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Sample records for cell distribution width

  1. Red cell distribution width in type 2 diabetic patients

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    Nada AM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aml Mohamed Nada Department of Internal Medicine, Unit of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Objective: To study the indices of some elements of the complete blood count, in type 2 diabetic patients, in comparison with nondiabetic healthy controls; and to find out the effects of glycemic control and different medications on these indices. To the best of our knowledge, this study is novel in our environment and will serve as a foundation for other researchers in this field. Methods: This retrospective study included 260 type 2 diabetic patients on treatment and 44 healthy control subjects. Sex, age, weight, height, blood pressure, complete blood count, fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, and lipid profile data, were available for all of the study population. For diabetic patients, data on duration of diabetes and all medications were also available. Results: Red cell distribution width (RDW was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in control subjects (P=0.008. It was also higher in patients with uncontrolled glycemia (HbA1c >7% than those with good control (HbA1c ≤7%; P=0.035. Mean platelet volume (MPV was comparable in both diabetic patients and healthy controls (P=0.238. RDW and MPV did not significantly correlate with fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, or duration of diabetes. Both aspirin and clopidogrel did not show a significant effect on MPV. Both insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents did not show a significant effect on RDW, mean corpuscular volume, MPV, platelet count, or white blood cell count. Diabetic patients treated with indapamide or the combined thiazides and angiotensin receptor blockers showed no significant difference in RDW when compared with the control subjects. Conclusion: RDW, which is recently considered as an inflammatory marker with a significant predictive value of mortality in diseased and healthy populations, is significantly higher in

  2. Relationship between red cell distribution width and early renal injury in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

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    Cheng, Dong; Zhao, Jiangtao; Jian, Liguo; Ding, Tongbin; Liu, Shichao

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies found that red cell distribution width was related to adverse cardiovascular events. However, few studies reported the relationship between red cell distribution width and early-stage renal injury in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Using a cross-sectional design, 334 pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus were enrolled according to the criterion of inclusion and exclusion. Demographic and clinical examination data were collected. Depended on the urine albumin, study population were divided into case group (n = 118) and control group (n = 216). Compared with control group, the case group tend to be higher red cell distribution width level (13.6 ± 0.9 vs.12.5 ± 0.6, p gestational diabetes mellitus patients. The elevated red cell distribution width level might be a predictor of early-stage renal injury in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. As an easy and routine examination index, red cell distribution width may provide better clinical guidance when combined with other important indices.

  3. Red blood cell distribution width and 1-year mortality in acute heart failure

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    van Kimmenade, Roland R. J.; Mohammed, Asim A.; Uthamalingam, Shanmugam; van der Meer, Peter; Felker, G. Michael; Januzzi, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) predicts mortality in chronic heart failure (HF) and stable coronary artery disease. The prognostic value of RDW in more acute settings such as acute HF, and its relative prognostic value compared with more established measures such as N-terminal pro-brain nat

  4. A Nomogram to Predict Prognostic Value of Red Cell Distribution Width in Patients with Esophageal Cancer

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    Gui-Ping Chen; Ying Huang; Xun Yang; Ji-Feng Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The prognostic value of inflammatory index in esophageal cancer (EC) was not established. In the present study, we initially used a nomogram to predict prognostic value of red cell distribution width (RDW) in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods. A total of 277 ESCC patients were included in this retrospective study. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the cancer-specific survival (CSS). A nomogram was established to predict the prognosis for CSS....

  5. Hubungan Nilai Red Cell Distribution Width dengan Mortalitas pada Pasien Sepsis di Unit Perawatan Intensif Anak

    OpenAIRE

    Devina, Trina

    2014-01-01

    Background Red cell distribution width (RDW) is a hematological parameter routinely obtained as part of the complete blood count. Recently, RDW has emerged as a potential independent predictor of clinical outcome in adult with sepsis. However, the role of RDW as a mortality predictor in pediatric population remains doubtful. Objective The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between RDW value and mortality in pediatric sepsis. Method We performed a cross sectional study o...

  6. A Nomogram to Predict Prognostic Value of Red Cell Distribution Width in Patients with Esophageal Cancer

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    Gui-Ping Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The prognostic value of inflammatory index in esophageal cancer (EC was not established. In the present study, we initially used a nomogram to predict prognostic value of red cell distribution width (RDW in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. Methods. A total of 277 ESCC patients were included in this retrospective study. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the cancer-specific survival (CSS. A nomogram was established to predict the prognosis for CSS. Results. The mean value of RDW was 14.5 ± 2.3%. The patients were then divided into two groups: RDW ≥ 14.5% and RDW < 14.5%. Patients with RDW < 14.5% had a significantly better 5-year CSS than patients with RDW ≥ 14.5% (43.9% versus 23.3%, P < 0.001. RDW was an independent prognostic factor in patients with ESCC (P = 0.036. A nomogram could be more accurate for CSS. Harrell’s c-index for CSS prediction was 0.68. Conclusion. RDW was a potential prognostic biomarker in patients with ESCC. The nomogram based on CSS could be used as an accurately prognostic prediction for patients with ESCC.

  7. Red blood cell distribution width and iron deficiency anemia among pregnant Sudanese women

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    Abdelrahman Esam G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA is a major health problem during pregnancy and it has adverse effects on the mother and the newborn. Red cell distribution width (RDW, which is a quantitative measure for red cell size variation (anisocytosis, is a predictor of IDA. Little is known regarding RDW and IDA during pregnancy. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted at the antenatal clinic of Khartoum Hospital, Sudan, to determine the performance of RDW in the diagnosis of IDA using serum ferritin as a gold standard. Results Among 194 pregnant women with a gestational period of 21.4 ± 6.5 weeks, 57 (29.4% had IDA according to serum ferritin levels (14.5. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of RDW where serum ferritin was the gold standard were 43.8% (95% CI: 31.4–57.0%, 73.7% (95% CI: 65.8–80.5%, 41.0% (95% CI: 29.2–53.6%, and 76.0% (95% CI: 68.1–82.6%, respectively. Conclusions In this study, we found that RDW has a poor performance in diagnosing IDA among pregnant women compared with serum ferritin as the gold standard. Virtual slides The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1721072967826303

  8. Variation of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Mean Platelet Volume after Moderate Endurance Exercise

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    Giuseppe Lippi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although physical exercise strongly influences several laboratory parameters, data about the hematological changes after medium distance running are scarce. We studied 31 middle-trained athletes (mean training regimen 217±32 min/week who performed a 21.1 km, half-marathon run. Blood samples were collected before the run, at the end, and 3 and 20 hours thereafter. The complete blood count was performed on Advia 2120 and included red blood cell (RBC, reticulocyte, and platelet counts; hemoglobin; mean corpuscular volume (MCV; mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH; reticulocyte haemoglobin content (Ret CHR; RBC distribution width (RDW, mean platelet volume (MPV. No significant variations were observed for MCH and Ret CHR. The RBC, reticulocyte, and hemoglobin values modestly decreased after the run. The MCV significantly increased at the end of running but returned to baseline 3 hours thereafter. The RDW constantly increased, reaching a peak 20 hours after the run. The platelet count and MPV both increased after the run and returned to baseline 3 hours thereafter. These results may have implications for definition of reference ranges and antidoping testing, and may also contribute to explaining the relationship between endurance exercise and mortality, since previous studies reported that RDW and MPV may be significantly associated with cardiovascular disease.

  9. The Evaluation of Red Cell Distribution Width in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

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    Hikmet Tekce

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Red cell distribution width (RDW has been used as a marker of iron deficiency; however, it is accepted as a marker of cardiovascular survival. We aimed to study RDW levels in hemodialysis (HD patients and the association between RDW and inflammatory, nutritional, and volume markers. Methods. We included 296 HD patients with sufficient iron storage and without anemia or hypervolemia. We grouped patients into four groups according to clinical parameters, albumin, and C-reactive protein (CRP. Results. The lowest RDW levels were found in group 1 (13.2%. Although RDW of group 2 was higher than that of group 1, it was still in normal range (14.7% versus 13.2%, P=0.028. RDW levels of groups 3 (17.8% and 4 (18.5% were significantly higher than those of groups 1 and 2 and above normal range. A positive correlation was detected between RDW and HD duration, interdialytic weight gain (IDWG, serum phosphate, and CRP levels and a negative correlation was detected with serum albumin. HD duration, CRP, IDWG, and serum albumin have been found as independent predictors of RDW elevation. Conclusions. Results of the present study reflect adverse effects of inflammation, malnutrition, and excess IDWG on RDW elevation in an HD study cohort with sufficient iron storage and without anemia and hypervolemia.

  10. Variation of red blood cell distribution width and mean platelet volume after moderate endurance exercise.

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    Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Danese, Elisa; Tarperi, Cantor; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Schena, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Although physical exercise strongly influences several laboratory parameters, data about the hematological changes after medium distance running are scarce. We studied 31 middle-trained athletes (mean training regimen 217 ± 32 min/week) who performed a 21.1 km, half-marathon run. Blood samples were collected before the run, at the end, and 3 and 20 hours thereafter. The complete blood count was performed on Advia 2120 and included red blood cell (RBC), reticulocyte, and platelet counts; hemoglobin; mean corpuscular volume (MCV); mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH); reticulocyte haemoglobin content (Ret CHR); RBC distribution width (RDW), mean platelet volume (MPV). No significant variations were observed for MCH and Ret CHR. The RBC, reticulocyte, and hemoglobin values modestly decreased after the run. The MCV significantly increased at the end of running but returned to baseline 3 hours thereafter. The RDW constantly increased, reaching a peak 20 hours after the run. The platelet count and MPV both increased after the run and returned to baseline 3 hours thereafter. These results may have implications for definition of reference ranges and antidoping testing, and may also contribute to explaining the relationship between endurance exercise and mortality, since previous studies reported that RDW and MPV may be significantly associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:25197280

  11. Admission red cell distribution width: a novel predictor of massive transfusion after injury.

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    Paulus, Elena M; Weinberg, Jordan A; Magnotti, Louis J; Sharpe, John P; Schroeppel, Thomas J; Fabian, Timothy C; Croce, Martin A

    2014-07-01

    Admission red cell distribution width (aRDW) has been shown to predict mortality in trauma patients by an unclear mechanism. It has been speculated that aRDW is a marker of chronic health status, but elevated RDW may also reflect recent hemorrhage. We hypothesized that aRDW is a predictor of major hemorrhage in trauma patients. Shock trauma patients at a Level I trauma center over 6.5 years were evaluated. Patients were stratified by aRDW quintile (Q1: less than 13%, Q2: 13.1 to 13.5%, Q3: 13.6 to 14.0%, Q4: 14.1 to 14.9%, Q5: 15.0% or greater). Massive transfusion (MT) was defined as 10 or more packed red blood cells in the first 24 hours. From multiple logistic regression, odds ratios with 95 per cent confidence intervals (CIs) were determined to evaluate the association between aRDW quintile and MT. Three thousand nine hundred ninety-four met study criteria. Overall MT incidence was 10 per cent and in-hospital mortality was 17 per cent. MT and mortality increased in a stepwise fashion by aRDW quintile (P < 0.0001). From logistic regression, a threefold increased odds of MT was associated with aRDW Q4 (CI, 1.81 to 4.92), and a 3.5-fold increased odds of MT was associated with aRDW Q5 (CI, 2.70 to 5.83). aRDW independently predicted MT, suggesting that elevated aRDW is an indicator of major hemorrhage in trauma patients. The association between aRDW and mortality in trauma patients may be explained by acute hemorrhage rather than chronic health status.

  12. Determinants of Red Cell Distribution Width (RDW) in Cardiorenal Patients : RDW is Not Related to Erythropoietin Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emans, Mireille E.; van der Putten, Karien; van Rooijen, Karlijn L.; Kraaijenhagen, Rob J.; Swinkels, Dorine; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Cramer, Maarten J.; Doevendans, Pieter A. F. M.; Braam, Branko; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that red cell distribution width (RDW) is related to outcome in chronic heart failure (CHF). The pathophysiological process is unknown. We studied the relationship between RDW and erythropoietin (EPO) resistance, and related factors such as erythropoietic activity, fun

  13. To study the correlation between red cell distribution width and left ventricular ejection fraction in patients of acute myocardial infraction

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    Ramji Sharma; Akram Mohammed; Mayank Shrivastava; Ajay Mathur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is a condition in which there is an inadequate supply of blood and oxygen to a portion of myocardium. The objective of study was to assess the correlation between red cell distribution width and left ventricular ejection fraction in patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction. Methods: Study was conducted on 200 patients admitted at tertiary care centre with acute myocardial infarction satisfying inclusion criteria. Detailed history and cl...

  14. Red cell distribution width in relation to incidence of stroke and carotid atherosclerosis: a population-based cohort study.

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    Martin Söderholm

    Full Text Available Increased red cell distribution width (RDW has been related to poor prognosis in patients with cardiovascular disease, and is a predictor of cardiovascular mortality in the general population. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if RDW is associated with increased incidence of stroke and its subtypes in individuals from the general population.Red cell distribution width was measured in 26,879 participants (16,561 women and 10,318 men aged 45-73 years without history of coronary events or stroke, from the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Incidences of total stroke and stroke subtypes over a mean follow-up of 15.2 years were calculated in relation to sex-specific quartiles of RDW. The presence of carotid plaque and intima-media thickness, as assessed by ultrasound, was studied in relation to RDW in a randomly selected subcohort (n = 5,309.Incidences of total stroke (n = 1,869 and cerebral infarction (n = 1,544 were both increased in individuals with high RDW. Hazard ratios (HRs in the highest compared to the lowest quartile were 1.31 for total stroke (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11-1.54, p for trend = 0.004 and 1.32 for cerebral infarction (95% CI: 1.10-1.58, p for trend = 0.004 after adjustment for stroke risk factors and hematological parameters. The adjusted HR for intracerebral hemorrhage (n = 230 was 1.44 (95% CI: 0.90-2.30 and the HR for subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 75 was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.43-2.07, in the highest compared to the lowest quartile of RDW. Red cell distribution width was positively associated with intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (p for trend = 0.011.Red cell distribution width in the highest quartile was associated with increased incidence of total stroke and cerebral infarction. There was no significant association between RDW and incidence of intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  15. The Prognostic Role of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width in Coronary Artery Disease: A Review of the Pathophysiology

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    Kamil Bujak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cell distribution width (RDW is a measure of red blood cell volume variations (anisocytosis and is reported as part of a standard complete blood count. In recent years, numerous studies have noted the importance of RDW as a predictor of poor clinical outcomes in the settings of various diseases, including coronary artery disease (CAD. In this paper, we discuss the prognostic value of RDW in CAD and describe the pathophysiological connection between RDW and acute coronary syndrome. In our opinion, the negative prognostic effects of elevated RDW levels may be attributed to the adverse effects of independent risk factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and vitamin D3 and iron deficiency on bone marrow function (erythropoiesis. Elevated RDW values may reflect the intensity of these phenomena and their unfavorable impacts on bone marrow erythropoiesis. Furthermore, decreased red blood cell deformability among patients with higher RDW values impairs blood flow through the microcirculation, resulting in the diminution of oxygen supply at the tissue level, particularly among patients suffering from myocardial infarction treated with urgent revascularization.

  16. The clinical significance of changes in red blood cell distribution width in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

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    Lee, Sang-Min; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Kyuseok; Jo, You Hwan; Lee, Jungyoup; Kim, Joonghee; Hwang, Ji Eun; Ko, Young Sang; Ha, Chulmin; Jang, Sujin; Park, Hyunmi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Red cell distribution width (RDW) is associated with mortality in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, little is known about the effect of changes in RDW during treatment on mortality. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the association between RDW changes and mortality in hospitalized patients with CAP. Methods Retrospective analyses were performed using medical records of patients hospitalized for CAP from April 2008 to February 2014. The abstracted laboratory values included RDW (from days one to four), clinical variables, and pneumonia severity index (PSI) scores. The ΔRDWn-1 was defined as the change in RDW calculated as: (RDWday1-RDWday-n)/RDWday1×100 (%), where ‘day n’ refers to hospital day. Results During the study period, a total of 1,069 patients were hospitalized for CAP. The 30-day mortality was 100/1,069 (9.4%). The median RDW at baseline was 14.1% (range, 11.1 to 30.2) and differed significantly between survivors and non-survivors (P<0.05). There were 470 patients with available serial RDW data (30-day mortality 58/470 [12.3%]). Of those, age, PSI score, blood urea nitrogen level, total protein concentration, albumin level, RDW at day 1, and the ΔRDW4-1 differed significantly between survivors and non-survivors. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the significance of the relationship between ΔRDW4-1 and 30-day mortality risk remained after adjusting for age, PSI score, RDW at day 1, total protein concentration, and initial albumin level. Conclusion RDW change from day 1 to day 4 was an independent predictor of mortality in patients with CAP.

  17. Establishing biological reference intervals for novel platelet parameters (immature platelet fraction, high immature platelet fraction, platelet distribution width, platelet large cell ratio, platelet-X, plateletcrit, and platelet distribution width and their correlations among each other

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    Ritesh Sachdev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study aims to establish biological reference interval for novel platelet parameters. Settings and Design: A total of 945 healthy individuals, age ranges from 18 to 64 years (881 males and 64 females coming for voluntary blood donation from June to August 2012 (3 months were enrolled after exclusion of rejection criteria. Materials and Methods: The samples were assayed by running in complete blood count + reticulocyte mode on the Sysmex XE-2100 hematology analyzer and the reference interval for the population was calculated using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Statistical analysis used: Tests were performed using SPSS (Statistical Product and Service Solutions , developed by IBM corporation, version 13. Student t test and pearsons correlation analysis were also used. Results: The normal range for various parameters was platelet count: 150-520 × 10 3 /cu mm, immature platelet fraction (IPF: 0.3-8.7%, platelet distribution width (PDW: 8.3-25.0 fL, mean platelet volume (MPV: 8.6-15.5 fL, plateletcrit (PCT: 0.15-0.62%, high immature platelet fraction (H-IPF: 0.1-2.7%, platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR: 11.9-66.9% and platelet-X (PLT-X (ch: 11.0-22.0. Negative correlation was observed between platelet count (r = −0.468 to r = −0.531; P < 0.001 and PCT (r = −0.080 to r = −0.235; P < 0.05 to P < 0.001 with IPF, PDW, MPV, H-IPF, P-LCR, and platelet-X. IPF/H-IPF showed a positive correlation among them and also with PDW, MPV, P-LCR, platelet-X (r = +0.662 to r = +0.925; P < 0.001. Conclusions: These novel platelet parameters offer newer avenues in research and clinical use. Establishing biological reference interval for different platelet parameters would help determine true high and low values and help guide treatment decisions.

  18. Width Distributions for Convex Regular Polyhedra

    CERN Document Server

    Finch, Steven R

    2011-01-01

    The mean width is a measure on three-dimensional convex bodies that enjoys equal status with volume and surface area [Rota]. As the phrase suggests, it is the mean of a probability density f. We verify formulas for mean widths of the regular tetrahedron and the cube. Higher-order moments of f_tetra and f_cube have not been examined until now. Assume that each polyhedron has edges of unit length. We deduce that the mean square width of the regular tetrahedron is 1/3+(3+sqrt(3))/(3*pi) and the mean square width of the cube is 1+4/pi.

  19. Red cell distribution width and other red blood cell parameters in patients with cancer: association with risk of venous thromboembolism and mortality.

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    Julia Riedl

    Full Text Available Cancer patients are at high risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE. Red cell distribution width (RDW has been reported to be associated with arterial and venous thrombosis and mortality in several diseases. Here, we analyzed the association between RDW and other red blood cell (RBC parameters with risk of VTE and mortality in patients with cancer.RBC parameters were measured in 1840 patients with cancers of the brain, breast, lung, stomach, colon, pancreas, prostate, kidney; lymphoma, multiple myeloma and other tumor sites, that were included in the Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study (CATS, which is an ongoing prospective, observational cohort study of patients with newly diagnosed or progressive cancer after remission. Primary study outcome is occurrence of symptomatic VTE and secondary outcome is death during a maximum follow-up of 2 years.During a median follow-up of 706 days, 131 (7.1% patients developed VTE and 702 (38.2% died. High RDW (>16% was not associated with a higher risk of VTE in the total study cohort; in competing risk analysis accounting for death as competing variable the univariable subhazard ratio (SHR was 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.80-2.23, p = 0.269. There was also no significant association between other RBC parameters and risk of VTE. High RDW was associated with an increased risk of mortality in the total study population (hazard ratio [HR, 95% CI]: 1.72 [1.39-2.12], p<0.001, and this association prevailed after adjustment for age, sex, hemoglobin, leukocyte and platelet count (HR [95% CI]: 1.34 [1.06-1.70], p = 0.016.RDW and other RBC parameters were not independently associated with risk of VTE in patients with cancer and might therefore not be of added value for estimating risk of VTE in patients with cancer. We could confirm that high RDW is an independent predictor of poor overall survival in cancer.

  20. The Acute Effect of the Antioxidant Drug U-74389G on Red Blood Cell Distribution Width Levels During Hypoxia Reoxygenation Injury in Rats

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    Tsompos Constantinos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The AIM of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of the antioxidant drug “U-74389G” in a rat model of hypoxia reoxygenation (HR using the previously established protocol. Effects of treatment were evaluated by mean red blood cell distribution width (RDW levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 40 rats of a mean weight of 231.875 g were employed in the study. RDW levels were determined at 60 min (groups A and C and at 120 min (groups B and D after starting the reoxygenation. Groups A and B received no drugs, whereas rats from groups C and D were administered with U-74389G. RESULTS: demonstrated that U-74389G administration significantly decreased the RDW levels by 4.96% + 2.27% (p = 0.0175. Reoxygenation time non-significantly decreased the RDW levels by 0.27% + 2.41% (p = 0.8889. Together, U-74389G administration and reoxygenation time non-significantly decreased the RDW levels by 2.54% + 1.39% (p = 0.0679. CONCLUSIONS: U-74389G administration particulary in concert without reperfusion declines the RDW levels even within the short - time context of 1.5 hours reperfusion.

  1. The Value of Erythrocyte Indices and Red Cell Volume Distribution Width in Differential Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency Anemia and Anemia of Chronic Disease

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    Abdullah Altıntaş

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia (IDA and anemia of chronic disease are the most commonly confused anemias. We investigate the diagnostic value of erythrocyte indices, red cell volume distribution width, and serum ferritin levels to make differential diagnosis of anemia in controls and anemic patients.Iron deficiency anemia (44 patients, anemia of chronic disease (41, IDA with anemia of chronic disease (17 and control (50 groups were compared. We performed serum ferritin, CBC, and sedimentation rate in all patientsand bone marrow aspiration in patients with anemia of chronic disease.Although mean cell volume (MCV and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH are low in IDA and anemia of chronic disease, it is much striking in the former one (p<0.001, p<0.001. Only 7.3% of patients with anemia of chronic disease had a MCV<70 fL and MCH<24 pg, 90.0% of patients with IDA were below that cut-off point. Serum ferritin means were in patients with IDA and anemia of chronic disease were 4.6±3.3 and 489.6 ±519.9 ng/ml, respectively.The probability of IDA is low when RDW is normal in microcytic anemias. RDW is high in half of patients with anemia of chronic disease. Reference values for ferritin must be changed in patients with anemia of chronic disease and IDA. If serum ferritin is 57.6-146.4 ng/ml anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency must ruled out by other diagnostic tests.

  2. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width (RDW in thorougbred horses from 12 to 24 months of age/ Valores da amplitude de distribuição do tamanho dos eritrócitos (RDW – Red Cell Distribution Width em equinos da raça puro sangue inglês (PSI de ambos os sexos de 12 a 24 meses de idade

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    Raimundo Souza Lopes

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to establish reference values for red blood cell distribution width (RDW in health horses. We obtained blood samples through jugular punctured from 90 clinicaly health thorougbred horses between 12 and 24 months of age. Blood was obtained in a Cell-Dyn 3500 (Abbott Diagnostic cell counter. Mean ± standart deviation values for RDW in male horses were 26,90 ± 1,41, whereas in females values were 26,89 ± 1,75. There were no differences in the RDW values between sexes, therefore, our reference values can be used in both males and females.O objetivo do presente estudo foi estabelecer valores da amplitude de distribuição do tamanho dos eritrócitos (RDW em eqüinos clinicamente sadios. Foram utilizadas 90 amostras de sangue de eqüinos da raça Puro Sangue Inglês (PSI, clinicamente sadios de 12 a 24 meses de idade, obtidas por venipunção jugular em tubos à vácuo contendo EDTA 10%. Posteriormente as amostras foram processadas no contador automático de células Cell-Dyn 3500 (Abbott Diagnostic. Os valores médios e o desvios-padrão para o RDW (% de machos foi de 26,90 ± 1,41 e para as fêmeas de 26,89 ± 1,75. Os resultados demonstram não haver diferenças nos valores de RDW para machos e fêmeas, podendo ser utilizados como referência para ambos os sexos.

  3. Combined Value of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Risk Score for Predicting Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

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    Zhao, Na; Mi, Lan; Liu, Xiaojun; Pan, Shuo; Xu, Jiaojiao; Xia, Dongyu; Liu, Zhongwei; Zhang, Yong; Xiang, Yu; Yuan, Zuyi; Guan, Gongchang; Wang, Junkui

    2015-01-01

    Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk score and red blood cell distribution width (RDW) content can both independently predict major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We investigated the combined predictive value of RDW and GRACE risk score for cardiovascular events in patients with ACS undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for the first time. We enrolled 480 ACS patients. During a median follow-up time of 37.2 months,...

  4. Narrowing of Terrace-width Distributions During Growth on Vicinals

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    Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Pimpinelli, A.; Einstein, T. L.

    2009-03-01

    Using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations for a generic minimal SOS model of vicinal surfaces, we compute the terrace-width distributions (TWDs) as a function of incident flux during homoepitaxial growth. We show that the distribution narrows markedly, U.B.P.-Clermont 2 as though there were a flux-dependent repulsion between steps, until the step picture fails at high flux. Using a Fokker-Planck approach, we analyze the evolution and saturation of this narrowing. We compare with a 1D model and with our simulations for narrowing due to an Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier.

  5. The distribution of equivalent widths in long GRB afterglow spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Postigo, A de Ugarte; Thoene, C C; Christensen, L; Gorosabel, J; Milvang-Jensen, B; Schulze, S; Jakobsson, P; Wiersema, K; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Leloudas, G; Zafar, T; Malesani, D; Hjorth, J

    2012-01-01

    The extreme brightness of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and their simple spectral shape make them ideal beacons to study the interstellar medium of their host galaxies through absorption line spectroscopy. Using 69 low-resolution GRB afterglow spectra, we conduct a study of the rest-frame equivalent width (EW) distribution of features with an average rest-frame EW larger than 0.5 A. To compare an individual GRB with the sample, we develop EW diagrams as a graphical tool, and we give a catalogue with diagrams for the 69 spectra. We introduce a line strength parameter (LSP) that allows us to quantify the strength of the absorption features as compared to the sample by a single number. Using the distributions of EWs of single-species features, we derive the distribution of column densities by a curve of growth (CoG) fit. We find correlations between the LSP and the extinction of the GRB, the UV brightness of the host galaxies and the neutral hydrogen column density. However, we see no significant evolution of...

  6. The distribution of equivalent widths in long GRB afterglow spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Thöne, C. C.; Christensen, L.; Gorosabel, J.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Schulze, S.; Jakobsson, P.; Wiersema, K.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Leloudas, G.; Zafar, T.; Malesani, D.; Hjorth, J.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The extreme brightness of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and their simple spectral shape make them ideal beacons to study the interstellar medium of their host galaxies through absorption line spectroscopy at almost any redshift. Aims: We describe the distribution of rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) of the most prominent absorption features in GRB afterglow spectra, providing the means to compare individual spectra to the sample and identify its peculiarities. Methods: Using 69 low-resolution GRB afterglow spectra, we conduct a study of the rest-frame EWs distribution of features with an average rest-frame EW larger than 0.5 Å. To compare an individual GRB with the sample, we develop EW diagrams as a graphical tool, and we give a catalogue with diagrams for the 69 spectra. We introduce a line strength parameter (LSP) that allows us to quantify the strength of the absorption features in a GRB spectrum as compared to the sample by a single number. Using the distributions of EWs of single-species features, we derive the distribution of their column densities by a curve of growth (CoG) fit. Results: We find correlations between the LSP and the extinction of the GRB, the UV brightness of the host galaxies and the neutral hydrogen column density. However, we see no significant evolution of the LSP with the redshift. There is a weak correlation between the ionisation of the absorbers and the energy of the GRB, indicating that, either the GRB event is responsible for part of the ionisation, or that galaxies with high-ionisation media produce more energetic GRBs. Spectral features in GRB spectra are, on average, 2.5 times stronger than those seen in QSO intervening damped Lyman-α (DLA) systems and slightly more ionised. In particular we find a larger excess in the EW of C ivλλ1549 relative to QSO DLAs, which could be related to an excess of Wolf-Rayet stars in the environments of GRBs. From the CoG fitting we obtain an average number of components in the

  7. Índice de anisocitose eritrocitária (RDW: diferenciação das anemias microcíticas e hipocrômicas Red blood cell distribution width (RDW: differentiation of microcytic and hypochromic anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Januária F. Matos

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A anemia ferropriva, talassemia menor e anemia de doença crônica são as anemias microcíticas e hipocrômicas mais comuns em nosso meio. O diagnóstico diferencial das referidas anemias é de grande importância clínica; contudo, muitas vezes é complexo em virtude de concomitância de doenças, além de demandar tempo e apresentar custos significativos. Com o propósito de conferir maior simplicidade e eficiência ao diagnóstico diferencial destas anemias, o uso de índices derivados de modernos contadores automáticos tem sido sugerido. Entre estes, pode ser citado o índice de anisocitose eritrocitária (RDW, que indica o grau de variabilidade do tamanho das hemácias. Neste estudo, o poder de discriminação deste índice quanto ao tipo de anemia microcítica e hipocrômica foi avaliado em um grupo de 159 pacientes sabidamente portadores de um quadro de anemia causado por deficiência de ferro, beta talassemia menor ou uma anemia de doença crônica. Não foi observada diferença significativa para o RDW entre os três grupos de anemias microcíticas, indicando não ser este índice uma ferramenta útil para a diferenciação entre anemia ferropriva, beta talassemia menor e anemia de doença crônica.Iron deficiency anemia, the thalassemia trait and chronic disease anemia are the most common microcytic and hypochromic anemias in the Brazilian population. Differential diagnosis of these anemias is of great clinical importance however, frequently, it is complex due to coexistence of diseases, as well as being time consuming and expensive. In order to simplify and increase efficiently of checking the differential diagnoses of these anemias, the use of indexes derived from modern blood cell counters has been suggested. Among them, is the index called red blood cell distribution width which indicates the variability in red blood cell size. In this study, the discriminative power of the red blood cell distribution width in differentiating

  8. Dependence of Wave Height Distribution on Spectral Width and Wave Steepness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文凡; 吴自库; 吕红民

    2004-01-01

    In this paper experimental wind wave data are analyzed. It is found that differences in spectral width will give rise to differences in wave height distribution. The effect of spectral width on the distribution is mainly in the high wave range.The effect of wave steepness is in low, medium and high wave ranges. In the high wave range the effect of spectral width is comparable to that of wave steepness. Differences in spectral width in the observations may give rise to discrepancies in the result when wave steepness is the only parameter in the distribution.

  9. 红细胞体积分布宽度与冠心病的关系研究%Correlation of red blood cell distribution width with coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛春梅; 马礼坤

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the relation between red blood cell distribution width(RDW)and coronary heart disease (CHD).Methods A total of 152 patients with CHD by coronary angiography admitted to our hospital were assigned to coronary heart disease group, and another 67 healthy cases in hospital physical examination in the same period were selected as control group.The laboratory indicators,in-cluding RDW,red blood cell count(RBC),hemoglobin(HGB),average red blood cell volume(MCV),white blood cell count(WBC),hema-tocrit(Hct),platelet count(PLT),mean platelet volume(MPV),aspartate aminotransferase(AST),alanine aminotransferase(ALT),muscle, liver(Cr),blood urea nitrogen(BUN)of the two groups were compared.The severity of coronary artery lesions was evaluated by modified Gensini score method,and its correlation with RDW was analyzed.Results Compared with control group,RDW in CHD group increased sig-nificantly(P <0.05).Conclusion RDW is associated with CHD and the severity of coronary artery lesion,which could be a predictor for the severity of pathological changes in coronary artery.%目的:探讨红细胞分布宽度(RDW)与冠心病(CHD)的关系。方法选取冠状动脉造影确诊的152例 CHD 患者为 CHD 组,67例健康体检人群为对照组。对比分析两组人群的 RDW、红细胞计数(RBC)、血红蛋白(HGB)、红细胞平均体积(MCV)、血细胞比容(Hct)、白细胞计数(WBC)、血小板计数(PLT)、平均血小板体积(MPV)、天冬氨酸氨基转移酶(AST)、丙氨酸氨基转移酶(ALT)、血肌肝(Cr)、尿素氮(BUN);采用改良 Gensini 积分法评价冠状动脉病变的严重程度。结果与对照组比较, CHD 组 RDW 明显升高(P <0.05)。结论RDW 与 CHD 及冠状动脉病变严重程度存在一定关系,可以预测其严重程度。

  10. Combined Value of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Risk Score for Predicting Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Mi, Lan; Liu, Xiaojun; Pan, Shuo; Xu, Jiaojiao; Xia, Dongyu; Liu, Zhongwei; Zhang, Yong; Xiang, Yu; Yuan, Zuyi; Guan, Gongchang; Wang, Junkui

    2015-01-01

    Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk score and red blood cell distribution width (RDW) content can both independently predict major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We investigated the combined predictive value of RDW and GRACE risk score for cardiovascular events in patients with ACS undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for the first time. We enrolled 480 ACS patients. During a median follow-up time of 37.2 months, 70 (14.58%) patients experienced MACEs. Patients were divided into tertiles according to the baseline RDW content (11.30–12.90, 13.00–13.50, 13.60–16.40). GRACE score was positively correlated with RDW content. Multivariate Cox analysis showed that both GRACE score and RDW content were independent predictors of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.039; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.024–1.055; p < 0.001; 1.699; 1.294–2.232; p < 0.001; respectively). Furthermore, Kaplan–Meier analysis demonstrated that the risk of MACEs increased with increasing RDW content (p < 0.001). For GRACE score alone, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for MACEs was 0.749 (95% CI: 0.707–0.787). The area under the ROC curve for MACEs increased to 0.805 (0.766–0.839, p = 0.034) after adding RDW content. The incremental predictive value of combining RDW content and GRACE risk score was significantly improved, also shown by the net reclassification improvement (NRI = 0.352, p < 0.001) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI = 0.023, p = 0.002). Combining the predictive value of RDW and GRACE risk score yielded a more accurate predictive value for long-term cardiovascular events in ACS patients who underwent PCI as compared to each measure alone. PMID:26468876

  11. Combined Value of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Risk Score for Predicting Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Zhao

    Full Text Available Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE risk score and red blood cell distribution width (RDW content can both independently predict major adverse cardiac events (MACEs in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS. We investigated the combined predictive value of RDW and GRACE risk score for cardiovascular events in patients with ACS undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI for the first time. We enrolled 480 ACS patients. During a median follow-up time of 37.2 months, 70 (14.58% patients experienced MACEs. Patients were divided into tertiles according to the baseline RDW content (11.30-12.90, 13.00-13.50, 13.60-16.40. GRACE score was positively correlated with RDW content. Multivariate Cox analysis showed that both GRACE score and RDW content were independent predictors of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.039; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.024-1.055; p < 0.001; 1.699; 1.294-2.232; p < 0.001; respectively. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that the risk of MACEs increased with increasing RDW content (p < 0.001. For GRACE score alone, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve for MACEs was 0.749 (95% CI: 0.707-0.787. The area under the ROC curve for MACEs increased to 0.805 (0.766-0.839, p = 0.034 after adding RDW content. The incremental predictive value of combining RDW content and GRACE risk score was significantly improved, also shown by the net reclassification improvement (NRI = 0.352, p < 0.001 and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI = 0.023, p = 0.002. Combining the predictive value of RDW and GRACE risk score yielded a more accurate predictive value for long-term cardiovascular events in ACS patients who underwent PCI as compared to each measure alone.

  12. Enlarging Red Blood Cell Distribution Width During Hospitalization Identifies a Very High-Risk Subset of Acutely Decompensated Heart Failure Patients and Adds Valuable Prognostic Information on Top of Hemoconcentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, João Pedro; Girerd, Nicolas; Arrigo, Mattia; Medeiros, Pedro Bettencourt; Ricardo, Miguel Bento; Almeida, Tiago; Rola, Alexandre; Tolpannen, Heli; Laribi, Said; Gayat, Etienne; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Mueller, Christian; Zannad, Faiez; Rossignol, Patrick; Aragão, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) may serve as an integrative marker of pathological processes that portend worse prognosis in heart failure (HF). The prognostic value of RDW variation (ΔRDW) during hospitalization for acute heart failure (AHF) has yet to be studied. We retrospectively analyzed 2 independent cohorts: Centro Hospitalar do Porto (derivation cohort) and Lariboisière hospital (validation cohort). In the derivation cohort a total of 170 patients (age 76.2 ± 10.3 years) were included and in the validation cohort 332 patients were included (age 76.4 ± 12.2 years). In the derivation cohort the primary composite outcome of HF admission and/or cardiovascular death occurred in 78 (45.9%) patients during the 180-day follow-up period. Discharge RDW and ΔRDW were both increased when hemoglobin levels were lower; peripheral edema was also associated with increased discharge RDW (all P  15% at discharge was associated with a 2-fold increase in event rate, HR = 1.95 (1.05–3.62), P = 0.04, while a ΔRDW >0 also had a strong association with outcome, HR = 2.47 (1.35–4.51), P = 0.003. The addition of both discharge RDW > 15% and ΔRDW > 0 to hemoconcentration was associated with a significant improvement in the net reclassification index, NRI = 18.3 (4.3–43.7), P = 0.012. Overlapping results were found in the validation cohort. As validated in 2 independent AHF cohorts, an in-hospital RDW enlargement and an elevated RDW at discharge are associated with increased rates of mid-term events. RDW variables improve the risk stratification of these patients on top of well-established prognostic markers. PMID:27057905

  13. Does prism width from the shell prismatic layer have a random distribution?

    OpenAIRE

    Verrecchia, Eric P.; Vancolen, Séverine

    2009-01-01

    A study of the distribution of the prism width inside the prismatic layer of Unio tumidus (Philipsson 1788, Diss Hist-Nat, Berling, Lundæ) from Lake Neuchâtel, Switzerland, has been conducted in order to determine whether or not this distribution is random. Measurements of 954 to 1,343 prism widths (depending on shell sample) have been made using a scanning electron microscope in backscattered electron mode. A white noise test has been applied to the distribution of prism sizes (i.e. width). ...

  14. A Novel Multisection Distributed Feedback Laser with Varied Ridge Width for Self-Pulsation Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Qin; SUN Chang-Zheng; XIONG Bing; WANG Jian; LUO Yi

    2006-01-01

    @@ A novel ridge-waveguide multisection (MS) distributed feedback (DFB) laser, which consists of two identical DFB sections but different ridge widths, is proposed to generate beating-type self-pulsations (SPs).

  15. The role of red cell distribution width in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis%红细胞体积分布宽度在急性胰腺炎诊断中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖; 周伟; 周芸华

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨红细胞体积分布宽度(RDW)在急性胰腺炎诊断中的作用。方法用血细胞分析仪测定45例急性胰腺炎患者和66例健康对照者 RDW 水平及白细胞计数(WBC),并用统计学方法进行比较分析。结果急性胰腺炎患者外周血 RDW(14.1±1.6)%与对照组的(13.2±1.1)%相比明显升高(P <0.05),ROC 曲线分析 RDW 和 WBC 在诊断急性胰腺炎的敏感性和特异性分别为71%、62%,84%、72%。结论RDW 在急性胰腺炎是升高的,但在诊断该病时具有一定的局限性。%Objective To explore the role of red cell distribution width(RDW)in the diagnosis of acute pan-creatitis.Methods RDW and leukocyte count were measured by Blood cell analyzer for 45 patients with acute pancre-atitis and 66 healthy person in the control group,then a comparative analysis was did.Results The mean RDW levels were(14.1±1.6)% in the acute pancreatitis group,while(13.2±1.1)% in the control group.RDW level were sig-nificantly higher in the acute pancreatitis group than that in the control goup(P <0.05).RDW and leukocyte count had a sensitivity and specificity that71% and 62%;and 84% and 72%,respectively in acute pancreatitis.Conclusion RDW level was higher in patients with acute pancreatitis.However,there is some limitations of RDW in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis has a little limitations.

  16. Resonance width distribution in RMT: Weak-coupling regime beyond Porter-Thomas

    OpenAIRE

    Fyodorov, YV; Savin, DV

    2015-01-01

    We employ the random matrix theory (RMT) framework to revisit the distribution of resonance widths in quantum chaotic systems weakly coupled to the continuum via a finite number M of open channels. In contrast to the standard first-order perturbation theory treatment we do not a priori assume the resonance widths being small compared to the mean level spacing. We show that to the leading order in weak coupling the perturbative χM2 distribution of the resonance widths (in particular, the Porte...

  17. Red blood cell distribution width and long-term outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the drug-eluting stenting era: a two-year cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Mu Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest the higher the red blood cell distribution width (RDW the greater the risk of mortality in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. However, the relationship between RDW and long-term outcome in CAD patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI with a drug-eluting stent (DES remains unclear. This study was designed to evaluate the long-term effect of RDW in patients treated with drug-eluting stent for CAD. METHODS: In total of 2169 non-anemic patients (1468 men, mean age 60.2 ± 10.9 years with CAD who had undergone successful PCI and had at least one drug-eluting stent were included in this study. Patients were grouped according to their baseline RDW: Quartile 1 (RDW<12.27%, Quartile 2 (12.27% ≤ RDW <13%, Quartile 3 (13% ≤ RDW<13.5%, and Quartile 4 (RDW ≥ 13.5. RESULTS: The incidence of in-hospital mortality and death or myocardial infarction was significantly higher in Quartiles 3 and 4 compared with Quartile 1 (P<0.05. After a follow-up of 29 months, the incidence of all-cause death and stent thrombosis in Quartile 4 was higher than in Quartiles 1, 2, and 3 (P<0.05. The incidence of death/myocardial infarction/stroke and cardiac death in Quartile 4 was higher than in Quartiles 1 and 2 (P<0.05. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that RDW was an independent predictor of all-cause death (hazard ratio (HR = 1.37, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.15-1.62, P<0.001 and outcomes of death/myocardial infarction/stroke (HR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.04-1.39, P = 0.013. The cumulative survival rate of Quartile 4 was lower than that of Quartiles 1, 2, and 3 (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: High RDW is an independent predictor of long-term adverse clinical outcomes in non-anemic patients with CAD treated with DES.

  18. Predictive value of red cell distribution width in aged patients with community acquired pneumonia%红细胞分布宽度对老年社区获得性肺炎预后的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小军; 张泓

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨红细胞分布宽度( red cell distribution width, RDW)对老年社区获得性肺炎( community acquired pneumonia, CAP)预后的预测价值。方法回顾性分析安徽医科大学第一附属医院急诊内科及急诊重症监护室205例老年CAP患者。根据入院时RDW将患者分为4组,对比各组间相关指标( CURB-65计分、器官衰竭及ICU入住率、住院天数、30 d死亡率)的差异,并就RDW对老年CAP住院患者死亡预测价值进行统计学分析。结果 CURB-65计分、器官衰竭发生率、ICU入住率、30 d死亡率4组间进行两两比较,差异有统计学意义( P<0.05);RDW预测老年CAP死亡的受试者工作曲线( ROC)的曲线下面积( AUC)=0.75。结论 RDW可作为临床对老年CAP患者病情严重程度的评估指标之一,对预测老年CAP患者死亡预后有一定意义。%Objective To investigate the predictive value of red cell distribution width ( RDW) in the aged patients with community acquired pneumonia(CAP). Methods 205 elderly patients with CAP from the Emergency Medical Ward and Emergency Intensive Care Unit of the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University were retrospectively analyzed.According to RDW on admission, the patients with CAP were divided into four groups.CURB-65 scores, organ failure, intensive care unit occupancy, the duration of hospital stay and 30 -day mortality outcomes were detected and compared among the groups, and RDW was statistically analyzed to predict mortality in these patients. Results Among the four groups, CURB-65, incidence of organ failure, ICU occupancy rate and 30-day mortality were statistically different (P<0.05).ROC curve was drawn to evaluate the predictive role of RDW in elderly CAP death, the area under the curve ( AUC) =0.75.Conclusion RDW can be used as a clinical evaluation of the severity of disease in elderly patients with CAP of one of the indicators.It is of some

  19. Modified model of neutron resonances widths distributions. Results of reduced neutron widths approximation for mass region 35 ≤ A ≤ 249

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distributions of the reduced neutron widths of s-, p- and d-resonances of nuclei of any type from nuclear mass region 35 ≤ A ≤ 249 were approximated with maximal precision by the model which presents experimental data set as a superposition of a maximum of four independent neutron amplitudes. Under the assumption that each of these amplitudes has the Gauss distribution with the unique maximum there were determined the most probable values of contribution of each amplitude in summary width distribution, their most probable mean values and dispersions. Comparison of the obtained χ2 values with value χ2 at description of the experimental data by one distribution of neutron amplitudes with best fitted parameters shows that all widths from more than 157 analyzed data sets can have different types of wave functions

  20. Computer Simulation of Fiber Length and Width Distribution for Two Poplar Woods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGDongmei; HOUZhuqiang; GUANNing

    2004-01-01

    Computer simulation was carried out on fiber length and width for plantation-grown Chinese white poplar (Populus tomentosa Cart. clone) and plantation-grown poplar 1-72 (P. x eurumericana (Dode) Guiner cv.). Skewness and kurtosis of measured results exhibited that distributions of the fiber length and width departured from normal distribution. Three-parameter Weibull density function was used in this investigation and the corresponding program was written with Turbo C. The results showed that profiles of simulated length and width histograms were similar to ones of measured histograms, and that there was a pretty good agreement between simulated and measured means of fiber length and width. There was a little influence on the simulated means from seed used in random number generator and number of simulated variables. That indicated that the simulation was steady when the seed and the number were altered. Different histograms can be obtained with different values of the location, the shape, and the scale parameter corresponding to different values of the minimum, the mean, and the standard deviation for fiber length and width. The simulation presented here can be used as a tool for the studies on the variations in fiber morphology.

  1. The influence of row width and seed spacing on uniformity of plant spatial distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griepentrog, Hans W.; Olsen, Jannie Maj; Weiner, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    width and evenness of spacing within rows influences two-dimensional spatial quality. The results can be used to define new requirements for improved seeding technologies to achieve higher benefits in sustainable crop production systems. In general it can be concluded that more even plant distributions...... are expected to result in a better crop plant performance....

  2. Terrace width distribution during unstable homoepitaxial growth of GaAs(110): An experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespillo, M.L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz s/n, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: mcrespillo@icmm.csic.es; Sacedon, J.L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz s/n, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Tejedor, P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz s/n, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-15

    The temporal evolution of the step bunching instability formed during GaAs homoepitaxial growth on the GaAs(110) vicinal to (111)A has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the step-step distribution has been quantified as a function of deposition time. Analysis of the AFM data has shown that neither the terrace width distribution (TWD) nor the terrace height distribution (THD) fit to a Gaussian function in the initial stages of growth, but both evolve with time as the bunching instability develops. After deposition of 500 ML of GaAs the TWD exhibits a clear Gaussian behavior while the THD is very well fitted to a Lorentzian distribution. The GaAs surface morphology initially shows a great dispersion in terrace height and width values with a clear anisotropy along the <001> tilt direction, but evidence of self-controlled growth is observed irrespective of layer thickness.

  3. Wavelength Width Dependence of Cavity Temperature Distribution in Semiconductor Diode Laser

    OpenAIRE

    A. Alimorady; Abbasi, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    The study of heat distribution in laser diode shows that there is nonuniform temperature distribution in cavity length of laser diode. In this paper, we investigate the temperature difference in laser diode cavity length and its effect on laser bar output wavelength width that mounted on usual CS model. In this survey at the first, laser was simulated then the simulations result was compared with experimental test result. The result shows that for each emitter there is difference, about 2.5 d...

  4. Avalanche dynamics in Bak-Sneppen evolution model observed with standard distribution width of fitness

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chaohong; Zhu, Xiwen; Gao, Kelin

    2001-01-01

    We introduce the standard distribution width of fitness to characterize the global and individual features of a ecosystem in the Bak-Sneppen evolution model. Through tracking this quantity in evolution, a different hierarchy of avalanche dynamics, $w_{0}$ avalanche is observed. The corresponding gap equation and the self-organized threshold $w_{c}$ are obtained. The critical exponents $\\tau ,$ $\\gamma $and $\\rho $, which describe the behavior of the avalanche size distribution, the average av...

  5. 红细胞分布宽度与冠心病相关性的性别差异探讨%Gender differences in relationship between red cell distribution width and coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马凤莲; 名盛; 刘俊; 李小林; 郭远林; 朱成刚; 徐瑞霞; 刘庚; 董倩

    2013-01-01

    目的 冠心病的临床特征具有明显的性别差异,既往研究证实红细胞分布宽度(RDW)与冠心病发生与发展有一定关系.本文探讨RDW与冠心病相关性的性别差异.方法 连续收集因胸痛疑诊冠心病的患者674例,根据冠状动脉造影(CAG)结果分为冠心病组499例(男性352例,女性147例)与对照组175例(男性89例,女性86例).分析冠心病传统危险因素在不同性别的差异,探讨RDW在不同性别冠心病患者中的分布情况.结果 不同性别总体的基线资料比较中,年龄、吸烟史、家族史、血红蛋白水平有性别差异(P<0.05),男女两组的RDW无明显差异(P>0.05).不同性别的冠心病组与对照组相比,女性冠心病组与女性对照组相比,RDW显著升高[(12.9±0.7)% vs (12.6±0.6)%,P=0.001],男性冠心病组与男性对照组相比,RDW无统计学差异[(13.0±0.8)%vs (12.8±1.0)%,P=0.144].女性冠心病患者多因素logistic回归分析显示,年龄和RDW是女性冠心病患者的独立预测因素(OR=1.07,95%CI:1.03~1.10,P<0.001 ; OR=2.03,95%CI:1.28~3.23,P<0.01).女性RDW的ROC曲线下面积(AUC)=0.63,95%CI:0.56~0.70,RDW界值为12.75%,敏感性为57.1%,特异性为66.3%.结论 RDW与冠心病之相关性存在性别差异,是女性冠心病的独立预测因素之一.%Objective To explore the gender differences in red cell distribution width (RDW) and CAD. Methods A total of 674 consecutively admitted patients from May 2011 to May 2012 in Fu Wai Hospital were analyzed. All patients had received coronary angiography (CAG) and then were divided into two groups based on the results of CAG: CAD group consisting of 499 patients (male=352, female=147), and control group consisting of 175 subjects (male=89, female=86). The clinical characteristics including traditional CAD risk factors were collected, and their gender differences and the gender differences in RDW and CAD were analysed. Results There were significant

  6. Inferences from the Distributions of Fast Radio Burst Pulse Widths, Dispersion Measures and Fluences

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    2015-01-01

    The widths, dispersion measures, dispersion indices and fluences of Fast Radio Bursts (FRB) impose coupled constraints that all models must satisfy. Observation of dispersion indices close to their low density limit of $-2$ sets a model-independent upper bound on the electron density and a lower bound on the size of any dispersive plasma cloud. The non-monotonic dependence of burst widths (after deconvolution of instrumental effects) on dispersion measure excludes the intergalactic medium as the location of scattering that broadens the FRB in time. Temporal broadening far greater than that of pulsars at similar high Galactic latitudes implies that scattering occurs close to the sources, where high densities and strong turbulence are plausible. FRB energetics are consistent with supergiant pulses from young, fast, high-field pulsars at cosmological distances. The distribution of FRB dispersion measures is inconsistent with expanding clouds (such as SNR). It excludes space-limited distributions (such as the loc...

  7. Influence of Connector Width on the Stress Distribution of Posterior Bridges under Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Azary, A.; Mokhtarykhoee, S.; F. Fallahi Arezodar; Heidarifar, H.; S. Mir Mohammad Rezaei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In all ceramic fixed partial dentures the connector area is a common fracture location. The survival time of three-unit fixed partial dentures may be improved by altering the connector design in regions of maximum tension. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of buccolingual increase of the connector width on the stress distribution in posterior fixed partial dentures made of IPS Empress 2. To simulate the anatomical condition, we used three-dimensional finite elem...

  8. Influence of Connector Width on the Stress Distribution of Posterior Bridges under Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Azary

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In all ceramic fixed partial dentures the connector area is a common fracture location. The survival time of three-unit fixed partial dentures may be improved by altering the connector design in regions of maximum tension. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of buccolingual increase of the connector width on the stress distribution in posterior fixed partial dentures made of IPS Empress 2. To simulate the anatomical condition, we used three-dimensional finite element analysis to generate.Materials and Methods: Three models of three-unit bridges replacing the first molar were prepared. The buccolingual connector width varied from 3.0 to 5.0 mm. Bridges were vertically loaded with 600 N at one point on the central fossa of the pontic, at 12 points along the cusp-fossa contact (50 N each, or at eight points along the cusp-marginal ridge contact (75 N each. Alternatively, a load of 225 N was applied at a 45º angle from the lingual side.Results: Stress concentrations were observed within or near the connectors. The von Mises stress decreased by increasing connector width, regardless of whether the loading was applied vertically or at an angle.Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, we conclude that increasing the connector width decreases the failure probability when a vertical or angled load is applied.

  9. Influence of leads widths distribution on turbulent heat transfer between the ocean and the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marcq

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Leads are linear-like structures of open water within the sea ice cover that develop as the result of fracturing due to divergence or shear. Through leads, air and water come into contact and directly exchange latent and sensible heat through convective processes driven by the large temperature and moisture differences between them. In the central Arctic, leads only cover 1 to 2% of the ocean during winter, but account for more than 80% of the heat fluxes. Furthermore, narrow leads (several meters are more than twice as efficient at transmitting turbulent heat than larger ones (several hundreds of meters. We show that lead widths are power law distributed, P(X~X−a with a>1, down to very small spatial scales (20 m or below. This implies that the open water fraction is by far dominated by very small leads. Using two classical formulations, which provide first order turbulence closure for the fetch-dependence of heat fluxes, we find that the mean heat fluxes (sensible and latent over open water are up to 55 % larger when considering the lead width distribution obtained from a SPOT satellite image of the ice cover, compared to the situation where the open water fraction constitutes one unique large lead and the rest of the area is covered by ice, as it is usually considered in climate models at the grid scale. This difference may be even larger if we assume that the power law scaling of lead widths extents down to smaller (~1 m scales. Such estimations may be a first step towards a subgrid scale parameterization of the spatial distribution of open water for heat fluxes calculations in ocean/sea ice coupled models.

  10. Red cell distribution width and other red blood cell parameters with venous thromboembolism and mortality risk of patients with cancer%癌症患者红细胞分布宽度和其他的血红细胞参数与静脉血栓栓塞和死亡风险的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨文惠

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the correlation of red cell distribution width(RDW) and other red blood cell(RBC) parameters with venous thromboembolism risk and mortality rate in patients with cancer.Methods:RBC parameters of 1840 patients with cancer were detected.The main research result was the occurrence of venous thromboembolism(VTE) symptoms,and the secondary outcome was followed up for 2 years of death.Results:High RDW(more than 16%) and other red blood cells parameters were not associated with VET risk.High RDW increased the mortality risk.Conclusion:RDW and other RBC parameters have no independent correlation with VET risk of patients with cancer.And high RDW was a independent predictor of poor survival in patients with cancer.%目的:分析癌症患者红细胞分布宽度(RDW)及其他血红细胞(RBC)参数与静脉血栓栓塞风险和死亡率的相关性。方法:检测1840例癌症患者的RBC参数,主要研究结果是静脉血栓栓塞(VTE)症状的发生、次要结局是随访2年死亡。结果:高RDW(>16%)及其他血红细胞参数与VET风险无明显关联。高RDW增加死亡风险。结论:RDW及其他RBC参数与癌症患者VET风险无独立相关,而高RDW是癌症患者生存较差的独立预示因素。

  11. Narrowing of terrace-width distributions during growth on vicinal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, A. BH.; Pimpinelli, A.; Einstein, T. L.

    2009-10-01

    We present analytic and numerical results for the steady-state, non-equilibrium terrace-width distribution (TWD) of steps during growth on vicinal surfaces. Kinetic Monte Carlo shows that the TWD narrows progressively with increasing flux until the model breaks down. The narrowing corresponds to kinetic repulsion between moving steps, due to the intrinsic asymmetry of the adatom diffusion current on a growing surface. With a 1-dimensional (1D) model, from a Burton-Cabrera-Frank approach, we make contact with previous work, in which the attachment asymmetry can also be due to electromigration or to asymmetry in attachment rates; we deduce an expression for the narrowing via a Fokker-Planck analysis. We illustrate how Ehrlich-Schwoebel barriers (although inducing an instability in 2D) also lead to such asymmetry and narrowing.

  12. Effects of $\\rho$-meson width on pion distributions in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Huovinen, Pasi; Marczenko, Michał; Morita, Kenji; Redlich, Krzysztof; Sasaki, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the finite width of $\\rho$ meson on the pion momentum distribution is studied quantitatively in the framework of the S-matrix approach combined with a blast-wave model to describe particle emissions from an expanding fireball. We find that the proper treatment of resonances which accounts for their production dynamics encoded in data for partial wave scattering amplitudes can substantially modify spectra of daughter particles originating in their two body decays. In particular, it results in an enhancement of the low-$p_T$ pions from the decays of $\\rho$ mesons which improves the quantitative description of the pion spectra in heavy ion collisions obtained by the ALICE collaboration at the LHC energy.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic DiscWinds and LineWidth Distributions.II

    CERN Document Server

    Chajet, L S

    2016-01-01

    We study AGN emission line profiles combining an improved version of the accretion disc-wind model of Murray & Chiang with the magneto-hydrodynamic model of Emmering et al. (1992). Here we extend our previous work to consider central objects with different masses and/or luminosities. We have compared the dispersions in our model C IV linewidth distributions to observational upper limit on that dispersion, considering both smooth and clumpy torus models. Following Fine et al., we transform that scatter in the profile line-widths into a constraint on the torus geometry and show how the half-opening angle of the obscuring structure depends on the mass of the central object and the accretion rate. We find that the results depend only mildly on the dimensionless angular momentum, one of the two integrals of motion that characterise the dynamics of the self-similar ideal MHD outflows

  14. The effect of erythropoietin on platelet distribution width during ischemia reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos Tsompos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aim of this experiment study was the erythropoietin (Epo testing, on rat model and particularly on ischemia reperfusion protocol. The benefit or the non effect of that molecule was studied hematologically on platelet distribution width (PDW. METHODS: 40 rats were used of mean weight 247,7 gr. PDW was measured on these time points: on 60 min after reperfusion (groups A and C, and on 120 min after reperfusion (groups B and D, A and B without but C and D with Epo administration. RESULTS: Epo administration increased significantly the PDW levels by 0.22 % [0.034374 % - 0.4056259 %] (P= 0.0214, in accordance also with paired t-test (P= 0.0196, 2 reperfusion time decreased significantly the PDW levels by 0.27 % [-0.4483669 % - 0.0916332 %] (P= 0.0040, in accordance also with paired t-test (P= 0.0012, and 3 interaction of Epo administration and reperfusion time increased non significantly the PDW levels by 0.06 % [-0.054648 % - 0.1819207 %] (P= 0.0615. CONCLUSION: Epo administration has significant increasing short-term effects on PDW levels. However, reperfusion time attenuates significantly this effect. Their interaction seems to resemble the action of Epo administration. The following question is whether these PDW levels alterations are the cause or the result of diseases process modification.

  15. Mean Platelet Volume and Red Cell distribution width in Hepatosteatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulali Aktas

    2013-06-01

    In conclusion, we think that beside MPV, RDW should also be an indicator of hepatosteatosis. More prospective studies with larger cohort are needed to confirm our results. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(3.000: 264-266

  16. An inter-hemispheric, statistical study of nightside spectral width distributions from coherent HF scatter radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the Doppler spectral width parameter routinely observed by HF coherent radars has been conducted between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for the nightside ionosphere. Data from the SuperDARN radars at Thykkvibær, Iceland and Syowa East, Antarctica have been employed for this purpose. Both radars frequently observe regions of high (>200 ms-1 spectral width polewards of low (<200 ms-1 spectral width. Three years of data from both radars have been analysed both for the spectral width and line of sight velocity. The pointing direction of these two radars is such that the flow reversal boundary may be estimated from the velocity data, and therefore, we have an estimate of the open/closed field line boundary location for comparison with the high spectral widths. Five key observations regarding the behaviour of the spectral width on the nightside have been made. These are (i the two radars observe similar characteristics on a statistical basis; (ii a latitudinal dependence related to magnetic local time is found in both hemispheres; (iii a seasonal dependence of the spectral width is observed by both radars, which shows a marked absence of latitudinal dependence during the summer months; (iv in general, the Syowa East spectral width tends to be larger than that from Iceland East, and (v the highest spectral widths seem to appear on both open and closed field lines. Points (i and (ii indicate that the cause of high spectral width is magnetospheric in origin. Point (iii suggests that either the propagation of the HF radio waves to regions of high spectral width or the generating mechanism(s for high spectral width is affected by solar illumination or other seasonal effects. Point (iv suggests that the radar beams from each of the radars are subject either to different instrumental or propagation effects, or different geophysical conditions due to their locations, although we suggest that this

  17. Association of Adiposity Indices with Platelet Distribution Width and Mean Platelet Volume in Chinese Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hou

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a prominent characteristic of inflammatory tissue lesions. It can affect platelet function. While mean platelet volume (MPV and platelet distribution width (PDW are sample platelet indices, they may reflect subcinical platelet activation. To investigated associations between adiposity indices and platelet indices, 17327 eligible individuals (7677 males and 9650 females from the Dongfeng-Tongji Cohort Study (DFTJ-Cohort Study, n=27009 were included in this study, except for 9682 individuals with missing data on demographical, lifestyle, physical indicators and diseases relative to PDW and MPV. Associations between adiposity indices including waist circumstance (WC, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR, body mass index (BMI, and MPV or PDW in the participants were analyzed using multiple logistic regressions. There were significantly negative associations between abnormal PDW and WC or WHtR for both sexes (ptrend<0.001 for all, as well as abnormal MPV and WC or WHtR among female participants (ptrend<0.05 for all. In the highest BMI groups, only females with low MPV or PDW were at greater risk for having low MPV (OR=1.33, 95% CI=1.10, 1.62 ptrend<0.001 or PDW (OR=1.34, 95% CI=1.14, 1.58, ptrend<0.001 than those who had low MPV or PDW in the corresponding lowest BMI group. The change of PDW seems more sensitive than MPV to oxidative stress and hypoxia. Associations between reduced PDW and MPV values and WC, WHtR and BMI values in Chinese female adults may help us to further investigate early changes in human body.

  18. Micromachined Si channel width and tortuosity on human osteoblast cell attachment and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, influence of coating chemistry, channel width and tortuosity of various two-dimensional micro-channels were explored on micromachined Si using osteoblast precursor cells line 1 (OPC1). The rationale for our study is to delineate the influence of different porosity parameters on bone cell attachment and proliferation in vitro. Channel widths of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 600 μm; channel bends of 0, 1, and 2 right angles; and gold and silicon dioxide coatings on single-crystal Si were studied. Experiments were conducted with channel tops under glass covered and uncovered conditions keeping the channel depth at 220 μm. Independent samples were evaluated using SEM imaging and MTT assay to measure bone cell morphology and quantity. Images were taken of micro-channels and exterior chambers at 50x, 500x, 1000x, and 5000x magnifications. Channel and chamber cell densities were scored as follows: bare (score = 0), scattered (1), limited (2), abundant (3), and overflowing (4). Samples were then scored and statistically analyzed for major differences. In general, OPC1 cells proliferated at least 5% or better based on cell numbers under uncovered conditions than glass covered. Channel widths of 100 μm largely prohibited cell proliferation and diffusion by narrow path inhibition with the lowest average score of 1.17. Among channel bends of 0, 1, and 2 right angles, an increase in micro-channel tortuosity from 0-2 bends amplified OPC1 cell growth upwards of ∼ 6.6%. A one-way ANOVA showed significant differences in cell quantity for alternating channel tortuosity at a significance level of p < 0.05. No preference was found for gold or silicon dioxide coatings on Si for bone cell proliferation.

  19. Distribution of Partial Neutron Widths for Nuclei close to a Maximum of the Neutron Strength Function

    OpenAIRE

    WeidenmÜller, H.

    2010-01-01

    For nuclei near a maximum of the neutron strength function, the secular dependence on energy E of s-wave partial neutron widths differs from the canonical form given by the square root of E. We derive the universal form of that dependence and show that it is expected to significantly influence the analysis of neutron resonance data.

  20. Avalanche dynamics in the Bak-Sneppen evolution model observed with a standard distribution width of fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chaohong; Zhu, Xiwen; Gao, Kelin

    2003-01-01

    We introduce the standard distribution width of fitness to characterize the global and individual features of an ecosystem described by the Bak-Sneppen evolution model. Through tracking this quantity in evolution, a different hierarchy of avalanche dynamics, the w0 avalanche, is observed. The corresponding gap equation and the self-organized threshold wc are obtained. The critical exponents τ, γ and ρ, which describe the behaviour of the avalanche size distribution, the average avalanche size and the relaxation to attractor, respectively, are calculated by numerical simulation. The exact master equation and γ equation are derived, and the scaling relations are established among the critical exponents of this new avalanche.

  1. Density saturation and the decrease of the normalised width of the multiplicity distribution in high energy pp collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias de Deus, Jorge; Ferreiro, E. G.; Pajares, C.; Ugoccioni, R.

    2004-11-01

    It is experimentally observed that the width of the KNO multiplicity distribution-or the negative binomial parameter, 1 / k-for pp collisions, in the energy region 10 ≲√{ s} ≲ 1800 GeV, is an increasing function of the energy. We argue that in models with parton or string saturation such trend will necessary change: at some energy the distribution will start to become narrower. In the framework of percolating strings, we have estimated the change to occur at an energy of the order of 5-10 TeV.

  2. Density saturation and the decrease of the normalised width of the multiplicity distribution in high energy pp collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Dias de Deus, J; Pajares, C; Ugoccioni, R

    2004-01-01

    It is experimentally observed that the width of the KNO multiplicity distribution --or the negative binomial parameter 1/k-- for pp collisions, in the energy region 10 to 1800 GeV, is an increasing function of the energy. We argue that in models with parton or string saturation such trend will necessary change: at some energy the distribution will start to become narrower. In the framework of percolating strings, we have estimated the change to occur at an energy of the order of 5--10 TeV.

  3. Atmospheric velocity spectral width measurements using the statistical distribution of pulsed CO2 lidar return signal intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancellet, Gerard M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Grant, William B.

    1989-01-01

    A pulsed CO2 lidar with coherent detection has been used to measure the correlation time of backscatter from an ensemble of atmospheric aerosol particles which are illuminated by the pulsed radiation. The correlation time of the backscatter of the return signal, which is directly related to the velocity spectral width, can be used to study the velocity structure constant of atmospheric turbulence and wind shear. Various techniques for correlation time measurement are discussed, and several measurement results are presented for the technique using the information contained in the statistical distribution of a set of lidar return signal intensities.

  4. 红细胞分布宽度对PCI治疗AMI患者心肌灌注不良的预测价值%Predictive value of red cell distribution width on poor myocardial perfusion in patients with acute myo-cardial infarction treated by PCI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王献忠; 朱国英; 张利峰; 李延民

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究红细胞分布宽度(RDW)对经皮冠脉介入(PCI)治疗的急性心肌梗死(AMI)患者心肌灌注不良的预测价值.方法:自2013年8月至2015年8月,选择在我院接受PCI治疗的212例ACS患者进行研究.根据血液分析仪的RDW检测结果,患者被分为RDW50%记为心肌灌注良好组(134例).比较两组患者的临床资料,并对心肌灌注影响因素进行单因素及多因素分析.结果:与RD W50% were regar- ded as good myocardial perfusion group (n=134).Clinical data were compared between two groups,and single fac- tor and multi-factor analysis were used to analyze influencing factors for myocardial perfusion.Results:Compared with RDW<13.0% group,there were significant rise in age [(62.85±5.23)years vs.(67.33±6.17)years],and significant reductions in left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF,(52.37±6.14)% vs.(50.55±5.53)%]and STR [(0.73±0.26)vs.(0.57±0.39)]in RDW≥13.0% group,P<0.05 or <0.01. Compared with good myocardial perfusion group,there were significant reductions in percentage of RDW<13% (59.70% vs.44.87%)and LVEF [(52.25±3.81)% vs.(50.29 ± 4.08)%],and significant rise in age [(63.29 ± 1.93)years vs.(66.42 ± 2.15) years]in poor myocardial perfusion group,P<0.05 all.Multi-factor Logistic regression analysis indicated that age, LVEF and RDW were independent predictors for poor myocardial perfusion (r=3.826~6.525,P<0.01 all).Con-clusion:Red cell distribution width possesses good predictive value for poor myocardial perfusion in patients with a- cute myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention,which is worth extending in clinic.

  5. Relationship of neutrophils lymphocyte ratio and red blood cell distribution width with idiopathic facial palsy%中性粒细胞淋巴细胞比及红细胞分布宽度与特发性面神经麻痹的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒湘宁; 马跃文

    2016-01-01

    背景:红细胞分布宽度与C-反应蛋白一样,是机体炎症水平的一个标志,红细胞表面可能存在多种炎症因子受体,推测红细胞参与了炎症过程,炎症导致红细胞分布宽度增加。目的:分析中性粒细胞淋巴细胞比和红细胞分布宽度与特发性面神经麻痹的发病机制及发病时疾病的严重程度之间关系。方法:特发性面神经麻痹患者30例(实验组),使用HB(House and Brackmann Facial Grading System)评分和SB(Sunnybrook System)评分评估患者病情严重程度,将实验组按SB评分分为一般瘫痪组(30-100分)和严重瘫痪组(0-29分);按照HB评估结果分为轻度(Ⅱ/Ⅲ)、中度(Ⅳ)、重度瘫痪组(Ⅴ/Ⅵ)。同时选健康者32人做对照。对比各组间中性粒细胞淋巴细胞比、红细胞分布宽度指标的差异;分析SB评分和HB评估结果与中性粒细胞淋巴细胞比、红细胞分布宽度之间的相关性。结果与结论:实验组中性粒细胞淋巴细胞比值明显高于对照组(P<0.01);红细胞分布宽度在实验组不同疾病程度组间均存在显著差异,且与SB评分呈显著负相关(P <0.01),与HB评估等级呈显著正相关(P<0.01)。结果说明,实验组中性粒细胞淋巴细胞比值显著高于对照组,红细胞分布宽度与疾病严重程度呈正相关,提示特发性面神经麻痹发病机制与炎症相关,红细胞分布宽度指标可能对特发性面神经麻痹发病时疾病严重程度评估有参考意义。%BACKGROUND:Similarly with C-reactive protein, red blood cel distribution width can reflect the inflammatory process. Red blood cels involved in inflammatory process leads to the increase in red blood cel distribution width due to various inflammation factor receptors existingon the surface of red blood cel s. OBJECTIVE:To analyze the relationship between the neutrophils lymphocyte ratio, red blood cel distribution width and the pathogenesis andseverity

  6. Terrace-width distributions of touching steps: Modification of the fermion analogy with implications for measuring step-step interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Einstein, T. L.

    2009-10-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we compute the terrace-width distributions (TWDs) of surfaces in which steps can touch each other, forming multiple-atomic height steps, but cannot cross (no overhangs), and so inconsistent with the standard mapping to spinless fermions. Our results show that the generalized Wigner distribution with minor modifications at small step separations, gives a very good fit for TWDs of touching steps. The interaction strength derived from the fit parameter (ϱ) indicates an effective attraction between steps. The strength of this effective attraction decreases for larger mean-step separations and decreasing step-touching energies; describable via finite-size scaling. Hence, accurate extraction of the true repulsion strength requires multiple vicinalities.

  7. Another way to view the chain conformation broadening of the line-width distribution measured in dynamic light scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴奇; 牛爱珍

    1999-01-01

    In dynamic laser light scattering (LLS), for a given polydisperse sample, a line-width distribution G(Γ) or the translational diffusion coefficient distribution G(D) can be obtained from the measured time correlation function. For rigid colloid particles, G(Γ) can be directly related to the hydrodynamic size distribution. However, for flexible polymer chains, G(Γ) depends not only on the chain length distribution, but also on the relaxation of the chain conformation; that is, even for a monodisperse polymer sample there still exists a chain conformation distribution. If the time scale of the chain conformation relaxation is comparable to that of the translational diffusion, such as in the case of a very long polymer chain, the conformation relaxation might lead to an additional broadening in G (Γ). This "conformation broadening" has been directly observed for the first time by comparing two G(Γ) s obtained from a poly(N-isopropyl-acrylamide) solution at~25℃ and~32℃ at which the solution is ther

  8. Distributed seeding for narrow-line width hard x-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anisimov, Petr Mikhaylovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewellen, IV, John W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Marksteiner, Quinn R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-09

    We describe a new FEL line-narrowing technique called distributed seeding (DS), using Si(111) Bragg crystal monochromators to enhance the spectral brightness of the MaRIE hard X-ray freeelectron laser. DS differs from self-seeding in three important aspects. First, DS relies on spectral filtering of the radiation at multiple locations along the undulator, with a monochromator located every few power gain lengths. Second, DS performs filtering early in the exponential gain region before SASE spikes start to appear in the radiation longitudinal profile. Third, DS provides the option to select a wavelength longer than the peak of the SASE gain curve, which leads to improved spectral contrast of the seeded FEL over the SASE background. Timedependent Genesis simulations show the power-vs-z growth curves for DS exhibit behaviors of a seeded FEL amplifier, such as exponential growth region immediately after the filters. Of the seeding approaches considered, the two-stage DS spectra produce the highest contrast of seeded FEL over the SASE background and that the three-stage DS provides the narrowest linewidth with a relative spectral FWHM of 8 X 10-5 .

  9. Top Quark Pair Production close to Threshold Top Mass, Width and Momentum Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, A H

    1999-01-01

    The complete NNLO QCD corrections to the total cross section $\\sigma(e^+e^- threshold are calculated by solving the corresponding Schroedinger equations exactly in momentum space in a consistent momentum cutoff regularization scheme. The corrections coming from the same NNLO QCD effects to the top quark three-momentum distribution $d\\sigma/d |\\vec k_t|$ are determined. We discuss the origin of the large NNLO corrections to the peak position and the normalization of the total cross section observed in previous works and propose a new top mass definition, the 1S mass M_1S, which stabilizes the peak in the total cross section. If the influence of beamstrahlung and initial state radiation on the mass determination is small, a theoretical uncertainty on the 1S top mass measurement of 200 MeV from the total cross section at the linear collider seems possible. We discuss how well the 1S mass can be related to the at NNLO by including electroweak effects into the NRQCD matching coefficients, which then can become com...

  10. 红细胞分布宽度与2型糖尿病患者血压和血糖的相关性%Relationship Between Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Blood Pressure and Blood Sugar in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶新桂; 刘晓苑

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨红细胞分布宽度( RDW)与2型糖尿病患者血压和血糖的相关性。方法连续收集2013-10~2014-06间于我院就诊并诊断为2型糖尿病的患者100例,作为糖尿病组;非2型糖尿病患者100例,作为对照组。收集所有患者的血液检测血常规,并测量坐姿血压。结果对照组患者平均空腹血糖为(95.20±30.10)mg/dL,糖尿病组为(147.85±72.54)mg/dL。糖尿病组和对照组平均血压分别为138/90 mmHg、120/80 mmHg,平均RDW-SD ( RDW标准差)分别为(46.84±3.18) fL、(46.44± 4.64)fL,两组的平均RDW-CV(RDW变异系数)分别为(14.80±0.71)%、(14.74±1.94)%。糖尿病患者中RDW-SD和空腹血糖、血压间无显著统计学意义的相关性,而RDW-CV和血压间呈显著的正相关性。结论本研究发现糖尿病患者中RDW-CV与血压明显相关。%Objective To evaluate the relationship between the red blood cell distribution width ( RDW) and fasting blood sugar/blood pressure.Methods Collecting 100 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from October , 2013 to June, 2014 in the hospital as the diabetes group;and 100 patients who were not type 2 diabetes mellitus were regarded as the control group .Colleting patients′blood detection on boold routine examination and measuring blood press under sitting position .Results The mean fasting blood sugar level was (95.20 ±30. 10) mg/dL in the control group, and (147.85 ±72.54) mg/dL in the diabetics.The mean blood pressures for diabetics was 138/90 mm-Hg and for non-diabetics 120/80 mmHg.The mean RDW-SD (RDW standard deviation) was (46.44 ±4.64)fL in the control group, and (46.84 ±3.18)fL in the diabetes group.The mean RDW -CV (RDW coefficient of variation) was (14.74 ±1.94)% in control group, and (14.80 ±0.71)% in diabetes group.No statistically significant correlation was found between the RDW -SD and fasting blood sugar/blood pressure in the

  11. Impact Of The Pulse Width Modulation On The Temperature Distribution In The Armature Of A Solenoid Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraj, R.

    2015-12-01

    In order to estimate the inductive power set in the armature of the high-speed solenoid valve (HSV) during the open loop control (OLC) using pulse width modulation (PWM) an analytical explicit formula has been derived. The simplifications taken both in the geometry and in the physical behavior of the HSV were described. The inductive power was calculated for different boundary conditions and shown as a function of the frequency of the coil current. The power set in the armature was used as an input to the thermal calculation. The thermal calculation had an objective to estimate the time dependent temperature distribution in the armature of the HSV. All the derivation steps were presented and the influence of different boundary conditions was shown and discussed. The increase of the temperature during the heating with inductive power has been evaluated both in the core and on the side surface of the HSV.

  12. Aspirin resistance may be identified by miR-92a in plasma combined with platelet distribution width

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Helle Glud; Houlind, Kim; Madsen, Jonna Skov;

    2016-01-01

    of circulating miR-92a and platelet size as biomarkers of the individual response to aspirin therapy. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 50 healthy blood donors without antithrombotic medication and 50 patients with intermittent claudication on daily aspirin therapy. Based on results from the arachidonic...... acid stimulated aggregation test on Multiplate®analyzer (ASPItest), patients were defined as aspirin resistant (n=10) or aspirin responders (n=40). Plasma levels of miR-92a were evaluated by RT-qPCR analysis and platelet distribution width (PDW) was used to assess platelet size variability. Receiver...... operating characteristic curves for miR-92a levels and PDW were used to set cut-off values for discrimination between aspirin responding and aspirin resistant patients. RESULTS: When defining aspirin resistance as an ASPItest ≥30U, the optimal cut-off values for discrimination of aspirin responders...

  13. Relationship between Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Accompanied by Hypertension and Red Blood Cell Distribution Width%阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停综合征合并高血压与红细胞分布宽度的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐劲松; 程亚慧; 夏国际

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停综合征(OSAS)合并高血压与红细胞分布宽度(RDW)的关系。方法选择2011年1月至2013年8月在中国人民解放军第九四医院呼吸内科门诊及住院的 OSAS 合并高血压患者(OSAS合并高血压组)44例和体检中心体检的原发性高血压患者(高血压组)57例、健康体检者(正常对照组)52例。各组清晨空腹抽取肘静脉血2 mL,用全自动五分类血细胞分析仪检测红细胞(RBC)计数、血红蛋白(Hb)、RDW 及白细胞(WBC)计数,比较各组 RDW 的差异,并进行相关性分析。结果高血压组 RBC 计数、Hb、RDW 和 WBC 计数与正常对照组比较差异均无统计学意义(均 P >0.05);OSAS 合并高血压组 BMI、DBP、RBC 计数、Hb 和 RDW 均明显高于正常对照组、高血压组,SBP 明显高于正常对照组、明显低于高血压组(均 P <0.05);高血压组 SBP、DBP均明显高于正常对照组(均 P <0.05)。相关性分析结果显示,OSAS 合并高血压组 RDW 与睡眠呼吸暂停低通气指数(AHI)呈正相关(r=0.426,P <0.05),与最低氧饱和度呈负相关(r=-0.509,P <0.05)。结论高血压患者RDW 无明显改变,RDW 增高可能是 OSAS 合并高血压患者心脑血管事件的标志物。%Objective To explore the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS)accompanied by hypertension and red blood cell distribution width(RDW).Methods Forty-four patients with OSAS accompanied by hypertension who were treated in the department of respiratory medicine in the 94th Hospital of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army from January 2011 to August 2013(OSAS accompanied by hypertension group)and 57 patients with primary hypertension(hypertension group)and 52 healthy physical examinees(normal control group)who were examined at physical examination center during the same period were selected in this

  14. Lead detection in Arctic sea ice from CryoSat-2: quality assessment, lead area fraction and width distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wernecke

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Leads cover only a small fraction of the Arctic sea ice but they have a dominant effect on the turbulent exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere. A supervised classification of CryoSat-2 measurements is performed by a combination with visual MODIS scenes. For several parameters thresholds are optimized and tested in order to reproduce this prior classification. The maximum power of the waveform shows the best classification properties amongst them, including the Pulse Peakiness. With the same correct lead detection rates as of published classifiers, the amount of ice being detected as lead can be reduced by up to 40%. Lead area fraction estimates based on CryoSat-2 show a major fracturing event in the Beaufort Sea in 2013. The resulting Arctic wide lead width distribution follows a power law with an exponent of 2.47 ± 0.04 for the winter seasons from 2011 to 2014, confirming and complementing a regional study based on a high resolution SPOT image.

  15. WIDTHS AND AVERAGE WIDTHS OF SOBOLEV CLASSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永平; 许贵桥

    2003-01-01

    This paper concerns the problem of the Kolmogorov n-width, the linear n-width, the Gel'fand n-width and the Bernstein n-width of Sobolev classes of the periodicmultivariate functions in the space Lp(Td) and the average Bernstein σ-width, averageKolmogorov σ-widths, the average linear σ-widths of Sobolev classes of the multivariatequantities.

  16. A Young double-slit experiment using a single electron source: Oscillations in the angular distribution of Auger-line width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fremont, F; Chesnel, J-Y [Universite de Caen-CEA-CNRS-EnsiCaen-CIMAP, 6 bd du Mal Juin, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France); Barrachina, R O; Suarez, S, E-mail: francois.fremont@ensicaen.f, E-mail: barra@cab.cnea.gov.a [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro 8400 S. C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina)

    2009-11-01

    We present evidence for two-center interference effects in the autoionization of a Helium atom following a double capture process in a He''2''+ + H{sub 2} collision, by looking, not at the total intensity as in a previous article [1], but at the full width at half maximum of the energy distribution at a function of the observation angle.

  17. On the determination of the He abundance distribution in globular clusters from the width of the main sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Cassisi, Santi; Pietrinferni, Adriano; Hyde, David

    2016-01-01

    One crucial piece of information to study the origin of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters, is the range of initial helium abundances $\\Delta{Y}$ amongst the sub-populations hosted by each cluster. These estimates are commonly obtained by measuring the width in colour of the unevolved main sequence in an optical colour-magnitude-diagram. The measured colour spread is then compared with predictions from theoretical stellar isochrones with varying initial He abundances, to determine $\\Delta{Y}$. The availability of UV/optical magnitudes thanks to the {\\sl HST UV Legacy Survey of Galactic GCs} project, will allow the homogeneous determination of $\\Delta{Y}$ for a large Galactic globular cluster sample. From a theoretical point of view, accurate UV CMDs can efficiently disentangle the various sub-populations, and main sequence colour differences in the ACS $F606W-(F606W-F814W)$ diagram allow an estimate of $\\Delta{Y}$. We demonstrate that from a theoretical perspective the ($F606W-F814W$) colour is...

  18. Chemical elements distribution in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, R.

    2005-04-01

    Analysing, imaging and understanding the cellular chemistry, from macromolecules to monoatomic elements, is probably a major challenge for the scientific community after the conclusion of the genome project. In order to probe the distribution of elements in cells, especially the so-called inorganic elements, it is necessary to apply microanalytical techniques with sub-micrometer resolution and high chemical sensitivity. This paper presents the current status of chemical element imaging inside cells, and a comparison of the different analytical techniques available: nuclear microprobe, electron microprobe and electron energy loss spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation microprobe, secondary ion mass spectrometry and fluorescence microscopy methods. Examples of intracellular chemical elements distributions relevant to cancer pharmacology, medical imaging, metal carcinogenesis and neuropathology studies obtained by nuclear microprobe and other microanalytical techniques are presented.

  19. A deterministic width function model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Puente

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of a deterministic fractal-multifractal (FM geometric method to model width functions of natural river networks, as derived distributions of simple multifractal measures via fractal interpolating functions, is reported. It is first demonstrated that the FM procedure may be used to simulate natural width functions, preserving their most relevant features like their overall shape and texture and their observed power-law scaling on their power spectra. It is then shown, via two natural river networks (Racoon and Brushy creeks in the United States, that the FM approach may also be used to closely approximate existing width functions.

  20. Countercurrent distribution of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    It is known that the addition of phosphate buffer to two polymer aqueous phase systems has a strong effect on the partition behavior of cells and other particles in such mixtures. The addition of sodium phosphate to aqueous poly(ethylene glycol) dextran phase systems causes a concentration-dependent shift in binodial on the phase diagram, progressively lowering the critical conditions for phase separation as the phosphate concentration is increased. Sodium chloride produces no significant shift in the critical point relative to the salt-free case. Accurate determinations of the phase diagram require measurements of the density of the phases; data is presented which allows this parameter to be calculated from polarimetric measurements of the dextran concentrations of both phases. Increasing polymer concentrations in the phase systems produce increasing preference of the phosphate for the dextran-rich bottom phase. Equilibrium dialysis experiments showed that poly(ethylene glycol) effectively rejected phosphate, and to a lesser extent chloride, but that dextran had little effect on the distribution of either salt. Increasing ionic strength via addition of 0.15 M NaCl to phase systems containing 0.01 M phosphate produces an increased concentration of phosphate ions in the bottom dextran-rich phase, the expected effect in this type of Donnan distribution.

  1. Amalgam width of matroids

    OpenAIRE

    Mach, Lukas; Toufar, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new matroid width parameter based on the operation of matroid amalgamation, which we call amalgam-width. The parameter is linearly related to branch-width on finitely representable matroids (which is not possible for branch-width). In particular, any property expressible in the monadic second order logic can be decided in linear time for matroids with bounded amalgam-width. We also prove that the Tutte polynomial can be computed in polynomial time for matroids with bounded amal...

  2. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  3. Quantification of cell-free layer thickness and cell distribution of blood by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauri, Janne; Bykov, Alexander; Fabritius, Tapio

    2016-04-01

    A high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) with 1-μm axial resolution was applied to assess the thickness of a cell-free layer (CFL) and a spatial distribution of red blood cells (RBC) next to the microchannel wall. The experiments were performed in vitro in a plain glass microchannel with a width of 2 mm and height of 0.2 mm. RBCs were suspended in phosphate buffered saline solution at the hematocrit level of 45%. Flow rates of 0.1 to 0.5 ml/h were used to compensate gravity induced CFL. The results indicate that OCT can be efficiently used for the quantification of CFL thickness and spatial distribution of RBCs in microcirculatory blood flow.

  4. A stochastic prediction of in situ stress magnitudes from the distributions of rock strength and breakout width at IODP Hole C0002A in Nankai accretionary prism, SW Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Insun; Chang, Chandong; Lee, Hikweon

    2015-04-01

    Most continuum theories in rock mechanics are based on a postulate of existence of a representative elementary volume (REV), over which a single number is chosen as an effective rock property. Such deterministic prediction of rock property without clear account of microstructural randomness over the REV excludes a rational discussion on risk assessment and uncertainty analysis. If the rock property is scale-dependent or severely heterogeneous, its distribution may provide more valuable information than its average does. Borehole wall images and sonic logging data obtained from IODP Hole C0002A near the Nankai Trough show a wide distribution of breakout widths and rock strengths even at a short interval of depth. The small-scale but frequent variation in breakout width in a short section of borehole wall is due to heterogeneous rock strength rather than a correspondingly frequent change in far-field stress. In this paper we consider the distribution of rock strengths and breakout widths in a given length of wellbore, which is large enough to analyze the logging data in a statistical manner but small enough to make sure that the far-field stresses are to be uniform, in order to determine the magnitudes of the stresses. Assuming the normal distribution of uniaxial compressive strength (UCS), which is estimated empirically from sonic velocity logs (Chang et al., 2006, JPSE; 2010, G3), we calculated the probability distribution of breakout width for given sets of the maximum and the minimum horizontal principal stresses (SHmax and Shmin, respectively) for every 20m depth interval. The same procedure was repeated for various combinations of the two horizontal principal stress magnitudes. Then the objective function with two variables, SHmax and Shmin, was obtained from the total misfits between the observed and the calculated occurrence distributions of breakout width. Finally we were able to determine the best solution of SHmax and Shmin with the minimum total misfit

  5. Distributed series resistance effects in solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Drud

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical treatment is presented of the effects of one-dimensional distributed series resistance in solar cells. A general perturbation theory is developed, including consistently the induced spatial variation of diode current density and leading to a first-order equivalent lumped resistance...... to cause an effective doubling of the "diode quality factor."...

  6. Hybrid pn-junction solar cells based on layers of inorganic nanocrystals and organic semiconductors: optimization of layer thickness by considering the width of the depletion region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sudip K; Guchhait, Asim; Pal, Amlan J

    2014-03-01

    We report the formation and characterization of hybrid pn-junction solar cells based on a layer of copper diffused silver indium disulfide (AgInS2@Cu) nanoparticles and another layer of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules. With copper diffusion in the nanocrystals, their optical absorption and hence the activity of the hybrid pn-junction solar cells was extended towards the near-IR region. To decrease the particle-to-particle separation for improved carrier transport through the inorganic layer, we replaced the long-chain ligands of copper-diffused nanocrystals in each monolayer with short-ones. Under illumination, the hybrid pn-junctions yielded a higher short-circuit current as compared to the combined contribution of the Schottky junctions based on the components. A wider depletion region at the interface between the two active layers in the pn-junction device as compared to that of the Schottky junctions has been considered to analyze the results. Capacitance-voltage characteristics under a dark condition supported such a hypothesis. We also determined the width of the depletion region in the two layers separately so that a pn-junction could be formed with a tailored thickness of the two materials. Such a "fully-depleted" device resulted in an improved photovoltaic performance, primarily due to lessening of the internal resistance of the hybrid pn-junction solar cells.

  7. Inflammatory Cell Distribution in Primary Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheat, Rachel [School of Cancer Sciences and CR UK Centre for Cancer Research, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Roberts, Claudia [School of Cancer Sciences and CR UK Centre for Cancer Research, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, New Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, Mindelsohn Way, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2WB (United Kingdom); Waterboer, Tim [Infection and Cancer Program, DKFZ (German Cancer Research Centre), 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Steele, Jane [Human Biomaterials Resource Centre, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Marsden, Jerry [University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, New Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, Mindelsohn Way, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2WB (United Kingdom); Steven, Neil M., E-mail: n.m.steven@bham.ac.uk [School of Cancer Sciences and CR UK Centre for Cancer Research, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, New Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, Mindelsohn Way, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2WB (United Kingdom); Blackbourn, David J., E-mail: n.m.steven@bham.ac.uk [Department of Microbial and Cellular Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-06

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive poorly differentiated neuroendocrine cutaneous carcinoma associated with older age, immunodeficiency and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) integrated within malignant cells. The presence of intra-tumoural CD8+ lymphocytes reportedly predicts better MCC-specific survival. In this study, the distribution of inflammatory cells and properties of CD8+ T lymphocytes within 20 primary MCC specimens were characterised using immunohistochemistry and multicolour immunofluorescent staining coupled to confocal microscopy. CD8+ cells and CD68+ macrophages were identified in 19/20 primary MCC. CD20+ B cells were present in 5/10, CD4+ cells in 10/10 and FoxP3+ cells in 7/10 specimens. Only two specimens had almost no inflammatory cells. Within specimens, inflammatory cells followed the same patchy distribution, focused at the edge of sheets and nodules and, in some cases, more intense in trabecular areas. CD8+ cells were outside vessels on the edge of tumour. Those few within malignant sheets typically lined up in fine septa not contacting MCC cells expressing MCPyV large T antigen. The homeostatic chemokine CXCL12 was expressed outside malignant nodules whereas its receptor CXCR4 was identified within tumour but not on CD8+ cells. CD8+ cells lacked CXCR3 and granzyme B expression irrespective of location within stroma versus malignant nodules or of the intensity of the intra-tumoural infiltrate. In summary, diverse inflammatory cells were organised around the margin of malignant deposits suggesting response to aberrant signaling, but were unable to penetrate the tumour microenvironment itself to enable an immune response against malignant cells or their polyomavirus.

  8. Level Width Broaden Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Shang

    2004-01-01

    In fitting the double-differential measurements thelevelwidth broadening effect should be taken into account properly due to Heisenberg uncertainty.Besides level width broadening effect the energy resolution in the measurements is also needed in this procedure.In general,the traditional normal Gaussian expansion is employed.However,the research indicates that to do so in this way the energy balance could not hold.For this reason,the deformed Gaussian expansion functions with exponential form for both the single energy point and continuous spectrum are introduced,with which the normalization and energy balance conditions could hold exactly in the analytical form.

  9. Magneto-optical resonance of electromagnetically induced absorption with high contrast and narrow width in a vapour cell with buffer gas

    CERN Document Server

    Brazhnikov, D V; Yudin, V I

    2014-01-01

    The method for observing the high-contrast and narrow-width resonances of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in the Hanle configuration under counterpropagating light waves is proposed. We theoretically analyze the absorption of a probe light wave in presence of counterpropagating one with the same frequency as the function of a static magnetic field applied along the vectors of light waves, propagating in a vapour cell. Here, as an example, we study a "dark" type of atomic dipole transition Fg=1-->Fe=1 in D1 line of 87Rb, where usually the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) can be observed. To obtain the EIA signal one should proper chose the polarizations of light waves and intensities. In contrast of regular schemes for observing EIA signals (in a single travelling light wave in the Hanle configuration or in a bichromatic light field consisted of two travelling waves), the proposed scheme allows one to use buffer gas to significantly enhance properties of the resonance. Also the drama...

  10. Computer generation of initial spatial distribution for cell automata

    OpenAIRE

    GuangHua Liu; WenJun Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The algorithm to generate spatial distribution patterns was developed and presented in this study. Three typical spatial distribution patterns, i.e., Poisson distribution, binomial distribution, and negative binomial distribution were included in the algorithm. The Java program was also provided. The algorithm can be used to generate initial distribution in cell automata modeling.

  11. Terrace-Width Distributions (TWDs) of Touching Steps: Modification of the Fermion Analogy, with Implications for Measuring Step-Step Interactions on Vicinals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, T. L.; Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Kim, Kwangmoo

    2010-03-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we computefootnotetextRS, ABH, and TLE, Phys. Rev. B 80 (2009) 153415. the TWDs of surfaces in which steps can touch each other, forming multiple-atomic height steps, but cannot cross (no overhangs), and so inconsistent with the standard mapping to spinless fermions. Our numerical results show that the generalized Wigner distribution, with minor modifications at small step separations, gives a very good fit for TWDs of touching steps. (We also generate analytic results by generalizing results for extended fermions.footnotetextSiew-Ann Cheong and C.L. Henley, arXiv:0907.4228v1.) The interaction strength derived from the fit parameter indicates an effective attraction between steps, weakening the overall repulsion. The strength of this effective attraction decreases for larger mean-step separations and decreasing step-touching energies; describable via finite-size scaling. Hence, accurate extraction of the true repulsion strength requires multiple vicinalities.

  12. Flow and Pressure Distribution in Fuel Cell Manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebæk, Jesper; Bang, Mads; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2010-01-01

    The manifold is an essential part of the fuel cell stack. Evidently, evenly distributed reactants are a prerequisite for an efficient fuel cell stack. In this study, the cathode manifold ability to distribute air to the cells of a 70 cell stack is investigated experimentally. By means of 20...

  13. Modeling and control of fuel cell based distributed generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin Woo

    This dissertation presents circuit models and control algorithms of fuel cell based distributed generation systems (DGS) for two DGS topologies. In the first topology, each DGS unit utilizes a battery in parallel to the fuel cell in a standalone AC power plant and a grid-interconnection. In the second topology, a Z-source converter, which employs both the L and C passive components and shoot-through zero vectors instead of the conventional DC/DC boost power converter in order to step up the DC-link voltage, is adopted for a standalone AC power supply. In Topology 1, two applications are studied: a standalone power generation (Single DGS Unit and Two DGS Units) and a grid-interconnection. First, dynamic model of the fuel cell is given based on electrochemical process. Second, two full-bridge DC to DC converters are adopted and their controllers are designed: an unidirectional full-bridge DC to DC boost converter for the fuel cell and a bidirectional full-bridge DC to DC buck/boost converter for the battery. Third, for a three-phase DC to AC inverter without or with a Delta/Y transformer, a discrete-time state space circuit model is given and two discrete-time feedback controllers are designed: voltage controller in the outer loop and current controller in the inner loop. And last, for load sharing of two DGS units and power flow control of two DGS units or the DGS connected to the grid, real and reactive power controllers are proposed. Particularly, for the grid-connected DGS application, a synchronization issue between an islanding mode and a paralleling mode to the grid is investigated, and two case studies are performed. To demonstrate the proposed circuit models and control strategies, simulation test-beds using Matlab/Simulink are constructed for each configuration of the fuel cell based DGS with a three-phase AC 120 V (L-N)/60 Hz/50 kVA and various simulation results are presented. In Topology 2, this dissertation presents system modeling, modified space

  14. Correlations for reduced-width amplitudes in 49V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the relative sign of inelastic proton-channel amplitudes permits the determination of amplitude correlations. Data were obtained for 45 5/2+ resonances in 49V. Although the reduced widths in each channel followed a Porter-Thomas distribution, large amplitude correlations were observed. The results are compared with the reduced-width--amplitude distribution of Krieger and Porter. This is the first direct test of the Krieger-Porter distribution

  15. Distributed Shared Memory for the Cell Broadband Engine (DSMCBE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Nørgaard; Skovhede, Kenneth; Vinter, Brian

    2009-01-01

    in and out of non-coherent local storage blocks for each special processor element. In this paper we present a software library, namely the Distributed Shared Memory for the Cell Broadband Engine (DSMCBE). By using techniques known from distributed shared memory DSMCBE allows programmers to program the CELL...

  16. The galaxy counts-in-cells distribution from the SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Abel

    2010-01-01

    We determine the galaxy counts-in-cells distribution from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) for 3D spherical cells in redshift space as well as for 2D projected cells. We find that cosmic variance in the SDSS causes the counts-in-cells distributions in different quadrants to differ from each other by up to 20%. We also find that within this cosmic variance, the overall galaxy counts-in-cells distribution agrees with both the gravitational quasi-equilibrium distribution and the negative binomial distribution. We also find that brighter galaxies are more strongly clustered than if they were randomly selected from a larger complete sample that includes galaxies of all luminosities. The results suggest that bright galaxies could be in dark matter haloes separated by less than ~10 Mpc/h.

  17. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marková

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceability limit states indicated in Eurocode 1. Analysis of sensitivity factors of basic variables enables to find out variables significantly affecting the total crack width.

  18. Absorbed Dose Distribution in a Pulse Radiolysis Optical Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    When a liquid solution in an optical cell is irradiated by an intense pulsed electron beam, it may be important in the chemical analysis of the solution to know the distribution of energy deposited throughout the cell. For the present work, absorbed dose distributions were measured by thin...... radiochromic dye film dosimeters placed at various depths in a quartz glass pulse radiolysis cell. The cell was irradiated with 30 ns pulses from a field-emission electron accelerator having a broad spectrum with a maximum energy of ≈MeV. The measured three-dimensional dose distributions showed sharp gradients...

  19. Distribution of Cell in Mobile Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bestak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Femtocell concept has emerged as a cost-effective solution to manage indoor environment coverage and increasing capacity requirements. Compare to the conventional control macrocell deployment, femtocells are spread in the uncontrolled manner as they are deployed in network by customers themselves. This paper discusses multi-distance spatial analysis, Ripley's K function, to describe distribution of femtocells in a macrocell. In our study, we investigate various femtocell distributions and various numbers of femtocells in the macrocell.

  20. Evolution of niche width and adaptive diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Martin; Doebeli, Michael

    2004-12-01

    Theoretical models suggest that resource competition can lead to the adaptive splitting of consumer populations into diverging lineages, that is, to adaptive diversification. In general, diversification is likely if consumers use only a narrow range of resources and thus have a small niche width. Here we use analytical and numerical methods to study the consequences for diversification if the niche width itself evolves. We found that the evolutionary outcome depends on the inherent costs or benefits of widening the niche. If widening the niche did not have costs in terms of overall resource uptake, then the consumer evolved a niche that was wide enough for disruptive selection on the niche position to vanish; adaptive diversification was no longer observed. However, if widening the niche was costly, then the niche widths remained relatively narrow, allowing for adaptive diversification in niche position. Adaptive diversification and speciation resulting from competition for a broadly distributed resource is thus likely if the niche width is fixed and relatively narrow or free to evolve but subject to costs. These results refine the conditions for adaptive diversification due to competition and formulate them in a way that might be more amenable for experimental investigations. PMID:15696740

  1. Renalase's expression and distribution in renal tissue and cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    Full Text Available To study renalase's expression and distribution in renal tissues and cells, renalase coded DNA vaccine was constructed, and anti-renalase monoclonal antibodies were produced using DNA immunization and hybridoma technique, followed by further investigation with immunological testing and western blotting to detect the expression and distribution of renalase among the renal tissue and cells. Anti-renalase monoclonal antibodies were successfully prepared by using DNA immunization technique. Further studies with anti-renalase monoclonal antibody showed that renalase expressed in glomeruli, tubule, mesangial cells, podocytes, renal tubule epithelial cells and its cells supernatant. Renalase is wildly expressed in kidney, including glomeruli, tubule, mesangial cells, podocytes and tubule epithelial cells, and may be secreted by tubule epithelial cells primarily.

  2. Biological width: No violation zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of gingival health is one of the keys for the longevity of teeth, as well as for the longevity of restorations. The concept of Biologic width has been widely described by periodontists and restorative dentists. An adequate understanding of relationship between periodontal tissues and restorative dentistry is paramount to ensure adequate form, function and esthetics, and comfort of the dentition. While most clinicians are aware of this important relationship, uncertainty remains regarding specific concepts such as biologic width and indications and applications of surgical crown lengthening. These violations lead to complications like gingival inflammation, alveolar bone loss and improper fit of the restorative component. This review gives the wide aspect of the complex question of biologic width and represents an attempt to answer some of the demands in relation to it. The article also discusses the possible methods to assess biologic width, problems that occur after improper margin placement in the periodontium and the alternative procedures for prevention of biological width violation.

  3. Final Technical Report for SBIR entitled Four-Dimensional Finite-Orbit-Width Fokker-Planck Code with Sources, for Neoclassical/Anomalous Transport Simulation of Ion and Electron Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, R. W. [CompX; Petrov, Yu. V. [CompX

    2013-12-03

    Within the US Department of Energy/Office of Fusion Energy magnetic fusion research program, there is an important whole-plasma-modeling need for a radio-frequency/neutral-beam-injection (RF/NBI) transport-oriented finite-difference Fokker-Planck (FP) code with combined capabilities for 4D (2R2V) geometry near the fusion plasma periphery, and computationally less demanding 3D (1R2V) bounce-averaged capabilities for plasma in the core of fusion devices. Demonstration of proof-of-principle achievement of this goal has been carried out in research carried out under Phase I of the SBIR award. Two DOE-sponsored codes, the CQL3D bounce-average Fokker-Planck code in which CompX has specialized, and the COGENT 4D, plasma edge-oriented Fokker-Planck code which has been constructed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory scientists, where coupled. Coupling was achieved by using CQL3D calculated velocity distributions including an energetic tail resulting from NBI, as boundary conditions for the COGENT code over the two-dimensional velocity space on a spatial interface (flux) surface at a given radius near the plasma periphery. The finite-orbit-width fast ions from the CQL3D distributions penetrated into the peripheral plasma modeled by the COGENT code. This combined code demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed 3D/4D code. By combining these codes, the greatest computational efficiency is achieved subject to present modeling needs in toroidally symmetric magnetic fusion devices. The more efficient 3D code can be used in its regions of applicability, coupled to the more computationally demanding 4D code in higher collisionality edge plasma regions where that extended capability is necessary for accurate representation of the plasma. More efficient code leads to greater use and utility of the model. An ancillary aim of the project is to make the combined 3D/4D code user friendly. Achievement of full-coupling of these two Fokker

  4. Average radiation widths and the giant dipole resonance width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M.; Thielemann, F.K.

    1982-11-01

    The average E1 radiation width can be calculated in terms of the energy Esub(G) and width GAMMAsub(G) of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR). While various models can predict Esub(G) quite reliably, the theoretical situation regarding ..lambda..sub(G) is much less satisfactory. We propose a simple phenomenological model which is able to provide GAMMAsub(G) values in good agreement with experimental data for spherical or deformed intermediate and heavy nuclei. In particular, this model can account for shell effects in GAMMAsub(G), and can be used in conjunction with the droplet model. The GAMMAsub(G) values derived in such a way are used to compute average E1 radiation widths which are quite close to the experimental values. The method proposed for the calculation of GAMMAsub(G) also appears to be well suited when the GDR characteristics of extended sets of nuclei are required, as is namely the case in nuclear astrophysics.

  5. On the maximal diphoton width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvio, Alberto; Staub, Florian; Strumia, Alessandro; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the 750 GeV diphoton excess found at LHC, we compute the maximal width into γγ that a neutral scalar can acquire through a loop of charged fermions or scalars as function of the maximal scale at which the theory holds, taking into account vacuum (meta)stability bounds. We show how an extra gauge symmetry can qualitatively weaken such bounds, and explore collider probes and connections with Dark Matter.

  6. On the maximal diphoton width

    CERN Document Server

    Salvio, Alberto; Strumia, Alessandro; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the 750 GeV diphoton excess found at LHC, we compute the maximal width into $\\gamma\\gamma$ that a neutral scalar can acquire through a loop of charged fermions or scalars as function of the maximal scale at which the theory holds, taking into account vacuum (meta)stability bounds. We show how an extra gauge symmetry can qualitatively weaken such bounds, and explore collider probes and connections with Dark Matter.

  7. Myoepithelial cells in lobular carcinoma in situ: distribution and immunophenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Jindal, Sonali; Martel, Maritza; Wu, Yaping; Schedin, Pepper; Troxell, Megan

    2016-09-01

    Myoepithelial cells have important physical and paracrine roles in breast tissue development, maintenance, and tumor suppression. Recent molecular and immunohistochemical studies have demonstrated phenotypic alterations in ductal carcinoma in situ-associated myoepithelial cells. Although the relationship of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and myoepithelial cells was described in 1980, further characterization of LCIS-associated myoepithelial cells is lacking. We stained 27 breast specimens harboring abundant LCIS with antibodies to smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, smooth muscle actin, and calponin. Dual stains for E-cadherin/smooth muscle myosin heavy chain and CK7/p63 were also performed. In each case, the intensity and distribution of staining in LCIS-associated myoepithelial cells were compared with normal breast tissue on the same slide. In 78% of the cases, LCIS-associated myoepithelial cells demonstrated decreased staining intensity for one or more myoepithelial markers. The normal localization of myoepithelial cells (flat against the basement membrane, pattern N) was seen in 96% of LCIS, yet 85% of cases had areas with myoepithelial cell cytoplasm oriented perpendicular to the basement membrane (pattern P), and in 30% of cases, myoepithelial cells appeared focally admixed with LCIS cells (pattern C). This study characterizes detailed architectural and immunophenotypic alterations of LCIS-associated myoepithelial cells. The finding of variably diminished staining favors application of several myoepithelial immunostains in clinical practice. The interaction of LCIS with myoepithelial cells, especially in light of the perpendicular and central architectural arrangements, deserves further mechanistic investigation. PMID:27195907

  8. Special Delivery: Distributing Iron in the Cytosol of Mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline C Philpott

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of proteins that require iron cofactors for activity. These iron enzymes are located in essentially every subcellular compartment; thus, iron cofactors must travel to every compartment in the cell. Iron cofactors exist in three basic forms: Heme, iron-sulfur clusters, and simple iron ions (also called non-heme iron. Iron ions taken up by the cell initially enter a kinetically labile, exchangeable pool that is referred to as the labile iron pool. The majority of the iron in this pool is delivered to mitochondria, where it is incorporated into heme and iron-sulfur clusters, as well as non-heme iron enzymes. These cofactors must then be distributed to nascent proteins in the mitochondria, cytosol, and membrane-bound organelles. Emerging evidence suggests that specific systems exist for the distribution of iron cofactors within the cell. These systems include membrane transporters, protein chaperones, specialized carriers, and small molecules. This review focuses on the distribution of iron ions in the cytosol and will highlight differences between the iron distribution systems of simple eukaryotes and mammalian cells.

  9. Unequal distribution of plastids during generative cell formation in Impatiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Went, J L

    1984-07-01

    This paper describes the unequal distribution of plastids in the developing microspores of Impatiens walleriana and Impatiens glandulifera which leads to the exclusion of plastids from the generative cell. During the development from young microspore to the onset of mitosis a change in the organization of the cytoplasm and distribution of organelles is gradually established. This includes the formation of vacuoles at the poles of the elongate-shaped microspores, the movement of the nucleus to a position near the microspore wall in the central part of the cell, and the accumulation of the plastids to a position near the wall at the opposite side of the cell. In Impatiens walleriana, the accumulated plastids are separated from each other by ER cisterns, and some mitochondria are also accumulated. In both Impatiens species, the portion of the microspore in which the generative cell will be formed is completely devoid of plastids at the time mitosis starts. PMID:24257638

  10. The width of the gamma-ray burst luminosity function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ulmer; R.A.M.J. Wijers

    1995-01-01

    We examine the width of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) luminosity function through the distribution of GRB peak count rates, Cpeak, as detected by Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) (1993). In the context of Galactic corona spatial distribution models, we attempt to place constaints on the cha

  11. Distribution and regulation of auxin in Arabidopsis root cells

    OpenAIRE

    Petersson, Sara

    2011-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin (IAA) coordinates many of the important processes in plant development. For example, IAA is critical for normal embryogenesis, root development, cell elongation, and the tropic responses such as gravitropism and phototropism. IAA gradients are established and maintained in many tissues and it is thought that these gradients act as developmental cues, determining the fate of cells and tissues. Descriptions of auxin distribution patterns with cellular resolution h...

  12. N-Widths and Average Widths of Besov Classes in Sobolev Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui Qiao XU; Yong Sheng SUN; Yong Ping LIU

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the n-widths and average widths of Besov classes in the usual Sobolev spaces. The weak asymptotic results concerning the Kolmogorov n-widths, the linear n-widths,the Gel'fand n-widths, in the Sobolev spaces on Td, and the infinite-dimensional widths and the average widths in the Sobolev spaces on Rd are obtained, respectively.

  13. Cell fusion and intramembrane particle distribution in polyethylene glycol-resistant cells

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of intramembrane particles (IMP) as revealed by freeze- fracture electron microscopy has been analyzed following treatment of mouse L cells and fusion-deficient L cell derivatives with several concentrations of polyethylene glycol (PEG). In cell cultures treated with concentrations of PEG below the critical level for fusion, no aggregation of IMP was observed. When confluent cultures of the parental cells are treated with 50% PEG, greater than 90% of the cells fuse, and cold-...

  14. Nuclear distribution of claudin-2 increases cell proliferation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikari, Akira; Watanabe, Ryo; Sato, Tomonari; Taga, Saeko; Shimobaba, Shun; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Sugatani, Junko

    2014-09-01

    Claudin-2 is expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma tissue and cell lines, although it is absent in normal lung tissue. However, the role of claudin-2 in cell proliferation and the regulatory mechanism of intracellular distribution remain undefined. Proliferation of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells was decreased by claudin-2 knockdown together with a decrease in the percentage of S phase cells. This knockdown decreased the expression levels of ZONAB and cell cycle regulators. Claudin-2 was distributed in the nucleus in human adenocarcinoma tissues and proliferating A549 cells. The nuclear distribution of ZONAB and percentage of S phase cells were higher in cells exogenously expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear localization signal than in cells expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear export signal. Nuclear claudin-2 formed a complex with ZO-1, ZONAB, and cyclin D1. Nuclear distribution of S208A mutant, a dephosphorylated form of claudin-2, was higher than that of wild type. We suggest that nuclear distribution of claudin-2 is up-regulated by dephosphorylation and claudin-2 serves to retain ZONAB and cyclin D1 in the nucleus, resulting in the enhancement of cell proliferation in lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  15. Somatic cell count distributions during lactation predict clinical mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, M.J.; Green, L.E.; Schukken, Y.H.; Bradley, A.J.; Peeler, E.J.; Barkema, H.W.; Haas, de Y.; Collis, V.J.; Medley, G.F.

    2004-01-01

    This research investigated somatic cell count (SCC) records during lactation, with the purpose of identifying distribution characteristics (mean and measures of variation) that were most closely associated with clinical mastitis. Three separate data sets were used, one containing quarter SCC (n = 14

  16. Development of Spatial Distribution Patterns by Biofilm Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Bak Christensen, Bjarke;

    2015-01-01

    -pattern by Acinetobacter sp. C6. Ecological spatial pattern analyses revealed that the microcolonies were not entirely randomly distributed, and instead arranged in a uniform pattern. Detailed time-lapse confocal microscopy at the single cell level demonstrated that the spatial pattern was the result of an intriguing self...

  17. Fuel cells for distributed generation in developing countries - an analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauen, A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Energy Policy and Technology; E4tech (UK) Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Hart, D. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Energy Policy and Technology; Chase, A. [E4tech (UK) Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    Fuel cells are still in development as power generation technologies. They are potentially efficient and low-emissions power generation technologies with a wide range of applications. Their deployment world wide and in developing countries in particular could result in mitigation of future greenhouse gas emissions and possibly other environmental and social benefits. The economics of the systems and their competitiveness with other power generation systems will be heavily dependent on local costs and infrastructure. Modelling, based energy demand projection and on fuel cell demand curves derived from expert interviews, suggests that worldwide, projected future cost reductions in fuel cells could result in fuel cell penetration of up to 50% of the world distributed generation market by 2020. This penetration, coupled with the use of a mix of low-carbon fuels, such as natural gas, would result in significant avoided emissions of CO{sub 2} over the same period. Also, a comparison of the levelised costs of generation for the Philippines and South Africa suggests that some fuel cell technologies could become competitive with centralised generation within the next decade. Assuming that fuel cell durability can be demonstrated, the potential for fuel cells to be introduced into distributed generation in certain developing countries appears high, from a technical, economic and environmental perspective. (author)

  18. Investigating Starburst Galaxy Emission Line Equivalent Widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, Helen; Richardson, Chris T.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling star forming galaxies with spectral synthesis codes allows us to study the gas conditions and excitation mechanisms that are necessary to reproduce high ionization emission lines in both local and high-z galaxies. Our study uses the locally optimally-emitting clouds model to develop an atlas of starburst galaxy emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, we address the following question: What physical conditions are necessary to produce strong high ionization emission lines assuming photoionization via starlight? Here we present the results of our photoionization simulations: an atlas spanning 15 orders of magnitude in ionizing flux and 10 orders of magnitude in hydrogen density that tracks over 150 emission lines ranging from the UV to the near IR. Each simulation grid contains ~1.5x104 photoionization models calculated by supplying a spectral energy distribution, grain content, and chemical abundances. Specifically, we will be discussing the effects on the emission line equivalent widths of varying the metallicity of the cloud, Z = 0.2 Z⊙ to Z = 5.0 Z⊙, and varying the star-formation history, using the instantaneous and continuous evolution tracks and the newly released Starburst99 Geneva rotation tracks.

  19. Frequency and distribution of Notch mutations in tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deregulated Notch signaling is linked to a variety of tumors and it is therefore important to learn more about the frequency and distribution of Notch mutations in a tumor context. In this report, we use data from the recently developed Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia to assess the frequency and distribution of Notch mutations in a large panel of cancer cell lines in silico. Our results show that the mutation frequency of Notch receptor and ligand genes is at par with that for established oncogenes and higher than for a set of house-keeping genes. Mutations were found across all four Notch receptor genes, but with notable differences between protein domains, mutations were for example more prevalent in the regions encoding the LNR and PEST domains in the Notch intracellular domain. Furthermore, an in silico estimation of functional impact showed that deleterious mutations cluster to the ligand-binding and the intracellular domains of NOTCH1. For most cell line groups, the mutation frequency of Notch genes is higher than in associated primary tumors. Our results shed new light on the spectrum of Notch mutations after in vitro culturing of tumor cells. The higher mutation frequency in tumor cell lines indicates that Notch mutations are associated with a growth advantage in vitro, and thus may be considered to be driver mutations in a tumor cell line context. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1278-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. The width of the gamma-ray burst luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Andrew; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.

    1995-01-01

    We examine the width of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) luminosity function through the distribution of GRB peak count rates, C(sub peak), as detected by Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) (1993). In the context of Galactic corona spatial distribution models, we attempt to place constaints on the characteristic width of the luminosity function by comparing the observed intensity distribution with those produced by a range of density and luminosity functions. We find that the intrinsic width of the luminosity function cannot be very well restricted. However, the distribution of intrinsic luminosities of detected bursts can be limited: we find that most observed bursts have luminosities that are in a range of one to two decades, but a significant population of undetected less luminous bursts cannot be excluded. These findings demonstrate that the assumption that GRB are standard candles is sufficient but not necessary to explain the observed intensity distribution. We show that the main reason for the relatively poor constraints is the fact that the bright-end part of the GRB flux distribution is not yet sampled by BATSE, and better sampling in the future may lead to significantly stronger constraints on the width of the luminosity function.

  1. Stationary Size Distributions of Growing Cells with Binary and Multiple Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rading, M. M.; Engel, T. A.; Lipowsky, R.; Valleriani, A.

    2011-10-01

    Populations of unicellular organisms that grow under constant environmental conditions are considered theoretically. The size distribution of these cells is calculated analytically, both for the usual process of binary division, in which one mother cell produces always two daughter cells, and for the more complex process of multiple division, in which one mother cell can produce 2 n daughter cells with n=1,2,3,… . The latter mode of division is inspired by the unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The uniform response of the whole population to different environmental conditions is encoded in the individual rates of growth and division of the cells. The analytical treatment of the problem is based on size-dependent rules for cell growth and stochastic transition processes for cell division. The comparison between binary and multiple division shows that these different division processes lead to qualitatively different results for the size distribution and the population growth rates.

  2. The PCP pathway regulates Baz planar distribution in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigouy, Benoit; Le Bivic, André

    2016-01-01

    The localisation of apico-basal polarity proteins along the Z-axis of epithelial cells is well understood while their distribution in the plane of the epithelium is poorly characterised. Here we provide a systematic description of the planar localisation of apico-basal polarity proteins in the Drosophila ommatidial epithelium. We show that the adherens junction proteins Shotgun and Armadillo, as well as the baso-lateral complexes, are bilateral, i.e. present on both sides of cell interfaces. In contrast, we report that other key adherens junction proteins, Bazooka and the myosin regulatory light chain (Spaghetti squash) are unilateral, i.e. present on one side of cell interfaces. Furthermore, we demonstrate that planar cell polarity (PCP) and not the apical determinants Crumbs and Par-6 control Bazooka unilaterality in cone cells. Altogether, our work unravels an unexpected organisation and combination of apico-basal, cytoskeletal and planar polarity proteins that is different on either side of cell-cell interfaces and unique for the different contacts of the same cell. PMID:27624969

  3. The PCP pathway regulates Baz planar distribution in epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigouy, Benoit; Le Bivic, André

    2016-01-01

    The localisation of apico-basal polarity proteins along the Z-axis of epithelial cells is well understood while their distribution in the plane of the epithelium is poorly characterised. Here we provide a systematic description of the planar localisation of apico-basal polarity proteins in the Drosophila ommatidial epithelium. We show that the adherens junction proteins Shotgun and Armadillo, as well as the baso-lateral complexes, are bilateral, i.e. present on both sides of cell interfaces. In contrast, we report that other key adherens junction proteins, Bazooka and the myosin regulatory light chain (Spaghetti squash) are unilateral, i.e. present on one side of cell interfaces. Furthermore, we demonstrate that planar cell polarity (PCP) and not the apical determinants Crumbs and Par-6 control Bazooka unilaterality in cone cells. Altogether, our work unravels an unexpected organisation and combination of apico-basal, cytoskeletal and planar polarity proteins that is different on either side of cell-cell interfaces and unique for the different contacts of the same cell. PMID:27624969

  4. The effect of cell size distribution on predicted osmotic responses of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmoazzen, H Y; Chan, C C V; Acker, J P; Elliott, J A W; McGann, L E

    2005-01-01

    An understanding of the kinetics of the osmotic response of cells is important in understanding permeability properties of cell membranes and predicting cell responses during exposure to anisotonic conditions. Traditionally, a mathematical model of cell osmotic response is obtained by applying mass transport and Boyle-vant Hoff equations using numerical methods. In the usual application of these equations, it is assumed that all cells are the same size equal to the mean or mode of the population. However, biological cells (even if they had identical membranes and hence identical permeability characteristics--which they do not) have a distribution in cell size and will therefore shrink or swell at different rates when exposed to anisotonic conditions. A population of cells may therefore exhibit a different average osmotic response than that of a single cell. In this study, a mathematical model using mass transport and Boyle-van't Hoff equations was applied to measured size distributions of cells. Chinese hamster fibroblast cells (V-79W) and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK), were placed in hypertonic solutions and the kinetics of cell shrinkage were monitored. Consistent with the theoretical predictions, the size distributions of these cells were found to change over time, therefore the selection of the measure of central tendency for the population may affect the calculated osmotic parameters. After examining three different average volumes (mean, median, and mode) using four different theoretical cell size distributions, it was determined that, for the assumptions used in this study, the mean or median were the best measures of central tendency to describe osmotic volume changes in cell suspensions. PMID:16082441

  5. Direct measurement of the W boson width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, B.S.; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /McGill U.; Ahsan, M.; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, A.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-09-01

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W {yields} e{nu} candidates selected in 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 {+-} 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model and is the most precise direct measurement result from a single experiment to date.

  6. Possible Gigantic Variations on the Width of Viscoelastic Fingers

    CERN Document Server

    Poire, E C; Poire, Eugenia Corvera

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the effect of frequency on the width of a single finger displacing a viscoelastic fluid. We derive a generalized Darcy's law in the frequency domain for a linear viscoelastic fluid flowing in a Hele Shaw cell. This leads to an analytic expression for the dynamic permeability that has maxima which are several orders of magnitude larger than the static permeability. We then follow an argument of de Gennes to obtain the smallest possible finger width when viscoelasticity is important. Using this, and a conservation law, we obtain a lowest bound for the width of a single finger displacing a viscoelastic fluid. Our results indicate that when a small amplitude signal of the frequency that maximizes the permeability is overimposed to a constant pressure drop, gigantic variations are obtained for the finger width.

  7. Retinal ganglion cell distribution and spatial resolving power in elasmobranchs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisney, Thomas J; Collin, Shaun P

    2008-01-01

    The total number, distribution and peak density of presumed retinal ganglion cells was assessed in 10 species of elasmobranch (nine species of shark and one species of batoid) using counts of Nissl-stained cells in retinal wholemounts. The species sampled include a number of active, predatory benthopelagic and pelagic sharks that are found in a variety of coastal and oceanic habitats and represent elasmobranch groups for which information of this nature is currently lacking. The topographic distribution of cells was heterogeneous in all species. Two benthic species, the shark Chiloscyllium punctatum and the batoid Taeniura lymma, have a dorsal or dorso-central horizontal streak of increased cell density, whereas the majority of the benthopelagic and pelagic sharks examined exhibit a more concentric pattern of increasing cell density, culminating in a central area centralis of higher cell density located close to the optic nerve head. The exception is the shark Alopias superciliosus, which possesses a ventral horizontal streak. Variation in retinal ganglion cell topography appears to be related to the visual demands of different habitats and lifestyles, as well as the positioning of the eyes in the head. The upper limits of spatial resolving power were calculated for all 10 species, using peak ganglion cell densities and estimates of focal length taken from cryo-sectioned eyes in combination with information from the literature. Spatial resolving power ranged from 2.02 to 10.56 cycles deg(-1), which is in accordance with previous studies. Species with a lower spatial resolving power tend to be benthic and/or coastal species that feed on benthic invertebrates and fishes. Active, benthopelagic and pelagic species from more oceanic habitats which feed on larger, more active prey, possess a higher resolving power. Additionally, ganglion cells in a juvenile of C. punctatum, were retrogradely-labeled from the optic nerve with biotinylated dextran amine (BDA). A comparison

  8. Testing for the maximum cell probabilities in multinomial distributions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG; Shifeng

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates one-sided hypotheses testing for p[1], the largest cell probability of multinomial distribution. A small sample test of Ethier (1982) is extended to the general cases. Based on an estimator of p[1], a kind of large sample tests is proposed. The asymptotic power of the above tests under local alternatives is derived. An example is presented at the end of this paper.

  9. A Bio-Based Fuel Cell for Distributed Energy Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony Terrinoni; Sean Gifford

    2008-06-30

    The technology we propose consists primarily of an improved design for increasing the energy density of a certain class of bio-fuel cell (BFC). The BFCs we consider are those which harvest electrons produced by microorganisms during their metabolism of organic substrates (e.g. glucose, acetate). We estimate that our technology will significantly enhance power production (per unit volume) of these BFCs, to the point where they could be employed as stand-alone systems for distributed energy generation.

  10. Distributed Initial Synchronization for 5G small cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berardinelli, Gilberto; Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão; Tirkkonen, Olav;

    2014-01-01

    Time synchronization in a large network of small cells enables efficient interference management as well as advanced transmission techniques which can boost the network throughput. In this paper, we focus on the distributed initial synchronization problem and propose different solutions aiming at....... A pathlossbased solution limits such reconfigurations but also leads to a higher residual interference than the ID-based solution. An hybrid solution is shown to be an effective trade-off between the two former approaches....

  11. The influence of the scaffold design on the distribution of adhering cells after perfusion cell seeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchels, Ferry P.W.; Tonnarelli, Beatrice; Olivares, Andy L.; Martin, Ivan; Lacroix, Damien; Feijen, Jan; Wendt, David J.; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    2011-01-01

    In natural tissues, the extracellular matrix composition, cell density and physiological properties are often non-homogeneous. Here we describe a model system, in which the distribution of cells throughout tissue engineering scaffolds after perfusion seeding can be influenced by the pore architectur

  12. Estimation of the Beam Width in Magnetic Mass Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.N. Peregudov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for estimation of the beam width in magnetic sector mass spectrometers is proposed. This method consists in the restoration of the initial ion density distribution function in a beam cross-section before the receiving collector slit and can be used for the qualitative estimation of the mass spectrometer ion-optical scheme.

  13. The relationship between red blood cell distribution width and blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Lagos, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Dada OA; Uche E; Akinbami A; Odesanya M; John-Olabode S; Adediran A; Oshinaike O; Ogbera AO; Okunoye O; Arogundade O; Aile K; Ekwere T

    2014-01-01

    Olusola Akinola Dada,1 Ebele Uche,2 Akinsegun Akinbami,2 Majeed Odesanya,3 Sarah John-Olabode,4 Adewumi Adediran,5 Olajumoke Oshinaike,1 Anthonia Okeoghene Ogbera,1 Olaitan Okunoye,6 Olanrewaju Arogundade,2 Kingsley Aile,7 Timothy Ekwere8 1Department of Medicine, Lagos State University, 2Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Lagos State University, College of Medicine, Ikeja, Nigeria; 3Oak Hospitals, Ikorodu, Lagos, Nigeria; 4Department of Haematology, Ben Carson School of Medicine...

  14. Distribution of somatostatin receptors in RINm5F insulinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies with heterogeneous populations of pancreatic cells have provided evidence for the presence of somatostatin (SRIF) receptors in cytosol and secretion vesicles, as well as the plasma membrane. To examine the distribution of SRIF receptors between soluble and membrane fractions in a homogeneous pancreatic islet cell population, we have used the clonal RINm5F insulinoma cell line. These cells contain specific, high affinity binding sites for [125I-Try11]SRIF on the cell surface, and occupancy of these sites by SRIF and SRIF analogs correlates with inhibition of insulin secretion. Stable, steady state binding was achieved using both intact cells and membranes by performing binding incubations with [25I-Tyr11]SRIF at 22 C. Half-maximal inhibition of [125I-Tyr11]SRIF binding occurred with 0.21 +/- 0.11 nM SRIF in membranes and 0.35 +/- 0.30 nM SRIF in cells. In contrast, the binding of [125I-Tyr11]SRIF to cytosolic macromolecules was not reduced by concentrations of SRIF as high as 100 nM, demonstrating that this binding was of much lower affinity. RINm5F membranes were further purified using a Percoll gradient to prepare a microsomal fraction, which was enriched in adenylate cyclase activity, and a secretory granule fraction, which was enriched in insulin. [125I-Tyr11]SRIF binding to the microsomal fraction (3.8 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg) was 3 times higher than to secretion granules (1.2 +/- 0.2 fmol/mg). Thus, high affinity SRIF binding sites were most abundant in microsomal membranes and were low or undetectable in secretory granules and cytosol. To determine whether translocation of SRIF receptors to the plasma membrane accompanied insulin secretion, we examined the effects of various insulin secretagogues on [125I-Tyr11]SRIF binding to intact cells

  15. Tissue Regeneration and Stem Cell Distribution in Adriamycin Induced Glomerulopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickri, Maha Baligh; Fattah, Marwa Mohamed Abdel; Metwally, Hala Gabr

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Glomerulosclerosis develops secondary to various kidney diseases. It was postulated that adriamycin (ADR) induce chronic glomerulopathy. Treatment combinations for one year did not significantly modify renal function in resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Recurrence of FSGS after renal transplantation impacts long-term graft survival and limits access to transplantation. The present study aimed at investigating the relation between the possible therapeutic effect of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs), isolated from cord blood on glomerular damage and their distribution by using ADR induced nephrotoxicity as a model in albino rat. Methods and Results Thirty three male albino rats were divided into control group, ADR group where rats were given single intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 5 mg/kg adriamycin. The rats were sacrificed 10, 20 and 30 days following confirmation of glomerular injury. In stem cell therapy group, rats were injected with HMSCs following confirmation of renal injury and sacrificed 10, 20 and 30 days after HMSCs therapy. Kidney sections were exposed to histological, histochemical, immunohistochemical, morphometric and serological studies. In response to SC therapy multiple Malpighian corpuscles (MC) appeared with patent Bowman's space (Bs) 10 and 20 days following therapy. One month following therapy no remarkable shrunken glomeruli were evident. Glomerular area and serum creatinine were significantly different in ADR group in comparison to control and SC therapy groups. Conclusions ADR induced glomerulosclerosis regressed in response to cord blood HMSC therapy. A reciprocal relation was recorded between the extent of renal regeneration and the distribution of undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:24298364

  16. Performance of multi-junction cells due to illumination distribution across the cell surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper addresses the influence of illumination distribution on the performance of a high concentration photovoltaic (HCPV) module. CPV systems comprise of optical elements as well as mechanical tracking to concentrate the solar flux onto the solar receiver as well as to keep the system on track with the sun. The performance of the subcells of the multi-junction concentrator cell depends on the optical alignment of the system. Raster scanning of the incident intensity in the optical plane of the receiver and corresponding I–V measurements were used to investigate the influence of illumination distribution on performance. The results show that the illumination distribution that differs between cells does affect the performance of the module. The performance of the subcells of the multi-junction concentrator cell also depends on the optical alignment of the system.

  17. Performance of multi-junction cells due to illumination distribution across the cell surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, R.D., E-mail: s206029578@live.nmmu.ac.za [Nelson Mandela University, Physics Department, P.O. Box 77000, 6031, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Vorster, F.J; Dyk, E.E van [Nelson Mandela University, Physics Department, P.O. Box 77000, 6031, Port Elizabeth (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    This paper addresses the influence of illumination distribution on the performance of a high concentration photovoltaic (HCPV) module. CPV systems comprise of optical elements as well as mechanical tracking to concentrate the solar flux onto the solar receiver as well as to keep the system on track with the sun. The performance of the subcells of the multi-junction concentrator cell depends on the optical alignment of the system. Raster scanning of the incident intensity in the optical plane of the receiver and corresponding I-V measurements were used to investigate the influence of illumination distribution on performance. The results show that the illumination distribution that differs between cells does affect the performance of the module. The performance of the subcells of the multi-junction concentrator cell also depends on the optical alignment of the system.

  18. Sliding Mode Control of the Battery Bank for the Fuel Cell-based Distributed Generation System

    OpenAIRE

    Junsheng Jiao

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic models for the fuel cell power and the configuration of the fuel cell distributed generation system are shown in this paper. Due to nonlinear characteristics of fuel cell model, the output voltage of fuel cell varies greatly when the load changes. A novel interface is designed to provide a constant output voltage for charging of the battery bank of the fuel cell distributed generation. The thesis presents a sliding mode control design of PEMFC distributed generation system. A casc...

  19. A Niche Width Model of Optimal Specialization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggeman, Jeroen; Ó Nualláin, Breanndán

    2000-01-01

    Niche width theory, a part of organizational ecology, predicts whether “specialist” or “generalist” forms of organizations have higher “fitness,” in a continually changing environment. To this end, niche width theory uses a mathematical model borrowed from biology. In this paper, we first loosen th

  20. On the spatial and temporal distribution of global thunderstorm cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of global thunderstorm activity have been made predominately by direct measurements of lightning discharges around the globe, either by optical measurements from satellites, or using ground-based radio antennas. In this paper we propose a new methodology in which thunderstorm clusters are constructed based on the lightning strokes detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) in the very low frequency range. We find that even with low lightning detection efficiency on a global scale, the spatial and temporal distribution of global thunderstorm cells is well reproduced. This is validated by comparing the global diurnal variations of the thunderstorm cells, and the currents produced by these storms, with the well-known Carnegie Curve, which represents the mean diurnal variability of the global atmospheric electric circuit, driven by thunderstorm activity. While the Carnegie Curve agrees well with our diurnal thunderstorm cluster variations, there is little agreement between the Carnegie Curve and the diurnal variation in the number of lightning strokes detected by the WWLLN. When multiplying the number of clusters we detect by the mean thunderstorm conduction current for land and ocean thunderstorms (Mach et al 2011 J. Geophys. Res. 116 D05201) we get a total average current of about 760 A. Our results show that thunderstorms alone explain more than 90% in the variability of the global electric circuit. However, while it has been previously shown that 90% of the global lightning occurs over continental landmasses, we show that around 50% of the thunderstorms are over the oceans, and from 00-09UTC there are more thunderstorm cells globally over the oceans than over the continents. Since the detection efficiency of the WWLLN system has increased over time, we estimate that the lower bound of the mean number of global thunderstorm cells in 2012 was around 1050 per hour, varying from around 840 at 03UTC to 1150 storms at 19UTC. (letter)

  1. Distribution of anionic groups at the cell surface of different Sporothrix schenckii cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchimol, M; de Souza, W; Travassos, L R

    1979-06-01

    The distribution of anionic groups at the cell surface of yeastlike forms, hyphae, and conidia of Sporothrix schenckii was studied by staining with colloidal iron hydroxide and cationized ferritin. By using colloidal iron hydroxide it was shown that the external cell wall layer of one strain (strain 1099.18) could be resolved into two reactive sublayers and that these layers were present in many but not all cells of the same population. In contrast, most cells of another strain (strain 1099.12) were stained by colloidal iron hydroxide, but only one reactive layer was seen. Acidic layers of the yeastlike forms of the two strains were much thicker than those of conidia and hyphae. By the cationized ferritin staining procedure it was observed that the acidic layers of yeast forms sloughed off of cells, probably due to cell-cell or cell-medium attrition in shaken submerged cultures or to a process by which the outer layers detach from cells as they are replaced by newly synthesized ones. The colloidal iron hydroxide- and cationized ferritin-reactive cell surface layers of S. schenckii correspond to the previously described (L. R. Travassos et al., Exp. Mycol. 1:293-305, 1977) concanavalin A-reactive peptidorhamnomannan complexes, and their reactivity is probably due to the presence of acidic amino acids of low pK values rather than to glucuronic acid units.

  2. Transients of Water Distribution and Transport in PEM Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hussaini, Irfan S.

    2009-01-01

    The response of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells to a step change in load is investigated experimentally in this work. Voltage undershoot, a characteristic feature of transient response following a step increase in current, is due to transients of water distribution in the membrane and ionomers occurring at subsecond time scales. The use of humidified reactants as a means to control the magnitude of voltage undershoot is demonstrated. Further, the response under a step decrease in current density is explored to determine the existence of hysteresis. Under sufficiently humidified conditions, the responses under forward and reverse step changes are symmetric, but under low relative humidity conditions, voltage undershoot is twice as large as the overshoot. © 2009 The Electrochemical Society.

  3. Kinetic Simulations of the Self-Focusing and Dissipation of Finite-Width Electron Plasma Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winjum, B. J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Berger, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chapman, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Banks, J. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brunner, S. [Federal Inst. of Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-09-01

    Two-dimensional simulations, both Vlasov and particle-in-cell, are presented that show the evolution of the field and electron distribution of finite-width, nonlinear electron plasma waves. The intrinsically intertwined effects of self-focusing and dissipation of field energy caused by electron trapping are studied in simulated systems that are hundreds of wavelengths long in the transverse direction but only one wavelength long and periodic in the propagation direction. From various initial wave states, both the width at focus Δm relative to the initial width Δ0 and the maximum field amplitude at focus are shown to be a function of the growth rate of the transverse modulational instability γTPMI divided by the loss rate of field energy νE to electrons escaping the trapping region. With dissipation included, an amplitude threshold for self-focusing γTPMIE~1 is found that supports the analysis of Rose [Phys. Plasmas 12, 012318 (2005)].

  4. Electric Field Screening by the Proximity of Two Knife-Edge Field Emitters of Finite Width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, P.; Tang, W.; Lau, Y. Y.; Hoff, B.

    2015-11-01

    Field emitter arrays have the potential to provide high current density, low voltage operation, and high pulse repetition for radar and communication. It is well known that packing density of the field emitter arrays significantly affect the emission current. Previously we calculated analytically the electric field profile of two-dimensional knife-edge cathodes with arbitrary separation by using a Schwarz-Christoffel transformation. Here we extend this previous work to include the finite width of two identical emitters. From the electric field profile, the field enhancement factor, thereby the severity of the electric field screening, are determined. It is found that for two identical emitters with finite width, the magnitude of the electric field on the knife-edge cathodes depends strongly on the ratio h / a and h / r , where h is the height of the knife-edge cathode, 2a is the distance between the cathodes, and 2 r represents their width. Particle-in-cell simulations are performed to compare with the analytical results on the emission current distribution. P. Y. Wong was supported by a Directed Energy Summer Scholar internship at Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, and by AFRL Award No. FA9451-14-1-0374.

  5. Distance distributions of photogenerated charge pairs in organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Alex J; Chen, Kai; Hodgkiss, Justin M

    2014-08-27

    Strong Coulomb interactions in organic photovoltaic cells dictate that charges must separate over relatively long distances in order to circumvent geminate recombination and produce photocurrent. In this article, we measure the distance distributions of thermalized charge pairs by accessing a regime at low temperature where charge pairs are frozen out following the primary charge separation step and recombine monomolecularly via tunneling. The exponential attenuation of tunneling rate with distance provides a sensitive probe of the distance distribution of primary charge pairs, reminiscent of electron transfer studies in proteins. By fitting recombination dynamics to distributions of recombination rates, we identified populations of charge-transfer states and well-separated charge pairs. For the wide range of materials we studied, the yield of separated charges in the tunneling regime is strongly correlated with the yield of free charges measured via their intensity-dependent bimolecular recombination dynamics at room temperature. We therefore conclude that populations of free charges are established via long-range charge separation within the thermalization time scale, thus invoking early branching between free and bound charges across an energetic barrier. Subject to assumed values of the electron tunneling attenuation constant, we estimate critical charge separation distances of ∼3-4 nm in all materials. In some blends, large fullerene crystals can enhance charge separation yields; however, the important role of the polymers is also highlighted in blends that achieved significant charge separation with minimal fullerene concentration. We expect that our approach of isolating the intrinsic properties of primary charge pairs will be of considerable value in guiding new material development and testing the validity of proposed mechanisms for long-range charge separation.

  6. Spin gated GDR widths at moderate temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukul Ish

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the evolution of giant dipole resonance (GDR width as a function of angular momentum in the compound nucleus 144Sm in the temperature range of 1.5-2.0 MeV. The high energy γ rays emitted from the decay of excited 144Sm were measured using large NaI detector in coincidence with 4π sum spin spectrometer. GDR widths were found to comply with thermal shape fluctuation model in this temperature range over a wide range of spin. Experimental widths tend to increase rapidly at high angular momentum values.

  7. Static vortices in long Josephson junctions of exponentially varying width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerdjieva, E. G.; Boyadjiev, T. L.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2004-06-01

    A numerical simulation is carried out for static vortices in a long Josephson junction with an exponentially varying width. At specified values of the parameters the corresponding boundary-value problem admits more than one solution. Each solution (distribution of the magnetic flux in the junction) is associated to a Sturm-Liouville problem, the smallest eigenvalue of which can be used, in a first approximation, to assess the stability of the vortex against relatively small spatiotemporal perturbations. The change in width of the junction leads to a renormalization of the magnetic flux in comparison with the case of a linear one-dimensional model. The influence of the model parameters on the stability of the states of the magnetic flux is investigated in detail, particularly that of the shape parameter. The critical curve of the junction is constructed from pieces of the critical curves for the different magnetic flux distributions having the highest critical currents for the given magnetic field.

  8. The Electrical Distribution Feed Box for the LHC Prototype Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Hauviller, Claude; Poncet, Alain; Sacré, P; Trilhe, P

    2000-01-01

    The Electrical Distribution Feed Box (DFB) for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Prototype Cell (String 2) is a 6 meter-long 4.6 K / 0.135 MPa liquid helium cryostat which supports and cools 13 kA and 600 A High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) current leads. These are used for powering the String 2 main dipole and quadrupole superconducting magnets, together with their correctors. The DFB also incorporates the l-plate between its saturated liquid helium bath and the magnet pressurized superfluid helium bath at 1.9 K/ 0.13 MPa. The DFB is built within the frame of a collaboration between CERN and the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk, Russian Federation). It is a complex cryostat satisfying a number of constraints (space available, accessibility, integration) and combining different technologies such as mechanical and electrical engineering, superconductivity, cryogenics and vacuum. The current status of the design and construction of the DFB for the LHC Prototype Cell, together with an outlook t...

  9. Distribution and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in tumor tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hai-feng; CHEN Jun; XU Zhi-shun; ZHANG Ke-qin

    2009-01-01

    Background Tumor has an ability to become enriched in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and of guiding MSCs to migrate to tumor tissue. But there are lack of relevant reports on the distribution and differentiation of MSCs in tumor tissue and the effect on tumor growth after MSCs engrafted in tumor tissue. In this study, we observed the distribution of bone marrow MSCs in tumor tissue and the possibility of MSCs differentiating into myofibroblast under the induction of local tumor microenvironment.Methods Twenty-four New Zealand rabbits were randomly classified into the control group and the test group. MSCs were isolated and cultured for each animal, vx-2 tumor tissue was transplanted under the bladder mucosa of each animal. One week after the transplantation, the self F2 passage MSCs marked by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole were transplanted into tumor tissue in the test group while only Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium-low glucose was infused into the control group. Ultrasonography was performed for each animal 1,2, 3 and 4 week(s) after the vx-2 tumor mass was transplanted. The maximum bladder tumor diameter of each animal was recorded and the mean value of each group was calculated. One animal from each group was sacrificed in the third week and the remaining animals in the fourth week to observe the tumor development. Another animal treated the same as the test group was sacrificed to observe the distribution of MSCs in tumor tissue one week after self MSCs transplantation. Immunofluorescence was used to trace MSCs in tumor tissue. The double labeling immunofluorescence for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin was performed to identify whether the MSCs can differentiate into myofibroblast.Results The ultrasonography showed no tumor mass one week after the vx-2 tumor mass transplantation. The mean maximum tumor diameter of the control group and test group was (0.70±0.14) cm and (0.78±0.14) cm, respectively, and there was no significant difference (t=1

  10. Chemokine-mediated distribution of dendritic cell subsets in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Werner

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC represents one of the most immunoresponsive cancers. Antigen-specific vaccination with dendritic cells (DCs in patients with metastatic RCC has been shown to induce cytotoxic T-cell responses associated with objective clinical responses. Thus, clinical trials utilizing DCs for immunotherapy of advanced RCCs appear to be promising; however, detailed analyses concerning the distribution and function of DC subsets in RCCs are lacking. Methods We characterized the distribution of the different immature and mature myeloid DC subsets in RCC tumour tissue and the corresponding normal kidney tissues. In further analyses, the expression of various chemokines and chemokine receptors controlling the migration of DC subsets was investigated. Results The highest numbers of immature CD1a+ DCs were found within RCC tumour tissue. In contrast, the accumulation of mature CD83+/DC-LAMP+ DCs were restricted to the invasive margin of the RCCs. The mature DCs formed clusters with proliferating T-cells. Furthermore, a close association was observed between MIP-3α-producing tumour cells and immature CCR6+ DC recruitment to the tumour bed. Conversely, MIP-3β and SLC expression was only detected at the tumour border, where CCR7-expressing T-cells and mature DCs formed clusters. Conclusion Increased numbers of immature DCs were observed within the tumour tissue of RCCs, whereas mature DCs were found in increased numbers at the tumour margin. Our results strongly implicate that the distribution of DC subsets is controlled by local lymphoid chemokine expression. Thus, increased expression of MIP-3α favours recruitment of immature DCs to the tumour bed, whereas de novo local expression of SLC and MIP-3β induces accumulation of mature DCs at the tumour margin forming clusters with proliferating T-cells reflecting a local anti-tumour immune response.

  11. W mass and width measurements at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Nurse, Emily

    2007-01-01

    I present a measurement of the W boson mass (M_W) and width (G_W) using 200 and 350 pb-1 of CDF Run II data respectively. The measurements, performed in both the electron and muon decay channels, rely on a fit to the W transverse mass distribution. We measure M_W = 80413 +/- 48 MeV and G_W = 2032 +/- 71 MeV which represent the world's single most precise measurements to date.

  12. On the Spectrum Width of Wind Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李陆平; 黄培基

    2001-01-01

    Based on the universal expression of wind wave spectra, four commonly used definitions of the spectrum width arere-examined. The results show that the non-dimensional spectrum width can measure the width of non-dimensionalspectra but it does not reflect the developing state of the spectra. The dimensional spectrum width expresses the degree ofconcentration of wave energy of the spectrum in the process of wind wave growth. Tests show that the spectrum widthpresented by Wen et al. can objectively measure the degree of concentration of wave energy of the spectrum, reflect thestate of wind wave growth, and provides a better result for practical application. The rules for definition of the spectrumwidth are discussed.

  13. Multicellular automaticity of cardiac cell monolayers: effects of density and spatial distribution of pacemaker cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elber Duverger, James; Boudreau-Béland, Jonathan; Le, Minh Duc; Comtois, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Self-organization of pacemaker (PM) activity of interconnected elements is important to the general theory of reaction-diffusion systems as well as for applications such as PM activity in cardiac tissue to initiate beating of the heart. Monolayer cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) are often used as experimental models in studies on cardiac electrophysiology. These monolayers exhibit automaticity (spontaneous activation) of their electrical activity. At low plated density, cells usually show a heterogeneous population consisting of PM and quiescent excitable cells (QECs). It is therefore highly probable that monolayers of NRVMs consist of a heterogeneous network of the two cell types. However, the effects of density and spatial distribution of the PM cells on spontaneous activity of monolayers remain unknown. Thus, a simple stochastic pattern formation algorithm was implemented to distribute PM and QECs in a binary-like 2D network. A FitzHugh-Nagumo excitable medium was used to simulate electrical spontaneous and propagating activity. Simulations showed a clear nonlinear dependency of spontaneous activity (occurrence and amplitude of spontaneous period) on the spatial patterns of PM cells. In most simulations, the first initiation sites were found to be located near the substrate boundaries. Comparison with experimental data obtained from cardiomyocyte monolayers shows important similarities in the position of initiation site activity. However, limitations in the model that do not reflect the complex beat-to-beat variation found in experiments indicate the need for a more realistic cardiomyocyte representation.

  14. Adherens junction distribution mechanisms during cell-cell contact elongation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Goldenberg

    Full Text Available During Drosophila gastrulation, amnioserosa (AS cells flatten and spread as an epithelial sheet. We used AS morphogenesis as a model to investigate how adherens junctions (AJs distribute along elongating cell-cell contacts in vivo. As the contacts elongated, total AJ protein levels increased along their length. However, genetically blocking this AJ addition indicated that it was not essential for maintaining AJ continuity. Implicating other remodeling mechanisms, AJ photobleaching revealed non-directional lateral mobility of AJs along the elongating contacts, as well as local AJ removal from the membranes. Actin stabilization with jasplakinolide reduced AJ redistribution, and live imaging of myosin II along elongating contacts revealed fragmented, expanding and contracting actomyosin networks, suggesting a mechanism for lateral AJ mobility. Actin stabilization also increased total AJ levels, suggesting an inhibition of AJ removal. Implicating AJ removal by endocytosis, clathrin endocytic machinery accumulated at AJs. However, dynamin disruption had no apparent effect on AJs, suggesting the involvement of redundant or dynamin-independent mechanisms. Overall, we propose that new synthesis, lateral diffusion, and endocytosis play overlapping roles to populate elongating cell-cell contacts with evenly distributed AJs in this in vivo system.

  15. a Linear Model for Meandering Rivers with Arbitrarily Varying Width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascati, A.; Lanzoni, S.

    2011-12-01

    Alluvial rivers usually exhibit quite complex planforms, characterized by a wide variety of alternating bends, that have attracted the interest of a large number of researchers. Much less attention has been paid to another striking feature observed in alluvial rivers, namely the relatively regular spatial variations attained by the channel width. Actively meandering channels, in fact, generally undergo spatial oscillations systematically correlated with channel curvature, with cross sections wider at bends than at crossings. Some other streams have been observed to exhibit irregular width variations. Conversely, rivers flowing in highly vegetated flood plains, i.e. canaliform rivers, may exhibit an opposite behavior, owing to the combined effects of bank erodibility and floodplain depositional processes which, in turn, are strictly linked to vegetation cover. Similarly to streamline curvatures induced by bends, the presence of along channel width variations may have remarkable effects on the flow field and sediment dynamics and, thereby, on the equilibrium river bed configuration. In particular, spatial distribution of channel curvature typically determines the formation of a rhythmic bar-pool pattern in the channel bed strictly associated with the development of river meanders. Channel width variations are on the contrary characterized by a sequence of narrowing, yielding a central scour, alternated to the downstream development of a widening associated with the formation of a central bar. Here we present a morphodynamic model that predict at a linear level the spatial distribution of the flow field and the equilibrium bed configuration of an alluvial river characterized by arbitrary along channel distributions of both the channel axis curvature and the channel width. The mathematical model is averaged over the depth and describes the steady, non-uniform flow and sediment transport in sinuous channels with a noncohesive bed. The governing two-dimensional equations

  16. Distribution of Prestin on Outer Hair Cell Basolateral Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ning; ZHAI Suo-qiang; YANG Shi-ming; HAN Dong-yi; ZHAO Hong-bo

    2008-01-01

    Prestin has been identified as a motor protein responsible for outer hair cell (OHC) electromotility and is expressed on the OHC surface. Previous studies revealed that OHC eleetromotility and its associated nonlinear capacitance were mainly located at the OHC lateral wall and absent at the apical cutieular plate and the basal nucleus region. Immunofluorescent staining for prestin also failed to demonstrate prestin expression at the OHC basal ends in whole-mount preparation of the organ of Corti. However, there lacks a definitive demonstration of the pattern of prestin distribution. The OHC lateral wall has a trilaminate organization and is composed of the plasma membrane, cortical lattice, and subsurface cisternae. In this study, the location of prestin proteins in dissociated OHCs was examined using immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy. We found that prestin was uniformly expressed on the basolateral surface, including the basal pole. No staining was seen on the cuticular plate and stereocilia. When co-stained with a membrane marker di-8-ANEPPS, prestin-labeling was found to be in the outer layer of the OHC lateral wall. After separating the plasma membrane from the underlying subsurface eisternae using a hypotonic extracellular solution, prestin-labeling was found to be in the plasma membrane, not the subsurface cisternae. The data show that prestin is expressed in the plasma membrane on the entire OHC basolateral surface.

  17. Influence of Doppler Bin Width on GNSS Detection Probabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Geiger, Bernhard C

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition stage in GNSS receivers determines Doppler shifts and code phases of visible satellites. Acquisition is thus a search in two continuous dimensions, where the digital algorithms require a partitioning of the search space into cells. We present analytic expressions for the acquisition performance depending on the partitioning of the Doppler frequency domain. In particular, the impact of the number and width of Doppler bins is analyzed. The presented results are verified by simulations.

  18. Investigation into Variations of Welding Residual Stresses and Redistribution Behaviors for Different Repair Welding Widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we investigated the variations in welding residual stresses in dissimilar metal butt weld due to width of repair welding and re-distribution behaviors resulting from similar metal welding (SMW) and mechanical loading. To this end, detailed two-dimensional axi-symmetric finite element (FE) analyses were performed considering five different repair welding widths. Based on the FE results, we first evaluated the welding residual stress distributions in repair welding. We then investigated the re-distribution behaviors of the residual stresses due to SMW and mechanical loads. It is revealed that large tensile welding residual stresses take place in the inner surface and that its distribution is affected, provided repair welding width is larger than certain value. The welding residual stresses resulting from repair welding are remarkably reduced due to SMW and mechanical loading, regardless of the width of the repair welding

  19. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S.; Seya, A. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Ichihara-shi (Japan); Asano, A. [Fuji Electric Corporate, Ltd., Yokosuka-shi (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  20. FEM Analysis of Rolling Pressure Along Strip Width in Cold Rolling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang-hua; SHI Xu; LI Shan-qing; XU Jian-yong; WANG Guo-dong

    2007-01-01

    Using 3-D elastic-plastic FEM, the cold strip rolling process in a 4-high mill was simulated. The elastic deformation of rolls, the plastic deformation of the strip, and the pressure between the work roll and the backup roll were taken into account. The distribution of rolling pressure along the strip width was obtained. Based on the simulation results, the peak value of rolling pressure and the location of the peak were analyzed under different rolling conditions. The effects of the roll bending force and the strip width on the distribution of rolling pressure along the width direction were determined.

  1. A Direct Measurement of the $W$ Decay Width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, Troy [Univ. of College, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-01

    A direct measurement of the W boson total decay width is presented in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using data collected by the CDF II detector. The measurement is made by fitting a simulated signal to the tail of the transverse mass distribution in the electron and muon decay channels. An integrated luminosity of 350 pb-1 is used, collected between February 2002 and August 2004. Combining the results from the separate decay channels gives the decay width as 2.038 ± 0.072 GeV in agreement with the theoretical prediction of 2.093 ± 0.002 GeV. A system is presented for the management of detector calibrations using a relational database schema. A description of the implementation and monitoring of a procedure to provide general users with a simple interface to the complete set of calibrations is also given.

  2. Constraints on widths of mixed pentaquark multiplets

    CERN Document Server

    Mohta, V

    2004-01-01

    We determine constraints on the partial widths of mixed pentaquark multiplets in the framework of heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory (HB$\\chi$PT). The partial widths satisfy a GMO-type relation at leading order in HB$\\chi$PT, for arbitrary mixing. The widths of N(1440), N(1710), and $\\Theta(1540)$ are not consistent with ideal mixing, $\\theta_{N} = 35.3^{\\circ}$, but are consistent with $\\theta_{N} \\lesssim 25^{\\circ}$. Furthermore, there are parameter values in HB$\\chi$PT that produce such a mixing angle while allowing the identification of the mass spectrum above. As an alternative to non-ideal mixing, we also suggest reasons for giving up on N(1440) as a pure pentaquark state.

  3. The Variable Line Width of Achernar

    CERN Document Server

    Rivinius, Th; Baade, D; Carciofi, A C; Leister, N; Štefl, S

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of Achernar over the past decades, have shown the photospheric line width, as measured by the rotational parameter $v \\sin i$, to vary in correlation with the emission activity. Here we present new observations, covering the most recent activity phase, and further archival data collected from the archives. The $v \\sin i$ variation is confirmed. On the basis of the available data it cannot be decided with certainty whether the increased line width precedes the emission activity, i.e. is a signature of the ejection mechanism, or postdates is, which would make it a signature of re-accretion of some of the disk-material. However, the observed evidence leans towards the re-accretion hypothesis. Two further stars showing the effect of variable line width in correlation with emission activity, namely 66 Oph and $\\pi$ Aqr, are presented as well.

  4. Distribution of natural killer cell receptors in HIV infected individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yong-jun; SHANG Hong; ZHANG Zi-ning; DIAO Ying-ying; GENG Wen-qing; DAI Di; LIU Jing; WANG Ya-nan; ZHANG Min; HAN Xiao-xu

    2007-01-01

    @@ Natural killer (NK) cells are bone marrow derived,large granular lymphocytes, comprising approximately 10% to 20% of the mononuclear cell fraction in normal peripheral blood. They form a part of the first line defense mechanism against tumoural and viral spreading.1-4 Unlike T and B cells, NK cells do not require gene rearrangement for assembly of their receptor genes; rather, NK cells discriminate potential target cells based on the levels of self major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ⅰ expression on such cells.5,6 There are two kinds of NK cell receptors.2,7,8 Inhibitory receptors recognize MHC class Ⅰ molecules and deliver a downregulatory signal that inactivates the lyric machinery of NK cells. Stimulatory receptors expressed by NK cells deliver an activation signal.

  5. High Fin Width Mosfet Using Gaa Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L.Tripathi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and optimization of gate-all-around (GAA MOSFETs structures. The optimum value of Fin width and Fin height are investigated for superior sub threshold behavior. Also the performance of Fin shaped GAA with gate oxide HfO2 are simulated and compared with conventional gate oxide SiO2 for the same structure. As a result, it was observed that the GAA with high K dielectric gate oxide has more possibility to optimize the Fin width with improved performance. All the simulations are performed on 3-D TCAD device simulator.

  6. High Fin Width Mosfet Using Gaa Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L.Tripathi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and optimization of gate-all-around (GAA MOSFETs structures. The optimum value of Fin width and Fin height are investigated for superior subthreshold behavior. Also the performance of Fin shaped GAA with gate oxide HfO2 are simulated and compared with conventional gate oxide SiO2 for the same structure. As a result, it was observed that the GAA with high K dielectric gate oxide has more possibility to optimize the Fin width with improved performance. All the simulations are performed on 3-D TCAD device simulator.

  7. Line width of Josephson flux flow oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V.P.; Dmitriev, P.N.; Sobolev, A.S.;

    2002-01-01

    to be proven before one initiates real FFO applications. To achieve this goal a comprehensive set of line width measurements of the FFO operating in different regimes has been performed. FFOs with tapered shape have been successfully implemented in order to avoid the superfine resonant structure with voltage...... spacing of about 20 nV and extremely low differential resistance, recently observed in the IVC of the standard rectangular geometry. The obtained results have been compared with existing theories and FFO models in order to understand and possibly eliminate excess noise in the FFO. The intrinsic line width...

  8. High Fin Width Mosfet Using Gaa Structure

    OpenAIRE

    S.L.Tripathi; Ramanuj Mishra; R. A. Mishra

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design and optimization of gate-all-around (GAA) MOSFETs structures. The optimum value of Fin width and Fin height are investigated for superior sub threshold behavior. Also the performance of Fin shaped GAA with gate oxide HfO2 are simulated and compared with conventional gate oxide SiO2 for the same structure. As a result, it was observed that the GAA with high K dielectric gate oxide has more possibility to optimize the Fin width with improved performance. All the ...

  9. Statistical characteristics of Doppler spectral width as observed by the conjugate SuperDARN radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hosokawa

    Full Text Available We performed a statistical analysis of the occurrence distribution of Doppler spectral width around the day-side high-latitude ionosphere using data from the conjugate radar pair composed of the CUTLASS Iceland-East radar in the Northern Hemisphere and the SENSU Syowa-East radar in the Southern Hemisphere. Three types of spectral width distribution were identified: (1 an exponential-like distribution in the lower magnetic latitudes (below 72°, (2 a Gaussian-like distribution around a few degrees magnetic latitude, centered on 78°, and (3 another type of distribution in the higher magnetic latitudes (above 80°. The first two are considered to represent the geophysical regimes such as the LLBL and the cusp, respectively, because they are similar to the spectral width distributions within the LLBL and the cusp, as classified by Baker et al. (1995. The distribution found above 80° magnetic latitude has been clarified for the first time in this study. This distribution has similarities to the exponential-like distribution in the lower latitude part, although clear differences also exist in their characteristics. These three spectral width distributions are commonly identified in conjugate hemispheres. The latitudinal transition from one distribution to another exhibits basically the same trend between two hemispheres. There is, however, an interhemispheric difference in the form of the distribution around the cusp latitudes, such that spectral width values obtained from Syowa-East are larger than those from Iceland-East. On the basis of the spectral width characteristics, the average locations of the cusp and the open/closed field line boundary are estimated statistically.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere inter-actions; plasma convection – Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers

  10. Radiative width of the rho- meson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excitation of high-energy pions in the nuclear Coulomb field has been investigated. The data, analyzed assuming the presence of both electromagnetic and strong contributions to coherent production of π-π0 systems, yield a decay width for rho- → π-γ of 67 +- 7 keV

  11. Theoretical determination of etab's electromagnetic decay width

    CERN Document Server

    Fabiano, N

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the theoretical predictions for the two photon decay width of the pseudoscalar etab meson. Predictions from potential models are examined. It is found that various models are in good agreement with each other. Results for etab are also compared with those from Upsilon data through the NRQCD procedure.

  12. The Galaxy Counts-in-cells Distribution from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Abel; Saslaw, William C.

    2011-03-01

    We determine the galaxy counts-in-cells distribution from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) for three-dimensional spherical cells in redshift space as well as for two-dimensional projected cells. We find that cosmic variance in the SDSS causes the counts-in-cells distributions in different quadrants to differ from each other by up to 20%. We also find that within this cosmic variance, the overall galaxy counts-in-cells distribution agrees with both the gravitational quasi-equilibrium distribution and the negative binomial distribution. We also find that brighter galaxies are more strongly clustered than if they were randomly selected from a larger complete sample that includes galaxies of all luminosities. The results suggest that bright galaxies could be in dark matter halos separated by less than ~10 h -1 Mpc.

  13. Nanoparticle Distributions in Cancer and other Cells from Light Transmission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatsch, Alison; Sun, Nan; Johnson, Jeffery; Stack, Sharon; Tanner, Carol; Ruggiero, Steven

    We have measured the optical properties of whole cells and lysates using light transmission spectroscopy (LTS). LTS provides both the optical extinction coefficient in the wavelength range from 220 to 1100 nm and (by spectral inversion using a Mie model) the particle distribution density in the size range from 1 to 3000 nm. Our current work involves whole cells and lysates of cultured human oral cells and other plant and animal cells. We have found systematic differences in the optical extinction between cancer and normal whole cells and lysates, which translate to different particle size distributions (PSDs) for these materials. We have also found specific power-law dependences of particle density with particle diameter for cell lysates. This suggests a universality of the packing distribution in cells that can be compared to ideal Apollonian packing, with the cell modeled as a fractal body comprised of spheres on all size scales.

  14. Reconstructing the in vivo dynamics of hematopoietic stem cells from telomere length distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Benjamin; Beier, Fabian; Hummel, Sebastian; Balabanov, Stefan; Lassay, Lisa; Orlikowsky, Thorsten; Dingli, David; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Traulsen, Arne

    2015-10-15

    We investigate the in vivo patterns of stem cell divisions in the human hematopoietic system throughout life. In particular, we analyze the shape of telomere length distributions underlying stem cell behavior within individuals. Our mathematical model shows that these distributions contain a fingerprint of the progressive telomere loss and the fraction of symmetric cell proliferations. Our predictions are tested against measured telomere length distributions in humans across all ages, collected from lymphocyte and granulocyte sorted telomere length data of 356 healthy individuals, including 47 cord blood and 28 bone marrow samples. We find an increasing stem cell pool during childhood and adolescence and an approximately maintained stem cell population in adults. Furthermore, our method is able to detect individual differences from a single tissue sample, i.e. a single snapshot. Prospectively, this allows us to compare cell proliferation between individuals and identify abnormal stem cell dynamics, which affects the risk of stem cell related diseases.

  15. Pressure distribution method for ex-situ evaluation of flow distribution in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, S.; Mueller, S.

    2015-04-01

    Fuel cells for automotive applications consist of cells with large active areas. The active area is generally between 150 cm2 and 400 cm2. The reaction gases and the cooling media are distributed via bipolar plates to the reaction zones. Understanding local and cell wide gas distribution within the flow field at high current densities greater than 2.0 A/cm2 is a key factor regarding efficiency at low stoichiometry, lambda less than 2. In this paper a new method is introduced, which can be used as ex-situ evaluation of flow distribution. The gas pressure distribution is mapped with an array of 5 × 12 membrane differential pressure sensors by measuring the static pressure locally against the outlet pressure. Below a differential pressure of 100 mbar the signal measurement accuracy is ±2.5 mbar. This is demonstrated in a flow field with an active area of 250 cm2. The sensors are located next to the micro porous layer of the gas diffusion layer to avoid any impact of dynamic pressure. The effect of the intrusion of gas diffusion layer material into the flow channels on the fluid distribution is evaluated at clamping pressures between 0.6 MPa and 4.2 MPa.

  16. Measuring skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution by laser ektacytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, S Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Lugovtsov, A E [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ustinov, V D [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Computational Mathematics and Cybernetics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-31

    An algorithm is proposed for measuring the parameters of red blood cell deformability distribution based on laser diffractometry of red blood cells in shear flow (ektacytometry). The algorithm is tested on specially prepared samples of rat blood. In these experiments we succeeded in measuring the mean deformability, deformability variance and skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution with errors of 10%, 15% and 35%, respectively. (laser biophotonics)

  17. Characterizing the width of amphibian movements during postbreeding migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coster, Stephanie S; Veysey Powell, Jessica S; Babbitt, Kimberly J

    2014-06-01

    Habitat linkages can help maintain connectivity of animal populations in developed landscapes. However, the lack of empirical data on the width of lateral movements (i.e., the zigzagging of individuals as they move from one point to point another) makes determining the width of such linkages challenging. We used radiotracking data from wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) in a managed forest in Maine (U.S.A.) to characterize movement patterns of populations and thus inform planning for the width of wildlife corridors. For each individual, we calculated the polar coordinates of all locations, estimated the vector sum of the polar coordinates, and measured the distance from each location to the vector sum. By fitting a Gaussian distribution over a histogram of these distances, we created a population-level probability density function and estimated the 50th and 95th percentiles to determine the width of lateral movement as individuals progressed from the pond to upland habitat. For spotted salamanders 50% of lateral movements were ≤13 m wide and 95% of movements were ≤39 m wide. For wood frogs, 50% of lateral movements were ≤17 m wide and 95% of movements were ≤ 51 m wide. For both species, those individuals that traveled the farthest from the pond also displayed the greatest lateral movement. Our results serve as a foundation for spatially explicit conservation planning for pond-breeding amphibians in areas undergoing development. Our technique can also be applied to movement data from other taxa to aid in designing habitat linkages. PMID:24423254

  18. Effects of Exterior Abscisic Acid on Calcium Distribution of Mesophyll Cells and Calcium Concentration of Guard Cells in Maize Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiu-lin; MA Yuan-yuan; LIU Zi-hui; LIU Bin-hui

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the direct effects of exterior abscisic acid (ABA) on both calcium distribution of mesophyll cells and cytosolic calcium concentration of guard cells were examined. The distribution of Ca2+ localization were observed with calcium antimonate precipitate-electromicroscopic-cyto-chemical methods after treated with ABA and pretreated with ethylene glycol-bis-(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), verapamil (Vp), and trifluoperazine (TFP). The laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to measure the cytosolic calcium concentrations of guard cells under different treatments. The results showed that the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration of mesophyll cells was induced to increase by ABA, but to decrease in both outside cell and the vacuoles within 10 min after treatments. The cytosolic calcium concentration of guard cells was increased gradually with the lag in treatment time. However, both EGTA and TFP could inverse those effects, indicating that the increase of cytosolic calcium induced by exterior ABA was mainly caused by calcium influx. The results also showed that calmodulin could influence both the calcium distribution of mesophyll cells and calcium concentration of guard cells. It shows that calmodulin participates in the process of ABA signal transduction, but the mechanism is not known as yet. The changes both calcium distribution of mesophyll cells and calcium concentration of guard cells further proved that the variations of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration induced by ABA were involved in the stomatal movements of maize seedlings.

  19. Radiative widths of K and rho mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissociation of K and π mesons in the nuclear Coulomb field has been studied. Results are: GAMMA(rho→πγ) = 67 +- 7 KeV., GAMMA(K*(890)→Kπ) = 60 +- 15 KeV; and the observation of Coulomb excitation of the following states: K*(1420,1700),A2,A1,B. The measured widths are in rough agreement with a simple quark model

  20. Ganglion cell and displaced amacrine cell density distribution in the retina of the howler monkey (Alouatta caraya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto Pereira Carneiro Muniz

    Full Text Available Unlike all other New World (platyrrine monkeys, both male and female howler monkeys (Alouatta sp. are obligatory trichromats. In all other platyrrines, only females can be trichromats, while males are always dichromats, as determined by multiple behavioral, electrophysiological, and genetic studies. In addition to obligatory trichromacy, Alouatta has an unusual fovea, with substantially higher peak cone density in the foveal pit than every other diurnal anthropoid monkey (both platyrrhines and catarrhines and great ape yet examined, including humans. In addition to documenting the general organization of the retinal ganglion cell layer in Alouatta, the distribution of cones is compared to retinal ganglion cells, to explore possible relationships between their atypical trichromacy and foveal specialization. The number and distribution of retinal ganglion cells and displaced amacrine cells were determined in six flat-mounted retinas from five Alouatta caraya. Ganglion cell density peaked at 0.5 mm between the fovea and optic nerve head, reaching 40,700-45,200 cells/mm2. Displaced amacrine cell density distribution peaked between 0.5-1.75 mm from the fovea, reaching mean values between 2,050-3,100 cells/mm2. The mean number of ganglion cells was 1,133,000±79,000 cells and the mean number of displaced amacrine cells was 537,000±61,800 cells, in retinas of mean area 641±62 mm2. Ganglion cell and displaced amacrine cell density distribution in the Alouatta retina was consistent with that observed among several species of diurnal Anthropoidea, both platyrrhines and catarrhines. The principal alteration in the Alouatta retina appears not to be in the number of any retinal cell class, but rather a marked gradient in cone density within the fovea, which could potentially support high chromatic acuity in a restricted central region.

  1. ECC water spreading width for flat plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the characteristics of water jet spreading width induced by Direct Vessel Injection(DVI), a steady state and separate effect test focusing on the effect of the downcomer curvature was performed using a rectangular flat-plate air-water open channel test facility. Comparative tests using various scaled diameter(D) of water jet nozzle, channel gap(W), water jet velocity(VJET), and forced cross air-flow(Vc) on the water film are performed for the Korean Next Generation Reactor(KNGR) during the late reflood phase of LBLOCA. A simplified and visible thin acryl plates were used. The air-water channel has a nearly full height in height between DVI and coldleg. The channel gap and the diameter of water injection nozzle have scaled ratios of 1/50 ∼ 1/10 by volume scaling method. The cross flow is introduced in the airwater channel to investigate the cross flow effects on the ECC water jet spreading width. The major parameters measured in the experiments are the film width of ECC water, the shifted degree of water film boundary by the cross air flow, and the attachment liquid fraction to total injected water in the region of front plate against water injected wall plate. It was found out that (1) If the test scale is increased, for the typical film spreading width without any cross flow, the film width is linearly increased at the bottom of air-water channel except at the top of film. (2) If the cross flow is induced on the liquid film for the test scale of 1:51.68, the highly shifted film shape is formed (3) If the test scale and the water injection velocity are increased, the attachment ratio of liquid on the front plate is sharply increased. (4) The attachment ratio of liquid on the front plate is strongly increased by cross flow. In the case of 9.52 scaled test, the attachment ratio of liquid is affected by both the cross flow and the water injection velocity

  2. Retinal Ganglion Cell Distribution and Spatial Resolving Power in Deep-Sea Lanternfishes (Myctophidae)

    KAUST Repository

    De Busserolles, Fanny

    2014-01-01

    Topographic analyses of retinal ganglion cell density are very useful in providing information about the visual ecology of a species by identifying areas of acute vision within the visual field (i.e. areas of high cell density). In this study, we investigated the neural cell distribution in the ganglion cell layer of a range of lanternfish species belonging to 10 genera. Analyses were performed on wholemounted retinas using stereology. Topographic maps were constructed of the distribution of all neurons and both ganglion and amacrine cell populations in 5 different species from Nissl-stained retinas using cytological criteria. Amacrine cell distribution was also examined immunohistochemically in 2 of the 5 species using anti-parvalbumin antibody. The distributions of both the total neuron and the amacrine cell populations were aligned in all of the species examined, showing a general increase in cell density toward the retinal periphery. However, when the ganglion cell population was topographically isolated from the amacrine cell population, which comprised up to 80% of the total neurons within the ganglion cell layer, a different distribution was revealed. Topographic maps of the true ganglion cell distribution in 18 species of lanternfishes revealed well-defined specializations in different regions of the retina. Different species possessed distinct areas of high ganglion cell density with respect to both peak density and the location and/or shape of the specialized acute zone (i.e. elongated areae ventro-temporales, areae temporales and large areae centrales). The spatial resolving power was calculated to be relatively low (varying from 1.6 to 4.4 cycles per degree), indicating that myctophids may constitute one of the less visually acute groups of deep-sea teleosts. The diversity in retinal specializations and spatial resolving power within the family is assessed in terms of possible ecological functions and evolutionary history.

  3. Distribution of mast cells in the rabbit oral mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    ERPEK, Dr.Semra; OTLU, Dr. Ali

    1995-01-01

    Mast cells were identified by light microscopy in various oral mucosal sites (tongue, cheek, palate, gingiva) of the rabbits. Materials were fixed in Camoy, IFAA, formalin solutions and embedded in paraffin. Four consecutive sections were taken from each sample. The first section was stained by Crossmann's triple staining method, the second and third with toluidine blue, for 1 minute and 7 days and tie last section was double stained in astra blue safranine. Mast cells in these sections were ...

  4. Angular width of Cherenkov radiation with inclusion of multiple scattering: an path-integral approach

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Visible Cherenkov radiation can offers a method of the measurement of the velocity of a charged particles. The angular width of the radiation is important since it determines the resolution of the velocity measurement. In this article, the angular width of Cherenkov radiation with inclusion of multiple scattering is calculated through the path-integral method, and and the analytical expressions are presented. The condition that multiple scattering process dominates the angular distribution is obtained.

  5. Angular width of the Cherenkov radiation with inclusion of multiple scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Visible Cherenkov radiation can offer a method of the measurement of the velocity of charged particles. The angular width of the radiation is important since it determines the resolution of the velocity measurement. In this article, the angular width of Cherenkov radiation with inclusion of multiple scattering is calculated through the path-integral method, and the analytical expressions are presented. The condition that multiple scattering processes dominate the angular distribution is obtained.

  6. Cell surface localization and tissue distribution of a hepatocyte cell-cell adhesion glycoprotein (cell-CAM 105)

    OpenAIRE

    Ocklind, C; Forsum, U; Obrink, B

    1983-01-01

    We recently identified a 105,000-dalton plasma membrane glycoprotein, denoted cell-CAM 105 (CAM, cell adhesion molecule), that is involved in intercellular adhesion of reaggregating rat hepatocytes (Ocklind, C., and B. Obrink, 1982, J. Biol. Chem., 257:6788-6795). In this communication we used a monospecific rabbit antiserum against cell-CAM 105 to localize the antigen by indirect immunofluorescence on isolated rat cells and on frozen rat tissue sections. This antiserum stained the surface of...

  7. Sliding Mode Control of the Battery Bank for the Fuel Cell-based Distributed Generation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsheng Jiao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic models for the fuel cell power and the configuration of the fuel cell distributed generation system are shown in this paper. Due to nonlinear characteristics of fuel cell model, the output voltage of fuel cell varies greatly when the load changes. A novel interface is designed to provide a constant output voltage for charging of the battery bank of the fuel cell distributed generation. The thesis presents a sliding mode control design of PEMFC distributed generation system. A cascaded control structure is chosen for ease of control realization and to exploit the motion separation property of power converters. The simulation results confirm the output current and voltage of the PEM fuel cell array converge rapidly to their reference values.

  8. Level and width statistics of the open many-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutori, Shoujirou; Aiba, Hirokazu

    2016-06-01

    The level and width statistics of the two kinds of the random matrix models coupled to the continuum are analyzed. In the first model, the gaussian orthogonal ensemble with random couplings to the continuum, not only the width statistics deviate from the Porter-Thomas distribution due to the super-radiant mechanism, but also the distribution of the nearest neighbor level spacings shows deviation from the Wigner one simultaneously. In the second model, the two body random ensemble with correlated couplings to the continuum, the correlation between the target and the compound states leads to the global energy dependence of the widths. Within the narrow energy interval where states with widths deviating from the global energy dependence lie, the distributions behave similar way with the case of the random couplings. Namely, the deviation of statistics of the nearest neighbor level spacings from the Wigner distribution and the deviation of the width statistics from the Porter-Thomas distribution take place simultaneously within the models we investigated.

  9. Global Distribution of Businesses Marketing Stem Cell-Based Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Israel; Ahmad, Amina; Bansal, Akhil; Kapoor, Tanvir; Sipp, Douglas; Rasko, John E J

    2016-08-01

    A structured search reveals that online marketing of stem-cell-based interventions is skewed toward developed economies including the United States, Ireland, Australia, and Germany. Websites made broad, imprecise therapeutic claims and frequently failed to detail procedures. Widespread marketing poses challenges to regulators, bioethicists, and those seeking realistic hope from therapies. PMID:27494673

  10. Distribution of ghrelin-ike immunoreactive cells in amphioxus, Branchiostoma belcheri- A study of immunohistochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Zhu Weng; Hai-Xia Song; Yong-Qiang Fang

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of ghrelin-like immunoreactive cells in amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) was investigated by using immunohisto-chemical staining with rabbit antiserum against synthetical mammalian ghrelin. The results showed that ghrelin-like immunoreactive cells were distributed widely in the nervous system, Hatschek's pit, wheel organ, digestive tract and gonads (ovary and testis). In nervous system, ghrelin-like immunoreactive neurons and their protrusions were distributed specifically on the dorsal side, ventral side and funnel part of brain vesicle, with a few dispersive immunoreactive nerve cells and their fibers in nerve tube. Ghrelin-like immunoreactivities were also detected in Hatschek's pit epithelial cells and wheel organ cells, with positive substance located along cell membrane. In digestive tract, ghrelin-like immunoreactive cells existed in hepatic diverticulum, anterior and posterior region of midgut, and could be classified into two types, closed- and opened-type endocrine cells. The number of positive cells was most in hepatic diverticulum, secondary in posterior region of midgut and least in anterior region of midgut. In gonads, ghrelin-like immunoreactive substance was detected in oogonia, oocytes and follicle cells in ovary at the small and large growth stages and in early spermatogenic cells and Sertoli cells in testis. The extensive distribution of ghrelin-like cells in amphioxus suggested that these kinds of cells are conservative in evolution and diversified in function. At the same time, we found for the first time that ghrelin-like immunoreactive cells existed in brain vesicle and Hatschek's pit, which provided new morphological evidence for the existence of an activation pathway between brain vesicle and Hatschek's pit for the regulation of growth hormone excretion.

  11. A mathematical model of the current density distribution in electrochemical cells - AUTHORS’ REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PREDRAG M. ŽIVKOVIĆ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An approach based on the equations of electrochemical kinetics for the estimation of the current density distribution in electrochemical cells is presented. This approach was employed for a theoretical explanation of the phenomena of the edge and corner effects. The effects of the geometry of the system, the kinetic parameters of the cathode reactions and the resistivity of the solution are also discussed. A procedure for a complete analysis of the current distribution in electrochemical cells is presented.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

    2016-05-17

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  13. Combined local current distribution measurements and high resolution neutron radiography of operating direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Alexander; Wippermann, Klaus [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Energy Research, IEF-3: Fuel Cells; Sanders, Tilman [RWTH Aachen (DE). Inst. for Power Electronics and Electrical Drives (ISEA); Arlt, Tobias [Helmholtz Centre Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials

    2010-07-01

    Neutron radiography allows the investigation of the local fluid distribution in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) under operating conditions. Spatial resolutions in the order of some tens of micrometers at the full test cell area are achieved. This offers the possibility to study practice-oriented, large stack cells with an active area of several hundred cm{sup 2} as well as specially designed, small test cells with an area of some cm{sup 2}. Combined studies of high resolution neutron radiography and segmented cell measurements are especially valuable, because they enable a correlation of local fluid distribution and local performance [1, 2]. The knowledge of this interdependency is essential to optimise the water management and performance respecting a homogeneous fluid, current and temperature distribution and to achieve high performance and durability of DMFCs. (orig.)

  14. Cell assemblies at multiple time scales with arbitrary lag distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Eleonora; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Hebb's idea of a cell assembly as the fundamental unit of neural information processing has dominated neuroscience like no other theoretical concept within the past 60 years. A range of different physiological phenomena, from precisely synchronized spiking to broadly simultaneous rate increases, has been subsumed under this term. Yet progress in this area is hampered by the lack of statistical tools that would enable to extract assemblies with arbitrary constellations of time lags, and at mul...

  15. Optical antennas with sinusoidal modulation in width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, Dirk Jan; Segerink, Frans B; Korterik, Jeroen P; Pfaff, Stefan S; Prangsma, Jord C; Herek, Jennifer L

    2016-08-01

    Small metal structures sustaining plasmon resonances in the optical regime are of great interest due to their large scattering cross sections and ability to concentrate light to subwavelength volumes. In this paper, we study the dipolar plasmon resonances of optical antennas with a constant volume and a sinusoidal modulation in width. We experimentally show that by changing the phase of the width-modulation, with a small 10 nm modulation amplitude, the resonance shifts over 160 nm. Using simulations we show how this simple design can create resonance shifts greater than 600 nm. The versatility of this design is further shown by creating asymmetric structures with two different modulation amplitudes, which we experimentally and numerically show to give rise to two resonances. Our results on both the symmetric and asymmetric antennas show the capability to control the localization of the fields outside the antenna, while still maintaining the freedom to change the antenna resonance wavelength. The antenna design we tested combines a large spectral tunability with a small footprint: all the antenna dimensions are factor 7 to 13 smaller than the wavelength, and hold potential as a design element in meta-surfaces for beam shaping.

  16. Analysis of a stochastic model for bacterial growth and the lognormality in the cell-size distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes a phenomenological stochastic model for bacterial growth. This model comprises cell divisions and linear growth of cells, where growth rates and cell cycles are drawn from lognormal distributions. We derive that the cell size is expressed as a sum of independent lognormal variables. We show numerically that the quality of the lognormal approximation greatly depends on the distributions of the growth rate and cell cycle. Furthermore, we show that actual parameters of the growth rate and cell cycle take values which give good lognormal approximation, so the experimental cell-size distribution is in good agreement with a lognormal distribution.

  17. Analysis of a Stochastic Model for Bacterial Growth and the Lognormality of the Cell-Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ken; Wakita, Jun-ichi

    2016-07-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes a phenomenological stochastic model for bacterial growth. This model comprises cell division and the linear growth of cells, where growth rates and cell cycles are drawn from lognormal distributions. We find that the cell size is expressed as a sum of independent lognormal variables. We show numerically that the quality of the lognormal approximation greatly depends on the distributions of the growth rate and cell cycle. Furthermore, we show that actual parameters of the growth rate and cell cycle take values that give a good lognormal approximation; thus, the experimental cell-size distribution is in good agreement with a lognormal distribution.

  18. Distribution and characterization of progenitor cells within the human filum terminale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Arvidsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Filum terminale (FT is a structure that is intimately associated with conus medullaris, the most caudal part of the spinal cord. It is well documented that certain regions of the adult human central nervous system contains undifferentiated, progenitor cells or multipotent precursors. The primary objective of this study was to describe the distribution and progenitor features of this cell population in humans, and to confirm their ability to differentiate within the neuroectodermal lineage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate that neural stem/progenitor cells are present in FT obtained from patients treated for tethered cord. When human or rat FT-derived cells were cultured in defined medium, they proliferated and formed neurospheres in 13 out of 21 individuals. Cells expressing Sox2 and Musashi-1 were found to outline the central canal, and also to be distributed in islets throughout the whole FT. Following plating, the cells developed antigen profiles characteristic of astrocytes (GFAP and neurons (β-III-tubulin. Addition of PDGF-BB directed the cells towards a neuronal fate. Moreover, the cells obtained from young donors shows higher capacity for proliferation and are easier to expand than cells derived from older donors. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The identification of bona fide neural progenitor cells in FT suggests a possible role for progenitor cells in this extension of conus medullaris and may provide an additional source of such cells for possible therapeutic purposes. Filum terminale, human, progenitor cells, neuron, astrocytes, spinal cord.

  19. Energy system analysis of fuel cells and distributed generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    on the energy system in which they are used. Consequently, coherent energy systems analyses of specific and complete energy systems must be conducted in order to evaluate the benefits of FC technologies and in order to be able to compare alternative solutions. In relation to distributed generation, FC...... can be used for such analyses. Moreover, the chapter presents the results of evaluating the overall system fuel savings achieved by introducing different FC applications into different energy systems. Natural gas-based and hydrogen-based micro FC-CHP, natural gas local FC-CHP plants for district...... technologies have different strengths and weaknesses in different energy systems, but often they do not have the expected effect. Specific analyses of each individual country must be conducted including scenarios of expansion of e.g. wind power in order to evaluate where and when the best use of FC...

  20. Intracellular pH distribution as a cell health indicator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Thomas; Glückstad, Jesper; Siegumfeldt, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    Internal pH regulation is vital for many cell functions, including transport mechanisms and metabolic enzyme activity. More specifically, transport mechanisms are to a wide degree governed by internal pH distributions. We introduce the term standard deviation of the intracellular pH (s.......d.(pHint)) to describe the internal pH distributions. The cellular pH distributional response to external stress such as heat has not previously been determined. In this study, the intracellular pH (pHi) and the s.d.(pHint) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed to supralethal temperatures were measured...

  1. Vertical distribution of the prokaryotic cell size in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ferla, R.; Maimone, G.; Azzaro, M.; Conversano, F.; Brunet, C.; Cabral, A. S.; Paranhos, R.

    2012-12-01

    Distributions of prokaryotic cell size and morphology were studied in different areas of the Mediterranean Sea by using image analysis on samples collected from surface down to bathypelagic layers (max depth 4,900 m) in the Southern Tyrrhenian, Southern Adriatic and Eastern Mediterranean Seas. Distribution of cell size of prokaryotes in marine ecosystem is very often not considered, which makes our study first in the context of prokaryotic ecology. In the deep Mediterranean layers, an usually-not-considered form of carbon sequestration through prokaryotic cells has been highlighted, which is consistent with an increase in cell size with the depth of the water column. A wide range in prokaryotic cell volumes was observed (between 0.045 and 0.566 μm3). Increase in cell size with depth was opposed to cell abundance distribution. Our results from microscopic observations were confirmed by the increasing HNA/LNA ratio (HNA, cells with high nucleic acid content; LNA, cells with low nucleic acid content) along the water column. Implications of our results on the increasing cell size with depth are in the fact that the quantitative estimation of prokaryotic biomass changes along the water column and the amount of carbon sequestered in the deep biota is enhanced.

  2. Distributed-parameter solar cells - Volt-ampere characteristics under uniform and nonuniform illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aripov, Kh. K.; Rumiantsev, V. D.

    A theoretical investigation is presented of a multicomponent equivalent circuit of solar cells of circular configuration intended for operation with radiation concentrators. Working formulas are obtained for the discrete coordinates of the load volt-ampere characteristics as well as for effective values of distributed and lumped resistances characterizing solar cells of arbitrary configuration under uniform illumination.

  3. Carotenoid Distribution in Living Cells of Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Aaron M.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Han, Danxiang; Hu, Qiang; Beechem, Thomas E.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Evens, Terence

    2011-09-06

    Haematococcus pluvialis is a freshwater unicellular green microalga belonging to the class Chlorophyceae and is of commercial interest for its ability to accumulate massive amounts of the red ketocarotenoid astaxanthin (3,3'-dihydroxy-β,β-carotene-4,4'-dione). Using confocal Raman microscopy and multivariate analysis, we demonstrate the ability to spectrally resolve resonance–enhanced Raman signatures associated with astaxanthin and β-carotene along with chlorophyll fluorescence. By mathematically isolating these spectral signatures, in turn, it is possible to locate these species independent of each other in living cells of H. pluvialis in various stages of the life cycle. Chlorophyll emission was found only in the chloroplast whereas astaxanthin was identified within globular and punctate regions of the cytoplasmic space. Moreover, we found evidence for β-carotene to be co-located with both the chloroplast and astaxanthin in the cytosol. These observations imply that β-carotene is a precursor for astaxanthin and the synthesis of astaxanthin occurs outside the chloroplast. Finally, our work demonstrates the broad utility of confocal Raman microscopy to resolve spectral signatures of highly similar chromophores in living cells.

  4. Distribution of Th17 cells and Th1 cells in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Li Jun; Xu, Wan Hai; Zhang, Zong Wen; Huang, Hui Tao; Zhang, Li Ming; Zhou, Jin

    2010-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated demyelinating disease of the peripheral nervous system. Th17 and Th1 cells contribute to the pathogenesis of most autoimmune diseases, but little is known about their distribution and reciprocal relationship in CIDP. In this study, we analyzed the distribution of Th17, Th1, and Th17/Th1 cells in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The results showed that the frequency of Th17 cells was significantly higher in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs) and CSF of active CIDP in comparison with remitting CIDP or to other non-inflammatory neurological diseases (ONDs), accompanied by similar findings for Th17/Th1 cells. Both active and remitting CIDP have higher percentage of Th1 cells in the CSF than OND. CSF protein levels positively correlated with the frequencies of Th17 cells either in the PBMCs or CSF of active CIDP, while there was no significant correlation with Th1 cells. In line with these observations, the levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17) in plasma and transcript factors retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)γt expressed by PBMCs were significantly higher in the active CIDP than remitting CIDP or OND. In summary, our preliminary findings suggest that elevated numbers of inflammatory T cells, especially for Th17 cells, might be an important determinant in the evolution of CIDP.

  5. The Distribution of Human Stem Cell–like Memory T Cell in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hai; Gu, Yong; Sheng, Si Yuan; Lu, Chuan Gang; Zou, Jian Yong

    2016-01-01

    Human stem cell–like memory T (Tscm) cells are long-lived, self-renewing memory lymphocytes that can differentiate into effector cells and mediate strong antitumour response in murine model. The distribution and function of Tscm cells in human lung cancer remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the properties of human Tscm cells in the blood and lymph node of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. There were more CD4+ Tscm cells in blood from NSCLC patients than from healthy donors, fewer CD4+ and CD8+ TSCM cells in blood than in lymph node from NSCLC patients. To further analyze their properties, we stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from NSCLC patients by mitogens to examine cytokine production. Our data suggest that both CD4 and CD8 Tscm cells in blood produced interferon-γ significantly increased in NSCLC patients compare with healthy subjects. In addition, fewer Tscm cells produced interferon-γ in lymph node than in blood from NSCLC patients. Our results strongly suggest that the distribution and function of CD4 Tscm cells in NSCLC patients is upregulated. Understanding of the properties of stem-like memory T cells will supply a good rationale for designing the new adoptive immunotherapy in cancer. PMID:27244531

  6. Distribution and development of peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Locher

    Full Text Available The adult human cochlea contains various types of peripheral glial cells that envelop or myelinate the three different domains of the spiral ganglion neurons: the central processes in the cochlear nerve, the cell bodies in the spiral ganglia, and the peripheral processes in the osseous spiral lamina. Little is known about the distribution, lineage separation and maturation of these peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea. In the current study, we observed peripheral glial cells expressing SOX10, SOX9 and S100B as early as 9 weeks of gestation (W9 in all three neuronal domains. We propose that these cells are the common precursor to both mature Schwann cells and satellite glial cells. Additionally, the peripheral glial cells located along the peripheral processes expressed NGFR, indicating a phenotype distinct from the peripheral glial cells located along the central processes. From W12, the spiral ganglion was gradually populated by satellite glial cells in a spatiotemporal gradient. In the cochlear nerve, radial sorting was accomplished by W22 and myelination started prior to myelination of the peripheral processes. The developmental dynamics of the peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea is in support of a neural crest origin. Our study provides the first overview of the distribution and maturation of peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea from W9 to W22.

  7. Intrinsic potential of cell membranes: opposite effects of lipid transmembrane asymmetry and asymmetric salt ion distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    Using atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we consider the intrinsic cell membrane potential that is found to originate from a subtle interplay between lipid transmembrane asymmetry and the asymmetric distribution of monovalent salt ions on the two sides of the cell membrane. It turns out......Cl saline solution and the PE leaflet is exposed to KCl, the outcome is that the effects of asymmetric lipid and salt ion distributions essentially cancel one another almost completely. Overall, our study highlights the complex nature of the intrinsic potential of cell membranes under physiological...

  8. Pulse width effect on the dissociation probability of CH4+ in the intense femtosecond laser field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gao; SONG Di; LIU Yuyan; KONG Fan'ao

    2006-01-01

    The laser pulse width effect on the dissociation probability of CH4+ irradiated by an ultrafast laser has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The femtosecond laser at 800 nm with an intensity of 8.0 × 1013 W/cm2 was used. The observed relative yield of the primary fragment ion CH3+ increases with increasing pulse width and tends to saturate when the pulse width is longer than 120 fs. The field-assisted dissociation (FAD) model and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculation were applied to predicting the dissociation probability of CH4+.The calculated probability is corrected with the molecular orientation effect and the spatial distribution of laser intensity. The modified results show that the dissociation requires at least 23 fs and saturates with long pulse widths (≥100 rs). The result is approximately consistent with the experimental observation.

  9. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bolkhovskaya, Olesya V.; Daniil Yu Zorin; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V.

    2014-01-01

    Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing d...

  10. 自体角膜缘干细胞移植治疗翼状胬肉取不同经线宽度植片的疗效比较%Curative effect comparison of autologous corneal limbal stem cell transplantation with grafts having different longitude widths for pterygium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡郑君; 李婷; 叶凡; 郭南春

    2016-01-01

    目的:比较自体角膜缘干细胞移植治疗翼状胬肉取不同经线宽度结膜植片的疗效。方法:对182例252眼初发翼状胬肉行翼状胬肉切除联合角膜缘干细胞移植,按术中结膜植片的经线宽度分为两组:小植片组86例110眼,行干细胞移植时取结膜植片经线宽度为3 mm;大植片组96例142眼,取结膜植片经线宽度为5mm,术后1、6、12、24mo随访,观察两组的复发率统计分析其差异。结果:术后早期(1~12mo)小植片组与大植片组复发率比较无统计学意义(P>0.05),术后远期(24mo)复发率差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:翼状胬肉切除联合自体角膜缘干细胞移植治疗翼状胬肉,较大经线宽度的结膜植片可以降低远期的复发率。%Abstract•AIM: To compare curative effect of autologous corneal limbal stem cell transplantation with grafts having different longitude widths for pterygium.•METHODS:A total of 182 patients (252 eyes) with initial pterygium accepted pterygium resection combined with corneal limbal stem cell transplantation, all of which were divided into two groups according to longitude width of conjunctival graft during the operations. When performing stem cell transplantation, patients with conjunctival grafts being taken out with longitude widths by 3mm had been classified into small graft group(n=86, 110 eyes), while those with longitude widths by 5mm had been classified into large graft group (n=96, 142 eyes). We observed and statistically analyzed the recurrence rates of the two groups at 1, 6, 12 and 24mo after operations during follow-up period.• RESULTS: There was no significant difference of recurrence rate between the small graft group and large graft group in early phase (1~12mo) after transplantation ( P >0.05 ), while there was statistically significant difference in long term (24mo) after transplantation (P<0.05).•CONCLUSION: Conjunctival graft with

  11. Engineered nanomaterial uptake and tissue distribution: from cell to organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kettiger H

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helene Kettiger,1,* Angela Schipanski,2,* Peter Wick,2 Jörg Huwyler1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 2Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Materials-Biology Interactions, St Gallen, Switzerland *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Improved understanding of interactions between nanoparticles and biological systems is needed to develop safety standards and to design new generations of nanomaterials. This article reviews the molecular mechanisms of cellular uptake of engineered nanoparticles, their intracellular fate, and their distribution within an organism. We have reviewed the available literature on the uptake and disposition of engineered nanoparticles. Special emphasis was placed on the analysis of experimental systems and their limitations with respect to their usefulness to predict the in vivo situation. The available literature confirms the need to study particle characteristics in an environment that simulates the situation encountered in biological systems. Phenomena such as protein binding and opsonization are of prime importance since they may have a strong impact on cellular internalization, biodistribution, and immunogenicity of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. Extrapolation from in vitro results to the in vivo situation in the whole organism remains a challenge. However, improved understanding of physicochemical properties of engineered nanoparticles and their influence on biological systems facilitates the design of nanomaterials that are safe, well tolerated, and suitable for diagnostic or therapeutic use in humans. Keywords: biodistribution, cellular transport, cellular uptake, endocytosis, engineered nanomaterials, nanosafety

  12. Influence of inhomogeneous broadening and deliberately introduced disorder on the width of the lasing spectrum of a quantum dot laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical expressions for the shape and width of the lasing spectra of a quantum-dot (QD) laser in the case of a small (in comparison with the spectrum width) homogeneous broadening of the QD energy levels have been obtained. It is shown that the dependence of the lasing spectrum width on the output power at room temperature is determined by two dimensionless parameters: the width of QD distribution over the optical-transition energy, normalized to temperature, and the ratio of the optical loss to the maximum gain. The optimal dimensions of the laser active region have been found to obtain a specified width of the emission spectrum at a minimum pump current. The possibility of using multilayer structures with QDs to increase the lasing spectrum’s width has been analyzed. It is shown that the use of several arrays of QDs with deliberately variable optical-transition energies leads to broadening of the lasing spectra; some numerical estimates are presented.

  13. Pressure and flow distribution in internal gas manifolds of a fuel-cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Joon-Ho; Seo, Hai-Kyung; Lee, Choong Gon; Yoo, Young-Sung; Lim, Hee Chun

    Gas-flow dynamics in internal gas manifolds of a fuel-cell stack are analyzed to investigate overall pressure variation and flow distribution. Different gas-flow patterns are considered in this analysis. Gas-flow through gas channels of each cell is modeled by means of Darcy's law where permeability should be determined on an experimental basis. Gas-flow in manifolds is modeled from the macroscopic mechanical energy balance with pressure-loss by wall friction and geometrical effects. A systematic algorithm to solve the proposed flow model is suggested to calculate pressure and flow distribution in fuel-cell stacks. Calculation is done for a 100-cell molten carbonate fuel-cell stack with internal manifolds. The results show that the pressure-loss by wall friction is negligible compared with the pressure recovery in inlet manifolds or loss in outlet manifolds due to mass dividing or combining flow at manifold-cell junctions. A more significant effect on manifold pressure possibly arises from the geometrical manifold structure which depends on the manifold size and shape. The geometrical effect is approximated from pressure-loss coefficients of several types of fittings and valves. The overall pressure and flow distribution is significantly affected by the value of the geometrical pressure-loss coefficient. It is also found that the flow in manifolds is mostly turbulent in the 100-cell stack and this way result in an uneven flow distribution when the stack manifold is incorrectly, designed.

  14. Lake Basin Fetch and Maximum Length/Width

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear features representing the Fetch, Maximum Length and Maximum Width of a lake basin. Fetch, maximum length and average width are calcuated from the lake...

  15. Pulse-Width Jitter Measurement for Laser Diode Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun-Hua; WANG Yun-Cai

    2006-01-01

    @@ Theoretical analysis and experimental measurement of pulse-width jitter of diode laser pulses are presented. The expression of pulse power spectra with all amplitude jitter, timing jitter and pulse-width jitter is deduced.

  16. Width spreading and tests of wave packet molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. We examine three aspects of wave packet molecular dynamics (WPMD): wave packet spreading, the versatility of the isotropic Gaussian basis, and the interpretation of WPMD data. It is commonly known in the WPMD community that at large temperatures isotropic Gaussian wave packets have divergent widths. We quantify the unphysicality of this behavior by calculating radial distribution functions at many temperatures and densities, and compare to quantum statistical potential and path integral Monte Carlo results. We also make direct comparisons with a numerically exact time-dependent Schroedinger equation solver to determine deficiencies in the basis by studying a single quantum electron traveling through a static classical dense plasma. Another aspect is the validity of standard calculation methods. Central to these quantum computations are the ensemble explored by WPMD and its ergodic properties.

  17. Precision measurement of the mass and width of the W boson at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Sarah Alam [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-01

    A precision measurement of the mass and width of the W boson is presented. The W bosons are produced in proton antiproton collisions occurring at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron accelerator. The data used for the analyses is collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and corresponds to an average integrated luminosity of 350 pb-1 for the W width analysis for the electron and muon channels and an average integrated luminosity of 2350 pb-1 for the W mass analysis. The mass and width of the W boson is extracted by fitting to the transverse mass distribution, with the peak of the distribution being most sensitive to the mass and the tail of the distribution sensitive to the width. The W width measurement in the electron and muon channels is combined to give a final result of 2032 ± 73 MeV. The systematic uncertainty on the W mass from the recoil of the W boson against the initial state gluon radiation is discussed. A systematic study of the recoil in Z → e+e- events where one electron is reconstructed in the central calorimeter and the other in the plug calorimeter and its effect on the W mass is presented for the first time in this thesis.

  18. Tooth width ratios in crowded and non-crowded dentitions

    OpenAIRE

    Bernabé, E.; Villanueva, KM; Flores-Mir, C

    2004-01-01

    Discrepancies in tooth width ratios could affect the excellence in the finishing of orthodontic cases. This study compares tooth width ratios in crowded and noncrowded dental arches. Tooth widths were measured from 143 dental casts (40 crowded and 33 spaced in male individuals and 43 crowded and 27 spaced in female individuals). Simultaneous crowded or spaced arches were selected. Tooth width measurements were made with a sliding caliper with a Vernier scale neared 0.1 mm. Inter- (0.990) and ...

  19. Is biologic width of anterior and posterior teeth similar?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Alireza Rasouli Ghahroudi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The biologic width (BW includes attached epithelial cells and connective tissue attachment complex being very important in the periodontal health during prosthetic treatments as invading this zone can cause bone resorption and gingival recession. The present study investigated biologic width values in the normal periodontium in anterior and posterior teeth. 30 patients that referred from restorative department to periodontics department of Tehran University of medical sciences who need crown lengthening procedure on their teeth with no history of orthodontic, prosthodontic and periodontal treatment were randomly enrolled in this cross-sectional trial. Sulcus depths (SD as well as the distance between free gingival margin and the bone crest (FB of anterior and posterior teeth were measured by UNC-15 probe and compared. periodontium thickness was also assessed. The data were subjected to Student t test. Mean BW in the 43 anterior and 47 posterior teeth was measured and not significantly different (1.4651±0.39 mm vs. 1.6312±0.49 mm was observed; however, BW was significantly more in the teeth with thick periodontium compared to those with thin periodontium (1.703±0.5 vs. 1.408±0.35; P=0.002. BW not only is different in individuals but also could be dissimilar in different teeth and should be calculated independently prior to restorative treatments.

  20. Effects of podocin transfection on CD2AP distribution in HEK293 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yugen SHA; Songming HUANG; Aihua ZHANG; Fei ZHAO; Ronghua CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to construct a podocin fluorescence expression vector and observe the effects of podocin transfection on CD2AP distribution in HEK293 cells. The pGEMT-easy vector containing the full-length cDNA encoding human podocin was cloned and digested with BamHI and XhoI. The digested full-length podocin was subcloned into pEGFP-C2. The constructed plas-mids were transfected into HEK293 cells and its effects on CD2AP distribution were observed by immunofluo-rescence. The pEGFP-NPHS2 expression vector was successfully constructed and podocin exclusively located on the HEK293 cell membrane. After podocin transfec-tion, CD2AP redistributed from the perinucleus to the cytoplasm in HEK293 cells. It can be concluded that podocin can recruit CD2AP to redistribute from the perinucleus to the cytoplasm in HEK293 cells.

  1. Characterization of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization: focus on OH radical distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shota; Honda, Ryosuke; Hokari, Yutaro; Takashima, Keisuke; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-08-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) is used medically for plasma-induced cell permeabilization. However, how plasma irradiation specifically triggers permeabilization remains unclear. In an attempt to identify the dominant factor(s), the distribution of plasma-produced reactive species was investigated, primarily focusing on OH radicals. A stronger plasma discharge, which produced more OH radicals in the gas phase, also produced more OH radicals in the liquid phase (OHaq), enhancing the cell membrane permeability. In addition, plasma irradiation-induced enhancement of cell membrane permeability decreased markedly with increased solution thickness (plasma-produced OHaq decayed in solution (diffusion length on the order of several hundred micrometers). Furthermore, the horizontally center-localized distribution of OHaq corresponded with the distribution of the permeabilized cells by plasma irradiation, while the overall plasma-produced oxidizing species in solution (detected by iodine-starch reaction) exhibited a doughnut-shaped horizontal distribution. These results suggest that OHaq, among the plasma-produced oxidizing species, represents the dominant factor in plasma-induced cell permeabilization. These results enhance the current understanding of the mechanism of APP as a cell-permeabilization tool.

  2. The Average Widths and Non-linear Widths of the Classes of Multivariate Functions with Bounded Moduli of Smoothness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-ping Liu; Gui-qiao Xu

    2002-01-01

    The classes of the multivariate functions with bounded moduli on Rd and Td are given and their average a-widths and non-linear n-widths are discussed. The weak asymptotic behaviors are established for the corresponding quantities.

  3. Asymmetric distribution of Spalt in Drosophila wing squamous and columnar epithelia ensures correct cell morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenqian; Wang, Dan; Shen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila wing imaginal disc is a sac-like structure that is composed of two opposing cell layers: peripodial epithelium (PE, also known as squamous epithelia) and disc proper (DP, also known as pseudostratified columnar epithelia). The molecular mechanism of cell morphogenesis has been well studied in the DP but not in the PE. Although proper Dpp signalling activity is required for proper PE formation, the detailed regulation mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we found that the Dpp target gene sal is only expressed in DP cells, not in PE cells, although pMad is present in the PE. Increasing Dpp signalling activity cannot activate Sal in PE cells. The absence of Sal in the PE is essential for PE formation. The ectopic expression of sal in PE cells is sufficient to increase the PE cell height. Down-regulation of sal in the DP reduced DP cell height. We further demonstrated that the known PE cell height regulator Lines, which can convert PE into a DP cell fate, is mediated by sal mis-activation in PE because sal-RNAi and lines co-expression largely restores PE cell morphology. By revealing the microtubule distribution, we demonstrated that Lines- and Sal-heightened PE cells are morphologically similar to the intermediate cell with cuboidal morphology. PMID:27452716

  4. A new low-voltage-driven GRIN liquid crystal lens with multiple ring electrodes in unequal widths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yung-Yuan; Chao, Paul C-P; Hsueh, Chieh-Wen

    2010-08-30

    This work is dedicated to design a novel liquid crystal (LC) lens device with multiple ring electrodes in unequal widths, in order to offer tunability on focusing quality and to lower the level of applied voltage. The number and widths of the multiple ring electrodes are pre-designed and optimized to offer the on-line tunability on individual electrode voltages to render a better refraction index distribution for focusing, as compared to the past hole-type LC lenses. The resulted refractive index distribution is expected to offer similar focusing effects based on the theory of the gradient refraction index (GRIN) lens. The transparent electrodes of this new LC lens are placed at the inner surface of the LC cell to minimize the driving voltages, in results, less than 10 V, for the same level of focusing power and an easy practical operation. A new fabrication process in the wafer level to bury bus lines is developed for generating smooth electrical fields over the lens aperture. In addition, a dielectric layer is coated between electrodes and the LC layer.

  5. Arginine starvation in colorectal carcinoma cells: Sensing, impact on translation control and cell cycle distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynnytska-Myronovska, Bozhena O; Kurlishchuk, Yuliya; Chen, Oleh; Bobak, Yaroslav; Dittfeld, Claudia; Hüther, Melanie; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Stasyk, Oleh V

    2016-02-01

    Tumor cells rely on a continued exogenous nutrient supply in order to maintain a high proliferative activity. Although a strong dependence of some tumor types on exogenous arginine sources has been reported, the mechanisms of arginine sensing by tumor cells and the impact of changes in arginine availability on translation and cell cycle regulation are not fully understood. The results presented herein state that human colorectal carcinoma cells rapidly exhaust the internal arginine sources in the absence of exogenous arginine and repress global translation by activation of the GCN2-mediated pathway and inhibition of mTOR signaling. Tumor suppressor protein p53 activation and G1/G0 cell cycle arrest support cell survival upon prolonged arginine starvation. Cells with the mutant or deleted TP53 fail to stop cell cycle progression at defined cell cycle checkpoints which appears to be associated with reduced recovery after durable metabolic stress triggered by arginine withdrawal.

  6. Distribution of Chromosome Breakpoints in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed to Low- and High-LET Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Zhang, Ye; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Feiveson, Alan; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    Low-and high-LET radiations produced distinct breakpoint distributions. The difference of the breakpoint distributions between low-and high-LET only appeared in break ends involved in interchromosome exchanges. The breakpoint distributions for break ends participating in intrachromosome exchanges were similar. Gene-rich regions do not necessarily have more chromosome breaks. High-LET appeared to produce long live (data not shown) or longer live breaks that can migrate a longer distance before rejoining with other breaks. Domains occupied by different segments of the chromosomes may be responsible for the breakpoint distribution. The dose responses for interchromosomal exchanges were linear in all four exposures. However, the dose response for intrachromosomal exchanges were none linear. Increasing dose of high dose rate exposure (Fe-ions or -rays) increase the fraction of cells with intrachromosome aberrations, whereas increasing dose of low dose rate exposure (neutrons or -rays) does not affect the fraction of cells with intrachromosome aberrations.

  7. Combined local current distribution measurements and high resolution neutron radiography of operating Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Alexander; Wippermann, Klaus; Mergel, Juergen; Lehnert, Werner; Stolten, Detlef [Institute of Energy Research, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Sanders, Tilman; Baumhoefer, Thorsten; Sauer, Dirk U. [Institute for Power Electronics and Electrical Drives (ISEA), RWTH Aachen University, Jaegerstrasse 17-19, 52066 Aachen (Germany); Manke, Ingo; Banhart, John [Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Berlin Institute of Technology, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Centre Berlin (Hahn-Meitner-Institute), SF3, Glienicker Strasse 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, Andre; Schloesser, Jana [Helmholtz Centre Berlin (Hahn-Meitner-Institute), SF3, Glienicker Strasse 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Hartnig, Christoph [Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research (ZSW), Helmholtzstrasse 8, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The current and fluid distribution in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs) was investigated in situ by means of combined high resolution neutron radiography and locally resolved current distribution measurements. The used neutron radiography set-up allows high spatial resolutions down to 70 {mu}m at the full test cell area. A local formation of water droplets in the cathode flow field channels could be observed. Strongly inhomogeneous current distributions during cathodic flooding processes result in a performance loss of up to 30% of the initial value. Single CO{sub 2} bubbles can be observed at low current densities. The water and current distribution during bi-functional operation of a DMFC was measured for the first time. (author)

  8. Optimal Cell Towers Distribution by using Spatial Mining and Geographic Information System

    CERN Document Server

    AL-Hamami, Alaa H

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of wireless communication is dramatically changing our life. Mobile telecommunications emerged as a technological marvel allowing for access to personal and other services, devices, computation and communication, in any place and at any time through effortless plug and play. Setting up wireless mobile networks often requires: Frequency Assignment, Communication Protocol selection, Routing schemes selection, and cells towers distributions. This research aims to optimize the cells towers distribution by using spatial mining with Geographic Information System (GIS) as a tool. The distribution optimization could be done by applying the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) on the image of the area which must be covered with two levels of hierarchy. The research will apply the spatial association rules technique on the second level to select the best square in the cell for placing the antenna. From that the proposal will try to minimize the number of installed towers, makes tower's location feasible, and pr...

  9. In vivo distribution and tissue localization of highly purified rat lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly purified population of effector lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells was generated by culturing nylon-wool column nonadherent rat splenocytes in the presence of interleukin 2 (IL-2), and the cells which became adherent to the plastic flasks were separated and maintained in culture for a total of 5 days. More than 95% of these cells had the morphology of large granular lymphocytes (LGL), expressed surface phenotypes characteristic of rat natural killer (NK) cells, and were able to kill NK-sensitive and NK-resistant tumor target cells. 51Cr-labeled purified A-LAK cells injected intravenously into syngeneic F344 rats localized primarily in the lungs 2 hr after injection but then redistributed to the liver and the spleen by 24 hr after injection. The effects of various immunological manipulations on the distribution pattern of the isolated LAK cells were evaluated. Treatment of the host with 500 rad total body X-irradiation 24 hr before cell injection resulted in an early uptake of LAK cells into the liver and the spleen, whereas treatment with cyclophosphamide 1 day before cell injection, resulted in an early uptake of LAK cells into the liver but not into the spleen. Treatment of the recipient rats with up to 120,000 units recombinant interleukin-2 intraperitoneally did not result in the accumulation of LAK cells at the site of IL-2 injection, nor did it result in a modulation of the overall distribution pattern or total recovery of radiolabeled LAK cells. Rather, the administration of IL-2 was necessary to maintain the cytotoxic activity of the injected LAK cells isolated from the liver and spleen

  10. SOL Width Scaling in the MAST Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joon-Wook; Counsell, Glenn; Connor, Jack; Kirk, Andrew

    2002-11-01

    Target heat loads are determined in large part by the upstream SOL heat flux width, Δ_h. Considerable effort has been made in the past to develop analytical and empirical scalings for Δh to allow reliable estimates to be made for the next-step device. The development of scalings for a large spherical tokamak (ST) such as MAST is particularly important both for development of the ST concept and for improving the robustness of scalings derived for conventional tokamaks. A first such scaling has been developed in MAST DND plasmas. The scaling was developed by flux-mapping data from the target Langmuir probe arrays to the mid-plane and fitting to key upstream parameters such as P_SOL, bar ne and q_95. In order to minimise the effects of co-linearity, dedicated campaigns were undertaken to explore the widest possible range of each parameter while keeping the remainder as fixed as possible. Initial results indicate a weak inverse dependence on P_SOL and approximately linear dependence on bar n_e. Scalings derived from consideration of theoretical edge transport models and integration with data from conventional devices is under way. The established scaling laws could be used for the extrapolations to the future machine such as Spherical Tokamak Power Plant (STPP). This work is jointly funded by Euratom and UK Department of Trade and Industry. J-W. Ahn would like to recognise the support of a grant from the British Foreign & Commonwealth Office.

  11. Tissue distribution of adoptively transferred adherent lymphokine-activated killer cells assessed by different cell labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, P; Herberman, R B; Hokland, M;

    1992-01-01

    by alternative direct visual methods for identification of the injected cells, such as fluorescent dyes (rhodamine and H33342) or immunohistochemical staining of asialo-GM1-positive cells. The number of i.v. injected A-LAK cells found in the liver by all visual methods ranged from 1% to 5% of the injected dose...

  12. GAP WIDTH STUDY IN LASER BUTT-WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    In this paper the maximum allowable gap width in laser butt-welding is intensively studied. The gap width study (GWS) is performed on the material of SST of W1.4401 (AISI 316) under various welding conditions, which are the gap width : 0.00-0.50 mm, the welding speed : 0.5-2.0 m/min, the laser...... power : 2 and 2.6 kW and the focal point position : 0 and -1.2 mm. Quality of all the butt welds are destructively tested according to ISO 13919-1.Influences of the variable process parameters to the maximum allowable gap width are observed as (1) the maximum gap width is inversely related to the...... welding speed, (2) the larger laser power leads to the bigger maximum allowable gap width and (3) the focal point position has very little influence on the maximum gap width....

  13. Using a GFP-gene fusion technique to study the cell cycle-dependent distribution of calmodulin in living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李朝军; 吕品; 张东才

    1999-01-01

    In this study, a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-calmodulin (CaM) fusion gene method was used to examine the distribution of calmodulin during various stages of cell cycle. First, it was found that the distribution of CaM in living cells changes with the cell cycle. CaM was found mainly in the cytoplasm during G1 phase. It began to move into the nucleus when the cell entered S phase. At G2 phase, CaM became more concentrated in the nucleus than in cytoplasm. Second, the accumulation of CaM in the nucleus during G2 phase appeared to be related to the onset of mitosis, since inhibiting the activation of CaM at this stage resulted in blocking the nuclear membrane breakdown and chromatin condensation. Finally, after the cell entered mitosis, a high concentration of CaM was found at the polar regions of the mitotic spindle. At this time, inhibiting the activity of CaM would cause a disruption of the spindle structure. The relationship between the stage-specific distribution of CaM and its function in regulat

  14. Simulation and in situ measurement of stress distribution in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, Javier; Cano, Ulises; Romero, Tatiana

    2016-10-01

    A critical parameter for PEM fuel cell's electric contact is the nominal clamping pressure. Predicting the mechanical behavior of all components in a fuel cell stack is a very complex task due to the diversity of materials properties. Prior to the integration of a 3 kW PEMFC power plant, a numerical simulation was performed in order to obtain the mechanical stress distribution for two of the most pressure sensitive components of the stack: the membrane, and the graphite plates. The stress distribution of the above mentioned components was numerically simulated by finite element analysis and the stress magnitude for the membrane was confirmed using pressure films. Stress values were found within the elastic zone which guarantees mechanical integrity of fuel cell components. These low stress levels particularly for the membrane will allow prolonging the life and integrity of the fuel cell stack according to its design specifications.

  15. Topographical Distributions of Allelic Loss in Individual Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Yatabe, Yasushi; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Shigeo; Takahashi, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    Non-small-cell carcinomas of the lung, especially adenocarcinomas, are characterized by a high degree of morphological heterogeneity. As carcinogenesis has been suggested to be a multistep process involving sequential accumulation of multiple genetic alterations, morphological heterogeneity may represent a cross-sectional view of genetic alterations within individual tumors. We therefore examined the topographical distribution of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events within 10 non-small-cell lu...

  16. Observation of DNA and protein distributions in mammalian cell nuclei using STXM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohigashi, Takuji; Ito, Atsushi; Shinohara, Kunio; Tone, Shigenobu; Kado, Masataka; Inagaki, Yuichi; Wang, Yu-Fu; Kosugi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A whole A549 cell and isolated nuclei of HeLa S3 cells in the apoptotic process were investigated by using a scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) in the UVSOR Synchrotron (Okazaki, Japan). Near edge X-ray absorption fine structures (NEXAFS) of DNA and histone in the N K-edge region were measured as reference and their distribution in the nuclei was determined by using these reference spectra. The four stages of the apoptosis were successfully distinguished.

  17. Dynamic distribution and stem cell characteristics of Sox1-expressing cells in the cerebellar cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joelle Alcock; Virginie Sottile

    2009-01-01

    Bergmann glia cells are a discrete radial glia population surrounding Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex. Al-though Bergmann glia are essential for the development and correct arborization of Purkinje cells, little is known about the regulation of this cell population after the developmental phase. In an effort to characterize this population at the molecular level, we have analyzed marker expression and established that adult Bergmann glia express Soxl, Sox2 and Sox9, a feature otherwise associated with neural stem cells (NSCs). In the present study, we have further analyzed the developmental pattern of Soxl-expressing cells in the developing cerebellum. We report that before be-coming restricted to the Purkinje cell layer, Soxl-positive cells are present throughout the immature tissue, and that these cells show characteristics of Bergmann glia progenitors. Our study shows that these progenitors express Soxl, Sox2 and Sox9, a signature maintained throughout cerebellar maturation into adulthood. When isolated in culture, the Soxl-expressing cerebellar population exhibited neurosphere-forming ability, NSC-marker characteristics, and demonstrated multipotency at the clonal level. Our results show that the Bergmann glia population expresses Soxl during cerebellar development, and that these cells can be isolated and show stem cell characteristics in vitro, sug-gesting that they could hold a broader potential than previously thought.

  18. Particle-in-cell simulation for different magnetic mirror effects on the plasma distribution in a cusped field thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chen, Peng-Bo; Zhao, Yin-Jian; Yu, Da-Ren

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic mirror used as an efficient tool to confine plasma has been widely adopted in many different areas especially in recent cusped field thrusters. In order to check the influence of magnetic mirror effect on the plasma distribution in a cusped field thruster, three different radii of the discharge channel (6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm) in a cusped field thruster are investigated by using Particle-in-Cell Plus Monte Carlo (PIC-MCC) simulated method, under the condition of a fixed axial length of the discharge channel and the same operating parameters. It is found that magnetic cusps inside the small radius discharge channel cannot confine electrons very well. Thus, the electric field is hard to establish. With the reduction of the discharge channel’s diameter, more electrons will escape from cusps to the centerline area near the anode due to a lower magnetic mirror ratio. Meanwhile, the leak width of the cusped magnetic field will increase at the cusp. By increasing the magnetic field strength in a small radius model of a cusped field thruster, the negative effect caused by the weak magnetic mirror effect can be partially compensated. Therefore, according to engineering design, the increase of magnetic field strength can contribute to obtaining a good performance, when the radial distance between the magnets and the inner surface of the discharge channel is relatively big. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51006028) and the Foundation for Innovative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51121004).

  19. Nonlinear Recurrent Neural Network Predictive Control for Energy Distribution of a Fuel Cell Powered Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a neural network predictive control strategy to optimize power distribution for a fuel cell/ultracapacitor hybrid power system of a robot. We model the nonlinear power system by employing time variant auto-regressive moving average with exogenous (ARMAX, and using recurrent neural network to represent the complicated coefficients of the ARMAX model. Because the dynamic of the system is viewed as operating- state- dependent time varying local linear behavior in this frame, a linear constrained model predictive control algorithm is developed to optimize the power splitting between the fuel cell and ultracapacitor. The proposed algorithm significantly simplifies implementation of the controller and can handle multiple constraints, such as limiting substantial fluctuation of fuel cell current. Experiment and simulation results demonstrate that the control strategy can optimally split power between the fuel cell and ultracapacitor, limit the change rate of the fuel cell current, and so as to extend the lifetime of the fuel cell.

  20. Nonlinear recurrent neural network predictive control for energy distribution of a fuel cell powered robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qihong; Long, Rong; Quan, Shuhai; Zhang, Liyan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a neural network predictive control strategy to optimize power distribution for a fuel cell/ultracapacitor hybrid power system of a robot. We model the nonlinear power system by employing time variant auto-regressive moving average with exogenous (ARMAX), and using recurrent neural network to represent the complicated coefficients of the ARMAX model. Because the dynamic of the system is viewed as operating- state- dependent time varying local linear behavior in this frame, a linear constrained model predictive control algorithm is developed to optimize the power splitting between the fuel cell and ultracapacitor. The proposed algorithm significantly simplifies implementation of the controller and can handle multiple constraints, such as limiting substantial fluctuation of fuel cell current. Experiment and simulation results demonstrate that the control strategy can optimally split power between the fuel cell and ultracapacitor, limit the change rate of the fuel cell current, and so as to extend the lifetime of the fuel cell.

  1. Modeling and analysis of the HPM pulse-width upset effect on CMOS inverter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We derive analytical models of the excess carrier density distribution and the HPM (high-power microwave) upset susceptibility with dependence of pulse-width, which are validated by the simulated results and experimental data. Mechanism analysis and model derivation verify that the excess carriers dominate the current amplification process of the latch-up. Our results reveal that the excess carrier density distribution in P-substrate behaves as pulse-width dependence. The HPM upset voltage threshold Vp decreases with the incremental pulse-width, while there is an inflection point which is caused because the excess carrier accumulation in the P-substrate will be suppressed over time. For the first time, the physical essence of the HPM pulse-width upset effect is proposed to be the excess carrier accumulation effect. Validation concludes that the Vp model is capable of giving a reliable and accurate prediction to the HPM upset susceptibility of a CMOS inverter, which simultaneously considers technology information, ambient temperature, and layout parameters. From the model, the layout parameter LB has been demonstrated to have a significant impact on the pulse-width upset effect: a CMOS inverter with minor LB is more susceptible to HPM, which enables us to put forward hardening measures for inverters that are immune from the HPM upset. (paper)

  2. Spatial distribution of niche and stem cells in ex vivo human limbal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, Indumathi; Kacham, Santhosh; Purushotham, Jyothi; Maddileti, Savitri; Siamwala, Jamila; Sangwan, Virender Singh

    2014-11-01

    Stem cells at the limbus mediate corneal epithelial regeneration and regulate normal tissue homeostasis. Ex vivo cultured limbal epithelial transplantations are being widely practiced in the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency. In this report, we examined whether the limbal niche cells that nurture and regulate epithelial stem cells coexist in ex vivo limbal cultures. We also compared the inherent differences between explant and suspension culture systems in terms of spatial distribution of niche cells and their effect on epithelial stem cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in vitro. We report that the stem cell content of both culture systems was similar, explaining the comparable clinical outcomes reported using these two methods. We also showed that the niche cells get expanded in culture and the nestin-positive cells migrate at the leading edges to direct epithelial cell migration in suspension cultures, whereas they are limited to the intact niche in explant cultures. We provide evidence that C/EBPδ-positive, p15-positive, and quiescent, label-retaining, early activated stem cells migrate at the leading edges to regulate epithelial cell proliferation in explant cultures, and this position effect is lost in early suspension cultures. However, in confluent suspension cultures, the stem cells and niche cells interact with each another, migrate in spiraling patterns, and self-organize to form three-dimensional niche-like compartments resembling the limbal crypts and thereby reestablish the position effect. These 3D-sphere clusters are enriched with nestin-, vimentin-, S100-, and p27-positive niche cells and p15-, p21-, p63α-, C/EBPδ-, ABCG2-, and Pax6-positive quiescent epithelial stem cells.

  3. Ganglion cell distribution and retinal resolution in the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass, Alla M; Ketten, Darlene R; Odell, Daniel K; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2012-01-01

    The topographic organization of retinal ganglion cells was examined in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) to assess ganglion cell size and distribution and to estimate retinal resolution. The ganglion cell layer of the manatee's retina was comprised primarily of large neurons with broad intercellular spaces. Cell sizes varied from 10 to 60 μm in diameter (mean 24.3 μm). The retinal wholemounts from adult animals measured 446-501 mm(2) in area with total ganglion cell counts of 62,000-81,800 (mean 70,200). The cell density changed across the retina, with the maximum in the area below the optic disc and decreasing toward the retinal edges and in the immediate vicinity of the optic disc. The maximum cell density ranged from 235 to 337 cells per millimeter square in the adult retinae. Two wholemounts obtained from juvenile animals were 271 and 282 mm(2) in area with total cell numbers of 70,900 and 68,700, respectively (mean 69,800), that is, nearly equivalent to those of adults, but juvenile retinae consequently had maximum cell densities that were higher than those of adults: 478 and 491 cells per millimeter square. Calculations indicate a retinal resolution of ∼19' (1.6 cycles per degree) in both adult and juvenile retinae. PMID:21964938

  4. Ganglion cell distribution and retinal resolution in the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass, Alla M; Ketten, Darlene R; Odell, Daniel K; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2012-01-01

    The topographic organization of retinal ganglion cells was examined in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) to assess ganglion cell size and distribution and to estimate retinal resolution. The ganglion cell layer of the manatee's retina was comprised primarily of large neurons with broad intercellular spaces. Cell sizes varied from 10 to 60 μm in diameter (mean 24.3 μm). The retinal wholemounts from adult animals measured 446-501 mm(2) in area with total ganglion cell counts of 62,000-81,800 (mean 70,200). The cell density changed across the retina, with the maximum in the area below the optic disc and decreasing toward the retinal edges and in the immediate vicinity of the optic disc. The maximum cell density ranged from 235 to 337 cells per millimeter square in the adult retinae. Two wholemounts obtained from juvenile animals were 271 and 282 mm(2) in area with total cell numbers of 70,900 and 68,700, respectively (mean 69,800), that is, nearly equivalent to those of adults, but juvenile retinae consequently had maximum cell densities that were higher than those of adults: 478 and 491 cells per millimeter square. Calculations indicate a retinal resolution of ∼19' (1.6 cycles per degree) in both adult and juvenile retinae.

  5. Distribution of primed T cells and antigen-loaded antigen presenting cells following intranasal immunization in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Ciabattini

    Full Text Available Priming of T cells is a key event in vaccination, since it bears a decisive influence on the type and magnitude of the immune response. T-cell priming after mucosal immunization via the nasal route was studied by investigating the distribution of antigen-loaded antigen presenting cells (APCs and primed antigen-specific T cells. Nasal immunization studies were conducted using the model protein antigen ovalbumin (OVA plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotide adjuvant. Trafficking of antigen-specific primed T cells was analyzed in vivo after adoptive transfer of OVA-specific transgenic T cells in the presence or absence of fingolimod, a drug that causes lymphocytes sequestration within lymph nodes. Antigen-loaded APCs were observed in mediastinal lymph nodes, draining the respiratory tract, but not in distal lymph nodes. Antigen-specific proliferating T cells were first observed within draining lymph nodes, and later in distal iliac and mesenteric lymph nodes and in the spleen. The presence at distal sites was due to migration of locally primed T cells as shown by fingolimod treatment that caused a drastic reduction of proliferated T cells in non-draining lymph nodes and an accumulation of extensively divided T cells within draining lymph nodes. Homing of nasally primed T cells in distal iliac lymph nodes was CD62L-dependent, while entry into mesenteric lymph nodes depended on both CD62L and α4β7, as shown by in vivo antibody-mediated inhibition of T-cell trafficking. These data, elucidating the trafficking of antigen-specific primed T cells to non-draining peripheral and mucosa-associated lymph nodes following nasal immunization, provide relevant insights for the design of vaccination strategies based on mucosal priming.

  6. STELLAR LOCI. I. METALLICITY DEPENDENCE AND INTRINSIC WIDTHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Haibo; Liu, Xiaowei [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xiang, Maosheng; Huang, Yang; Chen, Bingqiu, E-mail: yuanhb4861@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: x.liu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-02-01

    Stellar loci are widely used for selection of interesting outliers, reddening determinations, and calibrations. However, until now, the dependence of stellar loci on metallicity has not been fully explored, and their intrinsic widths are unclear. In this paper, by combining the spectroscopic and recalibrated imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, we have built a large, clean sample of dwarf stars with accurate colors and well-determined metallicities to investigate the metallicity dependence and intrinsic widths of the SDSS stellar loci. Typically, 1 dex decrease in metallicity causes 0.20 and 0.02 mag decrease in colors u – g and g – r and 0.02 and 0.02 mag increase in colors r – i and i – z, respectively. The variations are larger for metal-rich stars than for metal-poor ones, and larger for F/G/K stars than for A/M ones. Using the sample, we have performed two-dimensional polynomial fitting to the u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z colors as a function of color g – i and metallicity [Fe/H]. The residuals, at the level of 0.029, 0.008, 0.008, and 0.011 mag for the u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z colors, respectively, can be fully accounted for by the photometric errors and metallicity uncertainties, suggesting that the intrinsic widths of the loci are at maximum a few millimagnitudes. The residual distributions are asymmetric, revealing that a significant fraction of stars are binaries. In a companion paper, we will present an unbiased estimate of the binary fraction for field stars. Other potential applications of the metallicity-dependent stellar loci are briefly discussed.

  7. Rac1+ cells distributed in accordance with CD 133+ cells in glioblastomas and the elevated invasiveness of CD 133+ glioma cells with higher Rac1 activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bin; SUN Jian; YU Sheng-ping; CHEN Cong; LIU Bin; LIU Zhi-feng; REN Bing-cheng; MING Hao-lang; YANG Xue-jun

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that cancer stem cells are one of the major causes for tumor recurrence due to their resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy.Although the highly invasive nature of glioblastoma (GBM)cells is also implicated in the failure of current therapies,it is not clear how glioma stem cells (GSCs) are involved in invasiveness.Rac1 activity is necessary for inducing reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and cell movement.In this study,we aimed to investigate the distribution characteristics of CD133+ cells and Rac1+ cells in GBM as well as Rac1 activity in CD133+ GBM cells,and analyze the migration and invasion potential of these cells.Methods A series of 21 patients with GBM were admitted consecutively and received tumor resection in Tianjin Medical University General Hospital during the first half of the year 2011.Tissue specimens were collected both from the peripheral and the central parts for each tumor under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) navigation guidance.Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the CD133+ cells and Rac1+ cells distribution in GBM specimens.Double-labeling immunofluorescence was further used to analyze CD133 and Rac1 co-expression and the relationship between CD133+ cells distribution and Rac1 expression.Serum-free medium culture and magnetic sorting were used to isolate CD133+ cells from U87 cell line.Rac1 activation assay was conducted to assess the activation of Rac1 in CD133+ and CD133-U87 cells.The migration and invasive ability of CD133+ and CD133-U87 cells were determined by cell migration and invasion assays in vitro.Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used to determine statistical significance in this study.Results In the central parts of GBMs,CD133+ cells were found to cluster around necrosis and occasionally cluster around the vessels under the microscope by immunohistological staining.In the peripheral parts of the tumors,CD133+ cells were lined up along

  8. Measuring the complete cross-cell carrier mobility distributions in bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifter, Jason; Sun, Yanming; Choi, Hyosung; Lee, Byoung Hoon; Heeger, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotube-enabled, vertical, organic field effect transistors (CN-VFETs) based on the small molecule dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (DNTT) have demonstrated high current, low-power operation suitable for driving active matix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays. This performance is achieved without the need for costly high-resolution patterning, despite the low mobility of the organic semiconductor, by employing sub-micron channel widths, defined in the vertical devices by the thickness of the semiconducting layer. Replacing the thermally evaporated small molecule semiconductor with a solution-processed polymer would possibly further simplify the fabrication process and reduce manufacturing cost. Here we investigate several polymer systems as wide bandgap semiconducting channel layers for potentially air stable and transparent CN-VFETs. The field effect mobility and optical transparency of the polymer layers are determined, and the performance and air stability of CN-VFET devices are measured. A. S. gratefully acknowledges support from the National Science Foundation under DMR-1156737.

  9. Sizing stack and battery of a fuel cell hybrid distribution truck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tazelaar, Edwin; Shen, Y.; Veenhuizen, Bram; Hofman, T.; Bosch, P. van den

    2012-01-01

    An existing fuel cell hybrid distribution truck, built for demonstration purposes, is used as a case study to investigate the effect of stack (kW) and battery (kW, kWh) sizes on the hydrogen consumption of the vehicle. Three driving cycles, the NEDC for Low Power vehicles, CSC and JE05 cycle, define

  10. Control strategy of hybrid fuel cell/battery distributed generation system for grid-connected operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masoud Aliakbar GOLKAR; Amin HAJIZADEH

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a control strategy of a hybrid fuel cell/battery distributed generation (HDG) system in distribution systems. The overall structure of the HDG system is given, dynamic models for the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power plant,battery bank and its power electronic interfacing are briefly described, and controller design methodologies for the power conditioning units and fuel cell to control the power flow from the hybrid power plant to the utility grid are presented. To distribute the power between the fuel cell power plant and the battery energy storage, a neuro-fuzzy controller has been developed. Also, for controlling the active and reactive power independently in distribution systems, the current control strategy based on two fuzzy logic controllers has been presented. A Matlab/Simulink simulation model is developed for the HDG system by combining the individual component models and their controllers. Simulation results show the overall system performance including load-following and power management of the HDG system.

  11. An Interference-Aware Distributed Transmission Technique for Dense Small Cell Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Nurul Huda; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Pedersen, Klaus I.;

    2015-01-01

    An ultra-dense deployment of small cells with multi-antenna nodes is expected to be the solution for coping with the huge traffic growth expected in near future. Mutual interference among coexisting users is one of the main performance bottlenecks in such dense deployment scenarios. A distributed...

  12. ZnO/a-Si distributed Bragg reflectors for light trapping in thin film solar cells from visible to infrared range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aqing; Yuan, Qianmin; Zhu, Kaigui

    2016-01-01

    Distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) consisting of ZnO and amorphous silicon (a-Si) were prepared by magnetron sputtering method for selective light trapping. The quarter-wavelength ZnO/a-Si DBRs with only 6 periods exhibit a peak reflectance of above 99% and have a full width at half maximum that is greater than 347 nm in the range of visible to infrared. The 6-pair reversed quarter-wavelength ZnO/a-Si DBRs also have a peak reflectance of 98%. Combination of the two ZnO/a-Si DBRs leads to a broader stopband from 686 nm to 1354 nm. Using the ZnO/a-Si DBRs as the rear reflector of a-Si thin film solar cells significantly increases the photocurrent in the spectrum range of 400-1000 nm, in comparison with that of the cells with Al reflector. The obtained results suggest that ZnO/a-Si DBRs are promising reflectors of a-Si thin-film solar cells for light trapping.

  13. Elucidating the Uptake and Distribution of Nanoparticles in Solid Tumors via a Multilayered Cell Culture Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Darren Yohan; Charmainne Cruje; Xiaofeng Lu; Devika Chithrani

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular layers (MCLs) have previously been used to determine the pharmacokinetics of a variety of different cancer drugs including paclitaxel, doxorubicin, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil across a number of cell lines. It is not known how nanoparticles (NPs) navigate through the tumor microenvironment once they leave the tumor blood vessel. In this study, we used the MCL model to study the uptake and penetration dynamics of NPs. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were used as a model system to map the NP distribution within tissue-like structures. Our results show that NP uptake and transport are dependent on the tumor cell type. MDA-MB-231 tissue showed deeper penetration of GNPs as compared to MCF-7 one. Intracellular and extracellular distributions of NPs were mapped using CytoViva imaging. The ability of MCLs to mimic tumor tissue characteristics makes them a useful tool in assessing the efficacy of particle distribution in solid tumors.

  14. Temperature distributions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell from 3-D numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present TempDAC, a 3-D numerical model for calculating the steady-state temperature distribution for continuous wave laser-heated experiments in the diamond anvil cell. TempDAC solves the steady heat conduction equation in three dimensions over the sample chamber, gasket, and diamond anvils and includes material-, temperature-, and direction-dependent thermal conductivity, while allowing for flexible sample geometries, laser beam intensity profile, and laser absorption properties. The model has been validated against an axisymmetric analytic solution for the temperature distribution within a laser-heated sample. Example calculations illustrate the importance of considering heat flow in three dimensions for the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. In particular, we show that a “flat top” input laser beam profile does not lead to a more uniform temperature distribution or flatter temperature gradients than a wide Gaussian laser beam

  15. The prevalence and distribution of Th17 and Tc17 cells in patients with thyroid tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqin; Ma, Shoubao; Wei, Yan; Wu, Yan; Yu, Xiao; Liu, Haiyan

    2014-11-01

    Both Th17 and Tc17 cells have been found in various tumors and may play important roles in regulating anti-tumor immune responses. However, the prevalence and distribution of Th17 and Tc17 cells in thyroid tumors are still unclear. In the current study, we examined the percentages of Th17 and Tc17 cells in the peripheral blood of 31 thyroid adenoma and 11 thyroid carcinoma patients. The serum IL-17 levels were also examined and their associations with Th17 and Tc17 cells were evaluated. Moreover, the presence of Th17 cells was detected in both thyroid adenoma and carcinoma patients. Our results showed that compared with healthy individuals, patients with thyroid tumors had a higher proportion of Th17 and lower proportion of Tc17 cells in peripheral blood. The serum concentration of IL-17 was significantly increased in patients with thyroid tumors and it was correlated with the percent of Th17 cells. Furthermore, the number of Th17 cells was significantly increased in the tumors of the patients. Th17 and Tc17 cells were negatively correlated with the tumor size. There was no significant difference between thyroid adenoma and carcinoma patients. These results indicate that Th17 cells may contribute to thyroid tumor pathogenesis. PMID:25068436

  16. Spatial Distribution of Stem Cell-Like Keratinocytes in Dissected Compound Hair Follicles of the Dog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique J Wiener

    Full Text Available Hair cycle disturbances are common in dogs and comparable to some alopecic disorders in humans. A normal hair cycle is maintained by follicular stem cells which are predominately found in an area known as the bulge. Due to similar morphological characteristics of the bulge area in humans and dogs, the shared particularity of compound hair follicles as well as similarities in follicular biomarker expression, the dog is a promising model to study human hair cycle and stem cell disorders. To gain insight into the spatial distribution of follicular keratinocytes with stem cell potential in canine compound follicles, we microdissected hair follicles in anagen and telogen from skin samples of freshly euthanized dogs. The keratinocytes isolated from different locations were investigated for their colony forming efficiency, growth and differentiation potential as well as clonal growth. Our results indicate that i compound and single hair follicles exhibit a comparable spatial distribution pattern with respect to cells with high growth potential and stem cell-like characteristics, ii the lower isthmus (comprising the bulge harbors most cells with high growth potential in both, the anagen and the telogen hair cycle stage, iii unlike in other species, colonies with highest growth potential are rather small with an irregular perimeter and iv the keratinocytes derived from the bulbar region exhibit characteristics of actively dividing transit amplifying cells. Our results now provide the basis to conduct comparative studies of normal dogs and those with hair cycle disorders with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients.

  17. Light microscopical demonstration and zonal distribution of parasinusoidal cells (Ito cells) in normal human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Junge, Jette; Nielsen, O;

    1988-01-01

    The parasinusoidal cells of the liver (Ito cells) were demonstrated light microscopically in autopsy specimens fixed in formalin and stained with Oil red O after dichromate treatment. The method allows examination of large samples containing numerous acini. Quantitative assessment showed a zonal...

  18. Magnesium intracellular content and distribution map in drug-resistant and -sensitive whole cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Malucelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg plays crucial structural and regulatory roles within cells. Despite the extensive amount of data about the biochemistry of Mg, a complete picture of its regulation and cellular homeostasis is lacking. Thanks to recent improvements in third generation synchrotron X-ray sources, X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XRFM is becoming a highly sensitive method for mapping elemental distributions in cells. XRFM maps the element content but not the concentration, which is a relevant variable in a biological context. We tackled this issue by combining XRFM with atomic force microscopy that was used to obtain morphological information of the sample. The aim of the present study was to compare the content and the distribution of Mg in drug-resistant and -sensitive tumor cell lines. Our data has shown a massive increase of Mg in LoVo drug-resistant cells. Moreover, the map of intracellular Mg showed marked differences in the pattern distribution between sensitive and resistant cells.

  19. Cellular distribution of inorganic mercury and its relation to cytotoxicity in bovine kidney cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bovine kidney cell culture system was used to assess what relationship mercuric chloride (HgCl2) uptake and subcellular distribution had to cytotoxicity. Twenty-four-hour incubations with 0.05-50 μM HgCl2 elicited a concentration-related cytotoxicity. Cellular accumulation of 203Hg was also concentration-related, with 1.0 nmol/106 cells at the IC50. Measurement of Hg uptake over the 24-h exposure period revealed a multiphasic process. Peak accumulation was attained by 1 h and was followed by extrusion and plateauing of intracellular Hg levels. Least-squares regression analysis of the cytotoxicity and cellular uptake data indicated a potential relationship between the Hg uptake and cytotoxicity. However, the subcellular distribution of Hg was not concentration-related. Mitochondria and soluble protein fractions accounted for greater than 65% of the cell-associated Hg at all concentrations. The remaining Hg was distributed between the microsomal (6-10%) and nuclear and cell debris (11-22%) fractions at all concentrations tested. Less than 20% of the total cell-associated Hg was bound with metallothionein-like protein. 31 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  20. Distribution and number of epidermal growth factor receptors in skin is related to epithelial cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Basketter, D A; Couchman, J R;

    1983-01-01

    an undetectable or sharply reduced number of EGF receptors. The EGF receptor number and receptor affinity of epidermal basal cells freshly isolated from rats of increasing age has also been determined. We find that receptor affinity remains unchanged (3.3 nM) but that basal cell surface receptor number decreases...... markedly with age. This decrease in receptor number is similar in trend to the known drop in basal cell [3H]thymidine labelling index which occurs over the same time period. The data suggest that the distribution of EGF receptors and EGF cell surface receptor number in skin are important in the spatial...... receptors are detected on the epithelial cells overlying the basement membranes of the epidermis, sebaceous gland, and regions of the hair follicle all of which have proliferative capacity. In marked contrast, tissues which have started to differentiate and lost their growth potential, carry either...

  1. Distribution and ultrastructure of Merkel cell of the fishing bat (Myotis ricketti)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN JiangXia; WANG HongMei; RACEY Paul; ZHANG ShuYi

    2009-01-01

    The distribution and ultrastructure of Merkel cells were described in detail in piscivorous bats through immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy techniques. The findings indicated that Merkel cells are commonly found in raised-domes, hair follicles and in the basal epidermis of the skin from their back, abdomen, intercrural membranes, wing membranes and footpads. However, the density of Merkel cells is significantly higher in the footpad than in other places. These results suggested that there may be a link between Merkel cells and tactile sense, and also might imply that raised-domes with air-flow sensitive hairs played an important role in adjusting flying gestures by monitoring the air flow around the body. The ultrastructure of Merkel cells is similar to other vertebrates except having more intermediate filaments and larger granules.

  2. Distribution and ultrastructure of Merkel cell of the fishing bat (Myotis ricketti)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RACEY; Paul

    2009-01-01

    The distribution and ultrastructure of Merkel cells were described in detail in piscivorous bats through immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy techniques. The findings indicated that Merkel cells are commonly found in raised-domes,hair follicles and in the basal epidermis of the skin from their back,abdomen,intercrural membranes,wing membranes and footpads. However,the density of Merkel cells is significantly higher in the footpad than in other places. These results suggested that there may be a link between Merkel cells and tactile sense,and also might imply that raised-domes with air-flow sensitive hairs played an important role in adjusting flying gestures by monitoring the air flow around the body. The ultrastructure of Merkel cells is similar to other vertebrates except having more intermediate filaments and larger granules.

  3. Pattern of distribution of blood group antigens on human epidermal cells during maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Buschard, Karsten; Hakomori, Sen-Itiroh

    1984-01-01

    The distribution in human epidermis of A, B, and H blood group antigens and of a precursor carbohydrate chain, N-acetyl-lactosamine, was examined using immunofluorescence staining techniques. The material included tissue from 10 blood group A, 4 blood group B, and 9 blood group O persons. Murine...... on the lower spinous cells whereas H antigen was seen predominantly on upper spinous cells or on the granular cells. Epithelia from blood group A or B persons demonstrated A or B antigens, respectively, but only if the tissue sections were trypsinized before staining. In such cases A or B antigens were found...... monoclonal antibodies were used to identify H antigen (type 2 chain) and N-acetyl-lactosamine. Human antisera were used to identify A and B antigens. In all groups N-acetyl-lactosamine and H antigen were found on the cell membranes of the spinous cell layer. N-acetyl-lactosamine was present mainly...

  4. Perturbation method for experimental determination of neutron spatial distribution in the reactor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method is based on perturbation of the reactor cell from a few up to few tens of percent. Measurements were performed for square lattice calls of zero power reactors Anna, NORA and RB, with metal uranium and uranium oxide fuel elements, water, heavy water and graphite moderators. Character and functional dependence of perturbations were obtained from the experimental results. Zero perturbation was determined by extrapolation thus obtaining the real physical neutron flux distribution in the reactor cell. Simple diffusion theory for partial plate cell perturbation was developed for verification of the perturbation method. The results of these calculation proved that introducing the perturbation sample in the fuel results in flattening the thermal neutron density dependent on the amplitude of the applied perturbation. Extrapolation applied for perturbed distributions was found to be justified

  5. Detecting particles with cell phones: the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Vandenbroucke, Justin; Karn, Peter; Meehan, Matthew; Plewa, Matthew; Ruggles, Tyler; Schultz, David; Peacock, Jeffrey; Simons, Ariel Levi

    2015-01-01

    In 2014 the number of active cell phones worldwide for the first time surpassed the number of humans. Cell phone camera quality and onboard processing power (both CPU and GPU) continue to improve rapidly. In addition to their primary purpose of detecting photons, camera image sensors on cell phones and other ubiquitous devices such as tablets, laptops and digital cameras can detect ionizing radiation produced by cosmic rays and radioactive decays. While cosmic rays have long been understood and characterized as a nuisance in astronomical cameras, they can also be identified as a signal in idle camera image sensors. We present the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory (DECO), a platform for outreach and education as well as for citizen science. Consisting of an app and associated database and web site, DECO harnesses the power of distributed camera image sensors for cosmic-ray detection.

  6. Immunohistochemical study on distribution of endocrine cells in gastrointestinal tract of flower fish (Pseudophoxinus antalyae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenan (C)inar; Nurgül (S)enol; M Rü(s)tü (O)zen

    2006-01-01

    AIM:To detect distribution and relative frequency of endocrine cells in gastrointestinal tract of flower fish (Pseudophoxinus antalyae ).METHOIS:The intestinal tract of flower fish was divided into four portions from proximal to distal;the enlarged area after oesophagus and anterior, middle and posterior intestine. Immunohistochemical method using the peroxidase anti-peroxidase complex was employed.All antisera between four portions of flower fish were compared using ANOVA.RESULTS:Eleven types of gut endocrine cells were determined; they were immunoreactive for calcitonin gene related peptide, substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide, bombesin, somatostatin-14, secretin, TrkA, TrkB,TrkC, neurotensin, neuropeptide Y, which were found in almost all portions of the gastrointestinal tract.CONCLUSION:The regional distribution and relative frequency of immunoreactive cells in the flower fish,Pseudophoxinus antalyae, are essentially similar to those of other fish.

  7. Width effects on hydrodynamics of pendulum wave energy converter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冬姣; 邱守强; 叶家玮

    2014-01-01

    Based on two- and three-dimensional potential flow theories, the width effects on the hydrodynamics of a bottom-hinged trapezoidal pendulum wave energy converter are discussed. The two-dimensional eigenfunction expansion method is used to obtain the diffraction and radiation solutions when the converter width tends to be infinity. The trapezoidal section of the converter is approximated by a rectangular section for simplification. The nonlinear viscous damping effects are accounted for by including a drag term in the two- and three-dimensional methods. It is found that the three-dimensional results are in good agreement with the two-dimensional results when the converter width becomes larger, especially when the converter width is infinity, which shows that both of the methods are reasonable. Meantime, it is also found that the peak value of the conversion efficiency decreases as the converter width increases in short wave periods while increases when the converter width increases in long wave periods.

  8. Visual-Width of an Ultrasonic Gaussian Beam on the Schlieren Photograph and Explanation to the Nonspecularly Reflected Sound Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Guo-Zhen; SUN Yao; FU De-Yong

    2004-01-01

    @@ On the Schlieren photograph, a continuous ultrasonic Gaussian beam and its nonspecularly reflected beams [Chin.Phys. Lett. 16 (1999) 819] always have limited visual-width, although the theoretical spatial distribution of the sound field is a continuous function. To study this problem, the first step is to investigate the visual-width of the beam on the photograph related to the sound pressure at the centre of the beam by the threshold of the optical system caused by the refraction of light; the second step is to explain the visual-width of nonspecularly reflected field. By applying a relevant threshold, checked by the visual width of the incident beam, to cut the theoretical curves of the reflected sound field, one can find the visual-width of the two reflected beams and the gap between them correspond to that on the Schlieren photograph.

  9. Effects of Photovoltaic and Fuel Cell Hybrid System on Distribution Network Considering the Voltage Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABYANEH, H. A.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Development of distribution network and power consumption growth, increase voltage drop on the line impedance and therefore voltage drop in system buses. In some cases consumption is so high that voltage in some buses exceed from standard. In this paper, effect of the fuel cell and photovoltaic hybrid system on distribution network for solving expressed problem is studied. For determining the capacity of each distributed generation source, voltage limitation on the bus voltages under different conditions is considered. Simulation is done by using DIgSILENT software on the part of the 20 kV real life Sirjan distribution system. In this article, optimum location with regard to system and environmental conditions are studied in two different viewpoints.

  10. Crack Width Analysis of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius Ulbinas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the effectiveness of steel fiber reinforcement in RC concrete members in regard to ordinary reinforcement. The advantages and disadvantages of different shapes of steel fibers are discussed. The algorithm for calculating crack width based on EC2 and Rilem methodologies is presented. A comparison of theoretical and experimental crack widths has been performed. The relative errors of crack width predictions at different load levels were defined.Article in Lithuanian

  11. Crack Width Analysis of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Darius Ulbinas; Gintaris Kaklauskas

    2011-01-01

    The article investigates the effectiveness of steel fiber reinforcement in RC concrete members in regard to ordinary reinforcement. The advantages and disadvantages of different shapes of steel fibers are discussed. The algorithm for calculating crack width based on EC2 and Rilem methodologies is presented. A comparison of theoretical and experimental crack widths has been performed. The relative errors of crack width predictions at different load levels were defined.Article in Lithuanian

  12. The significance of biometric parameters in determining anterior teeth width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strajnić Ljiljana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. An important element of prosthetic treatment of edentulous patients is selecting the size of anterior artificial teeth that will restore the natural harmony of one’s dentolabial structure as well as the whole face. The main objective of this study was to determine the correlation between the inner canthal distance (ICD and interalar width (IAW on one side and the width of both central incisors (CIW, the width of central and lateral incisors (CLIW, the width of anterior teeth (ATW, the width between the canine cusps (CCW, which may be useful in clinical practice. Methods. A total of 89 subjects comprising 23 male and 66 female were studied. Their age ranged from 19 to 34 years with the mean of 25 years. Only the subjects with the preserved natural dentition were included in the sample. All facial and intraoral tooth measurements were made with a Boley Gauge (Buffalo Dental Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn NY, USA having a resolution of 0.1mm. Results. A moderate correlation was established between the interalar width and combined width of anterior teeth and canine cusp width (r = 0.439, r = 0.374. A low correlation was established between the inner canthal distance and the width of anterior teeth and canine cusp width (r = 0.335, r = 0.303. The differences between the two genders were highly significant for all the parameters (p < 0.01. The measured facial distances and width of anterior teeth were higher in men than in women. Conclusion. The results of this study suggest that the examined interalar width and inner canthal distance cannot be considered reliable guidelines in the selection of artificial upper anterior teeth. However, they may be used as a useful additional factor combined with other methods for objective tooth selection. The final decision should be made while working on dentures fitting models with the patient’s consent.

  13. Half-width at half-maximum, full-width at half-maximum analysis for resolution of asymmetrically apodized optical systems with slit apertures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andra Naresh Kumar Reddy; Dasari Karuna Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Resolution for the modified point spread function (PSF) of asymmetrically apodized optical systems has been analysed by a new parameter half-width at half-maximum (HWHM) in addition to the well-defined parameter full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). The distribution of half-maximum energy in the centroid of modified PSF has been investigated in terms of HWHM on good side and HWHM on bad side. We observed that as the asymmetry in PSF increases, FWHM of the main peak increases and then decreases and is being aided by the degree of amplitude apodization in the central region of slit functions. In the present study, HWHM (half-width at half-maximum) of the resultant PSF has been defined to characterize the resolution of the detection system. It is essentially a line of projection, which measures the width of the main lobe at its half-maximum position from the diffraction centre and has been computed for various amplitudes and antiphase apodizations of the slit aperture. We have noticed that HWHM on the good side decreases at the cost of the increased HWHM on the bad side in the presence of asymmetric apodization.

  14. Biologic width and its importance in periodontal and restorative dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babitha Nugala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An adequate understanding of the relationship between periodontal tissues and restorative dentistry is paramount to ensure adequate form, function, esthetics and comfort of the dentition. While most clinicians are aware of this important relationship, uncertainty remains regarding specific concepts such as biologic width, its maintenance and applications of crown lengthening in cases of biologic width violation. Relevant publications regarding biologic width, its violation and management were identified up to August 2011 using manual and electronic database search in Medline, Embase, Directory of Open Access Journals and Google Scholar. This review discusses the concept of biologic width around tooth and its relationship to periodontal health and restorative dentistry.

  15. Direct measurement of the total decay width of the top quark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-11-15

    We present a measurement of the total decay width of the top quark using events with top-antitop quark pair candidates reconstructed in the final state with one charged lepton and four or more hadronic jets. We use the full Tevatron run II data set of sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector. The top quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson are reconstructed for each event and compared with distributions derived from simulated signal and background samples to extract the top quark width (Γtop) and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. For a top quark mass Mtop=172.5  GeV/c2, we find 1.10quark width to date.

  16. Effect of Pulse Width and Fluence of Femtosecond Laser on Electron-Phonon Relaxation Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Ran-Ran; ZHANG Duan-Ming; WEI Hua; LI Zhi-Hua; YANG Feng-Xia; TAN Xin-Yu

    2008-01-01

    The electron-phonon relaxation time as functions of pulse width and fluence of femtosecond laser is studied based on the two-temperature model. The two-temperature model is solved using a finite difference method for copper target. The temperature distribution of the electron and the lattice along with space and time for a certain laser fluence is presented. The time-dependence of lattice and electron temperature of the surface for different pulse width and different laser fluence are also performed, respectively. Moreover, the variation of heat-affected zone per pulse with laser fluence is obtained. The satisfactory agreement between our numerical results and experimental data indicates that the electron-phonon relaxation time is reasonably accurate with the influences of pulse width and fluence of femtosecond laser.

  17. Cell Area and Strut Distribution Changes of Bent Coronary Stents: A Finite Element Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yang; WU Wei; YANG Da-zhi; QI Min

    2009-01-01

    Coronary stents are metal coils or mesh tubes delivered to blocked vessels through catheters, which are expanded by balloons to reopen and scaffold target vessels. Recently,special drugs are carried by stents (drug-eluting stents) to further reduce in-stent restenosis rate after stenting procedure. However,continual study on biomechanical characteristics of stents is necessary for better interactions between stents and tissue, or to provide a more suitable drug loading platform for drug-eluting stents. The purpose of this paper is to show how finite element methods can be used to study cell area and strut distribution changes of bent coronary stents. A same bending deformation was applied to two commercial coronary stent models by a rigid curved vessel. Results show that the stent design influenced the changes of cell area and strut distribution under bending situation. The stent with links had more cell area changes at outer curvature, and the stent with peak-peak (><) strut design could have strut contact and overlapping at inner curvature. In conclusion, this finite element method can be used to study and compare cell area and strut distribution changes of bent stents,and to provide a convenient tool for designers in testing and improving biomechanical characteristics of new stents.

  18. Distribution of S-100 positive dendritic cells in bovine pharynx,tonsils, and retropharyngeal lymph nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaxin WANG; Haixia BIAN; Wei SHI; Zhanjun LU

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells. However, the distribution of bovine DCs in the pharynx, tonsil, and retropharyngeal lymph nodes has not yet been documented. To address this issue, immunohistochemistry was conducted using S-100 pro-tein as a marker for DCs. It was observed that S-100 positive Langerhans cells (LCs) were primarily found in the basal layer of the pharyngeal epithelium. Some DCs were found in the outer layer of the epithelium and their dendrites extended out towards the epithelial surface. In the tonsil, S-100 positive DCs were found either in follicular germinal centers or in the T-cell areas. It is worth noting that the S-100 positive DCs were not only distributed in the cortex, but also in the medulla of bovine retropharyngeal lymph nodes. The distribution patterns of bovine DCs in the pharynx, tonsil, and retropharyngeal lymph nodes have an important implica-tion for our understanding of the interaction between pathogens and host.

  19. The distribution and redistribution of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in geoperceptive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniper, B E; French, A

    1972-09-01

    Within the root cap in maize the cells believed to be responsible for the perception of gravity possess a rough-surfaced ER system with a distinctive pattern of distribution. The ER is found normally parallel to the nuclear membrane and to the walls, and symmetrically distributed. It can be disturbed from its parallel position by moving the root to any horizontal orientation, but it is not displaced by inverting the root into the 180° vertical position. On returning to the normal position of growth the ER rapidly reforms into the original symmetrical position. The implications of this position and movement and the possible role of the ER are discussed.

  20. Distribution of immune response cells in the pelvic urethra and the prepuce of rams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Acosta-Dibarrat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The pathogens of the reproductive system in the male can penetrate and establish by ascending route, from to the prepuce to the urethra, accessory glands, epididymis and testicles. The aim of this paper is determine the distribution and number of cells involved in the immune response in prepuce and pelvic urethra of rams, without apparent clinical alterations in testicle, epididymis and prepuce. The distribution of some of the cells involved in the immune response at the level of the prepuce and the pelvic urethra was quantified in four one-year-old rams seronegative for B. ovis and A. seminis and without apparent lesions in the testicles, the epididymis, and the prepuce. At the moment of slaughter, samples were taken from the preputial fornix and the pelvic urethra and placed in 10% formalin and under freezing conditions. CD4, CD8, WC1, CD45RO, CD14 and CD1b cells were demonstrated by immunohistochemistry, and immunoglobulin-containing cells (ICC of the IgA, IgG and IgM classes were demonstrated by immunofluorescence. The labeled cells present in the mucosa of both organs were counted with an image analyzer. The total number of cells was compared between both tissues and differentially between the epithelium and the connective tissue of the mucosa. Significant differences were found in the total number of CD4, CD45RO, and WC1 lymphocytes, in CD14 macrophages, and CD1b dendritic cells, with mean values being greater in the fornix than in the urethra (p<0.05 in all cases. Only dendritic cells were found in the prepuce. No differences were found in the number of CD8 lymphocytes between both organs. The ratio between each cell type in the connective and the intraepithelial tissues and between organs was 10/1 for CD4 in the fornix (p<0.05, against 7/1 in the urethra (p<0.05, while CD8 had a 1/1 distribution in both mucosae. The WC1 ratio was 5/1 in both mucosae (p<0.05. CD45RO labeling was 19/1 in the prepuce (p<0.05 and 1/1 in the urethra. Ig

  1. Do bacterial cell numbers follow a theoretical Poisson distribution? Comparison of experimentally obtained numbers of single cells with random number generation via computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kento; Hokunan, Hidekazu; Hasegawa, Mayumi; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2016-12-01

    We investigated a bacterial sample preparation procedure for single-cell studies. In the present study, we examined whether single bacterial cells obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a theoretical Poisson distribution. Four serotypes of Salmonella enterica, three serotypes of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli and one serotype of Listeria monocytogenes were used as sample bacteria. An inoculum of each serotype was prepared via a 10-fold dilution series to obtain bacterial cell counts with mean values of one or two. To determine whether the experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts follow a theoretical Poisson distribution, a likelihood ratio test between the experimentally obtained cell counts and Poisson distribution which parameter estimated by maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) was conducted. The bacterial cell counts of each serotype sufficiently followed a Poisson distribution. Furthermore, to examine the validity of the parameters of Poisson distribution from experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts, we compared these with the parameters of a Poisson distribution that were estimated using random number generation via computer simulation. The Poisson distribution parameters experimentally obtained from bacterial cell counts were within the range of the parameters estimated using a computer simulation. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell counts of each serotype obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a Poisson distribution. The fact that the frequency of bacterial cell counts follows a Poisson distribution at low number would be applied to some single-cell studies with a few bacterial cells. In particular, the procedure presented in this study enables us to develop an inactivation model at the single-cell level that can estimate the variability of survival bacterial numbers during the bacterial death process. PMID:27554145

  2. Do bacterial cell numbers follow a theoretical Poisson distribution? Comparison of experimentally obtained numbers of single cells with random number generation via computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kento; Hokunan, Hidekazu; Hasegawa, Mayumi; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2016-12-01

    We investigated a bacterial sample preparation procedure for single-cell studies. In the present study, we examined whether single bacterial cells obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a theoretical Poisson distribution. Four serotypes of Salmonella enterica, three serotypes of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli and one serotype of Listeria monocytogenes were used as sample bacteria. An inoculum of each serotype was prepared via a 10-fold dilution series to obtain bacterial cell counts with mean values of one or two. To determine whether the experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts follow a theoretical Poisson distribution, a likelihood ratio test between the experimentally obtained cell counts and Poisson distribution which parameter estimated by maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) was conducted. The bacterial cell counts of each serotype sufficiently followed a Poisson distribution. Furthermore, to examine the validity of the parameters of Poisson distribution from experimentally obtained bacterial cell counts, we compared these with the parameters of a Poisson distribution that were estimated using random number generation via computer simulation. The Poisson distribution parameters experimentally obtained from bacterial cell counts were within the range of the parameters estimated using a computer simulation. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell counts of each serotype obtained via 10-fold dilution followed a Poisson distribution. The fact that the frequency of bacterial cell counts follows a Poisson distribution at low number would be applied to some single-cell studies with a few bacterial cells. In particular, the procedure presented in this study enables us to develop an inactivation model at the single-cell level that can estimate the variability of survival bacterial numbers during the bacterial death process.

  3. In situ hybridization of oxytocin messenger RNA: macroscopic distribution and quantitation in rat hypothalamic cell groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbach, J.P.; Voorhuis, T.A.; van Tol, H.H.; Ivell, R.

    1987-05-29

    Oxytocin mRNA was detected in the rat hypothalamus by in situ hybridization to a single stranded /sup 35/S-labelled DNA probe and the distribution of oxytocin mRNA-containing cell groups was studied at the macroscopic level. Specificity of hybridization was confirmed by comparison to vasopressin mRNA hybridization in parallel tissue sections. Cell groups containing oxytocin mRNA were confined to a set of hypothalamic cell groups, i.c. the supraoptic, paraventricular, anterior commissural nuclei, nucleus circularis and scattered hypothalamic islets. These cell groups displayed similar densities of autoradiographic signals indicating that the oxytocin gene is expressed at approximately the same average level at these various sites.

  4. Solar cells with distributed parameters: Current-voltage characteristics under uniform and nonuniform illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aripov, K. K.; Rumyantsev, V. D.

    1984-02-01

    A simple method of calculating the current voltage characteristics of solar cells, based on an equivalent resistance diode ladder network with stripline contacts, is applied to such cells with uniform thickness and various shapes of the active surface. Distributed resistance are represented by equivalent lumped ones. This procedure is applied first to the case of uniform illumination, using measured current voltage characteristics of cells and very precisely piecewise linearly approximated exponential current voltage characteristics of diodes. In the case of nonuniform illumination the latter is assumed to be axisymmetric, with the surface consisting of completely dark and uniformly bright segments. Numerical data is generated on this basis for GaAs cells of rectangular or sectoral shape uniformly illuminated and in the shape of circular disks either completely uniformly illuminated or with various configurations of concentric dark and bright zones. Nonuniform illumination is found to result in a flatter current voltage characteristic with a lower open circuit voltage.

  5. Distribution of oxidized and HNE-modified proteins in U87 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Tobias; Engels, Martina; Kaiser, Barbara; Grune, Tilman

    2005-01-01

    Protein modification is one of the important processes during oxidative stress. This modification of proteins is either due to direct oxidation of proteins by various oxidants or due to secondary modification by lipid peroxidation products, e.g. 4-hydroxynonenal. In the here presented work we compare the intracellular distribution of protein modification products after treatment of human U87 astrocytoma cells with hydrogen peroxide or HNE. The treatment with hydrogen peroxide leads mainly to a cytosolic formation of oxidized proteins whereas HNE treatment is forming HNE-adducts throughout the cell. Therefore, we concluded that HNE diffusion distance in cells enables this lipid peroxidation product to act as a second messenger within the cell and on the other hand is the reason for the genotoxic properties of this compound.

  6. Effects of hypoxia on promoter of telomerase reverse transcriptase and cell cycle distribution in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shun-lin; HUANG Jun; ZHU Jing; CAO Ke-jiang; DING Gui-peng; ZHU Yi; XU Lu

    2005-01-01

    @@ On the hypothesis that telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) of cardiac myocytes (CMs) is consistent with cell cycle distribution as well as tumour cells, we plan to investigate the expression of TERT in CMs and how TERT is in keeping with CMs cycle distribution after birth and under hypoxia, and roughly understand how hypoxia affects activity of TERT promoter.

  7. Mast cells in common wolffish Anarhichas lupus L.: ontogeny, distribution and association with lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellberg, Hege; Bjerkås, Inge; Vågnes, Øyvind B; Noga, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    The morphology, ontogeny and tissue distribution of mast cells were studied in common wolffish(Anarhichas lupus L.) at the larval, juvenile and adult life stages using light and electron-microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Fish were sampled at 1 day, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-hatching in addition to 6 and 9 months and 2 years and older. From 8 weeks post-hatching, mast cells in common wolffish mainly appeared as oval or rounded cells 8-15 mm in diameter with an eccentrically placed, ovoid nucleus and filled with cytoplasmic granules up to 1.2 mm in diameter. Granules were refractile and eosinophilic to slightly basophilic in H&E and stained bright red with Martius-scarlet-blue and purple with pinacyanol erythrosinate in formalin-fixed tissues. Mast cells stained positive for piscidin 4 and Fc ε RI by immunohistochemistry. From 1 day to 4 weeks post-hatching, immature mast cell containing only a few irregularly sized cytoplasmic granules were observed by light and electron-microscopy in loose connective tissue of cranial areas. From 1 day post-hatching, these cells stained positive for piscidin 4 and Fc ε RI by immunohistochemistry. From 12 weeks post-hatching, mast cells showed a primarily perivascular distribution and were particularly closely associated with lymphatic vessels and sinuses. Mast cells were mainly located at the peripheral border of the adventitia of arteries and veins, while they were in intimate contact with the endothelium of the lymphatic vessels. Numerous mast cells were observed in the intestine. A stratum compactum, as described in salmonids, was not observed in wolffish intestine,nor were mast cells confined to a separate layer, a stratum granulosum. Lymphatic vessels consisting of endothelium, intimal connective tissue and a poorly developed basal lamina were observed in the intestine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to compare the structure and localization of intestinal mast cells of common wolffish and rainbow trout

  8. Analyzing the effects of surface distribution of pores in cell electroporation for a cell membrane containing cholesterol

    CERN Document Server

    Shil, Pratip; Vidyasagar, Pandit B

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a model and numerical analysis of transmembrane potential induced in biological cell membrane under the influence of externally applied electric field (i.e., electroporation). This model differs from the established models in two distinct ways. Firstly, it incorporates the presence of cholesterol (~20% mole-fraction) in the membrane. Secondly, it considers the dependence of pore distribution on the variation of transmembrane potential from one region of the cell to the other. Formulation is based on the role of membrane tension and electrical forces in the formation of pores in a cell membrane, which is considered as an infinitesimally thin insulator. The model has been used to explore the creation and evolution of pores and to determine the number and size of pores as function of applied electric field (magnitude & duration). Results show that the presence of cholesterol enhances poration by changing the membrane tension. Analysis indicate that the number of pores, average pore radii ...

  9. Distinctive left-sided distribution of adrenergic-derived cells in the adult mouse heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley Osuala

    Full Text Available Adrenaline and noradrenaline are produced within the heart from neuronal and non-neuronal sources. These adrenergic hormones have profound effects on cardiovascular development and function, yet relatively little information is available about the specific tissue distribution of adrenergic cells within the adult heart. The purpose of the present study was to define the anatomical localization of cells derived from an adrenergic lineage within the adult heart. To accomplish this, we performed genetic fate-mapping experiments where mice with the cre-recombinase (Cre gene inserted into the phenylethanolamine-n-methyltransferase (Pnmt locus were cross-mated with homozygous Rosa26 reporter (R26R mice. Because Pnmt serves as a marker gene for adrenergic cells, offspring from these matings express the β-galactosidase (βGAL reporter gene in cells of an adrenergic lineage. βGAL expression was found throughout the adult mouse heart, but was predominantly (89% located in the left atrium (LA and ventricle (LV (p<0.001 compared to RA and RV, where many of these cells appeared to have cardiomyocyte-like morphological and structural characteristics. The staining pattern in the LA was diffuse, but the LV free wall displayed intermittent non-random staining that extended from the apex to the base of the heart, including heavy staining of the anterior papillary muscle along its perimeter. Three-dimensional computer-aided reconstruction of XGAL+ staining revealed distribution throughout the LA and LV, with specific finger-like projections apparent near the mid and apical regions of the LV free wall. These data indicate that adrenergic-derived cells display distinctive left-sided distribution patterns in the adult mouse heart.

  10. Spatial distribution of prominin-1 (CD133-positive cells within germinative zones of the vertebrate brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Jászai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In mammals, embryonic neural progenitors as well as adult neural stem cells can be prospectively isolated based on the cell surface expression of prominin-1 (CD133, a plasma membrane glycoprotein. In contrast, characterization of neural progenitors in non-mammalian vertebrates endowed with significant constitutive neurogenesis and inherent self-repair ability is hampered by the lack of suitable cell surface markers. Here, we have investigated whether prominin-1-orthologues of the major non-mammalian vertebrate model organisms show any degree of conservation as for their association with neurogenic geminative zones within the central nervous system (CNS as they do in mammals or associated with activated neural progenitors during provoked neurogenesis in the regenerating CNS. METHODS: We have recently identified prominin-1 orthologues from zebrafish, axolotl and chicken. The spatial distribution of prominin-1-positive cells--in comparison to those of mice--was mapped in the intact brain in these organisms by non-radioactive in situ hybridization combined with detection of proliferating neural progenitors, marked either by proliferating cell nuclear antigen or 5-bromo-deoxyuridine. Furthermore, distribution of prominin-1 transcripts was investigated in the regenerating spinal cord of injured axolotl. RESULTS: Remarkably, a conserved association of prominin-1 with germinative zones of the CNS was uncovered as manifested in a significant co-localization with cell proliferation markers during normal constitutive neurogenesis in all species investigated. Moreover, an enhanced expression of prominin-1 became evident associated with provoked, compensatory neurogenesis during the epimorphic regeneration of the axolotl spinal cord. Interestingly, significant prominin-1-expressing cell populations were also detected at distinct extraventricular (parenchymal locations in the CNS of all vertebrate species being suggestive of further, non

  11. Enhanced invasion in vitro and the distribution patterns in vivo of CD133+ glioma stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Sheng-ping; YANG Xue-jun; ZHANG Bin; MING Hao-lang; CHEN Cong; REN Bing-cheng; LIU Zhi-feng; LIU Bin

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that cancer stem cells cause tumor recurrence based on their resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy.Although the highly invasive nature of glioblastoma cells is also implicated in the failure of current therapies,it is not clear whether cancer stem cells are involved in invasiveness.This study aimed to assess invasive ability of glioma stem cells (GSCs) derived from C6 glioma cell line and the distribution patterns of GSCs in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat brain tumor.Methods Serum-free medium culture and magnetic isolation were used to gain purely CD133+ GSCs.The invasive stem cell markers and luxol fast blue staining for white matter tracts were performed to show the distribution patterns of GSCs in brain tumor of rats and the relationship among GSCs,vessels,and white matter tracts.The results of matrigel invasion assay were estimated using the Student's t test and the analysis of Western blotting was performed using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test.Results CD133+GSCs(number:85.3±4.1)were significantly more invasive in vitro than matched CD133- cells(number:25.9±3.1) (t=14.5,P <0.005).GSCs invaded into the brain diffusely and located in perivascular niche of tumor-brain interface or resided within perivascular niche next to white fiber tracts.The polarity of glioma cells containing GSCs was parallel to the white matter tracts.Conclusions Our data suggest that CD133+ GSCs exhibit more aggressive invasion in vitro and GSCs in vivo probably disseminate along the long axis of blood vessels and transit through the white matter tracts.The therapies targeting GSCs invasion combined with traditional glioblastoma multiforme therapeutic paradigms might be a new approach for avoiding malignant glioma recurrence.

  12. A practical algorithm for optimal operation management of distribution network including fuel cell power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, Taher; Meymand, Hamed Zeinoddini; Nayeripour, Majid [Electrical and Electronic Engineering Department, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran)

    2010-08-15

    Fuel cell power plants (FCPPs) have been taken into a great deal of consideration in recent years. The continuing growth of the power demand together with environmental constraints is increasing interest to use FCPPs in power system. Since FCPPs are usually connected to distribution network, the effect of FCPPs on distribution network is more than other sections of power system. One of the most important issues in distribution networks is optimal operation management (OOM) which can be affected by FCPPs. This paper proposes a new approach for optimal operation management of distribution networks including FCCPs. In the article, we consider the total electrical energy losses, the total electrical energy cost and the total emission as the objective functions which should be minimized. Whereas the optimal operation in distribution networks has a nonlinear mixed integer optimization problem, the optimal solution could be obtained through an evolutionary method. We use a new evolutionary algorithm based on Fuzzy Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization (FAPSO) to solve the optimal operation problem and compare this method with Genetic Algorithm (GA), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), Differential Evolution (DE), Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) and Tabu Search (TS) over two distribution test feeders. (author)

  13. Voronoi Cell Patterns: Application of the size distribution to societal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; González, Diego Luis; Pimpinelli, Alberto; Einstein, T. L.

    2012-02-01

    In studying the growth of islands on a surface subjected to a particle flux, we found it useful to characterize the distribution of the areas of associated Voronoi (proximity or Wigner-Seitz) cells in terms of the generalized Wigner surmiseootnotetextAP & TLE, PRL 99 (2007) 226102; PRL 104 (2010) 149602 and the gamma distributions. Here we show that the same concepts and distributions are useful in analyzing several problems arising in society.ootnotetextDLG et al., arXiv 1109.3994; RS, Ph.D. dissertation; RS et al., preprint We analyze the 1D problem of the distribution of gaps between parked cars, assuming that successive cars park in the middle of vacant spaces, and compare with published data. We study the formation of second-level administrative divisions, e.g. French arrondissements. We study the actual distribution of arrondissements and the Voronoi tessellation associated with the chief town in each. While generally applicable, there are subtleties in some cases. Lastly, we consider the pattern formed by Paris M'etro stations and show that near the central area, the associated Voronoi construction also has this sort of distribution.

  14. Current density distribution in cylindrical Li-Ion cells during impedance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osswald, P. J.; Erhard, S. V.; Noel, A.; Keil, P.; Kindermann, F. M.; Hoster, H.; Jossen, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, modified commercial cylindrical lithium-ion cells with multiple separate current tabs are used to analyze the influence of tab pattern, frequency and temperature on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In a first step, the effect of different current tab arrangements on the impedance spectra is analyzed and possible electrochemical causes are discussed. In a second step, one terminal is used to apply a sinusoidal current while the other terminals are used to monitor the local potential distribution at different positions along the electrodes of the cell. It is observed that the characteristic decay of the voltage amplitude along the electrode changes non-linearly with frequency, where high-frequent currents experience a stronger attenuation along the current collector than low-frequent currents. In further experiments, the decay characteristic is controlled by the cell temperature, driven by the increasing resistance of the current collector and the enhanced kinetic and transport properties of the active material and electrolyte. Measurements indicate that the ac current distribution depends strongly on the frequency and the temperature. In this context, the challenges for electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as cell diagnostic technique for commercial cells are discussed.

  15. Measuring Slit Width and Separation in a Diffraction Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, K. K.; Law, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for measuring slit width and separation in single- and double-slit diffraction experiments. Intensity spectra of diffracted laser light are measured with an optical sensor (PIN diode). Slit widths and separations are extracted by fitting to the measured spectra. We present a simple fitting procedure to account for the…

  16. Finite-width plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic multilayer cladding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Ishii, Satoshi;

    2015-01-01

    homogenization, we calculate the resonant eigenmodes of the finite-width cladding layers, and find agreement with the resonant features in the dispersion of the cladded waveguides. We show that at the resonant widths, the propagating modes of the waveguides are coupled to the cladding eigenmodes and hence...

  17. Quantifying River Widths of North America from Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G. H.; Pavelsky, T.; Miller, Z.

    2013-12-01

    River width is a fundamental predictor variable in many hydrologic, geomorphic, and biogeochemical models, yet current large-scale models rely on theoretical hydraulic geometry relationships that do not fully capture natural variability in river form. Here we present the first high-resolution dataset of long-term mean width of North American rivers wider than 30 m. The dataset contains 7.93 million georeferenced width measurements derived from Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery that were acquired when rivers were most likely to be at mean discharge. We built the dataset by developing an automated procedure that selects and downloads raw imagery, creates cloud-free normalized difference water index images, histogram balances and mosaics them together, and produces a water mask using a dynamic water-land threshold technique. We then visually inspected and corrected the mask for errors and used RivWidth software to calculate river width at each river centerline pixel. We validated our dataset using >1000 United States Geological Survey and Water Survey of Canada in situ gauge station measurements. Error analysis shows a robust relationship between the remotely sensed widths and in situ gauge measurements with an r 2 = 0.86 (Spearman's = 0.81) and a mean absolute error of 27.5 m. We find that North American river widths lie on logarithmic frequency curve with some notable exceptions at widths SWOT) satellite mission.

  18. Average widths of anisotropic Besov-Wiener classes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper concerns the problem of average σ-K width and average σ-L width of some anisotropic Besov-Wiener classes Srp q θb(Rd) and Srp q θB(Rd) in Lq(Rd) (1≤q≤p<∞). The weak asymptotic behavior is established for the corresponding quantities.

  19. Average widths of anisotropic Besov-Wiener classes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋艳杰

    2000-01-01

    This paper concems the problem of average σ-K width and average σ-L width of some anisotropic Besov-wiener classes Spqθr(Rd) and Spqθr(Rd) in Lq(Rd) (1≤≤q≤p<∞). The weak asymptotic behavior is established for the corresponding quantities.

  20. A direct and at nanometer scale study of electrical charge distribution on membranes of alive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlière Christian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented an innovative method to map in-vivo and at nanometer scale the electrical charge distribution on membranes of alive cells. It relies on a new atomic force microscopy (AFM mode based on an electro-mechanical coupling effect. Furthermore, an additional electrical signal detected by both the deflection of the AFM cantilever and simultaneous direct current measurements was detected at low scanning rates. It was attributed to the detection of the current stemming from ionic channels. It opens a new way to directly investigate in situ biological electrical surface processes involved in bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation, microbial fuel cells, etc.

  1. Spatiotemporal analysis of endocytosis and membrane distribution of fluorescent sterols in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Faergeman, Nils J

    2008-01-01

    proximity to the cell membrane. Spatial surface intensity patterns of DHE as well as that of the lipid marker DiIC12 being assessed by statistical image analysis persisted over several minutes in cells having a constant overall curvature. Sites of sterol endocytosis appeared indistinguishable from other...... (CTL) combined with advanced image analysis were used to study spatiotemporal sterol distribution in living macrophages, adipocytes and fibroblasts. Sterol endocytosis was directly visualized by time-lapse imaging and noise-robust tracking revealing confined motion of DHE containing vesicles in close...

  2. Recombinant human erythropoietin increases cerebral cortical width index and neurogenesis following ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongmin Wen; Peiji Wang

    2012-01-01

    The cerebral cortical expansion index refers to the ratio between left and right cortex width and is recognized as an indicator for cortical hyperplasia. Cerebral ischemia was established in CB-17 mice in the present study, and the mice were subsequently treated with recombinant human erythropoietin via subcutaneous injection. Results demonstrated that cerebral cortical width index significantly increased. Immunofluorescence detection showed that the number of nuclear antigen antibody/5-bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells at the infarction edge significantly increased. Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between neurological scores and cortical width indices in rats following ischemic stroke. These experimental findings suggested that recombinant human erythropoietin promoted cerebral cortical hyperplasia, increased cortical neurogenesis, and enhanced functional recovery following ischemic stroke.

  3. Crack widths in concrete with fibers and main reinforcement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Frede; Ulfkjær, Jens Peder; Brincker, Rune

    The main object of the research work presented in this paper is to establish design tools for concrete structures where main reinforcement is combined with addition of short discrete steel fibers. The work is concerned with calculating and measuring crack widths in structural elements subjected...... to bending load. Thus, the aim of the work is to enable engineers to calculate crack widths for flexural concrete members and analyze how different combinations of amounts of fibers and amounts of main reinforcement can meet a given maximum crack width requirement. A mathematical model including...... the ductility of the fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) is set up and experimental work is conducted in order to verify the crack width model. The ductility of the FRC is taken into account by using the stress crack width relation. The constitutive model for the FRC is based on the idea that the initial part...

  4. Distribution, Arrangement and Interconnectedness of Cell Surface Receptor sites in the body of an Organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utoh-Nedosa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell surface receptors have been identified as the sites of disease infectivity in living organisms in a previous study. Drugs used for the treatment or cure of infections have to eliminate infections through attacking infective organisms at the cell surface receptors to which the infective organisms are attached. Problem statement: The present study examines a wide sample of living things to get more information on the relationship of one cell surface receptor to other cell surface receptors in the body of an organism. Approach: The arrangement of cell surface receptors on the external covering of a few samples of fruits, leaves, stems, dry wood of a plant; wall gecko and some parts of the human body, were examined and photographed. Transverse and/or Longitudinal sections of soursop fruit and sycamore fruit were also examined and photographed. The five different coverings of the fleshy part of a coconut were also photographed. The photographs were studied to note the relationship of disease infection attached to cell surface receptors on the external surface of an organ to disease infection on the innermost covering of the same organ. Results: The results of the study showed that all living things had ubiquitous distribution of cell surface receptors which are usually observable with the unaided eye as dots or spots on the external covering of an organ, tissue or cell. The dots or receptor sites of cell surface receptors in the study are arranged in lines which were perpendicular, oblique, transverse or arranged in any other lineal geometrical form. The lineally arranged cell surface receptors were noted to be connected by grooves, channels or pipes which joined other receptor channels or intersected with them. Smaller cell surface receptor channels emptied into bigger channels or continued as small sized channels that ran side by side in a connective tissue bundle. These connective tissue bundles that carried many independent small-sized cell

  5. Distribution of Chromosome Breakpoints in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed to Low- and High-LET Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is not only its ability to identify simultaneously both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges, but also the ability to measure the breakpoint location along the length of the chromosome in a precision that is unmatched with other traditional banding techniques. Breakpoints on specific regions of a chromosome have been known to associate with specific cancers. The breakpoint distribution in cells after low- and high-LET radiation exposures will also provide the data for biophysical modeling of the chromatin structure, as well as the data for the modeling the formation of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. In a series of experiments, we studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations using the mBAND technique with chromosome 3 painted in 23 different colored bands. Human epithelial cells (CH1 84B5F5/M10) were exposed in vitro to Cs- 137 rays at both low and high dose rates, secondary neutrons with a broad energy spectrum at a low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions at a high dose rate. The data of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations involving the painted chromosome have been reported previously. Here we present data of the location of the chromosome breaks along the length of chromosome 3 in the cells after exposures to each of the four radiation scenarios. In comparison to the expected breakpoint distribution based on the length of the bands, the observed distribution appeared to be non-random for both the low- and high-LET radiations. In particular, hot spots towards both ends of the chromosome were found after low-LET irradiations of either low or high dose rates. For both high-LET radiation types (Fe ions and neutrons), the breakpoint distributions were similar, and were much smoother than that for low-LET radiation. The dependence of the breakpoint distribution on the radiation quality requires further investigations.

  6. A Preliminary Study on the Radiation dose Distribution in the Pyroprocess Hot Cell Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chankyu; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Giyoon; Lee, Eunjoong; Lee, Jeong Tae; Cho, Gyuseong [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seongkyu; Park, Sehwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Pyroprocessing is the promising technology for treatment of spent fuels. Because it is based on the collective recovery of TRU, it has an advantage in proliferation resistance compared to conventional aqueous processes. Development of pyroprocessing has positive effects to the public through reduction of the high-level radioactive waste and the effective use of energy resources. In Korea, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has researched pyroprocessing since 1997. The engineering scale integrated inactive pyroprocess facility (PRIDE) was constructed and test operation has been performed. A study on the preliminary conceptual design and cost estimation for a larger-scale model facility is in progress. The safeguards are essential in the pyroprocessing facility for proliferation resistance. To establish the reliable safeguards, the preliminary studies on radiation resistance requirements, assessment of the safeguards system applicability, and shielding of the safeguards equipment are required. Therefore, first of all, the radiation flux and dose distribution in hot cell environment have to be studied. The previous studies focused on the neutron flux at the pyroprocessing however they are limited to the individual unit process. In this study, the flux and dose distribution of neutron and gamma-ray in the hot cell environment of the pilot pyroprocessing facility are investigated. Based on the simplified material flow of pyroprocess, the material distribution model is established. In this study, the radiation flux and dose distribution in the hot cell environment of the pilot-scale pyroprocessing facility model is investigated preliminarily by the MCNP6 simulation. Based on the established material flow model, the material composition at each stage is calculated and used for the simulation. The simple hot cell structure and process batch size were assumed based on the previous studies.

  7. Electrical design and simulation of kinetic piezoelectric harvester for distributed control cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcola, Essodong; Rakotondrabe, Micky; Ouisse, Morvan; Bartasyte, Ausrine

    2016-05-01

    This paper deals with the design, the modeling and the simulation of two electrical circuits devoted to kinetic piezoelectric energy harvesters for powering distributed control cells. Two schemes are proposed, analyzed and discussed: the first is a based on classical electrical stages, and the second integrates a novel multiplier/rectifier stage which permits to reduce the voltage loss. Simulation and experimental tests are carried out and demonstrate the advantage of the second scheme relative to the first one.

  8. The influence of sulcus width on simulated electric fields induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, A. M.; Rampersad, S. M.; Lucka, F.; Lanfer, B.; Lew, S.; Aydin, Ü.; Wolters, C. H.; Stegeman, D. F.; Oostendorp, T. F.

    2013-07-01

    Volume conduction models can help in acquiring knowledge about the distribution of the electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation. One aspect of a detailed model is an accurate description of the cortical surface geometry. Since its estimation is difficult, it is important to know how accurate the geometry has to be represented. Previous studies only looked at the differences caused by neglecting the complete boundary between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and grey matter (Thielscher et al 2011 NeuroImage 54 234-43, Bijsterbosch et al 2012 Med. Biol. Eng. Comput. 50 671-81), or by resizing the whole brain (Wagner et al 2008 Exp. Brain Res. 186 539-50). However, due to the high conductive properties of the CSF, it can be expected that alterations in sulcus width can already have a significant effect on the distribution of the electric field. To answer this question, the sulcus width of a highly realistic head model, based on T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images, was altered systematically. This study shows that alterations in the sulcus width do not cause large differences in the majority of the electric field values. However, considerable overestimation of sulcus width produces an overestimation of the calculated field strength, also at locations distant from the target location.

  9. Quantitative Changes in Microtubule Distribution Correlate with Guard Cell Function in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William R. Eisinger; Viktor Kirik; Charlotte Lewis; David W. Ehrhardt; Winslow R. Briggs

    2012-01-01

    Radially arranged cortical microtubules are a prominent feature of guard cells.We observed guard cells expressing GFP-tubulin (GFP-TUA6) with confocal microscopy and found recognizable changes in the appearance of microtubules when stomata open or close (Eisinger et al.,2012).In the present study,analysis of fluorescence distribution showed a dramatic increase in peak intensities of microtubule bundles within guard cells as stomata open.This increase was correlated with an increase in the total fluorescence that could be attributed to polymerized tubulin.Adjacent pavement cells did not show similar changes in peak intensities or integrated fluorescence when stomatal apertures changed.Imaging of RFP-tagged end binding protein 1 (EB1) and YFP-tagged α-tubulin expressed in the same cell revealed that the number of microtubules with growing ends remained constant,although the total amount of polymerized tubulin was higher in open than in closed guard cells.Taken together,these results indicate that the changes in microtubule array organization that are correlated with and required for normal guard cell function are characterized by changes in microtubule clustering or bundling.

  10. [Distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Ping; Wu, Ren-Na; Guo, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Hu

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells(MSC) marked with lentiviral plasmid pGC FU-RFP-LV in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse. The MSC were infected by lentivirus with infection efficiency 78%, the infected MSC were injected into BALB/c mice via tail veins in concentration of 1×10(6) /mouse. The mice were randomly divided into 4 group according to 4 time points as 1, 2, 5 and 7 days. The lung tissue and bone marrow were taken and made of frozen sections and smears respectively in order to observed the distributions of MSC. The results indicated that the lentiviral infected MSC displayed phenotypes and biological characteristics which conformed to MSC by immunophenotyping analysis and induction differentiation detection. After the MSC were infected with optimal viral titer MOI = 50, the cell growth no significantly changed; the fluorescent microscopy revealed that the distributions of MSC in bone marrow on day 1, 2, 5 and 7 were 0.50 ± 0.20, 0.67 ± 0.23, 0.53 ± 0.14, 0.33 ± 0.16; those in lung tissue were 0.55 ± 0.15, 0.47 ± 0.13, 0.29 ± 0.13, 0.26 ± 0.08. It is concluded that the distribution of MSC in lung tissue reaches a peak on day 1, while distribution of MSC in bone marrow reaches a peak on day 2. The distribution of mouse MSC relates with RFP gene expression and implantation of MSC in lung tissue and bone marrow.

  11. Assessment of dye distribution in sensitized solar cells by microprobe techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiros, M.A., E-mail: alexandra.barreiros@lneg.pt [Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, LEN/UES, Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Corregidor, V. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Alves, L.C. [C2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Guimarães, F. [Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, LGM/UCTM, Rua da Amieira, Apartado 1089, 4466-901 S. Mamede de Infesta (Portugal); Mascarenhas, J.; Torres, E.; Brites, M.J. [Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, LEN/UES, Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-04-01

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have received considerable attention once this technology offers economic and environmental advantages over conventional photovoltaic (PV) devices. The PV performance of a DSC relies on the characteristics of its photoanode, which typically consists of a nanocrystalline porous TiO{sub 2} film, enabled with a large adsorptive surface area. Dye molecules that capture photons from light during device operation are attached to the film nanoparticles. The effective loading of the dye in the TiO{sub 2} electrode is of paramount relevance for controlling and optimizing solar cell parameters. Relatively few methods are known today for quantitative evaluation of the total dye adsorbed on the film. In this context, microprobe techniques come out as suitable tools to evaluate the dye surface distribution and depth profile in sensitized films. Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA) and Ion Beam Analytical (IBA) techniques using a micro-ion beam were used to quantify and to study the distribution of the Ru organometallic dye in TiO{sub 2} films, making use of the different penetration depth and beam sizes of each technique. Different 1D nanostructured TiO{sub 2} films were prepared, morphologically characterized by SEM, sensitized and analyzed by the referred techniques. Dye load evaluation in different TiO{sub 2} films by three different techniques (PIXE, RBS and EPMA/WDS) provided similar results of Ru/Ti mass fraction ratio. Moreover, it was possible to assess dye surface distribution and its depth profile, by means of Ru signal, and to visualize the dye distribution in sample cross-section through X-ray mapping by EPMA/EDS. PIXE maps of Ru and Ti indicated an homogeneous surface distribution. The assessment of Ru depth profile by RBS showed that some films have homogeneous Ru depth distribution while others present different Ru concentration in the top layer (2 μm thickness). These results are consistent with the EPMA/EDS maps obtained.

  12. Lateral current effects on the voltage distribution in the emitter of solar cells under concentrated sunlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Acevedo, Arturo [CINVESTAV-IPN, Electrical Engineering Department, Avenida IPN No. 2508, 07360 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2009-04-15

    The design of the grid contact in silicon solar cells is one of the most important steps for the optimization and fabrication of these energy conversion devices. The voltage drop due to the lateral flow of current towards the grid fingers can be a limiting factor causing the reduction of conversion efficiency. For low current levels this voltage drop can be made small, for typical values of sheet resistance in the emitter, but for solar cells made to operate at high sun concentrations this efficiency loss can be important, unless there is a clear vision of the current and voltage distribution so that the emitter and grid design can be improved. Hence, it is important to establish and solve the current and voltage distribution equations for solar cells with a grid contact. In this work, first these equations are established and then they are solved in order to show the effects that the lateral current flow in the emitter cause on the voltage distribution, particularly at high illumination levels. In addition, it will be shown that the open circuit voltage is significantly reduced due to the lateral current flow as compared to the value predicted from a simple equivalent circuit with a lumped resistance model. (author)

  13. Evaluation of production and distribution of oxidative DNA damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in human leukemia HL-60 cells was examined upon irradiation with carbon, neon, silicon and iron ions over an linear energy transfer (LET) range from 20 keV/μm to 440 keV/μm under hypoxic conditions. 8-OHdG was detected by HPLC in combination with an electro-chemical detector after extraction of DNA from irradiated cells. The yield strongly depends on ion species. For every ion, the yield appeared not to decrease monotonically but approach constant level or rather increase with increasing LET. This observation is consistent with the oxygen-in-the-track model where oxygen molecules are supposed to be produced along ion tracks. In order to visualize the distribution of 8-OHdG along ion tracks we tried to image 8-OHdG distribution in human A549 cells using FITC-labeled 8-OHdG antibody for carbon, neon, silicon and iron ions with no fragmentation. At a dose as small as 5 Gy, 8-OHdG was detected for every ion. In the case of iron, discrete distribution was observed, which probably indicated the radical formation along ion tracks. (author)

  14. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban R Fernández

    Full Text Available Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  15. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Esteban R; Olivera, Gabriela C; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P; González, Mariela N; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  16. Complexity of the tensegrity structure for dynamic energy and force distribution of cytoskeleton during cell spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Jung; Wu, Chia-Ching; Tang, Ming-Jer; Huang, Jong-Shin; Su, Fong-Chin

    2010-01-01

    Cytoskeleton plays important roles in intracellular force equilibrium and extracellular force transmission from/to attaching substrate through focal adhesions (FAs). Numerical simulations of intracellular force distribution to describe dynamic cell behaviors are still limited. The tensegrity structure comprises tension-supporting cables and compression-supporting struts that represent the actin filament and microtubule respectively, and has many features consistent with living cells. To simulate the dynamics of intracellular force distribution and total stored energy during cell spreading, the present study employed different complexities of the tensegrity structures by using octahedron tensegrity (OT) and cuboctahedron tensegrity (COT). The spreading was simulated by assigning specific connection nodes for radial displacement and attachment to substrate to form FAs. The traction force on each FA was estimated by summarizing the force carried in sounding cytoskeletal elements. The OT structure consisted of 24 cables and 6 struts and had limitations soon after the beginning of spreading by declining energy stored in struts indicating the abolishment of compression in microtubules. The COT structure, double the amount of cables and struts than the OT structure, provided sufficient spreading area and expressed similar features with documented cell behaviors. The traction force pointed inward on peripheral FAs in the spread out COT structure. The complex structure in COT provided further investigation of various FA number during different spreading stages. Before the middle phase of spreading (half of maximum spreading area), cell attachment with 8 FAs obtained minimized cytoskeletal energy. The maximum number of 12 FAs in the COT structure was required to achieve further spreading. The stored energy in actin filaments increased as cells spread out, while the energy stored in microtubules increased at initial spreading, peaked in middle phase, and then declined as

  17. Complexity of the tensegrity structure for dynamic energy and force distribution of cytoskeleton during cell spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Jung Chen

    Full Text Available Cytoskeleton plays important roles in intracellular force equilibrium and extracellular force transmission from/to attaching substrate through focal adhesions (FAs. Numerical simulations of intracellular force distribution to describe dynamic cell behaviors are still limited. The tensegrity structure comprises tension-supporting cables and compression-supporting struts that represent the actin filament and microtubule respectively, and has many features consistent with living cells. To simulate the dynamics of intracellular force distribution and total stored energy during cell spreading, the present study employed different complexities of the tensegrity structures by using octahedron tensegrity (OT and cuboctahedron tensegrity (COT. The spreading was simulated by assigning specific connection nodes for radial displacement and attachment to substrate to form FAs. The traction force on each FA was estimated by summarizing the force carried in sounding cytoskeletal elements. The OT structure consisted of 24 cables and 6 struts and had limitations soon after the beginning of spreading by declining energy stored in struts indicating the abolishment of compression in microtubules. The COT structure, double the amount of cables and struts than the OT structure, provided sufficient spreading area and expressed similar features with documented cell behaviors. The traction force pointed inward on peripheral FAs in the spread out COT structure. The complex structure in COT provided further investigation of various FA number during different spreading stages. Before the middle phase of spreading (half of maximum spreading area, cell attachment with 8 FAs obtained minimized cytoskeletal energy. The maximum number of 12 FAs in the COT structure was required to achieve further spreading. The stored energy in actin filaments increased as cells spread out, while the energy stored in microtubules increased at initial spreading, peaked in middle phase, and then

  18. Distribution of T Cells in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Skin and Responsiveness to Viral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Esther; Granja, Aitor G.; Zarza, Carlos; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Although the skin constitutes the first line of defense against waterborne pathogens, there is a great lack of information regarding the skin associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) and whether immune components of the skin are homogeneously distributed through the surface of the fish is still unknown. In the current work, we have analyzed the transcription of several immune genes throughout different rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin areas. We found that immunoglobulin and chemokine gene transcription levels were higher in a skin area close to the gills. Furthermore, this skin area as well as other anterior sections also transcribed significantly higher levels of many different immune genes related to T cell immunity such as T cell receptor α (TCRα), TCRγ, CD3, CD4, CD8, perforin, GATA3, Tbet, FoxP3, interferon γ (IFNγ), CD40L and Eomes in comparison to posterior skin sections. In agreement with these results, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that anterior skin areas had a higher concentration of CD3+ T cells and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes was also higher in anterior skin sections. These results demonstrate for the first time that T cells are not homogeneously distributed throughout the teleost skin. Additionally, we studied the transcriptional regulation of these and additional T cell markers in response to a bath infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). We found that VHSV regulated the transcription of several of these T cell markers in both the skin and the spleen; with some differences between anterior and posterior skin sections. Altogether, our results point to skin T cells as major players of teleost skin immunity in response to waterborne viral infections. PMID:26808410

  19. Ex vivo Expansion of Human Adult Pancreatic Cells with Properties of Distributed Stem Cells by Suppression of Asymmetric Cell Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Paré, JF; Sherley, JL

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation therapy for type I diabetes (T1D) might be improved if pancreatic stem cells were readily available for investigation. Unlike macroscopic islets, pancreatic tissue stem cells could more easily access the retroperitoneal pancreatic environment and thereby might achieve more effective pancreatic regeneration. Unfortunately, whether the adult pancreas actually contains renewing stem cells continues as a controversial issue in diabetes research. We evaluated a new method developed...

  20. Climatology Applied To Architecture: An Experimental Investigation about Internal Temperatures Distribution at Two Test Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Tibério Cardoso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Data were analyzed en relative spatial distribution of the internal surface temperature (IST and internal air temperature or dry bulb (TBS, in two different test cells, for a typical experimental day under the influence of tropical mass. The main goal of this research is to provide guidelines to collect temperature data experimentally since there is not an appropriate standard to guide this methodological procedure in buildings. The data series of dry bulb temperature and internal surface temperatures were measured in a test cell with a green roof and the other with conventional ceramic roof by thermocouples installed at predetermined locations. The data of solar radiation and the main climatic variables were recorded by the automatic weather station at the Center of Science Engineering Applied to the Environment (CCEAMA, School of Engineering of São Carlos (EESC-USP. The results led to the conclusion that the distribution of the internal surface temperature is almost uniform in the two test cells, but in relation to the dry bulb temperature there is a small vertical temperature gradient in the conventional cell. This work will contribute significantly to future studies in the area of human comfort and environmental suitability of buildings

  1. Current Density Distribution Mapping in PEM Fuel Cells as An Instrument for Operational Measurements

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    Martin Geske

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC. Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes.

  2. X-ray microimaging of cisplatin distribution in ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyozuka, Yasuhiko; Takemoto, Kuniko; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Guttmann, Peter; Tsubura, Airo; Kihara, Hiroshi

    2000-05-01

    X-ray microscopy has the possibility to be in use for elemental analysis of tissue and cells especially under physiological conditions with high lateral resolution. In X-ray microimaging cisdiamminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin: CDDP), an anticancer agent, which has a platinum atom at its functional center gives sufficient contrast against organic material at sub-cellular level. We analyzed the enhance effect and intracellular distribution of CDDP in human ovarian cancer cells with the transmission X-ray microscope at BESSY, Berlin. Two human ovarian cancer cell lines (MN-1 and EC) were treated with 1 and 10 μg/ml of CDDP for 4 hours and compared with untreated cells X-ray images of CDDP-treated samples show clearly labeled nucleoli, periphery of the nucleus and mitochondria, in a concentration-dependent manner. CDDP binds to DNA molecules via the formation of intra- or-inter-strand cross-links. Higher contrasts at the periphery of nucleus and nucleoli suggest the distribution of tightly packed heterochromatin. In addition, results show the possibility that CDDP binds to mitochondrial DNA. Biological function of cisplatin is not only the inhibition of DNA replication but is suggested to disturb mitochondrial function and RNA synthesis in the nucleolus.

  3. Altered subcellular distribution of nucleolar protein fibrillarin by actinomycin D in Hep-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min CHEN; Ping JIANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of actinomycin D on subcellular distribution of nucleolar protein fibrillarin in HEp-2(human esophageal epithelial type 2) cells, and molecular mechanisms for maintenance of fibrillarin in nucleolus.METHODS: Indirect immunofiuorescence assay was employed to investigate subcellular distribution of nucleolar protein fibrillarin and immunoblotting analysis was used to detect the total cellular amount of fibrillarin. RESULTS:Control cells with no drug treatment showed bright clumpy nucleolar staining, which indicated that fibrillarin decorated the nucleolus only. Treatment with actinomycin D caused dislocation of fibrillarin from nucleoli to nucleoplasm with numerous stained small nucleoplasmic entities. Immunoblotting showed that neither total cellular amount of fibrillarin nor the integrity of fibrillarin was changed upon the treatment. The dislocation of fibrillarin in cells treated at a lower concentration (0.05 mg/L) of actinomycin D, was totally reversible after removal of the drug from the medium. However, this reversion was not observed at a high drug concentration (1 mg/L). CONCLUSION:Actinomycin D induced dislocation of fibrillarin from nucleoli to nucleoplasm in HEp-2 cells. The retention of fibrillarin within the nucleolus was related to active RNA synthesis.

  4. Distributed coupling and multi-frequency microwave accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Li, Zenghai; Borchard, Philipp

    2016-07-05

    A microwave circuit for a linear accelerator has multiple metallic cell sections, a pair of distribution waveguide manifolds, and a sequence of feed arms connecting the manifolds to the cell sections. The distribution waveguide manifolds are connected to the cell sections so that alternating pairs of cell sections are connected to opposite distribution waveguide manifolds. The distribution waveguide manifolds have concave modifications of their walls opposite the feed arms, and the feed arms have portions of two distinct widths. In some embodiments, the distribution waveguide manifolds are connected to the cell sections by two different types of junctions adapted to allow two frequency operation. The microwave circuit may be manufactured by making two quasi-identical parts, and joining the two parts to form the microwave circuit, thereby allowing for many manufacturing techniques including electron beam welding, and thereby allowing the use of un-annealled copper alloys, and hence greater tolerance to high gradient operation.

  5. Placement of Combined Heat, Power and Hydrogen Production Fuel Cell Power Plants in a Distribution Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Bahmanifirouzi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new Fuzzy Adaptive Modified Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (FAMPSO for the placement of Fuel Cell Power Plants (FCPPs in distribution systems. FCPPs, as Distributed Generation (DG units, can be considered as Combined sources of Heat, Power, and Hydrogen (CHPH. CHPH operation of FCPPs can improve overall system efficiency, as well as produce hydrogen which can be stored for the future use of FCPPs or can be sold for profit. The objective functions investigated are minimizing the operating costs of electrical energy generation of distribution substations and FCPPs, minimizing the voltage deviation and minimizing the total emission. In this regard, this paper just considers the placement of CHPH FCPPs while investment cost of devices is not considered. Considering the fact that the objectives are different, non-commensurable and nonlinear, it is difficult to solve the problem using conventional approaches that may optimize a single objective. Moreover, the placement of FCPPs in distribution systems is a mixed integer problem. Therefore, this paper uses the FAMPSO algorithm to overcome these problems. For solving the proposed multi-objective problem, this paper utilizes the Pareto Optimality idea to obtain a set of solution in the multi-objective problem instead of only one. Also, a fuzzy system is used to tune parameters of FAMPSO algorithm such as inertia weight. The efficacy of the proposed approach is validated on a 69-bus distribution system.

  6. Width of gene expression profile drives alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wegmann

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates an enormous amount of functional and proteomic diversity in metazoan organisms. This process is probably central to the macromolecular and cellular complexity of higher eukaryotes. While most studies have focused on the molecular mechanism triggering and controlling alternative splicing, as well as on its incidence in different species, its maintenance and evolution within populations has been little investigated. Here, we propose to address these questions by comparing the structural characteristics as well as the functional and transcriptional profiles of genes with monomorphic or polymorphic splicing, referred to as MS and PS genes, respectively. We find that MS and PS genes differ particularly in the number of tissues and cell types where they are expressed.We find a striking deficit of PS genes on the sex chromosomes, particularly on the Y chromosome where it is shown not to be due to the observed lower breadth of expression of genes on that chromosome. The development of a simple model of evolution of cis-regulated alternative splicing leads to predictions in agreement with these observations. It further predicts the conditions for the emergence and the maintenance of cis-regulated alternative splicing, which are both favored by the tissue specific expression of splicing variants. We finally propose that the width of the gene expression profile is an essential factor for the acquisition of new transcript isoforms that could later be maintained by a new form of balancing selection.

  7. Quantitative analysis of organelle distribution and dynamics in Physcomitrella patens protonemal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furt Fabienne

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last decade, the moss Physcomitrella patens has emerged as a powerful plant model system, amenable for genetic manipulations not possible in any other plant. This moss is particularly well suited for plant polarized cell growth studies, as in its protonemal phase, expansion is restricted to the tip of its cells. Based on pollen tube and root hair studies, it is well known that tip growth requires active secretion and high polarization of the cellular components. However, such information is still missing in Physcomitrella patens. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the participation of organelle organization in tip growth, it is essential to determine the distribution and the dynamics of the organelles in moss cells. Results We used fluorescent protein fusions to visualize and track Golgi dictyosomes, mitochondria, and peroxisomes in live protonemal cells. We also visualized and tracked chloroplasts based on chlorophyll auto-fluorescence. We showed that in protonemata all four organelles are distributed in a gradient from the tip of the apical cell to the base of the sub-apical cell. For example, the density of Golgi dictyosomes is 4.7 and 3.4 times higher at the tip than at the base in caulonemata and chloronemata respectively. While Golgi stacks are concentrated at the extreme tip of the caulonemata, chloroplasts and peroxisomes are totally excluded. Interestingly, caulonemata, which grow faster than chloronemata, also contain significantly more Golgi dictyosomes and fewer chloroplasts than chloronemata. Moreover, the motility analysis revealed that organelles in protonemata move with low persistency and average instantaneous speeds ranging from 29 to 75 nm/s, which are at least three orders of magnitude slower than those of pollen tube or root hair organelles. Conclusions To our knowledge, this study reports the first quantitative analysis of organelles in Physcomitrella patens and will make possible

  8. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya V Bolkhovskaya

    Full Text Available Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing data. For 41 healthy individuals and a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, who undergone treatment, we invariably find power law scaling over several decades and for the first time calculate quantitatively meaningful values of decay exponent. It has proved to be much the same among healthy donors, significantly different for an autoimmune patient before the therapy, and converging towards a typical value afterwards. We discuss implications of the findings for theoretical understanding and mathematical modeling of adaptive immunity.

  9. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkhovskaya, Olesya V; Zorin, Daniil Yu; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing data. For 41 healthy individuals and a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, who undergone treatment, we invariably find power law scaling over several decades and for the first time calculate quantitatively meaningful values of decay exponent. It has proved to be much the same among healthy donors, significantly different for an autoimmune patient before the therapy, and converging towards a typical value afterwards. We discuss implications of the findings for theoretical understanding and mathematical modeling of adaptive immunity. PMID:25275470

  10. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkhovskaya, Olesya V; Zorin, Daniil Yu; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing data. For 41 healthy individuals and a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, who undergone treatment, we invariably find power law scaling over several decades and for the first time calculate quantitatively meaningful values of decay exponent. It has proved to be much the same among healthy donors, significantly different for an autoimmune patient before the therapy, and converging towards a typical value afterwards. We discuss implications of the findings for theoretical understanding and mathematical modeling of adaptive immunity.

  11. The distribution of microtubules in differentiating cells of Micrasterias denticulata bréb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiermayer, O

    1968-09-01

    As an extension of earlier cytophysiological and morphological studies on differentiating cells of Micrasterias denticulata, a fine structural investigation of glutaraldehyde-osmium tetroxide fixed material has been made. Special emphasis has been placed on the distribution of cytoplasmic microtubules and on their possible role in the processes of growth and differentiation. Four distinct systems of microtubules were found: (a) a band in the cortical protoplasm of the isthmus region which surrounds the nucleus; (b) several bands in the cortical protoplasm of the old half cells, with rod-like cross bridges between individual microtubules and between the microtubules and the plasmalemma; (c) clusters of microtubules near the posttelophase nucleus, some separated by "intertubular structures" possibly fibrils; and (d) microtubules in the internal and cortical protoplasm of differentiating half cells. PMID:24519210

  12. Step width alters iliotibial band strain during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meardon, Stacey A; Campbell, Samuel; Derrick, Timothy R

    2012-11-01

    This study assessed the effect of step width during running on factors related to iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematics and kinetics were recorded from 15 healthy recreational runners during overground running under various step width conditions (preferred and at least +/- 5% of their leg length). Strain and strain rate were estimated from a musculoskeletal model of the lower extremity. Greater ITB strain and strain rate were found in the narrower step width condition (p < 0.001, p = 0.040). ITB strain was significantly (p < 0.001) greater in the narrow condition than the preferred and wide conditions and it was greater in the preferred condition than the wide condition. ITB strain rate was significantly greater in the narrow condition than the wide condition (p = 0.020). Polynomial contrasts revealed a linear increase in both ITB strain and strain rate with decreasing step width. We conclude that relatively small decreases in step width can substantially increase ITB strain as well as strain rates. Increasing step width during running, especially in persons whose running style is characterized by a narrow step width, may be beneficial in the treatment and prevention of running-related ITB syndrome.

  13. Lumped series resistance of solar cells as a result of distributed sheet resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolić, Saša; Križaj, Dejan; Amon, Slavko

    1993-04-01

    An analysis of solar cell distributed sheet resistance is performed by solving the nonlinear Poisson equation for the surface potential. Two different approaches to lumped series resistance are discussed: equivalent series resistance RSeq obtained from the cell's equivalent circuit that satisfies the actual current of the cell (all other parameters in the equivalent circuit except the series resistance are kept constant) and Joule series resistance RSJ obtained from the Joule losses in the emitter of the cell. It is observed that the I( U) characteristic obtained from the equivalent circuit that includes RSJ generally disagrees with the actual I( U) characteristic of the solar cell. An additional series resistance RSadd should be introduced in series with RSJ. Series resistances RSJ, Sadd and RSeq are analyzed numerically in one and two dimensions for different conditions of terminal voltage, illumination and weighted sheet resistance Rshb2, where b is related to the geometry of the analyzed cell. Following the derivations and the results of the numerical analysis it can be concluded that wherever RSJ varies as a function of terminal voltage, RSadd should be taken into consideration.

  14. Isolation of dihydrocurcuminoids from cell clumps and their distribution in various parts of turmeric (Curcuma longa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Tomoko; Imai, Shinsuke; Sawada, Hiroshi; Seto, Haruo

    2009-05-01

    In addition to well-known curcuminoids, three colored metabolites were isolated from cultured cell clumps that had been induced from buds on turmeric rhizomes. The isolated compounds were identified as dihydro derivatives of curcuminoids, dihydrocurcumin (dihydroCurc), dihydrodesmethoxycurcumin-a (dihydroDMC-a), and dihydrobisdesmethoxycurcumin (dihydroBDMC). The cell clumps did not contain dihydroDMC-b, an isomer of dihydroDMC-a. A comparison of the distribution profiles of curcuminoids and dihydrocurcuminoids in the cell clumps with those in the rhizomes, leaves, and roots revealed the following differences: Unlike rhizomes, the cell clumps, leaves, and roots contained dihydrocurcuminoids as the major colored constituents. Whereas dimethoxy compounds, curcumin and dihydrocurcumin, respectively, were most abundant in the rhizomes and leaves, one of the monomethoxy derivatives, dihydroDMC-a, was found most abundantly in the cell clumps and roots. While both dihydroDMC-a and b were detected in the rhizomes, dihydroDMC-b was not detectable in the cell clumps, leaves, or roots. The occurrence of only one of the two possible isomers of dihydroDMC suggests biosynthetic formation of dihydrocurcuminoids in turmeric.

  15. On spatial distribution of proton radiation belt from solar cell degradation of Akebono satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, W.; Miyoshi, Y.; Matsuoka, A.

    2013-12-01

    Solar cells on any satellite degrade gradually due to severe space radiation environment. We found a fair correlation between the decrease rate of solar cell output current of Akebono satellite orbiting in the inner magnetosphere and trapped proton flux from AP8 model between 1989 and 1992. After 1993, presumably as a result of long-term degradation, variation of solar cell output seems more susceptible to other causes such as high temperature effect, and simple monthly averaged data show no significant relation between them. One of possible causes for the temperature variation of the solar cells is terrestrial heat radiation with changing orientation of solar cell panels towards the earth and another is solar radiation varied with eccentric earth's orbit around the sun. In order to remove the possible temperature effect, we sort the data expected to be least affected by the terrestrial heat radiation from the orbit conditions, and also analyze difference of the output current for a month from that for the same month in the previous year. The analysis method leads us to successfully track a continuous correlation between the decease rate of solar cell output and energetic trapped proton flux up to 1996. We also discuss the best-fitted spatial distribution of energetic protons from comparison with model calculations.

  16. Cell adhesion, multicellular morphology, and magnetosome distribution in the multicellular magnetotactic prokaryote Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Fernanda; Silva, Karen Tavares; Leão, Pedro; Guedes, Iame Alves; Keim, Carolina Neumann; Farina, Marcos; Lins, Ulysses

    2013-06-01

    Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis is an uncultured magnetotactic multicellular prokaryote composed of 17-40 Gram-negative cells that are capable of synthesizing organelles known as magnetosomes. The magnetosomes of Ca. M. multicellularis are composed of greigite and are organized in chains that are responsible for the microorganism's orientation along magnetic field lines. The characteristics of the microorganism, including its multicellular life cycle, magnetic field orientation, and swimming behavior, and the lack of viability of individual cells detached from the whole assembly, are considered strong evidence for the existence of a unique multicellular life cycle among prokaryotes. It has been proposed that the position of each cell within the aggregate is fundamental for the maintenance of its distinctive morphology and magnetic field orientation. However, the cellular organization of the whole organism has never been studied in detail. Here, we investigated the magnetosome organization within a cell, its distribution within the microorganism, and the intercellular relationships that might be responsible for maintaining the cells in the proper position within the microorganism, which is essential for determining the magnetic properties of Ca. M. multicellularis during its life cycle. The results indicate that cellular interactions are essential for the determination of individual cell shape and the magnetic properties of the organism and are likely directly associated with the morphological changes that occur during the multicellular life cycle of this species. PMID:23551897

  17. Respiratory chain complexes in dynamic mitochondria display a patchy distribution in life cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Muster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondria, the main suppliers of cellular energy, are dynamic organelles that fuse and divide frequently. Constraining these processes impairs mitochondrial is closely linked to certain neurodegenerative diseases. It is proposed that functional mitochondrial dynamics allows the exchange of compounds thereby providing a rescue mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The question discussed in this paper is whether fusion and fission of mitochondria in different cell lines result in re-localization of respiratory chain (RC complexes and of the ATP synthase. This was addressed by fusing cells containing mitochondria with respiratory complexes labelled with different fluorescent proteins and resolving their time dependent re-localization in living cells. We found a complete reshuffling of RC complexes throughout the entire chondriome in single HeLa cells within 2-3 h by organelle fusion and fission. Polykaryons of fused cells completely re-mixed their RC complexes in 10-24 h in a progressive way. In contrast to the recently described homogeneous mixing of matrix-targeted proteins or outer membrane proteins, the distribution of RC complexes and ATP synthase in fused hybrid mitochondria, however, was not homogeneous but patterned. Thus, complete equilibration of respiratory chain complexes as integral inner mitochondrial membrane complexes is a slow process compared with matrix proteins probably limited by complete fusion. In co-expressing cells, complex II is more homogenously distributed than complex I and V, resp. Indeed, this result argues for higher mobility and less integration in supercomplexes. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial fusion and fission dynamics favours the re-mixing of all RC complexes within the chondriome. This permanent mixing avoids a static situation with a fixed composition of RC complexes per mitochondrion.

  18. A1 demonstrates restricted tissue distribution during embryonic development and functions to protect against cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrió, R.; López-Hoyos, M.; Jimeno, J.; Benedict, M. A.; Merino, R.; Benito, A.; Fernández-Luna, J. L.; Núñez, G.; García-Porrero, J. A.; Merino, J.

    1996-01-01

    Members of the bcl-2 gene family are essential regulators of cell survival in a wide range of biological processes. A1, a member of the family, is known to be expressed in certain adult tissues. However, the precise tissue distribution and function of A1 remains poorly understood. We show here that A1 is expressed in multiple tissues during murine embryonic development. In the embryo, A1 was detected first at embryonic day 11.5 in liver, brain, and limbs. At day 13.5 of gestation, A1 expression was observed in the central nervous system, liver, perichondrium, and digital zones of developing limbs in a pattern different from that of bcl-X. In the central nervous system of 15.5-day embryos, A1 was expressed at high levels in the ventricular zone and cortical plate of brain cortex. Significantly, the interdigital zones of limbs and the intermediate region of the developing brain cortex, two sites associated with extensive cell death, were devoid of A1 and bcl-X. The expression of A1 was retained in many adult tissues. To assess the ability of A1 to modulate cell death, stable transfectants expressing different amounts of A1 protein were generated in K562 cells. Expression of A1 was associated with retardation of apoptotic cell death induced by actinomycin D and cycloheximide as well as by okadaic acid. Confocal microscopy showed that the A1 protein was localized to the cytoplasm in a pattern similar to that of Bcl-2. These results demonstrate that the expression of A1 is wider than previously reported in adult tissues. Furthermore, its distribution in multiple tissues of the embryo suggests that A1 plays a role in the regulation of physiological cell death during embryonic development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8952545

  19. Sediment dynamics in restored riparian forest with different widths and agricultural surroundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucchi Boschi, Raquel; Simões da Silva, Laura; Ribeiro Rodrigues, Ricardo; Cooper, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The riparian forests are essential to maintaining the quality of water resources, aquifer recharge and biodiversity. Due to the ecological services provided by riparian forests, these areas are considered by the law as Permanent Preservation Areas, being mandatory maintenance and restoration. However, the obligation of restoration and the extent of the Permanent Preservation Areas as defined by the Brazilian Forest Code, based on water body width, elucidates the lack of accurate scientific data on the influence of the size of the riparian forest in maintaining their ecological functions, particularly regarding the retention of sediments. Studies that evaluate the ideal width of riparian forests to guarantee their ecological functions are scarce and not conclusive, especially when we consider newly restored forests, located in agricultural areas. In this study, we investigate the dynamics of erosion and sedimentation in restored riparian forests with different widths situated in agricultural areas. The two study areas are located in a Semideciduous Tropical Forest inserted in sugarcane landscapes of São Paulo state, Brazil. The installed plots had 60 and 100 m in length and the riparian forest has a width of 15, 30 and 50 m. The characteristics of the sediments inside the plots were evaluated by detailed morphological and micromorphological studies as well as physical characterization. The dynamics of deposition and the amount of deposited sediments have been assessed with graded metal stakes partially buried inside the plots. The intensity, frequency and distribution of rainfall, as well as the occurrence of extreme events, have been evaluated by data collected from rain gauges installed in the areas. We expect that smaller widths are not able to retain sediments originated from the adjacent sugarcane areas. We also believe that extreme events are responsible for generating most of the sediments. The results will be important to support the discussion about an

  20. Enhanced biofilm distribution and cell performance of microfluidic microbial fuel cells with multiple anolyte inlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ye, Dingding; Liao, Qiang; Zhang, Pengqing; Zhu, Xun; Li, Jun; Fu, Qian

    2016-05-15

    A laminar-flow controlled microfluidic microbial fuel cell (MMFC) is considered as a promising approach to be a bio-electrochemical system (BES). But poor bacterial colonization and low power generation are two severe bottlenecks to restrict its development. In this study, we reported a MMFC with multiple anolyte inlets (MMFC-MI) to enhance the biofilm formation and promote the power density of MMFCs. Voltage profiles during the inoculation process demonstrated MMFC-MI had a faster start-up process than the conventional microfluidic microbial fuel cell with one inlet (MMFC-OI). Meanwhile, benefited from the periodical replenishment of boundary layer near the electrode, a more densely-packed bacterial aggregation was observed along the flow direction and also the substantially low internal resistance for MMFC-MI. Most importantly, the output power density of MMFC-MI was the highest value among the reported µl-scale MFCs to our best knowledge. The presented MMFC-MI appears promising for bio-chip technology and extends the scope of microfluidic energy.

  1. Quasi monolithic silicon load cell for loads up to 1000 kg with insensitivity to non-homogeneous load distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, Remco; Zwijze, Robert; Krijnen, Gijs; Lammerink, Theo; Elwenspoek, Miko

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a micromachined silicon load cell (force sensor) is presented for measuring loads up to 1000 kg. The sensitive surface of 1 cm2 contains a matrix of capacitive sensing elements to make the load cell insensitive to non-homogeneous load distributions. The load cell has been realized and

  2. Quasi monolithic silicon load cell for loads up to 1000 kg with insensitivity to non-homogenous load distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, Remco; Zwijze, Robert; Krijnen, Gijs; Lammerink, Theo; Elwenspoek, Miko

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, a micromachined silicon load cell (force sensor) is presented for measuring loads up to 1000 kg. The sensitive surface of 1 cm2 contains an array of sensing elements to make the load cell insensitive to non-homogeneous load distributions resulting in higher accuracy. The load cell has

  3. Nightside studies of coherent HF Radar spectral width behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    Full Text Available A previous case study found a relationship between high spectral width measured by the CUTLASS Finland HF radar and elevated electron temperatures observed by the EISCAT and ESR incoherent scatter radars in the post-midnight sector of magnetic local time. This paper expands that work by briefly re-examining that interval and looking in depth at two further case studies. In all three cases a region of high HF spectral width (>200 ms-1 exists poleward of a region of low HF spectral width (<200 ms-1. Each case, however, occurs under quite different geomagnetic conditions. The original case study occurred during an interval with no observed electrojet activity, the second study during a transition from quiet to active conditions with a clear band of ion frictional heating indicating the location of the flow reversal boundary, and the third during an isolated sub-storm. These case studies indicate that the relationship between elevated electron temperature and high HF radar spectral width appears on closed field lines after 03:00 magnetic local time (MLT on the nightside. It is not clear whether the same relationship would hold on open field lines, since our analysis of this relationship is restricted in latitude. We find two important properties of high spectral width data on the nightside. Firstly the high spectral width values occur on both open and closed field lines, and secondly that the power spectra which exhibit high widths are both single-peak and multiple-peak. In general the regions of high spectral width (>200 ms-1 have more multiple-peak spectra than the regions of low spectral widths whilst still maintaining a majority of single-peak spectra. We also find that the region of ion frictional heating is collocated with many multiple-peak HF spectra. Several mechanisms for the generation of high spectral width have been proposed which would produce multiple-peak spectra, these are discussed in relation to

  4. Biologic width and crown lengthening: case reports and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se-Lim

    2010-01-01

    The biologic width includes both the connective tissue attachment and the junctional epithelium and has a mean dimension of approximately 2 mm. Invading the biologic width with a restoration can result in localized crestal bone loss, gingival recession, localized gingival hyperplasia, or a combination of these three. When restoring teeth that have subgingival caries or fractures below the gingival attachment, a clinical crown-lengthening procedure is needed to establish the biologic width. This article presents three case reports that utilized crown-lengthening procedures.

  5. In-medium width of the η' meson

    OpenAIRE

    Niblaeus, Carl

    2013-01-01

    In this master’s thesis the width of the  meson is studied as a function of temperature. We consider a background medium consisting of a pion gas and assume a vanishing net baryon chemical potential. The width is obtained in the framework of large  chiral perturbation theory and we consider terms up to next-to-leading order in the effective Lagrangian. We use a low-density approximation to calculate the width increase due to scattering with pions from the heat bath. The results suggest that t...

  6. Pulse-width compression based on photonic crystal fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; WANG Zhen-li; SHI Yan-mei

    2006-01-01

    According to the characteristics of high-order solitons,compressed picosecond pulses are numerically simulated in the photonic crystal fiber (PCF),by means of split-step Fourier method. The results show that,PCF enables input pulse with lower peak power to form high-order solitons for the purpose of femtosecond pulse-width compression. For example,60- femtosecond pulse width was made for 1-ps initial pulse width only over the distance of 2.2 m.Besides,shorter optimum fiber length for compression and higher compression ratio could be obtained on the premise of pre-chirp technique.

  7. The Super-Radiant Mechanism and the Widths of Compound Nuclear States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the introduction I will present the theory of the super-radiant mechanism as applied to various phenomena. I will then discuss the statistics of resonance widths in a many-body Fermi system with open decay channels. Depending on the strength of the coupling to the continuum such systems show deviations from the standard Porter-Thomas distribution. The deviations result from the process of increasing interaction of the intrinsic states through the common decay channels. In the limit of very strong coupling this leads to super-radiance. The results I will present are important for the understanding of recent experimental data concerning the width distribution of compound neutron resonances in nuclei.

  8. Super-radiance and the widths of neutron resonances in the compound nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 1950s the possibility of forming a 'super-radiant' (SR) state in a gas of atoms confined to a volume of a size smaller than the wave length of radiation was suggested by Dicke. During the years this mechanism was applied to many phenomena in many different fields. Here it is used in the discussion of the statistics of resonance widths in a many-body system with open decay channels. Depending on the strength of the coupling to the continuum such systems show deviations from the Porter-Thomas distribution. In the limit of very strong coupling this leads to super-radiance. The results presented are important for the understanding of recent experimental data concerning the widths distribution of neutron resonances in nuclei.

  9. Distribution of a 69-kD laminin-binding protein in aortic and microvascular endothelial cells: modulation during cell attachment, spreading, and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Wewer, U; Liotta, L;

    1988-01-01

    cultured subconfluent cells actively synthesizing matrix. Endothelial cells express a 69-kD laminin-binding protein that is membrane associated and appears to colocalize with actin microfilaments. The topological distribution of 69 kD and its cytoskeletal associations can be modulated by the cell during...

  10. Effects of berberine on proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis of human breast cancer T47D and MCF7 cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmira Barzegar

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Berberine alone and in combination with doxorubicin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and altered cell cycle distribution of breast cancer cells. Therefore, berberine showed to be a good candidate for further studies as a new anticancer drug in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  11. OER and RBE for negative pion beams of different peak widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental data on survival curves for pion beams of different peak widths under aerobic and hypoxic conditions are reported. Metabolic depletion of oxygen by the Chinese hamster cells line (V79) was used to obtain hypoxia. The results indicate that the RBE at the beam entrance (plateau) is approximately 1.0. When the Bragg peaks were broadened to widths of 1.3, 7.8, and 10.5 cm (at the 80% dose level), the RBE (50% cell survival) at the peak centres was 1.7, 1.6, and 1.2, respectively. The OER at the entrance was 2.4 compared with about 2.9 for X rays. The OER was independent of the survival level at which it was measured. The OER at the peak centres at widths of 1.3, 7.8 and 10.5 cm was 2.1, 2.4 and 2.2, respectively. These results indicate that, although the RBE at the centre of the 10.5 cm wide peak was significantly lower than at the centres of the 1.3 and 7.8 cm peaks, the OER values are similar for all peak widths used in this study. (author)

  12. Cell-laden poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/alginate hybrid scaffolds fabricated by an aerosol cross-linking process for obtaining homogeneous cell distribution: fabrication, seeding efficiency, and cell proliferation and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, HyeongJin; Ahn, SeungHyun; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Chun, Wook; Kim, GeunHyung

    2013-10-01

    Generally, solid-freeform fabricated scaffolds show a controllable pore structure (pore size, porosity, pore connectivity, and permeability) and mechanical properties by using computer-aided techniques. Although the scaffolds can provide repeated and appropriate pore structures for tissue regeneration, they have a low biological activity, such as low cell-seeding efficiency and nonuniform cell density in the scaffold interior after a long culture period, due to a large pore size and completely open pores. Here we fabricated three different poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL)/alginate scaffolds: (1) a rapid prototyped porous PCL scaffold coated with an alginate, (2) the same PCL scaffold coated with a mixture of alginate and cells, and (3) a multidispensed hybrid PCL/alginate scaffold embedded with cell-laden alginate struts. The three scaffolds had similar micropore structures (pore size = 430-580 μm, porosity = 62%-68%, square pore shape). Preosteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) were used at the same cell density in each scaffold. By measuring cell-seeding efficiency, cell viability, and cell distribution after various periods of culturing, we sought to determine which scaffold was more appropriate for homogeneously regenerated tissues.

  13. Size distribution of fullerenol nanoparticles in cell culture medium and their influence on antioxidative enzymes in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srđenović Branislava U.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fullerenol (C60(OH24 nanoparticles (FNP have a significant role in biomedical research due to their numerous biological activities, some of which are cytoprotective and antioxidative properties. The aim of this study was to measure distribution of fullerenol nanoparticles and zeta potential in cell medium RPMI 1640 with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS and to investigate the influence of FNP on Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 survival, as well as to determine the activity of three antioxidative enzymes: superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-reductase and glutathione-S-transferase in mitomycin C-treated cell line. Our investigation implies that FNP, as a strong antioxidant, influence the cellular redox state and enzyme activities and thus may reduce cell proliferation, which confirms that FNP could be exploited for its use as a cytoprotective agent.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45005 i Pokrajinski Sekretarijat za nauku i tehnološki razvoj Vojvodine, grant number 114-451-2056/2011-01

  14. Effect of finite width on deflection and energy release rate of an orthotropic double cantilever specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapery, R. A.; Davidson, B. D.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of an orthotropic cantilevered plate subjected to a uniformly distributed end load is solved by the Rayleigh-Ritz energy method. The result is applied to laminated composite, double cantilevered specimens to estimate the effect of crack tip constraint on the transverse curvature, deflection and energy release rate. The solution is also utilized to determined finite width correction factors for fracture energy characterization tests in which neither plane stress nor plane strain conditions apply.

  15. Cell size distribution in a random tessellation of space governed by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model: Grain size distribution in crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Farjas Silva, Jordi; Roura Grabulosa, Pere

    2008-01-01

    The space subdivision in cells resulting from a process of random nucleation and growth is a subject of interest in many scientific fields. In this paper, we deduce the expected value and variance of these distributions while assuming that the space subdivision process is in accordance with the premises of the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model. We have not imposed restrictions on the time dependency of nucleation and growth rates. We have also developed an approximate analytical cell size ...

  16. Novel Method for Measuring Temperature Distribution within Fuel Cell using Microsensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Hsieh, Chi-Lieh; Wu, Guan-Wei

    2007-05-01

    A fuel cell has the potential to become an important source of electric power. However, measuring the temperature inside the fuel cell is difficult. Hence, in this investigation, an array of microsensors is set up inside the fuel cell to measure the temperature distribution. The substrate of a bipolar plate in the fuel cell is stainless steel (SS-316) and an electroforming technique is implemented to fabricate channels in the stainless steel substrate. Then micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technologies are employed to fabricate a platinum temperature sensor on the rib of a channel in the stainless steel substrate. In this experiment, the temperature of microsensor is measured to range from 31 to 80 °C and its resistance ranges from 0.593 to 0.649 Ω. Experimental results demonstrate that temperature is almost linearly related to resistance and that accuracy and sensitivity are 0.5 °C and 1.93× 10-3/°C, respectively. The performance curves of a single fuel cell operating at 34 °C and H2/O2 gas flow rates of 50/50 ml/min are determined. The maximum power density is 170 mW/cm2 and the current density is 513 mA/cm2.

  17. Optical waveguide device with an adiabatically-varying width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts; Michael R. , Nielson; Gregory N.

    2011-05-10

    Optical waveguide devices are disclosed which utilize an optical waveguide having a waveguide bend therein with a width that varies adiabatically between a minimum value and a maximum value of the width. One or more connecting members can be attached to the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width thereof to support the waveguide bend or to supply electrical power to an impurity-doped region located within the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width. The impurity-doped region can form an electrical heater or a semiconductor junction which can be activated with a voltage to provide a variable optical path length in the optical waveguide. The optical waveguide devices can be used to form a tunable interferometer (e.g. a Mach-Zehnder interferometer) which can be used for optical modulation or switching. The optical waveguide devices can also be used to form an optical delay line.

  18. Calculation of the decay width of decuplet baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Petschlies, Marcus; Pochinsky, Andrew V; Syritsyn, Sergey S

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the coupling constant and decay width of the decuplet to octet baryon transitions in lattice QCD using the transfer matrix method. The transition amplitude is related to the coupling constant and via the Fermi's Golden Rule to the decay width. The method is applicable for near-degeneracy of the energy levels of initial and final states and, when this condition is fulfilled, yields a good estimate of the decay width. We present results using a hybrid action with domain wall valence quarks on a staggered sea with $350$ MeV pion mass as well as for a domain wall fermion action with $180$ MeV pion mass. We find $\\Gamma\\left( \\Delta \\to \\pi\\,N \\right) = 119\\,( 8)\\,( 8)$ MeV for the transition of Delta to pion-nucleon within the unitary domain wall setup. We also report values for the decay widths of the $\\Sigma^*$ and $\\Xi*$ baryons.

  19. Systematics of oscillatory behavior in hadronic masses and widths

    CERN Document Server

    Tatischeff, Boris

    2016-01-01

    A systematic study of hadron masses and widths shows regular oscillations that can be fitted by a simple cosine function. This property can be observed when the difference between adjacent masses of each family is plotted versus the mean mass.

  20. Temporal and spatial changes in Ca2+ distribution during the programmed cell death of tracheary elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The changes in Ca2+ distribution in the tracheary elements (TEs) of the pepper leaves were studied using the cytochemical method of potassium antimonate. At the early stage of TEs formation, the vacuole and the nucleus held large volume, and antimonate Ca2+ deposits were observed mainly in the intercellular space and the cell wall. As the thickening of secondary wall occurred, the vacuole, nucleus and other organelles began to rupture, concomitant with the increase of calcium deposits in the cytosol, showing the influx of Ca2+ into the cell. With the further rupture of cytoplasm and other organelles, the number of calcium deposits at the non-thickening cell wall increased, but declined at the thickening bands of the secondary wall. When the cytoplasmic contents disappeared completely, the level of Ca2+ decreased at the non-thickening wall, but by contrast,increased at the thickening bands of the secondary wall.These observations indicated that the dynamic changes in Ca2+ distribution spatially and temporarily might have a close correlation with its distinct roles played during the formation of the secondary walls.

  1. Distribution of Rickettsia rickettsii in ovary cells of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille1806 (Acari: Ixodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Costa Luís

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering the fact that the dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, has a great potential to become the vector of Brazilian Spotted Fever (BSF for humans, the present study aimed to describe the distribution of the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, the etiological agent of BSF, in different regions of the ovaries of R. sanguineus using histological techniques. The ovaries were obtained from positive females confirmed by the hemolymph test and fed in the nymph stage on guinea pigs inoculated with R. rickettsii. Results The results showed a general distribution of R. rickettsii in the ovary cells, being found in oocytes in all stages of development (I, II, III, IV and V most commonly in the periphery of the oocyte and also in the cytoplasm of pedicel cells. Conclusions The histological analysis of the ovaries of R. sanguineus infected females confirmed the presence of the bacterium, indicating that the infection can interfere negatively in the process of reproduction of the ticks, once alterations were detected both in the shape and cell structure of the oocytes which contained bacteria.

  2. Comparison of the quantities and subset distributions of natural killer cells among different races

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yan-meng; ZHANG Rui-jun; ZHU Hong; PENG Hong; ZHOU Xiao-ping; HONG Kun-xue; LIU Jian-li; CHEN Jian-ping; SHAO Yi-ming

    2010-01-01

    Background Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in host immune defense, while the quantities and subset distributions may vary among different races. To address the difference, we compared these variables among Chinese Han, the Caucasians and the Blacks. The study may provide critical background information for both basic research and clinical investigation.Methods Blood samples collected from populations of different races were tested within 12 hours after collection and subsets of NK cells were characterized using flow cytometry.Results The absolute NK count in the Chinese Han was significantly higher than that in the Caucasian. The Han and Caucasian groups showed higher percentages of cytotoxic subset compared to that of the Black group. The percentage of cytokine-producing subset of Chinese Han group was lower than that of Caucasian and Black groups. Black group had a higher percentage of function-unknown NK subset than that of the Hah and Caucasian groups.Conclusion Our data indicated that NK cell count and the distribution of different subsets varied among different races,which should be taken into consideration in related investigations.

  3. A fractal analysis of the spatial distribution of tumoral mast cells in lymph nodes and bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidolin, Diego; Marinaccio, Christian; Tortorella, Cinzia; Ruggieri, Simona; Rizzi, Anna; Maiorano, Eugenio; Specchia, Giorgina; Ribatti, Domenico

    2015-11-15

    The spatial distribution of mast cells inside the tumor stroma has been little investigated. In this study, we have evaluated tumor mast cells distribution through the analysis of the morphological features of the spatial patterns generated by these cells, including size, shape, and architecture of the cell pattern. We have compared diffuse large B cells lymphoma (DLBCL) and systemic mastocytosis in two different anatomical localizations (lymph nodes for DLBCL and, respectively, bone marrow for mastocytosis). Results have indicated that, despite the high difference in size exhibited by the mast cells patterns in the two conditions, the spatial relationship between the mast cells forming the aggregates resulted similar, characterized by a significant tendency of the mast cells to self-organize in clusters.

  4. Calculating Method of Moments Uniform Bin Width Histograms

    OpenAIRE

    James S. Weber

    2016-01-01

    A clear articulation of Method of Moments (MOM) Histograms is instructive and has waited 121 years since 1895. Also of interest are enabling uniform bin width (UBW) shape level sets. Mean-variance MOM uniform bin width frequency and density histograms are not unique, however ranking them by histogram skewness compared to data skewness helps. Although theoretical issues rarely take second place to calculations, here calculations based on shape level sets are central and challenge uncritically ...

  5. Width of the plasmon resonance in metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, B.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    1995-05-01

    The width of the plasmon resonance in the clusters Na+9, Na+21, and Na+41 is investigated in the framework of the structure-averaged jellium model and compared with recent experimental data. The two leading mechanisms for the line broadening are fragmentation of the resonance into nearby 1ph states and splitting through thermal quadrupole fluctuations. The fragmentation becomes activated mainly through octupole fluctuations and it gives the dominating contribution to the width.

  6. Estimating the Spectral Width of a Narrowband Optical Signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Lars; Skov Jensen, A.

    1980-01-01

    Methods for estimating the spectral width of a narrowband optical signal are investigated. Spectral analysis and Fourier spectroscopy are compared. Optimum and close-to-optimum estimators are developed under the constraint of having only one photodetector.......Methods for estimating the spectral width of a narrowband optical signal are investigated. Spectral analysis and Fourier spectroscopy are compared. Optimum and close-to-optimum estimators are developed under the constraint of having only one photodetector....

  7. SM Higgs decay branching ratios and total Higgs width

    CERN Multimedia

    Daniel Denegri

    2001-01-01

    Upper: Higgs decay ratios as a function of Higgs mass. The largest branching ratio is not necessarily the most usefull one. The most usefull ones are gamma gamma bbar ZZ and WW as in those modes latter signal to background ratios can be achieved. Lower: Total Higgs decay width versus Higgs mass. At low masses the natural width is extremely small, thus observability depends on instrumental resolution primarily.

  8. Experimental study of current distribution in proton exchange membrane fuel cell : experimental setup and flow arrangement effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alaefour, I.; Jiao, K.; Al Shakhshir, S.; Li, X. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering; Karimi, G. [Shiraz Univ., Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is among the most promising zero-emission power sources for transportation applications. Many experimental and numerical studies have been devoted to understanding the current distribution in PEMFCs because it is essential to improve their reliability and durability. In this study, a special fuel cell with three parallel serpentine flow channels was designed and fabricated in-house in order to conduct in-situ mapping of the local current distribution over the electrode surface. An array of segmented current collectors was distributed on one of the bipolar plates. The local current density distribution along the serpentine flow channels was investigated for various flow configurations, including co-flow, cross-flow, and counter-flow arrangements. All the experimental results for the local density distribution were conducted under identical operating conditions. The current distribution along the flow channels with different vertical-horizontal cell was also examined. The study showed that the counter flow arrangement for the anode and cathode stream yields the most uniform distribution for the current density, whereas, co-flow arrangement results in a considerable variations in the current density from the cathode stream inlet to the cathode exit. Cell orientation can also influence the cell performance and the current distribution considerably. 24 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  9. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma: Frequency and distribution in a tertiary referral center in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak K Burad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Peripheral T/NK-cell lymphomas are uncommon types of non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma (NHL with a higher frequency in Far East countries as compared to the West. This study was undertaken to ascertain the frequency and distribution pattern of peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs diagnosed in a tertiary care center in South India. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was carried out in Department of General Pathology, Christian Medical College, Vellore. The time period was for 2 years from 1 st January 2008 till 31st December 2009. All PTCLs were reviewed and classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO 2008 classification. Results: Of a total of 1032 cases of NHL, 180 cases were PTCL, which accounted for 17.4% cases of all the NHLs. Of these, PTCL, not otherwise specified (PTCL, NOS was the most common subtype (48 cases, 26.1%, followed by anaplastic large cell lymphoma (41 cases, 22.8%, mycosis fungoides (21 cases, 11.7%, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (16 cases, 8.9%, subcutaneous panniculitis like T-cell lymphoma (15 cases, 8.4%, extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (12 cases, 6.7%, and hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (10 cases, 5.6%. The most common primary site of presentation was nodal accounting for 42% followed by cutaneous (34%, upper aerodigestive sites (8.9%, spleen (6.7%, and gastrointestinal tract (GIT; 3.3%. Conclusions: This is the largest single study on PTCLs in India and we document that its frequency is higher than that reported in Western literature and previous Indian studies and almost similar to that reported in some Far East studies. The frequency of mycosis fungoides, subcutaneous panniculitis like T-cell lymphoma, and hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma was higher than that reported in the World literature and previous Indian studies. The frequency of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma was much lower than that reported in the Far East literature.

  10. Experimental Study on Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuator with Different Encapsulated Electrode Widths for Airflow Control at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaohua; Yang, Liang; Yan, Huijie; Jin, Ying; Hua, Yue; Ren, Chunsheng

    2016-10-01

    The surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuator has shown great promise as an aerodynamic flow control device. In this paper, the encapsulated electrode width of a SDBD actuator is changed to study the airflow acceleration behavior. The effects of encapsulated electrode width on the actuator performance are experimentally investigated by measuring the dielectric layer surface potential, time-averaged ionic wind velocity and thrust force. Experimental results show that the airflow velocity and thrust force increase with the encapsulated electrode width. The results can be attributed to the distinct plasma distribution at different encapsulated electrode widths. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175037), National Natural Science Foundation for Young Scientists of China (No. 11305017) and Special Fund for Theoretical Physics (No. 11247239)

  11. Crack width monitoring of concrete structures based on smart film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to its direct link to structural security, crack width is thought to be one of the most important parameters reflecting damage conditions of concrete structures. However, the width problem is difficult to solve with the existing structural health monitoring methods. In this paper, crack width monitoring by means of adhering enameled copper wires with different ultimate strains on the surface of structures is proposed, based on smart film crack monitoring put forward by the present authors. The basic idea of the proposed method is related to a proportional relationship between the crack width and ultimate strain of the broken wire. Namely, when a certain width of crack passes through the wire, some low ultimate strain wires will be broken and higher ultimate strain wires may stay non-broken until the crack extends to a larger scale. Detection of the copper wire condition as broken or non-broken may indicate the width of the structural crack. Thereafter, a multi-layered stress transfer model and specimen experiment are performed to quantify the relationship. A practical smart film is then redesigned with this idea and applied to Chongqing Jiangjin Yangtze River Bridge. (paper)

  12. Crack width monitoring of concrete structures based on smart film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Benniu; Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2014-04-01

    Due to its direct link to structural security, crack width is thought to be one of the most important parameters reflecting damage conditions of concrete structures. However, the width problem is difficult to solve with the existing structural health monitoring methods. In this paper, crack width monitoring by means of adhering enameled copper wires with different ultimate strains on the surface of structures is proposed, based on smart film crack monitoring put forward by the present authors. The basic idea of the proposed method is related to a proportional relationship between the crack width and ultimate strain of the broken wire. Namely, when a certain width of crack passes through the wire, some low ultimate strain wires will be broken and higher ultimate strain wires may stay non-broken until the crack extends to a larger scale. Detection of the copper wire condition as broken or non-broken may indicate the width of the structural crack. Thereafter, a multi-layered stress transfer model and specimen experiment are performed to quantify the relationship. A practical smart film is then redesigned with this idea and applied to Chongqing Jiangjin Yangtze River Bridge.

  13. Low-cost piezoresistive silicon load cell independent of force distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Zwijze, Robert A.F.; Remco J. Wiegerink; Krijnen, Gijs J.M.; Lammerink, Theo S.J.; Elwenspoek, Miko

    1999-01-01

    A silicon load cell (force sensor) is presented which is based on a new operating principle. The force is measured by compressing a meander like strain gage. A second strain gage which is not loaded, is used for temperature compensation and for compensation of bending and stretching stresses in the chip. Also, same changes in zero load resistor values are eliminated. It is shown that the output of the bridge is a linear function of the total force and independent of the force distribution on ...

  14. Biomimetic macroporous hydrogels: protein ligand distribution and cell response to the ligand architecture in the scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, Irina N; Dainiak, Maria; Jungvid, Hans; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Galaev, Igor Yu

    2009-01-01

    Macroporous hydrogels (MHs), cryogels, are a new type of biomaterials for tissue engineering that can be produced from any natural or synthetic polymer that forms a gel. Synthetic MHs are rendered bioactive by surface or bulk modifications with extracellular matrix components. In this study, cell response to the architecture of protein ligands, bovine type-I collagen (CG) and human fibrinogen (Fg), immobilised using different methods on poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) macroporous hydrogels (MHs) was analysed. Bulk modification was performed by cross-linking cryo-co-polymerisation of HEMA and poly(ethylene glycol)diacrylate (PEGA) in the presence of proteins (CG/pHEMA and Fg/pHEMA MHs). The polymer surface was modified by covalent immobilisation of the proteins to the active epoxy (ep) groups present on pHEMA after hydrogel fabrication (CG-epHEMA and Fg-epHEMA MHs). The concentration of proteins in protein/pHEMA and protein-epHEMA MHs was 80-85 and 130-140 mug/ml hydrogel, respectively. It was demonstrated by immunostaining and confocal laser scanning microscopy that bulk modification resulted in spreading of CG in the polymer matrix and spot-like distribution of Fg. On the contrary, surface modification resulted in spot-like distribution of CG and uniform spreading of Fg, which evenly coated the surface. Proliferation rate of fibroblasts was higher on MHs with even distribution of the ligands, i.e., on Fg-epHEMA and CG/pHEMA. After 30 days of growth, fibroblasts formed several monolayers and deposited extracellular matrix filling the pores of these MHs. The best result in terms of cell proliferation was obtained on Fg-epHEMA. The ligands displayed on surface of these scaffolds were in native conformation, while in bulk-modified CG/pHEMA MHs most of the proteins were buried inside the polymer matrix and were less accessible for interactions with specific antibodies and cells. The method used for MH modification with bioligands strongly affects spatial

  15. SpatTrack: an imaging toolbox for analysis of vesicle motility and distribution in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Frederik Wendelboe; Jensen, Marie Louise; Christensen, Tanja;

    2014-01-01

    The endocytic pathway is a complex network of highly dynamic organelles, which has been traditionally studied by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The data generated by this method can be overwhelming and its analysis, even for the skilled microscopist, is tedious and error-prone. We developed...... SpatTrack, an open source, platform-independent program collecting a variety of methods for analysis of vesicle dynamics and distribution in living cells. SpatTrack performs 2D particle tracking, trajectory analysis and fitting of diffusion models to the calculated mean square displacement. It allows...... a subpopulation of late endosomes/lysosomes (LE/LYSs). This was paralleled by repositioning and active transport of NPC2-containing vesicles to the cell surface. The potential of SpatTrack for other applications in intracellular transport studies will be discussed....

  16. Spectral analysis of the angular distribution function of back reflectors for thin film silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escarre, J.; Villar, F.; Asensi, J.M.; Bertomeu, J.; Andreu, J. [CeRMAE - Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-06-15

    Nowadays, one of the most important challenges to enhance the efficiency of thin film silicon solar cells is to increase the short circuit intensity by means of optical confinement methods, such as textured back-reflector structures. In this work, two possible textured structures to be used as back reflectors for n-i-p solar cells have been optically analyzed and compared to a smooth one by using a system which is able to measure the angular distribution function (ADF) of the scattered light in a wide spectral range (350-1000nm). The accurate analysis of the ADF data corresponding to the reflector structures and to the {mu}c-Si:H films deposited onto them allows the optical losses due to the reflector absorption and its effectiveness in increasing light absorption in the {mu}c-Si:H layer, mainly at long wavelengths, to be quantified. (author)

  17. On the Gaussian behavior of marginals and the mean width of random polytopes

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-Gutierrez, David

    2012-01-01

    We show that the expected value of the mean width of a random polytope generated by $N$ random vectors ($n\\leq N\\leq e^{\\sqrt n}$) uniformly distributed in an isotropic convex body in $\\R^n$ is of the order $\\sqrt{\\log N} L_K$. This completes a result of Dafnis, Giannopoulos and Tsolomitis. We also prove some results in connection with the 1-dimensional marginals of the uniform probability measure on an isotropic convex body, extending the interval in which the average of the distribution functions of those marginals behaves in a sub- or supergaussian way.

  18. Effect of Bcl-2 and caspase-3 on calcium distribution in apoptosis of HL-60 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Apoptosis manifests in two major execution programs downstream of the death signal: the caspase pathway and organelle dysfunction. An important antiapoptosis factor, Bcl-2 protein, contributes in caspase pathway of apoptosis. Calcium, an important intracellular signal element in cells, is also observed to have changes during apoptosis, which maybe affected by Bcl2 protein. We have previously reported that in Harringtonine (HT) induced apoptosis of HL-60 cells, there's a change of intracellular calcium distribution, moving from cytoplast especially Golgi's apparatus to nucleus and accumulating there with the highest concentration. We report here that caspase-3 becomes activated in HT-induced apoptosis of HL-60 cells, which can be inhibited by overexpression of Bcl-2 protein. No sign of apoptosis or intracellular calcium movement from Golgi's apparatus to nucleus in HL-60 cells overexpressing Bcl-2 or treated with Ac-DEVD-CHO, a specific inhibitor of caspase-3. The results indicate that activated caspase-3 can promote the movement of intracellular calcium from Golgi's apparatus to nucleus, and the process is inhibited by Ac-DEVD-CHO (inhibitor of caspas-3), and that Bcl-2 can inhibit the movement and accumulation of intracellular calcium in nucleus through its inhibition on caspase3. Calcium relocalization in apoptosis seems to be irreversible, which is different from the intracellular calcium changes caused by growth factor.

  19. Distribution, characterization, and induction of CD8+ regulatory T cells and IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Li Jiang; Huang Zhou-Feng; Xiong Geng; Mo Hao-Yuan; Qiu Fang; Mai Hai-Qiang; Chen Qiu-Yan; He Jia; Chen Shu-peng; Zheng Li-Min; Qian Chao-Nan; Zeng Yi-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background CD8+ effector cells often have an antitumor function in patients with cancer. However, CD8+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tcregs) and interleukin (IL)-17-producing CD8+ T cells (Tc17 cells) also derive from the CD8+ T cell lineage. Their role in the antitumor response remains largely unknown. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the distribution, characterization, and generation of CD8+ Tcregs and Tc17 cells in NPC patients. Methods Peripheral blood and tumor biopsy t...

  20. Predicting the distribution of spiral waves from cell properties in a developmental-path model of Dictyostelium pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Geberth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is one of the model systems of biological pattern formation. One of the most successful answers to the challenge of establishing a spiral wave pattern in a colony of homogeneously distributed D. discoideum cells has been the suggestion of a developmental path the cells follow (Lauzeral and coworkers. This is a well-defined change in properties each cell undergoes on a longer time scale than the typical dynamics of the cell. Here we show that this concept leads to an inhomogeneous and systematic spatial distribution of spiral waves, which can be predicted from the distribution of cells on the developmental path. We propose specific experiments for checking whether such systematics are also found in data and thus, indirectly, provide evidence of a developmental path.

  1. SpatTrack: an imaging toolbox for analysis of vesicle motility and distribution in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Frederik W; Jensen, Maria Louise V; Christensen, Tanja; Nielsen, Gitte K; Heegaard, Christian W; Wüstner, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    The endocytic pathway is a complex network of highly dynamic organelles, which has been traditionally studied by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The data generated by this method can be overwhelming and its analysis, even for the skilled microscopist, is tedious and error-prone. We developed SpatTrack, an open source, platform-independent program collecting a variety of methods for analysis of vesicle dynamics and distribution in living cells. SpatTrack performs 2D particle tracking, trajectory analysis and fitting of diffusion models to the calculated mean square displacement. It allows for spatial analysis of detected vesicle patterns including calculation of the radial distribution function and particle-based colocalization. Importantly, all analysis tools are supported by Monte Carlo simulations of synthetic images. This allows the user to assess the reliability of the analysis and to study alternative scenarios. We demonstrate the functionality of SpatTrack by performing a detailed imaging study of internalized fluorescence-tagged Niemann Pick C2 (NPC2) protein in human disease fibroblasts. Using SpatTrack, we show that NPC2 rescued the cholesterol-storage phenotype from a subpopulation of late endosomes/lysosomes (LE/LYSs). This was paralleled by repositioning and active transport of NPC2-containing vesicles to the cell surface. The potential of SpatTrack for other applications in intracellular transport studies will be discussed.

  2. Visualizing Nanoscale Distribution of Corrosion Cells by Open-Loop Electric Potential Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honbo, Kyoko; Ogata, Shoichiro; Kitagawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Sugimoto, Itto; Shima, Shohei; Fukunaga, Akira; Takatoh, Chikako; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-02-23

    Corrosion is a traditional problem but still one of the most serious problems in industry. To reduce the huge economic loss caused by corrosion, tremendous effort has been made to understand, predict and prevent it. Corrosion phenomena are generally explained by the formation of corrosion cells at a metal-electrolyte interface. However, experimental verification of their nanoscale distribution has been a major challenge owing to the lack of a method able to visualize the local potential distribution in an electrolytic solution. In this study, we have investigated the nanoscale corrosion behavior of Cu fine wires and a duplex stainless steel by in situ imaging of local corrosion cells by open-loop electric potential microscopy (OL-EPM). For both materials, potential images obtained by OL-EPM show nanoscale contrasts, where areas of higher and lower potential correspond to anodic areas (i.e., corrosion sites) and cathodic areas, respectively. This imaging capability allows us to investigate the real-time transition of local corrosion sites even when surface structures show little change. This is particularly useful for investigating reactions under surface oxide layers or highly corrosion-resistant materials as demonstrated here. The proposed technique should be applicable to the study of other redox reactions on a battery electrode or a catalytic material. The results presented here open up such future applications of OL-EPM in nanoscale electrochemistry. PMID:26811989

  3. Quantitative determination of element distributions in silicon based thin film solar cells using SNMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastel, M; Breuer, U; Holzbrecher, H; Becker, J S; Dietze, H J; Kubon, M; Wagner, H

    1995-10-01

    The determination of elemental distributions in thin film solar cells based on amorphous silicon using electron beam SNMS is possible by quantifying the measured ion intensities. The relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) for all elements measured have to be known. The RSFs have been determined experimentally using implantation and bulk standards with known concentrations of the interesting elements. The measured RSFs have been compared with calculated RSFs. The model used for the calculation of the RSFs takes into account the probability for electron impact ionization and the dwell time of the neutrals inside the postionization region. The comparison between measured and calculated RSF shows, that this model is capable to explain the RSFs for most elements. Differences between calculated and measured values can be explained by the formation of hydride and fluoride molecules (in case of H and F) and influences of the angular distribution of the sputtered neutrals in case of Al. The experimentally determined RSFs have been used for a quantification of depth profiles of the i-, buffer-, p- and front contact layers of a-Si solar cells. PMID:15048522

  4. Numerical simulation of current distribution in metal pad of aluminum reduction cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xi-quan; FENG Nai-xiang; CUI Jian-zhong

    2005-01-01

    Based on the numerical calculation of 3-D potential distribution in aluminum reduction cells, current distribution in the metal pad is calculated under the following conditions: 1) pot ledge ideally formed; 2) ledge extension to below anode; 3) different metal heights; 4) AC and 5) Spike. It is found that Jy in metal pad increases first to a highest point and then decreases along anode length. At normal status, the largest Jy is about 0. 4 A/cm2 and it locates at about 2/3 of anode length. With longer ledge, the maximum value of Jy decreases and its position movescenter-ward. The longer the side ledge, the larger the negative current flowing center-ward at side channel. Jz in metal pad increases with anode length and it is not affected by metal height; while Jy increases with metal height. At AC, current flows toward metal under new anode. At spike, current concentrates at spike rather than evenly distributes. Normally, Jx is almost negligible in metal pad.

  5. Optimal operation management of fuel cell/wind/photovoltaic power sources connected to distribution networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknam, Taher; Kavousifard, Abdollah; Tabatabaei, Sajad; Aghaei, Jamshid

    2011-10-01

    In this paper a new multiobjective modified honey bee mating optimization (MHBMO) algorithm is presented to investigate the distribution feeder reconfiguration (DFR) problem considering renewable energy sources (RESs) (photovoltaics, fuel cell and wind energy) connected to the distribution network. The objective functions of the problem to be minimized are the electrical active power losses, the voltage deviations, the total electrical energy costs and the total emissions of RESs and substations. During the optimization process, the proposed algorithm finds a set of non-dominated (Pareto) optimal solutions which are stored in an external memory called repository. Since the objective functions investigated are not the same, a fuzzy clustering algorithm is utilized to handle the size of the repository in the specified limits. Moreover, a fuzzy-based decision maker is adopted to select the 'best' compromised solution among the non-dominated optimal solutions of multiobjective optimization problem. In order to see the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, two standard distribution test systems are used as case studies.

  6. Statistical significance of spreading widths for doorway states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strength function constructed as the Lorentz-weighted average of the reduced widths of the Wigner-Eisenbud R matrix (or of a reactance K matrix) is a continuous and well-defined function of energy for a fragmented doorway state (isobaric analog resonance, fission isomer, etc.) in both weak and strong coupling. If the half-width I of the Lorentz weighting function is chosen appropriately, this strength function itself approximates a Lorentzian whose width is the spreading width GAMMA/sup arrow-down//sub I/ of Feshbach, Kerman, and Lemmer. An ensemble of 400 doorway systems characterized by coupling strengths ranging from strong to weak is used to study properties of GAMMA/sup arrow-down//sub I/ and to determine the accuracy with which it can be determined for a particular doorway by a least-squares fit to the strength function. The results of this numerical study show that (1) GAMMA/sup arrow-down//sub I/ is a characteristic of each doorway state system, and that (2) its value can be determined from experimentally measured resonance energies and widths with an uncertainty which is less than the fluctuations in its value from one system to another and which decreases as the coupling strength decreases

  7. Surface roughness from MOLA backscatter pulse-widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, W. D.; Muller, J.-P.; Gupta, S.; Grindrod, P. M.

    2013-09-01

    The time-spread of backscatter laser altimeter pulses, known as pulse-widths, are thought to be capable of being used to infer variations in topography within the footprint of the laser pulse. Here, Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) pulse-widths have been compared to surface roughness and slope, as measured from high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs), over different terrains in order to understand how this dataset can be used in the selection of landing and roving sites, and in inferring surface formation and evolution. The results are varied, and suggest that pulsewidths do not respond consistently to variations in terrain. The results show that over Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) candidate landing sites, the pulse-widths can be used as a rough estimate of surface roughness at baselines much larger than the footprint of the pulse. Over much rougher terrain, these pulse-widths respond best to footprint scale slope, which suggests that an additional slope correction for 75 m baselines slopes is required to infer finer scale roughness. However, this is shown not to be the case, as correcting the pulse-widths for 75 m slopes at the MSL candidate sites, and detrending the DTM data, produced poorer results.

  8. Distribution of CD4 lymphocyte cells among apparently healthy HIV seropositive and seronegative populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulazeez A Abubakar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: CD4 lymphocyte cells are often used as prognostic markers for monitoring the progression of immunosupression such as HIV infection. Aim: This study was conducted to assess the distribution of CD4 lymphocytes among apparently healthy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV seronegative and seropositive populations in a Nigerian state. Materials and Methods: A total of 1520 apparently healthy subjects aged 18-64 years, composed of 800 males and 720 females attending some selected health institutions in the state, participated in the study. Ten milliliters of blood was collected from each subject; 5 ml of this was used for HIV antibodies sero-typing while the remaining 5 ml was anticoagulated and used for CD4 lymphocytes level determination. Only samples tested positive both with Capillus and Determine HIV test kits were further differentiated into sero-types with a standard diagnostic HIV test kit. The CD4 lymphocyte levels of all the sample were determined; mean CD4 levels of 205.1±0.09 and 287.4±0.3 cells/μl were recorded among females seropositives and seronagatives respectively. Statistical analysis by the Student t-test showed a significant difference in the mean CD4 lymphocyte count by gender. Results: Findings showed a mean CD4 level of 311.7±1.2 cells/μl among seropositive males while 399.3±0.6 cells/μl was recorded among seronegatives (t=5.86. The study also recorded a CD4 lymphocyte range of 232-464 cells/μl among apparently healthy seronegative population in this locality. Conclusion: The findings showed a significantly higher mean CD4 lymphocyte count among adult male HIV seronegatives (χ2= 9.22 and seropositives (χ2=15.07 than their female counterparts. Further research work using the automation technique is suggested to confirm this new range for monitoring HIV subjects on antiretroviral therapy.

  9. Development and distribution of mast cells and neuropeptides in human fetus duodenum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yu Chen; Xue-Mei Jia; You-Su Jia; Xiao-Rong Chen; Hui-Zhu Wang; Wei-Qin Qi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the developmental regularities and heterogeneity of mast cells (MC) in human fetus duodenum and the distribution and developmental regularities of substance P(SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive (IR) peptidergic nerves in fetus duodenum,as well as the relationship between MC, SP and CGRP- IR peptidergic nerves.METHODS: Duodena from 21 cases of human fetus and one term infant were stained by hematoxylin-eosin (HE),toluidine blue (TB) and immunohistochemical avidin-biotinylated peroxidase complex (ABC) method.RESULTS: Lobe-shape intestinal villi in duodenum were already developed at the twelfth week. At the 21st wk,muscular mucosa appeared gradually, and four layers were observed in the wall of duodenum. TB staining showed that the granules in the immature MC were pale violet,while the mature MC were strong violet in color by TB staining. Connective tissue MC (CTMC) appeared occasionally in submucosa and muscular layer of duodenum at the16th wk. While the mucosa MC (MMC) appeared at the18th wk. At the 22nd wk, both CTMC and MMC were activated, and distributed in the surrounding blood vessels and ganglions. The verge of some MC were unclear, and showed degranular phenomena. At the 14th wk, SP and CGRP-IR nerve fibers and cells appeared in the myenteric and submucous plexuses in small intestine, and the responses were turn strongly. Neurons were light to deep brown, and nerve fibers were present as varicose and liner profiles. On the corresponding site of serial sections, SP and CGRP immunohistochemical reactions were coexisted in one nerve fiber or cell. Some of MC showed SP and CGRP-IR positive staining.CONCLUSION: There are two heterogeneous kinds of MC in duodenum, MMC and CTMC. MC might play an important role in regulating blood circulation and sensation.

  10. ZTEK`s ultra-high efficiency fuel cell/gas turbine system for distributed generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, M.; Nathanson, D. [Ztek Corp., Waltham, MA (United States); Bradshaw, D.T. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Ztek`s Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system has exceptional potential for utility electric power generation because of: simplicity of components construction, capability for low cost manufacturing, efficient recovery of very high quality by-product heat (up to 1000{degrees}C), and system integration simplicity. Utility applications of the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell are varied and include distributed generation units (sub-MW to 30MW capacity), repowering existing power plants (i.e. 30MW to 100MW), and multi-megawatt central power plants. A TVA/EPRI collaboration program involved functional testing of the advanced solid oxide fuel cell stacks and design scale-up for distributed power generation applications. The emphasis is on the engineering design of the utility modules which will be the building blocks for up to megawatt scale power plants. The program has two distinctive subprograms: Verification test on a 1 kW stack and 25kW module for utility demonstration. A 1 kW Planar SOFC stack was successfully operated for 15,000 hours as of December, 1995. Ztek began work on a 25kW SOFC Power System for TVA, which plans to install the 25kW SOFC at a host site for demonstration in 1997. The 25kW module is Ztek`s intended building block for the commercial use of the Planar SOFC. Systems of up to megawatt capacity can be obtained by packaging the modules in 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional arrays.

  11. Distribution of kappa and lambda light chain isotypes among human blood immunoglobulin-secreting cells after vaccination with pneumococcal polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann, C; Barington, T

    1989-01-01

    pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), IgM-, IgG- and IgA-secreting cells expressed the kappa light chain isotype in approximately 65% of the cells. IgM- and IgG-secreting cells induced by vaccination with pneumococcal polysaccharides had a similar percentage of kappa light chain......-containing cells. In contrast, IgA-secreting cells induced by vaccination with pneumococcal polysaccharides showed a different (bimodal) distribution as regards expression of kappa light chain. The majority (56%) of the investigated individuals expressed kappa light chain in approximately 50% of the cells...... chain pattern of IgA-secreting cells from individuals vaccinated with pneumococcal polysaccharides and from unvaccinated individuals probably indicates that these cells are being derived from B-cell clones with a limited idiotypic heterogeneity, which have been selected and clonally expanded...

  12. Distribution of obestatin and ghrelin in human tissues: immunoreactive cells in the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and mammary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönberg, Malin; Tsolakis, Apostolos V; Magnusson, Linda;

    2008-01-01

    Obestatin and ghrelin are two peptides derived from the same prohormone. It is well established that ghrelin is produced by endocrine cells in the gastric mucosa. However, the distribution of human obestatin immunoreactive cells is not thoroughly characterized. A polyclonal antibody that specific...

  13. Variable Voltage Source Inverter with controlled frequency spectrum based on Random Pulse Width Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farrukh Yaqub

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method for single phase variable voltage inverter based on Random Pulse Width Modulation. In Random Pulse Width Modulation based inverter, the frequency spectrum of the output current and voltage waveforms becomes continuous because of the randomization of the switching function of the devices controlling the output voltages. This paper establishes a theory that if the distributions of the random numbers generated by the random source are kept within certain limit with respect to the peak value of reference sinusoidal waveform, the frequency spectrum can be controlled. On the basis of the results, a novel drive using variable tap changing transformer (optional and adaptive random number generator, to control the ratio between the numbers generated by the random source and the reference waveform has been suggested that will guarantee a better power quality profile for a broad range of output voltages.

  14. Distribution of class ii major histocompatibility complex antigenexpressing cells in human dental pulp with carious lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is a bacterial infection which causes destruction of the hard tissues of the tooth. Exposure of the dentin to the oral environment as a result of caries inevitably results in a cellular response in the pulp. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a group of genes that code for cell-surface histocompatibility antigens. Cells expressing class II MHC molecules participate in the initial recognition and the processing of antigenic substances to serve as antigen-presenting cells. Purpose: The aim of the study was to elucidate the alteration in the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in human dental pulp as carious lesions progressed toward the pulp. Methods: Fifteen third molars with caries at the occlusal site at various stages of decay and 5 intact third molars were extracted and used in this study. Before decalcifying with 10% EDTA solution (pH 7.4, all the samples were observed by micro-computed tomography to confirm the lesion condition three-dimensionally. The specimens were then processed for cryosection and immunohistochemistry using an anti-MHC class II monoclonal antibody. Results: Class II MHC antigen-expressing cells were found both in normal and carious specimens. In normal tooth, the class II MHC-immunopositive cells were observed mainly at the periphery of the pulp tissue. In teeth with caries, class II MHC-immunopositive cells were located predominantly subjacent to the carious lesions. As the caries progressed, the number of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells was increased. Conclusion: The depth of carious lesions affects the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in the dental pulp.Latar belakang: Karies merupakan penyakit infeksi bakteri yang mengakibatkan destruksi jaringan keras gigi. Dentin yang terbuka akibat karies akan menginduksi respon imun seluler pada pulpa. Kompleks histokompatibilitas utama (MHC merupakan sekumpulan gen yang mengkode histokompatibilitas

  15. Band width and multiple-angle valence-state mapping of diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, I.; Terminello, L.J.; Sutherland, D.G.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The band width may be considered the single most important parameter characterizing the electronic structure of a solid. The ratio of band width and Coulomb repulsion determines how correlated or delocalized an electron system is. Some of the most interesting solids straddle the boundary between localized and delocalized, e.g. the high-temperature superconductors. The bulk of the band calculations available today is based on local density functional (DF) theory. Even though the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues from that theory do not represent the outcome of a band-mapping experiment, they are remarkably similar to the bands mapped via photoemission. Strictly speaking, one should use an excited state calculation that takes the solid`s many-body screening response to the hole created in photoemission into account. Diamond is a useful prototype semiconductor because of its low atomic number and large band width, which has made it a long-time favorite for testing band theory. Yet, the two experimental values of the band width of diamond have error bars of {+-}1 eV and differ by 3.2 eV. To obtain an accurate valence band width for diamond, the authors use a band-mapping method that collects momentum distributions instead of the usual energy distributions. This method has undergone extensive experimental and theoretical tests in determining the band width of lithium fluoride. An efficient, imaging photoelectron spectrometer is coupled with a state-of-the-art undulator beam line at the Advanced Light Source to allow collection of a large number of data sets. Since it takes only a few seconds to take a picture of the photoelectrons emitted into a 84{degrees} cone, the authors can use photon energies as high as 350 eV where the cross section for photoemission from the valence band is already quite low, but the emitted photoelectrons behave free-electron-like. This make its much easier to locate the origin of the inter-band transitions in momentum space.

  16. Distribution of Nitric Oxide-Producing Cells along Spinal Cord in Urodeles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayada A Mahmoud

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is a unique neurotransmitter, which participates in many physiological and pathological processes in the organism. There are little data about the neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the spinal cord of amphibians. In this respect, the present study aims to investigate the distribution of nitric oxide producing cells in the spinal cord of urodele and to find out the possibility of a functional locomotory role to this neurotransmitter. The results of the present study demonstrate a specific pattern of NADPH-d labeling in the selected amphibian model throughout the spinal cord length as NADPH-d-producing cells and fibres were present in almost all segments of the spinal cord of the salamander investigated. However, their number, cytological characteristics and labeling intensity varied significantly. It was noticed that the NO-producing cells (NO-PC were accumulated in the ventral side of certain segments in the spinal cord corresponding to the brachial and sacral plexuses. In addition, the number of NO-PC was found to be increased also at the beginning of the tail and this could be due to the fact that salamanders are tetrapods having bimodal locomotion, namely swimming and walking.

  17. Fast Width Detection in Corridor Using Hough Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Javadi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available For many robotics and smart car applications it is vitally important to calculate the width. The present paper proposes a new approach for finding the width of a corridor within a constructed image frame that would keep a robot on a safe track away from walls. The main advantage of this approach is less computation time and hence faster response for path recognition. In this new approach, the Hugh Transform technique is also used as the basis of the provided algorithm. Within the determination of corridor width, in order to avoid the accident in the future researches, some approaches such as identify open space, modeling and reconstruction of three-dimensional space, can also be used.

  18. Interatomic Coulombic decay widths of helium trimer: Ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolorenč, Přemysl, E-mail: kolorenc@mbox.troja.mff.cuni.cz [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, V Holešovičkách 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Sisourat, Nicolas [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-12-14

    We report on an extensive study of interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) widths in helium trimer computed using a fully ab initio method based on the Fano theory of resonances. Algebraic diagrammatic construction for one-particle Green’s function is utilized for the solution of the many-electron problem. An advanced and universal approach to partitioning of the configuration space into discrete states and continuum subspaces is described and employed. Total decay widths are presented for all ICD-active states of the trimer characterized by one-site ionization and additional excitation of an electron into the second shell. Selected partial decay widths are analyzed in detail, showing how three-body effects can qualitatively change the character of certain relaxation transitions. Previously unreported type of three-electron decay processes is identified in one class of the metastable states.

  19. Morphodynamics structures induced by variations of the channel width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro, Gonzalo; Crosato, Alessandra; Tassi, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    In alluvial channels, forcing effects, such as a longitudinally varying width, can induce the formation of steady bars (Olesen, 1984). The type of bars that form, such as alternate, central or multiple, will mainly depend on the local flow width-to-depth ratio and on upstream conditions (Struiksma et al., 1985). The effects on bar formation of varying the channel width received attention only recently and investigations, based on flume experiments and mathematical modelling, are mostly restricted to small longitudinal sinusoidal variations of the channel width (e.g. Repetto et al., 2002; Wu and Yeh, 2005, Zolezzi et al., 2012; Frascati and Lanzoni, 2013). In this work, we analyze the variations in equilibrium bed topography in a longitudinal width-varying channel with characteristic scales of the Waal River (The Netherlands) using two different 2D depth-averaged morphodynamic models, one based on the Delft3D code and one on Telemac-Mascaret system. In particular, we explore the effects of changing the wavelength of sinusoidal width variations in a straight channel, focusing on the effects of the spatial lag between bar formation and forcing that is observed in numerical models and laboratory experiments (e.g. Crosato et al, 2011). We extend the investigations to finite width variations in which longitudinal changes of the width-to-depth ratio are such that they may affect the type of bars that become unstable (alternate, central or multiple bars). Numerical results are qualitatively validated with field observations and the resulting morphodynamic pattern is compared with the physics-based predictor of river bar modes by Crosato and Mosselman (2009). The numerical models are finally used to analyse the experimental conditions of Wu and Yeh (2005). The study should be seen as merely exploratory. The aim is to investigate possible approaches for future research aiming at assessing the effects of artificial river widening and narrowing to control bar formation in

  20. Effect of pressure drop in different flow fields on water accumulation and current distribution for a micro PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Her, Bing-Shyan; Huang, Yi-Ji [Department of Mechanical and Electro Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Time-dependent measurements of pressure drop in different flow fields on the cathode of a PEM fuel cell with different operating conditions of mass flow rates and cell temperatures on current distribution were conducted. The results show that, among four flow fields studied herein, the interdigitated flow channel has the biggest pressure drop and least influence on current distribution at an early phase ({<=}30 min) compared to those of the other three channels. In addition, the effect of pressure drop on water accumulation was noted. Similarly, the effects of mass flow rates as well as the cell temperature were also examined and discussed. (author)

  1. Analysis on Longitudinal Dose according to Change of Field Width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Won Seok; Shin, Ryung Mi; Oh, Byung Cheon; Jo, Jun Young; Kim, Gi Chul; Choi, Tae Gu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyunghee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Back, Jong Geal [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yensei Caner Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    To analyze the accuracy of tumor volume dose following field width change, to check the difference of dose change by using self-made moving car, and to evaluate practical delivery tumor dose when tomotherapy in the treatment of organ influenced by breathing. By using self-made moving car, the difference of longitudinal movement (0.0 cm, 1.0 cm, 1.5 cm, 2.0 cm) was applied and compared calculated dose with measured dose according to change of field width (1.05 cm, 2.50 cm, 5.02 cm) and apprehended margin of error. Then done comparative analysis in degree of photosensitivity of DQA film measured by using Gafchromic EBT film. Dose profile and Gamma histogram were used to measure degree of photosensitivity of DQA film. When field width were 1.05 cm, 2.50 cm, 5.02 cm, margin of error of dose delivery coefficient was -2.00%, -0.39%, -2.55%. In dose profile of Gafchromic EBT film's analysis, the movement of moving car had greater motion toward longitudinal direction and as field width was narrower, big error increased considerably at high dose part compared to calculated dose. The more field width was narrowed, gamma index had a large considerable influence of moving at gamma histogram. We could check the difference of longitudinal dose of moving organ. In order to small field width and minimize organ moving due to breathing, it is thought to be needed to develop breathing control unit and fixation tool.

  2. Measuring slit width and separation in a diffraction experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, K K; Law, A T [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)], E-mail: gan@mps.ohio-state.edu

    2009-11-15

    We present a procedure for measuring slit width and separation in single- and double-slit diffraction experiments. Intensity spectra of diffracted laser light are measured with an optical sensor (PIN diode). Slit widths and separations are extracted by fitting to the measured spectra. We present a simple fitting procedure to account for the integration (averaging) of light across the finite sensor aperture. This experiment provides students with a quantitative, in-depth verification of diffraction theory, as well as hands-on experience in sophisticated fitting methods.

  3. Shift adn width of HeII lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on a quantum statistical many-particle theory, the shift and the width of some He II lines have been evaluated. Ion dynamics have been treated within the model microfield method. Furthermore, fine structure splitting has been taken into account in order to check whether this effect is the cause for the existing large discrepancies between theoretical and experimental line widths. Besides the electronic contributions to the line shift, the shift due to the inhomogeneities of the ionic microfield as well as that due to the quadratic Stark effect has been included. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Fjords in viscous fingering: selection of width and opening scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineev-weinstein, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ristroph, Leif [UT-AUSTIN; Thrasher, Matthew [UT-AUSTIN; Swinney, Harry [UT-AUSTIN

    2008-01-01

    Our experiments on viscous fingering of air into oil contained between closely spaced plates reveal two selection rules for the fjords of oil that separate fingers of air. (Fjords are the building blocks of solutions of the zero-surface-tension Laplacian growth equation.) Experiments in rectangular and circular geometries yield fjords with base widths {lambda}{sub c}/2, where {lambda}{sub c} is the most unstable wavelength from a linear stability analysis. Further, fjords open at an angle of 8.0{sup o}{+-}1.0{sup o}. These selection rules hold for a wide range of pumping rates and fjord lengths, widths, and directions.

  5. Energy and decay width of the pi-K atom

    OpenAIRE

    Jallouli, H.; Sazdjian, H.

    2006-01-01

    The energy and decay width of the pi-K atom are evaluated in the framework of the quasipotential-constraint theory approach. The main electromagnetic and isospin symmetry breaking corrections to the lowest-order formulas for the energy shift from the Coulomb binding energy and for the decay width are calculated. They are estimated to be of the order of a few per cent. We display formulas to extract the strong interaction S-wave pi-K scattering lengths from future experimental data concerning ...

  6. Energy and decay width of the pi-K atom

    CERN Document Server

    Jallouli, H

    2006-01-01

    The energy and decay width of the pi-K atom are evaluated in the framework of the quasipotential-constraint theory approach. The main electromagnetic and isospin symmetry breaking corrections to the lowest-order formulas for the energy shift from the Coulomb binding energy and for the decay width are calculated. They are estimated to be of the order of a few per cent. We display formulas to extract the strong interaction S-wave pi-K scattering lengths from future experimental data concerning the pi-K atom.

  7. Domain wall width of lithium niobate poled during growth

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, R; Hole, D E; Callejo, D; Bermudez, V; Diéguez, E

    2003-01-01

    Good quality crystals of periodically poled lithium niobate can be generated directly during growth. However, the temperature gradients at the zone boundaries define the width of the regions where the polarity is reversed. Hence, the region influenced the domain transition may be a significant fraction of the overall poling period for material poled during growth. Evidence for the scale of this feature is reported both by chemical etching and by the less common method of ion beam luminescence and the 'domain wall' width approximately 1 mu m for these analyses. The influence of the reversal region may differ for alternative techniques but the relevance to device design for second harmonic generation is noted.

  8. Planar waveguide with "twisted" boundary conditions: small width

    CERN Document Server

    Borisov, D

    2011-01-01

    We consider a planar waveguide with "twisted" boundary conditions. By twisting we mean a special combination of Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Assuming that the width of the waveguide goes to zero, we identify the effective (limiting) operator as the width of the waveguide tends to zero, establish the uniform resolvent convergence in various possible operator norm, and give the estimates for the rates of convergence. We show that studying the resolvent convergence can be treated as a certain threshold effect and we present an elegant technique which justifies such point of view.

  9. On the Path-Width of Integer Linear Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Constantin ENEA; Habermehl, Peter; Inverso, Omar; Parlato, Gennaro

    2016-01-01

    We consider the feasibility problem of integer linear programming (ILP). We show that solutions of any ILP instance can be naturally represented by an FO-definable class of graphs. For each solution, there may be many graphs representing it. However, one of these graphs is of path-width at most 2n, where n is the number of variables in the instance. Since FO is decidable on graphs of bounded path-width, we obtain an alternative decidability result for ILP. The technique we use underlines a co...

  10. Distribution of the Current Density in Electrolyte of the Pem Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugeniusz Kurgan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper water management in proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell is considered. Firt mass convervation law for water is applied. Next proton transport is described by the Nernst-Planck equation and liqid water convection velocity is eliminated by the Schlogl equation. Electro-osmotic drag coefficient is related to hydrogen index and experimentally determined swelling coefficient. Three partial differential equations for molar water concentration Cw, electric potential ϕ and water pressure Pw are formulated. Current density vector i is derived from proton flux expression. These equations together with adequate boundary conditions were solved using finite element method. The distribution of electric potential and current density in function of geometrical parametres is investigated. At the end some illustrative example is given.

  11. Pressure, stress, and strain distribution in the double-stage diamond anvil cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobanov, Sergey S., E-mail: slobanov@carnegiescience.edu [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, District of Columbia 20015 (United States); V.S. Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Prescher, Clemens [Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60632 (United States); Konôpková, Zuzana; Liermann, Hanns-Peter [Photon Science DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Crispin, Katherine L. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, District of Columbia 20015 (United States); Zhang, Chi [Key Laboratory of Earth and Planetary Physics, Institute of Geology and Geophysics CAS, Beijing 100029 (China); Goncharov, Alexander F. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, District of Columbia 20015 (United States); Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics CAS, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2015-07-21

    Double stage diamond anvil cells (DACs) of two designs have been assembled and tested. We used a standard symmetric DAC with flat or beveled culets as a primary stage and CVD microanvils machined by a focused ion beam as a second. We evaluated pressure, stress, and strain distributions in gold and a mixture of gold and iron as well as in secondary anvils using synchrotron x-ray diffraction with a micro-focused beam. A maximum pressure of 240 GPa was reached independent of the first stage anvil culet size. We found that the stress field generated by the second stage anvils is typical of conventional DAC experiments. The maximum pressures reached are limited by strains developing in the secondary anvil and by cupping of the first stage diamond anvil in the presented experimental designs. Also, our experiments show that pressures of several megabars may be reached without sacrificing the first stage diamond anvils.

  12. Synchrotron-based analysis of chromium distributions in multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Mallory Ann; Hofstetter, Jasmin; Morishige, Ashley E.; Coletti, Gianluca; Lai, Barry; Fenning, David P.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-05-18

    Chromium (Cr) can degrade silicon wafer-based solar cell efficiencies at concentrations as low as 10(10) cm(-3). In this contribution, we employ synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy to study chromium distributions in multicrystalline silicon in as-grown material and after phosphorous diffusion. We complement quantified precipitate size and spatial distribution with interstitial Cr concentration and minority carrier lifetime measurements to provide insight into chromium gettering kinetics and offer suggestions for minimizing the device impacts of chromium. We observe that Cr-rich precipitates in as-grown material are generally smaller than iron-rich precipitates and that Cri point defects account for only one-half of the total Cr in the as-grown material. This observation is consistent with previous hypotheses that Cr transport and CrSi2 growth are more strongly diffusion-limited during ingot cooling. We apply two phosphorous diffusion gettering profiles that both increase minority carrier lifetime by two orders of magnitude and reduce [Cr-i] by three orders of magnitude to approximate to 10(10) cm(-3). Some Cr-rich precipitates persist after both processes, and locally high [Cri] after the high-temperature process indicates that further optimization of the chromium gettering profile is possible. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  13. Distribution of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in the Esophagus of Fetal Rats with Esophageal Atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Isbir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Scarcity of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC is related to motility disorders. In the study, we aimed to evaluate the number and density of ICCs in the fetal rat esophagus in the adriamycin - esophageal atresia (EA model. Material and Method: Rat fetuses were divided into three groups as a control, adriamycin group without EA and adriamycin group with EA. Four doses of adriamycin, 2 mg/kg each, were injected intraperitoneally to the adriamycin group rats between on 6 and 9 days of gestation. The presence of ICCs in the esophagus of the rat fetuses was determined by using an immunohistochemistry technique (c-kit, CD117. The average numbers of ICCs were calculated with microscopic evaluation by using a visual scoring system (range1 to 3. Results: Seven fetuses were included in each group. The ICCs score 3 distributions of fetuses were 5 (72% fetuses in the control group, 3 (43% fetuses in the adriamycin group without EA, 1 (14% fetus in the adriamycin group with EA. It have been found that there was a marked reduction of ICCs distribution in the adriamycin group with EA compared to control group (p 0.05. Discussion: ICCs density was significantly decreased in the rat fetuses with EA compared to the fetuses without EA. These findings support the idea that ICCs density may be congenitally abnormal in EA. This may be led to dismotility seen in the operated esophagus due to EA.

  14. A Measurement of the Total Width, the Electronic Width, and the Mass of the Upsilon(10580) Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Le Clerc, C; Lynch, G; Merchant, A M; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Donald, M; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Fisher, A; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Seeman, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wienands, U; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-01-01

    We present a measurement of the parameters of the $\\Upsilon(10580)$ resonance based on a dataset collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric $B$ factory. We measure the total width $\\Gamma_{\\rm tot}$ to be $(20.7\\pm1.6\\pm2.5) {\\rm MeV}$, the electronic partial width $\\Gamma_{ee} = (0.321\\pm0.017\\pm0.029) {\\rm keV}$ and the mass $M = (10579.3\\pm0.4\\pm1.2) {\\rm MeV/c^2}$.

  15. Surface width of the Solid-On-Solid models

    CERN Document Server

    Arisue, H

    1998-01-01

    The low-temperature series for the surface width of the Absolute value Solid-On-Solid model and the Discrete Gaussian model both on the square lattice and on the triangular lattice are generated to high orders using the improved finite-lattice method. The series are analyzed to give the critical points of the roughening phase transition for each model.

  16. Visualizing the Mass and Width Spectrum of Unstable Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Harshman, N. L.

    2003-01-01

    Several graphical representations of the mass and width spectrum of unstable subatomic particles are presented. Such plots are useful tools for introducing students to the particle zoo and provide students an alternate way to organize conceptually what can seem like an overwhelming amount of data. In particular, such graphs highlight phenomenological features of unstable particles characteristic of different energy and time scales.

  17. Haptic discrimination of stimuli varying in amplitude and width

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louw, S.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Koenderink, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    We studied active haptic discrimination of the geometrical features of an object. The geometrical parameters under investigation were the amplitude and width of a gaussian-shaped surface. Haptic discrimination thresholds were measured with regard to three values of these geometrical parameters. We f

  18. Echo width of foam supports used in scattering measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen; Solodukhov, V. V.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretically and experimentally determined echo widths of dielectric cylinders having circular, triangular, and quadratic cross sections have been compared. The cylinders were made of foam material having a relative dielectric constant of about 1.035. The purpose of the investigation was to find...

  19. Directed path-width and monotonicity in digraph searching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barat, Janos

    2006-01-01

    Directed path-width was defined by Reed, Thomas and Seymour around 1995. The author and P. Hajnal defined a cops-and-robber game on digraphs in 2000. We prove that the two notions are closely related and for any digraph D, the corresponding graph parameters differ by at most one. The result is ac...

  20. Width-parameterized SAT: Time-Space Tradeoffs

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shiteng; Papakonstantinou, Periklis; Tang, Bangsheng

    2011-01-01

    Width parameterizations of SAT, such as tree-width and path-width, enable the study of computationally more tractable and practical SAT instances. We give two simple algorithms. One that runs simultaneously in time-space $(O^*(2^{2tw(\\phi)}), O^*(2^{tw(\\phi)}))$ and another that runs in time-space $(O^*(3^{tw(\\phi)\\log{|\\phi|}}),|\\phi|^{O(1)})$, where $tw(\\phi)$ is the tree-width of a formula $\\phi$ with $|\\phi|$ many clauses and variables. This partially answers the question of Alekhnovitch and Razborov, who also gave algorithms exponential both in time and space, and asked whether the space can be made smaller. We conjecture that every algorithm for this problem that runs in time $2^{tw(\\phi)\\mathbf{o(\\log{|\\phi|})}}$ necessarily blows up the space to exponential in $tw(\\phi)$. We introduce a novel way to combine the two simple algorithms that allows us to trade \\emph{constant} factors in the exponents between running time and space. Our technique gives rise to a family of algorithms controlled by two param...

  1. The effect of buffer zone width on biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navntoft, Søren; Sigsgaard, Lene; Kristensen, Kristian;

    2012-01-01

    Field margin management for conservation purposes is a way to protect both functional biodiversity and biodiversity per se without considerable economical loss as field margins are less productive. However, the effect of width of the buffer zone on achievable biodiversity gains has received little...

  2. Rinsing Processes in Open-width Washing Machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, A.B.J.; Linden, van der H.J.L.J.; Groot Wassink, J.

    1986-01-01

    A simulator is described for rinsing processes carried out on open-width washing machines. In combination with a theoretical model, a simple method is given for testing rinsing processes. The method has been used to investigate the extraction of caustic soda from a cotton fabric, varying the tempera

  3. Improved determination of the width of the top quark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Graf C. P.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; La Cruz I. Heredia-De; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

    2012-05-04

    We present an improved determination of the total width of the top quark, {Gamma}{sub t}, using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The total width {Gamma}{sub t} is extracted from the partial decay width {Gamma}(t {yields} Wb) and the branching fraction {Beta}(t {yields} Wb). {Gamma}(t {yields} Wb) is obtained from the t-channel single top-quark production cross section and {Beta}(t {yields} Wb) is measured in t{bar t} events. For a top mass of 172.5 GeV, the resulting width is {Gamma}{sub t} = 2.00{sub -0.43}{sup +0.47} GeV. This translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.29{sub -0.63}{sup +0.90}) x 10{sup -25} s. We also extract an improved direct limit on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix element 0.81 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at 95% C.L. and a limit of |V{sub tb}| < 0.59 for a high-mass fourth-generation bottom quark assuming unitarity of the fourth-generation quark-mixing matrix.

  4. Measurement of joint space width and erosion size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharp, JI; van der Heijde, D; Angwin, J; Duryea, J; Moens, HJB; Jacobs, JWG; Maillefert, JF; Strand, CV

    2005-01-01

    Measurement of radiographic abnormalities in metric units has been reported by several investigators during the last 15 years. Measurement of joint space in large joints has been employed in a few trials to evaluate therapy in osteoarthritis. Measurement of joint space width in small joints has been

  5. Potential dominance of oscillating crescent waves in finite width tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that the emergence of previously observed oscillating crescent water wave patterns, created by class II (three-dimensional) instabilities which are in principle not dominant, could in fact be explained as an artifact of a finite width tank, combined with a suppression...

  6. Distribution, characterization, and induction of CD8+ regulatory T cells and IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD8+ effector cells often have an antitumor function in patients with cancer. However, CD8+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tcregs and interleukin (IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells (Tc17 cells also derive from the CD8+ T cell lineage. Their role in the antitumor response remains largely unknown. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the distribution, characterization, and generation of CD8+ Tcregs and Tc17 cells in NPC patients. Methods Peripheral blood and tumor biopsy tissues from 21 newly diagnosed patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC were collected, along with peripheral blood from 21 healthy donors. The biological characteristics of Tcregs and Tc17 cells from blood and tumor tissues were examined by intracellular staining, tetramer staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analysis. The suppressive function of Tcregs was investigated using a proliferation assay that involved co-culture of sorted CD8+CD25+ T cells with naïve CD4+ T cells in vitro. Results We observed an increased prevalence of Tcregs and Tc17 cells among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs and different distribution among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in NPC patients. Cytokine profiles showed that the Tcregs expressed a high level of IL-10 and low level of transforming growth factor β, whereas Tc17 cells expressed a high level of tumor necrosis factor α. Interestingly, both subsets expressed a high level of interferon γ in TILs, and the Tcregs suppressed naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation by a cell contact-dependent mechanism in vitro. Moreover, we demonstrated the existence of Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein (LMP 1 and LMP2 antigen-specific Tcregs in NPC. Conclusions Our data provide new insights into the composition and function of CD8+ T-cell subsets in NPC, which may have an important influence on NPC immunotherapy.

  7. Lithologic controls on valley width and strath terrace formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanz, Sarah A.; Montgomery, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Valley width and the degree of bedrock river terrace development vary with lithology in the Willapa and Nehalem river basins, Pacific Northwest, USA. Here, we present field-based evidence for the mechanisms by which lithology controls floodplain width and bedrock terrace formation in erosion-resistant and easily friable lithologies. We mapped valley surfaces in both basins, dated straths using radiocarbon, compared valley width versus drainage area for basalt and sedimentary bedrock valleys, and constructed slope-area plots. In the friable sedimentary bedrock, valleys are 2 to 3 times wider, host flights of strath terraces, and have concavity values near 1; whereas the erosion-resistant basalt bedrock forms narrow valleys with poorly developed, localized, or no bedrock terraces and a channel steepness index half that of the friable bedrock and an average channel concavity of about 0.5. The oldest dated strath terrace on the Willapa River, T2, was active for nearly 10,000 years, from 11,265 to 2862 calibrated years before present (cal YBP), whereas the youngest terrace, T1, is Anthropocene in age and recently abandoned. Incision rates derived from terrace ages average 0.32 mm y- 1 for T2 and 11.47 mm y- 1 for T1. Our results indicate bedrock weathering properties influence valley width through the creation of a dense fracture network in the friable bedrock that results in high rates of lateral erosion of exposed bedrock banks. Conversely, the erosion-resistant bedrock has concavity values more typical of detachment-limited streams, exhibits a sparse fracture network, and displays evidence for infrequent episodic block erosion and plucking. Lithology thereby plays a direct role on the rates of lateral erosion, influencing valley width and the potential for strath terrace planation and preservation.

  8. Changes of DHN1 expression and subcellular distribution in A. delicisoa cells under osmotic stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱全胜; 王泽宙; 蔡起贵; 姜荣锡

    2002-01-01

    The changes of DHN1 expression and subcellular distribution in A. delicisoa cells under osmotic stress were studied by using GFP as a reporter molecule. Through creating the Xba I and BamH I restriction sites at the ends of dhn1 by PCR, the expression vector for the fusion protein DHN1-mGFP4 was constructed by cloning dhn1 into plasmid pBIN-35SmGFP4. Then the DHN1-mGFP4 expression vector was transformed into A. delicisoa suspension cells by microprojectile bombardment method. Bright green fluorescence of GFP which shows the high-level expression of DHN1-mGFP4 was visualized after culture for 10 h. However, the green fluorescence was only located within the nucleus. By increasing the culture medium osmotic potential, the green fluorescence was visualized in the cytoplasm (mainly around the plasma membranes). The generation of GFP fluorescence in the cytoplasm was also promoted by increasing the medium osmotic potential. Moreover, GFP green fluorescence was abolished by protein synthesis inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimid, indicating that the cytoplasmic DHN1 was newly synthesized under osmotic stress. Furthermore, ABA promoted the presence of green fluorescence in the cytoplasm, and the GFP fluorescence was visualized within a shorter time under a higher osmotic potential.

  9. Structural dynamics and activity of nanocatalysts inside fuel cells by in operando atomic pair distribution studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Shan, Shiyao; Ren, Yang; Wu, Jinfang; Cronk, Hannah; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2016-05-01

    Here we present the results from a study aimed at clarifying the relationship between the atomic structure and activity of nanocatalysts for chemical reactions driving fuel cells, such as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, using in operando high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) we tracked the evolution of the atomic structure and activity of noble metal-transition metal (NM-TM) nanocatalysts for ORR as they function at the cathode of a fully operational proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Experimental HE-XRD data were analysed in terms of atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) and compared to the current output of the PEMFC, which was also recorded during the experiments. The comparison revealed that under actual operating conditions, NM-TM nanocatalysts can undergo structural changes that differ significantly in both length-scale and dynamics and so can suffer losses in their ORR activity that differ significantly in both character and magnitude. Therefore we argue that strategies for reducing ORR activity losses should implement steps for achieving control not only over the length but also over the time-scale of the structural changes of NM-TM NPs that indeed occur during PEMFC operation. Moreover, we demonstrate how such a control can be achieved and thereby the performance of PEMFCs improved considerably. Last but not least, we argue that the unique capabilities of in operando HE-XRD coupled to atomic PDF analysis to characterize active nanocatalysts inside operating fuel cells both in a time-resolved manner and with atomic level resolution, i.e. in 4D, can serve well the ongoing search for nanocatalysts that deliver more with less platinum.Here we present the results from a study aimed at clarifying the relationship between the atomic structure and activity of nanocatalysts for chemical reactions driving fuel cells, such as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, using in operando high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE

  10. Structural dynamics and activity of nanocatalysts inside fuel cells by in operando atomic pair distribution studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Shan, Shiyao; Ren, Yang; Wu, Jinfang; Cronk, Hannah; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2016-05-19

    Here we present the results from a study aimed at clarifying the relationship between the atomic structure and activity of nanocatalysts for chemical reactions driving fuel cells, such as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, using in operando high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) we tracked the evolution of the atomic structure and activity of noble metal-transition metal (NM-TM) nanocatalysts for ORR as they function at the cathode of a fully operational proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Experimental HE-XRD data were analysed in terms of atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) and compared to the current output of the PEMFC, which was also recorded during the experiments. The comparison revealed that under actual operating conditions, NM-TM nanocatalysts can undergo structural changes that differ significantly in both length-scale and dynamics and so can suffer losses in their ORR activity that differ significantly in both character and magnitude. Therefore we argue that strategies for reducing ORR activity losses should implement steps for achieving control not only over the length but also over the time-scale of the structural changes of NM-TM NPs that indeed occur during PEMFC operation. Moreover, we demonstrate how such a control can be achieved and thereby the performance of PEMFCs improved considerably. Last but not least, we argue that the unique capabilities of in operando HE-XRD coupled to atomic PDF analysis to characterize active nanocatalysts inside operating fuel cells both in a time-resolved manner and with atomic level resolution, i.e. in 4D, can serve well the ongoing search for nanocatalysts that deliver more with less platinum.

  11. Migration and distribution of bone marrow stromal cells in injured spinal cord with different transplantation techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Li; DU Fei; CHENG Bang-chang; PENG Hao; LIU Shi-qing

    2008-01-01

    To study the regularity of migration and distribution of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs)in iniured spinal cord with intradural space transplantation.Methods:Forty Wistar rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups. The spinal cord injury,model was prepared according to the modified Allen method. BMSCs were labeled by CM-Dil. And 5.0×10 6 cells were transplanted by different channels including intraventricular injection(Group A),injured spinal cord intrathecally injection(Group B),remote intrathecally injection at the L3-L4 level(Group C),and intravenous injection(Group D). Spinal cord was dissected at 24 hours,1,2,3 and 4 weeks after transplantation.Sections of 4 μm were cut on a cryostat and observed under fluorescence microscopy.Results:No fluorescence was observed 24 hours after transplantation in spinal cord injury parenchyma except Group B. One week later,BMSCs in Groups A and C began to migrate to the injured parenchyma;2-4 weeks later,BMSCs penetrated into the injured parenchyma except Group D.The number of BMSCS decreased at 3-4 weeks after transplantation. The number of cells in Group B decreased faster than that of Groups A and C.Conclusions:BMSCs transplanted through intraventricular injection,injured spinal cord intrathecally injection and remote intrathecal injection could migrate to the injured parenchyma of spinal cord effectively. The number of BMSCs migrated into injured spinal cord parenchyma is rare by intravenous injection.

  12. Structural dynamics and activity of nanocatalysts inside fuel cells by in operando atomic pair distribution studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Shan, Shiyao; Ren, Yang; Wu, Jinfang; Cronk, Hannah; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2016-05-19

    Here we present the results from a study aimed at clarifying the relationship between the atomic structure and activity of nanocatalysts for chemical reactions driving fuel cells, such as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, using in operando high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) we tracked the evolution of the atomic structure and activity of noble metal-transition metal (NM-TM) nanocatalysts for ORR as they function at the cathode of a fully operational proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Experimental HE-XRD data were analysed in terms of atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) and compared to the current output of the PEMFC, which was also recorded during the experiments. The comparison revealed that under actual operating conditions, NM-TM nanocatalysts can undergo structural changes that differ significantly in both length-scale and dynamics and so can suffer losses in their ORR activity that differ significantly in both character and magnitude. Therefore we argue that strategies for reducing ORR activity losses should implement steps for achieving control not only over the length but also over the time-scale of the structural changes of NM-TM NPs that indeed occur during PEMFC operation. Moreover, we demonstrate how such a control can be achieved and thereby the performance of PEMFCs improved considerably. Last but not least, we argue that the unique capabilities of in operando HE-XRD coupled to atomic PDF analysis to characterize active nanocatalysts inside operating fuel cells both in a time-resolved manner and with atomic level resolution, i.e. in 4D, can serve well the ongoing search for nanocatalysts that deliver more with less platinum. PMID:27160891

  13. A Direct Measurement of the Total Decay Width of the Top Quark

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Chokheli, Davit; Cho, Kihyeon; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; D'Errico, Maria; Devoto, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; Donati, Simone; D'Onofrio, Monica; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Elagin, Andrey L; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Giurgiu, Gavril A; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Goldin, Daniel; Gold, Michael S; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Gomez, Gervasio; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Harr, Robert Francis; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Junk, Thomas R; Jun, Soon Yung; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kimura, Naoki; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Young-Kee; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leone, Sandra; Leo, Sabato; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucà, Alessandra; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lysak, Roman; Lys, Jeremy E; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Marchese, Luigi Marchese; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Martínez-Perez, Mario; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Neu, Christopher Carl; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Oksuzian, Iuri Artur; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Prokoshin, Fedor; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Ranjan, Niharika; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Song, Hao; Sorin, Maria Veronica; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Tecker-Shreyber, Irina; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the total decay width of the top quark using events with top-antitop-quark pair candidates reconstructed in the final state with one charged lepton and four or more hadronic jets. We use the full Tevatron Run~II data set of $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$~TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector. The top-quark mass and the mass of the hadronically-decaying $W$ boson are reconstructed for each event and compared with distributions derived from simulated signal and background samples to extract the top-quark width (\\gmt) and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with {\\it in-situ} calibration. For a top-quark mass $\\mtop = \\gevcc{172.5}$, we find $1.10<\\gmt<\\gev{4.05}$ at 68\\% confidence level, which is in agreement with the standard-model expectation of \\gev{1.3} and is the most precise direct measurement of the top-quark width to date.

  14. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falgari, P. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Spinoza Inst.; Papanastasiou, A.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Signer, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-03-15

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of {Gamma}{sub X}/m{sub X}, with {Gamma}{sub X} and m{sub X} the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the q anti q partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naive counting {proportional_to}{Gamma}{sub t}/m{sub t}{proportional_to}1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  15. Direct Measurement of the Total Decay Width of the Top Quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-11-01

    We present a measurement of the total decay width of the top quark using events with top-antitop quark pair candidates reconstructed in the final state with one charged lepton and four or more hadronic jets. We use the full Tevatron run II data set of s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector. The top quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson are reconstructed for each event and compared with distributions derived from simulated signal and background samples to extract the top quark width (Γtop) and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. For a top quark mass Mtop=172.5GeV/c2, we find 1.10<Γtop<4.05GeV at 68% confidence level, which is in agreement with the standard model expectation of 1.3 GeV and is the most precise direct measurement of the top quark width to date.

  16. Dynamic Voltage Restorer Based on Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N S P Venkatesh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Power Quality problems encompass a wide range of disturbances such as voltage sags, swells, flicker,harmonics distortion and interruptions. The strategic deployment of custom power devices has been proposed asone of the means to protect sensitive loads from power quality problems such as voltage sags and swells. The Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR is a power electronic device that is used to inject 3-phase voltage in series and in synchronism with the distribution feeder voltages in order to compensate voltage sag and similarly itreacts quickly to inject the appropriate voltage component (negative voltage magnitude in order to compensate voltage swell. The principal component of the DVR is a voltage source inverter that generates three phase voltages and provides the voltage support to a sensitive load during voltage sags and swells. Pulse Width Modulation Technique is very critical for proper control of DVR. Sinusoidal Pulse Width Modulation (SPWM and Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation (SVPWM control techniques are used for controlling the DVR. Inthis work, the operation of DVR is presented and the control technique used for voltage source inverter is Space Vector PWM technique. Space vector PWM can utilize the better dc voltage and generates the fewer harmonic in inverter output voltage than Sinusoidal PWM technique. This work describes the DVR based on Space Vector PWM which provides voltage support to sensitive loads and is simulated by using MATLAB/SIMULINK. Simulation results show that the control approach is able to compensate for any type of voltage sags and swells.

  17. A distributed real-time model of degradation in a solid oxide fuel cell, part II: Analysis of fuel cell performance and potential failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccaria, V.; Tucker, D.; Traverso, A.

    2016-09-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells are characterized by very high efficiency, low emissions level, and large fuel flexibility. Unfortunately, their elevated costs and relatively short lifetimes reduce the economic feasibility of these technologies at the present time. Several mechanisms contribute to degrade fuel cell performance during time, and the study of these degradation modes and potential mitigation actions is critical to ensure the durability of the fuel cell and their long-term stability. In this work, localized degradation of a solid oxide fuel cell is modeled in real-time and its effects on various cell parameters are analyzed. Profile distributions of overpotential, temperature, heat generation, and temperature gradients in the stack are investigated during degradation. Several causes of failure could occur in the fuel cell if no proper control actions are applied. A local analysis of critical parameters conducted shows where the issues are and how they could be mitigated in order to extend the life of the cell.

  18. Fluorescence microscopical studies on chitin distribution in the cell wall of giant cells of Saccharomyces uvarum, grown following X-radiaiton treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teast cells are synchronized and modiated with X-rays (1.0 kGy) in the Cr, phase. Their growth behaviour is observed in suspension cultures and the formation of giant cells noted. The chitin structures are selectively stained with the fluorescent dye Calcofluor white. In the unradiated cells the chitin is deposited at the bud constriction site in the form of rings in the mother cell wall, whereas for irradiated cells only one chitin ring of normal appearance is formed between the mother cell and first bud equivalent. Between further bud equivalents an intensification of fluorescence is occasionally noted, however the organisation of the chitin into a regular ring arrangement is disturbed. In giant cells the facility for primary and secondary septa formation is missing and these are essential for successful cell division. By further experiments it was possible to identify the cause of disturbance in the cell cycle of irradiated cells. Giant cells only form one chitin ring because its DNA is replicated one time only. The major cause triggering the actual formation of giant cells must be considered the missing distribution of the once-rephicated DNA. All processes in the cell cycle dependent on this step are therefore stopped and only bud formation which occurs independently continues along its rhytmical path. (orig./MG)

  19. Lipid droplets characterization in adipocyte differentiated 3T3-L1 cells: size and optical density distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rizzatti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The 3T3-L1 cell line, derived from 3T3 cells, is widely used in biological research on adipose tissue. 3T3-L1 cells have a fibroblast-like morphology, but, under appropriate conditions, they differentiate into an adipocyte-like phenotype. During the differentiation process, 3T3-L1 cells increase the synthesis of triglycerides and acquire the behavior of adipose cells. In particular, triglycerides accumulate in lipid droplets (LDs embedded in the cytoplasm. The number and the size distribution of the LDs is often correlated with obesity and many other pathologies linked with fat accumulation. The integrated optical density (IOD of the LDs is related with the amount of triglycerides in the droplets. The aim of this study is the attempt to characterize the size distribution and the IOD of the LDs in 3T3-L1 differentiated cells. The cells were differentiated into adipocytes for 5 days with a standard procedure, stained with Oil Red O and observed with an optical microscope. The diameter, area, optical density of the LDs were measured. We found an asymmetry of the kernel density distribution of the maximum Feret’s diameter of the LDs with a tail due to very large LDs. More information regarding the birth of the LDs could help in finding the best mathematical model in order to analyze fat accumulation in adipocytes.

  20. Measurement of the W boson mass and width using a novel recoil model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetstein, Matthew J.; /Maryland U.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents a direct measurement of the W boson mass (M{sub W}) and decay width ({Lambda}{sub W}) in 1 fb{sup -1} of W {yields} e{nu} collider data at D0 using a novel method to model the hadronic recoil. The mass is extracted from fits to the transverse mass M{sub T}, p{sub T}(e), and E{sub T} distributions. The width is extracted from fits to the tail of the M{sub T} distribution. The electron energy measurement is simulated using a parameterized model, and the recoil is modeled using a new technique by which Z recoils are chosen from a data library to match the p{sub T} and direction of each generated W boson. We measure the the W boson mass to be M{sub W} = 80.4035 {+-} 0.024(stat) {+-} 0.039(syst) from the M{sub T}, M{sub W} = 80.4165 {+-} 0.027(stat) {+-} 0.038(syst) from the pT(e), and MW = 80.4025 {+-} 0.023(stat) {+-} 0.043(syst) from the E{sub T} distributions. {Lambda}{sub W} is measured to be {Lambda}{sub W} = 2.025 {+-} 0.038(stat) {+-} 0.061(syst) GeV.

  1. Measurement of the W boson mass and width using a novel recoil model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents a direct measurement of the W boson mass (MW) and decay widthW) in 1 fb-1 of W → ev collider data at D0 using a novel method to model the hadronic recoil. The mass is extracted from fits to the transverse mass MT, pT(e), and ET distributions. The width is extracted from fits to the tail of the MT distribution. The electron energy measurement is simulated using a parameterized model, and the recoil is modeled using a new technique by which Z recoils are chosen from a data library to match the pT and direction of each generated W boson. We measure the the W boson mass to be MW = 80.4035 ± 0.024(stat) ± 0.039(syst) from the MT, MW = 80.4165 ± 0.027(stat) ± 0.038(syst) from the pT(e), and MW = 80.4025 ± 0.023(stat) ± 0.043(syst) from the ET distributions. ΓW is measured to be ΓW = 2.025 ± 0.038(stat) ± 0.061(syst) GeV.

  2. Interrogating a Fiber Bragg Grating Vibration Sensor by Narrow Line Width Light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Chang; Dian-Heng Huo; Liang-Zhu Ma; Xiao-Hui Liu; Tong-Yu Liu; Chang Wang

    2008-01-01

    A method to interrogate fiber Bragg grating vibration sensor by narrow line width light is demonstrated. The interrogation scheme takes advantage of the intensity modulation of narrow spectral bandwidth light, such as distributed feedback laser, when a reflection or transmission spectrum curve of an fiber Bragg grating (FBG) moves due to the strain which is applied on the sensor. The sensor's response to accelerating frequency and amplitude is measured by experiment. The factors which have impacts on the sensitivity of the interrogation system are also discussed.

  3. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 μm diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed. (author)

  4. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Roberta G.; Santos, Carlos Antônio N.; Junior, Antônio Palumbo; Souza, Pedro A. V. R.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-05-01

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45° incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 μm diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed.

  5. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Energia Nuclear; Santos, Carlos Antonio N. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia - Bioengenharia; Palumbo Junior, Antonio; Souza, Pedro A.V.R.; Nasciutti, Luiz E., E-mail: nasciutt@ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Interacoes Celulares

    2011-07-01

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 {mu}m diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed. (author)

  6. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Santos, Carlos Antonio N.; Junior, Antonio Palumbo; Souza, Pedro A. V. R.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear, PEN/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biotecnologia - Bioengenharia - DIPRO, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial, Xerem. 25250-020, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Interacoes Celulares, ICB-CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941- 590, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear, PEN/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Interacoes Celulares, ICB-CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941- 590, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear, PEN/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-05-17

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg. incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 {mu}m diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed.

  7. Numerical simulation of red blood cell distributions in three-dimensional microvascular bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyakutake, Toru; Nagai, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    We constructed three-dimensional microvascular bifurcation models using a parent vessel of diameter 10μm and investigated the flow behavior of the red blood cells (RBCs) through bifurcations. We considered symmetric and asymmetric model types. Two cases of equal daughter vessel diameter were employed for the asymmetric models, where the first was 10μm, which is the same as the parent vessel and the second was 7.94μm, which satisfies Murray's law. Simulated blood flow was computed using the lattice Boltzmann method in conjunction with the immersed boundary method for incorporating fluid-membrane interactions between the flow field and deformable RBCs. First, we investigated the flow behavior of a single RBC through microvascular bifurcations. In the case of the symmetric bifurcation, the turning point of the fractional plasma flow wherein the RBC flow changed from one daughter vessel to the other was 0.50. This turning point was however different for asymmetric bifurcations. Additionally, we varied the initial offset of RBCs from the centerline of the parent vessel. The simulation results indicated that the RBCs preferentially flow through the branch of a larger flow ratio. Next, we investigated the distribution characteristics of multiple RBCs. Simulations indicated that the results of the symmetric model were similar to those predicted by a previously published empirical model. On the other hand, results of asymmetric models deviated from those of the symmetric and empirical models. These results suggest that the distribution of RBCs varies according to the bifurcation angle and daughter vessel diameter in a microvascular bifurcation of the size considered.

  8. The impact of capillary dilation on the distribution of red blood cells in artificial networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Franca; Reichold, Johannes; Weber, Bruno; Jenny, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that pericytes around capillaries are contractile and able to alter the diameter of capillaries. To investigate the effects of capillary dilation on network dynamics, we performed simulations in artificial capillary networks of different sizes and complexities. The unequal partition of hematocrit at diverging bifurcations was modeled by assuming that each red blood cell (RBC) enters the branch with the faster instantaneous flow. Network simulations with and without RBCs were performed to investigate the effect of local dilations. The results showed that the increase in flow rate due to capillary dilation was less when the effects of RBCs are included. For bifurcations with sufficient RBCs in the parent vessel and nearly equal flows in the branches, the flow rate in the dilated branch did not increase. Instead, a self-regulation of flow was observed due to accumulation of RBCs in the dilated capillary. A parametric study was performed to examine the dependence on initial capillary diameter, dilation factor, and tube hematocrit. Furthermore, the conditions needed for an efficient self-regulation mechanism are discussed. The results support the hypothesis that RBCs play a significant role for the fluid dynamics in capillary networks and that it is crucial to consider the blood flow rate and the distribution of RBCs to understand the supply of oxygen in the vasculature. Furthermore, our results suggest that capillary dilation/constriction offers the potential of being an efficient mechanism to alter the distribution of RBCs locally and hence could be important for the local regulation of oxygen delivery. PMID:25617356

  9. Power Quality Enhancement use DSTATCOM Based on Sinusoidal Pulse Width Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Jawlkar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effects Distribution STATCOM (DSTATCOM[1] for power quality problems, like voltage sag and swell based on Sinusoidal Pulse Width Modulation (SPWM[4] technique. A three-phase four-wire DSTATCOM (distribution static compensator based on three-leg VSC (voltage source converter and a star/delta transformer is proposed for power quality improvement. A harmonic current, reactive power and balances the load. Three single phase transformers are connected as star/delta transformer for interfacing to a three phase four-wire power distribution system and the required rating of the VSC [2] is reduced. However, a 4-leg VSC (voltage source converter[5] based DSTATCOM (Distribution Static Compensator is used for the load compensation and neutral current compensation in 3-phase 4-wire distribution system Power quality is an occurrence manifested as a nonstandard voltage, current or frequency that results in a failure of end use equipments. The major problems dealt here is the voltage sag and swell. To solve this problem, custom power devices are used. One of those devices is the Distribution STATCOM (D-STATCOM, which is the most efficient and effective modern custom power device used in power distribution networks. D-STATCOM injects a current in to the system to correct the voltage sag and swell. The control of the Voltage Source Converter (VSC is done with the help of SPWM. The proposed D-STATCOM [11] is modelled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK software [13

  10. Determination of the width of the top quark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Ćwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-01-14

    We extract the total width of the top quark, Γ(t), from the partial decay width Γ(t → Wb) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top-quark production and from the branching fraction B(t → Wb) measured in tt events using up to 2.3  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron pp Collider. The result is Γ(t) = 1.99(-0.55)(+0.69)  GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of τ(t) = (3.3(-0.9)(+1.3)) × 10(-25)   s. Assuming a high mass fourth generation b' quark and unitarity of the four-generation quark-mixing matrix, we set the first upper limit on |V(tb')| < 0.63 at 95% C.L.

  11. Histogram bin width selection for time-dependent Poisson processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Shinomoto, Shigeru [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2004-07-23

    In constructing a time histogram of the event sequences derived from a nonstationary point process, we wish to determine the bin width such that the mean squared error of the histogram from the underlying rate of occurrence is minimized. We find that the optimal bin widths obtained for a doubly stochastic Poisson process and a sinusoidally regulated Poisson process exhibit different scaling relations with respect to the number of sequences, time scale and amplitude of rate modulation, but both diverge under similar parametric conditions. This implies that under these conditions, no determination of the time-dependent rate can be made. We also apply the kernel method to these point processes, and find that the optimal kernels do not exhibit any critical phenomena, unlike the time histogram method.

  12. Histogram bin width selection for time-dependent Poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2004-07-01

    In constructing a time histogram of the event sequences derived from a nonstationary point process, we wish to determine the bin width such that the mean squared error of the histogram from the underlying rate of occurrence is minimized. We find that the optimal bin widths obtained for a doubly stochastic Poisson process and a sinusoidally regulated Poisson process exhibit different scaling relations with respect to the number of sequences, time scale and amplitude of rate modulation, but both diverge under similar parametric conditions. This implies that under these conditions, no determination of the time-dependent rate can be made. We also apply the kernel method to these point processes, and find that the optimal kernels do not exhibit any critical phenomena, unlike the time histogram method.

  13. On the Angular Width of Diffractive Beam in Anisotropic Media

    CERN Document Server

    Lock, Edwin H

    2011-01-01

    2-D diffraction patterns arising in the far-field region were investigated theoretically for the case, when the plane wave with non collinear group and phase velocities is incident on the wide slit in opaque screen with arbitrary orientation. This investigation was carried out by consideration as an example of magnetostatic surface wave diffraction in tangentially magnetized ferrite slab. It was deduced the universal analytical formula, which one can use to calculate the angular width of diffractive beam in any 2-D anisotropic geometries for the waves of various nature. It was shown, that in 2-D anisotropic geometries this width may be not only more or less then the value L/D (L - wavelength of incident wave, D - length of slit), but it also may be equal to zero in certain conditions.

  14. Determination of the width of the top quark

    OpenAIRE

    Abazov, V.; B. Abbott; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.; M. Adams; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.; Alkhazov, G.; Altona, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.(Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil); Ancu, L.; Aoki, M.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.

    2010-01-01

    We extract the total width of the top quark, Gamma_t, from the partial decay width Gamma(t -> W b) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top quark production and from the branching fraction B(t -> W b) measured in ttbar events using up to 2.3 fb^-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron ppbar Collider. The result is Gamma_t = 1.99 +0.69 -0.55 GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of tau_t = (3.3 +1.3 -0.9) x 10^-25 s. Assuming a high...

  15. Joint space width in dysplasia of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Søballe, K;

    2005-01-01

    In a longitudinal case-control study, we followed 81 subjects with dysplasia of the hip and 136 control subjects without dysplasia for ten years assessing radiological evidence of degeneration of the hip at admission and follow-up. There were no cases of subluxation in the group with dysplasia....... Neither subjects with dysplasia nor controls had radiological signs of ongoing degenerative disease at admission. The primary radiological discriminator of degeneration of the hip was a change in the minimum joint space width over time. There were no significant differences between these with dysplasia...... and controls in regard to age, body mass index or occupational exposure to daily repeated lifting at admission.We found no significant differences in the reduction of the joint space width at follow-up between subjects with dysplasia and the control subjects nor in self-reported pain in the hip. The...

  16. Determination of the width of the top quark

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Altona, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; \\degAsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besan?con, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdinb, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-P?erez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Th?ery, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M -C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; ?Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; D?eliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, 47 R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J -F; Grohsjean, A; Gr?unendahl, S; Gr?unewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haasc, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; La Cruz, I Heredia-De; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffr?e, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Justed, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kur?ca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garciae, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Maga?na-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Mart?\\inez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Garz?on, G J Otero y; Owen, 1 M; Padilla, M; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridgec, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petrillo, G; P?etroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M -A; Podesta-Lermaf, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M -E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; S?anchez-Hern?andez, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; S?oldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S Uvarov S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P

    2010-01-01

    We extract the total width of the top quark, Gamma_t, from the partial decay width Gamma(t -> W b) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top quark production and from the branching fraction B(t -> W b) measured in ttbar events using up to 2.3 fb^-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron ppbar Collider. The result is Gamma_t = 1.99 +0.69 -0.55 GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of tau_t = (3.3 +1.3 -0.9) x 10^-25 s. Assuming a high mass fourth generation b' quark and unitarity of the four-generation quark-mixing matrix, we set the first upper limit on |Vtb'| < 0.63 at 95% C.L.

  17. The SOL width and the MHD interchange instability in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerner, W. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Pogutse, O. [Kurchatov institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-07-01

    Instabilities in the SOL plasma can strongly influence the SOL plasma behaviour and in particular the SOL width. The SOL stability analysis shows that there exists a critical ratio of the thermal energy and the magnetic energy. If the SOL beta is greater than this critical value, the magnetic field cannot prevent the plasma displacement and a strong MHD instability in the SOL occurs. In the opposite case only slower resistive instabilities can develop. A theoretical investigation of the SOL plasma stability is presented for JET single-null and double-null divertor configurations. The dependence of the stability threshold on the SOL beta and on the sheath resistance is established. Applying a simple mixing length argument gives the scaling of the SOL width. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Beam Width Robustness of a 670 GHz Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K. B.; Llombart, N.; Dengler, R. J.; Siegel, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    Detection of a replica bomb belt concealed on a mannequin at 4 m standoff range is achieved using a 670 GHz imaging radar. At a somewhat larger standoff range of 4.6 m, the radar's beam width increases substantially, but the through-shirt image quality remains good. This suggests that a relatively modest increase in aperture size over the current design will be sufficient to detect person-borne concealed weapons at ranges exceeding 25 meters.

  19. Temperature Dependence of Spreading Width of Giant Dipole Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Storozhenko, A N; Ventura, A; Blokhin, A I

    2002-01-01

    The Quasiparticle-Phonon Nuclear Model extended to finite temperature within the framework of Thermo Field Dynamics is applied to calculate a temperature dependence of the spreading width Gamma^{\\downarrow} of a giant dipole resonance. Numerical calculations are made for ^{120}Sn and ^{208}Pb nuclei. It is found that Gamma^{\\downarrow} increases with T. The reason of this effect is discussed as well as a relation of the present approach to other ones, existing in the literature.

  20. Distribution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors genes in the Italian Caucasian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariani M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs are a family of inhibitory and activatory receptors that are expressed by most natural killer (NK cells. The KIR gene family is polymorphic: genomic diversity is achieved through differences in gene content and allelic polymorphism. The number of KIR loci has been reported to vary among individuals, resulting in different KIR haplotypes. In this study we report the genotypic structure of KIRs in 217 unrelated healthy Italian individuals from 22 immunogenetics laboratories, located in the northern, central and southern regions of Italy. Methods Two hundred and seventeen DNA samples were studied by a low resolution PCR-SSP kit designed to identify all KIR genes. Results All 17 KIR genes were observed in the population with different frequencies than other Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations; framework genes KIR3DL3, KIR3DP1, KIR2DL4 and KIR3DL2 were present in all individuals. Sixty-five different profiles were found in this Italian population study. Haplotype A remains the most prevalent and genotype 1, with a frequency of 28.5%, is the most commonly observed in the Italian population. Conclusion The Italian Caucasian population shows polymorphism of the KIR gene family like other Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations. Although 64 genotypes have been observed, genotype 1 remains the most frequent as already observed in other populations. Such knowledge of the KIR gene distribution in populations is very useful in the study of associations with diseases and in selection of donors for haploidentical bone marrow transplantation.

  1. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). On the recovery of the count-in-cell probability distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Di Porto, C.; Cucciati, O.; Granett, B. R.; Iovino, A.; de la Torre, S.; Marinoni, C.; Guzzo, L.; Moscardini, L.; Cappi, A.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Coupon, J.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Marchetti, A.; Mellier, Y.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.

    2016-04-01

    We compare three methods to measure the count-in-cell probability density function of galaxies in a spectroscopic redshift survey. From this comparison we found that, when the sampling is low (the average number of object per cell is around unity), it is necessary to use a parametric method to model the galaxy distribution. We used a set of mock catalogues of VIPERS to verify if we were able to reconstruct the cell-count probability distribution once the observational strategy is applied. We find that, in the simulated catalogues, the probability distribution of galaxies is better represented by a Gamma expansion than a skewed log-normal distribution. Finally, we correct the cell-count probability distribution function from the angular selection effect of the VIMOS instrument and study the redshift and absolute magnitude dependency of the underlying galaxy density function in VIPERS from redshift 0.5 to 1.1. We found a very weak evolution of the probability density distribution function and that it is well approximated by a Gamma distribution, independently of the chosen tracers. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programmes 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/

  2. Space maintainer effects on intercanine arch width and length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, M; Haydar, S; Unsal, B; Turk, T

    1996-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of space maintainers in intercanine arch width and length, twenty cases, characterized with the early loss of mandibular primary molars were selected and divided into two groups. The treatment group used removable space maintainers, while the other ten cases served as the control group. The first dental casts of the treatment and control groups were obtained when the primary canines were in the mouth. After the eruption of permanent canines second dental casts were obtained in both groups. Six measurements were made on the dental casts of each patient. No parameter was found to be statistically significant in the treatment group. In the control group the increase in intercanine arch width and perimeter were found to be statistically significant. Also the increase at the buccal and lingual bone measurements were found to be statistically significant. These results showed that space maintainers might cease the increase in intercanine arch width and length during the transition period between the primary and permanent canines.

  3. Evolution and diversity of subduction zones controlled by slab width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellart, W P; Freeman, J; Stegman, D R; Moresi, L; May, D

    2007-03-15

    Subducting slabs provide the main driving force for plate motion and flow in the Earth's mantle, and geodynamic, seismic and geochemical studies offer insight into slab dynamics and subduction-induced flow. Most previous geodynamic studies treat subduction zones as either infinite in trench-parallel extent (that is, two-dimensional) or finite in width but fixed in space. Subduction zones and their associated slabs are, however, limited in lateral extent (250-7,400 km) and their three-dimensional geometry evolves over time. Here we show that slab width controls two first-order features of plate tectonics-the curvature of subduction zones and their tendency to retreat backwards with time. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations of free subduction, we show that trench migration rate is inversely related to slab width and depends on proximity to a lateral slab edge. These results are consistent with retreat velocities observed globally, with maximum velocities (6-16 cm yr(-1)) only observed close to slab edges (2,000 km) retreat velocities are always slow ( or =4,000 km) are nearly stationary in the centre and develop a convex geometry, whereas trench retreat increases towards concave-shaped edges. Additionally, we identify periods (5-10 Myr) of slow trench advance at the centre of wide slabs. Such wide-slab behaviour may explain mountain building in the central Andes, as being a consequence of its tectonic setting, far from slab edges. PMID:17361181

  4. The lineshape problem in Doppler-width thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenica De Vizia, Maria; Moretti, Luigi; Castrillo, Antonio; Fasci, Eugenio; Gianfrani, Livio

    2011-09-01

    Typically eliminated in any experiment of time and frequency metrology, the Doppler broadening effect can be regarded as a gift of nature for the purpose of measuring the thermodynamic temperature of a gaseous sample. Nevertheless, Doppler-width retrieval from highly-accurate absorption spectra is surely not an easy task as it requires an adequate knowledge of the lineshape function, accounting for the different mechanisms that contribute to the overall linewidth. Semiclassical theories provide several possibilities, more or less accurate in reproducing the observed profiles. Here, the influence of the choice of the lineshape model in Doppler-width thermometry is investigated in the physical situation of self-colliding ? O molecules. A large number of absorption profiles were simulated, using the uncorrelated version of the speed-dependent Galatry profile and setting different values for the gas pressure, the signal-to-noise ratio and the Dicke-narrowing parameter. Spectral analysis was performed by means of different models, in order to retrieve the zero-pressure value of the Doppler width. It turned out that precision and accuracy can be pushed to extreme levels provided that the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high (namely, larger than 50,000) and that a speed-dependent lineshape model is used.

  5. Two-Pion Decay Widths of Excited Charm Mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Lähde, T A

    2001-01-01

    The widths for $\\pi\\pi$ decay of the L=1 charm mesons are calculated by describing the pion coupling to light constituents quarks by the lowest order chiral interaction. The wavefunctions of the charm mesons are obtained as solutions to the covariant Blankenbecler-Sugar equation. These solutions correspond to an interaction Hamiltonian modeled as the sum of a linear scalar confining and a screened one-gluon exchange (OGE) interaction. This interaction induces a two-quark contribution to the amplitude for two-pion decay, which is found to interfere destructively with the single quark amplitude. For the currently known L=1 $D$ mesons, the total $\\pi\\pi$ decay widths are found to be $\\sim 1$ MeV for the $D_1(2420)$ and $\\sim 3$ MeV for the $D^*_2(2460)$ if the axial coupling of the constituent quark is taken to be $g_A^q=1$. The as yet undiscovered spin singlet $D_1^*$ state is predicted to have a larger width of 7 - 10 MeV for $\\pi\\pi$ decay.

  6. A New Measurement of the Pi0 Radiative Decay Width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larin, I; Clinton, E; Ambrozewicz, P; Lawrence, D; Nakagawa, I; Prok, Y; Teymurazyan, A; Ahmidouch, A; Baker, K; Benton, L; Bernstein, A M; Burkert, V; Cole, P; Collins, P; Dale, D; Danagoulian, S; Davidenko, G; Demirchyan, R; Deur, A; Dolgolenko, A; Dzyubenko, Georgiy; Ent, R; Evdokimov, A; Feng, J; Gabrielyan, M; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Gevorkyan, S; Glamazdin, A; Goryachev, V; Gyurjyan, V; Hardy, K; He, J; Ito, M; Jiang, L; Kashy, D; Khandaker, M; Kingsberry, P; Kolarkar, A; Konchatnyi, M; Korsch, W; Kowalski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kubarovsky, V; Li, X; Martel, P; Mecking, B; Milbrath, B; Minehart, R; Miskimen, R; Mochalov, V; Mtingwa, S; Overby, S; Pasyuk, E; Payen, M; Pedroni, R; Ritchie, B; Rodrigues, T E; Salgado, C; Shahinyan, A; Sitnikov, A; Sober, D; Stepanyan, S; Stephens, W; Underwood, J; Vishnyakov, V; Wood, M

    2011-04-01

    High precision measurements of the differential cross sections for $\\pi^0$ photoproduction at forward angles for two nuclei, $^{12}$C and $^{208}$Pb, have been performed for incident photon energies of 4.9 - 5.5 GeV to extract the ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width. The experiment was done at Jefferson Lab using the Hall~B photon tagger and a high-resolution multichannel calorimeter. The ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width was extracted by fitting the measured cross sections using recently updated theoretical models for the process. The resulting value for the decay width is $\\Gamma{(\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma)} = 7.82 \\pm 0.14 ~({\\rm stat.}) \\pm 0.17 ~({\\rm syst.}) ~{\\rm eV}$. With the 2.8\\% total uncertainty, this result is a factor of 2.5 more precise than the current PDG average of this fundamental quantity and it is consistent with current theoretical predictions.

  7. A New Measurement of the $\\pi^0$ Radiative Decay Width

    CERN Document Server

    Larin, I; Clinton, E; Ambrozewicz, P; Lawrence, D; Nakagawa, I; Prok, Y; Teymurazyan, A; Ahmidouch, A; Asratyan, A; Baker, K; Benton, L; Bernstein, A M; Burkert, V; Cole, P; Collins, P; Dale, D; Danagoulian, S; Davidenko, G; Demirchyan, R; Deur, A; Dolgolenko, A; Dzyubenko, G; Ent, R; Evdokimov, A; Feng, J; Gabrielyan, M; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Gevorkyan, S; Glamazdin, A; Goryachev, V; Gyurjyan, V; Hardy, K; He, J; Ito, M; Jiang, L; Kashy, D; Khandaker, M; Kingsberry, P; Kolarkar, A; Konchatnyi, M; Korchin, A; Korsch, W; Kowalski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kubarovsky, V; Li, X; Martel, P; Matveev, V; Mecking, B; Milbrath, B; Minehart, R; Miskimen, R; Mochalov, V; Mtingwa, S; Overby, S; Pasyuk, E; Payen, M; Pedroni, R; Ritchie, B; Rodrigues, T E; Salgado, C; Shahinyan, A; Sitnikov, A; Sober, D; Stepanyan, S; Stephens, W; Underwood, J; Vasiliev, A; Vishnyakov, V; Wood, M; Zhou, S

    2010-01-01

    High precision measurements of the differential cross sections for $\\pi^0$ photoproduction at forward angles for two nuclei, $^{12}$C and $^{208}$Pb, have been performed for incident photon energies of 4.9 - 5.5 GeV to extract the ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width. The experiment was done at Jefferson Lab using the Hall B photon tagger and a high-resolution multichannel calorimeter. The ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width was extracted by fitting the measured cross sections using recently updated theoretical models for the process. The resulting value for the decay width is $\\Gamma{(\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma)} = 7.82 \\pm 0.14 ~({\\rm stat.}) \\pm 0.17 ~({\\rm syst.}) ~{\\rm eV}$. With the 2.8% total uncertainty, this result is a factor of 2.5 more precise than the current PDG average of this fundamental quantity and it is consistent with current theoretical predictions.

  8. Measurement of the mass and width of the W boson

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J A; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2006-01-01

    The mass and width of the W boson are measured using e+e- -> W+W- events from the data sample collected by the OPAL experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 170 GeV and 209 GeV. The mass (mw) and width (gw) are determined using direct reconstruction of the kinematics of W+W- -> qqbarlv and W+W- -> qqbarqqbar events. When combined with previous OPAL measurements using W+W- -> lvlv events and the dependence on mw of the WW production cross-section at threshold, the results are determined to be mw = 80.415 +- 0.042 +- 0.030 +- 0.009 GeV gw = 1.996 +- 0.096 +- 0.102 +- 0.003 GeV where the first error is statistical, the second systematic and the third due to uncertainties in the value of the LEP beam energy. By measuring mw with several different jet algorithms in the qqbarqqbar channel, a limit is also obtained on possible final-state interactions due to colour reconnection effects in W+W- -> qqbarqqbar events. The consistency of the results for the W mass and width with those inferred from other ele...

  9. Differential distribution of non-structural proteins of foot-and-mouth disease virus in BHK-21 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences in the kinetics of expression and cell distribution among FMDV non-structural proteins (NSPs) have been observed in BHK-21-infected cells. 3Dpol was the first protein detected by immunofluorescence (1.5 h p.i.), showing a perinuclear distribution. At 2-2.5 h p.i., 2B, 2C, 3B and 3C were detected, mostly exhibiting a punctuated, scattered pattern, while 3A and 3Dpol appeared concentrated at one side of the nucleus. This distribution was exhibited by all the NSPs from 3 h p.i., being 2C and, to a lesser extent, precursors 2BC and 3ABBB, the only proteins detected by Western blotting at that infection time. From 4 h p.i., all mature NSPs as well as precursors 2BC, 3ABBB, 3ABB, 3AB and 3CDpol were detected by this technique. In spite of their similar immunofluorescence patterns, 2C and 3A co-localized partially by confocal microscopy at 3.5 h p.i., and 3A, but not 2C, co-localized with the ER marker calreticulin, suggesting differences in the distribution of these proteins and/or their precursors as infection proceeded. Transient expression of 2C and 3AB resulted in punctuated fluorescence patterns similar to those found in early infected cells, while 3A showed a more diffuse distribution. A shift towards a fibrous pattern was noticed for 3ABB, while a major change was observed in cells expressing 3ABBB, which displayed a perinuclear fibrous distribution. Interestingly, when co-expressed with 3Dpol, the pattern observed for 3ABBB fluorescence was altered, resembling that exhibited by cells transfected with 3AB. Transient expression of 3Dpol showed a homogeneous cell distribution that included, as determined by confocal microscopy, the nucleus. This was confirmed by the detection of 3Dpol in nuclear fractions of transfected cells. 3Dpol and its precursor 3CDpol were also detected in nuclear fractions of infected cells, suggesting that these proteins can directly interact with the nucleus during FMDV infection

  10. The distribution of impurities in the interfaces and window layers of thin-film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a systematic multielement study of impurities in CdS window layers by dynamic and quantitative secondary-ion-mass spectrometry (SIMS) with high depth resolution. The study was carried out on CdTe/CdS solar cell structures, with the glass substrate removed. The analysis proceeded from the transparent conductive oxide free surface to the CdTe absorbing layer with a view to examining the influence of the CdCl2 heat treatment on the distribution and concentration of impurities in the structures. Special attention was paid to the impurities present in the CdS window layer that may be electrically active, and therefore affect the characteristics of the CdTe/CdS device. It was shown that Cl, Na, and Sb impurities had higher concentrations in CdS following cadmium chloride (CdCl2) heat treatment while Pb, O, Sn, and Cu conserved the same concentration. Furthermore, Zn, Si, and In showed slightly lower concentrations on CdCl2 treatment. Possible explanations of these changes are discussed and the results compared with previous SIMS measurements from the 'back wall' (i.e., from the CdTe free surface through the glass substrate) obtained from the same structures

  11. Maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Fazal; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups. Materials and Methods: The calculated sample size was 128 subjects. The crown width/height, arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width of the maxilla and mandible were obtained via digital calliper (Mitutoyo, Japan). A total of 4325 variables were measured. The sex differences in the crown width and height were evaluated. Analysis of variance was applied to evaluate the differences between arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups. Results: Males had significantly larger mean values for crown width and height than females (P ≤ 0.05) for maxillary and mandibular arches, both. There were no significant differences observed for the crown width/height ratio in various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups (P ≤ 0.05) in maxilla and mandible, both. Conclusions: Our results indicate sexual disparities in the crown width and height. Crown width and height has no significant relation to various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups of maxilla and mandible. Thus, it may be helpful for orthodontic and prosthodontic case investigations and comprehensive management. PMID:26929686

  12. Effect of Salinity on the Composition, Number and Size of Epidermal Cells along the Mature Blade of Wheat Leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Salinity inhibits leaf growth in association with changes in cell size. The objective of this study was to determine the spatial distributions of the composition, number and dimensions of epidermal cells in the mature blades of leaf four of wheat seedlings under saline conditions. Plants were grown in loamy soil either with or without 120 mmol/L NaCl in a growth chamber, and harvested after leaf four was fully developed. The results of the spatial distribution analyses of width along the blade showed that salinity not only reduced the width of the leaf blade, but that it also altered the distribution pattern of blade width along the leaf axis. The reduction in the final size of the leaf blade was associated with a reduction in the total number of epidermal cells and in their widths and lengths. This study also revealed the spatial effects of salinity on the blade and epidermal cell dimensions along the leaf axis. In particular, salinity inhibited the total cell number for interstomatal, sister and elongated cells, implying that cell division in wheat leaves is inhibited by salinity. However, the lengths of interstomatal cells were not affected by salinity (unlike those for the sister and elongated cells), suggesting the relative contributions of cell length and numbers to the reduction in the final length of the blade under salinity is dependent on cell type.

  13. [Cellular distribution and behavior of metallothionein in mammalian cells following exposure to silver nanoparticles and silver ions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyayama, Takamitsu; Arai, Yuta; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Hirano, Seishiro

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are commercially used mainly as antibacterial reagents in wound dressing and deodorant powders. However, the mechanisms underlying Ag toxicity in mammals are not fully understood. In the present study, we assessed cellular distribution and toxicity of AgNPs and AgNO3 in mouse macrophage cell line (J774.1) and those of AgNO3 in human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) focusing on behavior of metallothionein (MT). J774.1 cells were exposed to 0-100 μg Ag/mL AgNPs or AgNO3 and BEAS-2B cells were exposed to 0-100 μM AgNO3 for 24 h. The cytotoxicity was assayed by a modified MTT method. The cellular concentration and distribution of Ag were evaluated by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectorometry (ICP-MS) and laser scanning microscopy. Distribution of Ag to MT and other proteins was determined using HPLC-ICP-MS. Most AgNPs were found in lysosomes in J774.1 at 3 h after post exposure. Ag was distributed to high molecular weight proteins in AgNPs-exposed cells, while most Ag was bound to MT in AgNO3-exposed cells. In AgNO3-exposed BEAS-2B cells cellular Ag concentration and Ag-bound MT (Ag-MT) were sharply increased up to 3 h and then decreased. ROS production appeared to cause relocation of MT-bound Ag to mitochondria, which evoked inhibition of electron transport chain. AgNPs were sequestered by high-molecular weight proteins rather than MT, probably because they were taken up by lysosomes before induction of MT.

  14. A CFD study of hygro-thermal stresses distribution in tubular-shaped ambient air-breathing PEM micro fuel cell during regular cell operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for improved lifetime of air-breathing proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cells for portable applications necessitates that the failure mechanisms be clearly understood and life prediction models be developed, so that new designs can be introduced to improve long-term performance. An operating air-breathing PEM fuel cell has varying local conditions of temperature, humidity. As a result of in the changes in temperature and moisture, the membrane, GDL and bipolar plates will all experience expansion and contraction. Because of the different thermal expansion and swelling coefficients between these materials, hygro-thermal stresses are introduced into the unit cell during operation. In addition, the non-uniform current and reactant flow distributions in the cell result in non-uniform temperature and moisture content of the cell which could in turn, potentially causing localized increases in the stress magnitudes, and this leads to mechanical damage, which can appear as through-the-thickness flaws or pinholes in the membrane, or delaminating between the polymer membrane and gas diffusion layers. Therefore, in order to acquire a complete understanding of these damage mechanisms in the membranes and gas diffusion layers, mechanical response under steady-state hygro-thermal stresses should be studied under real cell operation conditions. A three-dimensional, multi–phase, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a novel, tubular, ambient air-breathing, proton exchange membrane micro fuel cell has been developed and used to investigate the displacement, deformation, and stresses inside the whole cell, which developed during the cell operation due to the changes of temperature and relative humidity. The behaviour of the fuel cell during operation has been studied and investigated under real cell operating conditions. In addition to the new and complex geometry, a unique feature of the present model is to incorporate the effect of

  15. Flow cytometry total cell counts: a field study assessing microbiological water quality and growth in unchlorinated drinking water distribution systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, G.; Van der Mark, E.J.; Verberk, J.Q.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    e objective of this study was to evaluate the application of flow cytometry total cell counts (TCCs) as a parameter to assess microbial growth in drinking water distribution systems and to determine the relationships between different parameters describing the biostability of treated water. A one-ye

  16. Design of low-power hybrid digital pulse width modulator with piecewise calibration scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Shaowei; Hou, Sijian; Gan, Wubing; Chen, Jingbo; Luo, Ping; Zhang, Bo

    2015-12-01

    A low-power hybrid digital pulse width modulator (DPWM) is proposed in the paper. Owing to the piecewise calibration scheme, the delay time of delay line is locked to target frequency. The delay line consists of two piecewise lines with different control codes. The delay time of each cell in one sub-delay-line is longer than the last significant bit (LSB) of DPWM, while the delay time of each cell in the other sub-delay-line is shorter than LSB. Optimum linearity is realised with minimum standard cells. Simulation results show that the differential nonlinearity and integral nonlinearity are improved from 5.1 to 0.4 and from 5 to 1.3, respectively. The DPWM is fully synthesised and fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS process. The proposed DPWM occupies a silicon area of 0.01 mm2, with 31.5 μw core power consumption. Experimental results are shown to demonstrate the 2-MHz, 10-bit resolution implementation. Pulse width histogram is firstly introduced to characterise the linearity of the DPWM.

  17. Simulation study on the effect of pre-evacuation time and exit width on evacuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Guanquan; SUN Jinhua; WANG Qingsong; CHEN Sining

    2006-01-01

    Occupant pre-evacuation time is often oversimplified into an explicit value in evacuation calculation. In fact, it is not an explicit value but a random variable following some kind of probability distribution. In order to analyze the importance of pre-evacuation time in evacuation calculation, GridFlow evacuation model is utilized to study the effect of pre-evacuation time on evacuation under different occupant densities and exit widths in a single room scenario. The evacuation time calculated by using normal pre-evacuation distribution is compared with that calculated by explicit pre-evacuation time. Two faults are presented when pre-evacuation time is considered as an explicit value. The theory of congestion and queue is presented to analyze the calculation results. Moreover, this paper also presents probability distribution of the total evacuation time when the pre-evacuation time follows normal distribution. The results show that the evacuation time is dominated by pre-evacuation time and hardly dependent on occupant density when the mean pre- evacuation time is long. For long mean pre-evacua- tion time, low occupant density or wide exit, when pre-evacuation time follows normal distribution, the total evacuation time also follows normal distribution.

  18. Determination of {alpha}-widths in {sup 19}F relevant to fluorine nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, F. de [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Coc, A. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Aguer, P. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Angulo, C. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Bogaert, G. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Kiener, J. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Lefebvre, A. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Tatischeff, V. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Thibaud, J.P. [CSNSM, 91 - Orsay (France); Fortier, S. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Maison, J.M. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Rosier, L. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Rotbard, G. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Vernotte, J. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Arnould, M. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Inst. d`Astronomie et d`Astrophysique; Jorissen, A. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Inst. d`Astronomie et d`Astrophysique; Mowlavi, N. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Inst. d`Astronomie et d`Astrophysique

    1996-01-29

    Nucleosynthesis of fluorine in the context of helium burning occurs through the {sup 15}N({alpha},{gamma}){sup 19}F reaction. At temperatures where fluorine formation takes place in most astrophysical models, the narrow resonance associated with the 4.378 MeV level of {sup 19}F is expected to dominate the reaction rate, but its strength is not known. We used a {sup 15}N confined gas target to study this level by means of the transfer reaction {sup 15}N({sup 7}Li,t){sup 19}F at 28 MeV. Reaction products were analysed with a split pole magnetic spectrometer and the angular distributions for the first 16 levels of {sup 19}F were extracted. These distributions are fairly well reproduced by FR-DWBA calculations in the framework of an {alpha}-cluster transfer model with a compound nucleus contribution obtained by Hauser-Feshbach calculations. {alpha}-spectroscopic factors were deduced and, for unbound levels, the {alpha}-widths were determined and compared with the existing direct measurements. The {alpha}-width of the level of astrophysical interest (E{sub x} 4.378 MeV) was found to be {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}=1.5 x 10{sup -9} eV, a value 60 times smaller than the commonly used one. The astrophysical consequences for {sup 19}F production in AGB stars are discussed. (orig.).

  19. Study of flow channel geometry using current distribution measurement in a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Justo; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Pinar, F. Javier; Úbeda, Diego

    To improve fuel cell design and performance, research studies supported by a wide variety of physical and electrochemical methods have to be carried out. Among the different techniques, current distribution measurement owns the desired feature that can be performed during operation, revealing information about internal phenomena when the fuel cell is working. Moreover, short durability is one of the main problems that is hindering fuel cell wide implementation and it is known to be related to current density heterogeneities over the electrode surface. A good flow channel geometry design can favor a uniform current density profile, hence hypothetically extending fuel cell life. With this, it was thought that a study on the influence of flow channel geometry on the performance of a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell using current distribution measurement should be a very solid work to optimize flow field design. Results demonstrate that the 4 step serpentine and pin-type geometries distribute the reactants more effectively, obtaining a relatively flat current density map at higher current densities than parallel or interdigitated ones and yielding maximum powers up to 25% higher when using oxygen as comburent. If air is the oxidant chosen, interdigitated flow channels perform almost as well as serpentine or pin-type due to that the flow conditions are very important for this geometry.

  20. Optical tweezers assisted imaging of the Z-ring in Escherichia coli: measuring its radial width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmon, G.; Kumar, P.; Feingold, M.

    2014-01-01

    Using single-beam, oscillating optical tweezers we can trap and rotate rod-shaped bacterial cells with respect to the optical axis. This technique allows imaging fluorescently labeled three-dimensional sub-cellular structures from different, optimized viewpoints. To illustrate our method we measure D, the radial width of the Z-ring in unconstricted Escherichia coli. We use cells that express FtsZ-GFP and have their cytoplasmic membrane stained with FM4-64. In a vertically oriented cell, both the Z-ring and the cytoplasmic membrane images appear as symmetric circular structures that lend themselves to quantitative analysis. We found that D ≅ 100 nm, much larger than expected.

  1. Frequency distribution of sickle cell anemia, sickle cell trait and sickle/beta-thalassemia among anemic patients in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Elsayid, Mohieldin; Al-Shehri, Mohammed Jahman; Alkulaibi, Yasser Abdullah; Alanazi, Abdullah; Qureshi, Shoeb

    2015-01-01

    Background: Notwithstanding, the growing incidence of sickle cell hemoglobinopathies (SCH) such as sickle cell anemia (SCA) or sickle cell disease, sickle/beta-thalassemia; the exact prevalence remains obscure in Saudi Arabia. Hence, this study is an attempt to determine the frequency of SCA and sickle cell trait (SCT) among all anemic patients with SCH treated at the King Abdul-Aziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Furthermore, the hemoglobin (Hb) S and other Hb patterns (Hb AS and...

  2. A biomimetic physiological model for human adipose tissue by adipocytes and endothelial cell cocultures with spatially controlled distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rui; Du, Yanan; Zhang, Renji; Lin, Feng; Luan, Jie

    2013-08-01

    An in vitro model that recapitulates the characteristics of native human adipose tissue would largely benefit pathology studies and therapy development. In this paper, we fabricated a physiological model composed of both human adipocytes and endothelial cells with spatially controlled distribution that biomimics the structure and composition of human adipose tissue. Detailed studies into the cell-cell interactions between the adipocytes and endothelial cells revealed a mutual-enhanced effect which resembles the in vivo routine. Furthermore, comparisons between planar coculture and model coculture demonstrated improved adipocyte function as well as endothelial cell proliferation under the same conditions. This research provided a reliable model for human adipose tissue development studies and potential obesity-related therapy development.

  3. Effects of berberine on proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis of human breast cancer T47D and MCF7 cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, Elmira; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Movahhed, Tahereh Komeili; Atashpour, Shekoufeh; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Azizi, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Berberine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid, has shown antitumor properties in some in vitro systems. But the effect of berberine on breast cancer has not yet been completely studied. In this study, we evaluated anticancer properties of berberine in comparison to doxorubicin. Materials and Methods: The antiproliferative effects of berberine and doxorubicin alone and in combination were evaluated in T47D and MCF7 cell lines using MTT cytotoxicity assay. In addition, flow cytometry analysis was performed to evaluate the cell cycle alteration and apoptosis induction in these cell lines following exposure to berberine and doxorubicin alone and in combination. Results: The IC50 of berberine was determined to be 25 µM after 48 hr of treatment in both cell lines but for doxorubicin it was 250 nM and 500 nM in T47D and MCF-7 cell lines, respectively. Co-treatment with berberine and doxorubicin increased cytotoxicity in T47D cells more significantly than in MCF-7 cells. Flow cytometry results demonstrated that berberine alone or in combination with doxorubicin induced G2/M arrest in the T47D cells, but G0/G1 arrest in the MCF-7 cells. Doxorubicin alone induced G2/M arrest in both cell lines. Furthermore, berberine and doxorubicin alone or in combination significantly induced apoptosis in both cell lines. Conclusion: Berberine alone and in combination with doxorubicin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and altered cell cycle distribution of breast cancer cells. Therefore, berberine showed to be a good candidate for further studies as a new anticancer drug in the treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:26019795

  4. A CFD model for analysis of performance, water and thermal distribution, and mechanical related failure in PEM fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive three–dimensional, multi–phase, non-isothermal model of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM fuel cell that incorporates significant physical processes and key parameters affecting the fuel cell performance. The model construction involves equations derivation, boundary conditions setting, and solution algorithm flow chart. Equations in gas flow channels, gas diffusion layers (GDLs, catalyst layers (CLs, and membrane as well as equations governing cell potential and hygro-thermal stresses are described. The algorithm flow chart starts from input of the desired cell current density, initialization, iteration of the equations solution, and finalizations by calculating the cell potential. In order to analyze performance, water and thermal distribution, and mechanical related failure in the cell, the equations are solved using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD code. Performance analysis includes a performance curve which plots the cell potential (Volt against nominal current density (A/cm2 as well as losses. Velocity vectors of gas and liquid water, liquid water saturation, and water content profile are calculated. Thermal distribution is then calculated together with hygro-thermal stresses and deformation. The CFD model was executed under boundary conditions of 20°C room temperature, 35% relative humidity, and 1 MPA pressure on the lower surface. Parameters values of membrane electrode assembly (MEA and other base conditions are selected. A cell with dimension of 1 mm x 1 mm x 50 mm is used as the object of analysis. The nominal current density of 1.4 A/cm2 is given as the input of the CFD calculation. The results show that the model represents well the performance curve obtained through experiment. Moreover, it can be concluded that the model can help in understanding complex process in the cell which is hard to be studied experimentally, and also provides computer aided tool for design and optimization of PEM

  5. Distribution of dystrophin- and utrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC/UAPC) in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teniente-De Alba, Carmen; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Vivanco-Calixto, Raúl; Galván, Iván J; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Cerecedo, Doris

    2011-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are defined by their cardinal properties, such as sustained proliferation, multilineage differentiation, and self-renewal, which give rise to a hierarchy of progenitor populations with more restricted potential lineage, ultimately leading to the production of all types of mature blood cells. HSC are anchored by cell adhesion molecules to their specific microenvironment, thus regulating their cell cycle, while cell migration is essentially required for seeding the HSC of the fetal bone marrow (BM) during development as well as in adult BM homeostasis. The dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) is a large group of membrane-associated proteins linking the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and exhibiting scaffolding, adhesion, and signaling roles in muscle and non-muscle cells including mature blood cells. Because adhesion and migration are mechanisms that influence the fate of the HSC, we explored the presence and the feasible role of DAPC. In this study, we characterized the pattern expression by immunoblot technique and, by confocal microscopy analysis, the cellular distribution of dystrophin and utrophin gene products, and the dystrophin-associated proteins (α-, β-dystroglycan, α-syntrophin, α-dystrobrevin) in relation to actin filaments in freshly isolated CD34+ cells from umbilical cord blood. Immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the presence of Dp71d/Dp71Δ110m ∼DAPC and Up400/Up140∼DAPC. The subcellular distribution of the two DAPC in actin-based structures suggests their dynamic participation in adhesion and cell migration. In addition, the particular protein pattern expression found in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells might be indicative of their feasible participation during differentiation.

  6. A Case for Distributed Control of Local Stem Cell Behavior in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahni, Ramin; Efroni, Idan; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2016-09-26

    The root meristem has a centrally located group of mitotically quiescent cells, to which current models assign a stem cell organizer function. However, evidence is emerging for decentralized control of stem cell activity, whereby self-renewing behavior emerges from the lack of cell displacement at the border of opposing differentiation gradients. We term this a "stagnation" model due to its reliance on passive mechanics. The position of stem cells is established by two opposing axes that reciprocally control each other's differentiation. Such broad tissue organization programs would allow plants, like some animal systems, to rapidly reconstitute stem cells from non-stem-cell tissues. PMID:27676436

  7. Development and characterisation of a new line width reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new critical dimension (CD, often synonymously used for line width) reference material with improved vertical parallel sidewalls (IVPSs) has been developed and characterised. The sample has a size of 6 mm  ×  6 mm, consisting of 4 groups of 5  ×  5 feature patterns. Each feature pattern has a group of five reference line features with a nominal CD of 50 nm, 70 nm, 90 nm, 110 nm and 130 nm, respectively. Each feature pattern includes a pair of triangular alignment marks, applicable for precisely identifying the target measurement position, e.g. for comparison or calibration between different tools. The geometry of line features has been investigated thoroughly using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope and a CD atomic force microscope (CD-AFM). Their results indicate the high quality of the line features: the top corner radius of  <7 nm, vertical sidewall (slope mostly within 90°  ±  0.5°) and very small line width variation (LWR down to 0.36 nm). The application of the developed sample for calibrating the scaling factor and effective tip geometry of the CD-AFM are demonstrated. The scaling factor of the CD-AFM is calibrated to be 0.9988, coinciding well with the theoretical value 1 as the tool was calibrated to a traceable metrological atomic force microscope. The effective width of a CDR120-EBD tip is calibrated as 128.32 nm. Finally, a strategy for the non-destructive calibration of the developed sample is introduced, which enables the application of the reference material in practice. (paper)

  8. Radial Regge trajectories and leptonic widths of the isovector mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalian, A. M.; Bakker, B. L. G.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that two physical phenomena are important for high excitations: (i) the screening of the universal gluon-exchange potential and (ii) the flattening of the confining potential owing to creation of quark loops, and both effects are determined quantitatively. Taking the first effect into account, we predict the masses of the ground states with l =0 , 1, 2 in agreement with experiment. The flattening effect ensures the observed linear behavior of the radial Regge trajectories M2(n )=m02+nrμ2 GeV2, where the slope μ2 is very sensitive to the parameter γ , which determines the weakening of the string tension σ (r ) at large distances. For the ρ trajectory the linear behavior starts with nr=1 and the values μ2=1.40 (2 ) GeV2 for γ =0.40 and μ2=1.34 (1 ) GeV2 for γ =0.45 are obtained. For the excited states the leptonic widths Γee(ρ (775 ))=7.0 (3 ) keV , Γee(ρ (1450 ))=1.7 (1 ) keV , Γee(ρ (1900 ))=1.0 (1 ) keV , Γee(ρ (2150 ))=0.7 (1 ) keV , and Γee(1 3D1)=0.26 (5 ) keV are calculated, if these states are considered as purely q q ¯ states. The width Γee(ρ (1700 )) increases if ρ (1700 ) is mixed with the 2 3S1 state, giving for a mixing angle θ =21 ° almost equal widths: Γee(ρ (1700 ))=0.75 (6 ) keV and Γee(1450 )=1.0 (1 ) keV .

  9. Bacterial Cell Wall-Induced Arthritis: Chemical Composition and Tissue Distribution of Four Lactobacillus Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Šimelyte, Egle; Rimpiläinen, Marja; Lehtonen, Leena; Zhang, Xiang; Toivanen, Paavo

    2000-01-01

    To study what determines the arthritogenicity of bacterial cell walls, cell wall-induced arthritis in the rat was applied, using four strains of Lactobacillus. Three of the strains used proved to induce chronic arthritis in the rat; all were Lactobacillus casei. The cell wall of Lactobacillus fermentum did not induce chronic arthritis. All arthritogenic bacterial cell walls had the same peptidoglycan structure, whereas that of L. fermentum was different. Likewise, all arthritogenic cell walls...

  10. Width of the confining string in Yang-Mills theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliozzi, F; Pepe, M; Wiese, U-J

    2010-06-11

    We investigate the transverse fluctuations of the confining string connecting two static quarks in (2+1)D SU(2) Yang-Mills theory using Monte Carlo calculations. The exponentially suppressed signal is extracted from the large noise by a very efficient multilevel algorithm. The resulting width of the string increases logarithmically with the distance between the static quark charges. Corrections at intermediate distances due to universal higher-order terms in the effective string action are calculated analytically. They accurately fit the numerical data.

  11. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F. D.; Hagel, K.; Kühn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O.; Charity, R. J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R. S.; Simon, R. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    High-energy γ rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of 136Xe+48Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width Γ is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy E*. A saturation at about Γ=10 MeV is observed for E*/A>=1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  12. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F.D.; Hagel, K.; Kuehn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O. (II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet, Giessen, Giessen (Germany)); Charity, R.J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R.S.; Simon, R.S.; Wessels, J.P. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)); Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A.A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Florence, Florence (Italy))

    1992-07-13

    High-energy {gamma} rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of {sup 136}Xe+{sup 48}Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width {Gamma} is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy {ital E}{sup *}. A saturation at about {Gamma}=10 MeV is observed for {ital E}{sup *}/{ital A}{ge}1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  13. Pulse-width modulated DC-DC power converters

    CERN Document Server

    Kazimierczuk, Marian K

    2008-01-01

    This book studies switch-mode power supplies (SMPS) in great detail. This type of converter changes an unregulated DC voltage into a high-frequency pulse-width modulated (PWM) voltage controlled by varying the duty cycle, then changes the PWM AC voltage to a regulated DC voltage at a high efficiency by rectification and filtering. Used to supply electronic circuits, this converter saves energy and space in the overall system. With concept-orientated explanations, this book offers state-of-the-art SMPS technology and promotes an understanding of the principle operations of PWM converters,

  14. Stark Widths of Spectral Lines of Neutral Neon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Milan S. Dimitrijević; Zoran Simić; Andjelka Kovačević; Aleksandar Valjarević; Sylvie Sahal-Bréchot

    2015-12-01

    In order to complete Stark broadening data for Ne I spectral lines which are needed for analysis of stellar atmospheres, collisional widths and shifts (the so-called Stark broadening parameters) of 29 isolated spectral lines of neutral neon have been determined within the impact semiclassical perturbation method. Calculations have been performed for the broadening by collisions with electrons, protons and ionized helium for astrophysical applications, and for collisions with ionized neon and argon for laboratory plasma diagnostics. The shifts have been compared with existing experimental values. The obtained data will be included in the STARK-B database, which is a part of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center – VAMDC.

  15. Impact of fuel cell power plants on multi-objective optimal operation management of distribution network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, T. [Electrical and Electronic Engineering Department, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zeinoddini-Meymand, H. [Islamic Azad University, Kerman Branch, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    This paper presents an interactive fuzzy satisfying method based on hybrid modified honey bee mating optimization and differential evolution (MHBMO-DE) to solve the multi-objective optimal operation management (MOOM) problem, which can be affected by fuel cell power plants (FCPPs). The objective functions are to minimize total electrical energy losses, total electrical energy cost, total pollutant emission produced by sources, and deviation of bus voltages. A new interactive fuzzy satisfying method is presented to solve the multi-objective problem by assuming that the decision-maker (DM) has fuzzy goals for each of the objective functions. Through the interaction with the DM, the fuzzy goals of the DM are quantified by eliciting the corresponding membership functions. Then, by considering the current solution, the DM acts on this solution by updating the reference membership values until the satisfying solution for the DM can be obtained. The MOOM problem is modeled as a mixed integer nonlinear programming problem. Evolutionary methods are used to solve this problem because of their independence from type of the objective function and constraints. Recently researchers have presented a new evolutionary method called honey bee mating optimization (HBMO) algorithm. Original HBMO often converges to local optima, in order to overcome this shortcoming, we propose a new method that improves the mating process and also, combines the modified HBMO with DE algorithm. Numerical results for a distribution test system have been presented to illustrate the performance and applicability of the proposed method. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Intratumoral distribution of EGFR-amplified and EGFR-mutated cells in pulmonary adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Shingo; Tsuta, Koji; Takano, Toshimi; Hatanaka, Yutaka; Yoshida, Akihiko; Suzuki, Kenji; Asamura, Hisao; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2014-03-01

    Alterations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are associated with carcinogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer. However, the intratumoral distribution of these abnormalities has not been elucidated. This study included patients with surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma. The predominant histological growth pattern was determined. Chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and EGFR-mutation specific-antibodies were used for analysis of changes in gene copy number and EGFR mutations, respectively. EGFR mutation detected immunohistochemistry (IHC) and amplification were identified in 31 (53%) and 30 (52%) cases, respectively. The predominant growth patterns in the 58 tumors evaluated were papillary (28, 48%), lepidic (8, 14%), acinar (15, 26%), and solid (7, 12%). EGFR mutations were the least common in cases with a solid predominant pattern. The incidence of EGFR amplification did not differ among predominant patterns. Analyzing each histological subtype, no differences were noted between the prevalence of EGFR-IHC positive and CISH-positive rates. In the analysis of EGFR amplification, CISH-positive status was more prevalent in IHC-positive cases than in IHC-negative cases. All 19 cases that were both IHC and CISH positive were analyzed. In 17 cases (90%), the IHC-positive area was equal to or larger than the CISH-positive area. Among the histological subtypes of lung adenocarcinoma, the solid predominant subtype was distinguishable by its infrequent EGFR mutations. EGFR gene mutations preceded changes in oncogenic drive, more so than did EGFR gene number alterations during the developmental process of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:24355440

  17. Cancerous epithelial cell lines shed extracellular vesicles with a bimodal size distribution that is sensitive to glutamine inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Steven Michael; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles (ESVs) facilitate a unique mode of cell-cell communication wherein vesicle uptake can induce a change in the recipient cell's state. Despite the intensity of ESV research, currently reported data represent the bulk characterization of concentrated vesicle samples with little attention paid to heterogeneity. ESV populations likely represent diversity in mechanisms of formation, cargo and size. To better understand ESV subpopulations and the signaling cascades implicated in their formation, we characterize ESV size distributions to identify subpopulations in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. We have discovered that cancer cells exhibit bimodal ESV distributions, one small-diameter and another large-diameter population, suggesting that two mechanisms may govern ESV formation, an exosome population and a cancer-specific microvesicle population. Altered glutamine metabolism in cancer is thought to fuel cancer growth but may also support metastatic niche formation through microvesicle production. We describe the role of a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, in ESV production. We have discovered that inhibiting glutamine metabolism significantly impairs large-diameter microvesicle production in cancer cells.

  18. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate affects the growth of LNCaP cells via membrane fluidity and distribution of cellular zinc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-guo YANG; Hai-ning YU; Shi-li SUN; Lan-cui ZHANG; Guo-qing HE; Undurti N. DAS; Hui RUAN; Sheng-rong SHEN

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the viability, membrane properties, and zinc distribution, with and without the presence of Zn2+, in human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. Methods: We examined changes in cellular morphology and membrane fluidity of LNCaP cells, distribution of cellular zinc, and the incorporated portion of EGCG after treatments with EGCG, Zn2+, and EGCG+Zn2+. Results: We observed an alteration in cellular morphology and a decrease in membrane fluidity of LNCaP cells after treatment with EGCG or Zn2+. The proportion of EGCG incorporated into liposomes treated with the mixture of EGCG and Zn2+ at the ratio of 1:l was 90.57%, which was significantly higher than that treated with EGCG alone (30.33%). Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies and determination of fatty acids showed that the effects of EGCG on the membrane fluidity of LNCaP were decreased by Zn2+. EGCG accelerated the accumulation of zinc in the mitochondria and cytosol as observed by atomic absorption spectrometer. Conclusion: These results show that EGCG interacted with cell membrane,decreased the membrane fluidity of LNCaP cells, and accelerated zinc accumulation in the mitochondria and cytosol, which could be the mechanism by which EGCG inhibits proliferation of LNCaP cells. In addition, high concentrations of Zn2+ could attenuate the actions elicited by EGCG.

  19. Dynamic distribution of Ser-10 phosphorylated histone H3 in cytoplasm of MCF-7 and CHO cells during mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Wen LI; Qin YANG; Jia Tong CHEN; Hao ZHOU; Ru Ming LIU; Xi Tai HUANG

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic distribution of phosphorylated Histone H3 on Ser10 (phospho-H3) in cells was investigated to determine its function during mitosis. Human breast adenocarcinoma cells MCF-7, and Chinese hamster cells CHO were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence staining with an antibody against phospho-H3. We found that the phosphorylation begins at early prophase, and spreads throughout the chromosomes at late prophase. At metaphase, most of the phosphoH3 aggregates at the end of the condensed entity of chromosomes at equatorial plate. During anaphase and telophase,the fluorescent signal of phospho-H3 is detached from chromosomes into cytoplasm. At early anaphase, phospho-H3shows ladder bands between two sets of separated chromosome, and forms "sandwich-like structure" when the chromosomes condensed. With the cleavage progressing, the "ladders" of the histone contract into a bigger bright dot. Then the histone aggregates and some of compacted microtubules in the midbody region are composed into a "bar-like"complex to separate daughter cells. The daughter cells seal their plasma membrane along with the ends of the "bar",inside which locates microtubules and modified histones, to finish the cytokinesis and keep the "bar complex" out of the cells. The specific distribution and kinetics of phospho-H3 in cytoplasm suggest that the modified histones may take part in the formation of midbody and play a crucial role in cytokinesis.

  20. A preliminary optical and electron microscopic study of the beta(1) integrin distribution pattern of human osteosarcoma-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banai, Kiarash; Brady, Ken; McDonald, Fraser

    2004-07-01

    Immunogold labelling was used to study the organisation of the beta(1) integrins on osteosarcoma-derived osteoblasts (Saos-2 and MG-63). Monolayers of cells were prepared in multiwell culture plates on both uncovered and collagen-covered coverslips, and beta(1) integrins were primarily labelled using mouse monoclonal antibodies to beta(1) integrins. Indirect immunofluorescence labels using an anti-mouse fluorescein-conjugated goat antibody showed an even distribution of the beta(1) integrins on the cell membranes of all cell types used. A concentration of 2 microg/ml of the primary antibodies and a 1:100 dilution of the secondary antibodies were determined as the optimal concentration for labelling to use with indirect localisation of the primary antibodies gold conjugated to goat anti-mouse antibodies and viewed under an electron microscope. Ten nanometre gold particles were used for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 40 nm gold particles for scanning electron microscopy. TEM showed that beta(1) integrins were mainly clustered on the cell membrane processes with less labelling on the cell membranes themselves. The distribution of beta(1) integrins on osteosarcoma cells supports the concept that integrins may function by forming focal adhesions at the site of the cytoplasmic membrane processes. PMID:15241608