WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell dynamic evaluation

  1. Clinical role of early dynamic FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Reiko; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kondo, Tsunenori; Tanabe, Kazunari [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Urology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We studied the usefulness of early dynamic (ED) and whole-body (WB) FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One hundred patients with 107 tumours underwent kidney ED and WB FDG-PET/CT. We visually and semiquantitatively evaluated the FDG accumulation in RCCs in the ED and WB phases, and compared the accumulation values with regard to histological type (clear cell carcinoma [CCC] vs. non-clear cell carcinoma [N-CCC]), the TNM stage (high stage [3-4] vs. low stage [1-2]), the Fuhrman grade (high grade [3-4] vs. low grade [1-2]) and presence versus absence of venous (V) and lymphatic (Ly) invasion. In the ED phase, visual evaluation revealed no significant differences in FDG accumulation in terms of each item. However, the maximum standardized uptake value and tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were significantly higher in the CCCs compared to the N-CCCs (p < 0.001). In the WB phase, in contrast, significantly higher FDG accumulation (p < 0.001) was found in RCCs with a higher TNM stage, higher Furman grade, and the presence of V and Ly invasion in both the visual and the semiquantitative evaluations. ED and WB FDG-PET/CT is a useful tool for the evaluation of RCCs. (orig.)

  2. Methods for quantitative evaluation of dynamics of repair proteins within irradiated cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hable, V.; Dollinger, G.; Greubel, C.; Hauptner, A.; Krücken, R.; Dietzel, S.; Cremer, T.; Drexler, G. A.; Friedl, A. A.; Löwe, R.

    2006-04-01

    Living HeLa cells are irradiated well directed with single 100 MeV oxygen ions by the superconducting ion microprobe SNAKE, the Superconducting Nanoscope for Applied Nuclear (=Kern-) Physics Experiments, at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator. Various proteins, which are involved directly or indirectly in repair processes, accumulate as clusters (so called foci) at DNA-double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by the ions. The spatiotemporal dynamics of these foci built by the phosphorylated histone γ-H2AX are studied. For this purpose cells are irradiated in line patterns. The γ-H2AX is made visible under the fluorescence microscope using immunofluorescence techniques. Quantitative analysis methods are developed to evaluate the data of the microscopic images in order to analyze movement of the foci and their changing size.

  3. Methods for quantitative evaluation of dynamics of repair proteins within irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Living HeLa cells are irradiated well directed with single 100 MeV oxygen ions by the superconducting ion microprobe SNAKE, the Superconducting Nanoscope for Applied Nuclear (=Kern-) Physics Experiments, at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator. Various proteins, which are involved directly or indirectly in repair processes, accumulate as clusters (so called foci) at DNA-double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by the ions. The spatiotemporal dynamics of these foci built by the phosphorylated histone γ-H2AX are studied. For this purpose cells are irradiated in line patterns. The γ-H2AX is made visible under the fluorescence microscope using immunofluorescence techniques. Quantitative analysis methods are developed to evaluate the data of the microscopic images in order to analyze movement of the foci and their changing size

  4. Dynamic consequence evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wastes at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site will be consolidated into buildings being vacated and/or into newly constructed buildings. The exact mix of waste types may not be known a priori; it will likely change over time. Building operations personnel need a method to dynamically evaluate the hazard of any proposed mix of wastes type, that is, determine a measure of the hazard without having to request a new hazard evaluation from the Safety Analysis department each time the waste mix is to be changed. This report presents such a method; the method is based on the use of a spreadsheet developed for this purpose. The spreadsheet is duser-friendly, robust, and protected so that theuser can modify only certain cells

  5. Dynamic modeling, experimental evaluation, optimal design and control of integrated fuel cell system and hybrid energy systems for building demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Gia Luong Huu

    Fuel cells can produce electricity with high efficiency, low pollutants, and low noise. With the advent of fuel cell technologies, fuel cell systems have since been demonstrated as reliable power generators with power outputs from a few watts to a few megawatts. With proper equipment, fuel cell systems can produce heating and cooling, thus increased its overall efficiency. To increase the acceptance from electrical utilities and building owners, fuel cell systems must operate more dynamically and integrate well with renewable energy resources. This research studies the dynamic performance of fuel cells and the integration of fuel cells with other equipment in three levels: (i) the fuel cell stack operating on hydrogen and reformate gases, (ii) the fuel cell system consisting of a fuel reformer, a fuel cell stack, and a heat recovery unit, and (iii) the hybrid energy system consisting of photovoltaic panels, fuel cell system, and energy storage. In the first part, this research studied the steady-state and dynamic performance of a high temperature PEM fuel cell stack. Collaborators at Aalborg University (Aalborg, Denmark) conducted experiments on a high temperature PEM fuel cell short stack at steady-state and transients. Along with the experimental activities, this research developed a first-principles dynamic model of a fuel cell stack. The dynamic model developed in this research was compared to the experimental results when operating on different reformate concentrations. Finally, the dynamic performance of the fuel cell stack for a rapid increase and rapid decrease in power was evaluated. The dynamic model well predicted the performance of the well-performing cells in the experimental fuel cell stack. The second part of the research studied the dynamic response of a high temperature PEM fuel cell system consisting of a fuel reformer, a fuel cell stack, and a heat recovery unit with high thermal integration. After verifying the model performance with the

  6. Hepatocyte and Kupffer cell function after liver transplantation in the rat - in vivo evaluation with dynamic scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo physiological measurements of hepatocyte and Kupffer cell function after liver transplantation are desirable. Orthotopic liver transplantation was performed in 54 rats. Hepatocyte and Kupffer cell function were measured with dynamic liver scintigraphy. Hepatic clearance of 99mTc-Nanocoll (%/min), an albumin colloid phagocytosed by the Kupffer cells, was used to evaluate Kupffer cell function. Hepatic clearance of 99mTc-IODIDA (%/min), an imino-diacetic-acid taken up and secreted by the hepatocytes, was used to evaluate the hepatocyte function. Hepatic clearance in control rats was 27±2 %/min for Nanocoll and 30±3 %/min for IODIDA. After syngenic liver transplantation, without rejection, there was a rise in Nanocoll clearance (34±2 %/min p<0.01) after 3 weeks, but no change in IODIDA clearance (32± %/min N.S.). After syngenic liver transplantation with preservation time prolonged to 16 h, there were no changes in IODIDA or Nanocoll clearance 1 day after transplantation. Both IODIDA (11±2 %/min) and Nanocoll clearance (22±2 %/min) were decreased (p<0.001) during rejection after allogenic transplantation. An in vivo method of measuring the hepatocyte and Kupffer cell function in the transplanted liver is described. Kupffer cell function was increased after syngenic liver transplantation. Kupffer cell and hepatocyte function were decreased during rejection. Dynamic liver scintigraphy seems a suitable procedure for examining liver injury after liver transplantation in the experimental setting. (au) 23 refs

  7. Label-free and dynamic evaluation of cell-surface epidermal growth factor receptor expression via an electrochemiluminescence cytosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Youyi; Wen, Qingqing; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Peihui

    2016-04-01

    A label-free electrochemiluminescence (ECL) cytosensor was developed for dynamically evaluating of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression on MCF-7 cancer cells based on the specific recognition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) with its receptor (EGFR). EGF-cytosensor was fabricated by in-situ electro-polymerization of polyaniline as substrate, using CdS quantum dots (CdS QDs) as ECL probe and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a carrier for loading of EGF. AuNPs and CdS QDs were jointly attached on polyaniline surface to provide a sensitive and stable sensing interface, as well as a simple and label-free mode for ECL assay. Electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical methods were employed to characterize the multilayer construction process of the sensing interface. The proposed EGF-cytosensor exhibited excellent analytical performance for MCF-7 cancer cells, ranging from 12 to 1.2 × 10(6) cells mL(-1), with a low detection limit of 12 cells mL(-1). Also, it was successfully applied in evaluating EGFR expression of cells surface, which was stimulated by some inhibitors or activator, and the results were confirmed by using flow cytometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy analysis. The proposed ECL cytosensor has potential applications in monitoring the dynamic variation of receptor molecules expression on cell surfaces in response to external stimulation by drugs and screening anti-cancer therapeutic agents. PMID:26838410

  8. Dynamized Preparations in Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellanzhiyil Surendran Sunila

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929 and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The effect of dynamized medicines to induce apoptosis was also evaluated and we studied how dynamized medicines affected genes expressed during apoptosis. Mother tinctures as well as some dynamized medicines showed significant cytotoxicity to cells during short and long-term incubation. Potentiated alcohol control did not produce any cytotoxicity at concentrations studied. The dynamized medicines were found to inhibit CHO cell colony formation and thymidine uptake in L929 cells and those of Thuja, Hydrastis and Carcinosinum were found to induce apoptosis in DLA cells. Moreover, dynamized Carcinosinum was found to induce the expression of p53 while dynamized Thuja produced characteristic laddering pattern in agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA. These results indicate that dynamized medicines possess cytotoxic as well as apoptosis-inducing properties.

  9. Dynamized Preparations in Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Girija Kuttan; Korengath Chandran Preethi; Ramadasan Kuttan; Ellanzhiyil Surendran Sunila

    2009-01-01

    Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929) and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The ...

  10. Non-small cell lung cancer: evaluation of the relationship between fibrosis and washout feature at dynamic contrast enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To correlate dynamic parameters at contrast enhanced CT and interstitial fibrosis grade of' non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Twenty-nine patients with NSCLC were evaluated by multi-slice CT. Images were obtained before and at 20, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 180, 300, 540, 720, 900 and 1200 s after the injection of contrast media, which was administered at a rate of 4 ml/s for a total of 420 mg I/kg body weight. Washout parameters were calculated. Lung cancer specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin stain and collagen and elastic double stain. Spearman test was made to analyze correlation between dynamic parameters and interstitial fibrosis grade of tumor. Results: Twenty- nine NSCLC demonstrated washout at 20 min 12.1 (0.32-58.0) HU, washout ratio at 20 minutes 15.3% (0.3%-39.2%), slope of washout at 20 minutes 0.0152%/s (0.0007%/s-0.0561%/s). Interstitial fibrosis of 29 lesions was graded as grade Ⅰ (10), grade Ⅱ (14) and grade Ⅲ (5). There were significant correlation between washout at 20 min (r=-0.402, P<0.05), washout ratio at 20 min (r= -0.372, P<0.05), slope of washout ratio (r=-0.459, P<0.05) and interstitial fibrosis grade in tumors. Conclusion: NSCLC washout features at dynamic multi-detector CT correlates with interstitial fibrosis in the tumor. (authors)

  11. Evaluation of a load cell model for dynamic calibration of the rotor systems research aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, R. W.; Bahrami, H.; Wellman, B.

    1985-01-01

    The Rotor Systems Research Aircraft uses load cells to isolate the rotor/transmission system from the fuselage. An analytical model of the relationship between applied rotor loads and the resulting load cell measurements is derived by applying a force-and-moment balance to the isolated rotor/transmission system. The model is then used to estimate the applied loads from measured load cell data, as obtained from a ground-based shake test. Using nominal design values for the parameters, the estimation errors, for the case of lateral forcing, were shown to be on the order of the sensor measurement noise in all but the roll axis. An unmodeled external load appears to be the source of the error in this axis.

  12. Evaluating gambles using dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, O.; Gell-Mann, M.

    2016-02-01

    Gambles are random variables that model possible changes in wealth. Classic decision theory transforms money into utility through a utility function and defines the value of a gamble as the expectation value of utility changes. Utility functions aim to capture individual psychological characteristics, but their generality limits predictive power. Expectation value maximizers are defined as rational in economics, but expectation values are only meaningful in the presence of ensembles or in systems with ergodic properties, whereas decision-makers have no access to ensembles, and the variables representing wealth in the usual growth models do not have the relevant ergodic properties. Simultaneously addressing the shortcomings of utility and those of expectations, we propose to evaluate gambles by averaging wealth growth over time. No utility function is needed, but a dynamic must be specified to compute time averages. Linear and logarithmic "utility functions" appear as transformations that generate ergodic observables for purely additive and purely multiplicative dynamics, respectively. We highlight inconsistencies throughout the development of decision theory, whose correction clarifies that our perspective is legitimate. These invalidate a commonly cited argument for bounded utility functions.

  13. Microbial Cell Dynamics Lab (MCDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microbial Cell Dynamics Laboratory at PNNL enables scientists to study the molecular details of microbes under relevant environmental conditions. The MCDL seeks...

  14. Dynamic evaluation of low-temperature metal-supported solid oxide fuel cell oriented to auxiliary power units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenwei; Berghaus, Jörg Oberste; Yick, Sing; Decès-Petit, Cyrille; Qu, Wei; Hui, Rob; Maric, Radenka; Ghosh, Dave

    A metal-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) composed of a Ni-Ce 0.8Sm 0.2O 2- δ (Ni-SDC) cermet anode and an SDC electrolyte was fabricated by suspension plasma spraying on a Hastelloy X substrate. The cathode, an Sm 0.5Sr 0.5CoO 3 (SSCo)-SDC composite, was screen-printed and fired in situ. The dynamic behaviour of the cell was measured while subjected to complete fuel shutoff and rapid start-up cycles, as typically encountered in auxiliary power units (APU) applications. A promising performance - with a maximum power density (MPD) of 0.176 W cm -2 at 600 °C - was achieved using humidified hydrogen as fuel and air as the oxidant. The cell also showed excellent resistance to oxidation at 600 °C during fuel shutoff, with only a slight drop in performance after reintroduction of the fuel. The Cr and Mn species in the Hastelloy X alloy appeared to be preferentially oxidized while the oxidation of nickel in the metallic substrate was temporarily alleviated. In rapid start-up cycles with a heating rate of 60 °C min -1, noticeable performance deterioration took place in the first two thermal cycles, and then continued at a much slower rate in subsequent cycles. A postmortem analysis of the cell suggested that the degradation was mainly due to the mismatch of the thermal expansion coefficient across the cathode/electrolyte interface.

  15. Evaluation of in-plane local stress distribution in stacked IC chip using dynamic random access memory cell array for highly reliable three-dimensional IC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Seiya; Kino, Hisashi; Fukushima, Takafumi; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2016-04-01

    As three-dimensional (3D) ICs have many advantages, IC performances can be enhanced without scaling down of transistor size. However, 3D IC has mechanical stresses inside Si substrates owing to its 3D stacking structure, which induces negative effects on transistor performances such as carrier mobility changes. One of the mechanical stresses is local bending stress due to organic adhesive shrinkage among stacked IC chips. In this paper, we have proposed an evaluation method for in-plane local stress distribution in the stacked IC chips using retention time modulation of a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) cell array. We fabricated a test structure composed of a DRAM chip bonded on a Si interposer with dummy Cu/Sn microbumps. As a result, we clarified that the DRAM cell array can precisely evaluate the in-plane local stress distribution in the stacked IC chips.

  16. Epidermal stem cell dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Sieber-Blum, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Wong and Reiter have explored the possibility that hair follicle stem cells can give rise to basal cell carcinoma (BCC). They expressed in mice an inducible human BCC-derived oncogenic allele of Smoothened, SmoM2, under the control of either the cytokeratin 14 (K14) or cytokeratin 15 (K15) promoter. Smoothened encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor protein in the hedgehog pathway, the misregulation of which is implicated in BCC and other human cancers. Chronic injury is thought to be a contribu...

  17. Evaluating impact of market changes on increasing cell-load variation in dynamic cellular manufacturing systems using a hybrid Tabu search and simulated annealing algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidin Delgoshaei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method is proposed for scheduling dynamic cellular manufacturing systems (D-CMS in the presence of uncertain product demands. The aim of this method is to control the process of trading off between in-house manufacturing and outsourcing while product demands are uncertain and can be varied from period to period. To solve the proposed problem, a hybrid Tabu Search and Simulated Annealing are developed to overcome hardness of the proposed model and then results are compared with a Branch and Bound and Simulated Annealing algorithms. A Taguchi method (L_27 orthogonal optimization is used to estimate parameters of the proposed method in order to solve experiments derived from literature. An in-depth analysis is conducted on the results in consideration of various factors. For evaluating the system imbalance in dynamic market demands, a new measuring index is developed. Our findings indicate that the uncertain condition of market demands affects the routing of product parts and may induce machine-load variations that yield to cell-load diversity. The results showed that the proposed hybrid method can provide solutions with better quality.

  18. Evaluation of phosphopeptide enrichment strategies for quantitative TMT analysis of complex network dynamics in cancer-associated cell signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Benedetta Lombardi; Nigel Rendell; Mina Edwards; Matilda Katan; Jasminka Godovac Zimmermann

    2015-01-01

    Defining alterations in signalling pathways in normal and malignant cells is becoming a major field in proteomics. A number of different approaches have been established to isolate, identify and quantify phosphorylated proteins and peptides. In the current report, a comparison between SCX prefractionation versus an antibody based approach, both coupled to TiO2 enrichment and applied to TMT labelled cellular lysates, is described. The antibody strategy was more complete for enriching phosphope...

  19. Evaluation of phosphopeptide enrichment strategies for quantitative TMT analysis of complex network dynamics in cancer-associated cell signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Lombardi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Defining alterations in signalling pathways in normal and malignant cells is becoming a major field in proteomics. A number of different approaches have been established to isolate, identify and quantify phosphorylated proteins and peptides. In the current report, a comparison between SCX prefractionation versus an antibody based approach, both coupled to TiO2 enrichment and applied to TMT labelled cellular lysates, is described. The antibody strategy was more complete for enriching phosphopeptides and allowed the identification of a large set of proteins known to be phosphorylated (715 protein groups with a minimum number of not previously known phosphorylated proteins (2.

  20. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Scherer, Norbert F.; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy...

  1. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy to be dissipated per unit volume. We use the model to understand and contrast growth in bacteria with different shapes such as spherical, ellipsoidal, cylindrical and toroidal morphologies. Coupling growth to cell wall constriction, we predict a discontinuous shape transformation, from partial constriction to cell division, as a function of the chemical potential driving cell-wall synthesis. Our model for cell wall energy and shape dynamics relates growth kinetics with cell geometry, and provides a unified framework to d...

  2. Development and evaluation of a global dynamical wetlands extent scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Stacke, T.; Hagemann, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we present the development of the dynamical wetland extent scheme (DWES) and evaluate its skill to represent the global wetland distribution. The DWES is a simple, global scale hydrological scheme that solves the water balance of wetlands and estimates their extent dynamically. The extent depends on the balance of water flows in the wetlands and the slope distribution within the grid cells. In contrast to most models, the DWES is not directly calibrated against wetland extent ob...

  3. Epigenetic dynamics across the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kheir, Tony Bou; Lund, Anders H.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of the mammalian cell cycle depends on correct timing and co-ordination of a series of events, which are managed by the cellular transcriptional machinery and epigenetic mechanisms governing genome accessibility. Epigenetic chromatin modifications are dynamic across the cell cycle...... a correct inheritance of epigenetic chromatin modifications to daughter cells. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge on the dynamics of epigenetic chromatin modifications during progression of the cell cycle....

  4. About Evaluation of Complex Dynamical Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Dmytro Polishchuk; Olexandr Polishchuk

    2016-01-01

    The methods are proposed for evaluation of complex dynamical systems, choice of their optimal operating modes, determination of optimal operating system from given class of equivalent systems, system's timeline behaviour analysis on the basis of versatile multicriteria and multilevel analysis of behaviour of system's elements.

  5. Cell Division, Differentiation and Dynamic Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, K; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Yomo, Tetsuya

    1993-01-01

    A novel mechanism for cell differentiation is proposed, based on the dynamic clustering in a globally coupled chaotic system. A simple model with metabolic reaction, active transport of chemicals from media, and cell division is found to show three successive stages with the growth of the number of cells; coherent growth, dynamic clustering, and fixed cell differentiation. At the last stage, disparity in activities, germ line segregation, somatic cell differentiation, and homeochaotic stability against external perturbation are found. Our results, in consistency with the experiments of the preceding paper, imply that cell differentiation can occur without a spatial pattern. From dynamical systems viewpoint, the new concept of ``open chaos" is proposed, as a novel and general scenario for systems with growing numbers of elements, also seen in economics and sociology.A

  6. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  7. Evaluation of Dynamic Methods for Earthwork Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlček Jozef

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of road construction imposes requests on fast and quality methods for earthwork quality evaluation. Dynamic methods are now adopted in numerous civil engineering sections. Especially evaluation of the earthwork quality can be sped up using dynamic equipment. This paper presents the results of the parallel measurements of chosen devices for determining the level of compaction of soils. Measurements were used to develop the correlations between values obtained from various apparatuses. Correlations show that examined apparatuses are suitable for examination of compaction level of fine-grained soils with consideration of boundary conditions of used equipment. Presented methods are quick and results can be obtained immediately after measurement, and they are thus suitable in cases when construction works have to be performed in a short period of time.

  8. Evaluation of pressure transducers. Dynamic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of a pressure transducer consists in checking its specifications. The tests of rapidity with a shock tube are important because they allow to find out transducer response time under a pressure step and also its natural frequency and damping. These last two data define the whole dynamic work of a fast transducer as the accuracy of the amplitude versus frequency function, the phase rotation, limit of use, overload. Several tests carried out on ETCA shock tube are described

  9. Quantitative evaluation of the reticuloendothelial system function with dynamic MRI.

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    Ting Liu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the reticuloendothelial system (RES function by real-time imaging blood clearance as well as hepatic uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPIO using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with two-compartment pharmacokinetic modeling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Kinetics of blood clearance and hepatic accumulation were recorded in young adult male 01b74 athymic nude mice by dynamic T2* weighted MRI after the injection of different doses of SPIO nanoparticles (0.5, 3 or 10 mg Fe/kg. Association parameter, Kin, dissociation parameter, Kout, and elimination constant, Ke, derived from dynamic data with two-compartment model, were used to describe active binding to Kupffer cells and extrahepatic clearance. The clodrosome and liposome were utilized to deplete macrophages and block the RES function to evaluate the capability of the kinetic parameters for investigation of macrophage function and density. RESULTS: The two-compartment model provided a good description for all data and showed a low sum squared residual for all mice (0.27±0.03. A lower Kin, a lower Kout and a lower Ke were found after clodrosome treatment, whereas a lower Kin, a higher Kout and a lower Ke were observed after liposome treatment in comparison to saline treatment (P<0.005. CONCLUSION: Dynamic SPIO-enhanced MR imaging with two-compartment modeling can provide information on RES function on both a cell number and receptor function level.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of Centralized Dynamic Cell Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Victor Fernandez; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret; Pedersen, Klaus I.;

    2016-01-01

    mechanism and solutions involving cell switching in general. Simulation results show that such solutions can greatly benefit from the use of receivers with interference suppression capabilities and a larger number of antennas, with a maximum data rate gain of 120%. High performance gains are observed with...... two different traffic models, and it is not necessary to be able to connect to a large number of cells in order to reap most of the benefits of the centralized dynamic cell selection....

  11. Experimental evaluation of cell liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell liners may be used in breeder reactor sodium pipe ways, sodium cells, and lower cavity region to provide a leak-tight cell and to protect the concrete from sodium in the unlikely event of a sodium spill. The objectives of the HEDL liner verification test program are to evaluate the integrity of liner concepts under postulated accident conditions and to develop the experimental data base which will demonstrate that liners will not fail. Two specific tests are reported; a high temperature liner feature test, and a large-scale liner sodium spill test. In both tests no failures of the liners or tendencies toward failure were detected. The discussed liner designs appeared to be conservative, and the liner strength appeared to be more than adequate

  12. Cell-wall dynamics in growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furchtgott, Leon; Wingreen, Ned; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial cells come in a large variety of shapes, and cell shape plays an important role in the regulation of many biological functions. Cell shape in bacterial cells is dictated by a cell wall composed of peptidoglycan, a polymer made up of long, stiff glycan strands and flexible peptide crosslinks. Although much is understood about the structural properties of peptidoglycan, little is known about the dynamics of cell wall organization in bacterial cells. In particular, during cell growth, how does the bacterial cell wall continuously expand and reorganize while maintaining cell shape? In order to investigate this question quantitatively, we model the cell wall of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli using a simple elastic model, in which glycan and peptide subunits are treated as springs with different spring constants and relaxed lengths. We consider the peptidoglycan network as a single-layered network of these springs under tension due to an internal osmotic pressure. Within this model, we simulate possible hypotheses for cell growth as different combinations of addition of new springs and breakage of old springs.

  13. Mitochondrial dynamics and the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear-mitochondrial (NM) communication impacts many aspects of plant development including vigor, sterility and viability. Dynamic changes in mitochondrial number, shape, size, and cellular location takes place during the cell cycle possibly impacting the process itself and leading to distribution...

  14. Dynamical Adaptation in Terrorist Cells/Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Ahmed, Zaki

    2010-01-01

    followers etc. In this research we analyze and predict the most likely role a particular node can adapt once a member of the network is either killed or caught. The adaptation is based on computing Bayes posteriori probability of each node and the level of the said node in the network structure.......Typical terrorist cells/networks have dynamical structure as they evolve or adapt to changes which may occur due to capturing or killing of a member of the cell/network. Analytical measures in graph theory like degree centrality, betweenness and closeness centralities are very common and have long...

  15. Cell list algorithms for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Matthew; Fox, Ian; Saracino, Alexandra

    2016-06-01

    We present two modifications of the standard cell list algorithm that handle molecular dynamics simulations with deforming periodic geometry. Such geometry naturally arises in the simulation of homogeneous, linear nonequilibrium flow modeled with periodic boundary conditions, and recent progress has been made developing boundary conditions suitable for general 3D flows of this type. Previous works focused on the planar flows handled by Lees-Edwards or Kraynik-Reinelt boundary conditions, while the new versions of the cell list algorithm presented here are formulated to handle the general 3D deforming simulation geometry. As in the case of equilibrium, for short-ranged pairwise interactions, the cell list algorithm reduces the computational complexity of the force computation from O(N2) to O(N), where N is the total number of particles in the simulation box. We include a comparison of the complexity and efficiency of the two proposed modifications of the standard algorithm.

  16. Development and evaluation of a global dynamical wetlands extent scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Stacke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present the development of the dynamical wetland extent scheme (DWES and evaluate its skill to represent the global wetland distribution. The DWES is a simple, global scale hydrological scheme that solves the water balance of wetlands and estimates their extent dynamically. The extent depends on the balance of water flows in the wetlands and the slope distribution within the grid cells. In contrast to most models, the DWES is not directly calibrated against wetland extent observations. Instead, wetland affected river discharge data are used to optimise global parameters of the model. The DWES is not a complete hydrological model by itself but implemented into the Max Planck Institute – Hydrology Model (MPI-HM. However, it can be transferred into other models as well.

    For present climate, the model evaluation reveals a good agreement for the spatial distribution of simulated wetlands compared to different observations on the global scale. The best results are achieved for the Northern Hemisphere where not only the wetland distribution pattern but also their extent is simulated reasonably well by the DWES. However, the wetland fraction in the tropical parts of South America and Central Africa is strongly overestimated. The simulated extent dynamics correlate well with monthly inundation variations obtained from satellites for most locations. Also, the simulated river discharge is affected by wetlands resulting in a delay and mitigation of peak flows. Compared to simulations without wetlands, we find locally increased evaporation and decreased river flow into the oceans due to the implemented wetland processes.

    In summary, the evaluation demonstrates the DWES' ability to simulate the distribution of wetlands and their seasonal variations for most regions. Thus, the DWES can provide hydrological boundary conditions for wetland related studies. In future applications, the DWES may be implemented into an Earth

  17. Purinergic responses of chondrogenic stem cells to dynamic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gađanski Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In habitually loaded tissues, dynamic loading can trigger ATP (adenosine 5’- triphosphate release to extracellular environment, and result in calcium signaling via ATP binding to purine P2 receptors1. In the current study we have compared purinergic responses (ATP release of two types of cells: bovine chondrocytes (bCHs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC that were encapsulated in agarose and subjected to dynamic loading. Both cell types were cultured under chondrogenic conditions, and their responses to loading were evaluated by ATP release assay in combination with connexin (Cx-sensitive fluorescent dye (Lucifer Yellow - LY and a Cx-hemichannel blocker (Flufenamic acid - FFA. In response to dynamic loading, chondrogenic hMSCs released significantly higher amounts of ATP (5-fold in comparison to the bCHs early in culture (day 2. Triggering of LY uptake in the bCHs and hMSCs by dynamic loading implies opening of the Cx-hemichannels. However, the number of LY-positive cells in hMSC-constructs was 2.5-fold lower compared to the loaded bCH-constructs, suggesting utilization of additional mechanisms of ATP release. Cx-reactive sites were detected in both bCHs and hMSCs-constructs. FFA application led to reduced ATP release both in bCHs and hMSCs, which confirms the involvement of connexin hemichannels, with more prominent effects in bCHs than in hMSCs, further implying the existence of additional mechanism of ATP release in chondrogenic hMSCs. Taken together, these results indicate stronger purinergic response to dynamic loading of chondrogenic hMSCs than primary chondrocytes, by activation of connexin hemichannels and additional mechanisms of ATP release. [Projekat Ministrastva nauke Republike Srbije, ON174028 i br. III41007

  18. Sonovestibular symptoms evaluated by computed dynamic posturography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teszler, C B; Ben-David, J; Podoshin, L; Sabo, E

    2000-01-01

    The investigation of stability under bilateral acoustic stimulation was undertaken in an attempt to mimic the real-life conditions of noisy environment (e.g., industry, aviation). The Tullio phenomenon evaluated by computed dynamic posturography (CDP) under acoustic stimulation is reflected in postural unsteadiness, rather than in the classic nystagmus. With such a method, the dangerous effects of noise-induced instability can be assessed and prevented. Three groups of subjects were submitted. The first (group A) included 20 patients who complained of sonovestibular symptoms (i.e., Tullio phenomenon) on the background of an inner-ear disease. The second group (B) included 20 neurootological patients without a history of Tullio phenomenon. Group C consisted of 20 patients with normal hearing, as controls. A pure-tone stimulus of 1,000 Hz at 110 dB was delivered binaurally for 20 seconds during condition 5 and condition 6 of the CDP sensory organization test. The sequence of six sensory organization conditions was performed three times with two intermissions of 15-20 minutes between the trials. The first was performed in the regular mode (quiet stance). This was followed 20 minutes by a trial carried out in quiet stance in sensory organizations tests (SOTs) 1 through 4, and with acoustic stimulation in SOT 5 and SOT 6. The last test was performed in quiet stance throughout (identical to the first trial). A significant drop in the composite equilibrium score was witnessed in group A patients upon acoustic stimulation (p statistical significance. This establishes the described method as a sensitive testing technique for validating the existence of the Tullio phenomenon in patients with a variety of disorders of the inner ear, especially chronic noise-induced hearing loss and acute acoustic trauma. All patients who suffered phonic trauma, chronic exposure to noise (e.g., aviation employees, industry and army personnel), or other neurootological disorders and who

  19. Mechanosensing Dynamics of Red blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jiandi

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stress-induced deformation of human red blood cells (RBCs) plays important physiopathological roles in oxygen delivery, blood rheology, transfusion, and malaria. Recent studies demonstrate that, in response to mechanical deformation, RBCs release adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), suggesting the existence of mechanotransductive pathways in RBCs. Most importantly, the released ATP from RBCs regulates vascular tone and impaired release of ATP from RBCs has been linked to diseases such as type II diabetes and cystic fibrosis. To date, however, the mechanisms of mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs remain unclear. Given that RBCs experience shear stresses continuously during the circulation cycle and the released ATP plays a central role in vascular physiopathology, understanding the mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs will provide not only fundamental insights to the role of RBCs in vascular homeostasis but also novel therapeutic strategies for red cell dysfunction and vascular disease. This talk describes the main research in my group on integrating microfluidic-based approaches to study the mechanosensing dynamics of RBCs. Specifically, I will introduce a micro?uidic approach that can probe the dynamics of shear-induced ATP release from RBCs with millisecond resolution and provide quantitative understandings of the mechanosensitive ATP release processes in RBCs. Furthermore, I will also describe our recent findings about the roles of the Piezo1 channel, a newly discovered mechanosensitive cation channel in the mechanotransductive ATP release in RBCs. Last, possible functions of RBCs in the regulation of cerebral blood flow will be discussed.

  20. Subjective evaluation of higher dynamic range video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanhart, Philippe; Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2014-09-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) imaging is able to capture a wide range of luminance values, closer to what the human eye can perceive. However, for capture and display technologies, it is important to answer the question on the significance of higher dynamic range for user preference. This paper answers this question by investigating the added value of higher dynamic range via a rigorous set of subjective experiments using paired comparison methodology. Video sequences at four different peak luminance levels were displayed side-by-side on a Dolby Research HDR RGB backlight dual modulation display (aka `Pulsar'), which is capable of reliably displaying video content at 4000 cd=m2 peak luminance. The results of the subjective experiment demonstrate that the preference of an average viewer increases logarithmically with the increase in the maximum luminance level at which HDR content is displayed, with 4000 cd=m2 being the most attractive option.

  1. Fluorescent tags to explore cell wall structure and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Gonneau, Martine; Höfte, Herman; Vernhettes, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are highly dynamic and heterogeneous structures, which vary between cell types, growth stages but also between microdomains within a single cell wall. In this review, we summarize the imaging techniques using fluorescent tags that are currently being used and which should in the coming years revolutionize our understanding of the dynamics of cell wall architecture and the cellular processes involved in the synthesis of cell wall components.

  2. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  3. Seismic evaluation of a hot cell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of the structural capacity of and the seismic demand on an existing hot cell structure in a nuclear facility is described. An ANSYS finite-element model of the cell was constructed, treating the walls as plates and the floor and ceiling as a system of discrete beams. A modal analysis showed that the fundamental frequencies of the cell walls lie far above the earthquake frequency range. An equivalent static analysis of the structure was performed. Based on the analysis it was demonstrated that the hot cell structure, would readily withstand the evaluation basis earthquake

  4. Protein Dynamics in Individual Human Cells: Experiment and Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Ariel Aharon; Kalisky, Tomer; Mayo, Avi; Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Danon, Tamar; Issaeva, Irina; Perzov, Natalie; Sigal, Alex; Alon, Uri; Isalan, Mark; Kopito, Ronen; Milo, Ron

    2009-01-01

    A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle–dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time pe...

  5. Sustainable test cell : performance evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Pedro Correia Pereira da; Bragança, L.; Mendonça, Paulo; Almeida, Manuela Guedes de

    2006-01-01

    Energy is one of the main causes of the environmental pollution. In the European Union, buildings are responsible for 40% of the final energy demand and 1/3 of the emissions of greenhouse gases. Therefore, in order to promote the energy consumption reduction, it is fundamental to employ sustainable development principles in the construction sector. In order to demonstrate and show the potentialities of Sustainable building technologies two Test Cells were built. Comparing the solutions obtain...

  6. Fluorescent tags to explore cell wall structure and dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Martine eGonneau; Herman eHöfte; Samantha eVernhettes

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are highly dynamic and heterogeneic structures, which vary between celltypes, growth stages but also between microdomains within a single cell wall. In this review, we summarize the imaging techniques using fluorescent tags that are currently being used and which should in the coming years revolutionize our understanding of the dynamics of cell wall architecture and the cellular processes involved in synthesis of cell wall components.

  7. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  8. Evaluating the Dynamic Nature of Market Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbs, Todd; Kuethe, Todd H.; Timothy G. Baker

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the systematic risk present in major crops for the United States and three corn-belt states. An index of commodities is used in conjunction with cash receipts to generate dynamic estimates of the systematic risk for each crop and state. In our study, we find that beta estimates from a time varying parameter model (FLS) and OLS formulation are substantially different. From our graphs of betas over time, one gains insight into the changing nature of risk and the impact of in...

  9. Evaluating human cancer cell metastasis in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo metastasis assays have traditionally been performed in mice, but the process is inefficient and costly. However, since zebrafish do not develop an adaptive immune system until 14 days post-fertilization, human cancer cells can survive and metastasize when transplanted into zebrafish larvae. Despite isolated reports, there has been no systematic evaluation of the robustness of this system to date. Individual cell lines were stained with CM-Dil and injected into the perivitelline space of 2-day old zebrafish larvae. After 2-4 days fish were imaged using confocal microscopy and the number of metastatic cells was determined using Fiji software. To determine whether zebrafish can faithfully report metastatic potential in human cancer cells, we injected a series of cells with different metastatic potential into the perivitelline space of 2 day old embryos. Using cells from breast, prostate, colon and pancreas we demonstrated that the degree of cell metastasis in fish is proportional to their invasion potential in vitro. Highly metastatic cells such as MDA231, DU145, SW620 and ASPC-1 are seen in the vasculature and throughout the body of the fish after only 24–48 hours. Importantly, cells that are not invasive in vitro such as T47D, LNCaP and HT29 do not metastasize in fish. Inactivation of JAK1/2 in fibrosarcoma cells leads to loss of invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo, and in zebrafish these cells show limited spread throughout the zebrafish body compared with the highly metastatic parental cells. Further, knockdown of WASF3 in DU145 cells which leads to loss of invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo also results in suppression of metastasis in zebrafish. In a cancer progression model involving normal MCF10A breast epithelial cells, the degree of invasion/metastasis in vitro and in mice is mirrored in zebrafish. Using a modified version of Fiji software, it is possible to quantify individual metastatic cells in the transparent larvae to correlate with

  10. Fluid dynamics and noise in bacterial cell-cell and cell-surface scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Drescher, Knut; Cisneros, Luis H; Ganguly, Sujoy; Goldstein, Raymond E; 10.1073/pnas.1019079108

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial processes ranging from gene expression to motility and biofilm formation are constantly challenged by internal and external noise. While the importance of stochastic fluctuations has been appreciated for chemotaxis, it is currently believed that deterministic long-range fluid dynamical effects govern cell-cell and cell-surface scattering - the elementary events that lead to swarming and collective swimming in active suspensions and to the formation of biofilms. Here, we report the first direct measurements of the bacterial flow field generated by individual swimming Escherichia coli both far from and near to a solid surface. These experiments allowed us to examine the relative importance of fluid dynamics and rotational diffusion for bacteria. For cell-cell interactions it is shown that thermal and intrinsic stochasticity drown the effects of long-range fluid dynamics, implying that physical interactions between bacteria are determined by steric collisions and near-field lubrication forces. This dom...

  11. Peer Dynamics 1978-79 Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winger, Joan

    This is an evaluation of the first year of a program designed to reduce the incidence of destructive risk-taking behavior (e.g., drug-alcohol abuse and juvenile delinquency) among school-age youth. Background research indicates that peer group pressure is the single most important factor in dictating the presence or absence of juvenile delinquency…

  12. Peer Dynamics 1977-78 Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shada, Marsha; Winger, Joan

    This is an evaluation of the second year of a program designed to reduce the incidence of destructive risk-taking behavior (e.g., drug-alcohol abuse and juvenile delinquency) among school-age youth. Background research indicates that peer group pressure is the single most important factor in dictating the presence or absence of juvenile…

  13. A dynamic performance evaluation method based on SD-BSC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG Chun-xian; PAN Xiao-dong; HU Xian-wu

    2007-01-01

    Taking into consideration the disadvantage of Balanced Scorecard (BSC) not being able to reflect time delay, nonlinear problems of causal relationship and being lack of effective simulation, we combined it with the characteristics of the System Dynamics (SD). Basing on the background of manufacturing enterprises,through SD integrating with the BSC we established a new performance evaluation method-SD-BSC method to overcome the disadvantage of BSC. A performance evaluation model of SD-BSC is provided and the simulation results are analyzed which show different production policies will lead to different customer's satisfaction degrees. The SD-BSC dynamic performance evaluation method can reflect dynamic, complex causal feedback relationship and time delay, so it compensates for the disadvantage of traditional financial performance evaluation method, and at the same time makes the BSC perfect.

  14. Discharging dynamics in an electrolytic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feicht, Sarah E; Frankel, Alexandra E; Khair, Aditya S

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a discharging electrolytic cell comprised of a binary symmetric electrolyte between two planar, parallel blocking electrodes. When a voltage is initially applied, ions in the electrolyte migrate towards the electrodes, forming electrical double layers. After the system reaches steady state and the external current decays to zero, the applied voltage is switched off and the cell discharges, with the ions eventually returning to a uniform spatial concentration. At voltages on the order of the thermal voltage V_{T}=k_{B}T/q≃25 mV, where k_{B} is Boltzmann's constant, T is temperature, and q is the charge of a proton, experiments on surfactant-doped nonpolar fluids observe that the temporal evolution of the external current during charging and discharging is not symmetric [V. Novotny and M. A. Hopper, J. Electrochem. Soc. 126, 925 (1979)JESOAN0013-465110.1149/1.2129195; P. Kornilovitch and Y. Jeon, J. Appl. Phys. 109, 064509 (2011)JAPIAU0021-897910.1063/1.3554445]. In fact, at sufficiently large voltages (several V_{T}), the current during discharging is no longer monotonic: it displays a "reverse peak" before decaying in magnitude to zero. We analyze the dynamics of discharging by solving the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations governing ion transport via asymptotic and numerical techniques in three regimes. First, in the "linear regime" when the applied voltage V is formally much less than V_{T}, the charging and discharging currents are antisymmetric in time; however, the potential and charge density profiles during charging and discharging are asymmetric. The current evolution is on the RC timescale of the cell, λ_{D}L/D, where L is the width of the cell, D is the diffusivity of ions, and λ_{D} is the Debye length. Second, in the (experimentally relevant) thin-double-layer limit ε=λ_{D}/L≪1, there is a "weakly nonlinear" regime defined by V_{T}≲V≲V_{T}ln(1/ε), where the bulk salt concentration is uniform; thus the RC timescale of

  15. Evaluating effectiveness of dynamic soundfield system in the classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Aline Duarte da Cruz; Kelly Cristina Alves Silvério; Aline Roberta Aceituno Da Costa; Adriane de Lima Mortari Moret; José Roberto Pereira Lauris; Regina Tangerino de Souza Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Research has reported on the use of soundfield amplification devices in the classroom. However, no study has used standardized tests to determine the potential advantages of the dynamic soundfield system for normally hearing students and for the teacher′s voice. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of using dynamic soundfield system on the noise of the classroom, teacher′s voice and students′ academic performance. This was a prospective cohort study in which 20 student participants enrolled in ...

  16. Empirical policy functions as benchmarks for evaluation of dynamic models

    OpenAIRE

    Bazdresch, Santiago; Kahn, R. Jay; Whited, Toni

    2011-01-01

    We describe a set of model-dependent statistical benchmarks that can be used to estimate and evaluate dynamic models of firms' investment and financing. The benchmarks characterize the empirical counterparts of the models' policy functions. These empirical policy functions (EPFs) are intuitively related to the corresponding model, their features can be estimated very easily and robustly, and they describe economically important aspects of firms' dynamic behavior. We calculate the benchmarks f...

  17. Quantitative Evaluation of the Reticuloendothelial System Function with Dynamic MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ting; Choi, Hoon; Zhou, Rong; Chen, I-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the reticuloendothelial system (RES) function by real-time imaging blood clearance as well as hepatic uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPIO) using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with two-compartment pharmacokinetic modeling. Materials and Methods Kinetics of blood clearance and hepatic accumulation were recorded in young adult male 01b74 athymic nude mice by dynamic T2* weighted MRI after the injection of different doses of SPIO nanoparticles ...

  18. Evaluating Cell Processes, Quality, and Biomarkers in Pluripotent Stem Cells Using Video Bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Atena; On, Vincent; Lin, Sabrina C; Bays, Brett C; Omaiye, Esther; Bhanu, Bir; Talbot, Prue

    2016-01-01

    There is a foundational need for quality control tools in stem cell laboratories engaged in basic research, regenerative therapies, and toxicological studies. These tools require automated methods for evaluating cell processes and quality during in vitro passaging, expansion, maintenance, and differentiation. In this paper, an unbiased, automated high-content profiling toolkit, StemCellQC, is presented that non-invasively extracts information on cell quality and cellular processes from time-lapse phase-contrast videos. Twenty four (24) morphological and dynamic features were analyzed in healthy, unhealthy, and dying human embryonic stem cell (hESC) colonies to identify those features that were affected in each group. Multiple features differed in the healthy versus unhealthy/dying groups, and these features were linked to growth, motility, and death. Biomarkers were discovered that predicted cell processes before they were detectable by manual observation. StemCellQC distinguished healthy and unhealthy/dying hESC colonies with 96% accuracy by non-invasively measuring and tracking dynamic and morphological features over 48 hours. Changes in cellular processes can be monitored by StemCellQC and predictions can be made about the quality of pluripotent stem cell colonies. This toolkit reduced the time and resources required to track multiple pluripotent stem cell colonies and eliminated handling errors and false classifications due to human bias. StemCellQC provided both user-specified and classifier-determined analysis in cases where the affected features are not intuitive or anticipated. Video analysis algorithms allowed assessment of biological phenomena using automatic detection analysis, which can aid facilities where maintaining stem cell quality and/or monitoring changes in cellular processes are essential. In the future StemCellQC can be expanded to include other features, cell types, treatments, and differentiating cells. PMID:26848582

  19. Evaluating Cell Processes, Quality, and Biomarkers in Pluripotent Stem Cells Using Video Bioinformatics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atena Zahedi

    Full Text Available There is a foundational need for quality control tools in stem cell laboratories engaged in basic research, regenerative therapies, and toxicological studies. These tools require automated methods for evaluating cell processes and quality during in vitro passaging, expansion, maintenance, and differentiation. In this paper, an unbiased, automated high-content profiling toolkit, StemCellQC, is presented that non-invasively extracts information on cell quality and cellular processes from time-lapse phase-contrast videos. Twenty four (24 morphological and dynamic features were analyzed in healthy, unhealthy, and dying human embryonic stem cell (hESC colonies to identify those features that were affected in each group. Multiple features differed in the healthy versus unhealthy/dying groups, and these features were linked to growth, motility, and death. Biomarkers were discovered that predicted cell processes before they were detectable by manual observation. StemCellQC distinguished healthy and unhealthy/dying hESC colonies with 96% accuracy by non-invasively measuring and tracking dynamic and morphological features over 48 hours. Changes in cellular processes can be monitored by StemCellQC and predictions can be made about the quality of pluripotent stem cell colonies. This toolkit reduced the time and resources required to track multiple pluripotent stem cell colonies and eliminated handling errors and false classifications due to human bias. StemCellQC provided both user-specified and classifier-determined analysis in cases where the affected features are not intuitive or anticipated. Video analysis algorithms allowed assessment of biological phenomena using automatic detection analysis, which can aid facilities where maintaining stem cell quality and/or monitoring changes in cellular processes are essential. In the future StemCellQC can be expanded to include other features, cell types, treatments, and differentiating cells.

  20. Multispectral fingerprinting for improved in vivo cell dynamics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Cameron HJ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracing cell dynamics in the embryo becomes tremendously difficult when cell trajectories cross in space and time and tissue density obscure individual cell borders. Here, we used the chick neural crest (NC as a model to test multicolor cell labeling and multispectral confocal imaging strategies to overcome these roadblocks. Results We found that multicolor nuclear cell labeling and multispectral imaging led to improved resolution of in vivo NC cell identification by providing a unique spectral identity for each cell. NC cell spectral identity allowed for more accurate cell tracking and was consistent during short term time-lapse imaging sessions. Computer model simulations predicted significantly better object counting for increasing cell densities in 3-color compared to 1-color nuclear cell labeling. To better resolve cell contacts, we show that a combination of 2-color membrane and 1-color nuclear cell labeling dramatically improved the semi-automated analysis of NC cell interactions, yet preserved the ability to track cell movements. We also found channel versus lambda scanning of multicolor labeled embryos significantly reduced the time and effort of image acquisition and analysis of large 3D volume data sets. Conclusions Our results reveal that multicolor cell labeling and multispectral imaging provide a cellular fingerprint that may uniquely determine a cell's position within the embryo. Together, these methods offer a spectral toolbox to resolve in vivo cell dynamics in unprecedented detail.

  1. Single cell migration dynamics mediated by geometric confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Hou, Ruixia; Xiao, Peng; Xing, Rubo; Chen, Tao; Han, Yanchun; Ren, Penggang; Fu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The migration dynamics of cells plays a key role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Previous studies mostly focus on regulating stem cell fate and phenotype by biophysical cues. In contrast, less is known about how the geometric cues mediate the migration dynamics of cells. Here, we fabricate graphene oxide (GO) microstripes on cell non-adhesive PEG substrate by using micromolding in capillary (MIMIC) method. Such micropatterns with alternating cell adhesion and cell resistance enable an effective control of selective adhesion and migration of single cells. The sharp contrast in cell adhesion minimizes the invasion of cells into the PEG patterns, and thereby strongly confines the cells on GO microstripes. As a result, the cells are forced to adapt highly polarized, elongated, and oriented geometry to fit the patterns. A series of pattern widths have been fabricated to modulate the extent of cell deformation and polarization. Under strong confinement, the cytoskeleton contractility, intracellular traction, and actin filament elongation are highly promoted, which result in enhanced cell migration along the patterns. This work provides an important insight into developing combinatorial graphene-based patterns for the control of cell migration dynamics, which is of great significance for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:27137805

  2. Internal dynamics of a living cell nucleus investigated by dynamic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suissa, M.; Place, C.; Goillot, E.; Freyssingeas, E.

    2008-08-01

    Recent progresses in cellular biology have shown that the nucleus of a living cell is a structured integration of many functional domains with a complex spatial organization. This organization, as well as molecular and biochemical processes, is time regulated. In the past years many investigations have been performed using fluorescent microscopy techniques to study the internal dynamics of the nucleus of a living cell. These investigations, however, have never focussed on the global internal dynamics of the nucleus, which is still unknown. In this article we present an original light scattering experimental device that we built to investigate this dynamics during biological processes. By means of this experimental set-up, we investigated the global dynamics of the nucleus of a living cell treated with a DNA replication inhibitor. This dynamics presents different and independent kinds of relaxation well separated in time that vary as a function of the cell cycle phases.

  3. Automated Evaluation of Dynamic Performance of Impulse Voltage Measurement Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manuscript presents and describes an automated system for the evaluation of the dynamic performance of high-voltage measurement systems, according to the requirements of the standard IEC 60060-2/2010. The system was developed in LabVIEW and controls the acquisition, measurement and analysis of step response tests of measurement systems, automatically calculating the relevant amplitude and time parameters

  4. Exploring Neural Cell Dynamics with Digital Holographic Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre

    2013-04-21

    In this talk, I will present how digital holographic microscopy, as a powerful quantitative phase technique, can non-invasively measure cell dynamics and especially resolve local neuronal network activity through simultaneous multiple site optical recording.

  5. F-pili dynamics by live-cell imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Margaret; Maddera, Lucinda; Harris, Robin L.; Silverman, Philip M.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved numerous mechanisms for cell–cell communication, many of which have important consequences for human health. Among these is conjugation, the direct transfer of DNA from one cell to another. For Gram-negative bacteria, conjugation requires thin, flexible filaments (conjugative pili) that are elaborated by DNA donor cells. The structure, function, and especially the dynamics of conjugative pili are poorly understood. Here, we have applied live-cell imaging to characterize ...

  6. IMAGING RED BLOOD CELL DYNAMICS BY QUANTITATIVE PHASE MICROSCOPY

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, Gabriel; Park, YoungKeun; Choi, Wonshik; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Michael S. Feld; Badizadegan, Kamran

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) play a crucial role in health and disease, and structural and mechanical abnormalities of these cells have been associated with important disorders such as Sickle cell disease and hereditary cytoskeletal abnormalities. Although several experimental methods exist for analysis of RBC mechanical properties, optical methods stand out as they enable collecting mechanical and dynamic data from live cells without physical contact and without the need for exogenous contrast age...

  7. Protein dynamics in individual human cells: experiment and theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Aharon Cohen

    Full Text Available A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle-dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time per cell is quadratic for proteins with long mRNA life times and approximately linear for a protein with short mRNA lifetime. Both behaviors correspond to a classical model of transcription and translation. A stochastic model, in which genes slowly switch between ON and OFF states, captures measured cell-cell variability. The data suggests, in accordance with the model, that switching to the gene ON state is exponentially distributed and that the cell-cell distribution of protein levels can be approximated by a Gamma distribution throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that relatively simple models may describe protein dynamics in individual human cells.

  8. Mitochondrial Dynamics Controls T Cell Fate through Metabolic Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Michael D; O'Sullivan, David; Klein Geltink, Ramon I; Curtis, Jonathan D; Chang, Chih-Hao; Sanin, David E; Qiu, Jing; Kretz, Oliver; Braas, Daniel; van der Windt, Gerritje J W; Chen, Qiongyu; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; O'Neill, Christina M; Edelson, Brian T; Pearce, Edward J; Sesaki, Hiromi; Huber, Tobias B; Rambold, Angelika S; Pearce, Erika L

    2016-06-30

    Activated effector T (TE) cells augment anabolic pathways of metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis, while memory T (TM) cells engage catabolic pathways, like fatty acid oxidation (FAO). However, signals that drive these differences remain unclear. Mitochondria are metabolic organelles that actively transform their ultrastructure. Therefore, we questioned whether mitochondrial dynamics controls T cell metabolism. We show that TE cells have punctate mitochondria, while TM cells maintain fused networks. The fusion protein Opa1 is required for TM, but not TE cells after infection, and enforcing fusion in TE cells imposes TM cell characteristics and enhances antitumor function. Our data suggest that, by altering cristae morphology, fusion in TM cells configures electron transport chain (ETC) complex associations favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and FAO, while fission in TE cells leads to cristae expansion, reducing ETC efficiency and promoting aerobic glycolysis. Thus, mitochondrial remodeling is a signaling mechanism that instructs T cell metabolic programming. PMID:27293185

  9. A positive feedback cell signaling nucleation model of astrocyte dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, Christopher L.; Silva, Gabriel A.

    2013-01-01

    We constructed a model of calcium signaling in astrocyte neural glial cells that incorporates a positive feedback nucleation mechanism, whereby small microdomain increases in local calcium can stochastically produce global cellular and intercellular network scale dynamics. The model is able to simultaneously capture dynamic spatial and temporal heterogeneities associated with intracellular calcium transients in individual cells and intercellular calcium waves (ICW) in spatially realistic netw...

  10. Sensitivity evaluation of dynamic speckle activity measurements using clustering methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluate and compare the use of competitive neural networks, self-organizing maps, the expectation-maximization algorithm, K-means, and fuzzy C-means techniques as partitional clustering methods, when the sensitivity of the activity measurement of dynamic speckle images needs to be improved. The temporal history of the acquired intensity generated by each pixel is analyzed in a wavelet decomposition framework, and it is shown that the mean energy of its corresponding wavelet coefficients provides a suited feature space for clustering purposes. The sensitivity obtained by using the evaluated clustering techniques is also compared with the well-known methods of Konishi-Fujii, weighted generalized differences, and wavelet entropy. The performance of the partitional clustering approach is evaluated using simulated dynamic speckle patterns and also experimental data.

  11. Durability evaluation of reversible solid oxide cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; O'Brien, James E.; O'Brien, Robert C.; Housley, Gregory K.

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide cells (SOCs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. Reversible operation of SOCs includes electricity generation in the fuel cell mode and hydrogen generation in the electrolysis mode. Degradation is a more significant issue when operating SOCs in the electrolysis mode. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOCs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. Cells were obtained from four industrial partners. Cells from Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) showed improved durability in electrolysis mode compared to previous stack tests. Cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials Inc. (St. Gobain) and SOFCPower Inc. demonstrated stable performance in the fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode, especially at high current density. Electrolyte-electrode delamination was found to have a significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the electrode microstructure helped to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements were performed during the tests to characterize cell performance and degradation.

  12. Water Dynamics in Living Cells and Tumor Cell Migration in Confined Microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sean

    More than 70% of the total mass in living cells is water. In most biological scenarios water serves as a passive medium responsible for solvation and proper functioning of proteins. However, it has been long recognized that there are situations where dynamic transport of water in cells is important. First, cells actively transport water in order to maintain its volume, and because cell volume directly influences cell shape and internal hydrostatic pressure, it is a critical aspect of cell mechanics. Furthermore, cell volume is coupled to protein synthesis which ultimately determines the cell size. Therefore water transport and cell volume dynamics ultimately impact cell growth and division. Second, epithelial cells in organs such as the eye and kidney actively transport water across the cell membrane and the epithelial layer. Indeed, water channels such as aquaporins increase water permeability of the membrane and facilitate this transport. Recent, we have shown that in confined microenvironments, active transport of water is responsible for actin-independent cell movement in confined spaces, especially for cancer cells. These results suggest that cells actively control its water content. The active regulation of water content is a crucial aspect of cell dynamics. We will discuss a theoretical model of cell pressure/volume control. Implications of this model for active cell dynamics in multi-cellular epithelial sheets will be discussed.

  13. Evaluating effectiveness of dynamic soundfield system in the classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Duarte da Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has reported on the use of soundfield amplification devices in the classroom. However, no study has used standardized tests to determine the potential advantages of the dynamic soundfield system for normally hearing students and for the teacher′s voice. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of using dynamic soundfield system on the noise of the classroom, teacher′s voice and students′ academic performance. This was a prospective cohort study in which 20 student participants enrolled in the third year of basic education were divided into two groups (i.e., control and experimental; their teacher participated. The experimental group was exposed to the dynamic soundfield system for 3 consecutive months. The groups were assessed using standardized tests to evaluate their academic performance. Further, questionnaires and statements were collected on the participants′ experience of using the soundfield system. We statistically analyzed the results to compare the academic performance of the control group with that of the experimental group. In all cases, a significance level of P < .05 was adopted. Use of the dynamic soundfield system was effective for improving the students′ academic performance on standardized tests for reading, improving the teacher′s speech intelligibility, and reducing the teacher′s vocal strain. The dynamic soundfield system minimizes the impact of noise in the classroom as demonstrated by the mensuration of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and pupil performance on standardized tests for reading and student and teacher ratings of amplification system effectiveness.

  14. Dynamic buckling of shells: evaluation of various methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of dynamic stability is substantially more complex than the buckling analysis of a shell subjected to static loads. Suitable criteria for dynamic bulking of shells, which are both logically sound and practically applicable, are not easily available. The purpose of this paper is to compare and evaluate some solutions by applying them to a specific problem. A shallow spherical cap, subjected to an axisymmetric, uniform-pressure, step-loading, is used as the structural example. The predictions, by various methods, of the dynamic buckling of this shell into unsymmetric modes, are then investigated and compared. The approximate methods used by Akkas are compared to the more rigorous and general solutions of the KSHEL, STARS, DYNASOR, and SATANS computer programs, and the various simplifying assumptions utilized are evaluated. Also included in the comparisons, are the predictions of the relatively simple 'dynamic buckling model' approach of Budiansky and Hutchinson. The approaches utilized by the more complex programs are compared in terms of accuracy, idealization complexity, ease of use, and user expertise and experience required for analysis. The comparisons show that the more approximate methods underpredict the dynamic buckling loads for this problem. In addition, some basic assumptions of the simpler solutions are found to be invalid. (Auth.)

  15. Quantitative ontogenetic assessment of connective tissue cell dynamics in the ventricular rat myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunov A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work the dynamics of connective tissue cell number in nonvascular stroma have been studied in different myocardial sites of left and right ventricles in rat hearts during prenatal and early postnatal periods of ontogenesis. The materials of study were hearts of 115 white rats. It has been studied 10 age groups – from 14 days of prenatal development to 20 days of postnatal life. Nonvascular stromal cell quantitative density was estimated by calculation of there nuclei count referred to the square of the cut. During prenatal development it have been studied separately the compact layer and trabecular layer of myocardium, during postnatal period – subendocardial, intramural and subepicardial layers of myocardium. Following pre-sent study a quantitative evaluation of the connective tissue cell number dynamics has been evaluated in ventricular myocardium. The most intensive stromal cell number dynamics in the myocardium have been documented twice – at 14-16 days of embryologic development and at first two weeks after birth. The dynamics in connective tissue cells number during prenatal period had more prominent rate in the compact layer of myocardium in comparison with the trabecular layer. This pattern may point to cellular migration from the developing epicardium toward endocardium. At every stage of cardiogenesis the dynamics in quantitative changes in myocardial connective tissue component correlated with myocardiocyte differentia-tion and microvasculature formation.

  16. A Group Creativity Support System for Dynamic Idea Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Frank

    Idea evaluation is necessary in most modern organizations to identify the level of novelty and usefulness of new ideas. However, current idea evaluation research hinders creativity by primarily supporting convergent thinking (narrowing down ideas to a few tangible solutions), while divergent...... thinking (the development of wildly creative and novel thoughts patterns) is discounted. In this paper, this current view of idea evaluation is challenged through the development of a prototype that supports dynamic idea evaluation. The prototype uses knowledge created during evaluative processes to...... facilitate divergent thinking in a Group Creativity Support System (GCSS) designed from state-of-the-art research. The prototype is interpretively explored through a field experiment in a Danish IS research department. Consequently, the prototype demonstrates the ability to including divergent thinking in...

  17. Advanced Cost Functions for Evaluation of Lateral Vehicle Dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ivanov, V.; Augsburg, K.; Savitski, D.; Plíhal, Jiří; Nedoma, P.; Machan, J.

    Berlin: Springer, 2013, s. 425-440. (Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering. 198). ISBN 978-3-642-33794-9. [FISITA 2012 World Automotive Congress. Beijing (CN), 27.11.2012-30.11.2012] Grant ostatní: Škoda AUTO a.s.(CZ) 6002 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : vehicle dynamics * cost functions * stability * vehicle weighting factors * simulation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/AS/plihal-advanced cost functions for evaluation of lateral vehicle dynamics.pdf

  18. A Population Dynamics Analysis of the Interaction between Adaptive Regulatory T Cells and Antigen Presenting Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fouchet, David; Regoes, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells are central actors in the maintenance of tolerance of self-antigens or allergens and in the regulation of the intensity of the immune response during infections by pathogens. An understanding of the network of the interaction between regulatory T cells, antigen presenting cells and effector T cells is starting to emerge. Dynamical systems analysis can help to understand the dynamical properties of an interaction network and can shed light on the different tasks t...

  19. Dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI evaluation of cerebral intraventricular tumors: preliminary results.

    OpenAIRE

    Holveck, A.; Grand, Sylvie; Boini, Stéphane; Kirchin, Miles; Le Bas, Jean-François; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Bracard, Serge; Kremer, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    International audience INTRODUCTION: The aims of the present study were to determine the perfusion characteristics of several types of intraventricular tumors and to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in making the differential diagnosis. METHODS: A total of 28 patients with intraventricular tumors (five meningiomas, five papillomas, three ependymomas, four subependymomas, seven central neurocytomas, two subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and two metastases) underwe...

  20. Dynamic evaluation of the response to specific immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Objectives: Evaluate in vivo response to specific immunotherapy in maintenance status, with leukocytes labelled with 99mTc-HMPAO. Methods: The leukocytes were labelled with 99mTc-HMPAO using the standard technique. After resuspension the labelled white cells with cell-free plasma they were injected intravenously in a peripheral vein faraway from the place where the therapeutic allergen suspension was applied. The both two administration were made at the same time. Simultaneously with the two injections, a 90 min dynamic acquisition, at thorax level, 64x64 matrix, at two frame/minute in anterior view, was carried out through a gamma camera. Static images, 256x256, 5 minutes, at 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 21 hours after injections, of thorax and pelvis in anterior view, were acquired. During the examination, the local erythema was monitored. Results: The results obtained show that 40 min after injection local inflammatory activity at the IT administration place, with a progressive increase of local activity. 60 minutes after injection, ascendant lymphatic drainage directed to the homolateral axillary region ant to the lymphoid tissue of the upper mediastinum and anterior region of the neck were visualized. The static images show a progressive improvement of the inflammatory area corresponding to the place where IT was applied, with individualization of focal supraclavicular areas, bilaterally. In the latter images, thoracic, mediastinal, bowel and upper cervical localizations, were observed. Discussion and conclusions: In the patients studied, the specific IT shows great efficiency linked with the tolerability to different allergens (provocation test) achieved and with a significant fall of the Prick reactivity. However, at the aqueous extract application place, the local erythema with papula is always less than 60 mm. In these patients, the inflammatory response was significantly bigger in depth, time dependent, even after complete disappearance of the erythema

  1. Dynamically constrained pipeline for tracking neural progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders; Holm, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    . A mitosis detector constructed from empirical observations of cells in a pre-mitotic state interacts with the graph formulation to dynamically allow for cell mitosis when appropriate. Track consistency is ensured by introducing pragmatic constraints and the notion of blob states. We validate the...

  2. Antigen dynamics of follicular dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, B.A.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal-derived follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are a major depot for antigen that are essential for formation of germinal centers, the site where memory and effector B cells differentiate and high-affinity antibody production takes place. Historically, FDCs have been characterized as ‘accessory’

  3. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH ON EVALUATING STRUCTURE DAMAGE WITH PIEZOELECTRIC DYNAMIC IMPEDANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic impedance-based structural health monitoring technique is introduced. According to the direct and the converse piezoelectric property of piezoelectric materials, the piezoceramic ( PZT ) can be used as an actuator and a sensor synchronously. If damages like cracks, holes, debonding or loose connections are presented in the structure, the physical variations of the structure will cause the mechanical impedance modified. On the basis of introducing the principle and the theory, the experiment and the analysis on some damages of the structure are studied by means of the dynamic impedance technique. On the view of experiment, kinds of structural damages are evaluated by the information of dynamic impedance in order to validate the feasibility of the method.

  4. Dynamic buckling of shells: evaluation of various methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of dynamic stability is substantially more complex than the buckling analysis of a shell subjected to static loads. Even at this date suitable criteria for dynamic buckling of shells, which are both logically sound and practically applicable, are not easily available. Thus, a variety of analyses are available to the user, encompassing various degrees of complexity, and involving a range of simplifying assumptions. The purpose of this paper is to compare and evaluate some of these solutions by applying them to a specific problem. A shallow spherical cap, subjected to an axisymmetric, uniform-pressure, step loading, is used as the structural example. The predictions, by various methods, of the dynamic buckling of this shell into unsymmetric modes, are then investigated and compared. (Auth.)

  5. Insights into the Cell Shape Dynamics of Migrating Dictyostelium discoideum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Meghan; Homan, Tess; McCann, Colin; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John; Losert, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    Dynamic cell shape is a highly visible manifestation of the interaction between the internal biochemical state of a cell and its external environment. We analyzed the dynamic cell shape of migrating cells using the model system Dictyostelium discoideum. Applying a snake algorithm to experimental movies, we extracted cell boundaries in each frame and followed local boundary motion over long time intervals. Using a local motion measure that corresponds to protrusive/retractive activity, we found that protrusions are intermittent and zig-zag, whereas retractions are more sustained and straight. Correlations of this local motion measure reveal that protrusions appear more localized than retractions. Using a local shape measure, curvature, we also found that small peaks in boundary curvature tend to originate at the front of cells and propagate backwards. We will review the possible cytoskeletal origin of these mechanical waves.

  6. Application of dynamic speckle interferometry for diagnosis of metabolism change in cultured cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, A. P.; Mikhailova, J. A.; Baharev, A. A.; Malygin, A. S.; Novosyolova, I. A.; Yakin, D. I.

    2015-08-01

    Previously, a speckle interferometry technique and a device that allows quantitative evaluation of the metabolic activity of cultured cells were theoretically grounded and successfully tested. A speckle time-averaging technique was proposed to separate and study the processes occurring in cells at various velocities. The objective of the present research was comparing the parameters of speckle dynamics used to evaluate cell metabolism and averaged in areas of various size. Areas inside the speckle image of a cell as well as areas of the image plane with various numbers of cells were averaging areas. Defrosted L-41 cells precipitated on a glass substrate were the target of the research. Time-average value T of digital radiation intensity in the TV camera pixels I~ (1) and the correlation coefficient of two digital images η (2) were used as speckle field change parameters. The digital images corresponded to a single frame area at two time moments.

  7. Borehole fluid dynamic temperature logging to evaluate fracture hydraulic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A borehole fluid dynamic temperature logging method was developed to evaluate the hydraulic conductivity of fractures intercepted by a borehole. This is different from conventional temperature logs that are measured in a non-flowing borehole, in that in our case the borehole is pumped at a constant flow rate. Thus we call it dynamic temperature logging method. The method involves the flushing of the wellbore with water of a known temperature (different from that of fracture fluids) and then pumping the well at a small flow rate Q. Under this constant flow rate, a sequence of temperature logs is measured at specified time intervals. Distinctive features in the logs develop as fluid from each fracture inflow point enters the borehole. This methodology is being developed to evaluate fracture flow properties at potential nuclear waste repositories

  8. Macromolecular Dynamics in Red Blood Cells Investigated Using Neutron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadler, Andreas Maximilian; Demmel, Franz; Artmann, Gerhard; 10.1098/rsif.2010.0306

    2011-01-01

    We present neutron scattering measurements on the dynamics of hemoglobin (Hb) in human red blood cells in vivo. Global and internal Hb dynamics were measured in the ps to ns time- and {\\AA} length-scale using quasielastic neutron backscattering spectroscopy. We observed the cross-over from global Hb short-time to long-time self-diffusion. Both short- and long-time diffusion coefficients agree quantitatively with predicted values from hydrodynamic theory of non-charged hard-sphere suspensions when a bound water fraction of around 0.23g H2O/ g Hb is taken into account. The higher amount of water in the cells facilitates internal protein fluctuations in the ps time-scale when compared to fully hydrated Hb powder. Slower internal dynamics of Hb in red blood cells in the ns time-range were found to be rather similar to results obtained with fully hydrated protein powders, solutions and E. coli cells.

  9. Evaluating effectiveness of dynamic soundfield system in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Aline Duarte; Alves Silvério, Kelly Cristina; Da Costa, Aline Roberta Aceituno; Moret, Adriane Lima Mortari; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; de Souza Jacob, Regina Tangerino

    2016-01-01

    Research has reported on the use of soundfield amplification devices in the classroom. However, no study has used standardized tests to determine the potential advantages of the dynamic soundfield system for normally hearing students and for the teacher's voice. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of using dynamic soundfield system on the noise of the classroom, teacher's voice and students' academic performance. This was a prospective cohort study in which 20 student participants enrolled in the third year of basic education were divided into two groups (i.e., control and experimental); their teacher participated. The experimental group was exposed to the dynamic soundfield system for 3 consecutive months. The groups were assessed using standardized tests to evaluate their academic performance. Further, questionnaires and statements were collected on the participants' experience of using the soundfield system. We statistically analyzed the results to compare the academic performance of the control group with that of the experimental group. In all cases, a significance level of P reading, improving the teacher's speech intelligibility, and reducing the teacher's vocal strain. The dynamic soundfield system minimizes the impact of noise in the classroom as demonstrated by the mensuration of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and pupil performance on standardized tests for reading and student and teacher ratings of amplification system effectiveness. PMID:26780961

  10. College Teaching Quality Evaluation Based on System Dynamics Model

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Kang-ning; Sun Shi-min; Yu Hai

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the main factors that influence the teaching quality and the cause and effect relationship between them, using system dynamics to establish the evaluation model of teaching quality in Colleges and universities. Taking a college A for example, this model is induced in the simulation of teaching quality, then the change process of teaching quality and feedback mechanism between these effective factors is proposed, as well as the teaching quality change under different policy...

  11. Dynamic instability of genomic methylation patterns in pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooi Steen KT

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic methylation patterns are established during gametogenesis, and perpetuated in somatic cells by faithful maintenance methylation. There have been previous indications that genomic methylation patterns may be less stable in embryonic stem (ES cells than in differentiated somatic cells, but it is not known whether different mechanisms of de novo and maintenance methylation operate in pluripotent stem cells compared with differentiating somatic cells. Results In this paper, we show that ablation of the DNA methyltransferase regulator DNMT3L (DNA methyltransferase 3-like in mouse ES cells renders them essentially incapable of de novo methylation of newly integrated retroviral DNA. We also show that ES cells lacking DNMT3L lose DNA methylation over time in culture, suggesting that DNA methylation in ES cells is the result of dynamic loss and gain of DNA methylation. We found that wild-type female ES cells lose DNA methylation at a much faster rate than do male ES cells; this defect could not be attributed to sex-specific differences in expression of DNMT3L or of any DNA methyltransferase. We also found that human ES and induced pluripotent stem cell lines showed marked but variable loss of methylation that could not be attributed to sex chromosome constitution or time in culture. Conclusions These data indicate that DNA methylation in pluripotent stem cells is much more dynamic and error-prone than is maintenance methylation in differentiated cells. DNA methylation requires DNMT3L in stem cells, but DNMT3L is not expressed in differentiating somatic cells. Error-prone maintenance methylation will introduce unpredictable phenotypic variation into clonal populations of pluripotent stem cells, and this variation is likely to be much more pronounced in cultured female cells. This epigenetic variability has obvious negative implications for the clinical applications of stem cells.

  12. Dynamic friction measurements on living HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Colbert, Marie-Josée; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2008-03-01

    The interaction of cells with various interfaces, and especially man-made surfaces, is an active field of research. In our experiment we use a micropipette to measure both the friction and normal force as a cell slides across a surface. A thin substrate, coated with Poly-L-Lysine is brought into contact with a HeLa cell. The adjustable substrate motion is used to study the response of the cell at various normal forces and speeds. Analysis of the micropipette provides dynamic measurements of both the friction and normal force. With our novel setup we are able to probe the attachment/detachment process of living cells.

  13. Dynamic quantitative microscopy and nanoscopy of red blood cells in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Telen, Marilyn J.; Truskey, George A.; Wax, Adam

    2012-03-01

    We have applied wide-field digital interferometric techniques to quantitatively image sickle red blood cells (RBCs) [1] in a noncontact label-free manner, and measure the nanometer-scale fluctuations in their thickness as an indication of their stiffness. The technique can simultaneously measure the fluctuations for multiple spatial points on the RBC and thus yields a map describing the stiffness of each RBC in the field of view. Using this map, the local rigidity regions of the RBC are evaluated quantitatively. Since wide-field digital interferometry is a quantitative holographic imaging technique rather than one-point measurement, it can be used to simultaneously evaluate cell transverse morphology plus thickness in addition to its stiffness profile. Using this technique, we examine the morphology and dynamics of RBCs from individuals who suffer from sickle cell disease, and find that the sickle RBCs are significantly stiffer than healthy RBCs. Furthermore, we show that the technique is sensitive enough to distinguish various classes of sickle RBCs, including sickle RBCs with visibly-normal morphology, compared to the stiffer crescent-shaped sickle RBCs.

  14. Dynamic buckling of shells: evaluation of various methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of dynamic stability is substantially more complex than the buckling analysis of a shell subjected to static loads. A shallow spherical cap, subjected to an axisymmetric, uniform-pressure, step loading, is used as structural example. The predictions, by various methods, of the dynamic buckling of this shell into unsymmetric modes, are then investigated and compared. The approximate methods used by Akkas are compared to the more rigorous and general solution of the KSHEL, STARS, DYNASOR and SATANS computer programs, and the various simplifying assumptions utilized are evaluated. Also included in the comparisons, are the predictions of the relatively simple 'dynamic buckling model' approach of Budiansky and Hutchinson. The approaches utilized by the more complex programs [KSHEL (spatial integration, modal superposition, perturbation approach), DYNASOR (finite elements, time integration of nonlinear dynamic equilibrium equations), SATANS (finite differences, pseudo load method, time integration), STARS (spatial and time integration, non-linear equilibrium or perturbation approaches)] will in turn be compared in terms of accuracy, idealization complexity, ease of use, and user expertise and experience required for analysis. The comparisons show that the more approximate methods underpredict the dynamic buckling loads for this problem. In addition, the basic assumptions of the simpler methods are found to be invalid

  15. Membrane Organization and Dynamics in Cell Polarity

    OpenAIRE

    Orlando, Kelly; Guo, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of cell polarity is important to a wide range of biological processes ranging from chemotaxis to embryogenesis. An essential feature of cell polarity is the asymmetric organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane. In this article, we discuss how polarity regulators such as small GTP-binding proteins and phospholipids spatially and kinetically control vesicular trafficking and membrane organization. Conversely, we discuss how membrane trafficking...

  16. Sustainable Deforestation Evaluation Model and System Dynamics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huirong Feng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study used the improved fuzzy analytic hierarchy process to construct a sustainable deforestation development evaluation system and evaluation model, which has refined a diversified system to evaluate the theory of sustainable deforestation development. Leveraging the visual image of the system dynamics causal and power flow diagram, we illustrated here that sustainable forestry development is a complex system that encompasses the interaction and dynamic development of ecology, economy, and society and has reflected the time dynamic effect of sustainable forestry development from the three combined effects. We compared experimental programs to prove the direct and indirect impacts of the ecological, economic, and social effects of the corresponding deforest techniques and fully reflected the importance of developing scientific and rational ecological harvesting and transportation technologies. Experimental and theoretical results illustrated that light cableway skidding is an ecoskidding method that is beneficial for the sustainable development of resources, the environment, the economy, and society and forecasted the broad potential applications of light cableway skidding in timber production technology. Furthermore, we discussed the sustainable development countermeasures of forest ecosystems from the aspects of causality, interaction, and harmony.

  17. Sustainable deforestation evaluation model and system dynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huirong; Lim, C W; Chen, Liqun; Zhou, Xinnian; Zhou, Chengjun; Lin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The current study used the improved fuzzy analytic hierarchy process to construct a sustainable deforestation development evaluation system and evaluation model, which has refined a diversified system to evaluate the theory of sustainable deforestation development. Leveraging the visual image of the system dynamics causal and power flow diagram, we illustrated here that sustainable forestry development is a complex system that encompasses the interaction and dynamic development of ecology, economy, and society and has reflected the time dynamic effect of sustainable forestry development from the three combined effects. We compared experimental programs to prove the direct and indirect impacts of the ecological, economic, and social effects of the corresponding deforest techniques and fully reflected the importance of developing scientific and rational ecological harvesting and transportation technologies. Experimental and theoretical results illustrated that light cableway skidding is an ecoskidding method that is beneficial for the sustainable development of resources, the environment, the economy, and society and forecasted the broad potential applications of light cableway skidding in timber production technology. Furthermore, we discussed the sustainable development countermeasures of forest ecosystems from the aspects of causality, interaction, and harmony. PMID:25254225

  18. Evaluating Learner Autonomy: A Dynamic Model with Descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giovanna Tassinari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Every autonomous learning process should entail an evaluation of the learner’s competencies for autonomy. The dynamic model of learner autonomy described in this paper is a tool designed in order to support the self-assessment and evaluation of learning competencies and to help both learners and advisors to focus on relevant aspects of the learning process. The dynamic model accounts for cognitive, metacognitive, action-oriented and affective components of learner autonomy and provides descriptors of learners’ attitudes, competencies and behaviors. It is dynamic in order to allow learners to focus on their own needs and goals.The model (http://www.sprachenzentrum.fuberlin.de/v/autonomiemodell/index.html has been validated in several workshops with experts at the Université Nancy 2, France and at the Freie Universität Berlin, Germany and tested by students, advisors and teachers. It is currently used at the Centre for Independent Language Learning at the Freie Universität Berlin for language advising. Learners can freely choose the components they would like to assess themselves in. Their assessment is then discussed in an advising session, where the learner and the advisor can compare their perspectives, focus on single aspects of the leaning process and set goals for further learning. The students’ feedback gathered in my PhD investigation shows that they are able to benefit from this evaluation; their awareness, self-reflection and decision-making in the autonomous learning process improved.

  19. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth differentiate toward neural cells in a medium dynamically cultured with Schwann cells in a series of polydimethylsiloxanes scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wen-Ta; Pan, Yu-Jing

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Schwann cells (SCs) are primary structural and functional cells in the peripheral nervous system. These cells play a crucial role in peripheral nerve regeneration by releasing neurotrophic factors. This study evaluated the neural differentiation potential effects of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) in a rat Schwann cell (RSC) culture medium. Approach. SHEDs and RSCs were individually cultured on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) scaffold, and the effects of the RSC medium on the SHEDs differentiation between static and dynamic cultures were compared. Main results. Results demonstrated that the SHED cells differentiated by the RSC cultured medium in the static culture formed neurospheres after 7 days at the earliest, and SHED cells formed neurospheres within 3 days in the dynamic culture. These results confirm that the RSC culture medium can induce neurospheres formation, the speed of formation and the number of neurospheres (19.16 folds high) in a dynamic culture was superior to the static culture for 3 days culture. The SHED-derived spheres were further incubated in the RSCs culture medium, these neurospheres continuously differentiated into neurons and neuroglial cells. Immunofluorescent staining and RT-PCR revealed nestin, β-III tubulin, GFAP, and γ-enolase of neural markers on the differentiated cells. Significance. These results indicated that the RSC culture medium can induce the neural differentiation of SHED cells, and can be used as a new therapeutic tool to repair nerve damage.

  20. Single-cell dynamics of mast cell-CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossi, Barbara; D'Incà, Federica; Crivellato, Enrico; Sibilano, Riccardo; Gri, Giorgia; Mongillo, Marco; Danelli, Luca; Maggi, Laura; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2011-07-01

    The biological behavior of immune cells is determined by their intrinsic properties and interactions with other cell populations within their microenvironment. Several studies have confirmed the existence of tight spatial interactions between mast cells (MCs) and Tregs in different settings. For instance, we have recently identified the functional cross-talk between MCs and Tregs, through the OX40L-OX40 axis, as a new mechanism of reciprocal influence. However, there is scant information regarding the single-cell dynamics of this process. In this study, time-lapse video microscopy revealed direct interactions between Tregs and MCs in both murine and human cell co-cultures, resulting in the inhibition of the MC degranulation response. MCs incubated with WT, but not OX40-deficient, Tregs mediated numerous and long-lasting interactions and displayed different morphological features lacking the classical signs of exocytosis. MC degranulation and Ca2+ mobilization upon activation were inhibited by Tregs on a single-cell basis, without affecting overall cytokine secretion. Transmission electron microscopy showed ultrastructural evidence of vesicle-mediated secretion reconcilable with the morphological pattern of piecemeal degranulation. Our results suggest that MC morphological and functional changes following MC-Treg interactions can be ascribed to cell-cell contact and represent a transversal, non-species-specific mechanism of immune response regulation. Further research, looking at the molecular composition of this interaction will broaden our understanding of its contribution to immunity. PMID:21509780

  1. Cytoarchitectonical dynamic of Sertoli cells in Melanorivulus punctatus (Cyprinodontiformes: Rivulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Mônica; Neves da Silva, Débora Fabiane; Ferreira, Adelina

    2013-02-01

    The Sertoli cell contributes to spermatogenesis acting in the differentiation of germ cells and being the only somatic cells present in the germinal compartment. So that spermatogenesis is primarily dependent of Sertoli-Sertoli and Sertoli-germ cell interactions once Sertoli cells provide critical factors necessary for a successful differentiation of germ cells to sperm. In teleost fish the cytoplasmic extensions of Sertoli cells support the cysts that remain closed until spermiogenesis. The number of Sertoli cells determines the testicular size, the number of testicular germ cells and the production capacity of spermatozoa. Our objective was to describe the morphology and the cytoarchitectonical dynamic of Sertoli cells in Melanorivulus punctatus, which were collected in the municipality of Chapada dos Guimarães, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The gonads were extracted and prepared according to histological routine for light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Sertoli cells have cytoplasmic extensions which provide the conformation of cysts in the interior of the lobes. These cells possess a polymorphic nucleus with a well-defined nuclear envelope and a prominent and eccentric nucleoli. Each cyst is sustained for more than one Sertoli cell and the cysts seem to share the Sertoli cells with each other regardless the stage of development of germ cells within these cysts. This disposal promotes a reticulated arrangement of Sertoli cells. The Sertoli cells lining the ducts assume rectangular shape with rounded nucleus. Thus, the morphological characteristics of Sertoli cells observed did not differ from what has been described for other teleosts. Despite the similarity in the morphology of these cells, we observed that its disposal in the extension of the gonad seems to differ from what is described for fish. The arrangement by which the cytoplasmic extensions of Sertoli cells connect the ends of lobes prevents the proliferation of spermatogonia on the lobe side

  2. Dynamic Modes of Red Blood Cells in Oscillatory Shear Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs) in oscillatory shear flow was studied using differential equations of three variables: a shape parameter, the inclination angle $\\theta$, and phase angle $\\phi$ of the membrane rotation. In steady shear flow, three types of dynamics occur depending on the shear rate and viscosity ratio. i) tank-treading (TT): $\\phi$ rotates while the shape and $\\theta$ oscillate. ii) tumbling (TB): $\\theta$ rotates while the shape and $\\phi$ oscillate. iii) intermediate ...

  3. Senescent cells in growing tumors: population dynamics and cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    C.A.M. La Porta; Zapperi, S.; Sethna, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary It is commonly believed that cell senescence – the loss of replicative capacity of cells – acts as a barrier for tumor growth. Here we follow the evolution of senescence markers in melanoma cells and find that while most cancer cells eventually turn senescent, this is at root irrelevant for the long-term growth rate of a tumor. To demonstrate this, we construct a mathematical population dynamics model incorporating cancer stem cells which is able to reproduce quantitatively the...

  4. A Preliminary Evaluation of Bandwidth Allocation Model Dynamic Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael F. Reale

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bandwidth Allocation Models (BAMs are used in order to define Bandwidth Constraints (BCs in a per-class basis for MPLS/DS-TE networks and effectively define how network resources like bandwidth are obtained and shared by applications. The BAMs proposed (MAM – Maximum Allocation Model, RDM – Russian Dolls Model, G-RDM – Generic RDM and AllocTC-Sharing attempt to optimize the use of bandwidth resources on a per-link basis with different allocation and resource sharing characteristics. As such, the adoption of distinct BAMs and/or changes in network resource demands (network traffic profile may result in different network traffic allocation and operational behavior for distinct BAMs. This paper evaluates the resulting network characteristics (li nk utilization, preemption and flows blocking of using BAMs dynamically with different traffic scenarios. In brief, it is investigated the dynamics of BAM switching with distinct traffic scenarios. The paper presents initially the investigated BAMs in relation to their behavior and resource allocation characteristics. Then, distinct BAMs are compared using different traffic scenarios in order to investigate the impact of a dynamic change of the BAM configured in the network. Finally, the paper shows that the adoption of a dynamic BAM allocation strategy may result in benefits for network operation in terms of link utilization, preemption and flows blocking.

  5. Evaluating the Dynamic Characteristics of Retrofitted RC Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, Amir S.; Esfahani, Mohamad R.; Moghaddasie, Behrang

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the relationship between the damage and changes in dynamic characteristics of reinforced concrete members strengthened with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP). Modal analysis is a popular non-destructive method for evaluating health of structural systems. A total of 8 reinforced concrete beams with similar dimensions were made using concrete with two different compressive strengths and reinforcement ratios. Monotonic loading was applied with four-point-bending setup in order to generate different damage levels in the specimens while dynamic testing was conducted to monitor the changes in dynamic characteristics of the specimens. In order to investigate the effect of CFRP on static and dynamic properties of specimens, some of the beams were loaded to half of their ultimate load carrying capacity and then were retrofitted using composite laminates with different configuration. Retrofitted specimens demonstrated elevated load carrying capacity, higher flexural stiffness and lower displacement ductility. By increasing the damage level in specimens, frequencies of the beams were decreased and after strengthening these values were improved significantly. The intensity of the damage level in each specimen affects the shape of its mode as well. Fixed points and curvatures of mode shapes of beams tend to move toward the location of the damage in each case.

  6. Evaluating the Dynamic Characteristics of Retrofitted RC Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the relationship between the damage and changes in dynamic characteristics of reinforced concrete members strengthened with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP). Modal analysis is a popular non-destructive method for evaluating health of structural systems. A total of 8 reinforced concrete beams with similar dimensions were made using concrete with two different compressive strengths and reinforcement ratios. Monotonic loading was applied with four-point-bending setup in order to generate different damage levels in the specimens while dynamic testing was conducted to monitor the changes in dynamic characteristics of the specimens. In order to investigate the effect of CFRP on static and dynamic properties of specimens, some of the beams were loaded to half of their ultimate load carrying capacity and then were retrofitted using composite laminates with different configuration. Retrofitted specimens demonstrated elevated load carrying capacity, higher flexural stiffness and lower displacement ductility. By increasing the damage level in specimens, frequencies of the beams were decreased and after strengthening these values were improved significantly. The intensity of the damage level in each specimen affects the shape of its mode as well. Fixed points and curvatures of mode shapes of beams tend to move toward the location of the damage in each case

  7. Dynamic battery cell model and state of charge estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewardana, S.; Vepa, R.; Shaheed, M. H.

    2016-03-01

    Mathematical modelling and the dynamic simulation of battery storage systems can be challenging and demanding due to the nonlinear nature of the battery chemistry. This paper introduces a new dynamic battery model, with application to state of charge estimation, considering all possible aspects of environmental conditions and variables. The aim of this paper is to present a suitable convenient, generic dynamic representation of rechargeable battery dynamics that can be used to model any Lithium-ion rechargeable battery. The proposed representation is used to develop a dynamic model considering the thermal balance of heat generation mechanism of the battery cell and the ambient temperature effect including other variables such as storage effects, cyclic charging, battery internal resistance, state of charge etc. The results of the simulations have been used to study the characteristics of a Lithium-ion battery and the proposed battery model is shown to produce responses within 98% of known experimental measurements.

  8. Phosphorylation site dynamics of early T-cell receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chylek, Lily A; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Dengjel, Jörn;

    2014-01-01

    systems-level understanding of how these components cooperate to control signaling dynamics, especially during the crucial first seconds of stimulation. Here, we used quantitative proteomics to characterize reshaping of the T-cell phosphoproteome in response to TCR/CD28 co-stimulation, and found that...... diverse dynamic patterns emerge within seconds. We detected phosphorylation dynamics as early as 5 s and observed widespread regulation of key TCR signaling proteins by 30 s. Development of a computational model pointed to the presence of novel regulatory mechanisms controlling phosphorylation of sites...

  9. Plastids: dynamic components of plant cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guikema, J. A.; Gallegos, G. L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The gravitropic bending of maize roots, as a response to reorientation of the root within a gravitational field, was examined for sensitivity to exogenous applications of the cytoskeletal inhibitor, cytochalasin D. Agar blocks were impregnated with this inhibitor, and were applied either to the root cap or to the zone of root cell elongation. Root growth was normal with either treatment, if the roots were not repositioned with respect to the gravitational vector. When untreated roots were placed in a horizontal position with respect to gravity, a 40 degree bending response was observed within one hour. This bending also occurred when cytochalasin D was applied at high concentrations to the zone of root cell elongation. However, when cytochalasin D above 40 micrograms/ml was applied to the root cap, roots lost the ability of directional reorientation within the gravitational field, causing a random bending.

  10. Numerical Simulations of Droplet Dynamics in PEM Fuel Cell Microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauble, Eric; Owkes, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are of beneficial interest due to their capability of producing clean energy with zero emissions. An important design challenge hindering the performance of fuel cells is controlling water removal to maintain a hydrated membrane while avoiding excess water that may lead to channel blockage. Fuel cell water management requires a detailed knowledge of multiphase flow dynamics within microchannels. Direct observation of gas-liquid flows is difficult due to the small scale and viewing obstructions of the channels within the fuel cell. Instead, this work uses a CFD approach to compute the formation and dynamics of droplets in fuel cell channels. The method leverages a conservative volume-of-fluid (VOF) formulation coupled with a novel methodology to track dynamic contact angles. We present details of the numerical approach and simulation results relevant to water management in PEM fuel cells. In particular, it is shown that variation of the contact hysteresis angle influences the wetting properties of the droplet and significantly impacts water transport throughout the a fuel cell channel.

  11. Colon stem cell and crypt dynamics exposed by cell lineage reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yitzhak Reizel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell dynamics in vivo are often being studied by lineage tracing methods. Our laboratory has previously developed a retrospective method for reconstructing cell lineage trees from somatic mutations accumulated in microsatellites. This method was applied here to explore different aspects of stem cell dynamics in the mouse colon without the use of stem cell markers. We first demonstrated the reliability of our method for the study of stem cells by confirming previously established facts, and then we addressed open questions. Our findings confirmed that colon crypts are monoclonal and that, throughout adulthood, the process of monoclonal conversion plays a major role in the maintenance of crypts. The absence of immortal strand mechanism in crypts stem cells was validated by the age-dependent accumulation of microsatellite mutations. In addition, we confirmed the positive correlation between physical and lineage proximity of crypts, by showing that the colon is separated into small domains that share a common ancestor. We gained new data demonstrating that colon epithelium is clustered separately from hematopoietic and other cell types, indicating that the colon is constituted of few progenitors and ruling out significant renewal of colonic epithelium from hematopoietic cells during adulthood. Overall, our study demonstrates the reliability of cell lineage reconstruction for the study of stem cell dynamics, and it further addresses open questions in colon stem cells. In addition, this method can be applied to study stem cell dynamics in other systems.

  12. A quantitative and dynamic model for plant stem cell regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Geier

    Full Text Available Plants maintain pools of totipotent stem cells throughout their entire life. These stem cells are embedded within specialized tissues called meristems, which form the growing points of the organism. The shoot apical meristem of the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana is subdivided into several distinct domains, which execute diverse biological functions, such as tissue organization, cell-proliferation and differentiation. The number of cells required for growth and organ formation changes over the course of a plants life, while the structure of the meristem remains remarkably constant. Thus, regulatory systems must be in place, which allow for an adaptation of cell proliferation within the shoot apical meristem, while maintaining the organization at the tissue level. To advance our understanding of this dynamic tissue behavior, we measured domain sizes as well as cell division rates of the shoot apical meristem under various environmental conditions, which cause adaptations in meristem size. Based on our results we developed a mathematical model to explain the observed changes by a cell pool size dependent regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation, which is able to correctly predict CLV3 and WUS over-expression phenotypes. While the model shows stem cell homeostasis under constant growth conditions, it predicts a variation in stem cell number under changing conditions. Consistent with our experimental data this behavior is correlated with variations in cell proliferation. Therefore, we investigate different signaling mechanisms, which could stabilize stem cell number despite variations in cell proliferation. Our results shed light onto the dynamic constraints of stem cell pool maintenance in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis in different environmental conditions and developmental states.

  13. Towards dynamic metabolic flux analysis in CHO cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Woo Suk; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2012-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most widely used mammalian cell line for biopharmaceutical production, with a total global market approaching $100 billion per year. In the pharmaceutical industry CHO cells are grown in fed-batch culture, where cellular metabolism is characterized by high glucose and glutamine uptake rates combined with high rates of ammonium and lactate secretion. The metabolism of CHO cells changes dramatically during a fed-batch culture as the cells adapt to a changing environment and transition from exponential growth phase to stationary phase. Thus far, it has been challenging to study metabolic flux dynamics in CHO cell cultures using conventional metabolic flux analysis techniques that were developed for systems at metabolic steady state. In this paper we review progress on flux analysis in CHO cells and techniques for dynamic metabolic flux analysis. Application of these new tools may allow identification of intracellular metabolic bottlenecks at specific stages in CHO cell cultures and eventually lead to novel strategies for improving CHO cell metabolism and optimizing biopharmaceutical process performance. PMID:22102428

  14. Computational investigation of epithelial cell dynamic phenotype in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Debnath Jayanta; Mostov Keith; Park Sunwoo; Kim Sean HJ; Hunt C Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background When grown in three-dimensional (3D) cultures, epithelial cells typically form cystic organoids that recapitulate cardinal features of in vivo epithelial structures. Characterizing essential cell actions and their roles, which constitute the system's dynamic phenotype, is critical to gaining deeper insight into the cystogenesis phenomena. Methods Starting with an earlier in silico epithelial analogue (ISEA1) that validated for several Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epith...

  15. Alteration of mammalian cell metabolism by dynamic nutrient feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Weichang; Rehm, Jutta; Europa, Anna; Hu, Wei-Shou

    1997-01-01

    The metabolism of hybridoma cells was controlled to reduce metabolic formation in fed-batch cultures by dynamically feeding a salt-free nutrient concentrate. For this purpose, on-line oxygen uptake rate (OUR) measurement was used to estimate the metabolic demand of hybridoma cells and to determine the feeding rate of a concentrated solution of salt-free DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with other medium components. The ratios among glucose, glutamine and other medium components in the feeding nut...

  16. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Laura-Roxana Stingaciu; Hugh O’Neill; Michelle Liberton; Urban, Volker S.; Himadri B. Pakrasi; Michael Ohl

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membran...

  17. Continuous cell-to-cell mapping and dynamic PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A current challenge in probabilistic safety analysis is the study of the dynamic behavior of systems. Several methods have been used, each one having its own drawbacks. The discrete Markovian approach (CCMT) especially suffers from modelling problems (e.g. introduction of control laws). A continuous Markovian approach (CCCMT) allows to get rid of such problems. The CCCMT is described in this paper and is applied to the well-known heated tank problem. Comparisons between CCCMT and CCMT are also given

  18. Quantitative Evaluation of Contrast Agent Dynamics in Liver MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlström, Nils

    2010-01-01

    The studies presented here evaluate the biliary, parenchymal and vascular enhancement effects of two T1-shortening liver-specific contrast agents, Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA, in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of healthy subjects and of patients. Ten healthy volunteers were examined with both contrast agents in a 1.5 T MRI system using three-dimensional gradient echo sequences for dynamic imaging until five hours after injection. The enhancement of the common hepatic duct in contrast to the li...

  19. Computational evaluation of convection schemes in fluid dynamics problems

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, Valdemir Garcia; Corrêa, Laís; Candezano, Miguel Antonio Caro; Cirilo, Eliandro Rodrigues; Natti, Paulo Laerte; Romeiro, Neyva Maria Lopes; 10.5433/1679-0375.2012v33n2p107

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a computational evaluation of the popular high resolution upwind WACEB, CUBISTA and ADBQUICKEST schemes for solving non-linear fluid dynamics problems. By using the finite difference methodology, the schemes are analyzed and implemented in the context of normalized variables of Leonard. In order to access the performance of the schemes, Riemann problems for 1D Burgers, Euler and shallow water equations are considered. From the numerical results, the schemes are ranked according to their performance in solving these non-linear equations. The best scheme is then applied in the numerical simulation of tridimensional incompressible moving free surface flows.

  20. Single Cell Proteolytic Assays to Investigate Cancer Clonal Heterogeneity and Cell Dynamics Using an Efficient Cell Loading Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Yu-Heng; Ingram, Patrick; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in cancer invasion, and recent work suggests that heterogeneous cancer populations cooperate in this process. Despite the importance of cell heterogeneity, conventional proteolytic assays measure average activity, requiring thousands of cells and providing limited information about heterogeneity and dynamics. Here, we developed a microfluidic platform that provides high-efficiency cell loading and simple valveless isolation, so the proteolytic activity of a small sample (10–100 cells) can be easily characterized. Combined with a single cell derived (clonal) sphere formation platform, we have successfully demonstrated the importance of microenvironmental cues for proteolytic activity and also investigated the difference between clones. Furthermore, the platform allows monitoring single cells at multiple time points, unveiling different cancer cell line dynamics in proteolytic activity. The presented tool facilitates single cell proteolytic analysis using small samples, and our findings illuminate the heterogeneous and dynamic nature of proteolytic activity. PMID:27283981

  1. Single Cell Proteolytic Assays to Investigate Cancer Clonal Heterogeneity and Cell Dynamics Using an Efficient Cell Loading Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Yu-Heng; Ingram, Patrick; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-06-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in cancer invasion, and recent work suggests that heterogeneous cancer populations cooperate in this process. Despite the importance of cell heterogeneity, conventional proteolytic assays measure average activity, requiring thousands of cells and providing limited information about heterogeneity and dynamics. Here, we developed a microfluidic platform that provides high-efficiency cell loading and simple valveless isolation, so the proteolytic activity of a small sample (10–100 cells) can be easily characterized. Combined with a single cell derived (clonal) sphere formation platform, we have successfully demonstrated the importance of microenvironmental cues for proteolytic activity and also investigated the difference between clones. Furthermore, the platform allows monitoring single cells at multiple time points, unveiling different cancer cell line dynamics in proteolytic activity. The presented tool facilitates single cell proteolytic analysis using small samples, and our findings illuminate the heterogeneous and dynamic nature of proteolytic activity.

  2. A dynamic simulation tool for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. M.; Hauer, K. H.; Friedman, D.; Cunningham, J.; Badrinarayanan, P.; Ramaswamy, S.; Eggert, A.

    This paper describes a dynamic fuel cell vehicle simulation (FCVSim) tool for the load-following direct-hydrogen (DH) fuel cell vehicle. The emphasis is on simulation of the direct-hydrogen fuel cell system (FC System) within the vehicle simulation tool. This paper is focused on the subsystems that are specific to the load-following direct-hydrogen model. The four major subsystems discussed are the fuel cell stack, the air supply, the water and thermal management (WTM), and the hydrogen supply. The discussion provides the details of these subsystem simulations. The basic vehicle configuration has been previously outlined by Hauer [An Analysis Tool For Fuel Cell Vehicle Hardware and Software (Controls) with an Application to Fuel Economy Comparisons of Alternative System Designs, Dissertation, UC California, Davis, USA, 2001] and Hauer and Moore [Fuel Cells for Automotive Applications, Professional Engineering Publishing, 2003, pp. 157-177, ISBN 1860584233] and is only briefly reviewed in this paper.

  3. Myosins and cell dynamics in cellular slime molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumura, Shigehiko; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2003-01-01

    Myosin is a mechanochemical transducer and serves as a motor for various motile activities such as cell migration, cytokinesis, maintenance of cell shape, phagocytosis, and morphogenesis. Nonmuscle myosin in vivo does not either stay static at specific subcellular regions or construct highly organized structures, such as sarcomere in skeletal muscle cells. The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is an ideal "model organism" for the investigation of cell movement and cytokinesis. The advantages of this organism prompted researchers to carry out pioneering cell biological, biochemical, and molecular genetic studies on myosin II, which resulted in elucidation of many fundamental features of function and regulation of this most abundant molecular motor. Furthermore, recent molecular biological research has revealed that many unconventional myosins play various functions in vivo. In this article, how myosins are organized and regulated in a dynamic manner in Dictyostelium cells is reviewed and discussed. PMID:12722951

  4. Dynamic simulation of a direct carbonate fuel cell power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest, J.B. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Kush, A.K. [Fuel Cell Engineering, Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is commercializing a 2.85 MW Direct carbonate Fuel Cell (DFC) power plant. The commercialization sequence has already progressed through construction and operation of the first commercial-scale DFC power plant on a U.S. electric utility, the 2 MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP), and the completion of the early phases of a Commercial Plant design. A 400 kW fuel cell stack Test Facility is being built at Energy Research Corporation (ERC), FCE`s parent company, which will be capable of testing commercial-sized fuel cell stacks in an integrated plant configuration. Fluor Daniel, Inc. provided engineering, procurement, and construction services for SCDP and has jointly developed the Commercial Plant design with FCE, focusing on the balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment outside of the fuel cell modules. This paper provides a brief orientation to the dynamic simulation of a fuel cell power plant and the benefits offered.

  5. Dynamic MR imaging of neurohypophyseal germ cell tumors for differential diagnosis of infundibular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the MR dynamic patterns of neurohypophyseal germ cell tumors (GCTs) for differential diagnosis of infundibular diseases affecting young people. Material and Methods: Eleven patients with neurohypophyseal GCTs underwent dynamic MR studies with T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) or turbo SE techniques. Other infundibular lesions, including adenohypophysitis (n=3), Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH, n=2), and 1 hemangioblastoma from von Hippel-Lindau disease, were also evaluated. Serial images were obtained every 15 s (turbo SE) or 30 s (SE technique) for 240 s after rapid injection of contrast medium. The dynamic patterns were analyzed quantitatively with the contrast medium enhancement ratio. Results: On dynamic MR images, GCTs typically showed a gradual enhancement increase with a peak between 105 s and 180 s, while two showed a relatively rapid increase. LCH and hemangioblastoma showed a dynamic pattern similar to GCTs, while adenohypophysitis demonstrated a sharp rise and a steeper wash-out with an obvious peak before 90 s. Conclusion: Typical dynamic pattern of GCTs was the gradual enhancement increase without wash-out. Dynamic MR imaging can distinguish GCTs from adenohypophysitis, but is not useful for differentiation from LCH

  6. Dynamic MR imaging of neurohypophyseal germ cell tumors for differential diagnosis of infundibular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, L.; Korogi, Y.; Sugahara, T.; Ikushima, I.; Shigematsu, Y.; Okuda, T.; Takahashi, M. [Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Radiology Dept.

    2000-11-01

    To investigate the MR dynamic patterns of neurohypophyseal germ cell tumors (GCTs) for differential diagnosis of infundibular diseases affecting young people. Material and Methods: Eleven patients with neurohypophyseal GCTs underwent dynamic MR studies with T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) or turbo SE techniques. Other infundibular lesions, including adenohypophysitis (n=3), Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH, n=2), and 1 hemangioblastoma from von Hippel-Lindau disease, were also evaluated. Serial images were obtained every 15 s (turbo SE) or 30 s (SE technique) for 240 s after rapid injection of contrast medium. The dynamic patterns were analyzed quantitatively with the contrast medium enhancement ratio. Results: On dynamic MR images, GCTs typically showed a gradual enhancement increase with a peak between 105 s and 180 s, while two showed a relatively rapid increase. LCH and hemangioblastoma showed a dynamic pattern similar to GCTs, while adenohypophysitis demonstrated a sharp rise and a steeper wash-out with an obvious peak before 90 s. Conclusion: Typical dynamic pattern of GCTs was the gradual enhancement increase without wash-out. Dynamic MR imaging can distinguish GCTs from adenohypophysitis, but is not useful for differentiation from LCH.

  7. Dynamic evaluation of traffic flows on city roads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan Yongshen; Guo Jifu; Wen Huimin; Sun Jianping

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the random fluctuations, deferred conduction effect and periodicity of road traffic based on the basic features of road networks. It also discusses the limitations of road network evaluation theories based on road "V/C". In addition, it proposes a set of theoretical and technical methods for the real-time evaluation of traffic flows for entire road networks, and for solving key technical issues, such as real-time data collection and process- ing in areas with no blind zones, the spatial-temporal dynamic analysis of road network traffic, and the calibration of key performance index thresholds. It also provides new technical tools for the strategic transportation planning and real-time diagnosis of road traffic. The new tools and methodology presented in this paper are validated using a case study in Beijing.

  8. Dynamic testing of nuclear power plant structures: an evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) evaluated the applications of system identification techniques to the dynamic testing of nuclear power plant structures and subsystems. These experimental techniques involve exciting a structure and measuring, digitizing, and processing the time-history motions that result. The data can be compared to parameters calculated using finite element or other models of the test systems to validate the model and to verify the seismic analysis. This report summarizes work in three main areas: (1) analytical qualification of a set of computer programs developed at LLL to extract model parameters from the time histories; (2) examination of the feasibility of safely exciting nuclear power plant structures and accurately recording the resulting time-history motions; (3) study of how the model parameters that are extracted from the data be used best to evaluate structural integrity and analyze nuclear power plants

  9. A positive feedback cell signaling nucleation model of astrocyte dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel A Silva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a model of calcium signaling in astrocyte neural glial cells that incorporates a positive feedback nucleation mechanism, whereby small microdomain increases in local calcium can stochastically produce global cellular and intercellular network scale dynamics. The model is able to simultaneously capture dynamic spatial and temporal heterogeneities associated with intracellular calcium transients in individual cells and intercellular calcium waves (ICW in spatially realistic networks of astrocytes, i.e. networks where the positions of cells were taken from real in vitro experimental data of spontaneously forming sparse networks, as opposed to artificially constructed grid networks or other non-realistic geometries. This is the first work we are aware of where an intracellular model of calcium signaling that reproduces intracellular dynamics inherently accounts for intercellular network dynamics. These results suggest that a nucleation type mechanism should be further investigated experimentally in order to test its contribution to calcium signaling in astrocytes and in other cells more broadly. It may also be of interest in engineered neuromimetic network systems that attempt to emulate biological signaling and information processing properties in synthetic hardwired neuromorphometric circuits or coded algorithms.

  10. Real space Dynamical Super Cell Approximation for interacting disordered systems

    OpenAIRE

    Moradian, Rostam

    2004-01-01

    Effective medium super-cell approximation method which is introduced for disordered systems is extended to a general case of interacting disordered systems. We found that the dynamical cluster approximation (DCA) and also the non local coherent potential approximation (NLCPA) are two simple case of this technique. Whole equations of this formalism derived by using the effective medium theory in real space.

  11. Dynamic heterogeneity and DNA methylation in embryonic stem cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Singer, Zakary S

    2014-07-01

    Cell populations can be strikingly heterogeneous, composed of multiple cellular states, each exhibiting stochastic noise in its gene expression. A major challenge is to disentangle these two types of variability and to understand the dynamic processes and mechanisms that control them. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provide an ideal model system to address this issue because they exhibit heterogeneous and dynamic expression of functionally important regulatory factors. We analyzed gene expression in individual ESCs using single-molecule RNA-FISH and quantitative time-lapse movies. These data discriminated stochastic switching between two coherent (correlated) gene expression states and burst-like transcriptional noise. We further showed that the "2i" signaling pathway inhibitors modulate both types of variation. Finally, we found that DNA methylation plays a key role in maintaining these metastable states. Together, these results show how ESC gene expression states and dynamics arise from a combination of intrinsic noise, coherent cellular states, and epigenetic regulation.

  12. Display Factors and Subjective Evaluation of Dynamic Text Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Joey C. Y.; Chan, Alan H. S.

    2009-01-01

    Communications technology has exploded in past decades, leading to the question of which display method is the best to deliver electronic text messages. Many of these systems employ cathode ray tubes, liquid crystal displays, gas plasma displays, or light-emitting diodes as the output device. In order to overcome the limitations of screen size of the display units, numerous means of presenting dynamic display on screens have been invented. There are many factors that affect the readability of electronic text. This paper reviews some related empirical studies concerning the various display methods of dynamic text presentation, such as text display type, character type, text display direction, and text/background color combination, highlighting method and validity of highlighting. The subjective evaluation questionnaire is also discussed. According to the readability and preference ratings of the subjects given under different conditions, the best display method and color for comprehending the delivered messages were investigated. General recommendations of displaying dynamic information are made for the large display units which have been widely used for delivering important messages.

  13. Numerical evaluation of cracked pipes under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to apply the leak-before-break concept to piping systems, the behavior of cracked pipes under dynamic, and especially seismic, loadings must be studied. A simple finite element model of a cracked pipe has been developed and implemented in the general purpose computer code CASTEM 2000. The model is a generalization of the approach proposed by Paris and Tada (1). Considered loads are bending moment and axial force (representing thermal expansion and internal pressure.) The elastic characteristics of the model are determined using the Zahoor formulae for the geometry-dependent factors. Owing to the material behabior plasticity must be taken into account. To represent the crack growth, the material is defined by two characteristic values: J1c which is the level of energy corresponding to crack initiation and the tearing modulus, T, which governs the length of propagation of the crack. For dynamic loads, unilateral conditions are imposed to represent crack closure. The model has been used for the design of dynamic tests to be conducted on shaking tables. Test principle is briefly described and numerical results are presented. Finally evaluation of margin, due to plasticity, in comparison with the standard design procedure is made

  14. Stochastic dynamics of interacting haematopoietic stem cell niche lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Székely

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since we still know very little about stem cells in their natural environment, it is useful to explore their dynamics through modelling and simulation, as well as experimentally. Most models of stem cell systems are based on deterministic differential equations that ignore the natural heterogeneity of stem cell populations. This is not appropriate at the level of individual cells and niches, when randomness is more likely to affect dynamics. In this paper, we introduce a fast stochastic method for simulating a metapopulation of stem cell niche lineages, that is, many sub-populations that together form a heterogeneous metapopulation, over time. By selecting the common limiting timestep, our method ensures that the entire metapopulation is simulated synchronously. This is important, as it allows us to introduce interactions between separate niche lineages, which would otherwise be impossible. We expand our method to enable the coupling of many lineages into niche groups, where differentiated cells are pooled within each niche group. Using this method, we explore the dynamics of the haematopoietic system from a demand control system perspective. We find that coupling together niche lineages allows the organism to regulate blood cell numbers as closely as possible to the homeostatic optimum. Furthermore, coupled lineages respond better than uncoupled ones to random perturbations, here the loss of some myeloid cells. This could imply that it is advantageous for an organism to connect together its niche lineages into groups. Our results suggest that a potential fruitful empirical direction will be to understand how stem cell descendants communicate with the niche and how cancer may arise as a result of a failure of such communication.

  15. EVALUATION OF DYNAMIC INDICATORS OF SIX-AXLE LOCOMOTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Myamlin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper is devoted to dynamic characteristics evaluation of the locomotive with prospective design and determination the feasibility of its use on the Ukrainian railways. Methodology. The methods of mathematical and computer modeling of the dynamics of railway vehicles, as well as methods for the numerical integration of systems of ordinary nonlinear differential equations were used to solve the problem. Findings. The calculated diagram of a locomotive on three-axle bogies was built to solve the problem, and it is a system of rigid bodies connected by various elements of rheology. The mathematical model of the locomotive movement, allowing studying its spatial vibrations at driving on straight and curved sections of the track with random irregularities in plan and profile was developed with use of this calculated diagram. At compiling the mathematical model took into account both geometric (nonlinearity profile of the wheel roll surface and physical nonlinearity of the system (the work forces of dry friction, nonlinearity characteristics of interaction forces between wheels and rails. The multivariate calculations, which allowed assessing the dynamic qualities of the locomotive at its movement along straight and curved sections of the track, were realized with the use of computer modeling. The smoothness movement indicators of the locomotive in horizontal and vertical planes, frame strength, coefficients of vertical dynamics in the first and second stages of the suspension, the load factor of resistance against the derailment of the wheel from the rail were determined at the period of research. In addition, a comparison of the obtained results with similar characteristics is widely used on the Ukrainian railways in six-axle locomotive TE 116. The influence of speed and technical state of the track on the locomotive traffic safety was determined.Originality. A mathematical model of the spatial movement of a six-axle locomotive with

  16. Monitoring of chromosome dynamics of single yeast cells in a microfluidic platform with aperture cell traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Si Hyung; Jang, Sung-Chan; Lee, Byungjin; Jeong, Heon-Ho; Jeong, Seong-Geun; Lee, Sung Sik; Kim, Keun Pil; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-04-12

    Chromosome movement plays important roles in DNA replication, repair, genetic recombination, and epigenetic phenomena during mitosis and meiosis. In particular, chromosome movement in the nuclear space is essential for the reorganization of the nucleus. However, conventional methods for analyzing the chromosome movements in vivo have been limited by technical constraints of cell trapping, cell cultivation, oxygenation, and in situ imaging. Here, we present a simple microfluidic platform with aperture-based cell trapping arrays to monitor the chromosome dynamics in single living cells for a desired period of time. Under the optimized conditions, our microfluidic platform shows a single-cell trapping efficiency of 57%. This microfluidic approach enables in situ imaging of intracellular dynamics in living cells responding to variable input stimuli under the well-controlled microenvironment. As a validation of this microfluidic platform, we investigate the fundamental features of the dynamic cellular response of the individual cells treated with different stimuli and drug. We prove the basis for dynamic chromosome movement in single yeast cells to be the telomere and nuclear envelope ensembles that attach to and move in concert with nuclear actin cables. Therefore, these results illustrate the monitoring of cellular functions and obtaining of dynamic information at a high spatiotemporal resolution through the integration of a simple microfluidic platform. PMID:26980179

  17. Dynamic neural network controller model of PEM fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatti, Mustapha [Nuclear Technologies Division, Nuclear Research Center of Birine, Ain Oussera, B.P 180, 17200 Djelfa (Algeria); Tioursi, Mustapha [Electrical Engineering Department, University of Sciences and Technology of Oran, B.P 1505, El M' Naouar, 31000 Oran (Algeria)

    2009-06-15

    This paper presents the artificial intelligence techniques to control a proton exchange membrane fuel cell system process, using particularly a methodology of dynamic neural network. In this work a dynamic neural network control model is obtained by introducing a delay line in the input of the neural network. A static production system including a PEMFC is subjected to variations of active and reactive power. Therefore the goal is to make the system follow these imposed variations. The simulation requires the modelling of the principal element (PEMFC) in dynamic mode. The simulation results demonstrate that the model-based dynamic neural network control scheme is appropriate for controlling, the stability of the identification and the tracking error were analyzed, and some reasons for the usefulness of this methodology are given. (author)

  18. Photon Counts Statistics in Leukocyte Cell Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present experiment ultra-weak photon emission/chemiluminescence from isolated neutrophils was recorded. It is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the 'respiratory burst' process which can be activated by PMA (Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate). Commonly, the reaction is demonstrated utilizing the enhancer luminol. However, with the use of highly sensitive photomultiplier equipment it is also recorded without enhancer. In that case, it can be hypothesized that photon count statistics may assist in understanding the underlying metabolic activity and cooperation of these cells. To study this hypothesis leukocytes were stimulated with PMA and increased photon signals were recorded in the quasi stable period utilizing Fano factor analysis at different window sizes. The Fano factor is defined by the variance over the mean of the number of photon within the observation time. The analysis demonstrated that the Fano factor of true signal and not of the surrogate signals obtained by random shuffling increases when the window size increased. It is concluded that photon count statistics, in particular Fano factor analysis, provides information regarding leukocyte interactions. It opens the perspective to utilize this analytical procedure in (in vivo) inflammation research. However, this needs further validation.

  19. Biological Evaluation of Single Cell Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the nutritional value of single cell protein (SCP) was evaluated as a non conventional protein source produced by fermenting fungal local strains of Trichoderma longibrachiatum, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus and Penicillium funiculosum with alkali treated sugar cane bagasse. Amino acid analysis revealed that the produced SCP contains essential and non essential amino acids. Male mice were fed on normal (basal) diet which contains 18% conventional protein and served as control group. In the second (T1) and the third (T2) group, the animals were fed on a diet in which 15% and 30% of conventional protein source were replaced by SCP, respectively. At intervals of 15, 30, 45 and 60 days, mice were sacrificed and the blood samples were collected for the biochemical evaluation. The daily averages of body weight were significantly higher with group T2 than group T1. Where as, the kidney weights in groups (T1) and (T2) were significantly increased as compared with control. A non significant difference between the tested groups in the enzyme activities of AST, ALT and GSH content of liver tissue were recorded. While, cholesterol and triglycerides contents showed a significant decrease in both (T1) and (T2) groups as compared with control. The recorded values of the serum hormone (T4), ALP activities, albumin and A/G ratio did not changed by the previous treatments. Serum levels of total protein, urea, creatinine and uric acid were higher for groups (T1) and (T2) than the control group. In conclusion, partial substitution of soy bean protein in mice diet with single cell protein (15%) improved the mice growth without any adverse effects on some of the physiological functions tested

  20. Nonlinear Dynamic Theory of Acute Cell Injuries and Brain Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Doaa; Anggraini, Fika; Degracia, Donald; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia in the form of stroke and cardiac arrest brain damage affect over 1 million people per year in the USA alone. In spite of close to 200 clinical trials and decades of research, there are no treatments to stop post-ischemic neuron death. We have argued that a major weakness of current brain ischemia research is lack of a deductive theoretical framework of acute cell injury to guide empirical studies. A previously published autonomous model based on the concept of nonlinear dynamic network was shown to capture important facets of cell injury, linking the concept of therapeutic to bistable dynamics. Here we present an improved, non-autonomous formulation of the nonlinear dynamic model of cell injury that allows multiple acute injuries over time, thereby allowing simulations of both therapeutic treatment and preconditioning. Our results are connected to the experimental data of gene expression and proteomics of neuron cells. Importantly, this new model may be construed as a novel approach to pharmacodynamics of acute cell injury. The model makes explicit that any pro-survival therapy is always a form of sub-lethal injury. This insight is expected to widely influence treatment of acute injury conditions that have defied successful treatment to date. This work is supported by NIH NINDS (NS081347) and Wayne State University President's Research Enhancement Award.

  1. The Dynamics of Interactions Among Immune and Glioblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Katalin; Kalman, Bernadette

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common intracranial malignancy that constitutes about 50 % of all gliomas. Despite aggressive, multimodal therapy consisting of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, the outcome of patients with glioblastoma remains poor with 5-year survival rates of <10 %. Resistance to conventional therapies is most likely caused by several factors. Alterations in the functions of local immune mediators may represent a critical contributor to this resistance. The tumor microenvironment contains innate and adaptive immune cells in addition to the cancer cells and their surrounding stroma. These various cells communicate with each other by means of direct cell-cell contact or by soluble factors including cytokines and chemokines, and act in autocrine and paracrine manners to modulate tumor growth. There are dynamic interactions among the local immune elements and the tumor cells, where primarily the protective immune cells attempt to overcome the malignant cells. However, by developing somatic mutations and epigenetic modifications, the glioblastoma tumor cells acquire the capability of counteracting the local immune responses, and even exploit the immune cells and products for their own growth benefits. In this review, we survey those immune mechanisms that likely contribute to glioblastoma pathogenesis and may serve as a basis for novel treatment strategies. PMID:26224516

  2. Microenvironment-Centred Dynamics in Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Cacciatore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive B-cell lymphomas share high proliferative and invasive attitudes and dismal prognosis despite heterogeneous biological features. In the interchained sequence of events leading to cancer progression, neoplastic clone-intrinsic molecular events play a major role. Nevertheless, microenvironment-related cues have progressively come into focus as true determinants for this process. The cancer-associated microenvironment is a complex network of nonneoplastic immune and stromal cells embedded in extracellular components, giving rise to a multifarious crosstalk with neoplastic cells towards the induction of a supportive milieu. The immunological and stromal microenvironments have been classically regarded as essential partners of indolent lymphomas, while considered mainly negligible in the setting of aggressive B-cell lymphomas that, by their nature, are less reliant on external stimuli. By this paper we try to delineate the cardinal microenvironment-centred dynamics exerting an influence over lymphoid clone progression in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

  3. The Influence of Immunization Route, Tissue Microenvironment, and Cytokine Cell Milieu on HIV-Specific CD8+ T Cells Measured Using Fluidigm Dynamic Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Shubhanshi; Ranasinghe, Charani

    2015-01-01

    Thirty different genes including cytokines, chemokines, granzymes, perforin and specifically integrins were evaluated in Peyer's patch-KdGag197–205-specific CD8+ T cells (pools of 100 cells) using Fluidigm 48.48 Dynamic arrays following three different prime-boost immunization strategies. Data revealed that the route of prime or the booster immunization differentially influenced the integrin expression profile on gut KdGag197–205-specific CD8+ T cells. Specifically, elevated numbers of integr...

  4. Clinical evaluation of radionuclide dynamic renography in renal transplant rejections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionuclide dynamic renography was performed in 125 cases of renal transplant. That was a correlation between radionuclide dynamic renography types and serum creatinine concentration. There are characteristic changes in phase imaging of radionuclide dynamic renography at acute, ultra-acute and chronic rejection. This dynamic imaging can show kidney function. The dynamic renography is more informative than renogram

  5. Cell fate reprogramming by control of intracellular network dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanudo, Jorge G. T.; Albert, Reka

    Identifying control strategies for biological networks is paramount for practical applications that involve reprogramming a cell's fate, such as disease therapeutics and stem cell reprogramming. Although the topic of controlling the dynamics of a system has a long history in control theory, most of this work is not directly applicable to intracellular networks. Here we present a network control method that integrates the structural and functional information available for intracellular networks to predict control targets. Formulated in a logical dynamic scheme, our control method takes advantage of certain function-dependent network components and their relation to steady states in order to identify control targets, which are guaranteed to drive any initial state to the target state with 100% effectiveness and need to be applied only transiently for the system to reach and stay in the desired state. We illustrate our method's potential to find intervention targets for cancer treatment and cell differentiation by applying it to a leukemia signaling network and to the network controlling the differentiation of T cells. We find that the predicted control targets are effective in a broad dynamic framework. Moreover, several of the predicted interventions are supported by experiments. This work was supported by NSF Grant PHY 1205840.

  6. Quantitative analysis of impact measurements using dynamic load cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent J. Maranzano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is used to estimate material properties from a short duration transient impact force measured by dropping spheres onto rectangular coupons fixed to a dynamic load cell. The contact stress between the dynamic load cell surface and the projectile are modeled using Hertzian contact mechanics. Due to the short impact time relative to the load cell dynamics, an additional Kelvin–Voigt element is included in the model to account for the finite response time of the piezoelectric crystal. Calculations with and without the Kelvin–Voigt element are compared to experimental data collected from combinations of polymeric spheres and polymeric and metallic surfaces. The results illustrate that the inclusion of the Kelvin–Voigt element qualitatively captures the post impact resonance and non-linear behavior of the load cell signal and quantitatively improves the estimation of the Young's elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. Mathematically, the additional KV element couples one additional differential equation to the Hertzian spring-dashpot equation. The model can be numerically integrated in seconds using standard numerical techniques allowing for its use as a rapid technique for the estimation of material properties.

  7. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A.; Falvo D’Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  8. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massai, Diana; Isu, Giuseppe; Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A; Falvo D'Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  9. Dynamics inside the cancer cell attractor reveal cell heterogeneity, limits of stability, and escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Wennborg, Anders; Aurell, Erik; Dekel, Erez; Zou, Jie-Zhi; Xu, Yuting; Huang, Sui; Ernberg, Ingemar

    2016-03-01

    The observed intercellular heterogeneity within a clonal cell population can be mapped as dynamical states clustered around an attractor point in gene expression space, owing to a balance between homeostatic forces and stochastic fluctuations. These dynamics have led to the cancer cell attractor conceptual model, with implications for both carcinogenesis and new therapeutic concepts. Immortalized and malignant EBV-carrying B-cell lines were used to explore this model and characterize the detailed structure of cell attractors. Any subpopulation selected from a population of cells repopulated the whole original basin of attraction within days to weeks. Cells at the basin edges were unstable and prone to apoptosis. Cells continuously changed states within their own attractor, thus driving the repopulation, as shown by fluorescent dye tracing. Perturbations of key regulatory genes induced a jump to a nearby attractor. Using the Fokker-Planck equation, this cell population behavior could be described as two virtual, opposing influences on the cells: one attracting toward the center and the other promoting diffusion in state space (noise). Transcriptome analysis suggests that these forces result from high-dimensional dynamics of the gene regulatory network. We propose that they can be generalized to all cancer cell populations and represent intrinsic behaviors of tumors, offering a previously unidentified characteristic for studying cancer. PMID:26929366

  10. Evaluation of intracerebral hematoma resorption dynamics with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High mortality and severe grade of disability observed in patients after intracerebral hemorrhage provide efforts to improve diagnostics and therapy of the hemorrhagic cerebral stroke. An aim of this paper was an evaluation of blood resorption dynamics in patients with intracerebral hematoma, performed with computed tomography of the head and an analysis of clinical significance of this process. An examined group included 133 patients with intracerebral hematoma proven by a CT exam. In 97 patients resorption of the hematoma was measured, based on control scans taken on 15th and 30th day on average. Volume of the hemorrhagic foci was measured as well as the width of ventricles and the displacement of medial structures. The mean hematoma volume reached 11,59 ml after 15 days, and 3,16 m after 30 days (average decrease of the volume 0,67 ml/day). There was a significant difference in the rate of resorption between the first (0-15 days) and the second (15-30 days) observation period - 0,78 and 0,62 ml/day respectively. The dynamics of the process was dependent on volume and localization of the hematoma and independent of the grade of displacement and compression of the ventricles. The calculated mean rate of the hematomas resorption enables to schedule control examinations precisely. The significant differences of the dynamics of blood resorption depending on hematomas size and the independence of compression and displacement of ventricular system suggest, that the most important factor in therapeutic decision-making should be a clinical status of the patient. (author)

  11. Evaluating Effectiveness of Tamper Proofing on Dynamic Graph Software Watermarks

    CERN Document Server

    Khiyal, Malik Sikandar Hayat; Amjad, Sehrish; Khalil, M Shahid

    2010-01-01

    For enhancing the protection level of dynamic graph software watermarks and for the purpose of conducting the analysis which evaluates the effect of integrating two software protection techniques such as software watermarking and tamper proofing, constant encoding technique along with the enhancement through the idea of constant splitting is proposed. In this paper Thomborson technique has been implemented with the scheme of breaking constants which enables to encode all constants without having any consideration about their values with respect to the value of watermark tree. Experimental analysis which have been conducted and provided in this paper concludes that the constant encoding process significantly increases the code size, heap space usage, and execution time, while making the tamper proofed code resilient to variety of semantic preserving program transformation attacks.

  12. Dynamic observation of micronuclei and cell survival in human liver cancer cells irradiated by heavy ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reported dynamic changes of micronuclei and cell survival in human liver cancer cells SMMC-7721 irradiated by 25 MeV/u 40Ar14+. The results show: (1) Change rules of frequency of micronuclei induced by single irradiation and fractionation irradiation with culture time have not clear difference. (2) Irradiated (single, fractionation) liver cancer cells grow much slower than control and their survival number with culture time shows decay tendency. (3) Dynamic changes of the relationship between micronucleus frequency and cell survival number presents negative correlation. (4) For cells irradiated by dose of 0.68 Gy, 6.8 Gy and 68 Gy, frequency of micronuclei following culture 24 hours is lower than that following culture 96 hours. (5) Negative dependences of survival number of liver cancer cells for culture 24 hours and 48 hours on dose are demonstrated

  13. Evaluation of periventricular radiolucency in hydrocephalus by dynamic CT studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Hideki; Bandou, Kuniaki; Miyaoka, Makoto (Fujisawa City Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1994-06-01

    The association of periventricular radiolucency (PVL) in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) on CT scan is a common finding. However, it is difficult to differentiate NPH from atrophy or infarctions in which shunt surgery does not reverse these conditions. To distinguish NPH from these, we examined PVL by means of dynamic CT (DCT) studies. We investigated 12 elderly patients presenting with gait disturbance, urinary incontinence and mental dysfunction who had both enlarged lateral ventricles and PVL. All patients had laboratory investigations, including radioisotope and CT cisternography and Xenon CBF studies. Nine patients were shunted because of abnormal CSF dynamics. Varying degrees of clinical improvement after surgery were observed in 6 cases. A difference of arrival time (AT) between PVL and thalamus obtained from time-density-curve was calculated in each patient. The AT difference was 6.2[+-]1.5 sec. in the shunt-effective group, and 1.4[+-]1.3 sec. in both, the shunt in effective and ineligible group, this was highly significant (p<0.01). We also measured peak time (PT) in PVL, of the thalamus and anterior cerebral artery, but no significant correlation was obtained. An AT difference between PVL and thalamus obtained from DCT studies is a clinically useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of NPH. (author).

  14. Dynamic network data envelopment analysis for university hospitals evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Maria Stella de Castro; Rodrigues, Henrique de Castro; André, Edgard Caires Gazzola; de Azeredo, Jônatas Almeida; Lins, Marcos Pereira Estellita

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To develop an assessment tool to evaluate the efficiency of federal university general hospitals. METHODS Data envelopment analysis, a linear programming technique, creates a best practice frontier by comparing observed production given the amount of resources used. The model is output-oriented and considers variable returns to scale. Network data envelopment analysis considers link variables belonging to more than one dimension (in the model, medical residents, adjusted admissions, and research projects). Dynamic network data envelopment analysis uses carry-over variables (in the model, financing budget) to analyze frontier shift in subsequent years. Data were gathered from the information system of the Brazilian Ministry of Education (MEC), 2010-2013. RESULTS The mean scores for health care, teaching and research over the period were 58.0%, 86.0%, and 61.0%, respectively. In 2012, the best performance year, for all units to reach the frontier it would be necessary to have a mean increase of 65.0% in outpatient visits; 34.0% in admissions; 12.0% in undergraduate students; 13.0% in multi-professional residents; 48.0% in graduate students; 7.0% in research projects; besides a decrease of 9.0% in medical residents. In the same year, an increase of 0.9% in financing budget would be necessary to improve the care output frontier. In the dynamic evaluation, there was progress in teaching efficiency, oscillation in medical care and no variation in research. CONCLUSIONS The proposed model generates public health planning and programming parameters by estimating efficiency scores and making projections to reach the best practice frontier. PMID:27191158

  15. Dynamic network data envelopment analysis for university hospitals evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stella de Castro Lobo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To develop an assessment tool to evaluate the efficiency of federal university general hospitals. METHODS Data envelopment analysis, a linear programming technique, creates a best practice frontier by comparing observed production given the amount of resources used. The model is output-oriented and considers variable returns to scale. Network data envelopment analysis considers link variables belonging to more than one dimension (in the model, medical residents, adjusted admissions, and research projects. Dynamic network data envelopment analysis uses carry-over variables (in the model, financing budget to analyze frontier shift in subsequent years. Data were gathered from the information system of the Brazilian Ministry of Education (MEC, 2010-2013. RESULTS The mean scores for health care, teaching and research over the period were 58.0%, 86.0%, and 61.0%, respectively. In 2012, the best performance year, for all units to reach the frontier it would be necessary to have a mean increase of 65.0% in outpatient visits; 34.0% in admissions; 12.0% in undergraduate students; 13.0% in multi-professional residents; 48.0% in graduate students; 7.0% in research projects; besides a decrease of 9.0% in medical residents. In the same year, an increase of 0.9% in financing budget would be necessary to improve the care output frontier. In the dynamic evaluation, there was progress in teaching efficiency, oscillation in medical care and no variation in research. CONCLUSIONS The proposed model generates public health planning and programming parameters by estimating efficiency scores and making projections to reach the best practice frontier.

  16. A simulation environment for the dynamic evaluation of disaster preparedness policies and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Bryan; Swarup, Samarth; Bisset, Keith; Eubank, Stephen; Marathe, Madhav; Barrett, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Disasters affect a society at many levels. Simulation-based studies often evaluate the effectiveness of 1 or 2 response policies in isolation and are unable to represent impact of the policies to coevolve with others. Similarly, most in-depth analyses are based on a static assessment of the "aftermath" rather than capturing dynamics. We have developed a data-centric simulation environment for applying a systems approach to a dynamic analysis of complex combinations of disaster responses. We analyze an improvised nuclear detonation in Washington, District of Columbia, with this environment. The simulated blast affects the transportation system, communications infrastructure, electrical power system, behaviors and motivations of population, and health status of survivors. The effectiveness of partially restoring wireless communications capacity is analyzed in concert with a range of other disaster response policies. Despite providing a limited increase in cell phone communication, overall health was improved. PMID:23903394

  17. Cell size dynamics and viability of cells exposed to hypotonic treatment and electroporation for electrofusion optimization:

    OpenAIRE

    Hudej, Rosana; Kandušer, Maša; Miklavčič, Damijan; Trontelj, Katja; Ušaj, Marko

    2009-01-01

    Background. Various electrofusion parameters have to be adjusted to obtain theoptimal electrofusion efficiency. Based on published data, good electrofusion conditions can be achieved with the hypotonic treatment. However, the duration of the hypotonic treatment before electroporation and buffer hypoosmolarity have to be adjusted in order to cause cell swelling, to avoid regulatory volume decrease and to preserve cell viability. The aims of our study were to determine cell size dynamics and vi...

  18. Cell size dynamics and viability of cells exposed to hypotonic treatment and electroporation for electrofusion optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Trontelj, Katja; Kandušer, Maša; Miklavčič, Damijan; Hudej, Rosana; Ušaj, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Background. Various electrofusion parameters have to be adjusted to obtain theoptimal electrofusion efficiency. Based on published data, good electrofusion conditions can be achieved with the hypotonic treatment. However, the duration of the hypotonic treatment before electroporation and buffer hypoosmolarity have to be adjusted in order to cause cell swelling, to avoid regulatory volume decrease and to preserve cell viability. The aims of our study were to determine cell size dynamics and vi...

  19. Stochastic and coherent dynamics of single and coupled beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    burst period as function of an external applied stochastic term and use a technique for reducing the stochastic differential equations to ODEs for the average and higher order moments. The later method is approximate and we shall discuss the limits of validity. The individual beta cells are coupled...... phenomenon, modeled by a slow-fast nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The single cell oscillations are complex as the dynamical behavior is a result of traversing a series of saddle node and homoclinic bifurcations, controlled by the slow variable. We shall present results on the...... beta cells in the simple one dimensional case and show how wave patterns can arise and propagate along the chain. These wave patterns can be blocked by inhomogeneous glucose concentration along the chain, and we shall show how the coupled cell model can be connected to the Fishers equation, which is...

  20. Dynamic Model of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2007-01-01

    The present work involves the development of a model for predicting the dynamic temperature of a high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. The model is developed to test different thermal control strategies before implementing them in the actual system. The test system consists of a prototype...... stack at a high stoichiometric air flow. This is possible because of the PBI fuel cell membranes used, and the very low pressure drop in the stack. The model consists of a discrete thermal model dividing the stack into three parts: inlet, middle and end and predicting the temperatures in these three...... parts, where also the temperatures are measured. The heat balance of the system involves a fuel cell model to describe the heat added by the fuel cells when a current is drawn. Furthermore the model also predicts the temperatures, when heating the stack with external heating elements for start-up, heat...

  1. Exploring neural cell dynamics with digital holographic microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre

    2013-07-11

    In this review, we summarize how the new concept of digital optics applied to the field of holographic microscopy has allowed the development of a reliable and flexible digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy (DH-QPM) technique at the nanoscale particularly suitable for cell imaging. Particular emphasis is placed on the original biological ormation provided by the quantitative phase signal. We present the most relevant DH-QPM applications in the field of cell biology, including automated cell counts, recognition, classification, three-dimensional tracking, discrimination between physiological and pathophysiological states, and the study of cell membrane fluctuations at the nanoscale. In the last part, original results show how DH-QPM can address two important issues in the field of neurobiology, namely, multiple-site optical recording of neuronal activity and noninvasive visualization of dendritic spine dynamics resulting from a full digital holographic microscopy tomographic approach. Copyright © 2013 by Annual Reviews.

  2. Dynamic loading, matrix maintenance and cell injection therapy of human intervertebral discs cultured in a bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, D H; Gawri, R; Moir, J; Beckman, L; Eglin, D; Steffen, T; Roughley, P J; Ouellet, J A; Haglund, L

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain originating from intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration affects the quality of life for millions of people, and it is a major contributor to global healthcare costs. Long-term culture of intact IVDs is necessary to develop ex vivo models of human IVD degeneration and repair, where the relationship between mechanobiology, disc matrix composition and metabolism can be better understood. A bioreactor was developed that facilitates culture of intact human IVDs in a controlled, dynamically loaded environment. Tissue integrity and cell viability was evaluated under 3 different loading conditions: low 0.1-0.3, medium 0.1-0.3 and high 0.1-1.2 MPa. Cell viability was maintained > 80 % throughout the disc at low and medium loads, whereas it dropped to approximately 70 % (NP) and 50 % (AF) under high loads. Although cell viability was affected at high loads, there was no evidence of sGAG loss, changes in newly synthesised collagen type II or chondroadherin fragmentation. Sulphated GAG content remained at a stable level of approximately 50 µg sGAG/mg tissue in all loading protocols. To evaluate the feasibility of tissue repair strategies with cell supplementation, human NP cells were transplanted into discs within a thermoreversible hyaluronan hydrogel. The discs were loaded under medium loads, and the injected cells remained largely localised to the NP region. This study demonstrates the feasibility of culturing human IVDs for 14 days under cyclic dynamic loading conditions. The system allows the determination a safe range-of-loading and presents a platform to evaluate cell therapies and help to elucidate the effect of load following cell-based therapies. PMID:26728497

  3. Cell Stability Analysis of Conventional 6T Dynamic 8T SRAM Cell in 45NM Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dhanumjaya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A SRAM cell must meet requirements for operation in submicron/nano ranges. The scaling of CMOS technology has significant impact on SRAM cell -- random fluctuation of electrical characteristics and substantial leakage current. In this paper we present dynamic column based power supply 8 T SRAM cell and comparing the proposed SRAM cell with respect to conventional SRAM 6T in various aspects. To verify read stability and write ability analysis we use N-curve metric. Simulation results affirmed that proposed 8T SRAM cell achieved improved read stability, read current, and leakage current in 45nm Technology comparing with conventional 6T SRAM using cadence virtuoso tool.

  4. Preliminary study of small scale solar test cells for solar thermal evaluation of building components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, G. [CIEMAT, Renewable Energy Dept., Madrid (Spain)]|[CENIDET, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Jimenez, M.J.; Heras, M.R. [CIEMAT, Renewable Energy Dept., Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study to validate small scale solar test cells for thermal evaluation of building components such as windows and roofs. The description and performance of the scale test cells are described. The validation of the thermal performance was made with the real test cell Passys indirectly by applying the classical averaging method that was initially used for the Passys cells to determine overall heat loss coefficient, UA, and the solar heat gain, gA. The use of this methodology was selected, as a first approach, to evaluate the viability of the study of scale test cells. Our preliminary results indicate that some percentage differences were high for some tests. Therefore, it is necessary to increase the period of time of the measurements of the scale test cells, in order to use dynamic system methods to reduce the percentage differences of UA and gA. (orig.)

  5. Growth dynamics of cancer cell colonies and their comparison with noncancerous cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huergo, M. A. C.; Pasquale, M. A.; González, P. H.; Bolzán, A. E.; Arvia, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) growth dynamics of HeLa (cervix cancer) cell colonies was studied following both their growth front and the pattern morphology evolutions utilizing large population colonies exhibiting linearly and radially spreading fronts. In both cases, the colony profile fractal dimension was df=1.20±0.05 and the growth fronts displaced at the constant velocity 0.90±0.05 μm min-1. Colonies showed changes in both cell morphology and average size. As time increased, the formation of large cells at the colony front was observed. Accordingly, the heterogeneity of the colony increased and local driving forces that set in began to influence the dynamics of the colony front. The dynamic scaling analysis of rough colony fronts resulted in a roughness exponent α = 0.50±0.05, a growth exponent β = 0.32±0.04, and a dynamic exponent z=1.5±0.2. The validity of this set of scaling exponents extended from a lower cutoff lc≈60 μm upward, and the exponents agreed with those predicted by the standard Kardar-Parisi-Zhang continuous equation. HeLa data were compared with those previously reported for Vero cell colonies. The value of df and the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang-type 2D front growth dynamics were similar for colonies of both cell lines. This indicates that the cell colony growth dynamics is independent of the genetic background and the tumorigenic nature of the cells. However, one can distinguish some differences between both cell lines during the growth of colonies that may result from specific cooperative effects and the nature of each biosystem.

  6. The Dynamic Evaluation of Enterprise's Strategy Based on Rough Set Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘恒江; 陈继祥

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents dynamic evaluation of enterprise's strategy which is suitable for dealing with the complex and dynamic problems of strategic evaluation. Rough Set Theory is a powerful mathematical tool to handle vagueness and uncertainty of dynamic evaluation. By the application of Rough Set Theory, this paper computes the significance and weights of each evaluation criterion and helps to lay evaluation emphasis on the main and effective criteria. From the reduced decision table,evaluators can get decision rules Which direct them to give judgment or suggestion of strategy. The whole evaluation process is decided by data, so the results are certain and reasonable.

  7. Early dynamic Thallium-201 SPECT in evaluation of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We performed early dynamic 201TlCl SPECT studies on patients with brain tumors to determine the value of 201TlCl dynamics for 15 minutes in distinguishing and evaluating the histologic grade of brain tumors. Method: SPECT studies were performed on 69 patients with brain tumors prior to surgical resection. Histological diagnosis was as follows: 28 patients with glioblastoma (grade IV), 8 patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III), 5 patients with grade II astrocytoma, 1 patients with pilocytic astrocytoma (grade I), and 27 patients with meningioma. Pilocytic astrocytoma and grade II astrocytoma were grouped together as low-grade gliomas. Results: In glioblastomas, the Time-activity ratios(TARs) increased significantly at 6 min (99.2±6.0%, p<0.0001 ), 9 min (103.0±4.6%, p<0.0001), 12 min (102.1±6.4%, p<0.01), and 15 min (102.0±5.0%, p<0.001) after 201TlCl administration when compared to the TAR at 3 min (93.7±6.9%). Unchanged radioactivity was observed on the time-activity curve in anaplastic astrocytomas (3 min: 106.0±17.8%, 6 min: 103.8±9.4%, 9 min: 99.1±6.3%, 12 min: 95.0±11.0%, 15 min: 96.0±13.0%). The TARs decreased significantly at 6 min (104.0±7.1%, p<0.05), 9 min (96.1±4.9%, p<0.02), 12 min(95.0±6.5%, p<0.05), and 15 min (89.8±12.8%, p<0.05) compared to the TAR at 3 min (113.9±9.5%) in low grade gliomas. In meningiomas, the TARs decreased at 12 min (94.0±9.1%, p<0.01), and 15 min (93.6±12.8%, p<0.02) compared to the TAR at 3 min (108.6±18.5%) respectively. Conclusion: In this early dynamic SPECT study, the entire duration of the examination is short, 15 minutes, a period similar to other general laboratory tests. Moreover, there is no need for adjustments of the imaging location with this method since continuous scanning is utilized. This examination method indicated not only 201Tl uptake but accumulative dynamics and also offer more accurate assessment in the diagnosis of brain tumors

  8. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) has been used to evaluate the effects of xenobiotics using three endpoints, stem cell differentiation, stem cell viability and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal is to establish amodel system that would evaluate chemical effects using a singl...

  9. Dynamic properties of high structural integrity auxetic open cell foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, F.; Ciffo, L. G.; Yates, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    This paper illustrates various dynamic characteristics of open cell compliant polyurethane foam with auxetic (negative Poisson's ratio) behaviour. The foam is obtained from off-the-shelf open cell polyurethane grey foam with a manufacturing process based on mechanical deformation on a mould in a temperature-controlled oven. The Poisson's ratio is measured with an image processing technique based on edge detection with wavelet methods. Foam samples have been tested in a viscoelastic analyser tensile test machine to determine the Young's modulus and loss factor for small dynamic strains. The same samples have also been tested in an acoustic impedance tube to measure acoustic absorption and specific acoustic resistance and reactance with a transmissibility technique. Another set of tests has been set up on a cam plastometer machine for constant strain rate dynamic crushing analysis. All the tests have been carried out on auxetic and normal foam samples to provide a comparison between the two types of cellular solids. The results from the experimental tests are discussed and interpreted using microstructure models for cellular materials existing in the literature. The negative Poisson's ratio foam presented in this paper shows an overall superiority regarding damping and acoustic properties compared to the original conventional foam. Its dynamic crushing performance is also significantly superior to the normal foam, suggesting a possible use in structural integrity compliant elements.

  10. Single cell growth and gene expression dynamics in model organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, Natalie Anne

    2009-01-01

    The developing discipline of synthetic biology attempts to recreate in artificial systems the emergent properties found in natural biology. Progress in this field requires a thorough understanding of the basic cellular functions that underly complex biological networks. Here, we present several studies that use existing and novel methods to probe the dynamic behavior of the model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli at the single cell level. First, we develop a microfluidic...

  11. Dynamic electrical behavior of halide perovskite based solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nemnes, George Alexandru; Besleaga, Cristina; Tomulescu, Andrei Gabriel; Pintilie, Ioana; Pintilie, Lucian; Torfason, Kristinn; Manolescu, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic electrical model is introduced to investigate the hysteretic effects in the I-V characteristics of perovskite based solar cells. By making a simple ansatz for the polarization relaxation, our model is able to reproduce qualitatively and quantitatively detailed features of measured I-V characteristics. Pre-poling effects are discussed, pointing out the differences between initially over- and under-polarized samples. In particular, the presence of the current over-shoot observed in th...

  12. Feedback Linearized Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS ) Neural Network was developed which learns a topology representing network (TRN) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is combined with a feedback linearized tracking controller to produce a robust control architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off-nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes network and its performance for accident scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control, stability derivative variation, and turbulence.

  13. Computational Systems Biology Analysis of Cell Reprogramming and Activation Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    In the past two decades, molecular cell biology has transitioned from a traditional descriptive science into a quantitative science that systematically measures cellular dynamics on different levels of genome, transcriptome and proteome. Along with this transition emerges the interdisciplinary field of systems biology, which aims to unravel complex interactions in biological systems through integrating experimental data into qualitative or quantitative models and computer simulations. In th...

  14. Dual interference channel quantitative phase microscopy of live cell dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Shaked, Natan T.; Rinehart, Matthew T.; Wax, Adam

    2009-01-01

    We introduce and experimentally demonstrate a new fast and accurate method for quantitative imaging of the dynamics of live biological cells. Using a dual-channel interferometric setup, two phase-shifted interferograms of nearly-transparent biological samples are acquired in a single digital camera exposure, and digitally processed into the phase profile of the sample. Since two interferograms of the same sample are acquired simultaneously, most of the common phase noise is eliminated, enabli...

  15. Dynamic Switch Between Two Adhesion Phenotypes in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yue; Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Agastin, Sivaprakash; Li, Jiahe; King, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The hematogenous metastatic cascade is mediated by the interaction of cancer cells and the endothelial cell lining of blood vessels. In this work, we examine the colon cancer cell line COLO 205, which grows simultaneously in both adherent and suspended states in culture and can serve as a good model for studying tumor heterogeneity. The two subpopulations of cells have different molecular characteristics despite being from the same parent cell line. We found that the ratio of adherent to suspended cells in culture is maintained at 7:3 (equilibrium ratio). The ratio was maintained even when we separate the two populations and culture them separately. After 8 h in culture the equilibrium was achieved only from either adherent or suspended population. The adherent cells were found to express less E-selectin binding glycans and demonstrated significantly weaker interaction with E-selectin under flow than the suspended cells. Manipulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers β-catenin and E-cadherin expression, either by siRNA knockdown of β-catenin or incubation with E-cadherin antibody-coated microbeads, shifted the ratio of adherent to suspended cells to 9:1. Interestingly, human plasma supplemented media shifted the ratio of adherent to suspended cells in the opposite direction to 1:9, favoring the suspended state. The dynamic COLO 205 population switch presents unique differential phenotypes of their subpopulations and could serve as a good model for studying cell heterogeneity and the EMT process in vitro. PMID:24575161

  16. Stochastic Polynomial Dynamic Models of the Yeast Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Indranil; Dimitrova, Elena; Jarrah, Abdul S.

    2010-03-01

    In the last decade a new holistic approach for tackling biological problems, systems biology, which takes into account the study of the interactions between the components of a biological system to predict function and behavior has emerged. The reverse-engineering of biochemical networks from experimental data have increasingly become important in systems biology. Based on Boolean networks, we propose a time-discrete stochastic framework for the reverse engineering of the yeast cell cycle regulatory network from experimental data. With a suitable choice of state set, we have used powerful tools from computational algebra, that underlie the reverse-engineering algorithm, avoiding costly enumeration strategies. Stochasticity is introduced by choosing at each update step a random coordinate function for each variable, chosen from a probability space of update functions. The algorithm is based on a combinatorial structure known as the Gr"obner fans of a polynomial ideal which identifies the underlying network structure and dynamics. The model depicts a correct dynamics of the yeast cell cycle network and reproduces the time sequence of expression patterns along the biological cell cycle. Our findings indicate that the methodolgy has high chance of success when applied to large and complex systems to determine the dynamical properties of corresponding networks.

  17. Clinical evaluation of dynamic CT scan of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuda, Masamichi

    1984-09-01

    The clinical usefulness of dynamic CT scans (DCT) of the pancreas was evaluated in 62 normal cases, 9 cases of acute pancreatitis, 24 cases of chronic pancreatitis and 43 cases of carcinoma of the pancreas. The normal pancreas was intensely and homogeneously enhanced on DCT, and peripancreatic vessels were clearly demonstrated, especially the gastroduodenal artery (98.4%). DCT was useful to demonstrate vascular lesions, associated with pancreatitis such as pseudoaneurysm. Although the carcinoma of the pancreas showed poor contrast enhancement on conventional enhanced CT (CCT), 37.2% showed intense contrast enhancement on DCT. Visualization of the gastroduodenal artery by DCT is helpful to decide the extent of tumor. DCT is superior to CCT in demonstrating collateral veins caused by tumor invasion to the portal system in carcinoma. DCT was approximately as accurate as angiography (92.6%) in evaluating tumor invasion to the portal system. DCT is a useful and minimally invasive modality in assessing the resectability of pancreatic carcinoma. DCT may eliminate angiography and surgery in unresectable cases. (author).

  18. Evaluation of WES one-dimensional dynamic soil testing procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, L.

    1983-06-01

    The Geomechanics Division of the Waterways Experiment Station (WES) tests soils to provide material property data for ground motion calculations in support of high explosives experiments. Thus, the validity of the ground motion predictions depends greatly on the WES material properties used. The usual WES experiments are uniaxial strain (UX) and triaxial shear (TX) tests that can be performed at static testing rates and at dynamic rates with rise times down to about one millisecond. However, in the field experiments being simulated, the measured rise times are often 0.01 ms up to 0.1 ms. Recently, an effort has been made to obtain test data in UX and TX devices with rise times of about 0.1 ms. Some of the test data obtained at these very high rates have appeared to be anomalous, suggesting that wave propagation or other effects may be invalidating the data. Because of these questions about the high rate soils test data, WES asked SRI to evaluate the testing methods used at WES and the data reduction device. This report documents an evaluation of laboratory test data obtained from the explosive-loaded uniaxial strain device developed at WES and the data analysis procedures currently being used.

  19. Fuel cell-gas turbine hybrid system design part II: Dynamics and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarty, Dustin; Brouwer, Jack; Samuelsen, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Fuel cell gas turbine hybrid systems have achieved ultra-high efficiency and ultra-low emissions at small scales, but have yet to demonstrate effective dynamic responsiveness or base-load cost savings. Fuel cell systems and hybrid prototypes have not utilized controls to address thermal cycling during load following operation, and have thus been relegated to the less valuable base-load and peak shaving power market. Additionally, pressurized hybrid topping cycles have exhibited increased stall/surge characteristics particularly during off-design operation. This paper evaluates additional control actuators with simple control methods capable of mitigating spatial temperature variation and stall/surge risk during load following operation of hybrid fuel cell systems. The novel use of detailed, spatially resolved, physical fuel cell and turbine models in an integrated system simulation enables the development and evaluation of these additional control methods. It is shown that the hybrid system can achieve greater dynamic response over a larger operating envelope than either individual sub-system; the fuel cell or gas turbine. Results indicate that a combined feed-forward, P-I and cascade control strategy is capable of handling moderate perturbations and achieving a 2:1 (MCFC) or 4:1 (SOFC) turndown ratio while retaining >65% fuel-to-electricity efficiency, while maintaining an acceptable stack temperature profile and stall/surge margin.

  20. Automated three-dimensional single cell phenotyping of spindle dynamics, cell shape, and volume

    CERN Document Server

    Plumb, Kemp; Pelletier, Vincent; Kilfoil, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    We present feature finding and tracking algorithms in 3D in living cells, and demonstrate their utility to measure metrics important in cell biological processes. We developed a computational imaging hybrid approach that combines automated three-dimensional tracking of point-like features with surface determination from which cell (or nuclear) volume, shape, and planes of interest can be extracted. After validation, we applied the technique to real space context-rich dynamics of the mitotic spindle, and cell volume and its relationship to spindle length, in dividing living cells. These methods are additionally useful for automated segregation of pre-anaphase and anaphase spindle populations in budding yeast. We found that genetic deletion of the yeast kinesin-5 mitotic motor cin8 leads to large mother and daughter cells that were indistinguishable based on size, and that in those cells the spindle length becomes uncorrelated with cell size. The technique can be used to visualize and quantify tracked feature c...

  1. The scale-free dynamics of eukaryotic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Aon

    Full Text Available Temporal organization of biological processes requires massively parallel processing on a synchronized time-base. We analyzed time-series data obtained from the bioenergetic oscillatory outputs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and isolated cardiomyocytes utilizing Relative Dispersional (RDA and Power Spectral (PSA analyses. These analyses revealed broad frequency distributions and evidence for long-term memory in the observed dynamics. Moreover RDA and PSA showed that the bioenergetic dynamics in both systems show fractal scaling over at least 3 orders of magnitude, and that this scaling obeys an inverse power law. Therefore we conclude that in S. cerevisiae and cardiomyocytes the dynamics are scale-free in vivo. Applying RDA and PSA to data generated from an in silico model of mitochondrial function indicated that in yeast and cardiomyocytes the underlying mechanisms regulating the scale-free behavior are similar. We validated this finding in vivo using single cells, and attenuating the activity of the mitochondrial inner membrane anion channel with 4-chlorodiazepam to show that the oscillation of NAD(PH and reactive oxygen species (ROS can be abated in these two evolutionarily distant species. Taken together these data strongly support our hypothesis that the generation of ROS, coupled to redox cycling, driven by cytoplasmic and mitochondrial processes, are at the core of the observed rhythmicity and scale-free dynamics. We argue that the operation of scale-free bioenergetic dynamics plays a fundamental role to integrate cellular function, while providing a framework for robust, yet flexible, responses to the environment.

  2. Global Dynamics of a Virus Dynamical Model with Cell-to-Cell Transmission and Cure Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongqian Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cure effect of a virus model with both cell-to-cell transmission and cell-to-virus transmission is studied. By the method of next generation matrix, the basic reproduction number is obtained. The locally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium is considered by investigating the characteristic equation of the model. The globally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium is proved by constructing suitable Lyapunov function, and the sufficient condition for the globally asymptotic stability of the endemic equilibrium is obtained by constructing suitable Lyapunov function and using LaSalle invariance principal.

  3. Tracking the mechanical dynamics of human embryonic stem cell chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A plastic chromatin structure has emerged as fundamental to the self-renewal and pluripotent capacity of embryonic stem (ES cells. Direct measurement of chromatin dynamics in vivo is, however, challenging as high spatiotemporal resolution is required. Here, we present a new tracking-based method which can detect high frequency chromatin movement and quantify the mechanical dynamics of chromatin in live cells. Results We use this method to study how the mechanical properties of chromatin movement in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are modulated spatiotemporally during differentiation into cardiomyocytes (CM. Notably, we find that pluripotency is associated with a highly discrete, energy-dependent frequency of chromatin movement that we refer to as a ‘breathing’ state. We find that this ‘breathing’ state is strictly dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and is progressively silenced during differentiation. Conclusions We thus propose that the measured chromatin high frequency movements in hESCs may represent a hallmark of pluripotency and serve as a mechanism to maintain the genome in a transcriptionally accessible state. This is a result that could not have been observed without the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by this novel tracking method.

  4. Quantitative Decomposition of Dynamics of Mathematical Cell Models: Method and Application to Ventricular Myocyte Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Shimayoshi

    Full Text Available Mathematical cell models are effective tools to understand cellular physiological functions precisely. For detailed analysis of model dynamics in order to investigate how much each component affects cellular behaviour, mathematical approaches are essential. This article presents a numerical analysis technique, which is applicable to any complicated cell model formulated as a system of ordinary differential equations, to quantitatively evaluate contributions of respective model components to the model dynamics in the intact situation. The present technique employs a novel mathematical index for decomposed dynamics with respect to each differential variable, along with a concept named instantaneous equilibrium point, which represents the trend of a model variable at some instant. This article also illustrates applications of the method to comprehensive myocardial cell models for analysing insights into the mechanisms of action potential generation and calcium transient. The analysis results exhibit quantitative contributions of individual channel gating mechanisms and ion exchanger activities to membrane repolarization and of calcium fluxes and buffers to raising and descending of the cytosolic calcium level. These analyses quantitatively explicate principle of the model, which leads to a better understanding of cellular dynamics.

  5. Dynamic load balancing algorithm for molecular dynamics based on Voronoi cells domain decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattebert, J.-L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Richards, D.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glosli, J.N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    We present a new algorithm for automatic parallel load balancing in classical molecular dynamics. It assumes a spatial domain decomposition of particles into Voronoi cells. It is a gradient method which attempts to minimize a cost function by displacing Voronoi sites associated with each processor/sub-domain along steepest descent directions. Excellent load balance has been obtained for quasi-2D and 3D practical applications, with up to 440·106 particles on 65,536 MPI tasks.

  6. Qualitative evaluation of renal function using dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of quantitative analysis of renal function using dynamic-enhanced MR imaging was performed on a 1.5 T superconducting MR system. To determine the best suitable pulse sequence and dose of Gd-DTPA to injection, preliminary study using phantom was done before clinical application. As the aim of this study was quantitative evaluation, S/N ratio and contrast resolution were most important factors to decide pulse sequence. Consequently, spin echo technique (TR/TE=200/15, INEX, 128 x 128) was adopted without respiratory suspension. Eleven patients with slightly impaired renal function and 12 patients with grafted kidneys were included in this clinical study. Time-intensity curve of renal parenchyma obtained by dynamic MRI (=MRI renogram) was intended to mathematical analysis. First, 2 compartment model was established for washout of Gd-DTPA. Then a formula as below can be formed for expressing theoretical time-intensity curve. X(t)=A·exexp (-k1·t)+B·exp (-k2·t)-C·exp (-k3·t). The parameters of A, B, C and k1, k2, k3 can be figure out by calculation of measured data by means of nonlinear least squares method. A new parameter (named MRI-GFR), expressed in formula as befow, was settled for representing GFR. MRI-GFR=k1·k2/A·k1+B·k2. The MRI-GFR was correlated well with GFR obtained by renogram using 99mTc-DTPA (correlation coefficient: r=0.901). In conclusion, MRI renogram was useful to calculate GFR by using mathematical analysis. (author)

  7. Dynamic Crushing Response of Closed-cell Aluminium Foam at Variable Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. A.; Kader, M. A.; Escobedo, J. P.; Hazell, P. J.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Quadir, M. Z.

    2015-06-01

    The impact response of aluminium foams is essential for assessing their crashworthiness and energy absorption capacity for potential applications. The dynamic compactions of closed-cell aluminium foams (CYMAT) have been tested at variable strain rates. Microstructural characterization has also been carried out. The low strain rate impact test has been carried out using drop weight experiments while the high strain compaction test has been carried out via plate impact experiments. The post impacted samples have been examined using optical and electron microscopy to observe the microstructural changes during dynamic loading. This combination of dynamic deformation during impact and post impact microstructural analysis helped to evaluate the pore collapse mechanism and impact energy absorption characteristics.

  8. Dynamic Enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination for Realistic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Klaus I.; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret; Barcos, Sonia; Gerardino, Guillermo Andrés Pocovi; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination (eICIC) is a key ingredient to boost the performance of co-channel Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets). eICIC encompasses two main techniques: Almost Blank Subframes (ABS), during which the macro cell remains silent to reduce the interference, and biased...... user association to offload more users to the picocells. However, its application to realistic irregular deployments opens a number of research questions. In this paper, we investigate the operation of eICIC in a realistic deployment based on three-dimensional data from a dense urban European capital...... area. Rather than the classical semi-static and network-wise configuration, the importance of having highly dynamic and distributed mechanisms that are able to adapt to local environment conditions is revealed. We propose two promising cell association algorithms: one aiming at pure load balancing and...

  9. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Evaluation; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer; Sprik, Sam; Ainscough, Chris; Saur, Genevieve

    2015-06-10

    This presentation provides a summary of NREL's FY15 fuel cell electric vehicle evaluation project activities and accomplishments. It was presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2015 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on June 10, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia.

  10. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Lamers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  11. Computational investigation of epithelial cell dynamic phenotype in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debnath Jayanta

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When grown in three-dimensional (3D cultures, epithelial cells typically form cystic organoids that recapitulate cardinal features of in vivo epithelial structures. Characterizing essential cell actions and their roles, which constitute the system's dynamic phenotype, is critical to gaining deeper insight into the cystogenesis phenomena. Methods Starting with an earlier in silico epithelial analogue (ISEA1 that validated for several Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK epithelial cell culture attributes, we built a revised analogue (ISEA2 to increase overlap between analogue and cell culture traits. Both analogues used agent-based, discrete event methods. A set of axioms determined ISEA behaviors; together, they specified the analogue's operating principles. A new experimentation framework enabled tracking relative axiom use and roles during simulated cystogenesis along with establishment of the consequences of their disruption. Results ISEA2 consistently produced convex cystic structures in a simulated embedded culture. Axiom use measures provided detailed descriptions of the analogue's dynamic phenotype. Dysregulating key cell death and division axioms led to disorganized structures. Adhering to either axiom less than 80% of the time caused ISEA1 to form easily identified morphological changes. ISEA2 was more robust to identical dysregulation. Both dysregulated analogues exhibited characteristics that resembled those associated with an in vitro model of early glandular epithelial cancer. Conclusion We documented the causal chains of events, and their relative roles, responsible for simulated cystogenesis. The results stand as an early hypothesis–a theory–of how individual MDCK cell actions give rise to consistently roundish, cystic organoids.

  12. Dynamic cell culture system: a new cell cultivation instrument for biological experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmunder, F. K.; Nordau, C. G.; Tschopp, A.; Huber, B.; Cogoli, A.

    1988-01-01

    The prototype of a miniaturized cell cultivation instrument for animal cell culture experiments aboard Spacelab is presented (Dynamic cell culture system: DCCS). The cell chamber is completely filled and has a working volume of 200 microliters. Medium exchange is achieved with a self-powered osmotic pump (flowrate 1 microliter h-1). The reservoir volume of culture medium is 230 microliters. The system is neither mechanically stirred nor equipped with sensors. Hamster kidney (Hak) cells growing on Cytodex 3 microcarriers were used to test the biological performance of the DCCS. Growth characteristics in the DCCS, as judged by maximal cell density, glucose consumption, lactic acid secretion and pH, were similar to those in cell culture tubes.

  13. An evaluation of utility of residual liver function prediction using dynamic SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for evaluating and predicting residual liver function was devised for dynamic single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The ratio of residual volume to total effective liver volume, K value and predictive index using dynamic SPECT were compared with respective values using dynamic planar scintigraphy. The coefficients of correlation were 0.86 (the ratio), 0.91 (K value) and 0.88 (predictive index). The predictive index, measured by dynamic SPECT, was as useful as by dynamic planar scintigraphy. In addition, the resecting line using SPECT was more accurate than using planar scintigraphy. Dynamic SPECT was more useful than dynamic planar scintigraphy. (author)

  14. Evaluation of pituitary adenomas by multidirectional multislice dynamic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Multidetector-row CT is a new technology with a short scanning time. Multislice dynamic CT (MSDCT) in various directions can be obtained using the multidetector-row CT with multiplanar reformatting (MPR) technique. Material and Methods: We evaluated the initial results of sagittal and coronal MSDCT images reconstructed by MPR (MSDCT-MPR) in 3 pituitary adenoma patients with a pacemaker. Results: In a patient with microadenoma, the maximum contrast between the normal anterior pituitary gland and the adenoma occurred approximately 50 s after the start of the contrast medium injection. A microadenoma was depicted as a less enhanced area relative to normal pituitary tissue. The macroadenomas were depicted as a less enhanced mass with cavernous sinus invasion in 1 patient and as a non-uniformly enhanced mass in another patient. Bone destruction and incomplete opening of the sellar floor during previous surgery were clearly detected in 2 patients with macroadenomas. These pituitary adenomas were removed via the transnasal route based on information from the MSDCT-MPR images only. The findings were verified surgically. Conclusion: The MSDCT-MPR provided the information needed for surgery with good image quality in the 3 patients with pacemakers. MSDCT-MPR appears to be a useful technique for patients with a pituitary adenoma in whom MR imaging is not available. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of the MSDCT-MPR technique being used to demonstrate pituitary disorders

  15. Dynamic maintenance of stochastic molecular clusters on cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugler, Andrew; Wehrens, Martijn; Ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2015-03-01

    Clustering of molecules on cell membranes is a widely observed phenomenon. A key example is the oncoprotein Ras. Maintenance of Ras clusters has been linked to proper Ras signaling. Yet, the mechanism by which Ras clusters are maintained remains unclear. Recently it was discovered that activated Ras promotes further Ras activation. We show using particle-based simulation that this positive feedback link is sufficient to produce persistent clusters of active Ras molecules via a dynamic nucleation mechanism. The cluster statistics are consistent with experimental observations. Interestingly, our model does not support a Turing regime of macroscopic reaction-diffusion patterning. This means that the clustering we observe is a purely stochastic effect, arising from the coupling of the positive feedback network with the discrete nature of individual molecules. These findings underscore the importance of stochastic and dynamic properties of reaction diffusion systems for biological behavior.

  16. A population dynamics analysis of the interaction between adaptive regulatory T cells and antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fouchet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells are central actors in the maintenance of tolerance of self-antigens or allergens and in the regulation of the intensity of the immune response during infections by pathogens. An understanding of the network of the interaction between regulatory T cells, antigen presenting cells and effector T cells is starting to emerge. Dynamical systems analysis can help to understand the dynamical properties of an interaction network and can shed light on the different tasks that can be accomplished by a network. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a mathematical model to describe a interaction network of adaptive regulatory T cells, in which mature precursor T cells may differentiate into either adaptive regulatory T cells or effector T cells, depending on the activation state of the cell by which the antigen was presented. Using an equilibrium analysis of the mathematical model we show that, for some parameters, the network has two stable equilibrium states: one in which effector T cells are strongly regulated by regulatory T cells and another in which effector T cells are not regulated because the regulatory T cell population is vanishingly small. We then simulate different types of perturbations, such as the introduction of an antigen into a virgin system, and look at the state into which the system falls. We find that whether or not the interaction network switches from the regulated (tolerant state to the unregulated state depends on the strength of the antigenic stimulus and the state from which the network has been perturbed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that the interaction network studied in this paper plays an essential part in generating and maintaining tolerance against allergens and self-antigens.

  17. MEMS-based dynamic cell-to-cell culture platforms using electrochemical surface modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MEMS-based biological platforms with the capability of both spatial placements and time releases of living cells for cell-to-cell culture experiments have been designed and demonstrated utilizing electrochemical surface modification effects. The spatial placement is accomplished by electrochemical surface modification of substrate surfaces to be either adhesive or non-adhesive for living cells. The time control is achieved by the electrical activation of the selective indium tin oxide co-culture electrode to allow the migration of living cells onto the electrode to start the cell-to-cell culture studies. Prototype devices have a three-electrode design with an electrode size of 50 × 50 µm2 and the separation gaps of 2 µm between them. An electrical voltage of −1.5 V has been used to activate the electrodes independently and sequentially to demonstrate the dynamic cell-to-cell culture experiments of NIH 3T3 fibroblast and Madin Darby canine kidney cells. As such, this MEMS platform could be a basic yet versatile tool to characterize transient cell-to-cell interactions

  18. Ibuprofen regulation of microtubule dynamics in cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymut, Sharon M; Kampman, Claire M; Corey, Deborah A; Endres, Tori; Cotton, Calvin U; Kelley, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    High-dose ibuprofen, an effective anti-inflammatory therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), has been shown to preserve lung function in a pediatric population. Despite its efficacy, few patients receive ibuprofen treatment due to potential renal and gastrointestinal toxicity. The mechanism of ibuprofen efficacy is also unclear. We have previously demonstrated that CF microtubules are slower to reform after depolymerization compared with respective wild-type controls. Slower microtubule dynamics in CF cells are responsible for impaired intracellular transport and are related to inflammatory signaling. Here, it is identified that high-dose ibuprofen treatment in both CF cell models and primary CF nasal epithelial cells restores microtubule reformation rates to wild-type levels, as well as induce extension of microtubules to the cell periphery. Ibuprofen treatment also restores microtubule-dependent intracellular transport monitored by measuring intracellular cholesterol transport. These effects are specific to ibuprofen as other cyclooxygenase inhibitors have no effect on these measures. Effects of ibuprofen are mimicked by stimulation of AMPK and blocked by the AMPK inhibitor compound C. We conclude that high-dose ibuprofen treatment enhances microtubule formation in CF cells likely through an AMPK-related pathway. These findings define a potential mechanism to explain the efficacy of ibuprofen therapy in CF. PMID:27317686

  19. Dynamics of Tetrahymena macronuclear lamina during cell division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENBIN; ZHONGHEZHAI

    1994-01-01

    During mitosis,the nuclear lamina in higher eukaryotic cells undergoes a distinctly morphological change.It breaks down into lamin polymers or monomers at prophase.At telophase,the lamins reassemble around the condensed chromatin to form the layer of lamina.Using antiserum to mammalian lamins,we studied the dynamics of lamina during cell division in the macronuleus of Tetrahymena shanghaiensis,which divided in the way of amitosis.In contrast to those in higher animal cells,the typical perinuclear lamin distribution in the macronucleus persisted throughout the whole cell cycle.It was further found that in some synchronized cells,the lamin distribution bisplayed an unusual pattern consisting of a series of spots within the macronucleus.Using South-western hybridization,we found that the purified 66 KD lamin in Tetrahymena showed specific affinity with the telomere DNA sequence in the same species.Therefore,we propose that pattern of immunofluorescence may be due to the interaction of lamin protein with the nucleoli and the condensed chromatins in the macronucleus.

  20. Dynamic characteristics of an automotive fuel cell system for transitory load changes

    OpenAIRE

    Rabbani, Raja Abid; Rokni, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    A dynamic model of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) system is developed to investigate the behavior and transient response of a fuel cell system for automotive applications. Fuel cell dynamics are subjected to reactant flows, heat management and water transportation inside the fuel cell. Therefore, a control-oriented model has been devised in Aspen Plus Dynamics, which accommodates electrochemical, thermal, feed flow and water crossover models in addition to two-phase calculatio...

  1. Dynamic mechanisms of cell rigidity sensing: insights from a computational model of actomyosin networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Borau

    Full Text Available Cells modulate themselves in response to the surrounding environment like substrate elasticity, exhibiting structural reorganization driven by the contractility of cytoskeleton. The cytoskeleton is the scaffolding structure of eukaryotic cells, playing a central role in many mechanical and biological functions. It is composed of a network of actins, actin cross-linking proteins (ACPs, and molecular motors. The motors generate contractile forces by sliding couples of actin filaments in a polar fashion, and the contractile response of the cytoskeleton network is known to be modulated also by external stimuli, such as substrate stiffness. This implies an important role of actomyosin contractility in the cell mechano-sensing. However, how cells sense matrix stiffness via the contractility remains an open question. Here, we present a 3-D Brownian dynamics computational model of a cross-linked actin network including the dynamics of molecular motors and ACPs. The mechano-sensing properties of this active network are investigated by evaluating contraction and stress in response to different substrate stiffness. Results demonstrate two mechanisms that act to limit internal stress: (i In stiff substrates, motors walk until they exert their maximum force, leading to a plateau stress that is independent of substrate stiffness, whereas (ii in soft substrates, motors walk until they become blocked by other motors or ACPs, leading to submaximal stress levels. Therefore, this study provides new insights into the role of molecular motors in the contraction and rigidity sensing of cells.

  2. Dynamics and Synchrony of Pancreatic beta-cells and Islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells secrete insulin in response to raised glucose levels. Malfunctioning of this system plays an important role in the metabolic disease diabetes. The biological steps from glucose stimulus to the final release of insulin are incompletely understood, and a more complete...... description of these processes and their interactions would provide important input in the search for a better treatment of the disease. The thesis describes several aspects of mathematical modeling of beta-cells relevant for the understanding of glucose stimulated insulin secretion. It consists of an...... biological hypotheses. The subjects addressed are: Quasi-steady-state approximations of enzyme reactions, the effect of noise on bursting electrical behavior, exciation wave propagation in pancreatic islets, intra- and inter-islet synchronization and pulsatile insulin secretion, and mitochondrial dynamics....

  3. Efficient evaluation of accuracy of molecular quantum dynamics using dephasing representation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Baiqing; Mollica, Cesare; Vanicek, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    Ab initio methods for the electronic structure of molecules have reached a satisfactory accuracy for calculations of static properties but remain too expensive for quantum dynamics calculations. We propose an efficient semiclassical method for evaluating the accuracy of a lower level quantum dynamics, as compared to a higher level quantum dynamics, without having to perform any quantum dynamics. The method is based on the dephasing representation of quantum fidelity and its fe...

  4. Sox17-Mediated XEN Cell Conversion Identifies Dynamic Networks Controlling Cell-Fate Decisions in Embryo-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela C.H. McDonald

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the gene regulatory networks (GRNs distinguishing extraembryonic endoderm (ExEn stem (XEN cells from those that maintain the extensively characterized embryonic stem cell (ESC. An intriguing network candidate is Sox17, an essential transcription factor for XEN derivation and self-renewal. Here, we show that forced Sox17 expression drives ESCs toward ExEn, generating XEN cells that contribute to ExEn when placed back into early mouse embryos. Transient Sox17 expression is sufficient to drive this fate change during which time cells transit through distinct intermediate states prior to the generation of functional XEN-like cells. To orchestrate this conversion process, Sox17 acts in autoregulatory and feedforward network motifs, regulating dynamic GRNs directing cell fate. Sox17-mediated XEN conversion helps to explain the regulation of cell-fate changes and reveals GRNs regulating lineage decisions in the mouse embryo.

  5. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana; O'Neill, Hugh; Liberton, Michelle; Urban, Volker S.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ohl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membranes in terms of their flexibility and motion during the photosynthetic process. We present a direct observation of thylakoid membrane undulatory motion in vivo and show a connection between membrane mobility and photosynthetic activity. High-resolution inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 assessed the flexibility of cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane sheets and the dependence of the membranes on illumination conditions. We observed softer thylakoid membranes in the dark that have three-to four fold excess mobility compared to membranes under high light conditions. Our analysis indicates that electron transfer between photosynthetic reaction centers and the associated electrochemical proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane result in a significant driving force for excess membrane dynamics. These observations provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular architecture.

  6. Cell wall dynamics modulate acetic acid-induced apoptotic cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Rego

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid triggers apoptotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, similar to mammalian apoptosis. To uncover novel regulators of this process, we analyzed whether impairing MAPK signaling affected acetic acid-induced apoptosis and found the mating-pheromone response and, especially, the cell wall integrity pathways were the major mediators, especially the latter, which we characterized further. Screening downstream effectors of this pathway, namely targets of the transcription factor Rlm1p, highlighted decreased cell wall remodeling as particularly important for acetic acid resistance. Modulation of cell surface dynamics therefore emerges as a powerful strategy to increase acetic acid resistance, with potential application in industrial fermentations using yeast, and in biomedicine to exploit the higher sensitivity of colorectal carcinoma cells to apoptosis induced by acetate produced by intestinal propionibacteria.

  7. Performance Evaluation of a Dedicated Camera Suitable for Dynamic Radiopharmaceuticals Evaluation in Small Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loudos, George; Majewski, Stanislaw; Wojcik, Randolph; Weisenberger, Andrew; Sakelios, Nikolas; Nikita, Konstantina; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos; Bouziotis, Penelope; Xanthopoulos, Stavros; Varvarigou, Alexandra

    2007-06-01

    As the result of a collaboration between the Detector and Imaging Group of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (US), the Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products (IRRP) of N.C.S.R. ldquoDemokritosrdquo and the Biomedical Simulations and Imaging Applications Laboratory (BIOSIM) of National Technical University of Athens (Greece), a mouse sized camera optimized for Tc^99m imaging was developed. The detector was built in Jefferson Lab and transferred to Greece, where it was evaluated with phantoms and small animals. The system will be used initially for planar dynamic studies in small animals, in order to assess the performance of new radiolabeled biomolecules for oncological studies. The active area of the detector is approximately 48 mm times 96 mm. It is based on two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT), a pixelated NaI(Tl) scintillator and a high resolution lead parallel-hole collimator. The system was developed to optim

  8. Replicator Dynamics of of Cancer Stem Cell; Selection in the Presence of Differentiation and Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Kaveh, Kamran; Kohandel, Mohammad; Sivaloganathan, Siv

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells have the potential to produce lineages of non-stem cell populations (differentiated cells) via a ubiquitous hierarchal division scheme. Differentiation of a stem cell into (partially) differentiated cells can happen either symmetrically or asymmetrically. The selection dynamics of a mutant cancer stem cell should be investigated in the light of a stem cell proliferation hierarchy and presence of a non-stem cell population. By constructing a three-compartment Moran-type model compos...

  9. Mitochondrial dynamics and cell death in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-García, José; Akhmedov, Alexander T

    2016-03-01

    The highly regulated processes of mitochondrial fusion (joining), fission (division) and trafficking, collectively called mitochondrial dynamics, determine cell-type specific morphology, intracellular distribution and activity of these critical organelles. Mitochondria are critical for cardiac function, while their structural and functional abnormalities contribute to several common cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure (HF). The tightly balanced mitochondrial fusion and fission determine number, morphology and activity of these multifunctional organelles. Although the intracellular architecture of mature cardiomyocytes greatly restricts mitochondrial dynamics, this process occurs in the adult human heart. Fusion and fission modulate multiple mitochondrial functions, ranging from energy and reactive oxygen species production to Ca(2+) homeostasis and cell death, allowing the heart to respond properly to body demands. Tightly controlled balance between fusion and fission is of utmost importance in the high energy-demanding cardiomyocytes. A shift toward fission leads to mitochondrial fragmentation, while a shift toward fusion results in the formation of enlarged mitochondria and in the fusion of damaged mitochondria with healthy organelles. Mfn1, Mfn2 and OPA1 constitute the core machinery promoting mitochondrial fusion, whereas Drp1, Fis1, Mff and MiD49/51 are the core components of fission machinery. Growing evidence suggests that fusion/fission factors in adult cardiomyocytes play essential noncanonical roles in cardiac development, Ca(2+) signaling, mitochondrial quality control and cell death. Impairment of this complex circuit causes cardiomyocyte dysfunction and death contributing to heart injury culminating in HF. Pharmacological targeting of components of this intricate network may be a novel therapeutic modality for HF treatment. PMID:26872674

  10. Dynamic characteristics of an automotive fuel cell system for transitory load changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabbani, Raja Abid; Rokni, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    A dynamic model of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) system is developed to investigate the behavior and transient response of a fuel cell system for automotive applications. Fuel cell dynamics are subjected to reactant flows, heat management and water transportation inside the fuel...

  11. Dynamic analysis and performance evaluation of the BIAcore surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laurent; Ospina, Juan

    2015-05-01

    Solution procedures were proposed to analyze nonlinear mass transport through an optical biosensor. A generalized collocation technique was applied to predict the dynamic behavior of an analyte along the flow chamber as a result of convection, diffusion and chemical reaction. The method estimated the effective time constants for reaching average steady-state concentrations of the free and bound analytes in the cell. When diffusion in the direction of flow was neglected, a closed-form solution, based on double Laplace transforms, was obtained after linearizing the original system. In both models, an increase in the sample diffusion coefficient lowered the effective time constant. This approach may help researchers evaluate the performance of biosensors and meet specific design criteria.

  12. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Design and Dynamic Modeling in MATLAB

    OpenAIRE

    S.V.T.Abirami; G.Samuel Muthura

    2015-01-01

    The alternatives to combustion engines in future will be fuel cells. The dynamic behavior of fuel cells for changing load conditions show poor voltage regulation. For improving the voltage regulation of PEM fuel cell, efficient control system should be designed. If the dynamic behavior of the fuel cell is known, the cost in designing the control system is greatly reduced .The behavior of the fuel cell for various load conditions and for changing pressure and temperature can be fou...

  13. Review on the Progress for Mutual Fund Performance Dynamic Evaluation Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhongqiuZhao

    2004-01-01

    The progress of performance dynamic evaluation theory for mutual fund from different points is summarized. The theories include conditional performance evaluation model, stochastic discount factors model, dynamic selecting and timing ability, portfolio change measure and so on. Meanwhile, this paper also summarized the progress of Performance Persistence and Survlvorshlp Bias. Then the analysis of the development tendency for the performance evaluation of portfolio is made.

  14. Adaptation and dynamics of cat retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enroth-Cugell, C; Shapley, R M

    1973-09-01

    1. The impulse/quantum (I/Q) ratio was measured as a function of background illumination for rod-dominated, pure central, linear square-wave responses of retinal ganglion cells in the cat.2. The I/Q ratio was constant at low backgrounds (dark adapted state) and inversely proportional to the 0.9 power of the background at high backgrounds (the light adapted state). There was an abrupt transition from the dark-adapted state to the light-adapted state.3. It was possible to define the adaptation level at a particular background as the ratio (I/Q ratio at that background)/(dark adapted I/Q ratio).4. The time course of the square-wave response was correlated with the adaptation level. The response was sustained in the dark-adapted state, partially transient at the transition level, and progressively more transient the lower the impulse/quantum ratio of the ganglion cell became. This was true both for on-centre and off-centre cells.5. The frequency response of the central response mechanism at different adaptation levels was measured. It was a low-pass characteristic in the dark-adapted state and became progressively more of a bandpass characteristic as the cell became more light-adapted.6. The rapidity of onset of adaptation was measured with a time-varying adapting light. The impulse/quantum ratio is reset within 100 msec of the onset of the conditioning light, and is kept at the new value throughout the time the conditioning light is on.7. These results can be explained by a nonlinear feedback model. In the model, it is postulated that the exponential function of the horizontal cell potential controls transmission from rods to bipolars. This model has an abrupt transition from dark- to light-adapted states, and its response dynamics are correlated with adaptation level. PMID:4747229

  15. Dynamics of Metal Partitioning at the Cell-Solution Interface: Implications for Toxicity Assessment under Growth-Inhibiting Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Jérôme F L; Paquet, Nathalie; Lavoie, Michel; Fortin, Claude

    2015-06-01

    Metal toxicity toward microorganisms is usually evaluated by determining growth inhibition. To achieve a mechanistic interpretation of such toxic effects, the intricate coupling between cell growth kinetics and metal partitioning dynamics at the cell-solution interface over time must be considered on a quantitative level. A formalism is elaborated to evaluate cell-surface-bound, internalized, and extracellular metal fractions in the limit where metal uptake kinetics is controlled by internalization under noncomplexing medium conditions. Cell growth kinetics is tackled using the continuous logistic equation modified to include growth inhibition by metal accumulation to intracellular or cell surface sites. The theory further includes metal-proton competition for adsorption at cell-surface binding sites, as well as possible variation of cell size during exposure to metal ions. The formalism elucidates the dramatic impacts of initial cell concentration on metal bioavailability and toxicity over time, in agreement with reported algae bioassays. It further highlights that appropriate definition of toxicity endpoints requires careful inspection of the ratio between exposure time scale and time scale of metal depletion from bulk solution. The latter depends on metal internalization-excretion rate constants, microorganism growth, and the extent of metal adsorption on nonspecific, transporter, and growth inhibitory sites. As an application of the theory, Cd toxicity in the algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata is interpreted from constrained modeling of cell growth kinetics and of interfacial Cd-partitioning dynamics measured under various exposure conditions. PMID:25945520

  16. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2008-10-01

    This report provides preliminary results from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluation of a protoptye fuel cell transit bus operating at Connecticut Transit in Hartford. Included are descriptions of the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment; early results and agency experience are also provided.

  17. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project: Evaluation Results Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-02-01

    This report evaluates a fuel cell electric bus demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. This evaluation report covers two years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2013.

  18. Open Zinc Freezing-Point Cell Assembly and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žužek, V.; Batagelj, V.; Drnovšek, J.; Bojkovski, J.

    2014-07-01

    An open metal freezing-point cell design has been developed in the Laboratory of Metrology and Quality. According to our design, a zinc cell was successfully assembled. The paper presents the needed parts for the cell, the cleaning process, and sealing of the cell. The assembled cell was then evaluated by comparison with two commercial closed zinc cells of different manufacturers. The freezing plateaus of the cells were measured, and a direct cell comparison was made. It was shown that the assembled open cell performed better than the used closed cell and was close to the brand new closed cell. The nominal purity of the zinc used for the open cell was 7 N, but the freezing plateau measurement suggests a higher impurity concentration. It was assumed that the zinc was contaminated to some extent during the process of cutting as its original shape was an irregular cylinder. The uncertainty due to impurities for the assembled cell is estimated to be 0.3 mK. Furthermore, the immersion profile and the pressure coefficient were measured. Both results are close to their theoretical values.

  19. Galectin-9: From cell biology to complex disease dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Sebastian; Mishra, Rashmi

    2016-09-01

    Galectins is a family of non-classically secreted, beta-galactoside-binding proteins that has recently received considerable attention in the spatio-temporal regulation of surface 'signal lattice' organization, membrane dynamics, cell-adhesion and disease therapeutics. Galectin-9 is a unique member of this family, with two non-homologous carbohydrate recognition domains joined by a linker peptide sequence of variable lengths, generating isoforms with distinct properties and functions in both physiological and pathological settings, such as during development, immune reaction, neoplastic transformations and metastasis. In this review, we summarize the latest knowledge on the structure, receptors, cellular targets, trafficking pathways and functional properties of galectin-9 and discuss how galectin-9-mediated signalling cascades can be exploited in cancers and immunotherapies. PMID:27581941

  20. Galectin-9: From cell biology to complex disease dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SEBASTIAN JOHN; RASHMI MISHRA

    2016-09-01

    Galectins is a family of non-classically secreted, β-galactoside-binding proteins that has recently received considerableattention in the spatio-temporal regulation of surface ‘signal lattice’ organization, membrane dynamics, cell-adhesionand disease therapeutics. Galectin-9 is a unique member of this family, with two non-homologous carbohydraterecognition domains joined by a linker peptide sequence of variable lengths, generating isoforms with distinctproperties and functions in both physiological and pathological settings, such as during development, immunereaction, neoplastic transformations and metastasis. In this review, we summarize the latest knowledge on thestructure, receptors, cellular targets, trafficking pathways and functional properties of galectin-9 and discuss howgalectin-9-mediated signalling cascades can be exploited in cancers and immunotherapies.

  1. Carrier injection dynamics in heterojunction solar cells with bipolar molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yosuke; Yonezawa, Kouhei [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi, E-mail: YASUDA.Takeshi@nims.go.jp, E-mail: moritomo.yutaka.gf@u.tsukuba.ac.jp [Photovoltaic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Moritomo, Yutaka, E-mail: YASUDA.Takeshi@nims.go.jp, E-mail: moritomo.yutaka.gf@u.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Center for Integrated Research in Fundamental Science and Engineering (CiRfSE), University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan)

    2015-03-23

    A boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) is a bipolar molecule and is used in hetero-junction organic solar cells. Here, we investigated the carrier injection dynamics from the donor α-sexithiophene (6T) or acceptor C{sub 60} layers to the bipolar SubPc layer by means of the femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy. We observed gradual increase of the SubPc{sup –} (SubPc{sup +}) species within ≈300 ps. The increases are interpreted in terms of the exciton diffusion within the 6T (C{sub 60}) layer and subsequent electron (hole) injection at the interface. In 6T/SubPc heterojunction, the electron injection is observed even at 80 K. The robust electron injection is ascribed to the efficient charge separation within the 6T layer under photo exciation at 400 nm.

  2. Carrier injection dynamics in heterojunction solar cells with bipolar molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) is a bipolar molecule and is used in hetero-junction organic solar cells. Here, we investigated the carrier injection dynamics from the donor α-sexithiophene (6T) or acceptor C60 layers to the bipolar SubPc layer by means of the femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy. We observed gradual increase of the SubPc– (SubPc+) species within ≈300 ps. The increases are interpreted in terms of the exciton diffusion within the 6T (C60) layer and subsequent electron (hole) injection at the interface. In 6T/SubPc heterojunction, the electron injection is observed even at 80 K. The robust electron injection is ascribed to the efficient charge separation within the 6T layer under photo exciation at 400 nm

  3. Reconstructing dynamic molecular states from single-cell time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lirong; Pauleve, Loic; Zechner, Christoph; Unger, Michael; Hansen, Anders S; Koeppl, Heinz

    2016-09-01

    The notion of state for a system is prevalent in the quantitative sciences and refers to the minimal system summary sufficient to describe the time evolution of the system in a self-consistent manner. This is a prerequisite for a principled understanding of the inner workings of a system. Owing to the complexity of intracellular processes, experimental techniques that can retrieve a sufficient summary are beyond our reach. For the case of stochastic biomolecular reaction networks, we show how to convert the partial state information accessible by experimental techniques into a full system state using mathematical analysis together with a computational model. This is intimately related to the notion of conditional Markov processes and we introduce the posterior master equation and derive novel approximations to the corresponding infinite-dimensional posterior moment dynamics. We exemplify this state reconstruction approach using both in silico data and single-cell data from two gene expression systems in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where we reconstruct the dynamic promoter and mRNA states from noisy protein abundance measurements. PMID:27605167

  4. Panel Data Based Dynamic Evaluation of Agricultural Resource Utilization Efficiency: A Case Study of Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yajuan; TIAN; Li; ZHEN

    2013-01-01

    Resource utilization efficiency is one of important factors influencing modern agricultural development. This paper evaluates agricultural resource utilization efficiency of Hebei Province in the Eleventh Five-Year Plan period by dynamic comprehensive evaluation method. Evaluation results indicate that regional disparity in agricultural resource utilization efficiency is significant, and the disparity is increasing year by year.

  5. Human normal bronchial epithelial cells: a novel in vitro cell model for toxicity evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Feng

    Full Text Available Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI and B(aP compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells. This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery.

  6. In vitro evaluation of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase reporter system in dynamic studies of transcriptional gene regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) reporter system is being used to directly and indirectly monitor therapeutic gene expression, immune cell trafficking and protein-protein interactions in various living animals. However, the issues of HSV1-TK enzyme stability in living cells and whether this reporter system is optimal for dynamic studies of gene expression events in genetic imaging have not be addressed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the application of this reporter system in dynamic studies of transcriptional gene regulation. To achieve this purpose, we established two tetracycline-inducible murine sarcoma cell lines, tetracycline-turn-off HSV1-tk-expressing cell line (NG4TL4/tet-off-HSV1-tk) and tetracycline-turn-off Luc-expressing cell line (NG4TL4/tet-off-Luc), to create an artificially regulated gene expression model in vitro. The dynamic transcriptional events mediating a series of doxycycline (Dox) inductions were monitored by HSV1-TK or by the firefly luciferase reporter gene using HSV1-TK enzyme activity assay and luciferase assay, respectively. The results of dynamic gene expression studies showed that the luciferase gene is an optimal reporter gene for monitoring short-timescale, dynamic transcriptional events mediating a series of Dox inductions, whereas the HSV1-tk is not optimal to achieve this purpose. Furthermore, the enzyme half-life of HSV1-TK in NG4TL4 cells is about 35 h after cycloheximide-induced protein inhibition. On the other hand, the results of an efflux assay of [131I] FIAU and [3H] GCV revealed that the molecular probe phosphorylated by HSV1-TK can be trapped long term within HSV1-TK stably transformed cells. Therefore, a long half-life radionuclide is not suitable for dynamic gene expression studies. Based on these results, we suggest that the HSV1-TK reporter system is not optimal for monitoring short-timescale dynamic processes such as kinetic gene expression controlled by inducible

  7. In vitro evaluation of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase reporter system in dynamic studies of transcriptional gene regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, C.-H. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); National Yang-Ming University Medical School and National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-E. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Deng, W.-P. [Institute of Biomedical Material, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Chen, J.-C. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Chen, F.-D. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China) and Institute of Radiological Sciences, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology Taichung 112, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: d49220009@ym.edu.tw

    2006-07-15

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) reporter system is being used to directly and indirectly monitor therapeutic gene expression, immune cell trafficking and protein-protein interactions in various living animals. However, the issues of HSV1-TK enzyme stability in living cells and whether this reporter system is optimal for dynamic studies of gene expression events in genetic imaging have not be addressed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the application of this reporter system in dynamic studies of transcriptional gene regulation. To achieve this purpose, we established two tetracycline-inducible murine sarcoma cell lines, tetracycline-turn-off HSV1-tk-expressing cell line (NG4TL4/tet-off-HSV1-tk) and tetracycline-turn-off Luc-expressing cell line (NG4TL4/tet-off-Luc), to create an artificially regulated gene expression model in vitro. The dynamic transcriptional events mediating a series of doxycycline (Dox) inductions were monitored by HSV1-TK or by the firefly luciferase reporter gene using HSV1-TK enzyme activity assay and luciferase assay, respectively. The results of dynamic gene expression studies showed that the luciferase gene is an optimal reporter gene for monitoring short-timescale, dynamic transcriptional events mediating a series of Dox inductions, whereas the HSV1-tk is not optimal to achieve this purpose. Furthermore, the enzyme half-life of HSV1-TK in NG4TL4 cells is about 35 h after cycloheximide-induced protein inhibition. On the other hand, the results of an efflux assay of [{sup 131}I] FIAU and [{sup 3}H] GCV revealed that the molecular probe phosphorylated by HSV1-TK can be trapped long term within HSV1-TK stably transformed cells. Therefore, a long half-life radionuclide is not suitable for dynamic gene expression studies. Based on these results, we suggest that the HSV1-TK reporter system is not optimal for monitoring short-timescale dynamic processes such as kinetic gene expression controlled by

  8. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (Keystone Sym)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our goal is to establish an in vitro model system to evaluate chemical effects using a single stem cell culture technique that would improve throughput and provide quantitative markers of differentiation and cell number. To this end, we have used an adherent cell differentiation ...

  9. Dynamic metabolic flux analysis using a convex analysis approach: Application to hybridoma cell cultures in perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes de Sousa, Sofia; Bastin, Georges; Jolicoeur, Mario; Vande Wouwer, Alain

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, dynamic metabolic flux analysis (DMFA) has been developed in order to evaluate the dynamic evolution of the metabolic fluxes. Most of the proposed approaches are dedicated to exactly determined or overdetermined systems. When an underdetermined system is considered, the literature suggests the use of dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA). However the main challenge of this approach is to determine an appropriate objective function, which remains valid over the whole culture. In this work, we propose an alternative dynamic metabolic flux analysis based on convex analysis, DMFCA, which allows the determination of bounded intervals for the fluxes using the available knowledge of the metabolic network and information provided by the time evolution of extracellular component concentrations. Smoothing splines and mass balance differential equations are used to estimate the time evolution of the uptake and excretion rates from this experimental data. The main advantage of the proposed procedure is that it does not require additional constraints or objective functions, and provides relatively narrow intervals for the intracellular metabolic fluxes. DMFCA is applied to experimental data from hybridoma HB58 cell perfusion cultures, in order to investigate the influence of the operating mode (batch and perfusion) on the metabolic flux distribution. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1102-1112. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26551676

  10. Murine Mesenchymal Stem Cell Commitment to Differentiation Is Regulated by Mitochondrial Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forni, Maria Fernanda; Peloggia, Julia; Trudeau, Kyle; Shirihai, Orian; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2016-03-01

    Mouse skin mesenchymal stem cells (msMSCs) are dermis CD105(+) CD90(+) CD73(+) CD29(+) CD34(-) mesodermal precursors which, after in vitro induction, undergo chondro, adipo, and osteogenesis. Extensive metabolic reconfiguration has been found to occur during differentiation, and the bioenergetic status of a cell is known to be dependent on the quality and abundance of the mitochondrial population, which may be regulated by fusion and fission. However, little is known regarding the impact of mitochondrial dynamics on the differentiation process. We addressed this knowledge gap by isolating MSCs from Swiss female mice, inducing these cells to differentiate into osteo, chondro, and adipocytes and measuring changes in mass, morphology, dynamics, and bioenergetics. Mitochondrial biogenesis was increased in adipogenesis, as evaluated through confocal microscopy, citrate synthase activity, and mtDNA content. The early steps of adipo and osteogenesis involved mitochondrial elongation, as well as increased expression of mitochondrial fusion proteins Mfn1 and 2. Chondrogenesis involved a fragmented mitochondrial phenotype, increased expression of fission proteins Drp1, Fis1, and 2, and enhanced mitophagy. These events were accompanied by profound bioenergetic alterations during the commitment period. Moreover, knockdown of Mfn2 in adipo and osteogenesis and the overexpression of a dominant negative form of Drp1 during chondrogenesis resulted in a loss of differentiation ability. Overall, we find that mitochondrial morphology and its regulating processes of fission/fusion are modulated early on during commitment, leading to alterations in the bioenergetic profile that are important for differentiation. We thus propose a central role for mitochondrial dynamics in the maintenance/commitment of mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:26638184

  11. Evaluation of dynamic bandwidth allocation algorithms in GPON networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozimkiewicz, J.; Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Dittmann, Lars;

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, two approaches for Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation in GPON networks are proposed, and validated through simulations in the OPNET modeler. One approach address a Status Reporting scheme, where the bandwidth allocation originates from the client request. The second use a centralized Non...... services....

  12. Dynamic evaluation of the levelized cost of wind power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Conventional levelized cost of energy is static and does not consider flexibility. • This paper defines a dynamic version by means of stochastic programming. • A penalty for early exercising is proposed to differentiate static and dynamic. • Results show the effects of feed-in tariff support in low wind sites. • Policy implications are derived on the basis of the static and dynamic measures. - Abstract: This paper discusses an alternative computation method of the levelized cost of energy of distributed wind power generators. Unlike in the conventional procedures, it includes time of commencement as an optimization variable. For that purpose, a methodology from Longstaff and Schwartz’s dynamic program for pricing financial American options is derived, which provides the ability to find the optimum time and value while coping with uncertainty revenues from energy sales and variable capital costs. The results obtained from the analysis of wind records of 50 sites entail that the conventional levelized cost of energy can be broken down into an optimum, minimum (time-dependent) value and a penalty for early exercising, which can be employed to define investment strategies and support policies

  13. Dynamic Fluctuation of Circulating Tumor Cells during Cancer Progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that CTCs’ diagnostic value might be increased through real-time monitoring of CTC dynamics. Using preclinical animal models of breast cancer and melanoma and in vivo flow cytometry with photoacoustic and fluorescence detection schematics, we show that CTC count does not always correlate with the primary tumor size. Individual analysis elucidated many cases where the highest level of CTCs was detected before the primary tumor starts progressing. This phenomenon could be attributed to aggressive tumors developing from cancer stem cells. Furthermore, real-time continuous monitoring of CTCs reveals that they occur at highly variable rates in a detection point over a period of time (e.g., a range of 0–54 CTCs per 5 min). These same fluctuations in CTC numbers were observed in vivo in epithelial and non-epithelial metastatic tumors, in different stages of tumor progression, and in different vessels. These temporal CTC fluctuations can explain false negative results of a one-time snapshot test in humans. Indeed, we observed wide variations in the number of CTCs in subsequent blood samples taken from the same metastatic melanoma patient, with some samples being CTC-free. If these phenomena are confirmed in our ongoing in vivo clinical trials, this could support a personalized strategy of CTC monitoring for cancer patients

  14. Dynamic Fluctuation of Circulating Tumor Cells during Cancer Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A. [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Melerzanov, Alexander V. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Zharov, Vladimir P. [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Arkansas Nanomedicine Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Galanzha, Ekaterina I., E-mail: egalanzha@uams.edu [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that CTCs’ diagnostic value might be increased through real-time monitoring of CTC dynamics. Using preclinical animal models of breast cancer and melanoma and in vivo flow cytometry with photoacoustic and fluorescence detection schematics, we show that CTC count does not always correlate with the primary tumor size. Individual analysis elucidated many cases where the highest level of CTCs was detected before the primary tumor starts progressing. This phenomenon could be attributed to aggressive tumors developing from cancer stem cells. Furthermore, real-time continuous monitoring of CTCs reveals that they occur at highly variable rates in a detection point over a period of time (e.g., a range of 0–54 CTCs per 5 min). These same fluctuations in CTC numbers were observed in vivo in epithelial and non-epithelial metastatic tumors, in different stages of tumor progression, and in different vessels. These temporal CTC fluctuations can explain false negative results of a one-time snapshot test in humans. Indeed, we observed wide variations in the number of CTCs in subsequent blood samples taken from the same metastatic melanoma patient, with some samples being CTC-free. If these phenomena are confirmed in our ongoing in vivo clinical trials, this could support a personalized strategy of CTC monitoring for cancer patients.

  15. Antimicrobial peptides and cell processes tracking endosymbiont dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Florent; Zaidman-Rémy, Anna; Heddi, Abdelaziz

    2016-05-26

    Many insects sustain long-term relationships with intracellular symbiotic bacteria that provide them with essential nutrients. Such endosymbiotic relationships likely emerged from ancestral infections of the host by free-living bacteria, the genomes of which experience drastic gene losses and rearrangements during the host-symbiont coevolution. While it is well documented that endosymbiont genome shrinkage results in the loss of bacterial virulence genes, whether and how the host immune system evolves towards the tolerance and control of bacterial partners remains elusive. Remarkably, many insects rely on a 'compartmentalization strategy' that consists in secluding endosymbionts within specialized host cells, the bacteriocytes, thus preventing direct symbiont contact with the host systemic immune system. In this review, we compile recent advances in the understanding of the bacteriocyte immune and cellular regulators involved in endosymbiont maintenance and control. We focus on the cereal weevils Sitophilus spp., in which bacteriocytes form bacteriome organs that strikingly evolve in structure and number according to insect development and physiological needs. We discuss how weevils track endosymbiont dynamics through at least two mechanisms: (i) a bacteriome local antimicrobial peptide synthesis that regulates endosymbiont cell cytokinesis and helps to maintain a homeostatic state within bacteriocytes and (ii) some cellular processes such as apoptosis and autophagy which adjust endosymbiont load to the host developmental requirements, hence ensuring a fine-tuned integration of symbiosis costs and benefits.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160600

  16. Modulating Exciton Dynamics in Composite Nanocrystals for Excitonic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concina, Isabella; Manzoni, Cristian; Grancini, Giulia; Celikin, Mert; Soudi, Afsoon; Rosei, Federico; Zavelani-Rossi, Margherita; Cerullo, Giulio; Vomiero, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) represent one of the most promising materials for third-generation solar cells due to their potential to boost the photoconversion efficiency beyond the Shockley-Queisser limit. Composite nanocrystals can challenge the current scenario by combining broad spectral response and tailored energy levels to favor charge extraction and reduce energy and charge recombination. We synthesized PbS/CdS QDs with different compositions at the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles assembled in a mesoporous film. The ultrafast photoinduced dynamics and the charge injection processes were investigated by pump-probe spectroscopy. We demonstrated good injection of photogenerated electrons from QDs to TiO2 in the PbS/CdS blend and used the QDs to fabricate solar cells. The fine-tuning of chemical composition and size of lead and cadmium chalcogenide QDs led to highly efficient PV devices (3% maximum photoconversion efficiency). This combined study paves the way to the full exploitation of QDs in next-generation photovoltaic (PV) devices. PMID:26266724

  17. Dynamic Fluctuation of Circulating Tumor Cells during Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen A. Juratli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are a promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that CTCs’ diagnostic value might be increased through real-time monitoring of CTC dynamics. Using preclinical animal models of breast cancer and melanoma and in vivo flow cytometry with photoacoustic and fluorescence detection schematics, we show that CTC count does not always correlate with the primary tumor size. Individual analysis elucidated many cases where the highest level of CTCs was detected before the primary tumor starts progressing. This phenomenon could be attributed to aggressive tumors developing from cancer stem cells. Furthermore, real-time continuous monitoring of CTCs reveals that they occur at highly variable rates in a detection point over a period of time (e.g., a range of 0–54 CTCs per 5 min. These same fluctuations in CTC numbers were observed in vivo in epithelial and non-epithelial metastatic tumors, in different stages of tumor progression, and in different vessels. These temporal CTC fluctuations can explain false negative results of a one-time snapshot test in humans. Indeed, we observed wide variations in the number of CTCs in subsequent blood samples taken from the same metastatic melanoma patient, with some samples being CTC-free. If these phenomena are confirmed in our ongoing in vivo clinical trials, this could support a personalized strategy of CTC monitoring for cancer patients.

  18. Bubble dynamics in a variable gap Hele-Shaw cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedra, Saul; Domiguez, Roberto; Ramos, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    We present observations of the dynamics of individual air bubbles ascending in a Hele-Shaw cell filled with water. Cells with gaps of 1 mm, 1.5 and 2.5 mm are used and the volume of the bubbles is such that we observe bubbles with apparent diameter from 2 mm to 7.3 mm. Given that we work with air and water in all experiments, the Morton number is constant and equal to 2 . 5 ×10-11 . The results are given in terms of the Eotvos, Archimedes and Reynolds numbers, and the trajectories and wakes of the bubbles are described as functions of the gap. In all cases we observe a linear relationship between the Reynolds and Archimedes numbers, but the proportionality constant varies with the gap. Also, although the wake is composed of alternating vortices similar to the von Karman vortex street, the size and location of the vortices vary with the gap. The analysis of some features of the observations and the description of the shape of the bubbles and dominant forces are made with a two dimensional numerical solution of the conservation equations using a front tracking strategy.

  19. Effect of Porosity and Cell Size on the Dynamic Compressive Properties of Aluminum Alloy Foams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties of open-cell aluminum alloy foams with different relative densities and cell sizeshave been investigated by compressive tests. The strain rates varied from 700 s-1 to 2600 s-1. The experimentalresults showed that the dynamic compressive stress-strain curves exhibited a typical three-stage behavior: elastic,plateau and densification. The dynamic compressive strength of foams is affected not only by the relative densitybut also by the strain rate and cell size. Aluminum alloy foams with higher relative density or smaller cell size aremore sensitive to the strain rate than foams with lower relative density or larger cell size.

  20. Charge carrier dynamics in thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strothkaemper, Christian

    2013-06-24

    This work investigates the charge carrier dynamics in three different technological approaches within the class of thin film solar cells: radial heterojunctions, the dye solar cell, and microcrystalline CuInSe{sub 2}, focusing on charge transport and separation at the electrode, and the relaxation of photogenerated charge carriers due to recombination and energy dissipation to the phonon system. This work relies mostly on optical-pump terahertz-probe (OPTP) spectroscopy, followed by transient absorption (TA) and two-photon photoemission (2PPE). The charge separation in ZnO-electrode/In{sub 2}S{sub 3}-absorber core/shell nanorods, which represent a model system of a radial heterojunction, is analyzed by OPTP. It is concluded, that the dynamics in the absorber are determined by multiple trapping, which leads to a dispersive charge transport to the electrode that lasts over hundreds of picoseconds. The high trap density on the order of 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3} is detrimental for the injection yield, which exhibits a decrease with increasing shell thickness. The heterogeneous electron transfer from a series of model dyes into ZnO proceeds on a time-scale of 200 fs. However, the photoconductivity builds up just on a 2-10 ps timescale, and 2PPE reveals that injected electrons are meanwhile localized spatially and energetically at the interface. It is concluded that the injection proceeds through adsorbate induced interface states. This is an important result because the back reaction from long lived interface states can be expected to be much faster than from bulk states. While the charge transport in stoichiometric CuInSe{sub 2} thin films is indicative of free charge carriers, CuInSe{sub 2} with a solar cell grade composition (Cu-poor) exhibits signs of carrier localization. This detrimental effect is attributed to a high density of charged defects and a high degree of compensation, which together create a spatially fluctuating potential that inhibits charge transport. On

  1. Subcellular dynamics of T cell immunological synapses and kinapses in lymph nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Azar, Georges A.; Lemaître, Fabrice; Robey, Ellen A.; Bousso, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    In vitro studies have revealed that T cell activation occurs during the formation of either dynamic or stable interactions with antigen-presenting cells (APC), and the respective cell junctions have been referred to as immunological kinapses and synapses. However, the relevance and molecular dynamics of kinapses and synapses remain to be established in vivo. Using two-photon imaging, we tracked the distribution of LAT-EGFP molecules during antigen recognition by activated CD4+ T cells in lymp...

  2. A Study of Developing a System Dynamics Model for the Learning Effectiveness Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Tian-Syung Lan; Yu-Hua Lan; Kai-Ling Chen; Pin-Chang Chen; Wen-Cheng Lin

    2013-01-01

    This study used the research method of system dynamics and applied the Vensim software to develop a learning effectiveness evaluation model. This study developed four cause-and-effect chains affecting learning effectiveness, including teachers’ teaching enthusiasm, family involvement, school’s implementation of scientific activities, and creative teaching method, as well as the system dynamics model based on the four cause-and-effect chains. Based on the developed system dynamic model, this s...

  3. Magneto-responsive liquid crystalline elastomer nanocomposites as potential candidates for dynamic cell culture substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Posada, Stephany; Mora-Navarro, Camilo; Ortiz-Bermudez, Patricia; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; McElhinny, Kyle M; Evans, Paul G; Calcagno, Barbara O; Acevedo, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    Recently, liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) have been proposed as active substrates for cell culture due to their potential to attach and orient cells, and impose dynamic mechanical signals through the application of external stimuli. In this report, the preparation of anisotropic and oriented nematic magnetic-sensitized LCEs with iron oxide nanoparticles, and the evaluation of the effect of particle addition at low concentrations on the resultant structural, thermal, thermo-mechanical, and mechanical properties is presented. Phase transformations produced by heating in alternating magnetic fields were investigated in LCEs in contact with air, water, and a common liquid cell culture medium was also evaluated. The inclusion of nanoparticles into the elastomers displaced the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition, without affecting the nematic structure as evidenced by similar values of the order parameter, while reducing the maximum thermomechanical deformations. Remote and reversible deformations of the magnetic LCEs were achieved through the application of alternating magnetic fields, which induces the nematic-isotropic phase transition through nanoparticle heat generation. Formulation parameters can be modified to allow for remote actuation at values closer to the human physiological temperature range and within the range of deformations that can affect the cellular behavior of fibroblasts. Finally, a collagen surface treatment was performed to improve compatibility with NIH-3T3 fibroblast cultures, which enabled the attachment and proliferation of fibroblasts on substrates with and without magnetic particles under quiescent conditions. The LCEs developed in this work, which are able to deform and experience stress changes by remote contact-less magnetic stimulation, may allow for further studies on the effect of substrate morphology changes and dynamic mechanical properties during in vitro cell culture. PMID:27157764

  4. Unsteady Vibration Aerodynamic Modeling and Evaluation of Dynamic Derivatives Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsteady aerodynamic system modeling is widely used to solve the dynamic stability problems encountering aircraft design. In this paper, single degree-of-freedom (SDF vibration model and forced simple harmonic motion (SHM model for dynamic derivative prediction are developed on the basis of modified Etkin model. In the light of the characteristics of SDF time domain solution, the free vibration identification methods for dynamic stability parameters are extended and applied to the time domain numerical simulation of blunted cone calibration model examples. The dynamic stability parameters by numerical identification are no more than 0.15% deviated from those by experimental simulation, confirming the correctness of SDF vibration model. The acceleration derivatives, rotary derivatives, and combination derivatives of Army-Navy Spinner Rocket are numerically identified by using unsteady N-S equation and solving different SHV patterns. Comparison with the experimental result of Army Ballistic Research Laboratories confirmed the correctness of the SHV model and dynamic derivative identification. The calculation result of forced SHM is better than that by the slender body theory of engineering approximation. SDF vibration model and SHM model for dynamic stability parameters provide a solution to the dynamic stability problem encountering aircraft design.

  5. Evaluating Link Prediction Accuracy on Dynamic Networks with Added and Removed Edges

    CERN Document Server

    Junuthula, Ruthwik R; Devabhaktuni, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    The task of predicting future relationships in a social network, known as link prediction, has been studied extensively in the literature. Many link prediction methods have been proposed, ranging from common neighbors to probabilistic models. Recent work by Yang et al. has highlighted several challenges in evaluating link prediction accuracy. In dynamic networks where edges are both added and removed over time, the link prediction problem is more complex and involves predicting both newly added and newly removed edges. This results in new challenges in the evaluation of dynamic link prediction methods, and the recommendations provided by Yang et al. are no longer applicable, because they do not address edge removal. In this paper, we investigate several metrics currently used for evaluating accuracies of dynamic link prediction methods and demonstrate why they can be misleading in many cases. We provide several recommendations on evaluating dynamic link prediction accuracy, including separation into two categ...

  6. Single-cell protein dynamics reproduce universal fluctuations in cell populations

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Naama; Rotella, James S; Salman, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Protein fluctuations in cell populations have recently been shown to exhibit a universal distribution shape under a broad range of biological realizations. Here, measuring protein content in individual bacteria continuously over ~70 generations, we show that single-cell trajectories fluctuate around their average with the same distribution shape as the population, i.e. their relative fluctuations are ergodic. Analysis of these temporal trajectories reveals that one effective random variable, sampled once each cell cycle, suffices to reconstruct the distribution from the trajectory. This in turn implies that cellular microscopic processes are strongly buffered and population-level protein distributions are insensitive to details of the intracellular dynamics. Probing them thus requires searching for novel universality-breaking experimental perturbations.

  7. Continuous, Dynamic and Comprehensive Article-Level Evaluation of Scientific Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xianwen; Fang, Zhichao; Yang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    It is time to make changes to the current research evaluation system, which is built on the journal selection. In this study, we propose the idea of continuous, dynamic and comprehensive article-level-evaluation based on article-level-metrics. Different kinds of metrics are integrated into a comprehensive indicator, which could quantify both the academic and societal impact of the article. At different phases after the publication, the weights of different metrics are dynamically adjusted to ...

  8. Evaluation of core-debris accommodation within inner containment cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactor cell concept for permanent retention has been developed based on evaluations of core debris melt penetration into containment structures, material interactions, pressure buildup and hydrogen concentration in the containment. The selected reactor cell concept includes a protective layer of MgO on the reactor cell floor, a graphite layer as the cell wall liner protection, and insulating firebrick to keep the cell concrete structures at an acceptable temperature level. To determine the feasibility of long-term/permanent retention of core debris, parametric studies were performed with the modified GROWS-2 code and the CACECO code to assess the range of debris penetration, containment responses and cooling requirements. Debris penetration into a MgO delay bed was shown to be very sensitive to the initial debris layer thickness. Long-term debris retention capability can be enhanced by preventing early sodium boil-off from the reactor cell

  9. Human tumor cell proliferation evaluated using manganese-enhanced MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod D Braun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor cell proliferation can depend on calcium entry across the cell membrane. As a first step toward the development of a non-invasive test of the extent of tumor cell proliferation in vivo, we tested the hypothesis that tumor cell uptake of a calcium surrogate, Mn(2+ [measured with manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI], is linked to proliferation rate in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Proliferation rates were determined in vitro in three different human tumor cell lines: C918 and OCM-1 human uveal melanomas and PC-3 prostate carcinoma. Cells growing at different average proliferation rates were exposed to 1 mM MnCl(2 for one hour and then thoroughly washed. MEMRI R(1 values (longitudinal relaxation rates, which have a positive linear relationship with Mn(2+ concentration, were then determined from cell pellets. Cell cycle distributions were determined using propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. All three lines showed Mn(2+-induced increases in R(1 compared to cells not exposed to Mn(2+. C918 and PC-3 cells each showed a significant, positive correlation between MEMRI R(1 values and proliferation rate (p≤0.005, while OCM-1 cells showed no significant correlation. Preliminary, general modeling of these positive relationships suggested that pellet R(1 for the PC-3 cells, but not for the C918 cells, could be adequately described by simply accounting for changes in the distribution of the cell cycle-dependent subpopulations in the pellet. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data clearly demonstrate the tumor-cell dependent nature of the relationship between proliferation and calcium influx, and underscore the usefulness of MEMRI as a non-invasive method for investigating this link. MEMRI is applicable to study tumors in vivo, and the present results raise the possibility of evaluating proliferation parameters of some tumor types in vivo using MEMRI.

  10. Optimization of cell motility evaluation in scratch assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotsulyak N. Ya.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A scratch test is one of the most popular methods of classical cell migration assay in a monolayer culture. At the same time, the scratch assay has some disadvantages that can be easily corrected. Aim. Optimization the existent scratch assay on the base of detection of scratch wound surface area and the length of the field of observation which is more objective and less time consuming. Methods. Scratch assay. Results. The modification of scratch assay enables to perform measurement more accurately and rapidly. This approach is more simple and eliminates the main disadvantages of the classical method. Conclusions. The procedure of scratch wound width measurement calculated on the base of detection of cell free area and the length of the field of observation is more effective than the classical wound healing assay. It will be useful for the estimation of cell migration dynamics in monolayer culture for a wide range of live cell based experiments.

  11. Photo-induced in situ crosslinking of polymer brushes with dimethyl maleimide moieties for dynamically stimulating stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisaka, Yoshinori; Nishijima, Yuka; Yusa, Shin-Ichi; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-09-01

    We designed photo-crosslinkable polymer brushes with dimethylmaleimide moieties, in order to demonstrate dynamic stimulation of cell differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The polymer brushes were synthesized by surface-initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization using dimethylmaleimide ethyl methacrylate and methyl methacrylate on a chain transfer agent-immobilized glass surface. The polymer brushes were crosslinked by photodimerization of the dimethylmaleimide moieties within polymer chains with stem cells present on the surface. In order to evaluate the effects of in situ photo-induced crosslinking of the polymer brushes on gene expression of stem cells, human bone marrow MSCs were cultured under static and dynamic culture conditions for 7 days. Expression of the osteocalcin (Ocn) gene in MSCs was used as an indicator of osteoblast differentiation under dynamic culture conditions. Structural conversion from non-crosslinked polymer brushes to crosslinked polymer brushes increased the expression of Ocn by 1.4-fold in the presence of adhered cells, compared with non-crosslinked polymer brushes under static culture conditions. These results suggest that MSCs recognized surface conversion from non-crosslinked to crosslinked structures, which resulted in altered differentiation lineages. Therefore, photo-crosslinkable surfaces with dimethyl maleimide moieties are potential novel materials for dynamically stimulating MSC differentiation. PMID:27255343

  12. Evaluation and characterization of bacterial metabolic dynamics with a novel profiling technique, real-time metabolotyping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Fukuda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental processes in ecosystems are dynamically altered by several metabolic responses in microorganisms, including intracellular sensing and pumping, battle for survival, and supply of or competition for nutrients. Notably, intestinal bacteria maintain homeostatic balance in mammals via multiple dynamic biochemical reactions to produce several metabolites from undigested food, and those metabolites exert various effects on mammalian cells in a time-dependent manner. We have established a method for the analysis of bacterial metabolic dynamics in real time and used it in combination with statistical NMR procedures. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a novel method called real-time metabolotyping (RT-MT, which performs sequential (1H-NMR profiling and two-dimensional (2D (1H, (13C-HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum coherence profiling during bacterial growth in an NMR tube. The profiles were evaluated with such statistical methods as Z-score analysis, principal components analysis, and time series of statistical TOtal Correlation SpectroScopY (TOCSY. In addition, using 2D (1H, (13C-HSQC with the stable isotope labeling technique, we observed the metabolic kinetics of specific biochemical reactions based on time-dependent 2D kinetic profiles. Using these methods, we clarified the pathway for linolenic acid hydrogenation by a gastrointestinal bacterium, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens. We identified trans11, cis13 conjugated linoleic acid as the intermediate of linolenic acid hydrogenation by B. fibrisolvens, based on the results of (13C-labeling RT-MT experiments. In addition, we showed that the biohydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids serves as a defense mechanism against their toxic effects. CONCLUSIONS: RT-MT is useful for the characterization of beneficial bacterium that shows potential for use as probiotic by producing bioactive compounds.

  13. Evaluation of water distribution system monitoring using stochastic dynamic modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Philip Edward James

    1992-01-01

    A stochastic dynamic constituent transport model was developed, capable of simulating the operation of a water distribution system containing pumps and storage tanks, and subject to random demands and contaminant inputs. Long term operation of a hypothetical small town water supply system containing one pump station and one storage tank was simulated while the system was subjected to external contaminant inputs. Repeated simulations were made under different regimes of exter...

  14. Feasibility of dynamic MRI for evaluating velopharyngeal insufficiency in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the feasibility of dynamic MRI with near-real-time temporal resolution for analysing velopharyngeal closure. Eleven children and young adults (seven girls, four boys, mean age: 8.4 years) with suspected velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI), and one healthy volunteer underwent MRI (1.5 Tesla) using T2 fast imaging sequences. Imaging was done without any sedation at rest and during various phonations in the axial and sagittal planes. Images were analysed by two radiologists, a plastic surgeon and a speech therapist. The MRI examinations were well tolerated by even the youngest patient. A qualitative analysis found that the sagittal dynamic sequences during phonation were in relation to the clinical data in all patients. A quantitative analysis enabled calculation of the elevation angle of the soft palate in relation to the hard palate, the velar eminence angle and the percentage of reduction of the antero-posterior diameter of the pharyngeal lumen. Dynamic MRI is a non-invasive, rapid and repeatable method. It can be considered a complementary tool to endoscopy and fluoroscopy, particularly in children, for assessing VPI without any sedation or radiation exposure. (orig.)

  15. Evaluate Dynamic Source Routing Protocol Performance in Wireless MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Perti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Routing protocols used in ad hoc networks must automatically adjust to environments that can vary between the extremes of high mobility with low bandwidth, and low mobility with high bandwidth. In my research paper I have analyzed a routing protocol called Dynamic Source Routing (DSR. At the ed of my Research paper result of its unique design, the protocol adapts quickly to routing changes when node movement is frequent, yet requires little or no overhead during periods in which nodes move less frequently. By graphical form a detailed analysis of DSR’s behaviour in a variety of situations, this paper generalizes the lessons learned from DSR so that they can be applied to the many other new routing protocols that have adopted the basic DSR framework. In the DSR protocol, a backup route will be initiated to transfer data (in route cache when the initial route is broken. However, a backup route affects the overall network performance such as end-to-end delay, etc. In this paper, I showed the simulation results of the dynamic source routing protocol based on it’s throughput, pause time, packet received, drop packet ratio, end to end delay, packet delivery fraction, and routing overhead. This results shows that dynamic source routing protocol is an efficient protocol to be used in Ad Hoc network.

  16. Feasibility of dynamic MRI for evaluating velopharyngeal insufficiency in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drissi, C. [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Pediatric Radiology, 82 av Denfert Rochereau, 75674, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Institut National de Neurologie, Radiology Department, Tunis (Tunisia); Mitrofanoff, M.; Talandier, C. [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Plastic Surgery, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Falip, C. [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Pediatric Radiology, 82 av Denfert Rochereau, 75674, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Paris Descartes University, Paris Cedex (France); Couls, V. le [Siemens, St Denis (France); Adamsbaum, C. [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Pediatric Radiology, 82 av Denfert Rochereau, 75674, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Paris Descartes University, Paris Cedex (France); St Vincent de Paul Hospital, AP-HP - Pediatric Imaging, Paris (France)

    2011-07-15

    To demonstrate the feasibility of dynamic MRI with near-real-time temporal resolution for analysing velopharyngeal closure. Eleven children and young adults (seven girls, four boys, mean age: 8.4 years) with suspected velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI), and one healthy volunteer underwent MRI (1.5 Tesla) using T2 fast imaging sequences. Imaging was done without any sedation at rest and during various phonations in the axial and sagittal planes. Images were analysed by two radiologists, a plastic surgeon and a speech therapist. The MRI examinations were well tolerated by even the youngest patient. A qualitative analysis found that the sagittal dynamic sequences during phonation were in relation to the clinical data in all patients. A quantitative analysis enabled calculation of the elevation angle of the soft palate in relation to the hard palate, the velar eminence angle and the percentage of reduction of the antero-posterior diameter of the pharyngeal lumen. Dynamic MRI is a non-invasive, rapid and repeatable method. It can be considered a complementary tool to endoscopy and fluoroscopy, particularly in children, for assessing VPI without any sedation or radiation exposure. (orig.)

  17. Cytotoxicity study of rock wool by cell magnetometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yuichiro; Kotani, Makoto; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2009-11-01

    The cytotoxicity of rock wool (RW), an asbestos substitute, was evaluated by cell magnetometry. Alveolar macrophages were isolated from male Fisher rats. Following addition of triiron tetraoxide (Fe(3)O(4)) to macrophages, RW was added. Then, the remnant magnetic field strength was measured for 20min after magnetization by an external field. Relaxation, an indicator of decay of cytotoxicity, was observed by cell magnetometry immediately postmagnetization in the group to which RW was added. In general, materials phagocytosed by macrophages are ingested into phagosomes and digested while migrating. This migration of phagosomes occurs by polymerization and depolymerization of the cytoskeleton. As a result of evaluation, relaxation was not delayed by addition of RW, since RW caused no effect on the cytoskeleton. It was suggested that RW has no cytotoxicity as evaluated by cell magnetometry. PMID:19559064

  18. Manufacture and evaluation of Li/BCX DD cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, S.; Takeuchi, E.

    1990-01-01

    This project is divided into four main tasks: cell manufacture, acceptance, and lot certification of cells, performance testing of cells, and abuse testing of cells. Lithium/bromine chloride in thionyl chloride (Li/BCX) 149 DD cells (PN 3B2085-XA) were built according to the provisions of Electrochem Industries Quality Plan 17096. Acceptance and lot certification testing was performed according to NASA JSC Document EP5-83-025, Revision B. Acceptance testing included open circuit and load voltage check, visual examination, size and weight measurements, and high temperature exposure. Lot certification tests were performed for capacity performance and for performance under conditions of thermal and electrical abuse. These tests included 149 C exposure, capacity discharge, fuse check, high temperature exposure, high rate discharge, short circuit, vibration, and overdischarge testing. A quantity of 200 cells was delivered to Johnson Space Center for life test evaluation. A parametric evaluation of the capacity discharge of Li/BCX DD cells was performed over a variety of temperatures and discharge rates. This testing served to map the performance capability of the cell. Tests were also performed over a variety of electrical and thermal abuse conditions. Abuse tests included short circuit, charging, overdischarge, high temperature exposure, shock, and vibration.

  19. Study on dynamic team performance evaluation methodology based on team situation awareness model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this thesis is to provide a theoretical framework and its evaluation methodology of team dynamic task performance of operating team at nuclear power plant under the dynamic and tactical environment such as radiological accident. This thesis suggested a team dynamic task performance evaluation model so called team crystallization model stemmed from Endsely's situation awareness model being comprised of four elements: state, information, organization, and orientation and its quantification methods using system dynamics approach and a communication process model based on a receding horizon control approach. The team crystallization model is a holistic approach for evaluating the team dynamic task performance in conjunction with team situation awareness considering physical system dynamics and team behavioral dynamics for a tactical and dynamic task at nuclear power plant. This model provides a systematic measure to evaluate time-dependent team effectiveness or performance affected by multi-agents such as plant states, communication quality in terms of transferring situation-specific information and strategies for achieving the team task goal at given time, and organizational factors. To demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model and its quantification method, the case study was carried out using the data obtained from a full-scope power plant simulator for 1,000MWe pressurized water reactors with four on-the-job operating groups and one expert group who knows accident sequences. Simulated results team dynamic task performance with reference key plant parameters behavior and team-specific organizational center of gravity and cue-and-response matrix illustrated good symmetry with observed value. The team crystallization model will be useful and effective tool for evaluating team effectiveness in terms of recruiting new operating team for new plant as cost-benefit manner. Also, this model can be utilized as a systematic analysis tool for

  20. Evaluation of The Virtual Cells Software: a Teaching Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.P. da Silva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies show that the use of games and interactive materials  at schools is a good educational strategy, motivating students to create mental  outlines and developing the reasoning and facilitating  the learn- ing. In this context, the Scientific Dissemination Coordination of the Center  for Structural Molecular Biotechnology  (CBME,  developed  a series of educational materials  destined  to the  elementary and high  schools,  universities  and  general  public.   Among  these,  we highlighted  the  Virtual  Cells soft- ware that was developed  with  the  aim of helping  in the  understanding of the  basic concepts  of cell types,  their  structures, organelles  and  specific functions.   Characterized by its  interactive  interface, this  software shows eukaryotes  and prokaryotes cells images, where organelles are shown as dynamic structures. In addition, it presents exercises in another  step that reinforce the comprehension  of Cy- tology.  A speaker  narrates the  resources  offered by the  program  and  the  necessary  steps  for its use. During  the  stage  of development of the  software,  students and  teachers of public and  private  high schools from Sao Carlos  city, Sao Paulo  State,  were invited  to register their  opinions  regarding  the language and content of the software in order to help us in the improvement of it.  After this stage, the Scientific Dissemination Coordination of CBME organized a series of workshops, where 120 individuals evaluated the software (students and teachers  of high school and others undergraduate students. For this evaluation, a questionnaire was elaborated based on the international current literature in the area of sciences teaching  and it was applied  after the interactive section with the software.  The analysis of the results demonstrated that most of the individuals  considered the software of easy

  1. Computational and experimental single cell biology techniques for the definition of cell type heterogeneity, interplay and intracellular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vargas Roditi, Laura; Claassen, Manfred

    2015-08-01

    Novel technological developments enable single cell population profiling with respect to their spatial and molecular setup. These include single cell sequencing, flow cytometry and multiparametric imaging approaches and open unprecedented possibilities to learn about the heterogeneity, dynamics and interplay of the different cell types which constitute tissues and multicellular organisms. Statistical and dynamic systems theory approaches have been applied to quantitatively describe a variety of cellular processes, such as transcription and cell signaling. Machine learning approaches have been developed to define cell types, their mutual relationships, and differentiation hierarchies shaping heterogeneous cell populations, yielding insights into topics such as, for example, immune cell differentiation and tumor cell type composition. This combination of experimental and computational advances has opened perspectives towards learning predictive multi-scale models of heterogeneous cell populations. PMID:25461506

  2. Evaluation of Stem Cell Markers, CD44/CD24 in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Hashemi Arabi

    2014-05-01

    Four breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 ، T47D ، MDA-MB231 and MDA-MB468 were purchased from National cell Bank of Iran based in Iran Pasture Institute and were cultured in high glucose DMEM supplemented with 10% FCS. Cells were stained with antiCD44-PE and antiCD24-FITC antibodies and Status of CD44 and CD24 as markers of breast cancer stem cells were evaluated using flow cytometer and fluorescent microscopy.Evaluation of CD44 and CD24 as markers of breast cancer stem cells showed that MDA-MB231 with 97±1.2% CD44+/CD24-/low cells is significantly different from the others that they were mainly CD44 and CD24 positive cells(p

  3. Evaluating hemorrhage in renal cell carcinoma using susceptibility weighted imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xing

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intratumoral hemorrhage is a frequent occurrence in renal cell carcinoma and is an indicator of tumor subtype. We hypothesize that susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI is sensitive to hemorrhage in renal cell carcinoma and can give a more diagnostic image when compared to conventional imaging techniques. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of 32 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma was evaluated. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and 22 out of 32 patients also underwent a computed tomography (CT scan. Hemorrhage was classified into 3 different categories according to shape and distribution. Histopathology was obtained from all masses by radical nephrectomy. The ability to detect the presence of hemorrhage using CT, non-contrast conventional MRI and SWI was evaluated, and the patterns of hemorrhage were compared. RESULTS: Using pathologic results as the gold standard, the sensitivities of non-contrast conventional MRI, SWI and CT in detecting hemorrhage in clear cell renal cell carcinoma were 65.6%, 100% and 22.7%, respectively. Accuracy of non-contrast conventional MRI and SWI in evaluating hemorrhagic patterns were 31.3% and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that SWI can better reveal hemorrhage and characterize the pattern more accurately than either non-contrast conventional MRI or CT. This suggests that SWI is the technique of choice for detecting hemorrhagic lesions in patients with renal cancer.

  4. Correlation between Dynamic Spiral-CT Enhancement Parameters and Tumor Angiogenesis in Renal Cell Carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhong Wang; Weixia Chen; Xiuhui Zhang; Pengqiu Min; Rongbo Liu; Hengxuan Yang

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To prospectively investigate the correlation between the enhancement parameters of a dynamic-CT (D-CT) scan for renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and the carcinoma tissue microvessel density (MVD) in renal cell carcinomas (RCC).METHODS Twenty-four cases of renal cell carcinoma verifyied by histopathology were scanned via dynamic-CT, followed by a whole kidney scan. Enhancement parameters were derived as follows .The slope of the contrast media uptake curve (S), area under the curve(AR), the density difference before and after tissue enhancement (△HU) and tissue blood ratio (TBR) were calculated for all lesions. Time-density curve types were ranked from the lowest to the highest of the slope of the contrast media uptake curve (S) as type A, B and C. Pathologic slides corresponding to the CT imagings were subjected to CD34 monoclonal antibodies, then were evaluated with an image analyzer to count hot spots of MVD. By using the Spearman rank correlation tests, statistical analysis was performed to determine the strength of the relationship between enhancement parameters and MVD determinations.RESULTS The carcinoma tissue MVD showed a direct correlation with the enhancement parameters of D-CT (r=0.54, r=0.62, r=0.55, r=0.64, r=0.44,P< 0.05). Moreover the S, △HU, TBR and type curves all demonstrated a strong correlation with the MVD. By analyzing the various enhancement parameters of the time-density curves, the relationship between the enhancement CT parameters corresponding to the tumor's MVD was identified.CONCLUSION A dynamic spiral-CT scan may be a helpful method as a measurement of tumor angiogenesis in vivo in RCC.

  5. CD4+ cell dynamics in untreated HIV-1 infection: overall rates, and effects of age, viral load, sex and calendar time

    OpenAIRE

    Cori, Anne; Pickles, Michael; van Sighem, Ard; Gras, Luuk; Bezemer, Daniela; Reiss, Peter; Fraser, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Background: CD4+ cell count is a key measure of HIV disease progression, and the basis of successive international guidelines for treatment initiation. CD4+ cell dynamics are used in mathematical and econometric models for evaluating public health need and interventions. Here, we estimate rates of CD4+ decline, stratified by relevant covariates, in a form that is clinically transparent and can be directly used in such models. Methods: We analyse the AIDS Therapy Evaluation in the Netherlands ...

  6. Dynamic Performance Characteristic Tests of Real Scale Lead Rubber Bearing for the Evaluation of Performance Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic characteristic tests of full scale lead rubber bearing were performed for the evaluation of performance criteria of isolation system for nuclear power plants. For the dynamic test for a full scale rubber bearing, two 1500mm diameter lead rubber bearings were manufactured. The viewpoints of this dynamic test are determination of an ultimate shear strain level of lead rubber bearing, behavior of rubber bearing according to static and dynamic input motion, sinusoidal and random (earthquake) motion, and 1-dimentional and 2-dimensional input motion. In this study, seismic isolation device tests were performed for the evaluation of performance criteria of isolation system. Through this test, it can be recognized that in the case of considering a mechanical property test, dynamic and multi degree of loading conditions should be determined. But these differences should be examined how much affect to the global structural behavior

  7. Dynamics and roles of phragmoplast microfilaments in cell plate formation during cytokinesis of tobacco BY-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan; ZHANG WenJie; BALUSKA Frantisek; MENZEL Diedrik; REN HaiYun

    2009-01-01

    The phragmoplast is a special apparatus that functions in establishing a cell plate in dividing plant cells.It is known that microfilaments (MFs) are involved in constituting phragmoplast structure, but the dynamic distribution and role of phragmoplast MFs are far from being understood. In this study, the precise structure and dynamics of MFs during the initiation and the late lateral expansion of the phragmoplast were observed by using a tobacco BY-2 cell line stably expressing the microfilament reporter construct GFP-f ABD2. Three-dimensional imaging showed that the phragmoplast MFs were initiated by two populations of MFs emerging between the reconstituting daughter nuclei at anaphase, which migrated to the mid-zone and gave rise to two layers of microfilament arrays. FM4-64 stained vesicles accumulated and fused with the cell plate between the two populations of MFs. The two layers of microfilament arrays of phragmoplast with ends overlapped always surrounded the centrifugally expanding cell plate. Partial disruption of MFs at metaphase by low concentration of latrunculin B resulted in the inhibition of the cell plate consolidation and the blockage of cell plate lateral expansion,whereas high concentration of latrunculin B restrained the progression of the cell cycle. Treating the cell after the initiation of phragmoplast led to the cease of the expansion of the cell plate. Our observations provide new insights into the precise structure and dynamics of phragmoplast MFs during cytokinesis and suggest that dynamic phragmoplast MFs are important in cell plate formation.

  8. Isolation of intestinal epithelial cells and evaluation of transport functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmich, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Epithelial cells can be isolated from the small intestine of chickens by a procedure involving hyaluronidase treatment of the intact tissue. The isolated cells retain a high degree of functional activity as assessed by the formation of 70-fold gradients of alpha-MG. Stability of the sugar gradients reflects maintenance of stable electrochemical Na+ gradients across the plasma membrane. The cells can be used to evaluate the properties of Na(+)-dependent sugar transport, Na(+)-independent sugar transport, ion transport, metabolism, membrane potentials, and the integration of these events, all of which are important to achieving a stable sugar gradient.

  9. Isolation of intestinal epithelial cells and evaluation of transport functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial cells can be isolated from the small intestine of chickens by a procedure involving hyaluronidase treatment of the intact tissue. The isolated cells retain a high degree of functional activity as assessed by the formation of 70-fold gradients of alpha-MG. Stability of the sugar gradients reflects maintenance of stable electrochemical Na+ gradients across the plasma membrane. The cells can be used to evaluate the properties of Na(+)-dependent sugar transport, Na(+)-independent sugar transport, ion transport, metabolism, membrane potentials, and the integration of these events, all of which are important to achieving a stable sugar gradient

  10. Visualization and orchestration of the dynamic molecular society in cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuebiao Yao; Guowei Fang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Visualization of specific molecules and their interactions in real space and time is essential to delineate how cellular plasticity and dynamics are achieved and orchestrated as perturbation of cellular plasticity and dynamics is detrimental to health. Elucidation of cellular dynamics requires molecular imaging at nanometer scale at millisecond resolution. The 1st International Conference on Cellular Dynamics and Chemical Biology held in Hefei, China (from 12 September to 15 September,2008) launched the quest by bringing synergism among photonics, chemistry and biology.

  11. Evaluation of cell cytotoxic effect on herbal extracts mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Soo; Gwon, Hui Jeong; Choi, Bo Ram; Lim, Youn Mook; Nho, Young Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Herbal extracts (HE) such as Houttuynia cordata Thunb., Eucommia ulimoides, Plantago asiatica var., Morus alba L., and Ulmus davidiana var., are known to suppress an atopic dermatitis like skin lesions. In this study, to evaluate the cell cytotoxicity effect on L929, HaCaT and HMC-1 cell by the HE, the herbs were extracted with distilled water (at 75 .deg. C) and then the HE mixtures were freeze-dried for 5 days and sterilized with {gamma}-rays. The cytotoxicity was measured by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The result showed that the HE mixtures did not significantly affect cell viability and had no toxicity on the cells. These findings indicate that the HE mixtures can be used as a potential therapeutic agent.

  12. Peer Dynamics Final Evaluation Report. 1979/1980. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Cathy; Walker, Connie

    This is Part I of a final evaluation of a program designed to reduce the incidence of destructive risk-taking behavior (e.g. drug-alcohol abuse, and juvenile delinquency) among school-age youth. Background research indicates that peer group pressure is the single most important factor in dictating the presence or absence of juvenile delinquency…

  13. ReAsH as a Quantitative Probe of In-Cell Protein Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Hannah; Wirth, Anna Jean; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The tetracysteine (tc) tag/biarsenical dye system (FlAsH or ReAsH) promises to combine the flexibility of fluorescent protein tags with the small size of dye labels, allowing in-cell study of target proteins that are perturbed by large protein tags. Quantitative thermodynamic and kinetic studies in-cell using FlAsH and ReAsH have been hampered by methodological complexities presented by the fluorescence properties of the tag-dye complex probed by either Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) or direct excitation. We label the model protein phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) with AcGFP1 and ReAsH for direct comparison with AcGFP1/mCherry-labeled PGK. We find that fast relaxation imaging (FReI), combining millisecond temperature jump kinetics with fluorescence microscopy detection, circumvents many of the difficulties encountered working with the ReAsH system, allowing us to obtain quantitative FRET measurements of protein stability and kinetics both in vitro and in cells. We also demonstrate the to us surprising result that fluorescence from directly excited, unburied ReAsH at the C-terminus of the model protein also reports on folding in vitro and in cells. Comparing the ReAsH-labeled protein to a construct labeled with two fluorescent protein tags allows us to evaluate how a bulkier protein tag affects protein dynamics in cells and in vitro. We find that the average folding rate in the cell is closer to the in vitro rate with the smaller tag, highlighting the effect of tags on quantitative in-cell measurements. PMID:26959408

  14. Cell Wall Nonlinear Elasticity and Growth Dynamics: How Do Bacterial Cells Regulate Pressure and Growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi

    In my thesis, I study intact and bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. I find strong evidence of power--law stress--stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of 1.22±0.12, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in intact cells (E = 23±8 MPa and 49±20 MPa in the axial and circumferential directions) than in unpressurized sacculi. These measurements also indicate that the turgor pressure in living cells E. coli is 29±3 kPa. The nonlinearity in cell elasticity serves as a plausible mechanism to balance the mechanical protection and tension measurement sensitivity of the cell envelope. I also study the growth dynamics of the Bacillus subtilis cell wall to help understand the mechanism of the spatiotemporal order of inserting new cell wall material. High density fluorescent markers are used to label the entire cell surface to capture the morphological changes of the cell surface at sub-cellular to diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-minute temporal resolution. This approach reveals that rod-shaped chaining B. subtilis cells grow and twist in a highly heterogeneous fashion both spatially and temporally. Regions of high growth and twisting activity have a typical length scale of 5 μm, and last for 10-40 minutes. Motivated by the quantification of the cell wall growth dynamics, two microscopy and image analysis techniques are developed and applied to broader applications beyond resolving bacterial growth. To resolve densely distributed quantum dots, we present a fast and efficient image analysis algorithm, namely Spatial Covariance Reconstruction (SCORE) microscopy that takes into account the blinking statistics of the fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging, which is at least an order of magnitude faster than single-particle localization based methods

  15. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transpor...

  16. Microwell-Based Live Cell Imaging of NK Cell Dynamics to Assess Heterogeneity in Motility and Cytotoxic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanherberghen, Bruno; Frisk, Thomas; Forslund, Elin; Olofsson, Per E; Guldevall, Karolin; Önfelt, Björn

    2016-01-01

    NK cell heterogeneity has primarily been studied either on the population level, measuring average responses, or on the single cell level by flow cytometry, providing static snapshots. These approaches have certain drawbacks, not enabling dynamic observations of single cells over extended periods of time. One of the primary limitations of single cell imaging has been throughput; it has been challenging to collect data for many cells due to their dynamic nature and migrating out of the field of view. Spatially confining cells combined with automated fluorescence microscopy enables the simultaneous monitoring of many NK cells in parallel for extended periods of time (>12 h). Such an approach allows us to dissect how the sum of individual NK cell responses translates to the global average response typically observed. PMID:27177659

  17. The studies of DNA metabolic dynamics in embryonic cell line and non-embryonic cell line of Onobrychis viciaefolia scop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypocotyls of aseptic seedlings of Onobrychis viciaefolia Scop. were used as explants for inducing callus. The embryonic cell line (E-line) and non-embryonic cell line (NE line) were established. The DNA synthesis dynamics in both cell lines were studied by autoradiography. The results showed that: DNA synthesis in E-line was active and confined to embryonic cell or cell masses and then the cells divided quickly and formed somatic embryos at different stages. The changes of DNA metabolism took place in a certain pattern and the maximum rate of DNA synthesis occured during the formation of globular embryo. There was a clear relationship between the difference of DNA synthesis rate and the polarity of the embryo. In NE-line, the beginning of cell division and the forming of callus were also based on DNA replication but were much deoxythymidine. There was a significant difference in DNA synthesis dynamics between the two cell lines

  18. Local Pheromone Release from Dynamic Polarity Sites Underlies Cell-Cell Pairing during Yeast Mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Laura; Khalili, Bita; Bendezú, Felipe O; Hurwitz, Daniel; Vincenzetti, Vincent; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Martin, Sophie G

    2016-04-25

    Cell pairing is central for many processes, including immune defense, neuronal connection, hyphal fusion, and sexual reproduction. How does a cell orient toward a partner, especially when faced with multiple choices? Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe P and M cells, which respectively express P and M factor pheromones [1, 2], pair during the mating process induced by nitrogen starvation. Engagement of pheromone receptors Map3 and Mam2 [3, 4] with their cognate pheromone ligands leads to activation of the Gα protein Gpa1 to signal sexual differentiation [3, 5, 6]. Prior to cell pairing, the Cdc42 GTPase, a central regulator of cell polarization, forms dynamic zones of activity at the cell periphery at distinct locations over time [7]. Here we show that Cdc42-GTP polarization sites contain the M factor transporter Mam1, the general secretion machinery, which underlies P factor secretion, and Gpa1, suggesting that these are sub-cellular zones of pheromone secretion and signaling. Zone lifetimes scale with pheromone concentration. Computational simulations of pair formation through a fluctuating zone show that the combination of local pheromone release and sensing, short pheromone decay length, and pheromone-dependent zone stabilization leads to efficient pair formation. Consistently, pairing efficiency is reduced in the absence of the P factor protease. Similarly, zone stabilization at reduced pheromone levels, which occurs in the absence of the predicted GTPase-activating protein for Ras, leads to reduction in pairing efficiency. We propose that efficient cell pairing relies on fluctuating local signal emission and perception, which become locked into place through stimulation. PMID:27020743

  19. High-resolution Time-lapse Imaging and Automated Analysis of Microtubule Dynamics in Living Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Alexander; Caesar, Nicole M; Dang, Kyvan; Myers, Kenneth A

    2016-01-01

    The physiological process by which new vasculature forms from existing vasculature requires specific signaling events that trigger morphological changes within individual endothelial cells (ECs). These processes are critical for homeostatic maintenance such as wound healing, and are also crucial in promoting tumor growth and metastasis. EC morphology is defined by the organization of the cytoskeleton, a tightly regulated system of actin and microtubule (MT) dynamics that is known to control EC branching, polarity and directional migration, essential components of angiogenesis. To study MT dynamics, we used high-resolution fluorescence microscopy coupled with computational image analysis of fluorescently-labeled MT plus-ends to investigate MT growth dynamics and the regulation of EC branching morphology and directional migration. Time-lapse imaging of living Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) was performed following transfection with fluorescently-labeled MT End Binding protein 3 (EB3) and Mitotic Centromere Associated Kinesin (MCAK)-specific cDNA constructs to evaluate effects on MT dynamics. PlusTipTracker software was used to track EB3-labeled MT plus ends in order to measure MT growth speeds and MT growth lifetimes in time-lapse images. This methodology allows for the study of MT dynamics and the identification of how localized regulation of MT dynamics within sub-cellular regions contributes to the angiogenic processes of EC branching and migration. PMID:27584860

  20. Dynamic changes in CD45RA−Foxp3high regulatory T-cells in chronic hepatitis C patients during antiviral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiqin Li; Yu Ping; Zujiang Yu; Meng Wang; Dongli Yue; Zhen Zhang; Jianbin Li; Bin Zhang,; Xuezhong Shi; Yi Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells (Treg) are known to accumulate under certain pathological conditions. This study was conducted to evaluate the characteristics of and dynamic changes in Treg cells in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients during antiviral therapy. Methods: One hundred and forty-five subjects were enrolled in this study, including 105 CHC patients and 40 healthy donors. The phenotypes and functions of Treg cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: A significan...

  1. Continuous, Dynamic and Comprehensive Article-Level Evaluation of Scientific Literature

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xianwen; Yang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    It is time to make changes to the current research evaluation system, which is built on the journal selection. In this study, we propose the idea of continuous, dynamic and comprehensive article-level-evaluation based on article-level-metrics. Different kinds of metrics are integrated into a comprehensive indicator, which could quantify both the academic and societal impact of the article. At different phases after the publication, the weights of different metrics are dynamically adjusted to mediate the long term and short term impact of the paper. Using the sample data, we make empirical study of the article-level-evaluation method.

  2. Methods for evaluating the predictive accuracy of structural dynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselman, T. K.; Chrostowski, Jon D.

    1990-01-01

    Uncertainty of frequency response using the fuzzy set method and on-orbit response prediction using laboratory test data to refine an analytical model are emphasized with respect to large space structures. Two aspects of the fuzzy set approach were investigated relative to its application to large structural dynamics problems: (1) minimizing the number of parameters involved in computing possible intervals; and (2) the treatment of extrema which may occur in the parameter space enclosed by all possible combinations of the important parameters of the model. Extensive printer graphics were added to the SSID code to help facilitate model verification, and an application of this code to the LaRC Ten Bay Truss is included in the appendix to illustrate this graphics capability.

  3. Evaluation of the Redesign of an Undergraduate Cell Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Laura April; Harris, dik; Schmid, Richard F.; Vogel, Jackie; Western, Tamara; Harrison, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a case study of the evaluation of a redesigned and redeveloped laboratory-based cell biology course. The course was a compulsory element of the biology program, but the laboratory had become outdated and was inadequately equipped. With the support of a faculty-based teaching improvement project, the teaching team redesigned the…

  4. Framework for Dynamic Evaluation of Muscle Fatigue in Manual Handling Work

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Liang; Chablat, Damien; Zhang, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is defined as the point at which the muscle is no longer able to sustain the required force or work output level. The overexertion of muscle force and muscle fatigue can induce acute pain and chronic pain in human body. When muscle fatigue is accumulated, the functional disability can be resulted as musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). There are several posture exposure analysis methods useful for rating the MSD risks, but they are mainly based on static postures. Even in some fatigue evaluation methods, muscle fatigue evaluation is only available for static postures, but not suitable for dynamic working process. Meanwhile, some existing muscle fatigue models based on physiological models cannot be easily used in industrial ergonomic evaluations. The external dynamic load is definitely the most important factor resulting muscle fatigue, thus we propose a new fatigue model under a framework for evaluating fatigue in dynamic working processes. Under this framework, virtual reality system is taken to ...

  5. Dynamic Muscle Fatigue Evaluation in Virtual Working Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Liang; Chablat, Damien; Bennis, Fouad; Zhang, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) is one of the major health problems in mechanical work especially in manual handling jobs. Muscle fatigue is believed to be the main reason for MSD. Posture analysis techniques have been used to expose MSD risks of the work, but most of the conventional methods are only suitable for static posture analysis. Meanwhile the subjective influences from the inspectors can result differences in the risk assessment. Another disadvantage is that the evaluation has to be ...

  6. A Modified NK Cell Degranulation Assay Applicable for Routine Evaluation of NK Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabrish, Snehal; Gupta, Maya; Madkaikar, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play important role in innate immunity against tumors and viral infections. Studies show that lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1, CD107a) is a marker for degranulation of NK and cytotoxic T cells and its expression is a sensitive marker for the cytotoxic activity determination. The conventional methods of determination of CD107a on NK cells involve use of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or pure NK cells and K562 cells as stimulants. Thus, it requires large volume of blood sample which is usually difficult to obtain in pediatric patients and patients with cytopenia and also requires specialized laboratory for maintaining cell line. We have designed a flow cytometric assay to determine CD107a on NK cells using whole blood, eliminating the need for isolation of PBMC or isolate NK cells. This assay uses phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore (Ca2+-ionophore) instead of K562 cells for stimulation and thus does not require specialized cell culture laboratory. CD107a expression on NK cells using modified NK cell degranulation assay compared to the conventional assay was significantly elevated (p < 0.0001). It was also validated by testing patients diagnosed with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) with defect in exocytosis. This assay is rapid, cost effective, and reproducible and requires significantly less volume of blood which is important for clinical evaluation of NK cells. PMID:27413758

  7. Evaluating alternative stem cell hypotheses for adultcorneal epithelial maintenance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John D West; Natalie J Dorà; Natalie J Dorà,

    2015-01-01

    In this review we evaluate evidence for three differenthypotheses that explain how the corneal epitheliumis maintained. The limbal epithelial stem cell (LESC)hypothesis is most widely accepted. This proposes thatstem cells in the basal layer of the limbal epithelium,at the periphery of the cornea, maintain themselvesand also produce transient (or transit) amplifying cells(TACs). TACs then move centripetally to the centre ofthe cornea in the basal layer of the corneal epitheliumand also replenish cells in the overlying suprabasallayers. The LESCs maintain the corneal epitheliumduring normal homeostasis and become more active torepair significant wounds. Second, the corneal epithelialstem cell (CESC) hypothesis postulates that, duringnormal homeostasis, stem cells distributed throughoutthe basal corneal epithelium, maintain the tissue.According to this hypothesis, LESCs are present in thelimbus but are only active during wound healing. We alsoconsider a third possibility, that the corneal epithelium ismaintained during normal homeostasis by proliferationof basal corneal epithelial cells without any input fromstem cells. After reviewing the published evidence,we conclude that the LESC and CESC hypotheses areconsistent with more of the evidence than the thirdhypothesis, so we do not consider this further. The LESCand CESC hypotheses each have difficulty accountingfor one main type of evidence so we evaluate the twokey lines of evidence that discriminate between them.Finally, we discuss how lineage-tracing experimentshave begun to resolve the debate in favour of theLESC hypothesis. Nevertheless, it also seems likely thatsome basal corneal epithelial cells can act as long-termprogenitors if limbal stem cell function is compromised.Thus, this aspect of the CESC hypothesis may have alasting impact on our understanding of corneal epithelialmaintenance, even if it is eventually shown that stemcells are restricted to the limbus as proposed by the

  8. Tritiated Thymidine as Tracer in DNA Metabolism and Cell Dynamics of Experimental Myeloid Leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium has been used as an isotopic tracer in a variety of biological problems in Israel. We wish to report, in particular, some findings in which tritiated thymidine (TH3) has been used to follow the cell dynamics in experimental myeloid leukaemia and also to investigate the mechanism of its incorporation into the DNA of these and Ehrlich ascites tumour cells. The leukaemic cells were labelled in-vivo by injecting the TH3 into the jugular vein. The dose was 1 pc/g/rat. The rate of appearance of the labelled cells in the peripheral blood and in the ascitic tumour of the animal, was estimated. In other experiments the rate of the dilution of the label in the nuclei was evaluated and thus it was possible to estimate the cellular doubling time in the myelocyte population. The dynamics of transfused leukaemia cells were investigated by injecting labelled myelocytes into the jugular vein of normal and leukaemic rats. Their rate of disappearance from the blood was measured. Various organs were examined for the labelled cells and it was found that soon after injection the cells were mainly trapped by the lungs, later by the spleen and to a lesser extent by the liver. After 24 h no labelled cells were detectable in any of the organs. Information was thus obtained on the fate of the leukaemic myelocytes in various organs of the normal and leukaemic animals. In in-vitro experiments, TH3 was added to the cell suspension in a concentration of 1 p.c/ml. In the course of the in-vitro labelling it was observed that the number of labelled cells was 40 times higher than the number of mitoses. (The same was found also after administering the TH3 in-vivo.) The rate of incorporation of the TH3 was established. Concentrations between 0.0036 p mole x 103 and 1.8 μmolex 10-3 were tested. It was found that the per cent of cells incorporating the label is constant for the various concentrations of thymidine. The number of grains per nucleus increased with the increase of the

  9. Dynamic modeling and experimental investigation of a high temperature PEM fuel cell stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlin, Simon Lennart

    2016-01-01

    High temperature polymer fuel cells operating at 100 to 200◦C require simple fuel processing and produce high quality heat that can integrate well with domestic heating systems. Because the transportation of hydrogen is challenging, an alternative option is to reform natural gas on site. This...... article presents the development of a dynamic model and the comparison with experimental data from a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack operating on hydrogen with carbon monoxide concentrations up to 0.8%, and temperatures from 155 to 175◦C. The dynamic response of the fuel cell is...... investigated with simulated reformate gas. The dynamic response of the fuel cell stack was compared with a step change in current from 0.09 to 0.18 and back to 0.09 A/cm2 . This article shows that the dynamic model calculates the voltage at steady state well. The dynamic response for a change in current shows...

  10. Dynamic nanomechanics of individual bone marrow stromal cells and cell-matrix composites during chondrogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, BoBae; Han, Lin; Frank, Eliot H; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Ortiz, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic nanomechanical properties of bovine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and their newly synthesized cartilage-like matrices were studied at nanometer scale deformation amplitudes. The increase in their dynamic modulus, |E(*)| (e.g., 2.4±0.4 kPa at 1 Hz to 9.7±0.2 kPa at 316 Hz at day 21, mean±SEM), and phase angle, δ, (e.g., 15±2° at 1 Hz to 74±1° at 316 Hz at day 21) with increasing frequency were attributed to the fluid flow induced poroelasticity, governed by both the newly synthesized matrix and the intracellular structures. The absence of culture duration dependence suggested that chondrogenesis of BMSCs had not yet resulted in the formation of a well-organized matrix with a hierarchical structure similar to cartilage. BMSC-matrix composites demonstrated different poro-viscoelastic frequency-dependent mechanical behavior and energy dissipation compared to chondrocyte-matrix composites due to differences in matrix molecular constituents, structure and cell properties. This study provides important insights into the design of optimal protocols for tissue-engineered cartilage products using chondrocytes and BMSCs. PMID:25468666

  11. A Comprehensive Fluid Dynamic-Diffusion Model of Blood Microcirculation with Focus on Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, Francois; Harris, Wesley L.

    2009-11-01

    A novel methodology has been developed to address sickle cell disease, based on highly descriptive mathematical models for blood flow in the capillaries. Our investigations focus on the coupling between oxygen delivery and red blood cell dynamics, which is crucial to understanding sickle cell crises and is unique to this blood disease. The main part of our work is an extensive study of blood dynamics through simulations of red cells deforming within the capillary vessels, and relies on the use of a large mathematical system of equations describing oxygen transfer, blood plasma dynamics and red cell membrane mechanics. This model is expected to lead to the development of new research strategies for sickle cell disease. Our simulation model could be used not only to assess current researched remedies, but also to spur innovative research initiatives, based on our study of the physical properties coupled in sickle cell disease.

  12. Experimental Dynamic Performance of a 30kW 90Cell PEFC Stack under Transportation Load Cycle Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    DE-BERNARDINIS, A; Harel, F.; Candusso, D.; Coquery, G.; GIRARDOT,L; Hissel, D.; Francois, X.; BESSE, S

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a synthesis with analysis of different experiments performed on a 30kW PEFC (Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell) stack in order to evaluate its dynamic performance. The PEFC stack is a pilot prototype manufactured by the French company HELION and is composed of 90 cells, 800cm2 MEA area (Membrane Electrode Assembly) fed by dry hydrogen and compressed air. The tests were performed in the framework of the French SPACT-80 research project which concerns the study, the realization a...

  13. Evaluation of Instrumentation and Dynamic Thermal Ratings for Overhead Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, A. [New York Power Authority, White Plains, NY (United States)

    2013-01-31

    In 2010, a project was initiated through a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the New York Power Authority (NYPA) to evaluate EPRI's rating technology and instrumentation that can be used to monitor the thermal states of transmission lines and provide the required real-time data for real-time rating calculations. The project included the installation and maintenance of various instruments at three 230 kV line sites in northern New York. The instruments were monitored, and data collection and rating calculations were performed for about a three year period.

  14. Dynamic evaluation of the effects of quality management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Evaluation of the effects of quality management over time at a radiology department. Materials and Methods: Data concerning the performance of the department, entered on a monthly basis, will be compared with entries in the error report system on the basis of time series analysis (regression models taking seasons and auto-correlation effects into account). The observation period consists of 46 homogeneous monthly time pulses. Results: Effects of the suggestions and the total number of reports in the quality assurance system on the performance of the department can be observed with a two-month delay. This association is statistically highly significant (p<0.01) and, because of the procedures used, not attributable to general developmental trends, seasonal fluctuations or autoregressive processes. Conclusion: Evaluation of quality assurance measures is a well justified demand and should be based on the analysis of data collected from quality assurance systems operating on a continuous basis over a long period of time. The analysis of data from a radiology department shows that quality assurance is reflected in the performance of the department

  15. American Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation. Second Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report presents results of the American Fuel Cell Bus (AFCB) Project, a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses operating in the Coachella Valley area of California. The prototype AFCB was developed as part of the Federal Transit Administration's (FTA's) National Fuel Cell Bus Program. Through the non-profit consortia CALSTART, a team led by SunLine Transit Agency and BAE Systems developed a new fuel cell electric bus for demonstration. SunLine added two more AFCBs to its fleet in 2014 and another in 2015. FTA and the AFCB project team are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. This report summarizes the performance results for the buses through June 2015.

  16. Robust and Irreversible Development in Cell Society as a General Consequence of Intra-Inter Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, K; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Furusawa, Chikara

    1999-01-01

    A dynamical systems scenario for developmental cell biology is proposed, based on numerical studies of a system with interacting units with internal dynamics and reproduction. Diversification, formation of discrete and recursive types, and rules for differentiation are found as a natural consequence of such a system. "Stem cells" that either proliferate or differentiate to different types stochastically are found to appear when intra-cellular dynamics are chaotic. Robustness of the developmental process against microscopic and macroscopic perturbations is shown to be a natural consequence of such intra-inter dynamics, while irreversibility in developmental process is discussed in terms of the gain of stability, loss of diversity and chaotic instability.

  17. Investigation of dynamic morphological changes of cancer cells during photoimmuno therapy (PIT) by low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Mikako; Yamauchi, Toyohiko; Iwai, Hidenao; Magata, Yasuhiro; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2014-03-01

    We have reported a new molecular-targeted cancer phototherapy, photoimmunotherapy (PIT), which killed implanted tumors in mice without side-effects. To understand the mechanism of cell killing with PIT, three-dimentional dynamic low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy (3D LC-QPM), a device developed by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K, was used to detect morphologic changes in cancer cells during PIT. 3T3/HER2 cells were incubated with anti-HER2 trastuzumab-IR700 (10 μg/mL, 0.1 μM as IR700) for 24 hours, then, three-dimensionally imaged with the LC-QPM during the exposure of two different optically filtered lights for excitation of IR700 (500-780 nm) and imaging (780-950 nm). For comparison with traditional PDT, the same experiments were performed with Photofrin (10 and 1 μM). Serial changes in the cell membrane were readily visualized on 3D LC-QPM. 3T3/HER2 cells began to swell rapidly after exposure to 500-780 nm light excitation. The cell volume reached a maximum within 1 min after continuous exposure, and then the cells appeared to burst. This finding suggests that PIT damages the cell membrane by photo-reaction inducing an influx of water into the cell causing swelling and bursting of the cells. Interestingly, even after only 5 seconds of light exposure, the cells demonstrated swelling and bursting albeit more slowly, implying that sufficient cumulative damage occurs on the cell membrane to induce lethal damage to cells even at minimal light exposure. Similar but non-selective membrane damage was shown in PDT-treated cells Photofrin. Thus, PIT induces sufficient damage to the cell membrane within 5 seconds to induce rapid necrotic cell death which can be observed directly with 3D LC-QPM. Further investigation is needed to evaluate the biochemical mechanisms underlying PIT-induced cellular membrane damage.

  18. Dynamic Simulation of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell System For Automotive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabbani, Raja Abid; Rokni, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic model of the PEMFC system is developed to investigate the behaviour and transient response of the fuel cell system for automotive applications. The system accounts for the fuel cell stack with coolant, humidifier, heat exchangers and pumps. Governing equations for fuel cell and humidifier...

  19. Dynamics of L cells along the crypt-villous axis in the chicken ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K; Hiramatsu, K; Watanabe, T

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of L cells along the crypt-villous axis were investigated in the ileum of male White Leghorn chicks (7 d of age, n = 5). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and an in situ hybridization technique to detect proglucagon messenger RNA (mRNA). Immunocytochemistry using colloidal gold was also applied to quantitatively evaluate the GLP-1 content. The cells expressing a proglucagon mRNA signal were distributed mainly in the crypts and the bottom of the villi but were never found in the upper part of the villi. Most of the cells expressing a proglucagon mRNA signal (97%) were immunoreactive for GLP-1 antiserum. In contrast, GLP-1 immunoreactive cells were distributed from the crypts to the middle part of the villi, and only 55% of them expressed a proglucagon mRNA signal. Quantitative evaluation by immunocytochemistry of GLP-1 using colloidal gold revealed that the GLP-1 content was significantly lower in L cells located in the villous epithelium than that of L cells located in the crypts (P < 0.01). These findings indicate that L cells in the chicken ileum mature and complete GLP-1 production in the crypts. L cells in the villous epithelium secrete GLP-1 but do not synthesize this peptide. PMID:27131336

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of breast radiotherapy in a dynamic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Geetha; Pudney, Delia; Smith, Wendy

    2011-12-01

    This phantom study quantifies changes in delivered dose due to respiratory motion for four breast radiotherapy planning techniques: three intensity-modulated techniques (forward-planned, surface-compensated and hybrid intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)); using a combination of open fields and inverse planned IMRT) and a 2D conventional technique. The plans were created on CT images of a wax breast phantom with a cork lung insert, and dose distributions were measured using films inserted through slits in the axial and sagittal planes. Films were irradiated according to each plan under a static (modeling breathhold) and three dynamic conditions—isocenter set at mid-respiratory cycle with motion amplitudes of 1 and 2 cm and at end-cycle with 2 cm motion amplitude (modeling end-exhale). Differences between static and moving deliveries were most pronounced for the more complex planning techniques with hot spots of up to 107% appearing in the anterior portion of all three IMRT plans at the largest motion at the end-exhale set-up. The delivered dose to the moving phantom was within 5% of that to the static phantom for all cases, while measurement accuracy was ±3%. The homogeneity index was significantly decreased only for the 2 cm motion end-exhale set-up; however, this same motion increased the equivalent uniform dose because of improved posterior breast coverage. Overall, the study demonstrates that the effect of respiratory motion is negligible for all planning techniques except in occasional instances of large motion.

  1. Multicriteria evaluation of discharge simulation in Dynamic Global Vegetation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Piao, Shilong; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Ciais, Philippe; Yin, Yi; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Sitch, Stephen; Ahlström, Anders; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Huntingford, Chris; Levis, Sam; Levy, Peter E.; Huang, Mengtian; Li, Yue; Li, Xiran; Lomas, Mark R.; Peylin, Philippe; Poulter, Ben; Viovy, Nicolas; Zaehle, Soenke; Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Wang, Lei

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we assessed the performance of discharge simulations by coupling the runoff from seven Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs; LPJ, ORCHIDEE, Sheffield-DGVM, TRIFFID, LPJ-GUESS, CLM4CN, and OCN) to one river routing model for 16 large river basins. The results show that the seasonal cycle of river discharge is generally modeled well in the low and middle latitudes but not in the high latitudes, where the peak discharge (due to snow and ice melting) is underestimated. For the annual mean discharge, the DGVMs chained with the routing model show an underestimation. Furthermore, the 30 year trend of discharge is also underestimated. For the interannual variability of discharge, a skill score based on overlapping of probability density functions (PDFs) suggests that most models correctly reproduce the observed variability (correlation coefficient higher than 0.5; i.e., models account for 50% of observed interannual variability) except for the Lena, Yenisei, Yukon, and the Congo river basins. In addition, we compared the simulated runoff from different simulations where models were forced with either fixed or varying land use. This suggests that both seasonal and annual mean runoff has been little affected by land use change but that the trend itself of runoff is sensitive to land use change. None of the models when considered individually show significantly better performances than any other and in all basins. This suggests that based on current modeling capability, a regional-weighted average of multimodel ensemble projections might be appropriate to reduce the bias in future projection of global river discharge.

  2. Dynamics and Regulation of Actin Cytoskeleton in Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Haiyun

    2007-01-01

    @@ The actin cytoskeleton constituted of globular actin (G-actin) is a ubiquitous component of eukaryotic cells and plays crucial roles in diverse physiological processes in plant cells, such as cytoplasmic streaming, organelle and nucleus positioning, cell morphogenesis, cell division, tip growth, etc.

  3. Comparative evaluations on dynamic simulation of foot traffic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation and optimization of emergency route systems can be accomplished with different engineering methods. These methods are based on two different principles: the macroscopic and the microscopic approach. Both allow forecasting of evacuation times for various settings. In the work presented simple settings are investigated, consisting of rooms, corridor and stairs with regard to evacuation times and foot traffic flows. These calculations use current computer simulation programs, based on microscopic models, and the macroscopic method of Predtechenskii and Milinskii. For the computer simulation we use ASERI 3.4c, buildingEXODUS V4.0 Level 2, PedGo Version 2.1.1 and Simulex 11.1.3. The comparison of the results shows that even for the simplest systems the evacuation times and foot traffic flows vary considerably with different simulation programs and deviate from experimental results. Furthermore we investigate the effects of the boundary conditions on the foot traffic flow. (orig.)

  4. High Dynamic Range Cognitive Radio Front Ends: Architecture to Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Arun; Subbiah, Iyappan; Varga, Gabor; Schrey, Moritz; Heinen, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Advent of TV white space digitization has released frequencies from 470 MHz to 790 MHz to be utilized opportunistically. The secondary user can utilize these so called TV spaces in the absence of primary users. The most important challenge for this coexistence is mutual interference. While the strong TV stations can completely saturate the receiver of the cognitive radio (CR), the cognitive radio spurious tones can disturb other primary users and white space devices. The aim of this paper is to address the challenges for enabling cognitive radio applications in WLAN and LTE. In this process, architectural considerations for the design of cognitive radio front ends are discussed. With high-IF converters, faster and flexible implementation of CR enabled WLAN and LTE are shown. The effectiveness of the architecture is shown by evaluating the CR front ends for compliance of standards namely 802.11b/g (WLAN) and 3GPP TS 36.101 (LTE).

  5. Cell Dynamics Simulation of Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami Kinetics of Phase Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Iwamatsu, Masao; Nakamura, Masato

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we use the cell dynamics method to test the validity of the Kormogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) theory of phase transformation. This cell dynamics method is similar to the well-known phase-field model, but it is a more simple and efficient numerical method for studying various scenarios of phase transformation in a unified manner. We find that the cell dynamics method reproduces the time evolution of the volume fraction of the transformed phase predicted by the KJMA theory. S...

  6. Evaluating the Effect of Cell Culture on Gene Expression in Primary Tissue Samples Using Microfluidic-Based Single Cell Transcriptional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Januszyk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Significant transcriptional heterogeneity is an inherent property of complex tissues such as tumors and healing wounds. Traditional methods of high-throughput analysis rely on pooling gene expression data from hundreds of thousands of cells and reporting a population-wide average that is unable to capture differences within distinct cell subsets. Recent advances in microfluidic technology have permitted the development of large-scale single cell analytic methods that overcome this limitation. The increased granularity afforded by such approaches allows us to answer the critical question of whether expansion in cell culture significantly alters the transcriptional characteristics of cells isolated from primary tissue. Here we examine an established population of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs using a novel, microfluidic-based method for high-throughput transcriptional interrogation, coupled with advanced bioinformatic analysis, to evaluate the dynamics of single cell gene expression among primary, passage 0, and passage 1 stem cells. We find significant differences in the transcriptional profiles of cells from each group, as well as a considerable shift in subpopulation dynamics as those subgroups better able to adhere and proliferate under these culture conditions gradually emerge as dominant. Taken together, these findings reinforce the importance of using primary or very early passage cells in future studies.

  7. Evaluation of high-energy lithium thionyl chloride primary cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, H. A.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced commercial primary lithium cell (LiSoCl2) was evaluated in order to establish baseline data for improved lithium batteries for aerospace applications. The cell tested had nominal capacity of 6 Ah. Maximum energy density at low rates (less than C/30, where C is the cell capacity in amp-hrs and 30 corresponds to a 30 hr discharge time) was found to be near 300 Wh/kg. An equation which predicts the operating voltage of these cells as a function of current and state of charge is presented. Heat generation rates of these cells were determined as a function of current in a calorimeter. It was found that heat rates could be theoretically predicted with some degree of accuracy at currents less than 1 amp or the C/6 rate. No explosions were observed in the cells during the condition of overdischarge or reversal nor during high rate discharge. It was found, however, that the cells can vent when overdischarge currents are greater than C/30 and when discharge rates are greater than 1.5C.

  8. Numerical Experiments on Dynamic Response Evaluation of Soil Structure Interaction Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Cibotaru, Mihai-Alexandru; Werkle, Horst

    2012-01-01

    Soil–Structure Interaction is an important issue in the dynamics of structures, being not taken into consideration, in many cases, due to complex volume of computations. The interaction between soil and foundation becomes meaningful especially in the case of rigid structures and foundations, being object of intensive investigations in latest 30 years. The present study is aiming to evaluate the dynamic response of a foundation structure, interacting with the soil using the computational envir...

  9. Biomechanical Model for Evaluation of Pediatric Upper Extremity Joint Dynamics during Wheelchair Mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Schnorenberg, Alyssa J.; Slavens, Brooke A.; Wang, Mei; Vogel, Lawrence; Smith, Peter; Harris, Gerald F.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric manual wheelchair users (MWU) require high joint demands on their upper extremity (UE) during wheelchair mobility, leading them to be at risk of developing pain and pathology. Studies have examined UE biomechanics during wheelchair mobility in the adult population; however, current methods for evaluating UE joint dynamics of pediatric MWU are limited. An inverse dynamics model is proposed to characterize three-dimensional UE joint kinematics and kinetics during pediatric wheelchair ...

  10. Evaluation of dynamic testing of as-built civil engineering structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes an evaluation of dynamic tests performed on large as-built structures. The objectives and methods (excitation and data analysis) of tests are reviewed. The utility and limitations of dynamic testing in light of actual experience is discussed. Though low-level tests in themselves will not be useful for predicting structural response to strong ground motion, they are useful for verifying linear models and for clarifying physical phenomena related to soil-structure interaction

  11. Dynamic Performance Evaluation of a 2-DoF Planar Parallel Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Qi; Guan Liwen; Wang Jianxin

    2012-01-01

    The acceleration performance function and dynamic performance evaluation combining the acceleration, velocity, gravity and external force of a 2‐DoF planar parallel mechanism are presented in this paper. By means of the principle of virtual work, the inverse dynamic model and acceleration performance function of the planar parallel mechanism are setup. Based on the factors in the acceleration performance function, the effect on the acceleration performance of parallel mechanisms is investigat...

  12. Cancer Stem Cells: Distinct Entities or Dynamically Regulated Phenotypes?

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yunqing; Laterra, John

    2012-01-01

    The origins of tumor propagating neoplastic stem-like cells (cancer stem cells, CSCs) and their relationship to the bulk population of tumor cells that lack stem-like tumor-propagating features(i.e. transit-amplifying cancer progenitor cells) remain unclear. Recent findings from multiple laboratories show that cancer progenitor cells have the capacity to dedifferentiate and acquire a stem-like phenotype in response to either genetic manipulation or environmental cues. These findings suggest t...

  13. Dynamic Switch Between Two Adhesion Phenotypes in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Geng, Yue; Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Agastin, Sivaprakash; Li, Jiahe; King, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The hematogenous metastatic cascade is mediated by the interaction of cancer cells and the endothelial cell lining of blood vessels. In this work, we examine the colon cancer cell line COLO 205, which grows simultaneously in both adherent and suspended states in culture and can serve as a good model for studying tumor heterogeneity. The two subpopulations of cells have different molecular characteristics despite being from the same parent cell line. We found that the ratio of adherent to susp...

  14. Collective migration models: Dynamic monitoring of leader cells in migratory/invasive disease processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Zachary Steven

    Leader cells are a fundamental biological process that have only been investigated since the early 2000s. These cells have often been observed emerging at the edge of an artificial wound in 2D epithelial cell collective invasion, created with either a mechanical scrape from a pipette tip or from the removal of a plastic, physical blocker. During migration, the moving cells maintain cell-cell contacts, an important quality of collective migration; the leader cells originate from either the first or the second row, they increase in size compared to other cells, and they establish ruffled lamellipodia. Recent studies in 3D have also shown that cells emerging from an invading collective group that also exhibit leader-like properties. Exactly how leader cells influence and interact with follower cells as well as other cells types during collective migration, however, is another matter, and is a subject of intense investigation between many different labs and researchers. The majority of leader cell research to date has involved epithelial cells, but as collective migration is implicated in many different pathogenic diseases, such as cancer and wound healing, a better understanding of leader cells in many cell types and environments will allow significant improvement to therapies and treatments for a wide variety of disease processes. In fact, more recent studies on collective migration and invasion have broadened the field to include other cell types, including mesenchymal cancer cells and fibroblasts. However, the proper technology for picking out dynamic, single cells within a moving and changing cell population over time has severely limited previous investigation into leader cell formation and influence over other cells. In line with these previous studies, we not only bring new technology capable of dynamically monitoring leader cell formation, but we propose that leader cell behavior is more than just an epithelial process, and that it is a critical physiological

  15. Swimming motility plays a key role in the stochastic dynamics of cell clumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xianghong; Nellas, Ricky B.; Byrn, Matthew W.; Russell, Matthew H.; Bible, Amber N.; Alexandre, Gladys; Shen, Tongye

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic cell-to-cell interactions are a prerequisite to many biological processes, including development and biofilm formation. Flagellum induced motility has been shown to modulate the initial cell-cell or cell-surface interaction and to contribute to the emergence of macroscopic patterns. While the role of swimming motility in surface colonization has been analyzed in some detail, a quantitative physical analysis of transient interactions between motile cells is lacking. We examined the Brownian dynamics of swimming cells in a crowded environment using a model of motorized adhesive tandem particles. Focusing on the motility and geometry of an exemplary motile bacterium Azospirillum brasilense, which is capable of transient cell-cell association (clumping), we constructed a physical model with proper parameters for the computer simulation of the clumping dynamics. By modulating mechanical interaction (‘stickiness’) between cells and swimming speed, we investigated how equilibrium and active features affect the clumping dynamics. We found that the modulation of active motion is required for the initial aggregation of cells to occur at a realistic time scale. Slowing down the rotation of flagellar motors (and thus swimming speeds) is correlated to the degree of clumping, which is consistent with the experimental results obtained for A. brasilense.

  16. Dynamics of dye release from nanocarriers of different types in model cell membranes and living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkacheva T. N.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the dynamics of lipophilic content release from nanocarriers of different types, organic molecular ensembles and inorganic nanoparticles (NPs in vitro experiments. Methods. Two-channel ratiometric fluorescence detection method based on Forster Resonance Energy Transfer, fluorescent spectroscopy and micro-spectroscopy have been used. Results. It has been found that the profiles of lipophilic dyes release from organic nanocarriers (PC liposomes and SDS micelles and inorganic ones (GdYVO4:Eu3+ and CeO2 NPs are well fitted by the first-order reaction kinetics in both model cell membranes and living cells (rat hepatocytes. The dye release constants (K and half-lives (t1/2 were analyzed. Conclusions. GdYVO4:Eu3+ and CeO2 NPs have been shown to provide faster lipophilic content release in model cell membranes as compared to PC liposomes. Negatively charged or lipophilic compounds added into nanocarriers can decrease the rate of lipophilic dyes release. Specific interaction of GdYVO4:Eu3+ NPs with rat hepatocytes has been observed.

  17. Computational modeling of the spatiotemporal dynamics of cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signoriello, Alexandra; Bosenberg, Marcus; Shattuck, Mark; O'Hern, Corey

    2015-03-01

    Cancer stem cells can differentiate into any cell type in a particular tumor, and thus can reform a tumor even when seeded from a single cell. Despite their importance, the identification of stem cells, their interactions, and how and why they malfunction to cause cancer and form tumors are not well understood. We have developed discrete element modeling (DEM) simulations to investigate the role of stem cells in the formation of heterogeneous cell populations in melanoma tumors. The DEM simulations include elastic, excluded volume, and signaling interactions between cells and rates for cell differentiation, apoptosis, and growth. The DEM is calibrated to results from experimental studies of melanoma tumor growth in mouse models. We use the simulations to generate virtual tumors and study their morphology and cell subtype populations as a function of time.

  18. Evaluation of Permanent Deformation of CRM-Reinforced SMA and Its Correlation with Dynamic Stiffness and Dynamic Creep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuha Salim Mashaan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, rapid economic and industrial growth generates increasing amounts of waste materials such as waste tyre rubber. Attempts to inspire a green technology which is more environmentally friendly that can produce economic value are a major consideration in the utilization of waste materials. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of waste tyre rubber (crumb rubber modifier (CRM, in stone mastic asphalt (SMA 20 performance. The virgin bitumen (80/100 penetration grade was used, modified with crumb rubber at four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 12%, 16%, and 20% by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the indirect tensile (dynamic stiffness, dynamic creep, and wheel tracking tests. By the experimentation, the appropriate amount of CRM was found to be 16% by weight of bitumen. The results show that the addition of CRM into the mixture has an obvious significant effect on the performance properties of SMA which could improve the mixture's resistance against permanent deformation. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the rut depth and permanent strain as compared to resilient modulus; thus dynamic creep test might be a more reliable test in evaluating the rut resistance of asphalt mixture.

  19. Evaluation of permanent deformation of CRM-reinforced SMA and its correlation with dynamic stiffness and dynamic creep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan

    2013-01-01

    Today, rapid economic and industrial growth generates increasing amounts of waste materials such as waste tyre rubber. Attempts to inspire a green technology which is more environmentally friendly that can produce economic value are a major consideration in the utilization of waste materials. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of waste tyre rubber (crumb rubber modifier (CRM)), in stone mastic asphalt (SMA 20) performance. The virgin bitumen (80/100) penetration grade was used, modified with crumb rubber at four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 12%, 16%, and 20% by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the indirect tensile (dynamic stiffness), dynamic creep, and wheel tracking tests. By the experimentation, the appropriate amount of CRM was found to be 16% by weight of bitumen. The results show that the addition of CRM into the mixture has an obvious significant effect on the performance properties of SMA which could improve the mixture's resistance against permanent deformation. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the rut depth and permanent strain as compared to resilient modulus; thus dynamic creep test might be a more reliable test in evaluating the rut resistance of asphalt mixture. PMID:24302883

  20. Changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology with metastatic ability in cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine if changes in cancer cell biophysical properties facilitate metastasis, we quantified cytoskeletal biophysics in well-characterized human skin, bladder, prostate and kidney cell line pairs that differ in metastatic ability. Using magnetic twisting cytometry with optical detection, cytoskeletal dynamics was observed through spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads and nonlinear rheology was characterized through large amplitude forced oscillations of probe beads. Measurements of cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology differed between strongly and weakly metastatic cells. However, no set of biophysical parameters changed systematically with metastatic ability across all cell lines. Compared to their weakly metastatic counterparts, the strongly metastatic kidney cancer cells exhibited both increased cytoskeletal dynamics and stiffness at large deformation which are thought to facilitate the process of vascular invasion. (paper)

  1. Mesenchymal morphogenesis of embryonic stem cells dynamically modulates the biophysical microtissue niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Melissa A.; Saeed, Rabbia; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell fate and function are dynamically modulated by the interdependent relationships between biochemical and biophysical signals constituting the local 3D microenvironment. While approaches to recapitulate the stem cell niche have been explored for directing stem cell differentiation, a quantitative relationship between embryonic stem cell (ESC) morphogenesis and intrinsic biophysical cues within three-dimensional microtissues has not been established. In this study, we demonstrate that mesenchymal embryonic microtissues induced by BMP4 exhibited increased stiffness and viscosity accompanying differentiation, with cytoskeletal tension significantly contributing to multicellular stiffness. Perturbation of the cytoskeleton during ESC differentiation led to modulation of the biomechanical and gene expression profiles, with the resulting cell phenotype and biophysical properties being highly correlated by multivariate analyses. Together, this study elucidates the dynamics of biophysical and biochemical signatures within embryonic microenvironments, with broad implications for monitoring tissue dynamics, modeling pathophysiological and embryonic morphogenesis and directing stem cell patterning and differentiation. PMID:24598818

  2. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation Results: Second Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-09-01

    Second report evaluating a fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL published its first report on the demonstration in February 2014. This report is an update to the previous report; it covers 3 full years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2014 and focuses on the final experiences and lessons learned.

  3. Single-molecule spectroscopy of protein conformational dynamics in live eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Iwo; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash; Aznauryan, Mikayel; Soranno, Andrea; Wunderlich, Bengt; Dingfelder, Fabian; Stüber, Jakob C; Plückthun, Andreas; Nettels, Daniel; Schuler, Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    Single-molecule methods have become widely used for quantifying the conformational heterogeneity and structural dynamics of biomolecules in vitro. Their application in vivo, however, has remained challenging owing to shortcomings in the design and reproducible delivery of labeled molecules, the range of applicable analysis methods, and suboptimal cell culture conditions. By addressing these limitations in an integrated approach, we demonstrate the feasibility of probing protein dynamics from milliseconds down to the nanosecond regime in live eukaryotic cells with confocal single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy. We illustrate the versatility of the approach by determining the dimensions and submicrosecond chain dynamics of an intrinsically disordered protein; by detecting even subtle changes in the temperature dependence of protein stability, including in-cell cold denaturation; and by quantifying the folding dynamics of a small protein. The methodology opens possibilities for assessing the effect of the cellular environment on biomolecular conformation, dynamics and function. PMID:26147918

  4. Risk evaluation of rock burst through theory of static and dynamic stresses superposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振雷; 蔡武; 窦林名; 何江; 王桂峰; 丁言露

    2015-01-01

    Rock burst is one of the most catastrophic dynamic hazards in coal mining. A static and dynamic stresses superposition-based (SDSS-based) risk evaluation method of rock burst was proposed to pre-evaluate rock burst risk. Theoretical basis of this method is the stress criterion incurring rock burst and rock burst risk is evaluated according to the closeness degree of the total stress (due to the superposition of static stress in the coal and dynamic stress induced by tremors) with the critical stress. In addition, risk evaluation criterion of rock burst was established by defining the “Satisfaction Degree” of static stress. Furthermore, the method was used to pre-evaluate rock burst risk degree and prejudge endangered area of an insular longwall face in Nanshan Coal Mine in China. Results show that rock burst risk is moderate at advance extent of 97 m, strong at advance extent of 97−131 m, and extremely strong (i.e. inevitable to occur) when advance extent exceeds 131 m (mining is prohibited in this case). The section of two gateways whose floor abuts 15−3 coal seam is a susceptible area prone to rock burst. Evaluation results were further compared with rock bursts and tremors detected by microseismic monitoring. Comparison results indicate that evaluation results are consistent with microseismic monitoring, which proves the method’s feasibility.

  5. Evaluation of the Redesign of an Undergraduate Cell Biology Course

    OpenAIRE

    McEwen, Laura April; Harris, dik; Schmid, Richard F.; Vogel, Jackie; Western, Tamara; Harrison, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a case study of the evaluation of a redesigned and redeveloped laboratory-based cell biology course. The course was a compulsory element of the biology program, but the laboratory had become outdated and was inadequately equipped. With the support of a faculty-based teaching improvement project, the teaching team redesigned the course and re-equipped the laboratory, using a more learner-centered, constructivist approach. The focus of the article is on the project-supported...

  6. Evaluation of nitroimidazole hypoxic cell radiosensitizers in a human tumor cell line high in intracellular glutathione

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five nitroimidazole hypoxic cell radiosensitizers were evaluated in a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (A549) whose GSH level was 8-fold higher than Chinese hamster V79 cells. One millimolar concentrations of Misonidazole (MISO), SR-2508, RSU-1164, RSU-1172, and Ro-03-8799 sensitized hypoxic A549 cells to radiation, with Ro-03-8799 giving the highest sensitizer enhancement ration (SER) (2.3). However, MISO, SR-2508 and Ro-03-8799 were less effective in this cell line than in V79 cells, presumably due to higher GSH content of the A549 cells. Increased hypoxic radiosensitization was seen with 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 after GSH depletion by BSO as compared to 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 alone (SER-1.8 vs 1.3). The combination of GSH depletion and 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 was considerably more toxic than 0.1 mM or 1.0 mM Ro-03-8799 alone. This sensitivity was much greater than has been observed for SR-2508. These data show that Ro-03-8799 was the most efficient hypoxic cell radiosensitizer in a human tumor cell line considerably higher in GSH than the rodent cell lines often used in hypoxic radiosensitization studies. Thus, Ro-03-8799 may be a more effective hypoxic cell sensitizer in human tumors that are high in GSH

  7. Lithium Iron Phosphate Cell Performance Evaluations for Lunar Extravehicular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha

    2007-01-01

    Lithium-ion battery cells are being evaluated for their ability to provide primary power and energy storage for NASA s future Exploration missions. These missions include the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, the Ares Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage, Extravehicular Activities (EVA, the advanced space suit), the Lunar Surface Ascent Module (LSAM), and the Lunar Precursor and Robotic Program (LPRP), among others. Each of these missions will have different battery requirements. Some missions may require high specific energy and high energy density, while others may require high specific power, wide operating temperature ranges, or a combination of several of these attributes. EVA is one type of mission that presents particular challenges for today s existing power sources. The Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for the advanced Lunar surface suit will be carried on an astronaut s back during eight hour long sorties, requiring a lightweight power source. Lunar sorties are also expected to occur during varying environmental conditions, requiring a power source that can operate over a wide range of temperatures. Concepts for Lunar EVAs include a primary power source for the PLSS that can recharge rapidly. A power source that can charge quickly could enable a lighter weight system that can be recharged while an astronaut is taking a short break. Preliminary results of Al23 Ml 26650 lithium iron phosphate cell performance evaluations for an advanced Lunar surface space suit application are discussed in this paper. These cells exhibit excellent recharge rate capability, however, their specific energy and energy density is lower than typical lithium-ion cell chemistries. The cells were evaluated for their ability to provide primary power in a lightweight battery system while operating at multiple temperatures.

  8. A Quantitative and Dynamic Model for Plant Stem Cell Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Geier, Florian; Lohmann, Jan U.; Gerstung, Moritz; Maier, Annette T.; Timmer, Jens; Fleck, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Plants maintain pools of totipotent stem cells throughout their entire life. These stem cells are embedded within specialized tissues called meristems, which form the growing points of the organism. The shoot apical meristem of the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana is subdivided into several distinct domains, which execute diverse biological functions, such as tissue organization, cell-proliferation and differentiation. The number of cells required for growth and organ formation changes ov...

  9. Jamming dynamics of stretch-induced surfactant release by alveolar type II cells

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, Arnab; Arold, Stephen P.; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Suki, Béla

    2011-01-01

    Secretion of pulmonary surfactant by alveolar epithelial type II cells is vital for the reduction of interfacial surface tension, thus preventing lung collapse. To study secretion dynamics, rat alveolar epithelial type II cells were cultured on elastic membranes and cyclically stretched. The amounts of phosphatidylcholine, the primary lipid component of surfactant, inside and outside the cells, were measured using radiolabeled choline. During and immediately after stretch, cells secreted less...

  10. Enhancer repertoires are reshaped independently of early priming and heterochromatin dynamics during B cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Choukrallah, Mohamed-Amin; Song, Shuang; Rolink, Antonius G.; Burger, Lukas; Matthias, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    A widely accepted model posits that activation of enhancers during differentiation goes through a priming step prior to lineage commitment. To investigate the chronology of enhancer repertoire establishment during hematopoiesis, we monitored epigenome dynamics during three developmental stages representing hematopoietic stem cells, B-cell progenitors and mature B-cells. We find that only a minority of enhancers primed in stem cells or progenitors become active at later stages. Furthermore, mo...

  11. Mesenchymal morphogenesis of embryonic stem cells dynamically modulates the biophysical microtissue niche

    OpenAIRE

    Kinney, Melissa A.; Rabbia Saeed; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell fate and function are dynamically modulated by the interdependent relationships between biochemical and biophysical signals constituting the local 3D microenvironment. While approaches to recapitulate the stem cell niche have been explored for directing stem cell differentiation, a quantitative relationship between embryonic stem cell (ESC) morphogenesis and intrinsic biophysical cues within three-dimensional microtissues has not been established. In this study, we demonstrate that ...

  12. Plant cell wall dynamics and wall-related susceptibility in plant–pathogen interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Bellincampi, Daniela; Cervone, Felice; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that often determines the outcome of the interactions between plants and pathogens. It is a barrier that pathogens need to breach to colonize the plant tissue. While fungal necrotrophs extensively destroy the integrity of the cell wall through the combined action of degrading enzymes, biotrophic fungi require a more localized and controlled degradation of the cell wall in order to keep the host cells alive and utilize their feeding structures. Also bacteri...

  13. Plant cell wall dynamics and wall-related susceptibility in plant-pathogen interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela eBellincampi; Felice eCervone; Vincenzo eLionetti

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that often determines the outcome of the interactions between plants and pathogens. It is a barrier that pathogens need to breach to colonize the plant tissue. While fungal necrotrophs extensively destroy the integrity of the cell wall through the combined action of degrading enzymes, biotrophic fungi require a more localized and controlled degradation of the cell wall in order to keep the host cells alive and utilize their feeding structures. Also bacteri...

  14. Dynamic Cell Adhesion and Migration on Nanoscale Grooved Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.; Riet, te J.; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  15. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.; Riet, J. te; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  16. Evaluation of ISABELLE full cell ultra high vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ISABELLE Full Cell Vacuum System consisting of a 40 m long, by 8.8 cm diameter stainless steel tube pumped by seven pumping stations was assembled and processed for 10-12 Torr operation. Evaluation and testing of the system and its sub-assemblies has been completed. Detail design of system components and the determination of the conditioning process was completed. The best procedure to rough pump, leak test, vacuum bake the system, condition pumps, degas gauges, turn on ion pumps and flash sublimation pumps was established. Pressures below 2 x 10-11 Torr are now routinely achieved in normal operation of the Full Cell. This includes pump down after replacement of various components and pump down after back fill with moist unfiltered air. The techniques developed for the Full Cell will be used to build the ISABELLE Ultra High Vacuum System

  17. Transplantation dose alters the dynamics of human neural stem cell engraftment, proliferation and migration after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja M. Piltti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of transplantation dose on the spatiotemporal dynamics of human neural stem cell (hNSC engraftment has not been quantitatively evaluated in the central nervous system. We investigated changes over time in engraftment/survival, proliferation, and migration of multipotent human central nervous system-derived neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns transplanted at doses ranging from 10,000 to 500,000 cells in spinal cord injured immunodeficient mice. Transplant dose was inversely correlated with measures of donor cell proliferation at 2 weeks post-transplant (WPT and dose-normalized engraftment at 16 WPT. Critically, mice receiving the highest cell dose exhibited an engraftment plateau, in which the total number of engrafted human cells never exceeded the initial dose. These data suggest that donor cell expansion was inversely regulated by target niche parameters and/or transplantation density. Investigation of the response of donor cells to the host microenvironment should be a key variable in defining target cell dose in pre-clinical models of CNS disease and injury.

  18. Manganese induces mitochondrial dynamics impairment and apoptotic cell death: a study in human Gli36 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaimo, Agustina; Gorojod, Roxana M; Miglietta, Esteban A; Villarreal, Alejandro; Ramos, Alberto J; Kotler, Mónica L

    2013-10-25

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element due to its participation in many physiological processes. However, overexposure to this metal leads to a neurological disorder known as Manganism whose clinical manifestations and molecular mechanisms resemble Parkinson's disease. Several lines of evidence implicate astrocytes as an early target of Mn neurotoxicity being the mitochondria the most affected organelles. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible mitochondrial dynamics alterations in Mn-exposed human astrocytes. Therefore, we employed Gli36 cells which express the astrocytic markers GFAP and S100B. We demonstrated that Mn triggers the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway revealed by increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and by caspase-9 activation. This apoptotic program may be in turn responsible of caspase-3/7 activation, PARP-1 cleavage, chromatin condensation and fragmentation. In addition, we determined that Mn induces deregulation in mitochondria-shaping proteins (Opa-1, Mfn-2 and Drp-1) expression levels in parallel with the disruption of the mitochondrial network toward to an exacerbated fragmentation. Since mitochondrial dynamics is altered in several neurodegenerative diseases, these proteins could become future targets to be considered in Manganism treatment. PMID:24021799

  19. Two novel low-power and high-speed dynamic carbon nanotube full-adder cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eshghi Mohammad; Bagherizadeh Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, two novel low-power and high-speed carbon nanotube full-adder cells in dynamic logic style are presented. Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) are efficient in designing a high performance circuit. To design our full-adder cells, CNFETs with three different threshold voltages (low threshold, normal threshold, and high threshold) are used. First design generates SUM and COUT through separate transistors, and second design is a multi-output dynamic full adde...

  20. Dynamics of the cell-cycle network under genome-rewiring perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cell-cycle progression is regulated by a specific network enabling its ordered dynamics. Recent experiments supported by computational models have shown that a core of genes ensures this robust cycle dynamics. However, much less is known about the direct interaction of the cell-cycle regulators with genes outside of the cell-cycle network, in particular those of the metabolic system. Following our recent experimental work, we present here a model focusing on the dynamics of the cell-cycle core network under rewiring perturbations. Rewiring is achieved by placing an essential metabolic gene exclusively under the regulation of a cell-cycle's promoter, forcing the cell-cycle network to function under a multitasking challenging condition; operating in parallel the cell-cycle progression and a metabolic essential gene. Our model relies on simple rate equations that capture the dynamics of the relevant protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions, while making a clear distinction between these two different types of processes. In particular, we treat the cell-cycle transcription factors as limited ‘resources’ and focus on the redistribution of resources in the network during its dynamics. This elucidates the sensitivity of its various nodes to rewiring interactions. The basic model produces the correct cycle dynamics for a wide range of parameters. The simplicity of the model enables us to study the interface between the cell-cycle regulation and other cellular processes. Rewiring a promoter of the network to regulate a foreign gene, forces a multitasking regulatory load. The higher the load on the promoter, the longer is the cell-cycle period. Moreover, in agreement with our experimental results, the model shows that different nodes of the network exhibit variable susceptibilities to the rewiring perturbations. Our model suggests that the topology of the cell-cycle core network ensures its plasticity and flexible interface with other cellular processes

  1. First Evaluation of Dynamic Aperture at Injection for FCC-hh

    CERN Document Server

    Dalena, Barbara; Chancé, Antoine; Holzer, Bernhard; Martin, Roman; Payet, Jacques; Schulte, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In the hadron machine option, proposed in the context of the Future Circular Colliders (FCC) study, the dipole field quality is expected to play an important role, as in the LHC. A preliminary evaluation of the field quality of dipoles, based on the Nb3Sn technology, has been provided by the magnet group. The effect of these field imperfections on the dynamic aperture, using the present lattice design, is presented and first tolerances on the main multipole components are evaluated.

  2. Evaluation of Lyapunov exponent in generalized linear dynamical models of queueing networks

    OpenAIRE

    Krivulin, N. K.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of evaluation of Lyapunov exponent in queueing network analysis is considered based on models and methods of idempotent algebra. General existence conditions for Lyapunov exponent to exist in generalized linear stochastic dynamic systems are given, and examples of evaluation of the exponent for systems with matrices of particular types are presented. A method which allow one to get the exponent is proposed based on some appropriate decomposition of the system matrix. A general app...

  3. Dynamic probability evaluation of safety levels of earth-rockfill dams using Bayesian approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zi-wu FAN; Shu-hai JIANG; Zhang, Ming

    2009-01-01

    In order to accurately predict and control the aging process of dams, new information should be collected continuously to renew the quantitative evaluation of dam safety levels. Owing to the complex structural characteristics of dams, it is quite difficult to predict the time-varying factors affecting their safety levels. It is not feasible to employ dynamic reliability indices to evaluate the actual safety levels of dams. Based on the relevant regulations for dam safety classification in Chi...

  4. Fuel cell/back-up battery hybrid energy conversion systems: Dynamic modeling and harmonic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Novel technique to completely eliminate the harmful harmonics of fuel cell system. • Presenting a novel high accurate detailed electrochemical dynamic model of fuel cells. • Back-up battery system to compensate the slow dynamic response of fuel cell system. • Exact analysis of real electrochemical reactions occurring inside fuel cells. - Abstract: In this study, a novel dynamic model of fuel cells is presented. High accurate static and dynamic responses of the proposed model are experimentally validated by comparing simulated results with real experimental data. The obtained model together with theoretical results shows that a fuel cell or a fuel cell stack has very slow dynamic response, so that, it cannot adapt itself to the fast variations in load demand. It is shown that for adapting well a fuel cell stack to the load demand, the stack should be equipped with a proposed back-up battery system which compensates the slow dynamic response of the stack by providing a bidirectional path to transmit/absorb the extra instant power. It is proved that the conventional switching waveforms used in the converters of the stacks and back-up systems produce an enormous amount of harmful harmonics. Then, a novel technique is proposed to completely eliminate main harmful harmonics. It is worthwhile to note that all the other techniques only reduce the harmful harmonics. Simulated results verify that the back-up battery system together with applying the proposed technique provide a fast dynamic response for the fuel cell/back-up battery system, and also completely eliminate the main harmful harmonics

  5. Evaluating the performance of microbial fuel cells powering electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewan, Alim; Beyenal, Haluk [Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Center for Environmental, Sediment and Aquatic Research, Pullman, WA (United States); Donovan, Conrad; Heo, Deukhyoun [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99163-2710 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is capable of powering an electronic device if we store the energy in an external storage device, such as a capacitor, and dispense that energy intermittently in bursts of high-power when needed. Therefore its performance needs to be evaluated using an energy-storing device such as a capacitor which can be charged and discharged rather than other evaluation techniques, such as continuous energy dissipation through a resistor. In this study, we develop a method of testing microbial fuel cell performance based on storing energy in a capacitor. When a capacitor is connected to a MFC it acts like a variable resistor and stores energy from the MFC at a variable rate. In practice the application of this method to testing microbial fuel cells is very challenging and time consuming; therefore we have custom-designed a microbial fuel cell tester (MFCT). The MFCT evaluates the performance of a MFC as a power source. It uses a capacitor as an energy storing device and waits until a desired amount of energy is stored then discharges the capacitor. The entire process is controlled using an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) board controlled by a custom-written computer program. The utility of our method and the MFCT is demonstrated using a laboratory microbial fuel cell (LMFC) and a sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC). We determine (1) how frequently a MFC can charge a capacitor, (2) which electrode is current-limiting, (3) what capacitor value will allow the maximum harvested energy from a MFC, which is called the ''optimum charging capacitor value,'' and (4) what capacitor charging potential will harvest the maximum energy from a MFC, which is called the ''optimum charging potential.'' Using a LMFC we find that (1) the time needed to charge a 3-F capacitor from 0 to 500 mV is 108 min, (2) the optimum charging capacitor value is 3 F, and (3) the optimum charging potential is 300 mV. Using a SMFC we find that (1

  6. Beam dynamics of a double-gap acceleration cell for ion implantation with multiple atomic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of our work on ion implantation, we derived equations for the beam dynamics of a two-gap-resonator cavity for accelerating and bunching various ion species of varying energies with the cavity designed for one particular ion species of a given energy (the design-reference particle). A two gap structure is useful at low resonant frequencies where lumped circuit elements (inductors) can be used and the structure kept small. A single gap structure has the advantage that each gap can be independently phased to produce the desired beam dynamics behavior for various ion species and ion energies. However at low frequencies, single gap resonant structures can be large. We find that the two-gap structure, where the phase difference between gaps, for the design reference particle, is fixed at π radians can give acceptable performance provided that the individual two gap cells in the entire accelerator are optimized for the ion species having the largest mass to charge ratio and having the maximum required output energy. Our equations show how to adjust the cavity phases and electric fields to obtain equivalent first-order accelerator performance for various ion species and energies. These equations allow for the effective evaluation of various accelerator concepts and can facilitate the tuning of a linac when changing energies and ion species. Extensive simulations have confirmed the efficacy of our equations. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  7. Implementation and evaluation for anode purging of a fuel cell based on nitrogen concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The model can predict voltage variation of a PEMFC operated at a varying-current. • Anode purge strategies are studied by simulation and experiments. • Performances of the PEMFC purged at different nitrogen concentrations are compared. • Anode purge based on current-integration with time is evaluated. - Abstract: When a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is operated in a dead-ended anode mode, its performance gradually decreases due to accumulation of nitrogen and liquid water. Many experimental studies show that nitrogen accumulation is mainly responsible for the performance drop. In this study, a dynamic mathematical model developed in our previous work is employed to predict the nitrogen accumulation in the anode and its corresponding cell voltage. The model is calibrated and validated using experimental data. A purge strategy based on nitrogen concentration in the anode is developed by the calibrated model and implemented into the controller for anode gas management. The performance variations of the single cell operated at a varying-current condition and purged at three nitrogen molar fractions are compared and discussed. Results show that simulated voltage variation agrees with experimental data. When the anode is purged at the nitrogen molar fraction of 0.15, the cell performance shows a dramatic variation. At the end of this study, anode purge based on current-integration with time is also evaluated

  8. Dynamics of Cancer Cell near Collagen Fiber Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihan; Sun, Bo

    Cell migration is an integrated process that is important in life. Migration is essential for embryonic development as well as homeostatic processes such as wound healing and immune responses. When cell migrates through connective extracellular matrix (ECM), it applies cellular traction force to ECM and senses the rigidity of their local environment. We used human breast cancer cell (MDA-MB-231) which is highly invasive and applies strong traction force to ECM. As cancer cell applies traction force to type I collage-based ECM, it deforms collagen fibers near the surface. Patterns of deforming collagen fibers are significantly different with pairs of cancer cells compared to a single cancer cell. While a pair of cancer cells within 60 um creates aligned collagen fiber chains between them permanently, a single cancer cell does not form any fiber chains. In this experiment we measured a cellular response and an interaction between a pair of cells through the chain. Finally, we analyzed correlation of directions between cancer cell migration and the collagen chain alignment.

  9. Enhancer repertoires are reshaped independently of early priming and heterochromatin dynamics during B cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choukrallah, Mohamed-Amin; Song, Shuang; Rolink, Antonius G; Burger, Lukas; Matthias, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    A widely accepted model posits that activation of enhancers during differentiation goes through a priming step prior to lineage commitment. To investigate the chronology of enhancer repertoire establishment during hematopoiesis, we monitored epigenome dynamics during three developmental stages representing hematopoietic stem cells, B-cell progenitors and mature B-cells. We find that only a minority of enhancers primed in stem cells or progenitors become active at later stages. Furthermore, most enhancers active in differentiated cells were not primed in earlier stages. Thus, the enhancer repertoire is reshaped dynamically during B-cell differentiation and enhancer priming in early stages does not appear to be an obligate step for enhancer activation. Furthermore, our data reveal that heterochromatin and Polycomb-mediated silencing have only a minor contribution in shaping enhancer repertoires during cell differentiation. Together, our data revisit the prevalent model about epigenetic reprogramming during hematopoiesis and give insights into the formation of gene regulatory networks. PMID:26477271

  10. Evaluation of two different dendritic cell preparations with BCG reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fol Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a key-role in the immune response against intracellular bacterial pathogens, including mycobacteria. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs are considered to behave as inflammatory cell populations. Different immunomagnetic methods (positive and negative can be used to purify monocytes before their in vitro differentiation and their culture behavior can be expected to be different. In this study we evaluated the reactivity of two dendritic cell populations towards the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG antigen. Monocytes were obtained from the blood of healthy donors, using positive and negative immunomagnetic separation methods. The expression of DC-SIGN, CD86, CD80, HLA-DR and CD40 on MoDCs was estimated by flow cytometry. The level of IL-12p70, IL-10 and TNF-α was measured by ELISA. Neither of the tested methods affected the surface marker expression of DCs. No significant alteration in immunological response, measured by cytokine production, was noted either. After BCG stimulation, the absence of IL-12, but the IL-23 production was observed in both cell preparations. Positive and negative magnetic separation methods are effective techniques to optimize the preparation of monocytes as the source of MoDCs for potential clinical application.

  11. Proton exchange fuel cell : the design, construction and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzen, M.R.; Simoes, G.C.; Da Silva, L. [Univ. do Vale do Itajai, Sao Jose, SC (Brazil). Lab. de Pesquisa em Energia; Fiori, M.A.; Paula, M.M.S. [Univ. do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Santa Catarina (Brazil). Lab. de Sintese de Complexos Multifuncionais; Benavides, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2010-07-15

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) convert the chemical energy stored in the fuel directly into electrical energy without intermediate steps. The PEMFC operates at a relatively low operating temperature making it a good choice for mobile applications, but a high power density is needed in order to decrease the total weight of the vehicles. This paper presented a simple methodology to construct a PEMFC-type fuel cell, with particular reference to the gaseous diffuser, cell structure, the fixing plate, mounting bracket, gas distribution plates, and the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The geometric design and meshing of the PEMFC were also described. The electrode was made using graphite with flow-field geometry. The PEMFC was tested for 100 hour of continuous work, during which time the current and voltage produced were monitored in order to evaluate the performance of the PEMFC. The materials used in the preparation of the fuel cell proved to be suitable. There was no loss of efficiency during the tests. The most relevant aspects affecting the PEMFC design were examined in an effort to optimize the performance of the cell. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Dynamic evaluation of environmental impact due to tritium accidental release from the fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of the key safety issues of fusion reactors, tritium environmental impact of fusion accidents has attracted great attention. In this work, the dynamic tritium concentrations in the air and human body were evaluated on the time scale based on accidental release scenarios under the extreme environmental conditions. The radiation dose through various exposure pathways was assessed to find out the potential relationships among them. Based on this work, the limits of HT and HTO release amount for arbitrary accidents were proposed for the fusion reactor according to dose limit of ITER. The dynamic results aim to give practical guidance for establishment of fusion emergency standard and design of fusion tritium system. - Highlights: • Dynamic tritium concentration in the air and human body evaluated on the time scale. • Different intake forms and relevant radiation dose assessed to find out the potential relationships. • HT and HTO release amount limits for arbitrary accidents proposed for the fusion reactor according to dose limit

  13. Using System Dynamics Analysis for Evaluating Neighborhood Economic Outcomes from Transportation and Land Use Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proposed Title: Using System Dynamics Analysis for Evaluating Neighborhood Economic Outcomes from Transportation and Land Use Decisions Topic (must choose one item from a drop-down list): Community Indicators Learning Objectives (must list 2): • What are the benefits and l...

  14. Evaluation of Student Models on Current Socio-Scientific Topics Based on System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuhoglu, Hasret

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to 1) enable primary school students to develop models that will help them understand and analyze a system, through a learning process based on system dynamics approach, 2) examine and evaluate students' models related to socio-scientific issues using certain criteria. The research method used is a case study. The study sample…

  15. Evaluation of the readsorption of plutonium and americium in dynamic fractionations of environmental solid samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Roongrat; Hou, Xiaolin; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2008-01-01

    extractions. The degree of readsorption in dynamic and conventional batch extraction systems are compared and evaluated by using a double-spiking technique. A high degree of readsorption of plutonium and americium (>75%) was observed in both systems, and they also exhibited similar distribution patterns...

  16. Dynamical evaluation of vaginal micro-ecosystem in a Chinese woman with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z Q; Zhou, W; Yue, X A; Mu, L Y; Jiang, Y M

    2015-01-01

    We reported a rare case of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) in this study. Through dynamic evaluation of the vaginal micro-ecosystem, we found that only depuratory degree, spores, blastospores, and hyphae were specific indicators and the "barometer" of RVVC development. Therefore, an understanding of vaginal micro-ecological changes can help clinicians to improve the treatment of patients with RVVC. PMID:25867410

  17. Rapid and Specific Method for Evaluating Streptomyces Competitive Dynamics in Complex Soil Communities▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Schlatter, Daniel C; Samac, Deborah A.; Tesfaye, Mesfin; Kinkel, Linda L

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying target microbial populations in complex communities remains a barrier to studying species interactions in soil environments. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed for quantifying pathogenic Streptomyces scabiei and antibiotic-producing Streptomyces lavendulae strains in complex soil communities. This assay will be useful for evaluating the competitive dynamics of streptomycetes in soil.

  18. Why Do CD8+ T Cells become Indifferent to Tumors: A Dynamic Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Colin; Zhang, Ranran; Haley, Jeremy S; Liu, Xin; Loughran, Thomas; Schell, Todd D; Albert, Réka; Thakar, Juilee

    2011-01-01

    CD8+ T cells have the potential to influence the outcome of cancer pathogenesis, including complete tumor eradication or selection of malignant tumor escape variants. The Simian virus 40 large T-antigen (Tag) oncoprotein promotes tumor formation in Tag-transgenic mice and also provides multiple target determinants (sites) for responding CD8+ T cells in C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice. To understand the in vivo quantitative dynamics of CD8+ T cells after encountering Tag, we constructed a dynamic model from in vivo-generated data to simulate the interactions between Tag-expressing cells and CD8+ T cells in distinct scenarios including immunization of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and of Tag-transgenic mice that develop various tumors. In these scenarios the model successfully reproduces the dynamics of both the Tag-expressing cells and antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. The model predicts that the tolerance of the site-specific T cells is dependent on their apoptosis rates and that the net growth of CD8+ T cells is altered in transgenic mice. We experimentally validate both predictions. Our results indicate that site-specific CD8+ T cells have tissue-specific apoptosis rates affecting their tolerance to the tumor antigen. Moreover, the model highlights differences in apoptosis rates that contribute to compromised CD8+ T cell responses and tumor progression, knowledge of which is essential for development of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:21808621

  19. Modelling and analysis of dynamics of viral infection of cells and of interferon resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getto, Ph.; Kimmel, M.; Marciniak-Czochra, A.

    2008-08-01

    Interferons are active biomolecules, which help fight viral infections by spreading from infected to uninfected cells and activate effector molecules, which confer resistance from the virus on cells. We propose a new model of dynamics of viral infection, including endocytosis, cell death, production of interferon and development of resistance. The novel element is a specific biologically justified mechanism of interferon action, which results in dynamics different from other infection models. The model reflects conditions prevailing in liquid cultures (ideal mixing), and the absence of cells or virus influx from outside. The basic model is a nonlinear system of five ordinary differential equations. For this variant, it is possible to characterise global behaviour, using a conservation law. Analytic results are supplemented by computational studies. The second variant of the model includes age-of-infection structure of infected cells, which is described by a transport-type partial differential equation for infected cells. The conclusions are: (i) If virus mortality is included, the virus becomes eventually extinct and subpopulations of uninfected and resistant cells are established. (ii) If virus mortality is not included, the dynamics may lead to extinction of uninfected cells. (iii) Switching off the interferon defense results in a decrease of the sum total of uninfected and resistant cells. (iv) Infection-age structure of infected cells may result in stabilisation or destabilisation of the system, depending on detailed assumptions. Our work seems to constitute the first comprehensive mathematical analysis of the cell-virus-interferon system based on biologically plausible hypotheses.

  20. Evaluation of milk yield in tsigaiewes by somatic cell count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Vršková

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our research was to study daily milk production which was affected by somatic cell count (SCC. The study was performed on a selected flock of purebred Tsigai ewes (326 animals. Regular milk yield recording was performed during the evening milking in around the middle of April, May and June. Milk samples were analyzed for basic milk composition (fat, protein and lactose and somatic cells count. SCC were evaluated using decadic logarithm (logSCC.According to animals, the dairy ewes were divided into the four groups on the basis of individual SCC (G1 = SCC <100 × 103 cells.mL-1, G2 = SCC between 100 – 300 × 103 cells.mL-1, G3 = SCC between 300 – 600 × 103 cells.mL-1, G4 = SCC >600 × 103 cells.mL-1 to study the frequency of distribution of animals in selected group of ewes throughout experimental period. The average daily milk production in selected flock of Tsigai was 421.02 mL. We reached the highest daily milk production in April 476.40 ml and the highest content of fat and protein in June, while milk production was the lowest. From this flock of purebred Tsigai 76% of eweswere below SCC 300 × 103 cells.mL-1. This SCC indicated a good health status of experimental ewes, at which 61% sheep were at the first lactation. We found a tendency to lower milk production by a higher SCC. With the increasing SCC decreased lactose content from 4.78% (G1 to 4.32% (G4. Reduced lactose content refers to the occurrence of mastitis and there is a need for performing bacteriological examination in milk.

  1. Cadherin-dependent cell morphology in an epithelium: constructing a quantitative dynamical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemp, Ian M; Carthew, Richard W; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2011-07-01

    Cells in the Drosophila retina have well-defined morphologies that are attained during tissue morphogenesis. We present a computer simulation of the epithelial tissue in which the global interfacial energy between cells is minimized. Experimental data for both normal cells and mutant cells either lacking or misexpressing the adhesion protein N-cadherin can be explained by a simple model incorporating salient features of morphogenesis that include the timing of N-cadherin expression in cells and its temporal relationship to the remodeling of cell-cell contacts. The simulations reproduce the geometries of wild-type and mutant cells, distinguish features of cadherin dynamics, and emphasize the importance of adhesion protein biogenesis and its timing with respect to cell remodeling. The simulations also indicate that N-cadherin protein is recycled from inactive interfaces to active interfaces, thereby modulating adhesion strengths between cells. PMID:21814505

  2. Cadherin-dependent cell morphology in an epithelium: constructing a quantitative dynamical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Gemp

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cells in the Drosophila retina have well-defined morphologies that are attained during tissue morphogenesis. We present a computer simulation of the epithelial tissue in which the global interfacial energy between cells is minimized. Experimental data for both normal cells and mutant cells either lacking or misexpressing the adhesion protein N-cadherin can be explained by a simple model incorporating salient features of morphogenesis that include the timing of N-cadherin expression in cells and its temporal relationship to the remodeling of cell-cell contacts. The simulations reproduce the geometries of wild-type and mutant cells, distinguish features of cadherin dynamics, and emphasize the importance of adhesion protein biogenesis and its timing with respect to cell remodeling. The simulations also indicate that N-cadherin protein is recycled from inactive interfaces to active interfaces, thereby modulating adhesion strengths between cells.

  3. Comprehensive benefit of flood resources utilization through dynamic successive fuzzy evaluation model: A case study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Taking the flood resources utilization in Baicheng, Jilin during 2002–2007 as the research background, and based on the entropy weight and multi-level & multi-objective fuzzy optimization theory, this research established a multi-level & semi-constructive index system and dynamic successive evaluation model for comprehensive benefit evaluation of regional flood resources utilization. With the year 2002 as the base year, the analyzing results showed that there existed a close positive correlation between flood utilization volume and its benefits, comprehensive evaluation value and its comparison increment. Within the six successive evaluation years, the comprehensive benefit of 2003 was the best, in which the benefit evaluation increment reached 82.8% whereas the year of 2004 was the worst, in which the increment was only 18.2%. Thus the sustainability and correctness of the evaluation were verified by six years successive evaluation and increment comparison. The analyzing results showed that the economic benefits, ecological benefits and social benefits of flood utilization were remarkable, and that the comprehensive benefit could be improved by increasing flood utilization capacity, which would promote the regional sustainable development as well. The established dynamic successive evaluation provides a stable theoretical basis and technical support for further flood utilization.

  4. Dynamic force spectroscopy to probe adhesion strength of living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Prechtel, K.; Bausch, A. R.; Marchi-Artzner, V.; Kantlehner, M.; Kessler, H; Merkel, R

    2002-01-01

    We studied the mechanical strength of the adhesion of living cells to model membranes. The latter contained a RGD lipopeptide which is a high affinity binding site for a cell adhesion molecule (integrin alpha(V)beta(3)). Cells adhered specifically to the vesicles. We used micropipette aspiration for breaking this adhesion with well defined forces. Systematic variation of the rate of force application revealed pronounced kinetic effects. The dependence of the detachment forces on the loading r...

  5. Stem cell dynamics in response to nutrient availability

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, Catherine J.; Wang, Lei; Wong, Chihunt; Jones, D. Leanne

    2010-01-01

    When nutrient availability becomes limited, animals must actively adjust their metabolism to allocate limited resources and maintain tissue homeostasis [1–3]. However, it is poorly understood how tissues maintained by adult stem cells respond to chronic changes in metabolism. To begin to address this question, we fed flies a diet lacking protein (protein starvation) and assayed both germline and intestinal stem cells. Our results revealed a decrease in stem cell proliferation and a reduction ...

  6. Dynamic regulation of mitochondrial genome maintenance in germ cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Nagao, Yasumitsu; Endo, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in the development and function of germ cells. Mitochondria contain a maternally inherited genome that should be transmitted to offspring without reactive oxygen species-induced damage during germ line development. Germ cells are also involved in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) bottleneck; thus, the appropriate regulation of mtDNA in these cells is very important for this characteristic transmission. In this review, we focused on unique regulation of the mitocho...

  7. Cell Molecular Dynamics for Cascades (CMDC): A new tool for cascade simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new Molecular Dynamics (MD) scheme for the simulation of cascades: Cell Molecular Dynamics for Cascades (CMDC). It is based on the decomposition of the material in nanometric cells which are added and removed on the fly from the MD simulation and the dynamics of which are treated with a local time step. An acceleration of several orders of magnitude is observed compared to standard calculation. The capacity of the method is demonstrated on the test cases of 60 keV He implantation and self-cascades in iron up to 1.8 MeV

  8. Dynamic monitoring of cell mechanical properties using profile microindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillou, L.; Babataheri, A.; Puech, P.-H.; Barakat, A. I.; Husson, J.

    2016-02-01

    We have developed a simple and relatively inexpensive system to visualize adherent cells in profile while measuring their mechanical properties using microindentation. The setup allows simultaneous control of cell microenvironment by introducing a micropipette for the delivery of soluble factors or other cell types. We validate this technique against atomic force microscopy measurements and, as a proof of concept, measure the viscoelastic properties of vascular endothelial cells in terms of an apparent stiffness and a dimensionless parameter that describes stress relaxation. Furthermore, we use this technique to monitor the time evolution of these mechanical properties as the cells’ actin is depolymerized using cytochalasin-D.

  9. Dynamics of Acute Local Inflammatory Response after Autologous Transplantation of Muscle-Derived Cells into the Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Burdzinska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of myoblasts transplanted into the skeletal muscle die within the first week after injection. Inflammatory response to the intramuscular cell transfer was studied in allogeneic but not in autologous model. The aim of this study was to evaluate immune reaction to autotransplantation of myogenic cells and to assess its dynamics within the first week after injection. Muscle-derived cells or medium alone was injected into the intact skeletal muscles in autologous model. Tissue samples were collected 1, 3, and 7 days after the procedure. Our analysis revealed the peak increase of the gene expression of all evaluated cytokines (Il-1α, Il-1β, Il-6, Tgf-β, and Tnf-α at day 1. The mRNA level of analyzed cytokines normalized in subsequent time points. The increase of Il-β gene expression was further confirmed at the protein level. Analysis of the tissue sections revealed rapid infiltration of injected cell clusters with neutrophils and macrophages. The inflammatory infiltration was almost completely resolved at day 7. The survived cells were able to participate in the muscle regeneration process. Presented results demonstrate that autotransplanted muscle-derived cells induce classical early immune reaction in the site of injection which may contribute to cellular graft elimination.

  10. Preparation, blood coagulation and cell compatibility evaluation of chitosan-graft-polylactide copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Liu, Pei; Liu, Peifeng; Gong, Tao; Li, Suming; Duan, Yourong; Zhang, Zhirong

    2014-02-01

    Biodegradable chitosan-graft-polylactide (PLA-CS) copolymers were prepared by the grafting of a poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) or poly(D-lactide) (PDLA) precursor to the backbone of chitosan using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC ⋅ HCl) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) as a coupling agent. The blood and cell compatibility of the graft copolymers were investigated in comparison to PLLA and PDLA homopolymers. The coagulation properties of PLA-CS were evaluated by hemolysis, plasma recalcification, dynamic blood clotting and protein absorption assays. PLA-CS copolymers present similar hemolysis ratio and plasma recalcification time as PLA, but slower dynamic blood clotting and lower protein absorption. The cell viability was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), agar diffusion and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) experiments. All the samples presented no effect on the viability to cells. Inflammatory cytokine analysis using sandwich ELISAs revealed that PLA-CS would not stimulate inflammatory activity. PMID:24448591

  11. Preparation, blood coagulation and cell compatibility evaluation of chitosan-graft-polylactide copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradable chitosan-graft-polylactide (PLA–CS) copolymers were prepared by the grafting of a poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) or poly(D-lactide) (PDLA) precursor to the backbone of chitosan using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC ⋅ HCl) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) as a coupling agent. The blood and cell compatibility of the graft copolymers were investigated in comparison to PLLA and PDLA homopolymers. The coagulation properties of PLA–CS were evaluated by hemolysis, plasma recalcification, dynamic blood clotting and protein absorption assays. PLA–CS copolymers present similar hemolysis ratio and plasma recalcification time as PLA, but slower dynamic blood clotting and lower protein absorption. The cell viability was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), agar diffusion and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) experiments. All the samples presented no effect on the viability to cells. Inflammatory cytokine analysis using sandwich ELISAs revealed that PLA–CS would not stimulate inflammatory activity. (paper)

  12. Evaluation of a Blade Force Measurement System for a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Using Load Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Rossander

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Unique blade force measurements on an open site straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine have been performed. This paper presents a method for measuring the tangential and normal forces on a 12-kW vertical axis wind turbine prototype with a three-bladed H-rotor. Four single-axis load cells were installed in-between the hub and the support arms on one of the blades. The experimental setup, the measurement principle, together with the necessary control and measurement system are described. The maximum errors of the forces and accompanying weather data that can be obtained with the system are carefully estimated. Measured forces from the four load cells are presented, as well as the normal and tangential forces derived from them and a comparison with theoretical data. The measured torque and bending moment are also provided. The influence of the load cells on the turbine dynamics has also been evaluated. For the aerodynamic normal force, the system provides periodic data in agreement with simulations. Unexpected mechanical oscillations are present in the tangential force, introduced by the turbine dynamics. The measurement errors are of an acceptable size and often depend on the measured variable. Equations are presented for the calculation of measurement errors.

  13. Comparison of a quasi-dynamic and a static extraction method for the cytotoxic evaluation of acrylic bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoess, A; López, A; Engqvist, H; Ott, M Karlsson; Persson, C

    2016-05-01

    In this study, two different extraction approaches were compared in order to evaluate the cytotoxicity of 7 different acrylic bone cements, mainly developed for spinal applications, to osteoblastic cells. Firstly, a static extraction was carried out continuously over 24h, a method widely used in literature. Secondly, a quasi-dynamic extraction method that allowed the investigation of time-dependent cytotoxic effects of curing acrylic bone cements to cells was introduced. In both cases the extraction of the cements was started at a very early stage of the polymerization process to simulate the conditions during clinical application. Data obtained by the quasi-dynamic extraction method suggest that the cytotoxicity of the setting materials mainly originates from the release of toxic components during the first hour of the polymerization reaction. It was also shown that a static extraction over 24h generally represents this initial stage of the curing process. Furthermore, compared to the static extraction, time-dependent cytotoxicity profiles could be detected using the quasi-dynamic extraction method. Specifically, a modification of commercial OsteopalV with castor oil as a plasticizer as well as a customized cement formulation showed clear differences in cytotoxic behavior compared to the other materials during the setting process. In addition, it was observed that unreacted monomer released from the castor oil modified cement was not the main component affecting the toxicity of the material extracts. The quasi-dynamic extraction method is a useful tool to get deeper insight into the cytotoxic potential of curing acrylic bone cements under relevant biological conditions, allowing systematic optimization of materials under development. PMID:26952424

  14. Isotropic averaging for cell-dynamical-system simulation of spinodal decomposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anand Kumar

    2003-07-01

    Formulae have been developed for the isotropic averagings in two and three dimensions. Averagings are employed in the cell-dynamical-system simulation of spinodal decomposition for inter-cell coupling. The averagings used in earlier works on spinodal decomposition have been discussed.

  15. Swimming motility plays a key role in the stochastic dynamics of cell clumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic cell-to-cell interactions are a prerequisite to many biological processes, including development and biofilm formation. Flagellum induced motility has been shown to modulate the initial cell–cell or cell–surface interaction and to contribute to the emergence of macroscopic patterns. While the role of swimming motility in surface colonization has been analyzed in some detail, a quantitative physical analysis of transient interactions between motile cells is lacking. We examined the Brownian dynamics of swimming cells in a crowded environment using a model of motorized adhesive tandem particles. Focusing on the motility and geometry of an exemplary motile bacterium Azospirillum brasilense, which is capable of transient cell–cell association (clumping), we constructed a physical model with proper parameters for the computer simulation of the clumping dynamics. By modulating mechanical interaction (‘stickiness’) between cells and swimming speed, we investigated how equilibrium and active features affect the clumping dynamics. We found that the modulation of active motion is required for the initial aggregation of cells to occur at a realistic time scale. Slowing down the rotation of flagellar motors (and thus swimming speeds) is correlated to the degree of clumping, which is consistent with the experimental results obtained for A. brasilense. (paper)

  16. Daily Emotional Dynamics in Depressed Youth: A Cell Phone Ecological Momentary Assessment Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Jennifer S.; Forbes, Erika E.; Whalen, Diana J.; Jakubcak, Jennifer L.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Ryan, Neal D.; Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Dahl, Ronald E.

    2011-01-01

    This study used a new cell phone ecological momentary assessment approach to investigate daily emotional dynamics in 47 youths with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 32 no-psychopathology controls (CON) (ages 7-17 years). Information about emotional experience in the natural environment was obtained using answer-only cell phones, while MDD…

  17. Coherent dynamics of exciatable coupled beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads P; Petersen, Mette Vesterager; Aslanidi, Oleg

    Propagation of excitation waves through a cluster of insulin-secreting beta-cells (a pancreatic islet of Langerhans) is modelled, and the results are related to recent image analysis experiments.......Propagation of excitation waves through a cluster of insulin-secreting beta-cells (a pancreatic islet of Langerhans) is modelled, and the results are related to recent image analysis experiments....

  18. Flagellar waveform dynamics of freely swimming algal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurtuldu, H.; Tam, D.; Hosoi, A.E.; Johnson, K.A.; Gollub, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    We present quantitative measurements of time-dependent flagellar waveforms for freely swimming biflagellated algal cells, for both synchronous and asynchronous beating. We use the waveforms in conjunction with resistive force theory as well as a singularity method to predict a cell's time-dependent

  19. Phosphorylation dynamics during early differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hoof, Dennis; Muñoz, Javier; Braam, Stefan R;

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells self-renew indefinitely and possess characteristic protein-protein networks that remodel during differentiation. How this occurs is poorly understood. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we analyzed the (phospho)proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) during...

  20. Modelling and Simulation of Fuel Cell Dynamics for Electrical Energy Usage of Hercules Airplanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Radmanesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC with hydrogen storage system for generating part of Hercules airplanes electrical energy is presented. Feasibility of using fuel cell (FC for this airplane is evaluated by means of simulations. Temperature change and dual layer capacity effect are considered in all simulations. Using a three-level 3-phase inverter, FC’s output voltage is connected to the essential bus of the airplane. Moreover, it is possible to connect FC’s output voltage to airplane DC bus alternatively. PID controller is presented to control flow of hydrogen and oxygen to FC and improve transient and steady state responses of the output voltage to load disturbances. FC’s output voltage is regulated via an ultracapacitor. Simulations are carried out via MATLAB/SIMULINK and results show that the load tracking and output voltage regulation are acceptable. The proposed system utilizes an electrolyser to generate hydrogen and a tank for storage. Therefore, there is no need for batteries. Moreover, the generated oxygen could be used in other applications in airplane.

  1. Dynamic regulation of mitochondrial genome maintenance in germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Nagao, Yasumitsu; Endo, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in the development and function of germ cells. Mitochondria contain a maternally inherited genome that should be transmitted to offspring without reactive oxygen species-induced damage during germ line development. Germ cells are also involved in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) bottleneck; thus, the appropriate regulation of mtDNA in these cells is very important for this characteristic transmission. In this review, we focused on unique regulation of the mitochondrial genome in animal germ cells; paternal elimination and the mtDNA bottleneck in females. We also summarized the mitochondrial nucleoid factors involved in various mtDNA regulation pathways. Among them, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), which has pleiotropic and essential roles in mtDNA maintenance, appears to have putative roles in germ cell regulation. PMID:24482608

  2. 动态估价的连续性质%Continuous Properties of Dynamical Evaluations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范胜君; 吴祝武; 胡建华

    2007-01-01

    In studying the problems on evaluations of risky assets and contingent claims, Peng[1] put forward the concept of dynamical evaluation and studied many properties about it. Based on these results, this paper further investigate the continuous properties of dynamical evaluation in the sense of "almost surely".%在研究风险资产和未定权益的定价问题时,彭实戈[1]提出了动态估价的概念并研究了它的很多性质.在这些结果的基础上,本文进一步研究了动态估价在几乎处处意义下的一些连续性质.

  3. Ca-alginate hydrogel mechanical transformations--the influence on yeast cell growth dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajić-Lijaković, Ivana; Plavsić, Milenko; Bugarski, Branko; Nedović, Viktor

    2007-05-01

    A mathematical model was formulated to describe yeast cell growth within the Ca-alginate microbead during air-lift bioreactor cultivation. Model development was based on experimentally obtained data for the intra-bead cell concentration profile, after reached the equilibrium state, as well as, total yeast cell concentration per microbed and microbead volume as function of time. Relatively uniform cell concentration in the carrier matrix indicated that no internal nutrient diffusion limitations, but microenvironmental restriction, affected dominantly the dynamics of cell growth. Also interesting phenomenon of very different rates of cell number growth during cultivation is observed. After some critical time, the growth rate of cell colonies decreased drastically, but than suddenly increased again under all other experimental condition been the same. It is interpreted as disintegration of gel network and opening new free space for growth of cell clusters. These complex phenomena are modeled using the thermodynamical, free energy formalism. The particular form of free energy functional is proposed to describe various kinds of interactions, which affected the dynamics of cell growth and cause pseudo-phase transition of hydrogel. The good agreement of experimentally obtained data and model predictions are obtained. In that way the model provides both, the quantitative tools for further technological optimization of the process and deeper insight into dynamics of cell growth mechanism. PMID:17331608

  4. Jamming dynamics of stretch-induced surfactant release by alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arnab; Arold, Stephen P; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Suki, Béla

    2012-03-01

    Secretion of pulmonary surfactant by alveolar epithelial type II cells is vital for the reduction of interfacial surface tension, thus preventing lung collapse. To study secretion dynamics, rat alveolar epithelial type II cells were cultured on elastic membranes and cyclically stretched. The amounts of phosphatidylcholine, the primary lipid component of surfactant, inside and outside the cells, were measured using radiolabeled choline. During and immediately after stretch, cells secreted less surfactant than unstretched cells; however, stretched cells secreted significantly more surfactant than unstretched cells after an extended lag period. We developed a model based on the hypothesis that stretching leads to jamming of surfactant traffic escaping the cell, similar to vehicular traffic jams. In the model, stretch increases surfactant transport from the interior to the exterior of the cell. This transport is mediated by a surface layer with a finite capacity due to the limited number of fusion pores through which secretion occurs. When the amount of surfactant in the surface layer approaches this capacity, interference among lamellar bodies carrying surfactant reduces the rate of secretion, effectively creating a jam. When the stretch stops, the jam takes an extended time to clear, and subsequently the amount of secreted surfactant increases. We solved the model analytically and show that its dynamics are consistent with experimental observations, implying that surfactant secretion is a fundamentally nonlinear process with memory representing collective behavior at the level of single cells. Our results thus highlight the importance of a jamming dynamics in stretch-induced cellular secretory processes. PMID:22033531

  5. Single Molecule Spectroelectrochemistry of Interfacial Charge Transfer Dynamics In Hybrid Organic Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Shanlin [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2014-11-16

    Our research under support of this DOE grant is focused on applied and fundamental aspects of model organic solar cell systems. Major accomplishments are: 1) we developed a spectroelectorchemistry technique of single molecule single nanoparticle method to study charge transfer between conjugated polymers and semiconductor at the single molecule level. The fluorescence of individual fluorescent polymers at semiconductor surfaces was shown to exhibit blinking behavior compared to molecules on glass substrates. Single molecule fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements showed the conformation of the polymer molecules did not differ appreciably between glass and semiconductor substrates. The similarities in molecular conformation suggest that the observed differences in blinking activity are due to charge transfer between fluorescent polymer and semiconductor, which provides additional pathways between states of high and low fluorescence quantum efficiency. Similar spectroelectrochemistry work has been done for small organic dyes for understand their charge transfer dynamics on various substrates and electrochemical environments; 2) We developed a method of transferring semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets into organic solvent for a potential electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells which employed polymer semiconductor as the electron donor. Electron transfer from the polymer semiconductor to semiconductor and GO in solutions and thin films was established through fluorescence spectroscopy and electroluminescence measurements. Solar cells containing these materials were constructed and evaluated using transient absorption spectroscopy and dynamic fluorescence techniques to understand the charge carrier generation and recombination events; 3) We invented a spectroelectorchemistry technique using light scattering and electroluminescence for rapid size determination and studying electrochemistry of single NPs in an

  6. Flagellar waveform dynamics of freely swimming algal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtuldu, H.; Tam, D.; Hosoi, A. E.; Johnson, K. A.; Gollub, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    We present quantitative measurements of time-dependent flagellar waveforms for freely swimming biflagellated algal cells, for both synchronous and asynchronous beating. We use the waveforms in conjunction with resistive force theory as well as a singularity method to predict a cell's time-dependent velocity for comparison with experiments. While net propulsion is thought to arise from asymmetry between the power and recovery strokes, we show that hydrodynamic interactions between the flagella and cell body on the return stroke make an important contribution to enhance net forward motion.

  7. Single-cell gene expression profiling and cell state dynamics: collecting data, correlating data points and connecting the dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Carsten; Zhou, Joseph X; Huang, Sui

    2016-06-01

    Single-cell analyses of transcript and protein expression profiles-more precisely, single-cell resolution analysis of molecular profiles of cell populations-have now entered the center stage with widespread applications of single-cell qPCR, single-cell RNA-Seq and CyTOF. These high-dimensional population snapshot techniques are complemented by low-dimensional time-resolved, microscopy-based monitoring methods. Both fronts of advance have exposed a rich heterogeneity of cell states within uniform cell populations in many biological contexts, producing a new kind of data that has triggered computational analysis methods for data visualization, dimensionality reduction, and cluster (subpopulation) identification. The next step is now to go beyond collecting data and correlating data points: to connect the dots, that is, to understand what actually underlies the identified data patterns. This entails interpreting the 'clouds of points' in state space as a manifestation of the underlying molecular regulatory network. In that way control of cell state dynamics can be formalized as a quasi-potential landscape, as first proposed by Waddington. We summarize key methods of data acquisition and computational analysis and explain the principles that link the single-cell resolution measurements to dynamical systems theory. PMID:27152696

  8. Classifying the expansion kinetics and critical surface dynamics of growing cell populations

    OpenAIRE

    Block, M; Schoell, E.; Drasdo, D.

    2006-01-01

    Based on a cellular automaton model the growth kinetics and the critical surface dynamics of cell monolayers is systematically studied by variation of the cell migration activity, the size of the proliferation zone and the cell cycle time distribution over wide ranges. The model design avoids lattice artifacts and ensures high performance. The monolayer expansion velocity derived from our simulations can be interpreted as a generalization of the velocity relationship for a traveling front in ...

  9. Mammalian Fat1 cadherin regulates actin dynamics and cell–cell contact

    OpenAIRE

    Tanoue, Takuji; Takeichi, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    Fat cadherins form a distinct subfamily of the cadherin gene superfamily, and are featured by their unusually large extracellular domain. In this work, we investigated the function of a mammalian Fat cadherin. Fat1 was localized at filopodial tips, lamellipodial edges, and cell–cell boundaries, overlapping with dynamic actin structures. RNA interference–mediated knockdown of Fat1 resulted in disorganization of cell junction–associated F-actin and other actin fibers/cables, disturbance of cell...

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell under transient automotive operations

    OpenAIRE

    Choopanya, Pattarapong

    2016-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is probably the most promising technology that will replace conventional internal combustion engines in the near future. As a primary power source for an automobile, the transient performance of a PEM fuel cell is of prime importance. In this thesis, a comprehensive, three-dimensional, two-phase, multi-species computational fuel cell dynamics model is developed in order to investigate the effect of flow-field design on the magnitude of current ov...

  11. Numerical Simulation of Dynamic Performance of the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于立军; 袁俊琪; 曾广益; 姜秀民

    2004-01-01

    A three dimension of dynamic mathematical model of the molten carbonate fuel cell is established,in which the heat generation, mass transfer and electrochemical characteristics are described. The performance of the fuel cell including the distributions of the temperature and the velocity is predicted numerically. Then the experimental data including the output performance of the fuel cell generation system and the temperature distributions are compared. The numerical results are in agreement with the experiment results.

  12. A Model Combining Oscillations and Attractor Dynamics for Generation of Grid Cell Firing

    OpenAIRE

    Michael E Hasselmo; Brandon, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Different models have been able to account for different features of the data on grid cell firing properties, including the relationship of grid cells to cellular properties and network oscillations. This paper describes a model that combines elements of two major classes of models of grid cells: models using interference of oscillations and models using attractor dynamics. This model includes a population of units with oscillatory input representing input from the medial septum. These units ...

  13. Penium margaritaceum: A Unicellular Model Organism for Studying Plant Cell Wall Architecture and Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Domozych, David S

    2014-01-01

    Penium margaritaceum is a new and valuable unicellular model organism for studying plant cell wall structure and developmental dynamics. This charophyte has a cell wall composition remarkably similar to the primary cell wall of many higher plants and clearly-defined inclusive zones containing specific polymers. Penium has a simple cylindrical phenotype with a distinct region of focused wall synthesis. Specific polymers, particularly pectins, can be identified using monoclonal antibodies rais...

  14. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation -- DWPF Late Wash Facility, Salt Process Cell and Chemical Process Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Nuclear Waste will be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for long term storage and disposal. This is a nuclear criticality safety evaluation for the Late Wash Facility (LWF), the Salt Processing Cell (SPC) and the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). of the DWPF. Waste salt solution is processed in the Tank Farm In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process and is then further washed in the DWPF Late Wash Facility (LWF) before it is fed to the DWPF Salt Processing Cell. In the Salt Processing Cell the precipitate slurry is processed in the Precipitate Reactor (PR) and the resultant Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) produce is combined with the sludge feed and frit in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell to produce a melter feed. The waste is finally immobilized in the Melt Cell. Material in the Tank Farm and the ITP and Extended Sludge processes have been shown to be safe against a nuclear criticality by others. The precipitate slurry feed from ITP and the first six batches of sludge feed are safe against a nuclear criticality and this evaluation demonstrates that the processes in the LWF, the SPC and the CPC do not alter the characteristics of the materials to compromise safety

  15. Dynamic expression of T-bet and GATA3 by regulatory T cells maintains immune tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Fang; Sharma, Suveena; Edwards, Julie; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Zhu, Jinfang

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells can express the transcription factors T-bet and GATA3 but the function of this expression and whether such cells represent stable subsets is still unknown. By using multiple reporter tools, we show that the expression of T-bet and GATA3 in Treg cells is dynamically influenced by the cytokine environment. Treg cell-specific deletion of either Tbx21 or Gata3 genes singly did not result in loss of Treg cell functions; however, mice with combined deficiency of both genes...

  16. Application of Computer Systems of Dynamic Modeling for Evaluation of Protection Behavior of Electric Power Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Romaniouk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems pertaining to mathematical modeling of a transformer substation with protected electric power lines. It is proposed to use systems of dynamic modeling for investigations applying a method of calculative experiment with the purpose to evaluate behavior of protection and automation at short circuits. The paper contains comparison of results obtained with the help of program-simulated complex on the basis of a complex mathematical model of an object and with the help of dynamic modeling system – MathLab.

  17. Full-scale Mark II CRT program: dynamic response evaluation test of pressure transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dynamic response evaluation test of pressure transducers was conducted in support of the JAERI Full-Scale Mark II CRT (Containment Response Test) Program. The test results indicated that certain of the cavity-type transducers used in the early blowdown test had undesirable response characteristics. The transducer mounting scheme was modified to avoid trapping of air bubbles in the pressure transmission tubing attached to the transducers. The dynamic response of the modified transducers was acceptable within the frequency range of 200 Hz. (author)

  18. National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC); (NREL) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer; Sprik, Sam

    2014-03-11

    This presentation gives an overview of the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC), describes how NFCTEC benefits the hydrogen and fuel cell community, and introduces a new fuel cell cost/price aggregation project.

  19. Dynamics of surfactant release in alveolar type II cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haller, Thomas; Ortmayr, Jörg; Friedrich, Franz; Völkl, Harald; Dietl, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, secreted via exocytosis of lamellar bodies (LB) by alveolar type II (AT II) cells, maintains low alveolar surface tension and is therefore essential for normal lung function. Here we describe real-time monitoring of exocytotic activity in these cells by visualizing and quantifying LB fusion with the plasma membrane (PM). Two approaches were used. First, fluorescence of LysoTracker Green DND-26 (LTG) in LB disappeared when the dye was released after exocytosis. Second, ph...

  20. Dynamical complexity and temporal plasticity in pancreatic -cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richard Bertram; Arthur Sherman

    2000-06-01

    We discuss some of the biological and mathematical issues involved in understanding and modelling the bursting electrical activity in pancreatic -cells. These issues include single-cell versus islet behaviour, parameter heterogeneity, channel noise, the effects of hormones, neurotransmitters, and ions, and multiple slow biophysical processes. Some of the key experimental and modelling studies are described, and some of the major open questions are discussed.

  1. Development and Experimental Evaluation of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Castle, Charles H.; Burke, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    To provide uniform cooling for a fuel cell stack, a cooling plate concept was evaluated. This concept utilized thin cooling plates to extract heat from the interior of a fuel cell stack and move this heat to a cooling manifold where it can be transferred to an external cooling fluid. The advantages of this cooling approach include a reduced number of ancillary components and the ability to directly utilize an external cooling fluid loop for cooling the fuel cell stack. A number of different types of cooling plates and manifolds were developed. The cooling plates consisted of two main types; a plate based on thermopyrolytic graphite (TPG) and a planar (or flat plate) heat pipe. The plates, along with solid metal control samples, were tested for both thermal and electrical conductivity. To transfer heat from the cooling plates to the cooling fluid, a number of manifold designs utilizing various materials were devised, constructed, and tested. A key aspect of the manifold was that it had to be electrically nonconductive so it would not short out the fuel cell stack during operation. Different manifold and cooling plate configurations were tested in a vacuum chamber to minimize convective heat losses. Cooling plates were placed in the grooves within the manifolds and heated with surface-mounted electric pad heaters. The plate temperature and its thermal distribution were recorded for all tested combinations of manifold cooling flow rates and heater power loads. This testing simulated the performance of the cooling plates and manifold within an operational fuel cell stack. Different types of control valves and control schemes were tested and evaluated based on their ability to maintain a constant temperature of the cooling plates. The control valves regulated the cooling fluid flow through the manifold, thereby controlling the heat flow to the cooling fluid. Through this work, a cooling plate and manifold system was developed that could maintain the cooling plates

  2. Dynamic behavior of gasoline fuel cell electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, William; Bowers, Brian J.; Garnier, Christophe; Boudjemaa, Fabien

    As we begin the 21st century, society is continuing efforts towards finding clean power sources and alternative forms of energy. In the automotive sector, reduction of pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions from the power plant is one of the main objectives of car manufacturers and innovative technologies are under active consideration to achieve this goal. One technology that has been proposed and vigorously pursued in the past decade is the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an electrochemical device that reacts hydrogen with oxygen to produce water, electricity and heat. Since today there is no existing extensive hydrogen infrastructure and no commercially viable hydrogen storage technology for vehicles, there is a continuing debate as to how the hydrogen for these advanced vehicles will be supplied. In order to circumvent the above issues, power systems based on PEM fuel cells can employ an on-board fuel processor that has the ability to convert conventional fuels such as gasoline into hydrogen for the fuel cell. This option could thereby remove the fuel infrastructure and storage issues. However, for these fuel processor/fuel cell vehicles to be commercially successful, issues such as start time and transient response must be addressed. This paper discusses the role of transient response of the fuel processor power plant and how it relates to the battery sizing for a gasoline fuel cell vehicle. In addition, results of fuel processor testing from a current Renault/Nuvera Fuel Cells project are presented to show the progress in transient performance.

  3. Mechanical Model of Geometric Cell and Topological Algorithm for Cell Dynamics from Single-Cell to Formation of Monolayered Tissues with Pattern

    KAUST Repository

    Kachalo, Sëma

    2015-05-14

    Geometric and mechanical properties of individual cells and interactions among neighboring cells are the basis of formation of tissue patterns. Understanding the complex interplay of cells is essential for gaining insight into embryogenesis, tissue development, and other emerging behavior. Here we describe a cell model and an efficient geometric algorithm for studying the dynamic process of tissue formation in 2D (e.g. epithelial tissues). Our approach improves upon previous methods by incorporating properties of individual cells as well as detailed description of the dynamic growth process, with all topological changes accounted for. Cell size, shape, and division plane orientation are modeled realistically. In addition, cell birth, cell growth, cell shrinkage, cell death, cell division, cell collision, and cell rearrangements are now fully accounted for. Different models of cell-cell interactions, such as lateral inhibition during the process of growth, can be studied in detail. Cellular pattern formation for monolayered tissues from arbitrary initial conditions, including that of a single cell, can also be studied in detail. Computational efficiency is achieved through the employment of a special data structure that ensures access to neighboring cells in constant time, without additional space requirement. We have successfully generated tissues consisting of more than 20,000 cells starting from 2 cells within 1 hour. We show that our model can be used to study embryogenesis, tissue fusion, and cell apoptosis. We give detailed study of the classical developmental process of bristle formation on the epidermis of D. melanogaster and the fundamental problem of homeostatic size control in epithelial tissues. Simulation results reveal significant roles of solubility of secreted factors in both the bristle formation and the homeostatic control of tissue size. Our method can be used to study broad problems in monolayered tissue formation. Our software is publicly

  4. Dynamic three-dimensional micropatterned cell co-cultures within photocurable and chemically degradable hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Shinji; Cha, Jae Min; Yanagawa, Fumiki; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we report on the development of dynamically controlled three-dimensional (3D) micropatterned cellular co-cultures within photocurable and chemically degradable hydrogels. Specifically, we generated dynamic co-cultures of micropatterned murine embryonic stem (mES) cells with human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells within 3D hydrogels. HepG2 cells were used due to their ability to direct the differentiation of mES cells through secreted paracrine factors. To generate dynamic co-cultures, mES cells were first encapsulated within micropatterned photocurable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. These micropatterned cell-laden PEG hydrogels were subsequently surrounded by calcium alginate (Ca-Alg) hydrogels containing HepG2 cells. After 4 days, the co-culture step was halted by exposing the system to sodium citrate solution, which removed the alginate gels and the encapsulated HepG2 cells. The encapsulated mES cells were then maintained in the resulting cultures for 16 days and cardiac differentiation was analysed. We observed that the mES cells that were exposed to HepG2 cells in the co-cultures generated cells with higher expression of cardiac genes and proteins, as well as increased spontaneous beating. Due to its ability to control the 3D microenvironment of cells in a spatially and temporally regulated manner, the method presented in this study is useful for a range of cell-culture applications related to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24170301

  5. Solid-State NMR on bacterial cells: selective cell wall signal enhancement and resolution improvement using dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for the study of material surfaces. In this study, we demonstrate its potential to investigate cell surface in intact cells. Using Bacillus subtilis bacterial cells as an example, it is shown that the polarizing agent 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL) has a strong binding affinity to cell wall polymers (peptidoglycan). This particular interaction is thoroughly investigated with a systematic study on extracted cell wall materials, disrupted cells, and entire cells, which proved that TOTAPOL is mainly accumulating in the cell wall. This property is used on one hand to selectively enhance or suppress cell wall signals by controlling radical concentrations and on the other hand to improve spectral resolution by means of a difference spectrum. Comparing DNP-enhanced and conventional solid-state NMR, an absolute sensitivity ratio of 24 was obtained on the entire cell sample. This important increase in sensitivity together with the possibility of enhancing specifically cell wall signals and improving resolution really opens new avenues for the use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR as an on-cell investigation tool. (authors)

  6. Lipid tethering of breast tumor cells enables real-time imaging of free-floating cell dynamics and drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Kristi R; Andorko, James I; Whipple, Rebecca A; Zhang, Peipei; Sooklal, Elisabeth L; Martin, Stuart S; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    Free-floating tumor cells located in the blood of cancer patients, known as circulating tumor cells (CTCs), have become key targets for studying metastasis. However, effective strategies to study the free-floating behavior of tumor cells in vitro have been a major barrier limiting the understanding of the functional properties of CTCs. Upon extracellular-matrix (ECM) detachment, breast tumor cells form tubulin-based protrusions known as microtentacles (McTNs) that play a role in the aggregation and re-attachment of tumor cells to increase their metastatic efficiency. In this study, we have designed a strategy to spatially immobilize ECM-detached tumor cells while maintaining their free-floating character. We use polyelectrolyte multilayers deposited on microfluidic substrates to prevent tumor cell adhesion and the addition of lipid moieties to tether tumor cells to these surfaces through interactions with the cell membranes. This coating remains optically clear, allowing capture of high-resolution images and videos of McTNs on viable free-floating cells. In addition, we show that tethering allows for the real-time analysis of McTN dynamics on individual tumor cells and in response to tubulin-targeting drugs. The ability to image detached tumor cells can vastly enhance our understanding of CTCs under conditions that better recapitulate the microenvironments they encounter during metastasis. PMID:26871289

  7. Lipid tethering of breast tumor cells enables real-time imaging of free-floating cell dynamics and drug response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Rebecca A.; Zhang, Peipei; Sooklal, Elisabeth L.; Martin, Stuart S.; Jewell, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Free-floating tumor cells located in the blood of cancer patients, known as circulating tumor cells (CTCs), have become key targets for studying metastasis. However, effective strategies to study the free-floating behavior of tumor cells in vitro have been a major barrier limiting the understanding of the functional properties of CTCs. Upon extracellular-matrix (ECM) detachment, breast tumor cells form tubulin-based protrusions known as microtentacles (McTNs) that play a role in the aggregation and re-attachment of tumor cells to increase their metastatic efficiency. In this study, we have designed a strategy to spatially immobilize ECM-detached tumor cells while maintaining their free-floating character. We use polyelectrolyte multilayers deposited on microfluidic substrates to prevent tumor cell adhesion and the addition of lipid moieties to tether tumor cells to these surfaces through interactions with the cell membranes. This coating remains optically clear, allowing capture of high-resolution images and videos of McTNs on viable free-floating cells. In addition, we show that tethering allows for the real-time analysis of McTN dynamics on individual tumor cells and in response to tubulin-targeting drugs. The ability to image detached tumor cells can vastly enhance our understanding of CTCs under conditions that better recapitulate the microenvironments they encounter during metastasis. PMID:26871289

  8. Reversibility, Water-Mediated Switching, and Directed Cell Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    J. C. Phillips

    2008-01-01

    Reversible switching of the complex network dynamics of proteins is mimicked in selected network glasses and compacted small carbohydrate molecules. Protein transitions occur on long time scales ~ us -ms, evocative of the exponentially large viscosities found in glass-forming supercooled liquids just above the glass transition; in searching for mechanisms for reversibly slowed "geared activation", Kauzmann was led from proteins to glasses. I show here that selected network glasses and small c...

  9. A polarised population of dynamic microtubules mediates homeostatic length control in animal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remigio Picone

    Full Text Available Because physical form and function are intimately linked, mechanisms that maintain cell shape and size within strict limits are likely to be important for a wide variety of biological processes. However, while intrinsic controls have been found to contribute to the relatively well-defined shape of bacteria and yeast cells, the extent to which individual cells from a multicellular animal control their plastic form remains unclear. Here, using micropatterned lines to limit cell extension to one dimension, we show that cells spread to a characteristic steady-state length that is independent of cell size, pattern width, and cortical actin. Instead, homeostatic length control on lines depends on a population of dynamic microtubules that lead during cell extension, and that are aligned along the long cell axis as the result of interactions of microtubule plus ends with the lateral cell cortex. Similarly, during the development of the zebrafish neural tube, elongated neuroepithelial cells maintain a relatively well-defined length that is independent of cell size but dependent upon oriented microtubules. A simple, quantitative model of cellular extension driven by microtubules recapitulates cell elongation on lines, the steady-state distribution of microtubules, and cell length homeostasis, and predicts the effects of microtubule inhibitors on cell length. Together this experimental and theoretical analysis suggests that microtubule dynamics impose unexpected limits on cell geometry that enable cells to regulate their length. Since cells are the building blocks and architects of tissue morphogenesis, such intrinsically defined limits may be important for development and homeostasis in multicellular organisms.

  10. Cell Sorting of Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells from the Adult Mouse Subventricular Zone and Live-imaging of their Cell Cycle Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daynac, Mathieu; Morizur, Lise; Kortulewski, Thierry; Gauthier, Laurent R; Ruat, Martial; Mouthon, Marc-André; Boussin, François D

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles (SVZ) sustain olfactory neurogenesis throughout life in the mammalian brain. They successively generate transit amplifying cells (TACs) and neuroblasts that differentiate into neurons once they integrate the olfactory bulbs. Emerging fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) techniques have allowed the isolation of NSCs as well as their progeny and have started to shed light on gene regulatory networks in adult neurogenic niches. We report here a cell sorting technique that allows to follow and distinguish the cell cycle dynamics of the above-mentioned cell populations from the adult SVZ with a LeX/EGFR/CD24 triple staining. Isolated cells are then plated as adherent cells to explore in details their cell cycle progression by time-lapse video microscopy. To this end, we use transgenic Fluorescence Ubiquitination Cell Cycle Indicator (FUCCI) mice in which cells are red-fluorescent during G1 phase due to a G1 specific red-Cdt1 reporter. This method has recently revealed that proliferating NSCs progressively lengthen their G1 phase during aging, leading to neurogenesis impairment. This method is easily transposable to other systems and could be of great interest for the study of the cell cycle dynamics of brain cells in the context of brain pathologies. PMID:26436641

  11. A study on dynamic evaluation methods for human-machine interfaces in advanced control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive efforts have been performed to reveal factors that largely affect to the safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Among them, human factors were known as a dominant cause of a severe accident, such as Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents. Thus a lot of efforts to resolve human factors related problems have been spent, and one of these efforts is an advanced control room (ACR) design to enhance human performance and the safety of NPPs. There are two important trends in the design of ACRs. The first one is increasing automation level, and the second one is the development of computer based compact workstations for control room operations including intelligent operator aid systems. However, several problems have been reported when another factors are not properly incorporated into the design of ACRs. Among them, one of the most important factors that significantly affect to operator performance is the design of human machine interfaces (HMIs). Thus, HMI evaluation should be emphasized to ensure appropriateness of HMI designs and the safety of NPPs. In general, two kinds of evaluations have been frequently used to assess appropriateness of the proposed HMI design. The one is the static evaluation and the other is the dynamic evaluation. Here, the static evaluation is the one based on guidelines that are extracted from various researches on HMI designs. And the dynamic evaluation generally attempts to evaluate and predict human performance through a model that can describe cognitive behaviors of human or interactions between HMIs and human. However, the static evaluation seems to be inappropriate because it can't properly capture context of task environment that strongly affects to human performance. In addition, in case of dynamic evaluations, development of a model that can sufficiently describe interactions or cognitive behaviors of human operators is very arduous and laborious. To overcome these problems, dynamic evaluation methods that can

  12. Analysis of dynamic requirements for fuel cell systems for vehicle applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischinger, Stefan; Schönfelder, Carsten; Ogrzewalla, Jürgen

    Conventional vehicles with internal combustion engines, as well as battery powered electric vehicles, achieve one of the most important customer requirements; achieving extremely short response times to load changes. Also, fast acceleration times from a cold start to full power in the range of seconds are practicable. New fuel cell-based propulsion systems, as well as auxiliary power units, have to fulfill the same demands to become competitive. This includes heating-up the system to operating temperature as well as the control strategy for start-up. An additional device to supply starting air is necessary, if the compressor motor can only be operated with fuel cell voltage. Since the system components (for example, the air supply or the fuel supply) are not mechanically coupled, as is the case with conventional internal combustion engines, these components have to be controlled by different sensors and actuators. This can be an advantage in optimizing the system, but it also can represent an additional challenge. This paper describes the fuel cell system requirements regarding transient operation and their dependence on system structure. In particular, the requirements for peripheral components such as air supply, fuel supply and the balance of heat in a fuel cell system are examined. Furthermore, the paper outlines the necessity of an electric storage device and its resultant capacity, which will enable faster load changes. Acceleration and deceleration of the vehicle are accomplished through the use of the electric storage device, while the fuel cell system only has to deliver the mean power consumption without higher load peaks. On the basis of system simulation, different concepts are evaluated for use as a propulsion system or APU and, then, critical components are identified. The effects of advanced control strategies regarding the dynamic behavior of the system are demonstrated. Technically, a fuel cell system could be a viable propulsion system alternative

  13. Lipid body accumulation alters calcium signaling dynamics in immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greineisen, William E.; Speck, Mark; Shimoda, Lori M.N.; Sung, Carl; Phan, Nolwenn; Maaetoft-Udsen, Kristina; Stokes, Alexander J.; Turner, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is well-established variability in the numbers of lipid bodies (LB) in macrophages, eosinophils, and neutrophils. Similarly to the steatosis observed in adipocytes and hepatocytes during hyperinsulinemia and nutrient overload, immune cell LB hyper-accumulate in response to bacterial and parasitic infection and inflammatory presentations. Recently we described that hyperinsulinemia, both in vitro and in vivo, drives steatosis and phenotypic changes in primary and transformed mast cells and basophils. LB reach high numbers in these steatotic cytosols, and here we propose that they could dramatically impact the transcytoplasmic signaling pathways. We compared calcium release and influx responses at the population and single cell level in normal and steatotic model mast cells. At the population level, all aspects of FcεRI-dependent calcium mobilization, as well as activation of calcium-dependent downstream signalling targets such as NFATC1 phosphorylation are suppressed. At the single cell level, we demonstrate that LB are both sources and sinks of calcium following FcεRI cross-linking. Unbiased analysis of the impact of the presence of LB on the rate of trans-cytoplasmic calcium signals suggest that LB enrichment accelerates calcium propagation, which may reflect a Bernoulli effect. LB abundance thus impacts this fundamental signalling pathway and its downstream targets. PMID:25016314

  14. A stochastic model of epigenetic dynamics in somatic cell reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max eFloettmann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Somatic cell reprogramming has dramatically changed stem cell research inrecent years. The high pace of new findings in the field and an ever increasingamount of data from new high throughput techniques make it challengingto isolate core principles of the process. In order to analyze suchmechanisms, we developed an abstract mechanistic model of a subset of theknown regulatory processes during cell differentiation and production of inducedpluripotent stem cells. This probabilistic Boolean network describesthe interplay between gene expression, chromatin modifications and DNAmethylation. The model incorporates recent findings in epigenetics and reproducesexperimentally observed reprogramming efficiencies and changes inmethylation and chromatin remodeling. It enables us to investigate in detail,how the temporal progression of the process is regulated. It also explicitlyincludes the transduction of factors using viral vectors and their silencing inreprogrammed cells, since this is still a standard procedure in somatic cellreprogramming. Based on the model we calculate an epigenetic landscape.Simulation results show good reproduction of experimental observations duringreprogramming, despite the simple stucture of the model. An extensiveanalysis and introduced variations hint towards possible optimizations of theprocess, that could push the technique closer to clinical applications. Fasterchanges in DNA methylation increase the speed of reprogramming at theexpense of efficiency, while accelerated chromatin modifications moderatelyimprove efficiency.

  15. A model combining oscillations and attractor dynamics for generation of grid cell firing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hasselmo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Different models have been able to account for different features of the data on grid cell firing properties, including the relationship of grid cells to cellular properties and network oscillations. This paper describes a model that combines elements of two major classes of models of grid cells: models using interference of oscillations and models using attractor dynamics. This model includes a population of units with oscillatory input representing input from the medial septum. These units are termed heading angle cells because their connectivity depends upon heading angle in the environment as well as the spatial phase coded by the cell. These cells project to a population of grid cells. The sum of the heading angle input results in standing waves of circularly symmetric input to the grid cell population. Feedback from the grid cell population increases the activity of subsets of the heading angle cells, resulting in the network settling into activity patterns that resemble the patterns of firing fields in a population of grid cells. The properties of heading angle cells firing as conjunctive grid-by-head-direction cells can shift the grid cell firing according to movement velocity. The pattern of interaction of oscillations requires use of separate populations that fire on alternate cycles of the net theta rhythmic input to grid cells, similar to recent neurophysiological data on theta cycle skipping in medial entorhinal cortex.

  16. A Study of Developing a System Dynamics Model for the Learning Effectiveness Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Syung Lan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used the research method of system dynamics and applied the Vensim software to develop a learning effectiveness evaluation model. This study developed four cause-and-effect chains affecting learning effectiveness, including teachers’ teaching enthusiasm, family involvement, school’s implementation of scientific activities, and creative teaching method, as well as the system dynamics model based on the four cause-and-effect chains. Based on the developed system dynamic model, this study performed simulation to investigate the relationship among family involvement, learning effectiveness, teaching achievement, creative teaching method, and students’ learning interest. The results of this study verified that there are positive correlations between family involvement and students’ learning effectiveness, as well as students’ learning effectiveness and teachers’ teaching achievements. The results also indicated that the use of creative teaching method is able to increase students’ learning interest and learning achievement.

  17. 周围型非小细胞肺癌间质内纤维化与CT动态增强廓清参数相关性研究%Non-small cell lung cancer: evaluation of the relationship between fibrosis and washout feature at dynamic contrast enhanced CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶晓丹; 袁正; 叶剑定; 李惠民; 朱玉兆; 张顺民; 刘士远; 肖湘生

    2010-01-01

    目的 评价周围型非小细胞肺癌MSCT廓清参数与肿瘤内部纤维化程度的相关性.方法 用16层CT扫描机对肺癌行平扫和增强后20、30、45、60、75、90、120、180、300、540、720、900和1200 s 13个序列扫描,非离子型对比剂以4 ml/s的流率从肘静脉注入,注射量为420 mg I/kg.分别计算20 min的廓清值、廓清率和廓清率线性斜率等参数.用肺癌间质内弹力纤维和胶原纤维双染色法,对肺癌内部纤维化程度进行分级,分析肺癌组织间质内纤维化程度与各参数的相关性.用非参数统计方法Spearman等级相关分析法分析各参数与肺癌间质纤维化程度的相关性.结果 共获得29个肺癌病灶的廓清参数值和间质纤维化分级资料,其中纤维化分级Ⅰ级10个病灶,Ⅱ级14个,Ⅲ级5个,20 min廓清值为12.1(0.32~58.0)HU,20 min廓清率中位数为15.3%(0.3%~39.2%),20 min廓清率线性斜率中位数为0.0152%/s(0.0007%/s~0.0561%/s).相关性分析发现20 min的廓清值(r=-0.402,P<0.05)、廓清率(r=-0.372,P<0.05)和廓清率线性斜率(r=-0.459,P<0.05)与肺癌中纤维化程度有相关性.结论 非小细胞肺癌间质内纤维化程度影响CT对比剂廓清.%Objective To correlate dynamic parameters at contrast enhanced CT and interstitial fibrosis grade of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Twenty-nine patients with NSCLC were evaluated by multi-slice CT. Images were obtained before and at 20,30,45,60,75,90,120,180,300,540,720,900 and 1200 s after the injection of contrast media, which was administered at a rate of 4 ml/s for a total of 420 mg I/kg body weight. Washout parameters were calculated. Lung cancer specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin stain and collagen and elastica double stain. Spearman test was made to analyze correlation between dynamic parameters and interstitial fibrosis grade of tumor. Results Twentynine NSCLC demonstrated washout at 20 min 12. 1 (0. 32-58.0 ) HU, washout ratio

  18. Dynamic imaging for CAR-T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami-Shahri, Nia; Papa, Sophie

    2016-04-15

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy is entering the mainstream for the treatment of CD19(+)cancers. As is does we learn more about resistance to therapy and the role, risks and management of toxicity. In solid tumour CAR therapy research the route to the clinic is less smooth with a wealth of challenges facing translating this, potentially hugely valuable, therapeutic option for patients. As we strive to understand our successes, and navigate the challenges, having a clear understanding of how adoptively transferred CAR-T-cells behavein vivoand in human trials is invaluable. Harnessing reporter gene imaging to enable detection and tracking of small numbers of CAR-T-cells after adoptive transfer is one way by which we can accomplish this. The compatibility of certain reporter gene systems with tracers available routinely in the clinic makes this approach highly useful for future appraisal of CAR-T-cell success in humans. PMID:27068944

  19. Experimental investigation of dynamic responses of a transparent PEM fuel cell to step changes in cell current density with operating temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic responses of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) are closely related to the novel water management technique used for the efficient operation of automotive PEMFCs. In order to better understand the dynamic water transport during cell transients, this paper presents an experimental investigation of the transient response of a cell under fully humidified conditions. The cell dynamic performance was measured by employing a transparent cell and investigated with visualization images of the water distribution in the flow channels. Furthermore, the effect of the operating temperature on the cell transients was examined. The results show that the cell dynamic behavior for the tested operating temperature (30-50 .deg. C) conditions is mainly governed by water transport characteristics related to cathode flooding. Also, we show that the time needed for the cell to reach steady-state after a current density step increase is retarded due to excessive water accumulation inside the cell at lower operating temperatures

  20. Optimized Temporal Window for Detection and Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinomas with Dynamic CT Scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhong Wang; Peijun Wang; Xiaohu Zhao; Xinqin Mao; Xiaolong Gao; Jun Liu

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the optimized time period for detection and characterization of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) when the specific CT features appear during spiral dynamic CT scanning, and to optimize an effective scanning protocol of spiral CT for evaluating RCC.METHODS Twenty-four patients with RCC verified by pathology had undergone a dynamic CT (D-CT) scan. A plain scan was employed to select the target slice. Single-level dynamic scanning started at 14-17 s after the intravenous contrast media had been administered, with a scan interval of 4.9 s acquiring a total number of 17~24 frames. A regular CT scan of the whole kidney followed by a delayed single slice acquisition through the target slice in the excretory phase was performed. Images were assessed in two ways: (1) A group of experienced radiologists reviewed the CT images to find when the specific signs appeared and when the CT features of RCC were optimally displayed; (2) Data measurement of the time-density curves (T-DC) of RCC. The exact time was obtained when the densities of the tumor, renal parenchyma, medulla and aorta reached their peak enhancement, thus also the time when the density difference between tumor and parenchyma was at maximum (Max T-M). Based on the slope of the contrast media uptake curve, T-DC types were ranked from the smallest to the biggest of slope as type A, B and C.RESULTS 1. The review of the CT images by the radiologists showed that the CT features of RCC were optimally demonstrated at 70.2 s. The earliest time at which RCC CT features were examined was at 23.9 s. 2. Image data analysis: the time that the density (or CT value) of the tumor mass reached peak enhancement was at 54 s and peak value was at 80.4 Hu for RCC. The time of the maximal difference of densities between tumor and renal parenchyma was at 102 s.CONCLUSION The following proposal is the scanning protocol for detecting RCC recommended by our research: After a plain scan to determine the target level, a

  1. An Evaluation of Flash Cells Used in Critical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Richard B.; Flowers, David; Bergevin, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Due to the common use of Flash technology in many commercial and industrial Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs) such as FPGAs and mixed-signal microcontrollers, flash technology is being utilized in fuzed munition applications. This presents a long-term reliability issue for both DoD and NASA safety- and mission-critical applications. A thorough understanding of the data retention failure modes and statistics associated with Flash data retention is of vital concern to the fuze safety community. A key retention parameter for a flash cell is the threshold voltage (VTH), which is an indirect indicator of the amount of charge stored on the cells floating gate. Initial test results based on a study of charge loss in flash cells in an FPGA device is presented. Statistical data taken from a small sample set indicates quantifiable charge loss for devices stored at both room temperature and 150 C. Initial evaluation of the distribution of threshold voltage in a large sample set (800 devices) is presented. The magnitude of charge loss from exposure to electrostatic discharge and electromagnetic fields is measured and presented. Simulated data (and measured data as available) resultant from harsh-environment testing (neutron, heavy ion, EMP) is presented.

  2. Adaptation-induced collective dynamics of a single-cell protozoan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Maiko; Hondou, Tsuyoshi; Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Yoshikatsu; Sugawara, Ken

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of a single-cell protozoan in a narrow tubular ring. This environment forces them to swim under a one-dimensional periodic boundary condition. Above a critical density, single-cell protozoa aggregate spontaneously without external stimulation. The high-density zone of swimming cells exhibits a characteristic collective dynamics including translation and boundary fluctuation. We analyzed the velocity distribution and turn rate of swimming cells and found that the regulation of the turing rate leads to a stable aggregation and that acceleration of velocity triggers instability of aggregation. These two opposing effects may help to explain the spontaneous dynamics of collective behavior. We also propose a stochastic model for the mechanism underlying the collective behavior of swimming cells.

  3. Measurement of the integral refractive index and dynamic cell morphometry of living cells with digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaz, Benjamin; Marquet, Pierre; Cuche, Etienne; Emery, Yves; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2005-11-01

    We have developed a digital holographic microscope (DHM), in a transmission mode, adapted to the quantitative study of cellular dynamics. Living cells in culture are optically probed by measuring the phase shift they produce on the transmitted wave front. The high temporal stability of the phase signal, equivalent to λ/1800, and the low acquisition time (~20μs) enable to monitor cellular dynamics processes. An experimental procedure allowing to calculate both the integral refractive index and the cellular thickness (morphometry) from the measured phase shift is presented. Specifically, the method has been applied to study the dynamics of neurons in culture during a hypotonic stress. Such stress produces a paradoxical decrease of the phase which can be entirely resolved by applying the methodological approach described in this article; indeed the method allows to determine independently the thickness and the integral refractive index of cells.

  4. Spin-cast bulk heterojunction solar cells: A dynamical investigation

    KAUST Repository

    Chou, Kang Wei

    2013-02-22

    Spin-coating is extensively used in the lab-based manufacture of organic solar cells, including most of the record-setting solution-processed cells. We report the first direct observation of photoactive layer formation as it occurs during spin-coating. The study provides new insight into mechanisms and kinetics of bulk heterojunction formation, which may be crucial for its successful transfer to scalable printing processes. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Cortactin Controls Cell Motility and Lamellipodial Dynamics by Regulating ECM Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bong Hwan; Zhu, Xiaodong; Kaverina, Irina; Weaver, Alissa

    2011-01-01

    Background Branched actin assembly is critical for both cell motility and membrane trafficking. The branched actin regulator, cortactin, is generally considered to promote cell migration by controlling leading edge lamellipodial dynamics. However, recent reports indicate that lamellipodia are not required for cell movement, suggesting an alternate mechanism. Results Since cortactin also regulates membrane trafficking and adhesion dynamics, we hypothesized that altered secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM) and/or integrin trafficking might underlie motility defects of cortactin-knockdown (KD) cells. Consistent with a primary defect in ECM secretion, both motility and lamellipodial defects of cortactin-KD cells were fully rescued by plating on increasing concentrations of exogenous ECM. Furthermore, cortactin-KD cell speed defects were rescued on cell-free autocrine ECM produced by control cells but not on ECM produced by cortactin-KD cells. Investigation of the mechanism revealed that whereas endocytosed FN is redeposited at the basal cell surface by control cells, cortactin-KD cells exhibit defective FN secretion and abnormal FN retention in a late endocytic/lysosomal compartment. Cortactin-KD motility and FN deposition defects were phenocopied by KD in control cells of the lysosomal fusion regulator Synaptotagmin-7. Rescue of cortactin-KD cells by expression of cortactin binding domain mutants revealed that interaction with Arp2/3 complex and actin filaments is essential for rescue of both cell motility and autocrine ECM secretion phenotypes whereas binding of SH3 domain partners is not required. Conclusions Efficient cell motility, promoted by cortactin regulation of branched actin networks, involves processing and resecretion of internalized ECM from a late endosomal/lysosomal compartment. PMID:21856159

  6. Evolutionary dynamics of imatinib-treated leukemic cells by stochastic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, Nicola; Valenti, Davide; Adorno, Dominique; Spagnolo, Bernardo

    2009-09-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of a system of cancerous cells in a model of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is investigated by a statistical approach. Cancer progression is explored by applying a Monte Carlo method to simulate the stochastic behavior of cell reproduction and death in a population of blood cells which can experience genetic mutations. In CML front line therapy is represented by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib which strongly affects the reproduction of leukemic cells only. In this work, we analyze the effects of a targeted therapy on the evolutionary dynamics of normal, first-mutant and cancerous cell populations. Several scenarios of the evolutionary dynamics of imatinib-treated leukemic cells are described as a consequence of the efficacy of the different modelled therapies. We show how the patient response to the therapy changes when a high value of the mutation rate from healthy to cancerous cells is present. Our results are in agreement with clinical observations. Unfortunately, development of resistance to imatinib is observed in a fraction of patients, whose blood cells are characterized by an increasing number of genetic alterations. We find that the occurrence of resistance to the therapy can be related to a progressive increase of deleterious mutations.

  7. Dynamic changes of B-cell compartments in kidney transplantation: lack of transitional B cells is associated with allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svachova, Veronika; Sekerkova, Alena; Hruba, Petra; Tycova, Irena; Rodova, Marketa; Cecrdlova, Eva; Slatinska, Janka; Honsova, Eva; Striz, Ilja; Viklicky, Ondrej

    2016-05-01

    B cells play an important role in the immune responses which affect the outcomes of kidney allografts. Dynamic changes of B-cell compartments in clinical kidney transplantation are still poorly understood. B-cell subsets were prospectively monitored using flow cytometry for 1 year in 98 kidney transplant recipients. Data were correlated with immunosuppression and clinical outcomes. An increase in the total population of B lymphocytes was observed during the first week after transplantation. The level of IgM(high) CD38(high) CD24(high) transitional B cells reduced significantly up until the third month, with partial repopulation in the first year. Lower numbers of transitional B cells in the third month were associated with higher risk of graft rejection. IgM(+) IgD(+) CD27(-) naive B cells did not change within follow-up. IgM(+) CD27(+) nonswitched memory B cells and IgM(-) CD27(+) switched memory B cells increased on post-operative day 7. IgM(-) CD38(high) CD27(high) plasmablasts showed similar kinetics during the first post-transplant year, similar to transitional B cells. In conclusion, sensitized kidney transplant recipients as well as those with either acute or chronic rejection within the first post-transplant year exhibited lower levels of transitional B cells. Therefore, these data further support the hypothesis that transitional B cells have a protective role in kidney transplantation. PMID:26839984

  8. Temporal dynamics of distinct CA1 cell populations during unconscious state induced by ketamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Kuang

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a widely used dissociative anesthetic which can induce some psychotic-like symptoms and memory deficits in some patients during the post-operative period. To understand its effects on neural population dynamics in the brain, we employed large-scale in vivo ensemble recording techniques to monitor the activity patterns of simultaneously recorded hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells and various interneurons during several conscious and unconscious states such as awake rest, running, slow wave sleep, and ketamine-induced anesthesia. Our analyses reveal that ketamine induces distinct oscillatory dynamics not only in pyramidal cells but also in at least seven different types of CA1 interneurons including putative basket cells, chandelier cells, bistratified cells, and O-LM cells. These emergent unique oscillatory dynamics may very well reflect the intrinsic temporal relationships within the CA1 circuit. It is conceivable that systematic characterization of network dynamics may eventually lead to better understanding of how ketamine induces unconsciousness and consequently alters the conscious mind.

  9. Evaluation of seismic behavior of soils under nuclear containment structures via dynamic centrifuge test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A series of dynamic centrifuge tests were performed for NPP structure to investigate the soil–foundation-structure interaction with various soil conditions from loose sand to weathered rock. • SFSI phenomena for NPP structure were observed directly using experimental method. • Effect of the soil stiffness and nonlinear characteristics on SFSI was estimated. • There are comparisons of the control motions for seismic design of a NPP structure. • Subsoil condition, earthquake intensity and control motion affected to seismic load. - Abstract: To evaluate the earthquake loads for the seismic design of a nuclear containment structure, it is necessary to consider the soil–foundation-structure interaction (SFSI) due to their interdependent behavior. Especially, understanding the effects of soil stiffness under the structure and the location of control motion to SFSI are very important. Motivated by these requirements, a series of dynamic centrifuge tests were performed with various soil conditions from loose sand to weathered rock (WR), as well as different seismic intensities for the bedrock motion. The different amplification characteristics in peak-accelerations profile and effects of soil-nonlinearity in response spectrum were observed. The dynamic behaviors were compared between surface of free-field and foundation of the structure for the evaluation of the control motion for seismic design. It was found that dynamic centrifuge test has potentials to estimate the seismic load considering SFSI

  10. Microscopic observation of carrier-transport dynamics in quantum-structure solar cells using a time-of-flight technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we propose a carrier time-of-flight technique to evaluate the carrier transport time across a quantum structure in an active region of solar cells. By observing the time-resolved photoluminescence signal with a quantum-well probe inserted under the quantum structure at forward bias, the carrier transport time can be efficiently determined at room temperature. The averaged drift velocity shows linear dependence on the internal field, allowing us to estimate the quantum structure as a quasi-bulk material with low effective mobility containing the information of carrier dynamics. We show that this direct and real-time observation is more sensitive to carrier transport than other conventional techniques, providing better insights into microscopic carrier transport dynamics to overcome a device design difficulty

  11. Microscopic observation of carrier-transport dynamics in quantum-structure solar cells using a time-of-flight technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toprasertpong, Kasidit; Fujii, Hiromasa; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Kasamatsu, Naofumi; Kada, Tomoyuki; Asahi, Shigeo; Kita, Takashi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Wang, Yunpeng; Watanabe, Kentaroh [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan)

    2015-07-27

    In this study, we propose a carrier time-of-flight technique to evaluate the carrier transport time across a quantum structure in an active region of solar cells. By observing the time-resolved photoluminescence signal with a quantum-well probe inserted under the quantum structure at forward bias, the carrier transport time can be efficiently determined at room temperature. The averaged drift velocity shows linear dependence on the internal field, allowing us to estimate the quantum structure as a quasi-bulk material with low effective mobility containing the information of carrier dynamics. We show that this direct and real-time observation is more sensitive to carrier transport than other conventional techniques, providing better insights into microscopic carrier transport dynamics to overcome a device design difficulty.

  12. Dynamic behaviour of a PEM fuel cells for stationary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of an investigation of the behavior of a proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) under fast load commutations. These results will be used to integrate the PEMFC in the renewable energy (RE) system based on hydrogen developed at the Institut de recherche sur l'hydrogene (IRH). (author)

  13. Tide forecasting method based on dynamic weight distribution for operational evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-wei QIU; Zeng-chuan DONG; Fen XU; Li SUN; Sheng CHEN

    2009-01-01

    Through analysis of operational evaluation factors for tide forecasting, the relationship between the evaluation factors and the weights of forecasters was examined. A tide forecasting method based on dynamic weight distribution for operational evaluation was developed, and multiple-forecaster synchronous forecasting was realized while avoiding the instability cased by only one forecaster. Weights were distributed to the forecasters according to each one's forecast precision. An evaluation criterion for the professional level of the forecasters was also built. The eligibility rates of forecast results demonstrate the skill of the forecasters and the stability of their forecasts. With the developed tide forecasting method, the precision and reasonableness of tide forecasting are improved. The application of the present method to tide forecasting at the Huangpu Park tidal station demonstrates the validity of the method.

  14. Evaluation of Ares-I Control System Robustness to Uncertain Aerodynamics and Flex Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; VanTassel, Chris; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Hall, Charles; Spanos, Pol

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of robust control theory to evaluate robustness of the Ares-I control systems. Three techniques for estimating upper and lower bounds of uncertain parameters which yield stable closed-loop response are used here: (1) Monte Carlo analysis, (2) mu analysis, and (3) characteristic frequency response analysis. All three methods are used to evaluate stability envelopes of the Ares-I control systems with uncertain aerodynamics and flex dynamics. The results show that characteristic frequency response analysis is the most effective of these methods for assessing robustness.

  15. Performance Evaluation of Dynamic and Static Sensor Node in Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal T Mahida

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A wireless sensor network (WSN consists of spatially distributed autonomous sensors to monitor physical or environmental conditions, such as temperature, sound, pressure, etc. and to cooperatively pass their data through the network to a main location. The main goal of this paper is to analysis and Evaluation of AODV routing protocol for wireless sensor network and compares the Static and Dynamic Scenarios for PDR, e2e Delay and throughput. The goal of this work is to perform a simulation with different metrics, analysis of the results and deriving a conclusion on basis of performance evaluation.

  16. Dynamic Tracking and Comprehensive Evaluation on the Natural Resources Security Elements and System in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Yulong; Zhou Hong

    2010-01-01

    System theory,pressure-state-response and drivingpressure-state-impact-response model have been applied to establishing China's dynamic tracking evaluation system of natural resources security in this article.Based on analytic hierarchy process and Delphi methods,the natural resources security situation has been evaluated systematically from 1991 to 2007.The result showed that the overall level of China's natural resources security presented a downtrend from 1991 to 2007.The basic reasons are the pressure indicators such as population,GDP,natural resources trade increased gradually,resulting in tension and fragility of natural resources security.

  17. First Evaluation of Dynamic Aperture at Injection for FCC-hh

    CERN Document Server

    Dalena, B; Chancé, A; Holzer, B; Schulte, D

    2016-01-01

    In the Hadron machine option, proposed in the context of the Future Circular Colliders (FCC) study, the dipole field quality is expected to play an important role, as in the LHC. A preliminary evaluation of the field quality of dipoles, based on the Nb$_{3}$Sn technology, has been provided by the magnet group. The effect of these field imperfections on the dynamic aperture, using the present lattice design, is presented and first tolerances on the b$_3$ and b$_5$ multipole components are evaluated.

  18. Application of Computer Systems of Dynamic Modeling for Evaluation of Protection Behavior of Electric Power Lines

    OpenAIRE

    F. A. Romaniouk; I. V. Novash; А. A. Tishechkin; V. I. Roumiantsev; N. N. Bobko; E. V. Glinsky

    2008-01-01

    The paper considers problems pertaining to mathematical modeling of a transformer substation with protected electric power lines. It is proposed to use systems of dynamic modeling for investigations applying a method of calculative experiment with the purpose to evaluate behavior of protection and automation at short circuits. The paper contains comparison of results obtained with the help of program-simulated complex on the basis of a complex mathematical model of an object and with the help...

  19. Design and experimental evaluation of a dynamically balanced redundant planar 4-RRR parallel manipulator

    OpenAIRE

    Wijk, van, M.J.; Krut, Sebastien; Pierrot, Francois; Herder, Just L

    2013-01-01

    Shaking forces and shaking moments in high speed parallel manipulators are a significant cause of base vibrations. These vibrations can be eliminated by designing the manipulator to be shaking-force balanced and shaking-moment balanced. In this article an approach for the design and for the evaluation of high speed dynamically balanced parallel manipulators is presented and applied for a comparative experimental investigation of the balanced and the unbalanced DUAL-V planar 4-RRR parallel man...

  20. Evaluating the dynamics of project strategy in innovative enterprises : Case: Standard Chartered Bank Nigeria (SCBN) Limited

    OpenAIRE

    Oladepo, O. Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    This research evaluates the dynamics of project strategy in innovative enterprises. More particularly, this research deploys the concepts of project autonomy and multiplicity of stakeholders as determinants of successful project strategy. From the theoretical point of view, this research defines and explains the significance of the concepts of project strategy in a single project’s environment. The main objective of this research is to contribute to the existing project management studies by ...

  1. Accelerated molecular dynamics force evaluation on graphics processing units for thermal conductivity calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Zheyong; Siro, Topi; harju, Ari

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a highly efficient molecular dynamics code fully implemented on graphics processing units for thermal conductivity calculations using the Green-Kubo formula. We compare two different schemes for force evaluation, a previously used thread-scheme where a single thread is used for one particle and each thread calculates the total force for the corresponding particle, and a new block-scheme where a whole block is used for one particle and each thread in the block calcula...

  2. Time-Varying Dynamic Properties of Offshore Wind Turbines Evaluated by Modal Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads; Andersen, J. K. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    resonance of the wind turbine structure. In this paper, free vibration tests and a numerical Winkler type approach are used to evaluate the dynamic properties of a total of 30 offshore wind turbines located in the North Sea. Analyses indicate time-varying eigenfrequencies and damping ratios of the lowest...... structural eigenmode. Isolating the oscillation oil damper performance, moveable seabed conditions may lead to the observed time dependency....

  3. A novel three-dimensional smile analysis based on dynamic evaluation of facial curve contour

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Lin; Han Lin; Qiuping Lin; Jinxin Zhang; Ping Zhu; Yao Lu; Zhi Zhao; Jiahong Lv; Mln Kyeong Lee; Yue Xu

    2016-01-01

    The influence of three-dimensional facial contour and dynamic evaluation decoding on factors of smile esthetics is essential for facial beauty improvement. However, the kinematic features of the facial smile contour and the contribution from the soft tissue and underlying skeleton are uncharted. Here, the cheekbone-maxilla contour and nasolabial fold were combined into a “smile contour” delineating the overall facial topography emerges prominently in smiling. We screened out the stable and un...

  4. Evaluation of Three MODIS-Derived Vegetation Index Time Series for Dryland Vegetation Dynamics Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Linlin Lu; Claudia Kuenzer; Cuizhen Wang; Huadong Guo; Qingting Li

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the spatial and temporal dynamics of vegetation is essential in drylands. In this paper, we evaluated three vegetation indices, namely the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), the Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI) and the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Surface-Reflectance Product in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China (XUAR), to assess index time series’ suitability for monitoring vege...

  5. Dynamic probability evaluation of safety levels of earth-rockfill dams using Bayesian approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-wu FAN; Shu-hai JIANG; Ming ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    In order to accurately predict and control the aging process of dams, new information should be collected continuously to renew the quantitative evaluation of dam safety levels. Owing to the complex structural characteristics of dams, it is quite difficult to predict the time-varying factors affecting their safety levels. It is not feasible to employ dynamic reliability indices to evaluate the actual safety levels of dams. Based on the relevant regulations for dam safety classification in China, a dynamic probability description of dam safety levels was developed. Using the Bayesian approach and effective information mining, as well as real-time information, this study achieved more rational evaluation and prediction of dam safety levels. With the Bayesian expression of discrete stochastic variables, the a priori probabilities of the dam safety levels determined by experts were combined with the likelihood probability of the real-time check information, and the probability information for the evaluation of dam safety levels was renewed. The probability index was then applied to dam rehabilitation decision-making. This method helps reduce the difficulty and uncertainty of the evaluation of dam safety levels and complies with the current safe decision-making regulations for dams in China. It also enhances the application of current risk analysis methods for dam safety levels.

  6. The epigenetic regulation of cell cycle and chromatin dynamic by sirtuins

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Redondo, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    Tesi realitzada a l'Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL) The chromatin consists of a hierarchical and dynamical structure that is modulated during the different cell cycle stages in order to maintain genome integrity and preserve the genetic information coded in the DNA. The dynamic structure of the chromatin depends on the coordination of the different chromatin remodeling processes: histone modifications, chromatin remodeling enzymes/complexes, DNA methylation and chr...

  7. The improvement of dynamic universal testing machine for hot cell usages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic universal testing machine(UTM) were developed for hot cell usages, which can perform tensile, compression, bending, fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth tests. In this report, technical reviews in the course of developing machine were described. Detailed subjects are as follows; 1. Outline of testing method using dynamic UTM 2. Detailed testing system organizations 3. Technical specification to develop machine 4. Setting up load string 5. Inspection and pre-commissioning tests on machine. (author). 14 figs

  8. Cell cycle dynamics of histone variants at the centromere, a model for chromosomal landmarks.

    OpenAIRE

    Boyarchuk, Ekaterina; Montes De Oca, Rocío; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2011-01-01

    Classical heterochromatin chromosomal landmarks, such as centromeres and telomeres, are characterized by specific chromatin signatures. Among these, the incorporation of histone variants has recently emerged as an important feature. Using the centromere as a paradigm, we consider the role of histone variant dynamics in locus-specific chromatin organization. We describe the distinct location and dynamics of CenH3, H3.3, and H2AZ at the centromere during the cell cycle. This leads us to present...

  9. A tunable cancer cell filter using magnetic beads: cellular and fluid dynamic simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gusenbauer, Markus; Bance, Simon; Exl, Lukas; Reichel, Franz; Oezelt, Harald; Schrefl, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In the field of biomedicine magnetic beads are used for drug delivery and to treat hyperthermia. Here we propose to use self-organized bead structures to isolate circulating tumor cells using lab-on-chip technologies. Typically blood flows past microposts functionalized with antibodies for circulating tumor cells. Creating these microposts with interacting magnetic beads makes it possible to tune the geometry in size, position and shape. We develop a simulation tool that combines micromagnetics, discrete particle dynamics and fluid dynamics, in order to design micropost arrays made of interacting beads. For the simulation of blood flow we use the Lattice-Boltzmann method with immersed elastic blood cell models. Parallelization distributes large fluid and particle dynamic simulations over available resources to reduce overall calculation time.

  10. Classifying the expansion kinetics and critical surface dynamics of growing cell populations

    CERN Document Server

    Block, M; Drasdo, D

    2006-01-01

    Based on a cellular automaton model the growth kinetics and the critical surface dynamics of cell monolayers is systematically studied by variation of the cell migration activity, the size of the proliferation zone and the cell cycle time distribution over wide ranges. The model design avoids lattice artifacts and ensures high performance. The monolayer expansion velocity derived from our simulations can be interpreted as a generalization of the velocity relationship for a traveling front in the Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskounov (FKPP) equation that is frequently used to model tumor growth phenomena by continuum models. The critical surface dynamics corresponds to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class for all parameters and model variations studied. While the velocity agrees quantitatively with experimental observations by Bru et al, the critical surface dynamics is in contrast to their interpretation as generic molecular-beam-epitaxy-like growth.

  11. Development of strain gauge evaluation channels for use in dynamic testing of shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transportation System Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) frequently evaluates the structural response of casks being developed to transport radioactive materials. A major part of this activity includes gathering instrumentation data from dynamic impact tests of cask models. The acquisition of reliable, high-quality instrumentation data is an important component of cask certification. One method to evaluate instrumentation error during testing is to include evaluation channels for the various structural transducers. Evaluation channels have been produced by some manufacturers of accelerometers used for structural evaluations of casks and are commercially available. These particular devices produce very low output or no output to applied shock acceleration. However, it was found that a packaged strain gauge evaluation channel is not commercially available. Consequently, strain gauge evaluation channels have been developed at SNL to evaluate non-strain-induced resistance changes from environmental factors that could affect resistance strain measurement data. These unwanted nonstrain-induced resistance changes could be caused, for example, by resistance changes in the interconnecting cabling, electromagnetic noise, or grounding effects

  12. Particle and Blood Cell Dynamics in Oscillatory Flows Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan M. Restrepo(PI)

    2008-09-01

    Our aim has been to uncover fundamental aspects of the suspension and dislodgement of particles in wall-bounded oscillatory flows, in flows characterized by Reynolds numbers en- compassing the situation found in rivers and near shores (and perhaps in some industrial processes). Our research tools are computational and our coverage of parameter space fairly broad. Computational means circumvent many complications that make the measurement of the dynamics of particles in a laboratory setting an impractical task, especially on the broad range of parameter space we plan to report upon. The impact of this work on the geophysical problem of sedimentation is boosted considerably by the fact that the proposed calculations can be considered ab-initio, in the sense that little to no modeling is done in generating dynamics of the particles and of the moving fluid: we use a three-dimensional Navier Stokes solver along with straightforward boundry conditions. Hence, to the extent that Navier Stokes is a model for an ideal incompressible isotropic Newtonian fluid, the calculations yield benchmark values for such things as the drag, buoyancy, and lift of particles, in a highly controlled environment. Our approach will be to make measurements of the lift, drag, and buoyancy of particles, by considering progressively more complex physical configurations and physics.

  13. Particle and Blood Cell Dynamics in Oscillatory Flows Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim has been to uncover fundamental aspects of the suspension and dislodgement of particles in wall-bounded oscillatory flows, in flows characterized by Reynolds numbers encompassing the situation found in rivers and near shores (and perhaps in some industrial processes). Our research tools are computational and our coverage of parameter space fairly broad. Computational means circumvent many complications that make the measurement of the dynamics of particles in a laboratory setting an impractical task, especially on the broad range of parameter space we plan to report upon. The impact of this work on the geophysical problem of sedimentation is boosted considerably by the fact that the proposed calculations can be considered ab-initio, in the sense that little to no modeling is done in generating dynamics of the particles and of the moving fluid: we use a three-dimensional Navier Stokes solver along with straightforward boundary conditions. Hence, to the extent that Navier Stokes is a model for an ideal incompressible isotropic Newtonian fluid, the calculations yield benchmark values for such things as the drag, buoyancy, and lift of particles, in a highly controlled environment. Our approach will be to make measurements of the lift, drag, and buoyancy of particles, by considering progressively more complex physical configurations and physics.

  14. Study on the evaluation technology for dynamic destruction strength of components in a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the normal operation and transients of a light water power reactor, the structural components such as the pressure vessel and the primary loop piping suffer from various damages by neutrons, thermal aging, fatigue and dynamic loads. The evaluation methods applied for those effects up to now are based on the conservative assumptions. This research was carried out to improve those evaluation methods. For this purpose, three kinds of experiments were conducted. The first is the test of condensation-induced water hammer in which large loads as well as sharp pressure spikes exerting on the pipe line were measured, and the mechanism and the loads following a condensation-induced water hammer were made clear. The second is the dynamic loading test for structural materials and welding joints in which the dynamic strength and fracture toughness were investigated, and the evaluation method for those strength was discussed. In the third, an impact pressure testing machine was equipped and the strength properties of pressurized pipe were measured. (author)

  15. Dynamic systems and the role of evaluation: The case of the Green Communities project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzoise, Valentina; Sardo, Stefania

    2016-02-01

    The crucial role evaluation can play in the co-development of project design and its implementation will be addressed through the analysis of a case study, the Green Communities (GC) project, funded by the Italian Ministry of Environment within the EU Interregional Operational Program (2007-2013) "Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency". The project's broader goals included an attempt to trigger a change in Italian local development strategies, especially for mountain and inland areas, which would be tailored to the real needs of communities, and based on a sustainable exploitation and management of the territorial assets. The goal was not achieved, and this paper addresses the issues of how GC could have been more effective in fostering a vision of change, and which design adaptations and evaluation procedures would have allowed the project to better cope with the unexpected consequences and resistances it encountered. The conclusions drawn are that projects should be conceived, designed and carried out as dynamic systems, inclusive of a dynamic and engaged evaluation enabling the generation of feedbacks loops, iteratively interpreting the narratives and dynamics unfolding within the project, and actively monitoring the potential of various relationships among project participants for generating positive social change. PMID:26215766

  16. Evaluation and optimization of the bandwidth of static converters: application to multi-cell converters; Evaluation et optimisation de la bande passante des convertisseurs statiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aime, M.

    2003-11-15

    Thanks to the technological progress achieved in the field of power electronics, the use of static converters has spread to new applications. In particular, some applications such as active filtering or the supply of special AC machines require power converters having good dynamic performances. The subject of this thesis is to evaluate systematically the dynamic performances of multi-cell converters, and then to optimize these performances. This document is organized in four chapters. The first one summarizes the main multilevel converter structures, and some control strategies dedicated to these structures. The second chapter presents the evaluation criteria chosen to quantify the dynamic performances of static converters. These criteria are then used to compare the performances obtained with two different PWM strategies. An optimized strategy which results from a trade-off between the two former strategies is then introduced. The third chapter shows a new control strategy of multi-cell voltage source converters. This new strategy enables to control the peak current at a fixed switching frequency. The operation of this controller is explained, and the results obtained by digital simulations are presented and discussed. The fourth chapter deals with the experimental achievement of the peak current control. In particular, the implementation of the control algorithm within a FPGA is demonstrated. Finally, the conclusion of this thesis presents some orientations for further developments, in order to improve the current control strategy and to widen its field of applications. (author)

  17. Dynamic Pax6 expression during the neurogenic cell cycle influences proliferation and cell fate choices of retinal progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xian-Jie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The paired homeobox protein Pax6 is essential for proliferation and pluripotency of retinal progenitors. However, temporal changes in Pax6 protein expression associated with the generation of various retinal neurons have not been characterized with regard to the cell cycle. Here, we examine the dynamic changes of Pax6 expression among chicken retinal progenitors as they progress through the neurogenic cell cycle, and determine the effects of altered Pax6 levels on retinogenesis. Results We provide evidence that during the preneurogenic to neurogenic transition, Pax6 protein levels in proliferating progenitor cells are down-regulated. Neurogenic retinal progenitors retain a relatively low level of Pax6 protein, whereas postmitotic neurons either elevate or extinguish Pax6 expression in a cell type-specific manner. Cell imaging and cell cycle analyses show that neurogenic progenitors in the S phase of the cell cycle contain low levels of Pax6 protein, whereas a subset of progenitors exhibits divergent levels of Pax6 protein upon entering the G2 phase of the cell cycle. We also show that M phase cells contain varied levels of Pax6, and some correlate with the onset of early neuronal marker expression, forecasting cell cycle exit and cell fate commitment. Furthermore, either elevating or knocking down Pax6 attenuates cell proliferation and results in increased cell death. Reducing Pax6 decreases retinal ganglion cell genesis and enhances cone photoreceptor and amacrine interneuron production, whereas elevating Pax6 suppresses cone photoreceptor and amacrine cell fates. Conclusion These studies demonstrate for the first time quantitative changes in Pax6 protein expression during the preneurogenic to neurogenic transition and during the neurogenic cell cycle. The results indicate that Pax6 protein levels are stringently controlled in proliferating progenitors. Maintaining a relatively low Pax6 protein level is necessary for S phase

  18. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing. PMID:27105673

  19. Gene analysis and dynamics of tumor stem cell in human glioblastoma cells after radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because glioblastoma is the most malignant central nervous system (CNS) tumor, it is very difficult to cure despite surgery and adjuvant therapy. At present, surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are combined in the treatment of each patient. However, glioblastoma have radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, and this is not a radical treatment. We suspect that the tumor stem cell affects the recurrence, radiotherapy resistance and chemotherapy resistance of the tumor. Many studies suggest that tumor stem cells play an important role in tumorgenesis and tumor progression. Using human glioblastoma cell lines (T98G, A172), irradiated (0 Gy, 30 Gy, 60 Gy) glioblastoma cells were prepared under the same conditions as clinical therapy. We performed the analysis of cell proliferation rate, side population analysis by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS), isolation of CD133+ cells and genetic analysis (human stem cell), using these cells. In the results of this study, the stem cell-related genes were highly expressed in the CD133+ cells compared with the CD133- cells. Therefore, it suggested that the CD133+ cells may contain tumor stem cells. In T98G, when compared to unirradiated cells and 60 Gy-irradiated cells, the cell proliferation rate for 30 Gy-irradiated cells tended to be higher, and stem cell-related genes were highly expressed in 30 Gy-irradiated CD133+ cells. In other words, in T98G, from the viewpoint of antitumor effects, the results suggest that chemotherapy may show more effect in 30 Gy-irradiated. In this genetic analysis, we suggest that CD133+ cells strongly affect tumor proliferation. In addition, CD133+ cells affect the resistance and the effect of treatments because some kind of changes occur in CD133+ cells after radiation. (author)

  20. Automated Static Culture System Cell Module Mixing Protocol and Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Truong, Tuan; Goodwin, Thomas J,

    2004-01-01

    This report is a documentation of a fluid dynamic analysis of the proposed Automated Static Culture System (ASCS) cell module mixing protocol. The report consists of a review of some basic fluid dynamics principles appropriate for the mixing of a patch of high oxygen content media into the surrounding media which is initially depleted of oxygen, followed by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of this process for the proposed protocol over a range of the governing parameters. The time histories of oxygen concentration distributions and mechanical shear levels generated are used to characterize the mixing process for different parameter values.

  1. A new picture of cell wall protein dynamics in elongating cells of Arabidopsis thaliana: Confirmed actors and newcomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamet Elisabeth

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell elongation in plants requires addition and re-arrangements of cell wall components. Even if some protein families have been shown to play roles in these events, a global picture of proteins present in cell walls of elongating cells is still missing. A proteomic study was performed on etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis used as model of cells undergoing elongation followed by growth arrest within a short time. Results Two developmental stages (active growth and after growth arrest were compared. A new strategy consisting of high performance cation exchange chromatography and mono-dimensional electrophoresis was established for separation of cell wall proteins. This work allowed identification of 137 predicted secreted proteins, among which 51 had not been identified previously. Apart from expected proteins known to be involved in cell wall extension such as xyloglucan endotransglucosylase-hydrolases, expansins, polygalacturonases, pectin methylesterases and peroxidases, new proteins were identified such as proteases, proteins related to lipid metabolism and proteins of unknown function. Conclusion This work highlights the CWP dynamics that takes place between the two developmental stages. The presence of proteins known to be related to cell wall extension after growth arrest showed that these proteins may play other roles in cell walls. Finally, putative regulatory mechanisms of protein biological activity are discussed from this global view of cell wall proteins.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cell arrival triggers dynamic remodeling of the perivascular niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamplin, Owen J; Durand, Ellen M; Carr, Logan A; Childs, Sarah J; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Li, Pulin; Yzaguirre, Amanda D; Speck, Nancy A; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-01-15

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) can reconstitute and sustain the entire blood system. We generated a highly specific transgenic reporter of HSPCs in zebrafish. This allowed us to perform high-resolution live imaging on endogenous HSPCs not currently possible in mammalian bone marrow. Using this system, we have uncovered distinct interactions between single HSPCs and their niche. When an HSPC arrives in the perivascular niche, a group of endothelial cells remodel to form a surrounding pocket. This structure appears conserved in mouse fetal liver. Correlative light and electron microscopy revealed that endothelial cells surround a single HSPC attached to a single mesenchymal stromal cell. Live imaging showed that mesenchymal stromal cells anchor HSPCs and orient their divisions. A chemical genetic screen found that the compound lycorine promotes HSPC-niche interactions during development and ultimately expands the stem cell pool into adulthood. Our studies provide evidence for dynamic niche interactions upon stem cell colonization. PAPERFLICK: PMID:25594182

  3. Progenitor Cell Dynamics in the Newt Telencephalon during Homeostasis and Neuronal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Kirkham

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The adult newt brain has a marked neurogenic potential and is highly regenerative. Ventricular, radial glia-like ependymoglia cells give rise to neurons both during normal homeostasis and after injury, but subpopulations among ependymoglia cells have not been defined. We show here that a substantial portion of GFAP+ ependymoglia cells in the proliferative hot spots of the telencephalon has transit-amplifying characteristics. In contrast, proliferating ependymoglia cells, which are scattered along the ventricular wall, have stem cell features in terms of label retention and insensitivity to AraC treatment. Ablation of neurons remodels the proliferation dynamics and leads to de novo formation of regions displaying features of neurogenic niches, such as the appearance of cells with transit-amplifying features and proliferating neuroblasts. The results have implication both for our understanding of the evolutionary diversification of radial glia cells as well as the processes regulating neurogenesis and regeneration in the adult vertebrate brain.

  4. Metric dynamics for membrane transformation through regulated cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Hiroshi C.

    2016-01-01

    This study develops an equation for describing three-dimensional membrane transformation through proliferation of its component cells regulated by morphogen density distributions on the membrane. The equation is developed in a two-dimensional coordinate system mapped on the membrane, referred to as the membrane coordinates. When the membrane expands, the membrane coordinates expand in the same manner so that the membrane is invariant in the coordinates. In the membrane coordinate system, the ...

  5. The Cell Probe Complexity of Dynamic Range Counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green

    is specified by a point q = (x, y), and the goal is to report the sum of the weights assigned to the points dominated by q, where a point (x0, y0) is dominated by q if x0 x and y0 y. In addition to being the highest cell probe lower bound to date, our lower bound is also tight for data struc- tures...

  6. Transcriptional dynamics of the embryonic stem cell switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chickarmane, Vijay; Troein, Carl; Nuber, Ulrike A; Sauro, Herbert M; Peterson, Carsten

    2006-09-15

    Recent ChIP experiments of human and mouse embryonic stem cells have elucidated the architecture of the transcriptional regulatory circuitry responsible for cell determination, which involves the transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG. In addition to regulating each other through feedback loops, these genes also regulate downstream target genes involved in the maintenance and differentiation of embryonic stem cells. A search for the OCT4-SOX2-NANOG network motif in other species reveals that it is unique to mammals. With a kinetic modeling approach, we ascribe function to the observed OCT4-SOX2-NANOG network by making plausible assumptions about the interactions between the transcription factors at the gene promoter binding sites and RNA polymerase (RNAP), at each of the three genes as well as at the target genes. We identify a bistable switch in the network, which arises due to several positive feedback loops, and is switched on/off by input environmental signals. The switch stabilizes the expression levels of the three genes, and through their regulatory roles on the downstream target genes, leads to a binary decision: when OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG are expressed and the switch is on, the self-renewal genes are on and the differentiation genes are off. The opposite holds when the switch is off. The model is extremely robust to parameter changes. In addition to providing a self-consistent picture of the transcriptional circuit, the model generates several predictions. Increasing the binding strength of NANOG to OCT4 and SOX2, or increasing its basal transcriptional rate, leads to an irreversible bistable switch: the switch remains on even when the activating signal is removed. Hence, the stem cell can be manipulated to be self-renewing without the requirement of input signals. We also suggest tests that could discriminate between a variety of feedforward regulation architectures of the target genes by OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG. PMID:16978048

  7. Transcriptional dynamics of the embryonic stem cell switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Chickarmane

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent ChIP experiments of human and mouse embryonic stem cells have elucidated the architecture of the transcriptional regulatory circuitry responsible for cell determination, which involves the transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG. In addition to regulating each other through feedback loops, these genes also regulate downstream target genes involved in the maintenance and differentiation of embryonic stem cells. A search for the OCT4-SOX2-NANOG network motif in other species reveals that it is unique to mammals. With a kinetic modeling approach, we ascribe function to the observed OCT4-SOX2-NANOG network by making plausible assumptions about the interactions between the transcription factors at the gene promoter binding sites and RNA polymerase (RNAP, at each of the three genes as well as at the target genes. We identify a bistable switch in the network, which arises due to several positive feedback loops, and is switched on/off by input environmental signals. The switch stabilizes the expression levels of the three genes, and through their regulatory roles on the downstream target genes, leads to a binary decision: when OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG are expressed and the switch is on, the self-renewal genes are on and the differentiation genes are off. The opposite holds when the switch is off. The model is extremely robust to parameter changes. In addition to providing a self-consistent picture of the transcriptional circuit, the model generates several predictions. Increasing the binding strength of NANOG to OCT4 and SOX2, or increasing its basal transcriptional rate, leads to an irreversible bistable switch: the switch remains on even when the activating signal is removed. Hence, the stem cell can be manipulated to be self-renewing without the requirement of input signals. We also suggest tests that could discriminate between a variety of feedforward regulation architectures of the target genes by OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG.

  8. Chromatin dynamics during cell cycle mediate conversion of DNA damage into chromatid breaks and affect formation of chromosomal aberrations: Biological and clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I.; Hatzi, Vasiliki I. [Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products, National Centre for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , 15310 Ag. Paraskevi Attikis, Athens (Greece); Donta-Bakoyianni, Catherine [Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, University of Athens Dental School, Athens (Greece); Pantelias, Gabriel E., E-mail: gabriel@ipta.demokritos.gr [Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products, National Centre for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , 15310 Ag. Paraskevi Attikis, Athens (Greece)

    2011-06-03

    The formation of diverse chromosomal aberrations following irradiation and the variability in radiosensitivity at different cell-cycle stages remain a long standing controversy, probably because most of the studies have focused on elucidating the enzymatic mechanisms involved using simple DNA substrates. Yet, recognition, processing and repair of DNA damage occur within the nucleoprotein complex of chromatin which is dynamic in nature, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding. The present work reviews experimental work designed to investigate the impact of chromatin dynamics and chromosome conformation changes during cell-cycle in the formation of chromosomal aberrations. Using conventional cytogenetics and premature chromosome condensation to visualize interphase chromatin, the data presented support the hypothesis that chromatin dynamic changes during cell-cycle are important determinants in the conversion of sub-microscopic DNA lesions into chromatid breaks. Consequently, the type and yield of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations at a given cell-cycle-stage depends on the combined effect of DNA repair processes and chromatin dynamics, which is cell-cycle-regulated and subject to up- or down-regulation following radiation exposure or genetic alterations. This new hypothesis is used to explain the variability in radiosensitivity observed at various cell-cycle-stages, among mutant cells and cells of different origin, or among different individuals, and to revisit unresolved issues and unanswered questions. In addition, it is used to better understand hypersensitivity of AT cells and to provide an improved predictive G2-assay for evaluating radiosensitivity at individual level. Finally, experimental data at single cell level obtained using hybrid cells suggest that the proposed hypothesis applies only to the irradiated component of the hybrid.

  9. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-Chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y.-S.; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-07-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ3, but not in those by integrin α5β1. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  10. Dynamic heterogeneity as a strategy of stem cell self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Philip; Simons, Benjamin D

    2016-07-01

    To maintain cycling adult tissue in homeostasis the balance between proliferation and differentiation of stem cells needs to be precisely regulated. To investigate how stem cells achieve perfect self-renewal, emphasis has been placed on models in which stem cells progress sequentially through a one-way proliferative hierarchy. However, investigations of tissue regeneration have revealed a surprising degree of flexibility, with cells normally committed to differentiation able to recover stem cell competence following injury. Here, we investigate whether the reversible transfer of cells between states poised for proliferation or differentiation may provide a viable mechanism for a heterogeneous stem cell population to maintain homeostasis even under normal physiological conditions. By addressing the clonal dynamics, we show that such models of "dynamic heterogeneity" may be equally capable of describing the results of recent lineage tracing assays involving epithelial tissues. Moreover, together with competition for limited niche access, such models may provide a mechanism to render tissue homeostasis robust. In particular, in 2D epithelial layers, we show that the mechanism of dynamic heterogeneity avoids some pathological dependencies that undermine models based on a hierarchical stem/progenitor organization. PMID:27313213

  11. Genetic barcode sequencing for screening altered population dynamics of hematopoietic stem cells transduced with lentivirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Daniela B; Tsujita, Maristela; Borelli, Primavera; Aguiar, Rodrigo B; Ferrari, Daniel G; Strauss, Bryan E

    2014-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis has been associated with malignant cell transformation in gene therapy protocols, leading to discussions about vector security. Therefore, clonal analysis is important for the assessment of vector safety and its impact on patient health. Here, we report a unique approach to assess dynamic changes in clonality of lentivirus transduced cells upon Sanger sequence analysis of a specially designed genetic barcode. In our approach, changes in the electropherogram peaks are measured and compared between successive time points, revealing alteration in the cell population. After in vitro validation, barcoded lentiviral libraries carrying IL2RG or LMO2 transgenes, or empty vector were used to transduce mouse hematopoietic (ckit+) stem cells, which were subsequently transplanted in recipient mice. We found that neither the empty nor IL2RG encoding vector had an effect on cell dynamics. In sharp contrast, the LMO2 oncogene was associated with altered cell dynamics even though hematologic counts remained unchanged, suggesting that the barcode could reveal changes in cell populations not observed by the frontline clinical assay. We describe a simple and sensitive method for the analysis of clonality, which could be easily used by any laboratory for the assessment of cellular behavior upon lentiviral transduction. PMID:26052520

  12. Dynamics of mercury, cadmium and vanadium in cultured bovine kidney cells: an examination of relationships to cytotoxicity and cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to partially define the in vitro cellular response to mercury, cadmium and vanadium insult. A bovine kidney cell line served as the model system for examining the relationship of the cellular dynamics of metal accumulation and distribution to cytotoxicity. Additionally, biochemical marker functions were monitored in surviving cells to determine the importance of metal uptake and distribution to cell functionality. Each metal (HgCl2, CdCl2, and Na3VO4) elicited a concentration-related cytotoxicity which was correlated to the cellular metal burden. Multiphasic accumulation kinetics were established for mercury and vanadium; cadmium was accumulated in a linear fashion. Subcellular metal distribution was independent of both the extra-cellular metal concentration and the degree of cytotoxicity. Biochemical marker functions indicated a toxicity-related decrease in cell functionality in surviving cells for all metals

  13. Host cell cytotoxicity, cellular repopulation dynamics, and phase-specific cell survival in X-irradiated rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postirradiation tumor volume response, cellular repopulation dynamics, cell-cycle perturbations, and phase-specific cell survival were characterized in rat rhabdomyosarcoma R-1 tumors (the R2C5 subline) following an in situ 10-Gy dose of 225-kVp X rays. This X-ray dose produced a 7.5-day delay in tumor growth to twice the volume measured at the time of irradiation, and reduced the initial surviving fraction of R2C5 cells to 0.17 as measured by the excision assay procedure. The surviving fraction of R2C5 cells returned to unity by the 16th day after tumor irradiation. On the basis of flow cytometry measurements of DNA content in tumor cells stained with a noncytotoxic concentration of Hoechst 33342, a transient G2 block was observed 1 day after irradiation. Flow cytometry measurements also demonstrated that the tetraploid R2C5 cells constituted only 30% of the total tumor cell population, with the remainder being diploid host cells comprised of macrophages, monocytes, lymphocytes, and granulocytes. Large numbers of host cells infiltrated the irradiated tumors, leading to an increase in the percentage of diploid cells by Day 2 and reaching a level of more than 80% of the total tumor cell population by 4 to 8 days after irradiation. The influx of host cells into irradiated tumors was correlated temporally with a significant 12-fold decrease in the surviving fraction of R2C5 cells that occurred between Days 2 and 4 postirradiation. When the diploid host cell population was removed by cell sorting procedures, the surviving fraction of R2C5 cells at Day 4 substantially greater than that in the presence of the host cells. Experiments involving the mixing of 4/1 and 12/1 ratios of diploid host cells and tetraploid tumor cells isolated from irradiated and unirradiated tumors demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of the host cells was specific for the irradiated tumor cells

  14. Preliminary experience using dynamic MRI at 3.0 tesla for evaluation of soft tissue tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Micheal; Jee, Won Hee; Jung, Joon Yong [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Ki [Dept. of Radiology, Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So Yeon [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    We aimed to evaluate the use of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) at 3.0 T for differentiating the benign from malignant soft tissue tumors. Also we aimed to assess whether the shorter length of DCE-MRI protocols are adequate, and to evaluate the effect of temporal resolution. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, at 3.0 T with a 1 second temporal resolution in 13 patients with pathologically confirmed soft tissue tumors, was analyzed. Visual assessment of time-signal curves, subtraction images, maximal relative enhancement at the first (maximal peak enhancement [Emax]/1) and second (Emax/2) minutes, Emax, steepest slope calculated by using various time intervals (5, 30, 60 seconds), and the start of dynamic enhancement were analyzed. The 13 tumors were comprised of seven benign and six malignant soft tissue neoplasms. Washout on time-signal curves was seen on three (50%) malignant tumors and one (14%) benign one. The most discriminating DCE-MRI parameter was the steepest slope calculated, by using at 5-second intervals, followed by Emax/1 and Emax/2. All of the steepest slope values occurred within 2 minutes of the dynamic study. Start of dynamic enhancement did not show a significant difference, but no malignant tumor rendered a value greater than 14 seconds. The steepest slope and early relative enhancement have the potential for differentiating benign from malignant soft tissue tumors. Short-length rather than long-length DCE-MRI protocol may be adequate for our purpose. The steepest slope parameters require a short temporal resolution, while maximal peak enhancement parameter may be more optimal for a longer temporal resolution.

  15. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MR Urography in the Evaluation of Children with Obstructive Uropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghafoori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the use of dynamic contrast material-enhanced MR urography in the children identified as obstructed uropathy. "nPatients and Methods: The total of 32 children who diagnosed as hydronephrosis and suspected of having obstructed uropathy and referred to the radiology ward of Hazrat Rasoul Hospital entered into the study. The children were hydrated prior to undergoing both conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR urography of the kidneys and urinary tract. We injected furosemide 15 minutes before contrast material (Gadolinum injection. The morphology of the kidneys and pyelocalyceal system was evaluated and also the time between the appearance of contrast material in the kidney and passage through ureters was measured. The morphology of the kidneys and pyelocalyceal system obtained in dynamic MR urography was compared with conventional imaging modalities including IVU, VCUG and ultrasonography.The degree of obstruction diagnosed in MR urography was confirmed by diuretic renal scintigraphy and long term follow up the patients."nResults: The results obtained in dynamic MR urography had good correlation with the results of diuretic renal scintigraphy and patients follow up in all the children. The morphology of the kidneys and pyelocalyceal system were also correlated with other imaging modalities."nConclusion: Dynamic contrast material-enhanced MR urography is a useful imaging modality that can show the morphology of the kidneys and pyelocalyceal system and also the excretory function of the kidneys in children with obstructive uropathy and allow normal kidneys to be differentiated from obstructed and partially obstructed kidneys.

  16. Mathematical model for HIV dynamics in HIV-specific helper cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Carla M. A.; Carvalho, Ana

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we study a delay mathematical model for the dynamics of HIV in HIV-specific CD4 + T helper cells. We modify the model presented by Roy and Wodarz in 2012, where the HIV dynamics is studied, considering a single CD4 + T cell population. Non-specific helper cells are included as alternative target cell population, to account for macrophages and dendritic cells. In this paper, we include two types of delay: (1) a latent period between the time target cells are contacted by the virus particles and the time the virions enter the cells and; (2) virus production period for new virions to be produced within and released from the infected cells. We compute the reproduction number of the model, R0, and the local stability of the disease free equilibrium and of the endemic equilibrium. We find that for values of R01, the model approximates asymptotically the endemic equilibrium. We observe numerically the phenomenon of backward bifurcation for values of R0⪅1. This statement will be proved in future work. We also vary the values of the latent period and the production period of infected cells and free virus. We conclude that increasing these values translates in a decrease of the reproduction number. Thus, a good strategy to control the HIV virus should focus on drugs to prolong the latent period and/or slow down the virus production. These results suggest that the model is mathematically and epidemiologically well-posed.

  17. The Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System for myelofibrosis predicts outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Bart L; Gooley, Ted A; Sorror, Mohamed L; Rezvani, Andrew R; Linenberger, Michael L; Grim, Jonathan; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Myerson, David; Chauncey, Thomas R; Storb, Rainer; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Radich, Jerald P; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Deeg, H Joachim

    2012-03-15

    Studies by the International Working Group showed that the prognosis of myelofibrosis patients is predicted by the Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System (DIPSS) risk categorization, which includes patient age, constitutional symptoms, hemoglobin, leukocyte count, and circulating blasts. We evaluated the prognostic usefulness of the DIPSS in 170 patients with myelofibrosis, 12 to 78 years of age (median, 51.5 years of age), who received hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) between 1990 and 2009 from related (n = 86) or unrelated donors (n = 84). By DIPSS, 21 patients had low-risk disease, 48 had intermediate-1, 50 had intermediate-2, and 51 had high-risk disease. Five-year incidence of relapse, relapse-free survival, overall survival, and nonrelapse mortality for all patients were 10%, 57%, 57%, and 34%, respectively. Among patients with DIPSS high-risk disease, the hazard ratio for post-HCT mortality was 4.11 (95% CI, 1.44-11.78; P = .008), and for nonrelapse mortality was 3.41 (95% CI, 1.15-10.09; P = .03) compared with low-risk patients. After a median follow-up of 5.9 years, the median survivals have not been reached for DIPSS risk groups low and intermediate-1, and were 7 and 2.5 years for intermediate-2 and high-risk patients, respectively. Thus, HCT was curative for a large proportion of patients with myelofibrosis, and post-HCT success was dependent on pre-HCT DIPSS classification. PMID:22234678

  18. Diverse spatio-temporal dynamical patterns of p53 and cell fate decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairambault, Jean; Eliaš, Ján

    2016-06-01

    The protein p53 as a tumour suppressor protein accumulates in cells in response to DNA damage and transactivates a large variety of genes involved in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and numerous other processes. Recent biological observations suggest that specific spatio-temporal dynamical patterns of p53 may be associated with specific cellular response, and thus the spatio-temporal heterogeneity of the p53 dynamics contributes to the overall complexity of p53 signalling. Reaction-diffusion equations taking into account spatial representation of the cell and motion of the species inside the cell can be used to model p53 protein network and could be thus of some help to biologists and pharmacologists in anticancer treatment.

  19. Clustering in Cell Cycle Dynamics with General Response/Signaling Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Todd; Buckalew, Richard; Moses, Gregory; Boczko, Erik; 10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.10.002.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by experimental and theoretical work on autonomous oscillations in yeast, we analyze ordinary differential equations models of large populations of cells with cell-cycle dependent feedback. We assume a particular type of feedback that we call Responsive/Signaling (RS), but do not specify a functional form of the feedback. We study the dynamics and emergent behaviour of solutions, particularly temporal clustering and stability of clustered solutions. We establish the existence of certain periodic clustered solutions as well as "uniform" solutions and add to the evidence that cell-cycle dependent feedback robustly leads to cell-cycle clustering. We highlight the fundamental differences in dynamics between systems with negative and positive feedback. For positive feedback systems the most important mechanism seems to be the stability of individual isolated clusters. On the other hand we find that in negative feedback systems, clusters must interact with each other to reinforce coherence. We conclude fr...

  20. A phenomenological approach to the simulation of metabolism and proliferation dynamics of large tumour cell populations

    CERN Document Server

    Chignola, R; Chignola, Roberto; Milotti, Edoardo

    2005-01-01

    A major goal of modern computational biology is to simulate the collective behaviour of large cell populations starting from the intricate web of molecular interactions occurring at the microscopic level. In this paper we describe a simplified model of cell metabolism, growth and proliferation, suitable for inclusion in a multicell simulator, now under development (Chignola R and Milotti E 2004 Physica A 338 261-6). Nutrients regulate the proliferation dynamics of tumor cells which adapt their behaviour to respond to changes in the biochemical composition of the environment. This modeling of nutrient metabolism and cell cycle at a mesoscopic scale level leads to a continuous flow of information between the two disparate spatiotemporal scales of molecular and cellular dynamics that can be simulated with modern computers and tested experimentally.

  1. Evaluation of a CMIP5 derived dynamical global wind wave climate model ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemer, Mark A.; Trenham, Claire E.

    2016-07-01

    Much effort has gone into evaluating the skill of General Circulation Models (GCMs) for 'standard' climate variables such as surface (air and/or sea) temperature, or precipitation. Whether climate model skill to simulate standard variables translates to the performance of dynamical GCM forced wind-wave simulations is yet to be established. We assess an ensemble of historical dynamical wave climate simulations whereby surface winds taken from GCMs participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) are used to force a spectral wave model. The GCMs used include 8 CMIP5 models and two dynamically downscaled CMIP3 models. The climatological properties of key integrated wave parameters (significant wave height, maximum wave height, mean wave period and direction) are evaluated, using two independent methods, relative to three historical wave hindcast/reanalysis datasets over 13 areas of the global ocean. We identify that high performance of GCMs for 'standard' climate variables does not imply high performance for GCM forced wave simulations. We also identify there is little to no benefit in choosing a higher resolution CMIP5 GCM (with resolution of ∼1.4°) over a lower resolution GCM (∼2.8°) to improve skill of GCM forced dynamical wave simulations. With the conscious push towards developing projections of waves and storm surges to aid assessments of possible climate driven impacts to coastal communities, we stress the need to evaluate the performance of a GCM for the marine meteorological climate independently of the performance of the GCM for the 'standard' climate variables.

  2. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 3. Binary mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Muzny, Chris D; Frenkel, Michael

    2009-02-01

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. The present paper describes the first application of this concept to the evaluation of thermophysical properties for binary chemical systems. Five activity-coefficient models have been implemented for representation of phase-equilibrium data (vapor-liquid, liquid-liquid, and solid-liquid equilibrium): NRTL, UNIQUAC, Van Laar, Margules/Redlich-Kister, and Wilson. Implementation of these models in TDE is fully described. Properties modeled individually are densities, surface tensions, critical temperatures, critical pressures, excess enthalpies, and the transport properties-viscosity and thermal conductivity. Extensions to the class structure of the program are described with emphasis on special features allowing close linkage between mixture and pure-component properties required for implementation of the models. Details of gas-phase models used in conjunction with the activity-coefficient models are shown. Initial implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept for reactions is demonstrated with evaluation of enthalpies of formation for compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. Directions for future enhancements are outlined. PMID:19434848

  3. EVALUATION OF CYTOKINE GENE POLYMORPHISM IN B CELL LYMPHOID MALIGNANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Nazarova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies with some solid tumors has shown that polymorphisms of certain cytokine genes may be used as predictors of clinical outcome in the patients. It seemed important to evaluate potential correlations between production of certain pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and co-receptor molecules, and promoter polymorphism of the cytokine genes involved into regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, lipid metabolism and blood clotting in the patients with hematological malignancies. The article contains our results concerning associations between of IL-1β, -2, -4, -10, -17, TNFα, and allelic polymorphisms of their genes in 62 patients with B cell lymphoid malignancies in an ethnically homogenous group (self-identified as Russians. We have shown that the GА and AA genotypes of the G-308A polymorphism in TNFα gene are significantly associated with increased production of this cytokine, being more common in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, more rare in multiple myeloma and in indolent non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

  4. Electron Transfer Dynamics in Efficient Molecular Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Gerald John

    2014-10-01

    This research provided new mechanistic insights into surface mediated photochemical processes relevant to solar energy conversion. In this past three years our research has focused on oxidation photo-redox chemistry and on the role surface electric fields play on basic spectroscopic properties of molecular-semiconductor interfaces. Although this research as purely fundamental science, the results and their interpretation have relevance to applications in dye sensitized and photogalvanic solar cells as well as in the storage of solar energy in the form of chemical bonds.

  5. Evaluation of apatite silicates as solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero-Lopez, D. [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada I, Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficies (Unidad Asociada al C.S.I.C.), Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Martin-Sedeno, M.C.; Aranda, M.A.G. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Pena-Martinez, J. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Instituto de Energias Renovables, Parque Tecnologico, Universidad de Castilla La Mancha, 02006 Albacete (Spain); Ruiz-Morales, J.C.; Nunez, P. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Ramos-Barrado, J.R. [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada I, Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficies (Unidad Asociada al C.S.I.C.), Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    Apatite-type silicates have been considered as promising electrolytes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC); however studies on the potential use of these materials in SOFC devices have received relatively little attention. The lanthanum silicate with composition La{sub 10}Si{sub 5.5}Al{sub 0.5}O{sub 26.75} has been evaluated as electrolyte with the electrode materials commonly used in SOFC, i.e. manganite, ferrite and cobaltite as cathode materials and NiO-CGO composite, chromium-manganite and Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} as anode materials. Chemical compatibility, area-specific resistance and fuel cell studies have been performed. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analysis did not reveal any trace of reaction products between the apatite electrolyte and most of the aforementioned electrode materials. However, the area-specific polarisation resistance (ASR) of these electrodes in contact with apatite electrolyte increased significantly with the sintering temperature, indicating reactivity at the electrolyte/electrode interface. On the other hand, the ASR values are significantly improved using a ceria buffer layer between the electrolyte and electrode materials to prevent reactivity. Maximum power densities of 195 and 65 mWcm{sup -2} were obtained at 850 and 700 C, respectively in H{sub 2} fuel, using an 1 mm-thick electrolyte, a NiO-Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9} composite as anode and La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} as cathode materials. This fuel cell was tested for 100 h in 5%H{sub 2}-Ar atmosphere showing stable performance. (author)

  6. Nuclear deformability and telomere dynamics are regulated by cell geometric constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Ekta; Jokhun, D S; Shivashankar, G V

    2016-01-01

    Forces generated by the cytoskeleton can be transmitted to the nucleus and chromatin via physical links on the nuclear envelope and the lamin meshwork. Although the role of these active forces in modulating prestressed nuclear morphology has been well studied, the effect on nuclear and chromatin dynamics remains to be explored. To understand the regulation of nuclear deformability by these active forces, we created different cytoskeletal states in mouse fibroblasts using micropatterned substrates. We observed that constrained and isotropic cells, which lack long actin stress fibers, have more deformable nuclei than elongated and polarized cells. This nuclear deformability altered in response to actin, myosin, formin perturbations, or a transcriptional down-regulation of lamin A/C levels in the constrained and isotropic geometry. Furthermore, to probe the effect of active cytoskeletal forces on chromatin dynamics, we tracked the spatiotemporal dynamics of heterochromatin foci and telomeres. We observed increased dynamics and decreased correlation of the heterochromatin foci and telomere trajectories in constrained and isotropic cell geometry. The observed enhanced dynamics upon treatment with actin depolymerizing reagents in elongated and polarized geometry were regained once the reagent was washed off, suggesting an inherent structural memory in chromatin organization. We conclude that active forces from the cytoskeleton and rigidity from lamin A/C nucleoskeleton can together regulate nuclear and chromatin dynamics. Because chromatin remodeling is a necessary step in transcription control and its memory, genome integrity, and cellular deformability during migration, our results highlight the importance of cell geometric constraints as critical regulators in cell behavior. PMID:26699462

  7. Evaluation of acrylamide-removing properties of two Lactobacillus strains under simulated gastrointestinal conditions using a dynamic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Jimenez, L; Ramírez-Ortiz, K; González-Córdova, A F; Vallejo-Cordoba, B; Garcia, H S; Hernandez-Mendoza, A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of Lactobacillus reuteri NRRL 14171 and Lactobacillus casei Shirota to remove dietary acrylamide (AA) under simulated gastrointestinal conditions using a dynamic system. The effects of different AA levels or bacteria concentration on toxin removal by Lactobacillus strains were assessed. Thereafter, AA-removing capability of bacteria strains under either fasting or postprandial simulated gastrointestinal conditions was evaluated. Commercial potato chips were analyzed for their AA content, and then used as a food model. Average AA content (34,162μg/kg) in potato chips exceeded by ca. 34-fold the indicative values recommended by the EU. Toxin removal ability was dependent on AA content and bacterial cell concentration. A reduction on bacterial viability was observed in the food model and at the end of both digestive processes evaluated. However, bacteria survived in enough concentrations to remove part of the toxin (32-73%). Both bacterial strains were able to remove AA under different simulated gastrointestinal conditions, being L. casei Shirota the most effective (ca. 70% removal). These findings confirmed the risk of potato chips as dietary AA exposure for consumers, and that strains of the genus Lactobacillus could be employed to reduce the bioavailability of dietary AA. PMID:27393995

  8. A new method for decreasing cell-load variation in dynamic cellular manufacturing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Aidin Delgoshaei; Mohd Khairol Mohd Ariffin,; Btht Hang Tuah Bin Baharudin; Zulkiflle Leman

    2016-01-01

    Cell load variation is considered a significant shortcoming in scheduling of cellular manufacturing systems. In this article, a new method is proposed for scheduling dynamic cellular manufacturing systems in the presence of bottleneck and parallel machines. The aim of this method is to control cell load variation during the process of determining the best trading off values between in-house manufacturing and outsourcing. A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed because of the high potential of t...

  9. Dynamics between Cancer Cell Subpopulations Reveals a Model Coordinating with Both Hierarchical and Stochastic Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Weikang; Quan, Yi; Fu, Qibin; Liu, Yu; Liang, Ying; Wu, Jingwen; Yang, Gen; Luo, Chunxiong; Ouyang, Qi; Wang, Yugang

    2014-01-01

    Tumors are often heterogeneous in which tumor cells of different phenotypes have distinct properties. For scientific and clinical interests, it is of fundamental importance to understand their properties and the dynamic variations among different phenotypes, specifically under radio- and/or chemo-therapy. Currently there are two controversial models describing tumor heterogeneity, the cancer stem cell (CSC) model and the stochastic model. To clarify the controversy, we measured probabilities ...

  10. Dynamic Behavior of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell under Transportation Cycle Load

    OpenAIRE

    Garnier, J.; PERA, MC; Hissel, D.; DE-BERNARDINIS, A; KAUFFMANN, JM; Coquery, G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic modeling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) for transportation applications. Based on an electrochemical analysis, it gives an equivalent circuit of the fuel cell which can be used in association with a power electronic converter. Experimental polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are used to identify model parameters and to validate simulation results. Finally, experimental responses to a current step and to transporta...

  11. Single-Cell and Population NF-κB Dynamic Responses Depend on Lipopolysaccharide Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Miriam V Gutschow; Hughey, Jacob J.; Nicholas A Ruggero; Bryce T Bajar; Valle, Sean D.; Covert, Markus W

    2013-01-01

    Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), found in the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, elicits a strong response from the transcription factor family Nuclear factor (NF)-κB via Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. The cellular response to lipopolysaccharide varies depending on the source and preparation of the ligand, however. Our goal was to compare single-cell NF-κB dynamics across multiple sources and concentrations of LPS. Methodology/Principal Findings Using live-cell fluorescence microscopy...

  12. Thermal Fluctuations of Red Blood Cell Membrane via a Constant-Area Particle-Dynamics Model

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelli, Gianluca; Parker, Kim H.; Winlove, C. Peter

    2005-01-01

    We describe a model of the mechanical properties of the cell plasma membrane using a finite-temperature particle-dynamics simulation of the whole cell, in which a two-dimensional network of virtual particles embedded in a three-dimensional closed surface represents the membrane. The particles interact via harmonic potential and dihedral angle potential and are subject to a constant area constraint. The evolution of the positions of the particles yields the equilibrium state of the membrane an...

  13. Perioperative dynamic alterations in peripheral regulatory T and B cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tianxiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intratumoral and circulating regulatory T cells (Tregs have been shown to be critical in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However there is limited knowledge on the alterations of regulatory B cells (Bregs. We here investigated perioperative dynamic alterations of peripheral circulating Tregs and Bregs in HCC patients to reveal the relationship between regulatory lymphocytes and its clinical implications. Methods 36 patients with HCC, 6 with chronic hepatitis B infection and 10 healthy donors were enrolled for this study. Frequencies of peripheral Tregs and Bregs were measured by flow cytometry with antibodies against CD4, CD25, CD127, CD19 and IL-10 before, and after radical surgery. Then, clinical informatics of HCC patients was achieved through Digital Evaluation Score System (DESS for the assessment of disease severity. Finally, we analysed correlations between digitalized clinical features and kinetics of circulating regulatory lymphocytes. Results Level of circulating CD4+CD25+CD127- Tregs in HCC patients was significantly lower than that in healthy donors and patients with chronic hepatitis B infection before surgery, but was increased after surgery. Preoperative level of CD19+ IL-10+ Bregs in HCC patients was also significantly lower than the other groups. However it dramatically was elevated right after surgery and remained elevated compared to controls (about 7 days after surgery, P = 0.04. Frequency of circulating Tregs was correlated with circulating leukocytes, ferritin, and clinical features suggesting tumor aggressiveness including portal vein thrombosis, hepatic vein involvement and advanced clinical stages. Frequency of circulating Bregs was associated with Hepatitis B e Antigen (HBeAg and Hepatitis B virus (HBV DNA copy number. In addition, DESS was significantly and positively correlated with other staging systems. Conclusion Frequencies of peripheral Tregs and Bregs in HCC patients

  14. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. ► ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. ► ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. ► ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  15. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara-Miyauchi, Chikako [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Tsuji, Osahiko [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hanyu, Aki [Division of Biochemistry, The Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okada, Seiji [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yasuda, Akimasa [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Fukano, Takashi [Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Akazawa, Chihiro [Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakamura, Masaya [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Imamura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Medicine for Pathogenesis, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, The Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Yumi [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Okano, Hirotaka James, E-mail: hjokano@jikei.ac.jp [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Division of Regenerative Medicine Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 150-8461 (Japan); and others

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  16. Radiosensitivity evaluation of Human tumor cell lines by single cell gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of determining radiosensitivity of human tumor cell lines in vitro using single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Methods: Three human tumor cell lines were selected in this study, HepG2, EC-9706 and MCF-7. The surviving fraction (SF) and DNA damage were detected by MTT assay, nested PCR technique and comet assay respectively. Results: MTT assay: The SF of HepG2 and EC-9706 after irradiated by 2, 4 and 8 Gy was lower significantly than that of MCF-7, which showed that the radiosensitivity of HepG2 and EC-9706 was higher than that of MCF-7. But there was no statistical difference of SF between HepG2 and EC-9706. SCGE: The difference of radiosensitivity among these three tumor cell lines was significant after 8 Gy γ-ray irradiation. Conclusion: The multi-utilization of many biological parameter is hopeful to evaluate the radiosensitivity of tumor cells more objectively and exactly. (authors)

  17. 78 FR 27441 - NIJ Evaluation of Hand-Held Cell Phone Detector Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... of Justice Programs NIJ Evaluation of Hand-Held Cell Phone Detector Devices AGENCY: National...) is soliciting interest in supplying hand-held cell phone detector devices for participation in an... soliciting interest in supplying hand-held cell phone detector devices for participation in an evaluation...

  18. Experimental investigation of dynamic performance and transient responses of a kW-class PEM fuel cell stack under various load changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic performance is a very important evaluation index of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells used for real application, which is mostly related with water, heat and gas management. A commercial PEM fuel cell system of Nexa module is employed to experimentally investigate the dynamic behavior and transient response of a PEM fuel cell stack and reveal involved influential factors. Five groups of dynamic tests are conducted and divided into different stage such as start-up, shut-down, step-up load, regular load variation and irregular load variation. It is observed that the external load changes the current output proportionally and reverses stack voltage accordingly. The purge operation benefits performance recovery and enhancement during a constant load and its time strongly depends on the operational current level. Overshoot and undershoot behaviors are observed during transience. But the current undershoot does not appear due to charge double-layer effect. Additionally, magnitudes of the peaks of the voltage overshoot and undershoot vary at different current levels. The operating temperature responds fast to current load but changes slowly showing an arc-like profile without any overshoot and undershoot events. The air flow rate changes directly following the dynamic load demand. But the increased amount of air flow rate during different step-change is not identical, which depends on the requirement of internal reaction and flooding intensity. The results can be utilized for validation of dynamic fuel cell models, and regarded as reference for effective control and management strategies.

  19. Applicability of the tissue stem cell turnover concept on the validity of cumulative dose based radiation risk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation protection system adopts the linear no-threshold model to achieve proper radiation protection for considering cancer risks resulting from radiation exposure. This model uses cumulative dose to a tissue for risk evaluation in which cumulative dose is related to the amount of DNA damage and consequential induction of gene mutation. In this concept, gene mutation accumulates in tissue stem cells, the putative target of carcinogenesis, with total dose given to the tissue. Unlike high-dose-rate exposure, epidemiological studies in high radiation background areas, such as Kerala in India, revealed that cancer risks is not elevated by the dose to the inhabitants, suggesting that there exists some mechanisms to eliminate the damage/mutation in the exposed tissue under extremely low-dose-rate exposure situations. In this report, the dynamics of tissue stem cell turnover is evaluated as a possible mechanism under extremely low-dose-rate exposure situations. To this end, we reviewed recent literatures studying tissue stem cell turnover, and found that great advances in stem cell research have made it possible to trace a fate of stem cells in tissues. Furthermore, turnover of tissue stem cells is found to occur after irradiation, due to competition of stem cells within tissues. This raises a possibility that radiation effects may not accumulate in a tissue depending on the dose-rate and duration of exposure period. (author)

  20. Evaluation of dynamic coastal response to sea-level rise modifies inundation likelihood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Erika E.; Thieler, E. Robert; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Stippa, Sawyer R.; Horton, Radley M.; Gesch, Dean B.

    2016-01-01

    Sea-level rise (SLR) poses a range of threats to natural and built environments1, 2, making assessments of SLR-induced hazards essential for informed decision making3. We develop a probabilistic model that evaluates the likelihood that an area will inundate (flood) or dynamically respond (adapt) to SLR. The broad-area applicability of the approach is demonstrated by producing 30 × 30 m resolution predictions for more than 38,000 km2 of diverse coastal landscape in the northeastern United States. Probabilistic SLR projections, coastal elevation and vertical land movement are used to estimate likely future inundation levels. Then, conditioned on future inundation levels and the current land-cover type, we evaluate the likelihood of dynamic response versus inundation. We find that nearly 70% of this coastal landscape has some capacity to respond dynamically to SLR, and we show that inundation models over-predict land likely to submerge. This approach is well suited to guiding coastal resource management decisions that weigh future SLR impacts and uncertainty against ecological targets and economic constraints.