evan

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines the Idea Factory exercise, an interactive exercise designed to help participants examine group, individual, and organizational factors that affect intergroup conflict. Specific emphasis is placed on exploring the relationship between intra- and intergroup dynamics and identifying managerial practices that foster effective…

  11. Factory Downtime Minimization through Tracking of Maintenance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The front factory comprises two tandems: tandem A and B. The total downtime records for the first six months of 2013/14 sugar production season for tandem A show that the downtime was mainly due to mechanical failures, lack of canes, preventive maintenance activities, cleanings due to blockages, and electrical failures, ...

  12. Permanent-Magnet Quadrupoles for Neutrino Factories

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    2000-01-01

    Using permanent-magnet quadrupoles for the long straight sections of the recirculating linear accelerators and in the muon storage ring proper of a neutrino factory is proposed. The parameters needed for such quadrupoles are compared to the parameters of the permanent-magnet quadrupoles that are used in the Recycler Ring at Fermilab. Using such quadrupoles for ELFE at CERN is also considered.

  13. Predictors of Organizational Commitment of Factory Employees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This survey research investigated the predictive influence of organizational climate, self-efficacy and emotional intelligence on organizational commitment. Data were collected from 200randomly selected employees of Cocacola Factory who served as participants in this study using structured questionnaire. Results of the ...

  14. Factorial and reduced K-means reconsidered

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Marieke E.; Ceulemans, Eva; Kiers, Henk A. L.; Vichi, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Factorial K-means analysis (FKM) and Reduced K-means analysis (RKM) are clustering methods that aim at simultaneously achieving a clustering of the objects and a dimension reduction of the variables. Because a comprehensive comparison between FKM and RKM is lacking in the literature so far, a

  15. SuperB, the super flavor factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitlin, D. G.

    2009-06-01

    Heavy flavor physics measurements, in particular B and τ physics results from the B Factories, currently provide strong constraints on models of physics beyond the Standard Model. SuperB, a next generation asymmetric collider with 50 to 100 times the luminosity of existing colliders, can, in a dialog with LHC and ILC, provide unique insights into New Physics phenomena seen at those machines.

  16. The Energy Factory; EnergieFabriek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Boomen, M.; Van den Dungen, G.J.; Elias, T.; Jansen, M. [Universiteit van Amsterdam UvA, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15

    The Energy Factory is a collaboration of 26 Dutch local water boards in which options for energy saving and energy production are examined. According to the authors, the initiative of the Energy Factory will lead to a reframing of the role of the water boards. Moreover, they explain how the PPP concept (People, Planet, Profit) may act as platform for negotiations between actors who are involved in the Energy Factory. In addition, the PPP concept is used to demonstrate that the Energy Factory will lead to larger social involvement, social entrepreneurship and growing profits [Dutch] De Energiefabriek is een samenwerkingsverband van 26 waterschappen in Nederland waarin wordt gezocht naar mogelijkheden om energie te besparen en zelf energie te produceren. Volgens de auteurs van deze notitie leidt het initiatief van de Energiefabriek tot een reframing van de rol van waterschappen. Daarnaast leggen ze uit hoe het PPP-concept (People, Profit, Planet) kan fungeren als platform voor onderhandelingen tussen de actoren die betrokken zijn bij de Energiefabriek. Verder wordt met het PPP-concept aangetoond dat de Energiefabriek leidt tot ruimere maatschappelijke betrokkenheid, maatschappelijk ondernemen en winstvergroting.

  17. Undergraduate Students' Initial Conceptions of Factorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Elise; Erickson, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Counting problems offer rich opportunities for students to engage in mathematical thinking, but they can be difficult for students to solve. In this paper, we present a study that examines student thinking about one concept within counting, factorials, which are a key aspect of many combinatorial ideas. In an effort to better understand students'…

  18. A tau -- charm -- factory at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, E.; Fields, T.; Grosnick, D.; Norem, J.; Repond, J.; Schoessow, P.

    1994-01-01

    Depending on the beam energy setting, the τ -- charm -- factory will be optimized to study physics with τ leptons, with charmed mesons, or with charmonium states. This report gives a short overview of the physics of these topics. Also discussed are the detectors and the costs associated with this project

  19. Science achievement determinants: factorial structure of family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of. Family Psychotherapy, 1:29-38. Science achievement determinants: factorial structure of family variables. Elias Oupa Mashile. Faculty of Education ... children themselves have about such involvement and support. Most researchers only ascribe a few of these variables to familial influence in their studies. Also ...

  20. Business plan Feed Factory Zambezi Valley, Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooij, A.G.; Wilschut, S.

    2015-01-01

    This business plan focuses on the establishment of a poultry feed factory, one of the essential elements of a sustainable and profitable poultry meat value chain. There is a growing demand for poultry meat in the Tete Province, and currently a large part of the consumed broilers come from other

  1. An Epiphany in a Toilet Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Catlin

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experiences of the universality of art making and artistic experience of being a dancer and teaching artist. She describes her performance at Kohler, a worldwide leader in plumbing products in Spartanburg, South Carolina, where she had an epiphany dancing in a toilet factory--a sudden, intuitive moment of…

  2. Stem Cell Therapy: Repurposing Cell-Based Regenerative Medicine Beyond Cell Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Eleonora; Lippert, Trenton; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2018-02-27

    Stem cells exhibit simple and naive cellular features, yet their exact purpose for regenerative medicine continues to elude even the most elegantly designed research paradigms from developmental biology to clinical therapeutics. Based on their capacity to divide indefinitely and their dynamic differentiation into any type of tissue, the advent of transplantable stem cells has offered a potential treatment for aging-related and injury-mediated diseases. Recent laboratory evidence has demonstrated that transplanted human neural stem cells facilitate endogenous reparative mechanisms by initiating multiple regenerative processes in the brain neurogenic areas. Within these highly proliferative niches reside a myriad of potent regenerative molecules, including anti-inflammatory cytokines, proteomes, and neurotrophic factors, altogether representing a biochemical cocktail vital for restoring brain function in the aging and diseased brain. Here, we advance the concept of therapeutically repurposing stem cells not towards cell replacement per se, but rather exploiting the cells' intrinsic properties to serve as the host brain regenerative catalysts.

  3. Optimizing cell viability in droplet-based cell deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Jan; Visser, C.W.; Henke, S.J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Biofabrication commonly involves the use of liquid droplets to transport cells to the printed structure. However, the viability of the cells after impact is poorly controlled and understood, hampering applications including cell spraying, inkjet bioprinting, and laser-assisted cell transfer. Here,

  4. CrossRef Neutrino factories

    CERN Document Server

    Wildner, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Neutrinos are produced by many processes in our universe. These elusive particles reach the earth having a certain energy permitting them to react with nuclei in detectors that are specifically designed to probe their properties. However, to get higher intensities and higher energy neutrinos for better statistics and better physics reach, the use of accelerators is necessary to advance in the field of neutrino research. To produce neutrinos with an accelerator, one needs to send a high power beam onto a target to get particles or isotopes that produce neutrinos with the required properties, by decay. The parent particles have to be collected and prepared for injection into an accelerating structure. Accelerator-based experiments can tune the energy of the produced neutrinos by boosting and controlling the energy of the parent particle. The produced neutrinos will travel the distance between the source and the detector, generally through earth; the distance the neutrino travels through earth, the energy of the...

  5. 3PL Factories or Lernstatts?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prockl, Günter; Pflaum, Alexander; Kotzab, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    with work of organizational theory and develops an analytical framework based on conceptual considerations. First empirical results are additionally used to support and illustrate the key outcomes. Findings – Combining the dimensions of integration power and intangible knowledge creation, the authors...... are able to specify generic types of contract logistics services. Thereby the authors deducted for every type the distinct requirements for service fulfilment and present this in a specific frame of reference. Research limitations/implications – The illustrated empirical results are still limited due...... with first empirical results, the paper's results offer insights for practitioners to rethink their value propositions and potentially redesign their service architectures. Originality/value – The paper delivers a set of distinct business models for 3PL services reflecting the customer's, as well...

  6. Asymptotic formulas for sequence factorial of arithmetic progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aṣiru, Muniru A.

    2014-08-01

    This note provides asymptotic formulas for approximating the sequence factorial of members of a finite arithmetic progression by using Stirling, Burnside and other more accurate asymptotic formulas for large factorials that have appeared in the literature.

  7. Production of Tetraquark State Tcc at B-Factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidin, Reyima

    2013-12-01

    We study production of the tetraquark state Tcc via virtual photon at the B-factories in the QCD factorization framework. We predict the cross section of tetraquark state production in the leading order at the B-factories.

  8. "Mixing" as an ethnoetiology of HIV/AIDS in Malaysia's multinational factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Robin

    2006-09-01

    Minah Karan, the stigmatizing label appended to Malay factory women in the 1980s, signaled a dangerous female sexuality that risked spreading beyond the factory gates and infecting Malaysia's idea(l)s of its traditional kampung culture. This article narrates how Minah Karan, as the former antihero of development, was reconstituted in the 1990s, with the government's labeling of factories as "high-risk settings" for HIV/AIDS. This is an ethnoetiology based not on any evidential epidemiological data but on the racial and gendered "mixing" that transpires behind factory walls: a fear that the "mixing of the sexes" means ipso facto "sexual mixing" among the races. The article demonstrates how importation of the high-risk label articulates at the local level the new and contested linkages, economic, religious, and scientific, constitutive of globalization. The pragmatic nature and imperatives of this high-risk process are discerned in factory women's accounts of how they negotiate the interactional imperatives of factory work, because transnational structures of productivity violate the social boundaries that have long connoted political stability, moral integrity, ethnic community, and individual safety. The article concludes by questioning whether ethnoetiologies, especially when they concern sexual networks, become social etiologies, because this would locate ethnoetiologies as central to conventional public health praxis rather than as ethnographic exotica in the margins.

  9. An Interactive Simulation Tool for Production Planning in Bacon Factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard

    1994-01-01

    The paper describes an interactive simulation tool for production planning in bacon factories. The main aim of the tool is to make it possible to combine the production plans of all parts of the factory......The paper describes an interactive simulation tool for production planning in bacon factories. The main aim of the tool is to make it possible to combine the production plans of all parts of the factory...

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  11. Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  12. Palomar Transient Factory Discovery of 5 New Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenko, S. B.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Matheson, T.; Nugent, P. E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Bloom, J. S.; Quimby, R M.

    2010-09-01

    We report the discovery and spectroscopic classification of 5 new supernovae from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf). The supernovae were discovered and classified by Oarical, an autonomous software framework of the PTF collaboration, based on observations made with the Palomar 48-inch Oschin Schmidt telescope. Spectroscopy was undertaken with the R-C spectrograph mounted at the Cassegrain focus of the Mayall 4-m telescope at Kitt Peak Observatory on UT 2010 September 8 by Cenko, Kulkarni, and Matheson.

  13. The computer control system for the CESR B factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohman, C.R.; Rice, D.H.; Peck, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    B factories present unique requirements for controls and instrumentation systems. High reliability is critical to achieving the integrated luminosity goals. The CESR-B upgrade at Cornell University will have a control system based on the architecture of the successful CESR control system, which uses a centralized database/massage routing system in a multiported memory, and VAX stations for all high-level control functions. The implementation of this architecture will address the deficiencies in the current implementation while providing the required performance and reliability. (author)

  14. Stem Cell-Based Therapies for Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Hao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, stem cell-based approaches have attracted more attention from scientists and clinicians due to their possible therapeutical effect on stroke. Animal studies have demonstrated that the beneficial effects of stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs, inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, neural stem cells (NSCs, and mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs might be due to cell replacement, neuroprotection, endogenous neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and modulation on inflammation and immune response. Although several clinical studies have shown the high efficiency and safety of stem cell in stroke management, mainly MSCs, some issues regarding to cell homing, survival, tracking, safety, and optimal cell transplantation protocol, such as cell dose and time window, should be addressed. Undoubtably, stem cell-based gene therapy represents a novel potential therapeutic strategy for stroke in future.

  15. Assessment of noise in furniture factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Petusk Filipe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Work safety is of great importance in all industrial activities. The Norm NR15 of the Brazilian law determines that the work environment be tailored to employees to minimize biological, ergonomic, physical, chemical risks and accidents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the exposure of intermittent noise in a daily dose to workers in furniture factories. Measurements were made with a sound level meter and dosimeter in a workday of eight hours in 14 furniture factories located in the South of Minas Gerais. Noise values ranged from 66.0 to 117.4 dB(A. At a dose of 8 working hours it was observed that the values exceed the tolerance limit of a unit, being from 2.76 to 30.52 for minimum and maximum units, respectively. Both noises and daily doses were superior than the values set by the NR-15-Annex 01 (BRASIL, 2008.

  16. Portable Material Culture and Death Factory Auschwitz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian T. Myers

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Like any other factory, the death factory of Auschwitz consumed primary materials and produced secondary products. Unique to Auschwitz, though, is that the primary material consumed was human life; not just the life of the breathing human body, but also the material possessions associated with that life. The detritus of this most efficient genocide – clothing, jewellery, food, corpses – was appropriated and put to new uses by the SS and the prisoners. Others have recognised the various postwar material cultural outcomes of the camp: the writing, the film, the theatre, the art, the tourism. This article, however, demonstrates that the material culture of Auschwitz is not a phenomenon exclusive to the postwar era. It focuses on the fact that inside the camp during the war, despite the landscape of death and deprivation, intimate interaction between humans and material culture continued.

  17. The Physics of the B Factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevan, A.J.; Golob, B.; Mannel, T.

    2014-01-01

    The inspiration for this book came from Fran@cois le Diberder. During his term as spokesperson for BABAR he laid down a vision for the two B Factory detector collaborations, BABAR and Belle, to work together on a book that would describe the methodologies used and physics results obtained by those experiments. A key ideal emphasized from the outset was that this book should be written from a pedagogical perspective; it should be of interest to the student and expert alike. This vision was presented during a BABAR collaboration meeting on the island of Elba in May 2008 and a follow up Belle collaboration meeting at KEK, with visiting colleagues from the BABAR collaboration, and was embraced by the community. A number of workshops involving people from the theoretical community as well as the two collaborations were held on four continents over the following years. The resulting book, ''The Physics of the B Factories'', is a testament to the way that this concept captured the zeitgeist on both sides of the Pacific Ocean. This book is divided into three parts, the first of which provides a brief description of the B Factories, including a short (though not exhaustive) historical perspective, as well as descriptions of the detectors, ancillary data acquisition systems and data (re)processing systems that were built by the two detector collaborations in the late 1990's. The second part of the book discusses tools and methods that are frequently used when analyzing the data collected. These range from details of low level reconstruction algorithms and abstract summaries of statistical methods to high level prescriptions used when evaluating systematic uncertainties on measurements of observables. The third part of the book is devoted to physics results. This includes sufficient theoretical discussion in order for the reader to understand the context of the work being described. We are indebted to our colleagues from the theoretical community who have helped us achieve

  18. Physics at e+e- factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.; MacFarlane, D.B.

    1991-02-01

    Feasible designs are well advanced for high-luminosity e + e - storage rings which produce B 0 bar B 0 pairs either at rest or, in what appears to be a more promising option, boosted in the detector frame. Facilities which could provide samples of 30--100 fb -1 per year on the Υ(4S) will be proposed in early 1991. Here we examine the principal physics goal of such B Factories, namely CP violation in the b system. Methods in a variety of channels, estimated event samples, and detector requirements are all considered. We conclude that the physics argument for an e + e - B Factory is well documented, and compelling. 50 refs., 22 figs., 10 tabs

  19. Software Development Factories, the Project Management Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a software factory, the applications are developed in the same way Henri Ford started manufacturing cars. In such a way, a customized solution could be obtained within a reasonable budget and within the foreseen timeframe. This development method offers a flexible solution that can be readapted rapidly and automatically to the changing business needs, so the Project Management becomes a real challenge.

  20. Muon front end for the neutrino factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. Rogers

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the neutrino factory, muons are produced by firing high-energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons and pass through a capture channel known as the muon front end, before acceleration to 12.6 GeV. The muon front end comprises a variable frequency rf system for longitudinal capture and an ionization cooling channel. In this paper we detail recent improvements in the design of the muon front end.

  1. LAMPF: the meson factory. A LASL monograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, J.C.

    1977-08-01

    A general and simplified introduction to the entire concept of LAMPF is given in terms of its experimental capabilities. Parts of the current experimental program are used as illustrative examples. Topics discussed include: (1) the evolution of the meson factory; (2) accelerator construction; (3) strong focusing; (4) accelerator innovations at LAMPF; (5) photons and pions; (6) muons as nuclear probes; (7) nuclear chemistry; (8) radiobiology and medical applications; (9) radioisotope production; (10) materials testing; and (11) LAMPF management and users group

  2. LAMPF: the meson factory. A LASL monograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C.

    1977-08-01

    A general and simplified introduction to the entire concept of LAMPF is given in terms of its experimental capabilities. Parts of the current experimental program are used as illustrative examples. Topics discussed include: (1) the evolution of the meson factory; (2) accelerator construction; (3) strong focusing; (4) accelerator innovations at LAMPF; (5) photons and pions; (6) muons as nuclear probes; (7) nuclear chemistry; (8) radiobiology and medical applications; (9) radioisotope production; (10) materials testing; and (11) LAMPF management and users group. (PMA)

  3. Black hole as a wormhole factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Won Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There have been lots of debates about the final fate of an evaporating black hole and the singularity hidden by an event horizon in quantum gravity. However, on general grounds, one may argue that a black hole stops radiation at the Planck mass (ħc/G1/2∼10−5 g, where the radiated energy is comparable to the black hole's mass. And also, it has been argued that there would be a wormhole-like structure, known as “spacetime foam”, due to large fluctuations below the Planck length (ħG/c31/2∼10−33 cm. In this paper, as an explicit example, we consider an exact classical solution which represents nicely those two properties in a recently proposed quantum gravity model based on different scaling dimensions between space and time coordinates. The solution, called “Black Wormhole”, consists of two different states, depending on its mass parameter M and an IR parameter ω: For the black hole state (with ωM2>1/2, a non-traversable wormhole occupies the interior region of the black hole around the singularity at the origin, whereas for the wormhole state (with ωM2<1/2, the interior wormhole is exposed to an outside observer as the black hole horizon is disappearing from evaporation. The black hole state becomes thermodynamically stable as it approaches the merging point where the interior wormhole throat and the black hole horizon merges, and the Hawking temperature vanishes at the exact merge point (with ωM2=1/2. This solution suggests the “Generalized Cosmic Censorship” by the existence of a wormhole-like structure which protects the naked singularity even after the black hole evaporation. One could understand the would-be wormhole inside the black hole horizon as the result of microscopic wormholes created by “negative” energy quanta which have entered the black hole horizon in Hawking radiation process; the quantum black hole could be a wormhole factory! It is found that this speculative picture may be consistent with the

  4. A biophysical model for transcription factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canals-Hamann, Ana Z; Neves, Ricardo Pires das; Reittie, Joyce E; Iñiguez, Carlos; Soneji, Shamit; Enver, Tariq; Buckle, Veronica J; Iborra, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factories are nuclear domains where gene transcription takes place although the molecular basis for their formation and maintenance are unknown. In this study, we explored how the properties of chromatin as a polymer may contribute to the structure of transcription factories. We found that transcriptional active chromatin contains modifications like histone H4 acetylated at Lysine 16 (H4K16ac). Single fibre analysis showed that this modification spans the entire body of the gene. Furthermore, H4K16ac genes cluster in regions up to 500 Kb alternating active and inactive chromatin. The introduction of H4K16ac in chromatin induces stiffness in the chromatin fibre. The result of this change in flexibility is that chromatin could behave like a multi-block copolymer with repetitions of stiff-flexible (active-inactive chromatin) components. Copolymers with such structure self-organize through spontaneous phase separation into microdomains. Consistent with such model H4K16ac chromatin form foci that associates with nascent transcripts. We propose that transcription factories are the result of the spontaneous concentration of H4K16ac chromatin that are in proximity, mainly in cis

  5. Factorial complexity and Morally Debatable Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimaldo Muchotrigo, Mirian P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, from the scientific and professional practice point of view, comes out the necessity to know more about moral permissiveness, as it seems to be an increase in “moral relativism”.. Because it, it this is important to have tools to collect valid and reliable information about moral in social situations defined as social and personal behavior issue. This paper presents a technical note of The Morally Debatable Behaviors Scale (MDBS from Harding & Phillips (1986, which was developed in USA and mainly focused on young people and adults. This technical note makes direct reference to a recent Latin American study (Merino & Grimaldo, 2010; this article focuses on the internal structure and the problems associated with evidences of factorial complexity among items of the MDBS. This means that the interpretation of scores is not factorially simple and could not be achieved by a conceptual distinction between the latent constructs applied to the study sample.. The results in the previous study of the factorial complexity leads the researcher to decide whether an instrument for measuring this aspect may contain a reasonable amount of complexity that is consistent with what is in reality, or look for the unidimensional and simple structure.

  6. Backgrounds at e+e- B factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    B-factory designers and prospective users have learned that the viability of such facilities is crucially dependent upon control of machine-related backgrounds in the interaction region (IR). Photons from synchrotron radiation (SR), and the debris that follows loss of stored beam, can compromise the performance and thwart the mission of the elaborate and expensive experimental detectors. This danger is relevant to taucharm and phi factories as well. My goal is to make clear to non-experts why this is so, and to explicate the underlying physical processes and important defensive measures. We shall stay close to reality by comparing simulation to actual experience at the CLEOII detector - CESR storage ring complex at Cornell. Why should one expect background difficulties at B factories? First, backgrounds are not negligible now, at luminosities of 2.10 32 cm 2 sec -1 ; future facilities will require currents and luminosity 10 to 50 times greater. Second, backgrounds rise faster than linearly with beam current; since gas evolution is driven by SR, the beam-gas backgrounds will grow quadratically with current. High beam energies (for asymmetric colliders) and the very strong quadrupole fields required for small β * and rapid beam separation exacerbate the problems posed by SR from magnets near the IR. The experiments will employ thin beryllium beampipes at (typically) 2.5 cm radius, with little inherent resistance to penetration by x rays. Finally, the HEP physics is ''high-precision physics,'' especially vulnerable to corruption by backgrounds. (orig.)

  7. Lyapunov exponents and phase diagrams reveal multi-factorial control over TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Bree B; Gaudet, Suzanne; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Sorger, Peter K

    2011-11-22

    Receptor-mediated apoptosis proceeds via two pathways: one requiring only a cascade of initiator and effector caspases (type I behavior) and the second requiring an initiator-effector caspase cascade and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (type II behavior). Here, we investigate factors controlling type I versus II phenotypes by performing Lyapunov exponent analysis of an ODE-based model of cell death. The resulting phase diagrams predict that the ratio of XIAP to pro-caspase-3 concentrations plays a key regulatory role: type I behavior predominates when the ratio is low and type II behavior when the ratio is high. Cell-to-cell variability in phenotype is observed when the ratio is close to the type I versus II boundary. By positioning multiple tumor cell lines on the phase diagram we confirm these predictions. We also extend phase space analysis to mutations affecting the rate of caspase-3 ubiquitylation by XIAP, predicting and showing that such mutations abolish all-or-none control over activation of effector caspases. Thus, phase diagrams derived from Lyapunov exponent analysis represent a means to study multi-factorial control over a complex biochemical pathway.

  8. Detection of polymorphism of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular genetic selection on individual genes is a promising method to genetically improve economically important traits in chickens. The insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) gene may play important roles in growth of multiple tissues, including muscle cells, cartilage and bone. In the present study, polymorphism of the ...

  9. Does open-air exposure to volatile organic compounds near a plastic recycling factory cause health effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Noguchi, Miyuki; Tsuda, Toshihide; Suzuki, Etsuji; Takao, Soshi; Kashima, Saori; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    After a plastic reprocessing factory began to operate in August 2004, the residents around the factory in Neyagawa, Osaka, Japan, began to complain of symptoms. Therefore, we conducted an exposure assessment and a population-based epidemiological study in 2006. To assess exposure, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total VOCs were measured at two locations in the vicinity of the factory. In the population-based study, a total of 3,950 residents were targeted. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information about subjects' mucocutaneous or respiratory symptoms. Using logistic regression models, we compared the prevalence of symptoms in July 2006 by employing the farthest area from the factory as a reference, and prevalence odds ratios (PORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. The concentration of total VOCs was higher in the vicinity of the factory. The prevalence of mucocutaneous and respiratory symptoms was the highest among the residents in the closest area to the factory. Some symptoms were significantly increased among the residents within 500 m of the factory compared with residents of an area 2800 m from the factory: e.g., sore throat (POR=3.2, 95% CI: 1.3-8.0), eye itch (POR=3.0, 95% CI: 1.5-6.0), eye discharge (POR=6.0, 95% CI: 2.3-15.9), eczema (POR=3.0, 95% CI: 1.1-7.9) and sputum (POR=2.4, 95% CI: 1.1-5.1). Despite of the limitations of this study, these results imply a possible association of open-air VOCs with mucocutaneous and respiratory symptoms. Because this kind of plasticre cycling factory only recently came into operation, more attention should be paid to the operation of plastic recycling factories in the environment.

  10. Promoting contraceptive use among unmarried female migrants in one factory in Shanghai: a pilot workplace intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In urban China, more single women are becoming pregnant and resorting to induced abortion, despite the wide availability of temporary methods of contraception. We developed and piloted a workplace-based intervention to promote contraceptive use in unmarried female migrants working in privately owned factories. Methods Quasi-experimental design. In consultation with clients, we developed a workplace based intervention to promote contraception use in unmarried female migrants in a privately owned factory. We then implemented this in one factory, using a controlled before-and-after design. The intervention included lectures, bespoke information leaflets, and support to the factory doctors in providing a contraceptive service. Results 598 women participated: most were under 25, migrants to the city, with high school education. Twenty percent were lost when staff were made redundant, and implementation was logistically complicated. All women attended the initial lecture, and just over half the second lecture. Most reported reading the educational material provided (73%, but very few women reported using the free family planning services offered at the factory clinic (5% or the Family Planning Institute (3%. At baseline, 90% (N = 539 stated that contraceptives were required if having sex before marriage; of those reporting sex in the last three months, the majority reporting using contraceptives (78%, 62/79 but condom use was low (44%, 35/79. Qualitative data showed that the reading material seemed to be popular and young women expressed a need for more specific reproductive health information, particularly on HIV/AIDS. Women wanted services with some privacy and anonymity, and views on the factory service were mixed. Conclusion Implementing a complex intervention with a hard to reach population through a factory in China, using a quasi-experimental design, is not easy. Further research should focus on the specific needs and

  11. Reduced cells based on extremal principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, B.

    1989-01-01

    It is known that the Buerger cell, a+b+c=abs min, is ambiguous. Uniqueness is usually achieved by an additional system of inequalities which leads to the generally accepted Niggli cell. However, this system is rather unusual and does not suggest any geometrical meaning for the Niggli cell. In this paper four types of unique cells originating from the Buerger cell are introduced by means of simple conditions which have an extremal character. Any of these cells may stand for a reduced cell and has an express geometrical property. One of the four types coincides with the Niggli cell, which is thus given a geometrical interpretation. Systems of inequalities are shown that allow recognition of the cell of any type and algorithms are presented for achieving it. An algorithm for obtaining all Buerger cells of a lattice is included. The use of the reciprocal lattice enables the definition of four further unique cells which, however, need not be Buerger cells and are not discussed in detail. The mathematics must deal with a number of inequalities which often contain square roots, and sometimes rather intricate technical tricks are required. (orig.)

  12. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Hijacks RNA Polymerase II To Create a Viral Transcriptional Factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christopher Phillip; Lyu, Yuanzhi; Chuang, Frank; Nakano, Kazushi; Izumiya, Chie; Jin, Di; Campbell, Mel; Izumiya, Yoshihiro

    2017-06-01

    Locally concentrated nuclear factors ensure efficient binding to DNA templates, facilitating RNA polymerase II recruitment and frequent reutilization of stable preinitiation complexes. We have uncovered a mechanism for effective viral transcription by focal assembly of RNA polymerase II around Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genomes in the host cell nucleus. Using immunofluorescence labeling of latent nuclear antigen (LANA) protein, together with fluorescence in situ RNA hybridization (RNA-FISH) of the intron region of immediate early transcripts, we visualized active transcription of viral genomes in naturally infected cells. At the single-cell level, we found that not all episomes were uniformly transcribed following reactivation stimuli. However, those episomes that were being transcribed would spontaneously aggregate to form transcriptional "factories," which recruited a significant fraction of cellular RNA polymerase II. Focal assembly of "viral transcriptional factories" decreased the pool of cellular RNA polymerase II available for cellular gene transcription, which consequently impaired cellular gene expression globally, with the exception of selected ones. The viral transcriptional factories localized with replicating viral genomic DNAs. The observed colocalization of viral transcriptional factories with replicating viral genomic DNA suggests that KSHV assembles an "all-in-one" factory for both gene transcription and DNA replication. We propose that the assembly of RNA polymerase II around viral episomes in the nucleus may be a previously unexplored aspect of KSHV gene regulation by confiscation of a limited supply of RNA polymerase II in infected cells. IMPORTANCE B cells infected with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) harbor multiple copies of the KSHV genome in the form of episomes. Three-dimensional imaging of viral gene expression in the nucleus allows us to study interactions and changes in the physical distribution of

  13. Test results of distributed ion pump designs for the PEP-II Asymmetric B-Factory collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, M.; Holdener, F.; Peterson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    The testing facility measurement methods and results of prototype distributed ion pump (DIP) designs for the PEP-II B-Factory High Energy Ring are presented. Two basic designs with 5- or 7-anode plates were tested at LLNL with penning cell sizes of 15, 18, and 21 mm. Direct comparison of 5- and 7-plate anodes with 18 mm holes shows increased pumping speed with the 7-plate design. The 5-plate, 18 mm and 7-plate, 15 mm designs both gave an average pumping speed of 135 1/s/m at 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} Torr nitrogen base pressure in a varying 0.18 T peak B-field. Comparison of the three hole sizes indicates that cells smaller than the 15 mm tested can be efficiently used to obtain higher pumping speeds for the same anode plate sizes used.

  14. The Tau-Charm Factory in the ERA of B-Factories and CESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beers, L.V.; Perl, M.L.

    1994-10-01

    This paper is a collection of presentations made at a conference on tau-charm factories, held at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and Stanford University on August 15-16, 1994. The papers presented summarize the physics which can be learned from such a facility, the advantages it would present over planned B-factories and large centers such as CESR, and the types of decay modes which could be observed. More detailed studies of tau physics are opened up, as well as charmonium and charmed systems. Seperate presentations to the proceedings are indexed individually into the database

  15. Studies of Helium Based Gas Mixtures Using a Small Cell Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, Jaret; British Columbia U.

    2006-01-01

    An international collaboration is currently working on the construction and design of an asymmetric B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center that will be ready to collect data in 1999. The main physics motivation for such a facility is to test the description and mechanism of CP violation in the Standard Model of particle physics and provide insight into the question of why more matter than antimatter is observed in the universe today. In particular, this experiment will measure CP violation in the decay of B mesons. In the early stages of this effort, the Canadian contingent proposed to build the central tracking chamber for the BABAR detector. Presently, a prototype drift chamber is in operation and studies are being performed to test some of the unique features of drift chamber design dictated by the conditions of the experiment. Using cosmic muons, it is possible to study tracking and pattern recognition in the prototype chamber, and therefore calculate the efficiency and spatial resolution of the prototype chamber cells. These performance features will be used to test whether or not the helium-based gas mixtures proposed for the BABAR drift chamber are a viable alternative to the more traditional argon-based gases

  16. Diamond Growth in the Subduction Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, H.; Frost, D. J.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Leroy, C.; Estève, I.

    2014-12-01

    Natural diamonds are fabulous probes of the deep Earth Interior. They are the evidence of the deep storage of volatile elements, carbon at first, but also hydrogen and chlorine trapped as hydrous fluids in inclusions. The study of diamond growth processes in the lithosphere and mantle helps for our understanding of volatile elements cycling between deep reservoirs. We know now that inclusion-bearing diamonds similar to diamonds found in nature (i.e. polycrystalline, fibrous and coated diamonds) can grow in hydrous fluids or melts (Bureau et al., GCA 77, 202-214, 2012). Therefore, we propose that the best environment to promote such diamonds is the subduction factory, where highly hydrous fluids or melts are present. When oceanic plates are subducted in the lithosphere, they carry an oceanic crust soaked with seawater. While the slabs are traveling en route to the mantle, dehydration processes generate saline fluids highly concentrated in NaCl. In the present study we have experimentally shown that diamonds can grow from the saline fluids (up to 30 g/l NaCl in water) generated in subducted slabs. We have performed multi-anvil press experiments at 6-7 GPa and from 1300 to 1400°C during 6:00 hours to 30:00 hours. We observed large areas of new diamond grown in epitaxy on pure diamond seeds in salty hydrous carbonated melts, forming coated gems. The new rims are containing multi-component primary inclusions. Detailed characterizations of the diamonds and their inclusions have been performed and will be presented. These experimental results suggest that multi-component salty fluids of supercritical nature migrate with the slabs, down to the deep mantle. Such fluids may insure the first stage of the deep Earth's volatiles cycling (C, H, halogen elements) en route to the transition zone and the lower mantle. We suggest that the subduction factory may also be a diamond factory.

  17. Utilization and control of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections and community-based microbial cell factories [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinoth Wigneswaran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial activities are most often shaped by interactions between co-existing microbes within mixed-species communities. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms of species interactions within communities is a central issue in microbial ecology, and our ability to engineer and control microbial communities depends, to a large extent, on our knowledge of these interactions. This review highlights the recent advances regarding molecular characterization of microbe-microbe interactions that modulate community structure, activity, and stability, and aims to illustrate how these findings have helped us reach an engineering-level understanding of microbial communities in relation to both human health and industrial biotechnology.

  18. Progenitor cell-based treatment of glial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Steven A

    2017-01-01

    -based neurodegenerative conditions may now be compelling targets for cell-based therapy. As such, glial cell-based therapies may offer potential benefit to a broader range of diseases than ever before contemplated, including disorders such as Huntington's disease and the motor neuron degeneration of amyotrophic lateral...

  19. FASER Rescue Equipment and Mining Lamp Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubala, L.

    1984-12-01

    The history of the FASER Rescue Equipment and Mining Lamp Factory founded in 1924 is discussed. Plant development from 1924 to 1939 and from 1947 to 1984 is evaluated. The FASER Plant has been subordinated to the EMAG Center for Research and Production of Electrical Engineering and Mine Automation since 1980. Equipment manufactured by the plant is discussed: oxygen respirators, canisters, protective clothing, control systems and measuring instruments used in mine rescue, medical equipment, lighting systems and light bulbs for underground mines. Some problems associated with manufacturing processes are evaluated: manufacturing equipment, manufacturing technologies, quality of rescue equipment, innovation and its economic significance, etc.

  20. Advanced manufacturing: optimising the factories of tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippon, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Faced with competition Patrick Philippon - Les Defis du CEA no.179 - April 2013 from the emerging countries, the competitiveness of the industrialised nations depends on the ability of their industries to innovate. This strategy necessarily entails the reorganisation and optimisation of the production systems. This is the whole challenge for 'advanced manufacturing', which relies on the new information and communication technologies. Interactive robotics, virtual reality and non-destructive testing are all technological building blocks developed by CEA, now approved within a cross-cutting programme, to meet the needs of industry and together build the factories of tomorrow. (author)

  1. Tau/Charm Factory Accelerator Report

    OpenAIRE

    M. E. BiaginiINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; R. BoniINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; M. BoscoloINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; A. ChiarucciINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; R. CiminoINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; A. ClozzaINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; A. DragoINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; S. GuiducciINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; C. LigiINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; G. MazzitelliINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; R. RicciINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; C. SanelliINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; M. SerioINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; A. StellaINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy; S. TomassiniINFN, Laboratori Nazionali Frascati, Italy

    2014-01-01

    The present Report concerns the current status of the Italian Tau/Charm accelerator project and in particular discusses the issues related to the lattice design, to the accelerators systems and to the associated conventional facilities. The project aims at realizing a variable energy Flavor Factory between 1 and 4.6 GeV in the center of mass, and succeeds to the SuperB project from which it inherits most of the solutions proposed in this document. The work comes from a cooperation involving t...

  2. Racetrack lattices for the TRIUMF KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servranckx, R.V.; Craddock, M.K.

    1989-05-01

    Separated-function racetrack lattices have been developed for the KAON Factory accelerators that have more flexibility than the old circular lattices. The arcs of the large rings have a regular FODO structure with a superimposed six-fold symmetric modulation of the betafunction in order to raise γ t to infinity. In the small rings, γ t is kept high enough by choosing a sufficiently large phase advance in the arcs. Straight sections with zero dispersion are provided for rf cavities and fast injection and extraction, and with controlled dispersion for H - injection and slow extraction. The ion-optical properties of the lattices and the results from tracking studies are discussed

  3. Cellular Silica Encapsulation for Development of Robust Cell Based Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Robert; Rogelj, Snezna; Harper, Jason; Tartis, Michaelann

    2014-03-01

    In order to detect chemical and biological threats both on the battlefield and in civilian life, development of portable, robust detection systems capable of real-time identification of the chemical and biological agents are needed. Living cell-based sensors have proven effective as sensitive, specific, near real-time detectors; however, living cell-based sensors require frequent cell replenishment due to cell sensitivity to the ex-vivo environment, which limits sensor stability. Incorporation of living cells within a biocompatible matrix that provides mechanical protection and maintains access to the external environment may facilitate the development of long-term stable cell-based biosensors. We are exploring the use of a novel Chemical Vapor into Liquid (CViL) deposition process for whole cell encapsulation in silica. In CViL, the high vapor pressure of common silica alkoxides is utilized to deliver silica into an aqueous medium, creating a silica sol. Mixing of cells with the resulting silica sol facilitates encapsulation of cells in silica while minimizing cell contact with the cytotoxic products of silica generating reactions. Using fluorescence microscopy analysis with multiple silica specific markers, encapsulation of multiple eukaryotic cell types (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Jurkat, HeLa, and U87 cells) with CViL generated silica is shown, providing a foundation for development of long -term stable cell-based biosensors with diverse sensing capabilities.

  4. Silanization of glass chips—A factorial approach for optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistas, Cláudia R.; Águas, Ana C. P.; Ferreira, Guilherme N. M.

    2013-12-01

    Silanization of glass chips with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) was investigated and optimized to generate a high-quality layer with well-oriented thiol groups. A full factorial design was used to evaluate the influence of silane concentration and reaction time. The stabilization of the silane monolayer by thermal curing was also investigated, and a disulfide reduction step was included to fully regenerate the thiol-modified surface function. Fluorescence analysis and water contact angle measurements were used to quantitatively assess the chemical modifications, wettability and quality of modified chip surfaces throughout the silanization, curing and reduction steps. The factorial design enables a systematic approach for the optimization of glass chips silanization process. The optimal conditions for the silanization were incubation of the chips in a 2.5% MPTS solution for 2 h, followed by a curing process at 110 °C for 2 h and a reduction step with 10 mM dithiothreitol for 30 min at 37 °C. For these conditions the surface density of functional thiol groups was 4.9 × 1013 molecules/cm2, which is similar to the expected maximum coverage obtained from the theoretical estimations based on projected molecular area (∼5 × 1013 molecules/cm2).

  5. Circular Higgs Factories & Possible Long-Term Strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    In 2012 two LHC experiments have discovered a new particle with a mass around 125 GeV, which appears to be the scalar Higgs boson of the Standard Model. To further examine this remarkable particle it could be produced in large numbers for precision studies by an e+e− collider operating near the ZH threshold at beam energies of 120 GeV, or, in the s-channel by a gamma-gamma collider with primary electron beam energies of 80 GeV, or by a high-energy electron-proton collider. In this talk I will discuss tentative design parameters, novel concepts and accelerator-physics challenges (1) for a high-luminosity lepton-hadron collider, bringing into collision a 60-GeV electron beam from an energy-recovery electron linac with one of the LHC hadron beams – LHeC –, (2) for a gamma-gamma Higgs-factory collider based on the reconfigured recirculating SC electron linac – SAPPHiRE – and (3) for a circular e+e− Higgs-factory collider in a new tunnel with a circumference of 80-100 km – TLEP. I will also discuss f...

  6. Optimization of minoxidil microemulsions using fractional factorial design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaipakdee, Napaphak; Limpongsa, Ekapol; Pongjanyakul, Thaned

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply fractional factorial and multi-response optimization designs using desirability function approach for developing topical microemulsions. Minoxidil (MX) was used as a model drug. Limonene was used as an oil phase. Based on solubility, Tween 20 and caprylocaproyl polyoxyl-8 glycerides were selected as surfactants, propylene glycol and ethanol were selected as co-solvent in aqueous phase. Experiments were performed according to a two-level fractional factorial design to evaluate the effects of independent variables: Tween 20 concentration in surfactant system (X1), surfactant concentration (X2), ethanol concentration in co-solvent system (X3), limonene concentration (X4) on MX solubility (Y1), permeation flux (Y2), lag time (Y3), deposition (Y4) of MX microemulsions. It was found that Y1 increased with increasing X3 and decreasing X2, X4; whereas Y2 increased with decreasing X1, X2 and increasing X3. While Y3 was not affected by these variables, Y4 increased with decreasing X1, X2. Three regression equations were obtained and calculated for predicted values of responses Y1, Y2 and Y4. The predicted values matched experimental values reasonably well with high determination coefficient. By using optimal desirability function, optimized microemulsion demonstrating the highest MX solubility, permeation flux and skin deposition was confirmed as low level of X1, X2 and X4 but high level of X3.

  7. PROMYS – Programming synthetic networks for bio-based production of value chemicals – FP7 project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The global chemical industry is transitioning from petrochemical production processes to bio-based production processes. This transition creates a clear market need for technologies that reduce the development time and cost of cell factories. PROMYS will develop, validate and implement a novel...... synthetic biology platform technology termed ligand responsive regulation and selection systems. Ligand responsive regulation and selection systems are biological devices that integrate biological sensing modules, within larger regulatory networks to control cellular programs. This technology...... will drastically accelerate the construction, optimization and performance of cell factories by enabling industrial users to impose non-natural objectives on the engineered cell factory. PROMYS will address three major challenges in metabolic engineering that limit the development of new cell factories: 1...

  8. Rare B decays at B factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trabelsi, Karim

    2010-01-01

    Radiative and Electroweak Penguin Decays are Flavor Changing Neutral Currents (FCNC) occurring in the Standard Model only at the loop level. They are characterized by high sensitivity to New Physics (they can appear in the loop with size comparable to leading SM contributions) and they are Complementary to the direct production of new particles expected at LHC. Huge datasets collected at the two B- factories, BaBar and Belle, have made it possible to explore precisely these decays in exclusive channels and inclusive measurements. b →sγ, b→dγ, b→s l + l - , B + →τν, B→Dτν etc measured provide tests of SM predictions and interesting BSM constraints: Charged Higgs bounds from b →sγ, B + →τν, B + →Dτν; Constraints on Wilson coefficients C 7 , C 9 and C 10 ; and Constraints on |V td |/|V ts |. They provide interesting signatures: B(B + →τ + ν) direct measurement versus CKM fit; and large forward-backward asymmetry of K* l + l - . Final Belle/BaBar data samples are yet to be analyzed and even more interesting results are expected at Super B factories with two orders of magnitude larger data samples

  9. Organic Based Solar Cells with Morphology Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Rieks

    The field of organic solar cells has in the last years gone through an impressive development with efficiencies reported up to 12 %. For organic solar cells to take the leap from primarily being a laboratory scale technology to being utilized as renewable energy source, several issues need...... Microscopy and as solar cells in a blend with PCBM. It was concluded that these particles did not show a potential large enough for continuous work due to a high material loss and low efficiency when applied in solar cells. The second method to achieve was preparation of pre-arranged morphology organic...... nanoparticles consisting of a blend of donor and acceptor in an aqueous dispersion, thereby addressing two of the issues remaining in the field of organic solar cells. This approach was used on six different polymers, which all had the ability to prepare aqueous nanoparticle inks. The morphology...

  10. Targeting 3-phosphoinoside-dependent kinase-1 to inhibit insulin-like growth factor-I induced AKT and p70 S6 kinase activation in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita M Baxi

    Full Text Available Binding of IGF to IGF-IR activates PI3K to generate PIP3 which in turn recruits and activates proteins that contain a pleckstrin homology (PH domain, including AKT and PDK1. PDK1 is highly expressed in breast tumor samples and breast cancer cell lines. Here we demonstrate that targeting PDK1 with the potent and selective PDK1 inhibitor PF-5177624 in the IGF-PI3K pathway blocks breast cancer cell proliferation and transformation. Breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T47D, representing the luminal ER positive subtype and harboring PIK3CA mutations, were most responsive to IGF-I induction resulting in upregulated AKT and p70S6K phosphorylation via PDK1 activation. PF-5177624 downregulated AKT and p70S6K phosphorylation, blocked cell cycle progression, and decreased cell proliferation and transformation to block IGFR-I induced activation in breast cancer cells. These results may provide insight into clinical strategies for developing an IGFR-I inhibitor and/or a PDK1 inhibitor in luminal breast cancer patients.

  11. A Hospital Is Not Just a Factory, but a Complex Adaptive System-Implications for Perioperative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Aman; Islam, Salim D; Schwartz, Michael J; Cannesson, Maxime

    2017-07-01

    Many methods used to improve hospital and perioperative services productivity and quality of care have assumed that the hospital is essentially a factory, and therefore, that industrial engineering and manufacturing-derived redesign approaches such as Six Sigma and Lean can be applied to hospitals and perioperative services just as they have been applied in factories. However, a hospital is not merely a factory but also a complex adaptive system (CAS). The hospital CAS has many subsystems, with perioperative care being an important one for which concepts of factory redesign are frequently advocated. In this article, we argue that applying only factory approaches such as lean methodologies or process standardization to complex systems such as perioperative care could account for difficulties and/or failures in improving performance in care delivery. Within perioperative services, only noncomplex/low-variance surgical episodes are amenable to manufacturing-based redesign. On the other hand, complex surgery/high-variance cases and preoperative segmentation (the process of distinguishing between normal and complex cases) can be viewed as CAS-like. These systems tend to self-organize, often resist or react unpredictably to attempts at control, and therefore require application of CAS principles to modify system behavior. We describe 2 examples of perioperative redesign to illustrate the concepts outlined above. These examples present complementary and contrasting cases from 2 leading delivery systems. The Mayo Clinic example illustrates the application of manufacturing-based redesign principles to a factory-like (high-volume, low-risk, and mature practice) clinical program, while the Kaiser Permanente example illustrates the application of both manufacturing-based and self-organization-based approaches to programs and processes that are not factory-like but CAS-like. In this article, we describe how factory-like processes and CAS can coexist within a hospital and how

  12. Non-genetic engineering of cells for drug delivery and cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun; Cheng, Hao; Peng, Haisheng; Zhou, Hao; Li, Peter Y; Langer, Robert

    2015-08-30

    Cell-based therapy is a promising modality to address many unmet medical needs. In addition to genetic engineering, material-based, biochemical, and physical science-based approaches have emerged as novel approaches to modify cells. Non-genetic engineering of cells has been applied in delivering therapeutics to tissues, homing of cells to the bone marrow or inflammatory tissues, cancer imaging, immunotherapy, and remotely controlling cellular functions. This new strategy has unique advantages in disease therapy and is complementary to existing gene-based cell engineering approaches. A better understanding of cellular systems and different engineering methods will allow us to better exploit engineered cells in biomedicine. Here, we review non-genetic cell engineering techniques and applications of engineered cells, discuss the pros and cons of different methods, and provide our perspectives on future research directions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Stem cell homing-based tissue engineering using bioactive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yinxian; Sun, Binbin; Yi, Chengqing; Mo, Xiumei

    2017-06-01

    Tissue engineering focuses on repairing tissue and restoring tissue functions by employing three elements: scaffolds, cells and biochemical signals. In tissue engineering, bioactive material scaffolds have been used to cure tissue and organ defects with stem cell-based therapies being one of the best documented approaches. In the review, different biomaterials which are used in several methods to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds were explained and show good properties (biocompatibility, biodegradability, and mechanical properties etc.) for cell migration and infiltration. Stem cell homing is a recruitment process for inducing the migration of the systemically transplanted cells, or host cells, to defect sites. The mechanisms and modes of stem cell homing-based tissue engineering can be divided into two types depending on the source of the stem cells: endogenous and exogenous. Exogenous stem cell-based bioactive scaffolds have the challenge of long-term culturing in vitro and for endogenous stem cells the biochemical signal homing recruitment mechanism is not clear yet. Although the stem cell homing-based bioactive scaffolds are attractive candidates for tissue defect therapies, based on in vitro studies and animal tests, there is still a long way before clinical application.

  14. Human Neural Cell-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    outgrowth in PC12 cells via upregulation of alpha(v) integrins. Brain Res 885 (2): p. 220-30. Lin LF, Doherty DH, Lile JD, Bektesh S, and Collins F...neurite outgrowth. Neurotoxicology 29 (3): 361-76 Radio, NM, et al. (2008) Assessment of chemical effects on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells using high...content screening. Toxicol Sci 105 (1): p. 106-18. Radio, NM, et al. (2010) Comparison of PC12 and cerebellar granule cell cultures for evaluating

  15. The tourist function in a car factory Audi Forum Ingolstadt example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cudny Waldemar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents modern car industry and tourism issues. It is a case study of a multifunctional centre - the Audi Forum Ingolstadt, situated next to a large Audi factory in Ingolstadt, Germany. It was created in order to promote the Audi brand and provide service for the customers picking up their cars in Ingolstadt. It also performs tourist functions as it focuses on providing service for the people who arrive to visit the car factory, the Audi museum mobile and the region. The centre offers specific tourist products based on particular experiences, which may be included in industrial tourism. The facilities in the Audi Forum Ingolstadt are tourist assets in themselves; they may also be seen as tourist infrastructure. It is also a place where numerous events are held, attracting tourists. The Audi Forum Ingolstadt is an example of a multifunctional centre with distinctive tourist functions, situated on the premises of a large modern car factory.

  16. Assessment of the confiability and factorial structure of three scales measuring chronic procrastination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Argumedo Bustinza

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the confiability and factorial structure of three scales measuring chronic procrastination: Scale of General Procrastination (EPG. Lay. 1986. Adult Procrastinatio Inventory (lPA. McCown & Johnson as cited in Ferrari. Johnson & McCown. 1995 and the Scale of Procrastination in Decision-Making (PTF. Mann. 1982. The sample included 514 adults between 20 and 65 years of age from Lima. The three scales showed high levels of intemal consistency and factorial analysis showed three factors for EPG and IPA and one factor for PTD A second degree factorial analysis suggested the presence of only one factor based on the grouping of items of the EPG and IPA scales The study did not find theoretically relevant dlfferences in chronic procrastination according to gender, age or education level. However,with respect to socioeconomic status. there were higher levels of chronic procrastmation in the poorest sector

  17. Lifestyles and Periodontal Disease of Japanese Factory Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Yukie, YOSHIDA; Yukiko, OGAWA; Masahide, IMAKI; Takeo, NAKAMURA; Seiki, TANADA; Osaka Prefectural College of Health Science; Osaka Prefectural College of Health Science; Osaka Prefectural College of Health Science; Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University; Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University

    1997-01-01

    The association between lifestyle and periodontal disease as classified by the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) was investigated in 1, 821 factory workers, 20-69 years of age, residing in Osaka, Japan. Lifestyles were examined using a questionnaire concerning the smoking habits, alcohol consumption, physical exercise, sleeping hours and dietary habits of male factory workers. Age and sex were strongly associated with the CPITN score. In the male factory workers, the CPIT...

  18. INDOOR THERMAL CONDITION OF FACTORY BUILDING IN BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammed Abdullah Al Sayem Khan; Mohd. Hamdan Ahmad; Tareef Hayat Khan

    2011-01-01

    Bangladesh is a developing country and has a lot of factories for different products for local use and also export to abroad. Garments industries are one of the top most items of exported items. A huge number of populations are working in garments industries. But these factories are not well designed in sense of the thermal environment. Workers experiences sickness related to indoor environment. The productions of these factories are affected due to employees’ health condition. The research i...

  19. Exploring the Limitations on RFID Technology in Traceability Systems at Beverage Factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Expósito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of RFID in traceability of products in beverage factories is analyzed in terms of the electromagnetic conditions defined by the massive presence of metallic elements and liquids. Various experiments are reported to determine the maximum reading range from RFID tags installed on tanks or to read RFID information around bottles, both empty and full of wine, trying to put in context the possible problems that could appear when installing an RFID-based traceability system within a winery, a brewery, or any other beverage factory.

  20. A multi-agent based cell controller

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Leitão; Francisco José de Oliveira Restivo; Goran Putnik

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the opportunity to use multi-agents technology in automation and distributed manufacturing systems and the expected improvements. To support the discussion, it is described a manufacturing cell control application developed using the multi-agent technology, and the results are compared with other control application developed in the past by some of the authors, using a traditional approach, for the same flexible manufacturing cell.

  1. Computational cell model based on autonomous cell movement regulated by cell-cell signalling successfully recapitulates the "inside and outside" pattern of cell sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajioka Itsuki

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of multicellular organisms proceeds from a single fertilized egg as the combined effect of countless numbers of cellular interactions among highly dynamic cells. Since at least a reminiscent pattern of morphogenesis can be recapitulated in a reproducible manner in reaggregation cultures of dissociated embryonic cells, which is known as cell sorting, the cells themselves must possess some autonomous cell behaviors that assure specific and reproducible self-organization. Understanding of this self-organized dynamics of heterogeneous cell population seems to require some novel approaches so that the approaches bridge a gap between molecular events and morphogenesis in developmental and cell biology. A conceptual cell model in a computer may answer that purpose. We constructed a dynamical cell model based on autonomous cell behaviors, including cell shape, growth, division, adhesion, transformation, and motility as well as cell-cell signaling. The model gives some insights about what cellular behaviors make an appropriate global pattern of the cell population. Results We applied the model to "inside and outside" pattern of cell-sorting, in which two different embryonic cell types within a randomly mixed aggregate are sorted so that one cell type tends to gather in the central region of the aggregate and the other cell type surrounds the first cell type. Our model can modify the above cell behaviors by varying parameters related to them. We explored various parameter sets with which the "inside and outside" pattern could be achieved. The simulation results suggested that direction of cell movement responding to its neighborhood and the cell's mobility are important for this specific rearrangement. Conclusion We constructed an in silico cell model that mimics autonomous cell behaviors and applied it to cell sorting, which is a simple and appropriate phenomenon exhibiting self-organization of cell population. The model

  2. Suprahyoid approach to base-of-tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the base of the tongue has a poor prognosis.1,2 This is a result of late presentation and diagnostic difficulties. Apart from the fact that there are few early symptoms of squamous cell carcinoma of the base of the tongue, the symptoms are often nonspecific and physical examination of this area is ...

  3. Cell-based quantification of molecular biomarkers in histopathology specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Lassoued, Wiem; Grama, Kedar; Nath, Sumit K; Zhu, Jianliang; Oueslati, Ridha; Feldman, Michael; Lee, William M F; Roysam, Badrinath

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the use of a computer-assisted technology for objective, cell-based quantification of molecular biomarkers in specified cell types in histopathology specimens, with the aim of advancing current visual estimation and pixel-level (rather than cell-based) quantification methods. Tissue specimens were multiplex-immunostained to reveal cell structures, cell type markers, and analytes, and imaged with multispectral microscopy. The image data were processed with novel software that automatically delineates and types each cell in the field, measures morphological features, and quantifies analytes in different subcellular compartments of specified cells.The methodology was validated with the use of cell blocks composed of differentially labelled cultured cells mixed in known proportions, and evaluated on human breast carcinoma specimens for quantifying human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, Ki67, phospho-extracellular signal-related kinase, and phospho-S6. Automated cell-level analyses closely matched human assessments, but, predictably, differed from pixel-level analyses of the same images. Our method reveals the type, distribution, morphology and biomarker state of each cell in the field, and allows multiple biomarkers to be quantified over specified cell types, regardless of their abundance. It is ideal for studying specimens from patients in clinical trials of targeted therapeutic agents, for investigating minority stromal cell subpopulations, and for phenotypic characterization to personalize therapy and prognosis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  4. Producción escrita: Estructura factorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Esperanza HERRERA GARCÍA

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio se planteó con la idea de comprobar de forma empírica si los indicadores lingüísticos obtenidos en investigaciones realizadas sobre comprensión lectora aparecían también como significativos en el análisis de la producción escrita. Si bien la investigación psicológica ha demostrado en numerosas ocasiones la relación existente entre comprensión y producción en el sentido de una maduración anterior de la primera con respecto a la segunda, podemos considerar a priori la existencia de indicadores que nos permitan medir ambos aspectos. Para ello buscamos la estructura factorial que presentan los indicadores lingüísticos que vamos a considerar y comprobaremos si presenta los factores encontrados en comprensión lectora.

  5. Achille Maramotti, between factory and collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Pirozzi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes Achille Maramotti’s figure and links between entrepreneurship and his passion for art and contemporary collections: from the desire to expose his private collection inside Max Mara factory to create a collection that was the mirror of the artistic experiments of his time. The article analyzes the critical contributions in the development of Maramotti Collection and, in particular, the relationship between Achille Maramotti and Mario Diacono that, as the Emilian collector, is expert and admirer of European and American painting of the second half of the twentieth century. Achille Maramotti, sons and daughter are considered among the most influential collectors in the world, and represents a successful example of contemporary art collection linked to the image and business management; the Max Mara fashion house.

  6. Microproteomics with microfluidic-based cell sorting: Application to 1000 and 100 immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Kie; Katoh, Yasutake; Nagase, Keisuke; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-07-01

    Ultimately, cell biology seeks to define molecular mechanisms underlying cellular functions. However, heterogeneity within cell populations must be considered for optimal assay design and data interpretation. Although single-cell analyses are desirable for addressing this issue, practical considerations, including assay sensitivity, limit their broad application. Therefore, omics studies on small numbers of cells in defined subpopulations represent a viable alternative for elucidating cell functions at the molecular level. MS-based proteomics allows in-depth proteome exploration, although analyses of small numbers of cells have not been pursued due to loss during the multistep procedure involved. Thus, optimization of the proteomics workflow to facilitate the analysis of rare cells would be useful. Here, we report a microproteomics workflow for limited numbers of immune cells using non-damaging, microfluidic chip-based cell sorting and MS-based proteomics. Samples of 1000 or 100 THP-1 cells were sorted, and after enzymatic digestion, peptide mixtures were subjected to nano-LC-MS analysis. We achieved reasonable proteome coverage from as few as 100-sorted cells, and the data obtained from 1000-sorted cells were as comprehensive as those obtained using 1 μg of whole cell lysate. With further refinement, our approach could be useful for studying cell subpopulations or limited samples, such as clinical specimens. © 2017 The Authors. Proteomics published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Factories Act 1961, Ionizing Radiations (Unsealed Radioactive Substances) Regulations 1968, Certificate of Approval No.1 (General)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Under the Ionising Radiations (Unsealed Radioactive Substances) Regulations No. 780 of 1968, the Chief Inspector of Factories has wide powers to ensure the protection of workers. By this Certificate he approved, for the purpose of measuring radiation doses, any radiation dosemeter, based on the phenomenon of radiation-induced thermoluminescence, supplied by an approved laboratory. (NEA) [fr

  8. The EC's next global warming factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, A.

    1993-12-01

    Greenpeace suggests that, because they waste far more of the fuel's energy than they transform into electricity, fossil fuel power plants would more accurately be called global warming factories. Electricity is effectively only a by-product. Although the European Community's Energy and Environment ministers three years ago agreed to stabilise rising CO 2 emissions, the strategy proposed by the European Commission would have virtually no impact on the electricity sector, the largest source of CO 2 . Emissions threaten to be 17% higher in 2000 than in 1990 yet power companies are building more plants. Greenpeace has compiled a list of the next 145 global warming factories in the EC amounting to 90,000 MW with the potential to emit around 375 million tonnes CO 2 per year. More strenuous efforts must be made to curb CO 2 emissions. A UN panel of the world's leading climate scientists has confirmed its earlier findings justifying deep cuts in CO 2 emissions. Part of the solution lies in severing the link between electricity sales and power companies' profits. Even the best efforts to save energy will be undermined by the power sector unless its profitability is coupled to improving customer energy efficiency. A planning framework along these lines known as Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) has performed successfully in North America for over a decade. Greenpeace is calling for a moratorium on power plant construction until options for saving energy are exhausted and a shake-up of the power sector in Europe to put energy efficiency first with the rapid introduction of new power planning legislation at national and Community levels concerning IRP. 2 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Evolution of the Factory 1975-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Since it was founded in 1973. Equipos Nucleares (ENSA) has been actively present in the nuclear market. This was the reason for its creation and for which it was organized from the very beginning, by designing a company with a nuclear structure and mentality. The author reviews the history and evolution of the Factory- more than a workshop- and describes its different stages, which were strongly affected by the unexpected evolution of a diminishing market- an inexistent market the likes to say- and also stresses the extraordinary difficulty of its work and the determination to remain in the nuclear market. He acknowledges the people and the culture of ENSA emphasizing their dedication, generosity, flexibility, training and enthusiasm, and stresses their stake in being the best and to attain excellence in the quality of supplies, meeting deadlines and customer satisfaction, identifying these as fundamental factors of the company's legacy. Having a better Factory is possible by improving its technological capability through researching and developing its processes, automating and robotizing manufacturing and inspection activities, and simplifying its operating systems. A result of these efforts is the continuous international presence as a supplier and collaborator with the world's leading designers, which has consolidated it as a reference supplier on the American market. Of not is the supply to the market of its different product lines a result of combining its design and manufacturing capabilities with its flexibility and size, all of which contribute to ENSA's wealth, diversity and appeal. ENSA is aware of the forthcoming resurgence of the new nuclear market. It is preparing for the future by renewing and upgrading its manufacturing facilities and implementing new systems techniques- Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma-into its Annual Improvement Plans to favor and drive its technological capability and competitiveness and to respond to the increasingly demanding

  10. Wake Fields in the Super B Factory Interaction Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, Stephen; /SLAC; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The geometry of storage ring collider interaction regions present an impedance to beam fields resulting in the generation of additional electromagnetic fields (higher order modes or wake fields) which affect the beam energy and trajectory. These affects are computed for the Super B interaction region by evaluating longitudinal loss factors and averaged transverse kicks for short range wake fields. Results indicate at least a factor of 2 lower wake field power generation in comparison with the interaction region geometry of the PEP-II B-factory collider. Wake field reduction is a consderation in the Super B design. Transverse kicks are consistent with an attractive potential from the crotch nearest the beam trajectory. The longitudinal loss factor scales as the -2.5 power of the bunch length. A factor of 60 loss factor reduction is possible with crotch geometry based on an intersecting tubes model.

  11. FACTORIAL CORRESPONDENCES ANALYSIS – A TOOL IN TOURISM MOTIVATION RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Danut I. JUGANARU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at analyzing the distribution of tourist flows in 2014, from 25 European countries, on three main categories of trip purposes, and assumes that there are differences or similarities between the tourists’ countries of residence and their trip purposes. "Purpose'' is a multidimensional concept used in marketing research, most often for understanding consumer behavior, and for identifying market segments or customer target groups, reunited in terms of similar characteristics. Being aware that the decision of choice/ purchase is based on purposes, their knowledge proves useful in designing strategies to increase the satisfaction level provided to the customer. The statistical method used in this paper is the factorial correspondences analysis. In our opinion, the identification, by this method, of the existence of differences or similarities between the tourists’ countries of residence and their trip purposes can represent a useful step in studying the tourism market and the choice/ reformulation of strategies.

  12. Higher order mode damping in Kaon factory RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enegren, T.; Poirier, R.; Griffin, J.; Walling, L.; Thiessen, H.A.; Smythe, W.R.

    1989-05-01

    Proposed designs for Kaon factory accelerators require that the rf cavities support beam currents on the order of several amperes. The beam current has Fourier components at all multiples of the rf frequency. Empty rf buckets produce additional components at all multiples of the revolution frequency. If a Fourier component of the beam coincides with the resonant frequency of a higher order mode of the cavity, which is inevitable if the cavity has a large frequency swing, significant excitation of this mode can occur. The induced voltage may then excite coupled bunch mode instabilities. Effective means are required to damp higher order modes without significantly affecting the fundamental mode. A mode damping scheme based on coupled transmission lines has been investigated and is report

  13. Factorial estimation of energy requirement for egg production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chwalibog, André

    1992-01-01

    Based on balance and respiration measurements with 60 White Leghorns during the laying period from 27 to 48 wk of age, a factorial method for estimating the energy requirement for egg production is proposed. The present experiment showed that the deposition of fat and energy increased during...... the laying period, but protein deposition slightly decreased. It has been shown that the efficiency of ME utilization for fat energy deposition is higher than for protein energy deposition in the egg. Because the proportions of protein and fat differ during the laying period, and because energy utilization...... is different between protein and fat, the ME requirement was calculated as the sum of ME for maintenance and the partial requirements for protein, fat, and carbohydrate deposition. For practical applications, functions for prediction of protein (OP), fat (OF), and energy (OE) in eggs during the laying period...

  14. Designing High Performance Factory Automation Applications on Top of DDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Calvo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available DDS is a recent specification aimed at providing high-performance publisher/subscriber middleware solutions. Despite being a very powerful flexible technology, it may prove complex to use, especially for the inexperienced. This work provides some guidelines for connecting software components that represent a new generation of automation devices (such as PLCs, IPCs and robots using Data Distribution Service (DDS as a virtual software bus. More specifically, it presents the design of a DDS-based component, the so-called Automation Component, and discusses how to map different traffic patterns using DDS entities exploiting the wealth of QoS management mechanisms provided by the DDS specification. A case study demonstrates the creation of factory automation applications out of software components that encapsulate independent stations.

  15. Effect of shift work on mental state of factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Shin-Ya; Maeda, Takafumi; Sasaki, Akihiko; Sato, Akihiko; Tanaka, Kazuko; Kobayashi, Toshio; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Fukushima, Tetsuhito

    2004-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of shift work on the mental state of factory workers. As an indicator of the workers' mental condition, the authors used a scoring system (referred to below as the 'depression tendency score') based on the SRQ-D investigative report. The depression tendency score of the men was higher among the shift worker group than among the regular day worker group (p workers was higher than that of the male regular day workers among skilled workers (p worker group and the shift worker group. However, the depression tendency score of the female two-shift workers was higher than that of the female regular day workers among skilled workers (p work and that of women is affected by two-shift work because of the difference in modern societal/home role between man and woman.

  16. Radiobiological analyse based on cell cluster models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Hui; Jing Jia; Meng Damin; Xu Yuanying; Xu Liangfeng

    2010-01-01

    The influence of cell cluster dimension on EUD and TCP for targeted radionuclide therapy was studied using the radiobiological method. The radiobiological features of tumor with activity-lack in core were evaluated and analyzed by associating EUD, TCP and SF.The results show that EUD will increase with the increase of tumor dimension under the activity homogeneous distribution. If the extra-cellular activity was taken into consideration, the EUD will increase 47%. Under the activity-lack in tumor center and the requirement of TCP=0.90, the α cross-fire influence of 211 At could make up the maximum(48 μm)3 activity-lack for Nucleus source, but(72 μm)3 for Cytoplasm, Cell Surface, Cell and Voxel sources. In clinic,the physician could prefer the suggested dose of Cell Surface source in case of the future of local tumor control for under-dose. Generally TCP could well exhibit the effect difference between under-dose and due-dose, but not between due-dose and over-dose, which makes TCP more suitable for the therapy plan choice. EUD could well exhibit the difference between different models and activity distributions,which makes it more suitable for the research work. When the user uses EUD to study the influence of activity inhomogeneous distribution, one should keep the consistency of the configuration and volume of the former and the latter models. (authors)

  17. PHOTOELECTROCHEMICAL SOLAR CELLS BASED ON DYE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conventional solid-state solar cells convert light into electricity by ... network via diffusion [2] due to electron scattering to the conductive .... The surface network morphology of these film layers was examined with an atomic force microscope in contact mode. (AFM: Nanoscope Illa from digital instruments version 4.42r4).

  18. Cell-based delivery of glucagon-like peptide-1 using encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallrapp, Christine; Thoenes, Eric; Thürmer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) CellBeads are cell-based implants for the sustained local delivery of bioactive factors. They consist of GLP-1 secreting mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in a spherically shaped immuno-isolating alginate matrix. A highly standardized and reproducible encapsulati...

  19. Cell based therapeutic approach in vascular surgery: application and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocca Aldo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent stem cells - such as mesenchymal stem/stromal cells and stem cells derived from different sources like vascular wall are intensely studied to try to rapidly translate their discovered features from bench to bedside. Vascular wall resident stem cells recruitment, differentiation, survival, proliferation, growth factor production, and signaling pathways transduced were analyzed. We studied biological properties of vascular resident stem cells and explored the relationship from several factors as Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs and regulations of biological, translational and clinical features of these cells. In this review we described a translational and clinical approach to Adult Vascular Wall Resident Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells (VW-SCs and reported their involvement in alternative clinical approach as cells based therapy in vascular disease like arterial aneurysms or peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

  20. Advances in evidence-based cancer adoptive cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chunlei; Li, Ruilei; Song, Xin; Qin, Shukui

    2017-04-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has been developed in cancer treatment by transferring/infusing immune cells into cancer patients, which are able to recognize, target, and destroy tumor cells. Recently, sipuleucel-T and genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) show a great potential to control metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and hematologic malignancies in clinic. This review summarized some of the major evidence-based ACT and the challenges to improve cell quality and reduce the side effects in the field. This review also provided future research directions to make sure ACT widely available in clinic.

  1. The synergistic effect of acupuncture and computer-based cognitive training on post-stroke cognitive dysfunction: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of 2 × 2 factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shanli; Ye, Haicheng; Huang, Jia; Tao, Jing; Jiang, Cai; Lin, Zhicheng; Zheng, Guohua; Chen, Lidian

    2014-08-07

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of cognitive impairment. Up to 75% of stroke survivors may be considered to have cognitive impairment, which severely limit individual autonomy for successful reintegration into family, work and social life. The clinical efficacy of acupuncture with Baihui (DU20) and Shenting (DU24) in stroke and post-stroke cognitive impairment has been previously demonstrated. Computer-assisted cognitive training is part of conventional cognitive rehabilitation and has also shown to be effective in improvement of cognitive function of affected patients. However, the cognitive impairment after stroke is so complexity that one single treatment cannot resolve effectively. Besides, the effects of acupuncture and RehaCom cognitive training have not been systematically compared, nor has the possibility of a synergistic effect of combination of the two therapeutic modalities been evaluated. Our primary aim of this trial is to evaluate the synergistic effect of acupuncture and RehaCom cognitive training on cognitive dysfunction after stroke. A randomized controlled trial of 2 × 2 factorial design will be conducted in the Rehabilitation Hospital Affiliated to Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. A total of 240 patients with cognitive dysfunction after stroke who meet the eligibility criteria will be recruited and randomized into RehaCom training group, acupuncture group, a combination of both or control group in a 1:1:1:1 ratio. All patients will receive conventional treatment. The interventions will last for 12 weeks (30 min per day, Monday to Friday every week). Evaluations will be conducted by blinded assessors at baseline and again at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Outcome measurements include mini-mental state examination (MMSE), Montreal cognitive assessments (MoCA), functional independence measure scale (FIM) and adverse events. The results of this trial are expected to clarify the synergistic effect of acupuncture and RehaCom cognitive

  2. GridFactory - Distributed computing on ephemeral resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Frederik; Niinimaki, Marko

    2011-01-01

    on demand, across organizational boundaries. Other features include firewall-friendliness, integrated software provisioning and virtual machine management. We describe the design and architecture of Grid Factory and four applications that utilize it. Moreover, we compare the performance of Grid Factory...

  3. The Cupcake Factory: Helping Elementary Students Understand Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeargan, Howard; Hatcher, Barbara

    1985-01-01

    Described is a project in which third graders create their own corporation--a cupcake factory--and learn first-hand about economic principles and the decisions that businesses must make in the market economy. The cupcake factory is one example of how enterprising educators can make economics comprehensible and captivating. (RM)

  4. Factorial analysis of slaughter characteristics of fattening pigs fed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... determined slaughter traits of pigs fed diets containing different additives. The results obtained in general ... was fed standard diet supplemented with probiotic Lacture and. Microbond. Pigs received food ad ... rotation, a factorial matrix was obtained whose elements are factorial ponders, and ponders of ...

  5. Parametric study of a target factory for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherohman, J.W.; Meier, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of a target factory leading to the derivation of production rate equations has provided the basis for a parametric study. Rate equations describing the production of laser fusion targets have been developed for the purpose of identifying key parameters, attractive production techniques and cost scaling relationships for a commercial target factory

  6. Factorial moment -generating function and the Pascal distribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Given a distribution, the cumulants or factorial moments can be used to obtain the skewness and kurtosis which in turn are used to determine the normal approximation of the given distribution. It is shown in this paper that for the Pascal Distribution, the factorial moment generating function provides a simpler technique.

  7. Review of Hosein Aabad Sugar Factory (HASF) Wastewater and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugar industry is one of the largest industries in the world. Hosein Abad sugar factory (HASF) is located in Hamadan province of Iran. The aim of this research was to evaluate the quality and quantity of wastewater of the said factory and to estimate the pollution load and its emission factor as prerequisite of the management ...

  8. Proceedings of the Workshop on CP Violation at KAON Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, J.N.

    1989-07-01

    These proceedings contain the written version of eight talks delivered at the Workshop on CP Violation at KAON Factory. The articles contain reviews on the exploration of CP violation effects associated with the s-quark. Discussion on the use of intense kaon fluxes, which will be available at the proposed KAON Factory, are included

  9. Factorial validation and reliability analysis of the brain fag syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Brain fag is an indigenous psychopathology or culture-bound syndrome formally documented in Nigeria in the 1960's by Raymond Prince. Objective: The need for a factorial examination of the scale to ensure factorial validity and also to examine the reliability of this screening scale. Methods: Two hundred thirty ...

  10. Stem cell-based therapies for osteoarthritis: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekman, Brian O; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine offers the exciting potential of developing alternatives to total joint replacement for treating osteoarthritis. In this article, we highlight recent work that addresses key challenges of stem cell-based therapies for osteoarthritis and provide examples of innovative ways in which stem cells can aid in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Significant progress has been made in understanding the challenges to successful stem cell therapy, such as the effects of age or disease on stem cell properties, altered stem cell function due to an inflammatory joint environment and phenotypic instability in vivo. Novel scaffold designs have been shown to enhance the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage and have also improved the integration of newly formed tissue within the joint. Emerging strategies such as injecting stem cells directly into the joint, manipulating endogenous stem cells to enhance regenerative capacity and utilizing stem cells for drug discovery have expanded the potential uses of stem cells in treating osteoarthritis. Several recent studies have greatly advanced the development and preclinical evaluation of potential stem cell-based treatments for osteoarthritis through novel approaches focused on cell therapy, tissue engineering and drug discovery.

  11. Laser-guidance-based cell deposition microscope for heterotypic single-cell micropatterning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Zhen; Wan Qin; Yun, Julie X; Gao, Bruce Z [Department of Bioengineering, COMSET, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Pirlo, Russell K [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Yuan, Xiaocong [Institute of Modern Optics, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Science and Technology, Ministry of Education of China, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); Xiang Peng [Institute of Optoelectronics, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong (China); Borg, Thomas K, E-mail: zgao@clemson.edu [Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Cell patterning methods enable researchers to control specific homotypic and heterotypic contact-mediated cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions and to impose defined cell and tissue geometries. To micropattern individual cells to specific points on a substrate with high spatial resolution, we have developed a cell deposition microscope based on the laser-guidance technique. We discuss the theory of optical forces for generating laser guidance and the optimization of the optical configuration (NA {approx} 0.1) to manipulate cells with high speed in three dimensions. Our cell deposition microscope is capable of patterning different cell types onto and within standard cell research devices and providing on-stage incubation for long-term cell culturing. Using this cell deposition microscope, rat mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow were micropatterned with cardiomyocytes into a substrate microfabricated with polydimethylsiloxane on a 22 mm x 22 mm coverglass to form a single-cell coculturing microenvironment, and their electrophysiological property changes were investigated during the coculturing days.

  12. Natural killer cell dysfunction in hepatocellular carcinoma and NK cell-based immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Sun, Hao-yu; Xiao, Wei-hua; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhi-gang

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms linking hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain largely unknown. Natural killer (NK) cells account for 25%–50% of the total number of liver lymphocytes, suggesting that NK cells play an important role in liver immunity. The number of NK cells in the blood and tumor tissues of HCC patients is positively correlated with their survival and prognosis. Furthermore, a group of NK cell-associated genes in HCC tissues is positively associated with the prolonged survival. These facts suggest that NK cells and HCC progression are strongly associated. In this review, we describe the abnormal NK cells and their functional impairment in patients with chronic HBV and HCV infection, which contribute to the progression of HCC. Then, we summarize the association of NK cells with HCC based on the abnormalities in the numbers and phenotypes of blood and liver NK cells in HCC patients. In particular, the exhaustion of NK cells that represents lower cytotoxicity and impaired cytokine production may serve as a predictor for the occurrence of HCC. Finally, we present the current achievements in NK cell immunotherapy conducted in mouse models of liver cancer and in clinical trials, highlighting how chemoimmunotherapy, NK cell transfer, gene therapy, cytokine therapy and mAb therapy improve NK cell function in HCC treatment. It is conceivable that NK cell-based anti-HCC therapeutic strategies alone or in combination with other therapies will be great promise for HCC treatment. PMID:26073325

  13. Job stress in the staff of a tire factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    marzieh torshizi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Occupational stress is a major problem in industrial societies. Its relationship with various diseases is increasing ,but it probably has vast socio-economic consequences manifested in the form of absenteeism, labour turnover, loss of productivity and disability pension costs. The present study aimed at determining stress in the staff of a tyre factory.   Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was done on 196 members of staff from various sections of a tire factory in 2008 through proportional classification and randomized sampling .Data was collected by means of Coudron two questionnaires "demographic" and "standardized job stress" . The obtained data was analyzed using SPSS software (v: 11.5, chi-square test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient (P ≤ 0.05.   Results: It was found that 49.5% of the staff had severe job stress .Severe job stress was 55.8% in the production unit (No. =53, 50% in the administrative unit (No. =16 and 40.6% supporting the backing unit (No=28.   There was a significant relationship between variables income and adequate sleep on one hand and level of job stress on the other (P < 0.001.However, no significant relationship was observed between job stress and age, marital status, education, working record ,and exercise.   Conclusion: Based on the results of the current study, more than half of the employees suffered from job stress. Compared with employees in other industrialized countries, Iranian employees appeared to have much higher prevalence of stress. Therefore, more studies are required in order to reduce the amount of stress and its consequences.

  14. A Cell-Based Approach to the Human Proteome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Neil L.

    2012-10-01

    The general scope of a project to determine the protein molecules that comprise the cells within the human body is framed. By focusing on protein primary structure as expressed in specific cell types, this concept for a cell-based version of the Human Proteome Project (CB-HPP) is crafted in a manner analogous to the Human Genome Project while recognizing that cells provide a primary context in which to define a proteome. Several activities flow from this articulation of the HPP, which enables the definition of clear milestones and deliverables. The CB-HPP highlights major gaps in our knowledge regarding cell heterogeneity and protein isoforms, and calls for development of technology that is capable of defining all human cell types and their proteomes. The main activities will involve mapping and sorting cell types combined with the application of beyond the state-of-the art in protein mass spectrometry.

  15. Modeling base excision repair in Escherichia coli bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, O.V.

    2011-01-01

    A model describing the key processes in Escherichia coli bacterial cells during base excision repair is developed. The mechanism is modeled of damaged base elimination involving formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (the Fpg protein), which possesses several types of activities. The modeling of the transitions between DNA states is based on a stochastic approach to the chemical reaction description

  16. Versatile microscale screening platform for improving recombinant protein productivity in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Gram; Nilsson, Claes Nymand; Lund, Anne Mathilde

    2015-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used as cell factories for the production of biopharmaceuticals. In contrast to the highly optimized production processes for monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based biopharmaceuticals, improving productivity of non-mAb therapeutic glycoproteins is more likely...

  17. Phenothiazine-Based Dyes in Solar Cell Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Bejan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenothiazine is a fused heterocyclic ring with strong electron-donating character which makes it an important building block for designing organic materials for solar cells applications. The present paper reviews the most recent achievements of phenothiazine-based compounds as dyes in solar cells, with special emphasis on the structure – performance relationship.

  18. Virtual microstructural leaf tissue generation based on cell growth modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abera, M.K.; Retta, M.A.; Verboven, P.; Nicolai, B.M.; Berghuijs, H.; Struik, P.

    2016-01-01

    A cell growth algorithm for virtual leaf tissue generation is presented based on the biomechanics of plant cells in tissues. The algorithm can account for typical differences in epidermal layers, palisade mesophyll layer and spongy mesophyll layer which have characteristic differences in the

  19. The promise of fuel cell-based automobiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The fuel cell system energy efficiency at present is about 60%, which is much higher than both the Otto (ca. 20%) as well as Diesel (ca. 30%) versions of ICEVs (Jeong and Oh 1999). Although, the 80 kW of the power needed to provide the acceleration to the fuel cell-based automobile could be supplied by an appropri-.

  20. Indacenodithienothiophene-Based Ternary Organic Solar Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparini, Nicola; García-Rodríguez, Amaranda; Prosa, Mario; Bayseç, Şebnem; Palma-Cando, Alex; Katsouras, Athanasios; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Pagona, Georgia; Gregoriou, Vasilis G.; Chochos, Christos L.; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ulrich; Brabec, Christoph J.; Ameri, Tayebeh

    2017-01-01

    One of the key aspects to achieve high efficiency in ternary bulk-hetorojunction solar cells is the physical and chemical compatibility between the donor materials. Here, we report the synthesis of a novel conjugated polymer (P1) containing alternating pyridyl[2,1,3]thiadiazole between two different donor fragments, dithienosilole and indacenodithienothiophene (IDTT), used as a sensitizer in a host system of indacenodithieno[3,2-b]thiophene,2,3-bis(3-(octyloxy)phenyl)quinoxaline (PIDTTQ) and [6,6]-phenyl C 70 butyric acid methyl ester (PC 71 BM). We found that the use of the same IDTT unit in the host and guest materials does not lead to significant changes in the morphology of the ternary blend compared to the host binary. With the complementary use of optoelectronic characterizations, we found that the ternary cells suffer from a lower mobility-lifetime (μτ) product, adversely impacting the fill factor. However, the significant light harvesting in the near infrared region improvement, compensating the transport losses, results in an overall power conversion efficiency enhancement of ~7% for ternary blends as compared to the PIDTTQ:PC 71 BM devices.

  1. Processes for chalcopyrite-based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lux-Steiner, M.C.; Ennaoui, A.; Fischer, C.-H.; Jaeger-Waldau, A.; Klaer, J.; Klenk, R.; Koenenkamp, R.; Matthes, T.; Scheer, R.; Siebentritt, S.; Weidinger, A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    2000-02-21

    This contribution deals with the investigations of chalcopyrite solar cells. Main attention is paid to absorber materials with band gaps larger than 1.5 eV. Besides the different efforts to modify and optimise stoichiometric CuInS{sub 2} films, novel deposition technologies for CuGaSe{sub 2} films and buffer layers as well as alternative buffer layers were studied and compared. With ZnSe as alternative buffer layer on Cu(InGa)(S,Se){sub 2} absorbers developed by SSI Camarillo and Siemens Solar, Munich, total area efficiencies up to 13.7% and active area efficiencies up to 15.7% could be reached, respectively. For CuInS{sub 2} two important results were achieved. The efficiency of Cu-poor CuInS{sub 2} cells could be increased to 8.3%. Standard Cu-rich prepared devices led to a new record efficiency of 12.5%. (orig.)

  2. Silicon Based Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jackie Vincent

    The purpose of this project has been to investigate and fabricate small scale Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (μDMFC). They are investigated as a possible alternative for Zinc-air batteries in small size consumer devices such as hearing aids. In such devices the conventional rechargeable batteri...... variation in the path length through the proton conductive phase. In addition the trade-off between mass transfer losses and activation losses deriving from the catalyst layer density is developed.......The purpose of this project has been to investigate and fabricate small scale Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (μDMFC). They are investigated as a possible alternative for Zinc-air batteries in small size consumer devices such as hearing aids. In such devices the conventional rechargeable batteries...... on a perforated silicon plate which acts as a mechanical support structure a proton conducting polymer membrane, which connects catalyst layers deposited through spray coating on either side of the silicon device. An improvement of this design is also presented which integrates the catalyst layer into the current...

  3. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Jill W.; Latouche, Eduardo L.; Sano, Michael B.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Verbridge, Scott S.

    2015-11-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100 μs) is enhanced for larger cells, short pulses (~1 μs) preferentially result in high fields within the cell interior, which scale in magnitude with nucleus size. Because enlarged nuclei represent a reliable indicator of malignancy, this suggested a means of preferentially targeting malignant cells. While we demonstrate killing of both normal and malignant cells using pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to treat spontaneous canine GBM, we proposed that properly tuned PEFs might provide targeted ablation based on nuclear size. Using 3D hydrogel models of normal and malignant brain tissues, which permit high-resolution interrogation during treatment testing, we confirmed that PEFs could be tuned to preferentially kill cancerous cells. Finally, we estimated the nuclear envelope electric potential disruption needed for cell death from PEFs. Our results may be useful in safely targeting the therapy-resistant cell niches that cause recurrence of GBM tumors.

  4. Cell phone–based health education messaging improves health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SMS), provides new and innovative opportunities for disease prevention and health education. Objective: To explore the use of cell phone–based health education SMS to improve the health literacy of community residents in China. Methods: ...

  5. Agile manufacturing: The factory of the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Joseph M.; Bossieux, Terry A.

    1994-01-01

    The factory of the future will require an operating methodology which effectively utilizes all of the elements of product design, manufacturing and delivery. The process must respond rapidly to changes in product demand, product mix, design changes or changes in the raw materials. To achieve agility in a manufacturing operation, the design and development of the manufacturing processes must focus on customer satisfaction. Achieving greatest results requires that the manufacturing process be considered from product concept through sales. This provides the best opportunity to build a quality product for the customer at a reasonable rate. The primary elements of a manufacturing system include people, equipment, materials, methods and the environment. The most significant and most agile element in any process is the human resource. Only with a highly trained, knowledgeable work force can the proper methods be applied to efficiently process materials with machinery which is predictable, reliable and flexible. This paper discusses the affect of each element on the development of agile manufacturing systems.

  6. Hospitals as factories of medical garbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Sarah

    2017-12-01

    Over the course of the twentieth century, as hospitals cleaned up, they came to produce more and more rubbish. Beginning in the 1970s and gaining pace in the 1980s and 1990s, single-use plastic items (syringes, blood bags, tubing) saturated everyday medical practice across the globe. This essay brings the question of plastic to bear upon the longer history of twentieth century sanitary science. The widespread adoption of single-use disposable medical plastics consolidated a century's worth of changes in medical hygiene. As strange as it may seem today, the initial uptake of medical plastics was not driven primarily by concerns about hygiene. Plastic began as a mid-century technology of convenience and durability. It was not until the end of the twentieth century that it morphed into a powerful symbol and instrument of medical hygiene. Today, both patients and practitioners have embraced plastic as an indispensable technology of clean medicine. The procession of single-use medical plastics through everyday medicine now comprises a constant, if disposable, infrastructure of medical hygiene. This new processional infrastructure of disposable hygiene has produced another, albeit unintended, consequence. This new regime has exponentially increased hospitals' material outputs. In so doing, plastic has refigured the ecologies of everyday medicine. Plastic hygiene has rendered hospitals factories of medical garbage.

  7. The factorial structure of pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Z; Blaszczynski, A

    1996-03-01

    Pathological gambling has been characterised by DSM-III-R and DSM-IV as a disorder of impulse control with a proportion of gamblers identified as meeting criteria for a co-morbid diagnosis of Antisocial Personality Disorder. To date, empirical evidence in support of the notion that pathological gamblers as a group manifest elevated traits of impulsivity remains equivocal. Principal components analysis was used to investigate relationships between the constructs of impulsivity, psychopathy, DSM-III-R criteria for Antisocial Personality Disorder, psychological distress, criminal offending behavior and a range of other common psychological measures employed with pathological gamblers. The sample comprised 115 pathological gamblers, 80 consecutive gamblers seeking treatment from a general hospital psychiatric inpatient behavior therapy unit, and 35 volunteer Gamblers Anonymous attenders. Four primary factors were determined: psychological distress, sensation seeking, crime and liveliness, and impulsive-antisocial. Results suggest that pathological gambling consists of a number of discrete and reproducible factorial structures. The impulsive antisocial factor was found to be associated with gambling behavior and indices of poor psychosocial functioning.

  8. New Physics at a Super Flavor Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Browder, Thomas E; Pirjol, Dan; Soni, Amarjit; Zupan, Jure

    2009-01-01

    The potential of a Super Flavor Factory (SFF) for searches of New Physics is reviewed. While very high luminosity B physics is assumed to be at the core of the program, its scope for extensive charm and tau studies are also emphasized. The possibility to run at the Upsilon(5S) as well as at the Upsilon(4S) is also very briefly discussed; in principle, this could provide very clean measurements of B_s decays. The strength and reach of a SFF is most notably due to the possibility of examining an impressive array of very clean observables. The angles and the sides of the unitarity triangle can be determined with unprecedented accuracy. These serve as a reference for New Physics (NP) sensitive decays such as B^+ ->tau^+ nu and penguin dominated hadronic decay modes, providing tests of generic NP scenarios with an accuracy of a few percent. Besides, very precise studies of direct and time dependent CP asymmetries in radiative B decays and forward-backward asymmetry studies in B -> X_s l^+ l^- and numerous null tes...

  9. The chemoimmunotherapy based on dendritic cells and cisplatin in experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbach, O.; Khranovska, N.; Skachkova, O.; Sydor, R.; Pozur, V.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a scheme of combined chemoimmunotherapy and to investigate antitumor and immunomodulatory activity of chemoimmunotherapy regimen using the vaccine based on dendritic cells and low-doses of cisplatin in CBA mice with sarcoma-37. Maximal antitumor and immunomodulatory effects were observed after application of the vaccine based on dendritic cells in combination with doses of cisplatin concentration of 2 mg/kg. Among significant immunomodulatory effects of com...

  10. Polyaniline–lead sulfate based cell with supercapattery behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsadek A. Alguail

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemically synthesized polyaniline and lead sulfate are investigated as a possible active material of the aqueous based hybrid asymmetric supercapacitors. The electrochemical characteristics of polyaniline (doping-dedoping reactions, as well as electrical characteristics (specific capacitance, capacity, energy, and power of the PbSO4|PANI cell, are determined. Based on the estimated specific energy and power, it is suggested that investigated cell could be classified as “supercapattery” type of electrochemical power sources.

  11. A validated system for ligation-free USER™ -based assembly of expression vectors for mammalian cell engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Hansen, Bjarne Gram

    The development in the field of mammalian cell factories require fast and high-throughput methods, this means a high need for simpler and more efficient cloning techniques. For optimization of protein expression by genetic engineering and for allowing metabolic engineering in mammalian cells, a n...... versatile expression vector system was developed. This vector system applies the ligation-free uracilexcision cloning technique to construct mammalian expression vectors of multiple parts and with maximum flexibility....

  12. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wei; Guo, Weimin; Han, Shufeng; Zhu, Yun; Liu, Shuyun; Guo, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a fundamental role in meniscal regeneration. According to current studies, the main cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering are single cell type strategies; cell coculture strategies also were applied to meniscus tissue engineering. Likewise, on the one side, the zonal recapitulation strategies based on mimicking meniscal differing cells and internal architectures have received wide attentions. On the other side, cell self-assembling strategies without any scaffolds may be a better way to build a bionic meniscus. In this review, we primarily discuss cell seeds for meniscus tissue engineering and their application strategies. We also discuss recent advances and achievements in meniscus repair experiments that further improve our understanding of meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:27274735

  13. Performance of Lithium Polymer Cells with Polyacrylonitrile based Electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perera, Kumudu; Dissanayake, M.A.K.L.; Skaarup, Steen

    2006-01-01

    The performance of lithium polymer cells fabricated with Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based electrolytes was studied using cycling voltammetry and continuous charge discharge cycling. The electrolytes consisted of PAN, ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC) and lithium trifluoromethanesulfo......The performance of lithium polymer cells fabricated with Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based electrolytes was studied using cycling voltammetry and continuous charge discharge cycling. The electrolytes consisted of PAN, ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC) and lithium...... voltammetry at slow scan rates were similar. The charge factor remained close to unity. These results show the fact that satisfactory cell performance can be achieved with thin electrode films and cycling at slow scan rates....

  14. Glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood leukodystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, M Joana; Goldman, Steven A

    2016-09-01

    The childhood leukodystrophies comprise a group of hereditary disorders characterized by the absence, malformation or destruction of myelin. These disorders share common clinical, radiological and pathological features, despite their diverse molecular and genetic etiologies. Oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are the major affected cell populations, and are either structurally impaired or metabolically compromised through cell-intrinsic pathology, or are the victims of mis-accumulated toxic byproducts of metabolic derangement. In either case, glial cell replacement using implanted tissue or pluripotent stem cell-derived human neural or glial progenitor cells may comprise a promising strategy for both structural remyelination and metabolic rescue. A broad variety of pediatric white matter disorders, including the primary hypomyelinating disorders, the lysosomal storage disorders, and the broader group of non-lysosomal metabolic leukodystrophies, may all be appropriate candidates for glial progenitor cell-based treatment. Nonetheless, a variety of specific challenges remain before this therapeutic strategy can be applied to children. These include timely diagnosis, before irreparable neuronal injury has ensued; understanding the natural history of the targeted disease; defining the optimal cell phenotype for each disorder; achieving safe and scalable cellular compositions; designing age-appropriate controlled clinical trials; and for autologous therapy of genetic disorders, achieving the safe genetic editing of pluripotent stem cells. Yet these challenges notwithstanding, the promise of glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood myelin disorders offers hope to the many victims of this otherwise largely untreatable class of disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of stem cell/biomaterial combinations for stem cell-based tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuss, Sabine; Apel, Christian; Buttler, Patricia; Denecke, Bernd; Dhanasingh, Anandhan; Ding, Xiaolei; Grafahrend, Dirk; Groger, Andreas; Hemmrich, Karsten; Herr, Alexander; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Mastitskaya, Svetlana; Perez-Bouza, Alberto; Rosewick, Stephanie; Salber, Jochen; Wöltje, Michael; Zenke, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Biomaterials are used in tissue engineering with the aim to repair or reconstruct tissues and organs. Frequently, the identification and development of biomaterials is an iterative process with biomaterials being designed and then individually tested for their properties in combination with one specific cell type. However, recent efforts have been devoted to systematic, combinatorial and parallel approaches to identify biomaterials, suitable for specific applications. Embryonic and adult stem cells represent an ideal cell source for tissue engineering. Since stem cells can be readily isolated, expanded and transplanted, their application in cell-based therapies has become a major focus of research. Biomaterials can potentially influence e.g. stem cell proliferation and differentiation in both, positive or negative ways and biomaterial characteristics have been applied to repel or attract stem cells in a niche-like microenvironment. Our consortium has now established a grid-based platform to investigate stem cell/biomaterial interactions. So far, we have assessed 140 combinations of seven different stem cell types and 19 different polymers performing systematic screening assays to analyse parameters such as morphology, vitality, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and proliferation. We thus can suggest and advise for and against special combinations for stem cell-based tissue engineering.

  16. Multilevel Factorial Designs With Experiment-Induced Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Dziak, John J; Collins, Linda M

    2017-04-06

    Factorial experimental designs have many applications in the behavioral sciences. In the context of intervention development, factorial experiments play a critical role in building and optimizing high-quality, multicomponent behavioral interventions. One challenge in implementing factorial experiments in the behavioral sciences is that individuals are often clustered in social or administrative units and may be more similar to each other than to individuals in other clusters. This means that data are dependent within clusters. Power planning resources are available for factorial experiments in which the multilevel structure of the data is due to individuals' membership in groups that existed before experimentation. However, in many cases clusters are generated in the course of the study itself. Such experiment-induced clustering (EIC) requires different data analysis models and power planning resources from those available for multilevel experimental designs in which clusters exist prior to experimentation. Despite the common occurrence of both experimental designs with EIC and factorial designs, a bridge has yet to be built between EIC and factorial designs. Therefore, resources are limited or nonexistent for planning factorial experiments that involve EIC. This article seeks to bridge this gap by extending prior models for EIC, developed for single-factor experiments, to factorial experiments involving various types of EIC. We also offer power formulas to help investigators decide whether a particular experimental design involving EIC is feasible. We demonstrate that factorial experiments can be powerful and feasible even with EIC. We discuss design considerations and directions for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Sexual behavior and perceived risk of HIV/AIDS among young migrant factory workers in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, M; Cleland, J

    2006-03-01

    To analyze the sexual behavior, perceived risk of contracting STIs and HIV/AIDS, and protective behaviors of migrant workers aged 14-19 years in carpet and garment factories in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. A common assumption in Nepal is that young migrant workers experience an increase in vulnerability. Moving away from the social controls of family and community, they become exposed to a mixed-gender environment and therefore might initiate sex earlier or have more casual encounters than might otherwise be the case. The analysis is based on a representative sample survey of 1050 factory workers. Information was also obtained from 23 in-depth case histories. Both bivarite and multivariate techniques were applied to identify the factors associated with involvement in risky sexual behavior. Despite religious and cultural restrictions, one in five boys and one in eight unmarried girls reported experience of sexual intercourse. Early sexual experimentation, multiple partners, and low and irregular use of condoms are not uncommon. Instances of sexual exploitation by factory owners or managers were documented but were rare. Most nonregular sex partners were described as friends from the same factory or community. Despite high-risk behavior, relatively few young people considered themselves to be at risk of getting STIs or HIV/AIDS. Information on the possible consequences of unsafe sex is inadequate. Programs aimed at promotion of safer sex practices and life skill training that facilitates communication and utilization of sexual health services should target vulnerable migrant young people.

  18. Lifestyle intervention using an internet-based curriculum with cell phone reminders for obese Chinese teens: a randomized controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha A Abraham

    Full Text Available Obesity is an increasing public health problem affecting young people. The causes of obesity are multi-factorial among Chinese youth including lack of physical activity and poor eating habits. The use of an internet curriculum and cell phone reminders and texting may be an innovative means of increasing follow up and compliance with obese teens. The objectives of this study were to determine the feasibility of using an adapted internet curriculum and existing nutritional program along with cell phone follow up for obese Chinese teens.This was a randomized controlled study involving obese teens receiving care at a paediatric obesity clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Hong Kong. Forty-eight subjects aged 12 to 18 years were randomized into three groups. The control group received usual care visits with a physician in the obesity clinic every three months. The first intervention (IT group received usual care visits every three months plus a 12-week internet-based curriculum with cell phone calls/texts reminders. The second intervention group received usual care visits every three months plus four nutritional counselling sessions.The use of the internet-based curriculum was shown to be feasible as evidenced by the high recruitment rate, internet log-in rate, compliance with completing the curriculum and responses to phone reminders. No significant differences in weight were found between IT, sLMP and control groups.An internet-based curriculum with cell phone reminders as a supplement to usual care of obesity is feasible. Further study is required to determine whether an internet plus text intervention can be both an effective and a cost-effective adjunct to changing weight in obese youth.Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-12002624.

  19. 3D NAND Flash Based on Planar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Silvagni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the transition from 2D NAND to 3D NAND is first addressed, and the various 3D NAND architectures are compared. The article carries out a comparison of 3D NAND architectures that are based on a “punch-and-plug” process—with gate-all-around (GAA cell devices—against architectures that are based on planar cell devices. The differences and similarities between the two classes of architectures are highlighted. The differences between architectures using floating-gate (FG and charge-trap (CT devices are also considered. Although the current production of 3D NAND is based on GAA cell devices, it is suggested that architectures with planar cell devices could also be viable for mass production.

  20. Nanomembrane-Based, Thermal-Transport Biosensor for Living Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami T.

    2016-11-23

    Knowledge of materials\\' thermal-transport properties, conductivity and diffusivity, is crucial for several applications within areas of biology, material science and engineering. Specifically, a microsized, flexible, biologically integrated thermal transport sensor is beneficial to a plethora of applications, ranging across plants physiological ecology and thermal imaging and treatment of cancerous cells, to thermal dissipation in flexible semiconductors and thermoelectrics. Living cells pose extra challenges, due to their small volumes and irregular curvilinear shapes. Here a novel approach of simultaneously measuring thermal conductivity and diffusivity of different materials and its applicability to single cells is demonstrated. This technique is based on increasing phonon-boundary-scattering rate in nanomembranes, having extremely low flexural rigidities, to induce a considerable spectral dependence of the bandgap-emission over excitation-laser intensity. It is demonstrated that once in contact with organic or inorganic materials, the nanomembranes\\' emission spectrally shift based on the material\\'s thermal diffusivity and conductivity. This NM-based technique is further applied to differentiate between different types and subtypes of cancer cells, based on their thermal-transport properties. It is anticipated that this novel technique to enable an efficient single-cell thermal targeting, allow better modeling of cellular thermal distribution and enable novel diagnostic techniques based on variations of single-cell thermal-transport properties.

  1. Regulatory issues in cell-based therapy for clinical purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Tabera, Jaime; Vilarrodona, Anna; Trias, Esteve

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development in the fields of cellular and molecular biology, biotechnology, and bioengineering medicine has brought new, highly innovative treatments and medicinal products, some of which contain viable cells and tissues associated with scaffolds and devices. These new cell-based therapy approaches in regenerative medicine have great potential for use in the treatment of a number of diseases that at present cannot be managed effectively. Given the unique challenges associated with the development of human cell-based medicinal products, great care is required in the development of procedures, practices, and regulation. In cell therapy, appropriate methodologies in the areas of production, reproducibility, maintenance, and delivery are essential for accurate definition and reliable assurance of the suitability and quality of the final products. Recently, the official European Community agencies (EMA) and the relevant authority in the USA (FDA) have made significant efforts to establish regulatory guidance for use in the application of the cell-based therapies for human patients. The guidelines surrounding cell-based therapy take into account the current legislation, but focus less on the heterogeneity and requirements of individual human cell-based products, including specific combination products and applications. When considering guidelines and regulation, a risk assessment approach is an effective method of identifying priority areas for the development of human cell-based medicinal products. Additionally, effective design and thorough validation of the manufacturing process in line with existing Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) and quality control regimes and a program that ensures the traceability and biovigilance of the final products are also all essential elements to consider. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. PEP-II: An asymmetric B factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    In this report, the authors have described an updated conceptual design for the high-luminosity Asymmetric B Factory (PEP-II) to be built in the PEP tunnel culmination of more than four years of effort aimed at the design and construction of an asymmetric e + e - collider capable of achieving a luminosity of L = 3 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 . All aspects of the conceptual design were scrutinized in March 1991 by a DOE technical review committee chaired by Dr. L. Edward Temple. The design was deemed feasible and capable of achieving its physics goals. Furthermore, the cost estimate, schedule, and management plan for the project were fully endorsed by the committee. This updated conceptual design report captures the technical progress since the March 1991 review and reflects the lower cost estimate corresponding to the improved design. Although the PEP-II design has continued to evolve, no technical scope changes have been made that invalidate the conclusion of the DOE review. The configuration adopted utilizes two storage rings, an electron ring operating at 9 GeV and a positron ring at 3.1 GeV, each with a circumference of 2200 m. The high-energy ring is an upgrade of the PEP storage ring at SLAC; all PEP magnets and most power supplies will be reused. The upgrade consists primarily of replacing the PEP vacuum chamber and RF system with newly designed versions optimized for the high-current environment of PEP-II. The low-energy ring will be newly constructed and will be situated atop the high-energy ring in the PEP tunnel. Utilities already installed in the PEP tunnel are largely sufficient to operate the two PEP-II storage rings

  3. Make your company a talent factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ready, Douglas A; Conger, Jay A

    2007-06-01

    Despite the great sums of money companies dedicate to talent management systems, many still struggle to fill key positions - limiting their potential for growth in the process. Virtually all the human resource executives in the authors' 2005 survey of 40 companies around the world said that their pipeline of high-potential employees was insufficient to fill strategic management roles. The survey revealed two primary reasons for this. First, the formal procedures for identifying and developing next-generation leaders have fallen out of sync with what companies need to grow or expand into new markets. To save money, for example, some firms have eliminated positions that would expose high-potential employees to a broad range of problems, thus sacrificing future development opportunities that would far outweigh any initial savings from the job cuts. Second, HR executives often have trouble keeping top leaders' attention on talent issues, despite those leaders' vigorous assertions that obtaining and keeping the best people is a major priority. If passion for that objective doesn't start at the top and infuse the culture, say the authors, talent management can easily deteriorate into the management of bureaucratic routines. Yet there are companies that can face the future with confidence. These firms don't just manage talent, they build talent factories. The authors describe the experiences of two such corporations - consumer products icon Procter & Gamble and financial services giant HSBC Group -that figured out how to develop and retain key employees and fill positions quickly to meet evolving business needs. Though each company approached talent management from a different direction, they both maintained a twin focus on functionality (rigorous talent processes that support strategic and cultural objectives) and vitality (management's emotional commitment, which is reflected in daily actions).

  4. Creating plant molecular factories for industrial and nutritional isoprenoid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Marilise; Enfissi, Eugenia Ma; Almeida, Juliana; Fraser, Paul D

    2018-02-01

    Chemical refining is a highly efficient process that has driven industrialisation and globalisation. However, dwindling fuel reserves and climatic fluctuation are now imposing key societal and economic challenges to health and welfare provision, agriculture, manufacturing outputs and energy. Plants are potentially exploitable 'green' chemical factories, with vast chemical diversity that can be used for the discovery and production of food, feed, medicines and biomaterials. Despite notable advances, plant based production under real-life scenarios remains, in most cases, economically uncompetitive when compared to inherently non-sustainable petrochemical based processes. In the present review the strategies available and those emerging will be described. Furthermore, how can the new evolving molecular tools such as genome editing be utilised to create a new paradigm of plant-based production? To illustrate the present status quo, we have chosen the isoprenoids as the class of natural products. These compounds display vast chemical diversity and have been used across multiple industrial sectors as medicines, supplements in food and feedstuffs, colourants and fragrances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanical behavior of cells within a cell-based model of wheat leaf growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulyana Zubairova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the principles and mechanisms of cell growth coordination in plant tissue remains an outstanding challenge for modern developmental biology. Cell-based modeling is a widely used technique for studying the geometric and topological features of plant tissue morphology during growth. We developed a quasi-one-dimensional model of unidirectional growth of a tissue layer in a linear leaf blade that takes cell autonomous growth mode into account. The model allows for fitting of the visible cell length using the experimental cell length distribution along the longitudinal axis of a wheat leaf epidermis. Additionally, it describes changes in turgor and osmotic pressures for each cell in the growing tissue. Our numerical experiments show that the pressures in the cell change over the cell cycle, and in symplastically growing tissue, they vary from cell to cell and strongly depend on the leaf growing zone to which the cells belong. Therefore, we believe that the mechanical signals generated by pressures are important to consider in simulations of tissue growth as possible targets for molecular genetic regulators of individual cell growth.

  6. MEMS-based dynamic cell-to-cell culture platforms using electrochemical surface modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Lin, Liwei; Yoon, Sang-Hee; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2011-01-01

    MEMS-based biological platforms with the capability of both spatial placements and time releases of living cells for cell-to-cell culture experiments have been designed and demonstrated utilizing electrochemical surface modification effects. The spatial placement is accomplished by electrochemical surface modification of substrate surfaces to be either adhesive or non-adhesive for living cells. The time control is achieved by the electrical activation of the selective indium tin oxide co-culture electrode to allow the migration of living cells onto the electrode to start the cell-to-cell culture studies. Prototype devices have a three-electrode design with an electrode size of 50 × 50 µm 2 and the separation gaps of 2 µm between them. An electrical voltage of −1.5 V has been used to activate the electrodes independently and sequentially to demonstrate the dynamic cell-to-cell culture experiments of NIH 3T3 fibroblast and Madin Darby canine kidney cells. As such, this MEMS platform could be a basic yet versatile tool to characterize transient cell-to-cell interactions

  7. Cell-based therapeutic strategies for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolding, Neil J; Pasquini, Marcelo; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2017-11-01

    The availability of multiple disease-modifying medications with regulatory approval to treat multiple sclerosis illustrates the substantial progress made in therapy of the disease. However, all are only partially effective in preventing inflammatory tissue damage in the central nervous system and none directly promotes repair. Cell-based therapies, including immunoablation followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, mesenchymal and related stem cell transplantation, pharmacologic manipulation of endogenous stem cells to enhance their reparative capabilities, and transplantation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, have generated substantial interest as novel therapeutic strategies for immune modulation, neuroprotection, or repair of the damaged central nervous system in multiple sclerosis. Each approach has potential advantages but also safety concerns and unresolved questions. Moreover, clinical trials of cell-based therapies present several unique methodological and ethical issues. We summarize here the status of cell-based therapies to treat multiple sclerosis and make consensus recommendations for future research and clinical trials. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  8. The promise of fuel cell-based automobiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fuel cell-based automobiles have gained attention in the last few years due to growing public concern about urban air pollution and consequent environmental problems. From an analysis of the power and energy requirements of a modern car, it is estimated that a base sustainable power of c a . 50 kW supplemented with ...

  9. The promise of fuel cell-based automobiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Fuel cell-based automobiles have gained attention in the last few years due to growing public con- cern about urban air pollution and consequent environmental problems. From an analysis of the power and energy requirements of a modern car, it is estimated that a base sustainable power of ca. 50 kW ...

  10. Immune modulation by dendritic-cell-based cancer vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-31

    Jan 31, 2017 ... 5. Molecular mechanism of action of. DC-based cancer vaccines. DC-based vaccines aim to load DCs with tumour antigens ex vivo or in vivo followed by maturation of DCs that leads to their activation. Upon infusion into the patient, the ex vivo mature DCs generate anti-tumour T-cell responses resulting.

  11. Everyday life of Frianovo silk weaving factory workers in XVIII — first quarter of the XIX century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. GOTOVTSOVA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Based upon a wide range of archive records, the article covers issues relating to particular aspects of life and living standards of silk weaving factory workers’ families in a village of Fryanovo of Moskovski county in XVIII — fi rst quarter of XIX centuries.Workers’ daily life was signifi cantly infl uenced by living conditions. It is via this article that we analyze dimensions and types of living premises provided to workers by the factory owners, as well as its improvements. The Fryanovo factory offi ce records that remain intact allow consideration of issues relating to food for workers, including sources for providing Fryanovo inhabitants with bread and other food products, the composition and the average amount thereof.One chapter of the article is specifi cally devoted to workers’ worship service attendance, as well as diff erences in religion belief of Fryanovo inhabitants. In addition to the orthodox Christian majority of its population, there were also Catholics and Old Believers among its inhabitants.The issues directly relating to working at the silk weaving factory include work schedule and rules, average age of workers, wage payment methods, as well as workers motivation by the silk weaving factory owner. Considered are the issues relating to employment of children and women at the silk weaving factory. An important part of the research relates to living conditions of non-working population groups: young children, retired and handicaps who were given some money or bread, on monthly bases, by silk weaving factory owners.Medical services for the silk weaving factory workers, personal taxation and other fees, participation by factory workers, in recruitments, penalties and fi nes system as implemented by the silk weaving factory in Fryanovo are also within the spectrum of questions that are discussed within the article.The fi nal chapter of the research points out the village inner life issues, such as alcohol abuse among

  12. Oscillations of factorial cumulants to factorial moments ratio from an eikonal approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggio, P.C., E-mail: beggio@uenf.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul – UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro – UENF, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-09-02

    We study the factorial moments (F{sub q}), the factorial cumulants (K{sub q}) and the ratio of K{sub q} to F{sub q} (H{sub q}=K{sub q}/F{sub q}) in pp/pp{sup ¯} collisions using an updated approach, in which the multiplicity distribution is related to the eikonal function. The QCD inspired eikonal model adopted contains contributions of quark–quark, quark–gluon and gluon–gluon interactions. Our work shows that the approach can reproduce the collision energy dependence of the F{sub q} moments, correctly predicts that the first minimum of the H{sub q} lies around q=5 and qualitatively reproduces the oscillations of the H{sub q} moments, as shown in the experimental data and predicted by QCD at preasymptotic energy. The result of this study seems to indicate that the H{sub q} oscillations are manifestations of semihard component in the multiparticle production process. Predictions for multiplicity distribution and H{sub q} moments at the LHC energy of √(s)=14 TeV are presented.

  13. Controversial issue: is it safe to employ mesenchymal stem cells in cell-based therapies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepperdinger, Günter; Brunauer, Regina; Jamnig, Angelika

    2008-01-01

    The prospective clinical use of multipotent mesenchymal stromal stem cells (MSC) holds enormous promise for the treatment of a large number of degenerative and age-related diseases. However, the challenges and risks for cell-based therapies are multifaceted. The risks for patients receiving stem...

  14. Bronchiolitis associated with exposure to artificial butter flavoring in workers at a cookie factory in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Zaida do Rego; Albuquerque Filho, Alfredo Pereira Leite de; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro; Coletta, Ester Nei Aparecida Martins

    2012-01-01

    To report the cases of four patients with bronchiolitis caused by exposure to artificial butter flavoring at a cookie factory in Brazil. We described the clinical, tomographic, and spirometric findings in the four patients, as well as the lung biopsy findings in one of the patients. All four patients were young male nonsmokers and developed persistent airflow obstruction (reduced FEV1/FVC ratio and FEV1 at 25-44% of predicted) after 1-3 years of exposure to diacetyl, without the use of personal protective equipment, at a cookie factory. The HRCT findings were indicative of bronchiolitis. In one patient, the surgical lung biopsy revealed bronchiolitis obliterans accompanied by giant cells. Bronchiolitis resulting from exposure to artificial flavoring agents should be included in the differential diagnosis of airflow obstruction in workers in Brazil.

  15. PhysiCell: An open source physics-based cell simulator for 3-D multicellular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarizadeh, Ahmadreza; Heiland, Randy; Friedman, Samuel H; Mumenthaler, Shannon M; Macklin, Paul

    2018-02-01

    Many multicellular systems problems can only be understood by studying how cells move, grow, divide, interact, and die. Tissue-scale dynamics emerge from systems of many interacting cells as they respond to and influence their microenvironment. The ideal "virtual laboratory" for such multicellular systems simulates both the biochemical microenvironment (the "stage") and many mechanically and biochemically interacting cells (the "players" upon the stage). PhysiCell-physics-based multicellular simulator-is an open source agent-based simulator that provides both the stage and the players for studying many interacting cells in dynamic tissue microenvironments. It builds upon a multi-substrate biotransport solver to link cell phenotype to multiple diffusing substrates and signaling factors. It includes biologically-driven sub-models for cell cycling, apoptosis, necrosis, solid and fluid volume changes, mechanics, and motility "out of the box." The C++ code has minimal dependencies, making it simple to maintain and deploy across platforms. PhysiCell has been parallelized with OpenMP, and its performance scales linearly with the number of cells. Simulations up to 105-106 cells are feasible on quad-core desktop workstations; larger simulations are attainable on single HPC compute nodes. We demonstrate PhysiCell by simulating the impact of necrotic core biomechanics, 3-D geometry, and stochasticity on the dynamics of hanging drop tumor spheroids and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. We demonstrate stochastic motility, chemical and contact-based interaction of multiple cell types, and the extensibility of PhysiCell with examples in synthetic multicellular systems (a "cellular cargo delivery" system, with application to anti-cancer treatments), cancer heterogeneity, and cancer immunology. PhysiCell is a powerful multicellular systems simulator that will be continually improved with new capabilities and performance improvements. It also represents a significant

  16. Stem Cell-Based Neuroprotective and Neurorestorative Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wei Hung

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells, a special subset of cells derived from embryo or adult tissues, are known to present the characteristics of self-renewal, multiple lineages of differentiation, high plastic capability, and long-term maintenance. Recent reports have further suggested that neural stem cells (NSCs derived from the adult hippocampal and subventricular regions possess the utilizing potential to develop the transplantation strategies and to screen the candidate agents for neurogenesis, neuroprotection, and neuroplasticity in neurodegenerative diseases. In this article, we review the roles of NSCs and other stem cells in neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies for neurological and psychiatric diseases. We show the evidences that NSCs play the key roles involved in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, including depression, stroke and Parkinson’s disease. Moreover, the potential and possible utilities of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS, reprogramming from adult fibroblasts with ectopic expression of four embryonic genes, are also reviewed and further discussed. An understanding of the biophysiology of stem cells could help us elucidate the pathogenicity and develop new treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to cell transplantation therapies, the application of stem cells can further provide a platform for drug discovery and small molecular testing, including Chinese herbal medicines. In addition, the high-throughput stem cell-based systems can be used to elucidate the mechanisms of neuroprotective candidates in translation medical research for neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Potential of Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany E. Marei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is one of the major health problems worldwide. The only FDA approved anti-thrombotic drug for acute ischemic stroke is the tissue plasminogen activator. Several studies have been devoted to assessing the therapeutic potential of different types of stem cells such as neural stem cells (NSCs, mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived NSCs as treatments for ischemic stroke. The results of these studies are intriguing but many of them have presented conflicting results. Additionally, the mechanism(s by which engrafted stem/progenitor cells exert their actions are to a large extent unknown. In this review, we will provide a synopsis of different preclinical and clinical studies related to the use of stem cell-based stroke therapy, and explore possible beneficial/detrimental outcomes associated with the use of different types of stem cells. Due to limited/short time window implemented in most of the recorded clinical trials about the use of stem cells as potential therapeutic intervention for stroke, further clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of the intervention in a longer time window after cellular engraftments are still needed.

  18. Potential of Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marei, Hany E; Hasan, A; Rizzi, R; Althani, A; Afifi, N; Cenciarelli, C; Caceci, Thomas; Shuaib, Ashfaq

    2018-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the major health problems worldwide. The only FDA approved anti-thrombotic drug for acute ischemic stroke is the tissue plasminogen activator. Several studies have been devoted to assessing the therapeutic potential of different types of stem cells such as neural stem cells (NSCs), mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived NSCs as treatments for ischemic stroke. The results of these studies are intriguing but many of them have presented conflicting results. Additionally, the mechanism(s) by which engrafted stem/progenitor cells exert their actions are to a large extent unknown. In this review, we will provide a synopsis of different preclinical and clinical studies related to the use of stem cell-based stroke therapy, and explore possible beneficial/detrimental outcomes associated with the use of different types of stem cells. Due to limited/short time window implemented in most of the recorded clinical trials about the use of stem cells as potential therapeutic intervention for stroke, further clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of the intervention in a longer time window after cellular engraftments are still needed.

  19. B-meson factory in the CERN-ISR tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivkin, L.

    1990-01-01

    This is a feasibility study of the proposed B-meson factory in the CERN ISR tunnel. Machine parameters, the lattice, interaction region, RF system, beam instabilities, vacuum system, and background radiation are discussed

  20. Argonne Tau-charm factory collider design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.; Crosbie, E.A.; Norem, J.

    1995-01-01

    The design approach and design principles for a Tau-charm Factory at Argonne were studied. These studies led to a set of preliminary parameters and tentative component features as presented in this paper

  1. Neutrino Factory Accelerator R and D: Status and Priorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes the status of worldwide Neutrino Factory R and D efforts. Activities are categorized as simulations, component development, and system tests. An indication of R and D tasks that remain to be accomplished is also given

  2. PARTICLE FACTORIES: Tau-charm in the spotlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Following earlier workshops in Stanford (1989) and in Orsay (1990), some hundred physicists from Europe and the United States met from 29 April to 2 May in Seville, Spain, to consolidate plans for a Tau-Charm Factory

  3. Implementasi Corporate Sosial Responsibility PT Riau Crumb Rubber Factory terhadap Masyarakat Kelurahan Sri Meranti Kota Pekanbaru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Shandy Utama

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A company that carries out its business activities in the field and/or related to natural resources is obliged to carry out its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR. This research was conducted at PT Riau Crumb Rubber Factory which is located in Sri Meranti Village. Raw rubber production activities into semi-finished rubbers have been routinely generating pollution for the environment and society, such as air pollution and water pollution. The problem is how the implementation of CSR PT Riau Crumb Rubber Factory to the community of Sri Meranti Village in Pekanbaru City? What are the obstacles and the legal effort based on Riau Province Regional Regulation Number 6 Year 2012? This research is a sociological law research. Source of data used in this research is primary data and secondary data. Data collection techniques used in this study are observation, interview, and literature study. Data analysis technique used in this research is qualitative analysis. The result of this research is PT Riau Crumb Rubber Factory has implemented CSR, but has not fulfilled the expectation the community of Sri Meranti Village because it is not comparable with the pollution and environmental damage caused by the company's operational activities. The obstacle from the company side is the limited budget of CSR funds owned by PT Riau Crumb Rubber Factory to be able to meet all the needs of the community, while from the community side is the lack of legal knowledge of the community of Sri Meranti Village about CSR. The legal effort is that if PT Riau Crumb Rubber Factory does not implement CSR, the community of Sri Meranti Village can convey their aspirations to the DPRD of Riau Province for the company to be recommended to get administrative sanction from the government, such as the suspension of operational license of the company.

  4. Solar Cell Capacitance Determination Based on an RLC Resonant Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petru Adrian Cotfas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The capacitance is one of the key dynamic parameters of solar cells, which can provide essential information regarding the quality and health state of the cell. However, the measurement of this parameter is not a trivial task, as it typically requires high accuracy instruments using, e.g., electrical impedance spectroscopy (IS. This paper introduces a simple and effective method to determine the electric capacitance of the solar cells. An RLC (Resistor Inductance Capacitor circuit is formed by using an inductor as a load for the solar cell. The capacitance of the solar cell is found by measuring the frequency of the damped oscillation that occurs at the moment of connecting the inductor to the solar cell. The study is performed through simulation based on National Instruments (NI Multisim application as SPICE simulation software and through experimental capacitance measurements of a monocrystalline silicon commercial solar cell and a photovoltaic panel using the proposed method. The results were validated using impedance spectroscopy. The differences between the capacitance values obtained by the two methods are of 1% for the solar cells and of 9.6% for the PV panel. The irradiance level effect upon the solar cell capacitance was studied obtaining an increase in the capacitance in function of the irradiance. By connecting different inductors to the solar cell, the frequency effect upon the solar cell capacitance was studied noticing a very small decrease in the capacitance with the frequency. Additionally, the temperature effect over the solar cell capacitance was studied achieving an increase in capacitance with temperature.

  5. Preparation and optimization of PIT solid lipid nanoparticles via statistical factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, C; Tomasello, B; Ruozi, B; Renis, M; Puglisi, G

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was the preparation, physico-chemical characterization and statistical optimization of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) prepared by the PIT method as potential carrier for gene therapy, emphasizing the application of factorial design in such a kind of studies. The preliminary screening from a physico-chemical point of view on three cationic lipids (CTAB, DDAB and DOTAP), selected on the basis of their different chemical structure and increasing lipophilicity, allowed us to select SLN with DOTAP, due to its higher zeta potential and smaller particle size. Afterward, a 2(2) full factorial experimental design was developed in order to study the effects of two independent variables (amount of DOTAP and concentration of lipid matrix) and their interaction on mean particle size and zeta potential values. The factorial planning was validated by ANOVA analysis; the correspondence between the predicted values of size and zeta and those measured experimentally confirmed the validity of the design and the equation applied for its resolution. The factorial design showed a significant influence of the independent variables on the selected parameters; in particular, a higher effect of DOTAP was observed on zeta potential value. Different dilutions of the optimized SLN containing 7% w/w of cutina CP and 1% w/w of DOTAP, with size and zeta potential values respectively of 462.9 nm and 50.8 mV, were in vitro examined to evaluate the possible cytotoxicity on two models of cell cultures: human prostate cancer androgen-non-responsive DU-145 cells and primary cultures of rat astrocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Noncommunicable disease risk profile of factory workers in Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Jugal; Kohli, Charu; Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Ekta

    2012-09-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are becoming more prevalent in India. The data for presence of NCDs and its risk factors among factory workers is deficient in India. A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out among 37 factory workers and equal number of comparable subjects from general population. Screening for presence of diabetes along with its risk factors was made in both the groups using pretested predesigned World Health Organization STEPwise approach to surveillance (WHO STEPS) questionnaire in rural area of Delhi. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 software. The estimation of risk in two groups was done with calculation of odds ratio (OR). P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. A total of 74 participants were included in the present study. Hypertension and diabetes was present in 13.5 and 5.4% of factory workers and four (10.8%) and three (8.8%) subjects in comparative group, respectively. Seven (18.9%) factory and eight (21.6%) non-factory subjects fell in the category of current smoker or smokeless tobacco users. High density lipoprotein levels were found abnormal among one (2.7%) factory worker and nine (24.3%) subjects in comparative group (P-value = 0.01). Behavioral risk factors, alcohol consumption, and fruits and vegetable intake were significantly different among two groups. Factory workers were having better profile than non-factory subjects except for risk factors such as alcohol intake and inadequate fruits and vegetable intake. However, healthy worker effect phenomenon cannot be ruled out.

  7. Economic and Environmental Sustainability of Factory Farming in the US

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Asbjørn Lupo; Giersing, Josephine; Magrane, David; Breitenstein, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This paper is written with the purpose of looking into sustainable development. More specifically, it will look at the relationship between the environmental and economical pillars of sustainability. In order for sustainable development to take place, the economy must be growing while maintaining earth’s natural resources. Factory farming might be strong from an economic point of view, but it does not seem to be environmentally friendly. Therefore we used factory farming as an example of an i...

  8. Factorial moment and fractal analysis of γ families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmakhelidze, M.Eh.; Roinishvili, N.N.; Svanidze, M.S.; Khizanishvili, L.A.; Chadranyan, L.Kh.

    1997-01-01

    Factorial and fractal methods were applied to nuclear-electromagnetic cascades in the atmosphere (γ families) to find sensitivity of these methods to multiparticle fluctuations in γ families. Averaged parameters of factorial and fractal methods of the real families were compared with the same quantities for the statistical set of random families. The correlations between the same parameters for families divided into sectors and into rings are studied. The correlations between different parameters for the same families divided into sectors are investigated

  9. EXERGETIC OPTIMIZATION OF PHOSPHORIC ACID FACTORY POWER PLANT

    OpenAIRE

    Tahar, Khir

    2017-01-01

    AnEnergetic and Exergetic Analysis is conducted on a Steam Turbine Power Plant ofan existing Phosphoric Acid Factory. The heat recovery systems used indifferent parts of the plant are also considered in the analysis. Mass, thermaland exergy balances are established on the main components of the factory. Anumerical code is established using EES software to perform the calculationsrequired for the thermal and exergy plant analysis. The effects of the keyoperating parameters such as steam pressu...

  10. Expert Meeting Report: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E.; Mullens, M.; Tompos, E.; Kessler, B.; Rath, P.

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about the Building America expert meeting on advanced envelope research for factory built housing, hosted by the ARIES Collaborative on October 11, 2011, in Phoenix, Arizona. The goals of this meeting were to provide a comprehensive solution to the use of three previously selected advanced alternatives for factory-built wall construction, assess each option focusing on major issues relating to viability and commercial potential, and determine additional steps are required to reach this potential.

  11. Expert Meeting Report: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E.; Mullens, M.; Tompos, E.; Kessler, B.; Rath, P.

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about the expert meeting on advanced envelope research for factory built housing, hosted by the ARIES Collaborative on October 11, 2011, in Phoenix, Arizona. The goals of this meeting were to provide a comprehensive solution to the use of three previously selected advanced alternatives for factory-built wall construction, assess each option focusing on major issues relating to viability and commercial potential, and determine additional steps are required to reach this potential.

  12. High frequency electromechanical memory cells based on telescoping carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, A M; Lozovik, Y E; Kulish, A S; Bichoutskaia, E

    2010-07-01

    A new method to increase the operational frequency of electromechanical memory cells based on the telescoping motion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes through the selection of the form of the switching voltage pulse is proposed. The relative motion of the walls of carbon nanotubes can be controlled through the shape of the interwall interaction energy surface. This allows the use of the memory cells in nonvolatile or volatile regime, depending on the structure of carbon nanotube. Simulations based on ab initio and semi-empirical calculations of the interwall interaction energies are used to estimate the switching voltage and the operational frequency of volatile cells with the electrodes made of carbon nanotubes. The lifetime of nonvolatile memory cells is also predicted.

  13. Impact of Base Station Cooperation on Cell Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Dexter Garcia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Base station cooperation (BSC has been identified as a key radio access technology for next-generation cellular networks such as LTE-Advanced. BSC impacts cell planning, which is the methodical selection of base station (BS sites, and BS equipment configuration for cost-effective cellular networks. In this paper, the impact of BSC on cell plan parameters (coverage, traffic, handover, and cost, as well as additional cell planning steps required for BSC are discussed. Results show that BSC maximizes its gains over noncooperation (NC in a network wherein interference from cooperating BSs is the main limitation. Locations exist where NC may produce higher throughputs, therefore dynamic or semistatic switching between BSC and NC, called fractional BSC, is recommended. Because of interference from noncooperating BSs, the gains of BSC over NC are upper bounded, and diminishes at greater intersite distances because of noise. This encourages smaller cell sizes, higher transmit powers, and dynamic clustering of cooperative BSs.

  14. Automated migration analysis based on cell texture: method & reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittenden Thomas W

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper, we present and validate a way to measure automatically the extent of cell migration based on automated examination of a series of digital photographs. It was designed specifically to identify the impact of Second Hand Smoke (SHS on endothelial cell migration but has broader applications. The analysis has two stages: (1 preprocessing of image texture, and (2 migration analysis. Results The output is a graphic overlay that indicates the front lines of cell migration superimposed on each original image, with automated reporting of the distance traversed vs. time. Expert preference compares to manual placement of leading edge shows complete equivalence of automated vs. manual leading edge definition for cell migration measurement. Conclusion Our method is indistinguishable from careful manual determinations of cell front lines, with the advantages of full automation, objectivity, and speed.

  15. Interactive cell segmentation based on phase contrast optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hang; Su, Zhou; Zheng, Shibao; Yang, Hua; Wei, Sha

    2014-01-01

    Cell segmentation in phase contrast microscopy images lays a crucial foundation for numerous subsequent computer-aided cell image analysis, but it encounters many unsolved challenges due to image qualities and artifacts caused by phase contrast optics. Addressing the unsolved challenges, the authors propose an interactive cell segmentation scheme over phase retardation features. After partitioning the images into phase homogeneous atoms, human annotations are propagated to unlabeled atoms over an affinity graph that is learned based on discrimination analysis. Then, an active query strategy is proposed for which the most informative unlabeled atom is selected for annotation, which is also propagated to the other unlabeled atoms. Cell segmentation converges to quality results after several rounds of interactions involving both the user's intentions and characteristics of image features. Experimental results demonstrate that cells with different optical properties are well segmented via the proposed approach.

  16. Factorial microarray analysis of zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha: Dreissenidae, Bivalvia adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Mohamed

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha has been well known for its expertise in attaching to substances under the water. Studies in past decades on this underwater adhesion focused on the adhesive protein isolated from the byssogenesis apparatus of the zebra mussel. However, the mechanism of the initiation, maintenance, and determination of the attachment process remains largely unknown. Results In this study, we used a zebra mussel cDNA microarray previously developed in our lab and a factorial analysis to identify the genes that were involved in response to the changes of four factors: temperature (Factor A, current velocity (Factor B, dissolved oxygen (Factor C, and byssogenesis status (Factor D. Twenty probes in the microarray were found to be modified by one of the factors. The transcription products of four selected genes, DPFP-BG20_A01, EGP-BG97/192_B06, EGP-BG13_G05, and NH-BG17_C09 were unique to the zebra mussel foot based on the results of quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR. The expression profiles of these four genes under the attachment and non-attachment were also confirmed by qRT-PCR and the result is accordant to that from microarray assay. The in situ hybridization with the RNA probes of two identified genes DPFP-BG20_A01 and EGP-BG97/192_B06 indicated that both of them were expressed by a type of exocrine gland cell located in the middle part of the zebra mussel foot. Conclusions The results of this study suggested that the changes of D. polymorpha byssogenesis status and the environmental factors can dramatically affect the expression profiles of the genes unique to the foot. It turns out that the factorial design and analysis of the microarray experiment is a reliable method to identify the influence of multiple factors on the expression profiles of the probesets in the microarray; therein it provides a powerful tool to reveal the mechanism of zebra mussel underwater attachment.

  17. Factorial microarray analysis of zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha: Dreissenidae, Bivalvia) adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Faisal, Mohamed

    2010-05-28

    The zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) has been well known for its expertise in attaching to substances under the water. Studies in past decades on this underwater adhesion focused on the adhesive protein isolated from the byssogenesis apparatus of the zebra mussel. However, the mechanism of the initiation, maintenance, and determination of the attachment process remains largely unknown. In this study, we used a zebra mussel cDNA microarray previously developed in our lab and a factorial analysis to identify the genes that were involved in response to the changes of four factors: temperature (Factor A), current velocity (Factor B), dissolved oxygen (Factor C), and byssogenesis status (Factor D). Twenty probes in the microarray were found to be modified by one of the factors. The transcription products of four selected genes, DPFP-BG20_A01, EGP-BG97/192_B06, EGP-BG13_G05, and NH-BG17_C09 were unique to the zebra mussel foot based on the results of quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). The expression profiles of these four genes under the attachment and non-attachment were also confirmed by qRT-PCR and the result is accordant to that from microarray assay. The in situ hybridization with the RNA probes of two identified genes DPFP-BG20_A01 and EGP-BG97/192_B06 indicated that both of them were expressed by a type of exocrine gland cell located in the middle part of the zebra mussel foot. The results of this study suggested that the changes of D. polymorpha byssogenesis status and the environmental factors can dramatically affect the expression profiles of the genes unique to the foot. It turns out that the factorial design and analysis of the microarray experiment is a reliable method to identify the influence of multiple factors on the expression profiles of the probesets in the microarray; therein it provides a powerful tool to reveal the mechanism of zebra mussel underwater attachment.

  18. Evaluation of a cell phone-based physical activity diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternfeld, Barbara; Jiang, Sheng-Fang; Picchi, Teresa; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Ainsworth, Barbara; Quesenberry, Charles P

    2012-03-01

    Physical activity (PA) diaries reduce the recall error inherent in self-reported PA but are burdensome. The purpose of this study was to compare a cell phone-based diary with a paper diary and examine the reliability and validity of the cell phone diary. In a pilot study, 25 women and 23 men, age 45-65 yr, completed cell phone and paper PA diaries 4 d·wk(-1) for three consecutive weeks and a user satisfaction survey. In the subsequent validation study, 623 middle-age participants (52.5% women) were asked to complete the cell phone diary and wear an accelerometer for two 7-d periods, approximately 6 months apart. They also completed two PA questionnaires. Fitness, body mass index, and percent body fat were obtained as indirect validation criteria. Estimates of PA from the cell phone and paper diaries were similar (mean within person difference = -43.8 MET·min·d(-1) of total PA, SD = 360, P = 0.49, 7.4 min·d(-1) of moderate-vigorous PA, SD = 66, P = 0.53). Users preferred the cell phone diary over the paper diary (59.6% vs 35.4%). In the subsequent study, intraclass correlations for the cell phone diary ranged from 0.55 for light PA to 0.63 for vigorous PA. Although PA estimates from the cell phone diary were generally significantly higher than those from the accelerometer and the questionnaires, correlations for moderate and vigorous PA were moderate (ρ = 0.25-0.59 with the questionnaires and 0.27-0.35 with the accelerometer). The correlations between the cell phone diary and the indirect validation criteria were generally in the expected direction and of moderate magnitude. A cell phone-based PA diary is equivalent to a paper diary, acceptable to users, and a relatively reliable and valid approach to self-reported PA.

  19. Implementing Clinical Research Using Factorial Designs: A Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Timothy B; Smith, Stevens S; Bolt, Daniel M; Loh, Wei-Yin; Mermelstein, Robin; Fiore, Michael C; Piper, Megan E; Collins, Linda M

    2017-07-01

    Factorial experiments have rarely been used in the development or evaluation of clinical interventions. However, factorial designs offer advantages over randomized controlled trial designs, the latter being much more frequently used in such research. Factorial designs are highly efficient (permitting evaluation of multiple intervention components with good statistical power) and present the opportunity to detect interactions amongst intervention components. Such advantages have led methodologists to advocate for the greater use of factorial designs in research on clinical interventions (Collins, Dziak, & Li, 2009). However, researchers considering the use of such designs in clinical research face a series of choices that have consequential implications for the interpretability and value of the experimental results. These choices include: whether to use a factorial design, selection of the number and type of factors to include, how to address the compatibility of the different factors included, whether and how to avoid confounds between the type and number of interventions a participant receives, and how to interpret interactions. The use of factorial designs in clinical intervention research poses choices that differ from those typically considered in randomized clinical trial designs. However, the great information yield of the former encourages clinical researchers' increased and careful execution of such designs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. INDOOR THERMAL CONDITION OF FACTORY BUILDING IN BANGLADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Abdullah Al Sayem Khan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh is a developing country and has a lot of factories for different products for local use and also export to abroad. Garments industries are one of the top most items of exported items. A huge number of populations are working in garments industries. But these factories are not well designed in sense of the thermal environment. Workers experiences sickness related to indoor environment. The productions of these factories are affected due to employees’ health condition. The research is done in two different methods. One is empirical data collection using thermal data loggers and the other is questionnaire survey on the spots for three factory buildings. The field study was conducted in four different months of the same year during winter and summer period. Expected findings of this research are that the indoor environment is not comfortable for works at day time during summer season. This research will help the factory workers in providing a comfortable thermal environment and also help the employers or factory owners to increase their production margin.