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Sample records for cell disease patients

  1. Pentazocine dependence among sickle cell disease patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Sickle cell disease is a chronic disease. Severe bone pain is commonly the hallmark of clinical features. This commonly necessitates the use of analgesics especially Opioids which unfortunately have a high potential to produce dependence. The complications of dependence in patients on any psychoactive ...

  2. Lipid profile in sickle cell disease patients with chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dyslipidaemia is reported to occur in patients with sickle cell disease as well as patients with chronic kidney disease irrespective of the haemoglobin genotype. This study aimed at evaluating lipid profile in subjects with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS), sickle cell trait (HbAS) and normal haemoglobin genotype ...

  3. Chronic osteoyelitis in patients with sickle cell disease | Nwadiaro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the baseline pattern and audit management modalities of chronic osteomyelitis in patients with sickle cell disease. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria from August 1993 to July 1997. Patients: Twenty four patients with concomitant chronic sickle cell ...

  4. Addiction or pseudoaddiction in sickle cell disease patients: Time to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this report is to highlight the background factors associated with opioid abuse among Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) patients. Patients: Eleven patients aged 13-53 years (mean, 26.1yrs) which included six female and five male were seen in the last six year at a tertiary health facility. The modes of ...

  5. Towards safer surgery in patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshikhes, Abdul-Wahed N.

    2007-01-01

    Surgery in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has been associated with high morbidity and mortality. In recent years, a marked improvement in the safety of surgery and anesthesia in this high-risk group of patients has been witnessed; owing to the improvements in surgical and anesthetic care, greater awareness of pathophysiology of disease, proper perioperative preparation and attention to factors predisposing to vasoocclusive crises. However, this is not paralleled by similar improvement in countries where the disease is not prevalent. Greater population mobility in recent years makes recognition of surgical manifestations of the disease and awareness of perioperative management of sickle cell patients undergoing surgical interventions of paramount importance. This article aims to summarize steps towards safer surgery in patients with SCD. (author)

  6. Red blood cell alloimmunization in sickle cell disease patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Alloimmunization is a recognized complication of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and causes delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions and provides problems sourcing compatible blood for future transfusions. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of RBC alloimmunization in SCD patients in ...

  7. Stem cell transplantation in primary immunodeficiency disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomonobu; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Toita, Nariaki; Kaneda, Makoto; Hatano, Norikazu; Iguchi, Akihiro; Kawamura, Nobuaki; Ariga, Tadashi

    2007-12-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID) are rare but have a high associated risk of death from overwhelming infection in early childhood. Stem cell transplantation (SCT) can be curative for PID, but standardized protocols for each disease have not yet been established. Between May 1995 and May 2005, nine patients diagnosed with a PID received SCT at the Department of Pediatrics, Hokkaido University Hospital. The median age of the patients (eight boys and one girl) was 1.0 year (range: 6 months-4 years). Five patients had Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), three had severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), and one had X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (X-HIGM). Four patients received bone marrow transplantation (BMT), and five received cord blood stem cell transplantation (CBSCT). All patients, including those with SCID, received a conditioning regimen: six (WAS and X-HIGM) received a myeloablative conditioning regimen, and three (SCID) received a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. All the patients are alive and have stable, complete chimerism, based on a median follow-up period of 4 years. Moreover, all patients have good immune reconstitution, and none required immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Two patients had significant acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and three patients had chronic GVHD. Four of the nine patients developed cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection after SCT. The transplantation procedures appear to have provided a permanent cure in nine PID patients. Early diagnosis and prompt performance of SCT with an optimal donor and conditioning regimen contributed to the favorable outcomes.

  8. Alloimmunization in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease in French Guiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcisse Elenga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study in French Guiana assessed the frequency of alloimmunization to red cell antigens in sickle cell disease patients over 1995–2011 and identified the most common antibodies. A retrospective analysis of the transfusion history and medical records of 302 patients showed that 29/178 transfused patients had developed alloantibodies (16%. The most frequent alloantibodies were anti-LE1, anti-MNS1, anti-LE2, and anti-FY1 and were developed after transfusion of standard red cell units. The frequency of the clinically significant antibodies in this population of SCD patients was 11% (19/178. The antibodies found on those patients who had delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction were anti-K1, anti-FY1, and anti-MNS3. The strategies used to decrease alloimmunization in French Guiana are discussed.

  9. Sleep-disordered breathing in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Vikram M; Whitesell, Peter L; Lim, Seah H

    2018-05-01

    Sickle cell disease is one of the most common hereditary hemoglobinopathies worldwide, and its vaso-occlusive and hemolytic crises cause considerable patient morbidity. A growing body of evidence has shown that sleep-disordered breathing, and in particular, obstructive sleep apnea, occurs at high frequency in the sickle cell population, and that there is significant overlap in the underlying pathophysiology of these two conditions. Through a variety of mechanisms including nocturnal hypoxemia and increased oxidative stress, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and endothelial dysfunction, sickle cell anemia and sleep-disordered breathing potentiate each other's clinical effects and end-organ complications. Here, we will review the shared pathophysiologic mechanisms of these conditions and discuss their clinical sequelae. We will also examine the results of studies that have been carried out with clinical intervention of nocturnal hypoxemia in patients with sickle cell disease in the attempts to overcome the complications of the disease. Finally, we will propose the areas of investigation that merit further investigations in future in patients with sickle cell disease and sleep-disordered breathing.

  10. Stroke prevalence amongst sickle cell disease patients in Nigeria: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is a life-changing, debilitating complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). Previous studies had recorded high stroke prevalence amongst this group of patients. Nigeria has a large population of people affected by this condition and this study aims to assess the stroke prevalence in this large population.

  11. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum in a patient with sickle cell disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum in a patient with sickle cell disease: case report. AM Adam, MC Maritim. Abstract. No Abstract. East African Medical Journal Vol. 85 (2) 2008 pp. 98-101. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  12. Autopsy findings in sickle cell disease patients in Lagos State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autopsy findings in sickle cell disease patients in Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria. ... The study showed that the most common cause of sudden death was anemia-related (50%) while 21% were due to acute infections, 18.4 % were due to cardiovascular events and 4.6% were due to ...

  13. Predictors of osteoclast activity in patients with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouraie, Mehdi; Cheng, Kevin; Niu, Xiaomei; Moore-King, Evadne; Fadojutimi-Akinsi, Margaret F.; Minniti, Caterina P.; Sable, Craig; Rana, Sohail; Dham, Niti; Campbell, Andrew; Ensing, Gregory; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Castro, Oswaldo L.; Gordeuk, Victor R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Bone changes are common in sickle cell disease, but the pathogenesis is not fully understood. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) type 5b is produced by bone-resorbing osteoclasts. In other forms of hemolytic anemia, increased iron stores are associated with osteoporosis. We hypothesized that transfusional iron overload would be associated with increased osteoclast activity in patients with sickle cell disease. Design and Methods We examined tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations in patients with sickle cell disease and normal controls of similar age and sex distribution at steady state. Serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentration was measured using an immunocapture enzyme assay and plasma concentrations of other cytokines were assayed using the Bio-Plex suspension array system. Tricuspid regurgitation velocity, an indirect measure of systolic pulmonary artery pressure, was determined by echocardiography. Results Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations were higher in 58 adults with sickle cell disease than in 22 controls (medians of 4.4 versus 2.4 U/L, respectively; P=0.0001). Among the patients with sickle cell disease, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b independently correlated with blood urea nitrogen (standardized beta=0.40, P=0.003), interleukin-8 (standardized beta=0.30, P=0.020), and chemokine C-C motif ligand 5 (standardized beta=−0.28, P=0.031) concentrations, but not with serum ferritin concentration. Frequent blood transfusions (>10 units in life time) were not associated with higher tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b levels in multivariate analysis. There were strong correlations among tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, alkaline phosphatase and tricuspid regurgitation velocity (r>0.35, Psickle cell disease have increased osteoclast activity as reflected by serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations. Our results may support a potential role of inflammation

  14. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  15. Best practices for transfusion for patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Wun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The beta-globin gene mutation in sickle cell anemia results in anemia and repeated bouts of vascular occlusion. The cumulative effect of these vasocclusive events is progressive damage to many organs including the kidneys, lungs, and brain. The transfusion of red blood cells (RBC can ameliorate many of these complications, but can be associated with both acute and chronic complications, including iron overload. The objective of the Best Practices in Transfusion Medicine for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD Conference was to review the available published evidence and clinical experience surrounding the use of RBC transfusions for sickle cell disease by a panel of experts. The expert panel developed explicit clinical guidelines for the use of RBC in SCD patients. The panel also made recommendations for further research.  A set of guidelines were produced for dissemination to pertinent stakeholders. If implemented, these clinical pathways have the potential to optimize the use of red blood cell transfusions in SCD.

  16. Increased theta band EEG power in sickle cell disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Case M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Case,1 Sina Shirinpour,1 Huishi Zhang,1 Yvonne H Datta,2 Stephen C Nelson,3 Karim T Sadak,4 Kalpna Gupta,2 Bin He1,5 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, 3Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, 4Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital, 5Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Objective: Pain is a major issue in the care of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD. The mechanisms behind pain and the best way to treat it are not well understood. We studied how electroencephalography (EEG is altered in SCD patients. Methods: We recruited 20 SCD patients and compared their resting state EEG to that of 14 healthy controls. EEG power was found across frequency bands using Welch’s method. Electrophysiological source imaging was assessed for each frequency band using the eLORETA algorithm. Results: SCD patients had increased theta power and decreased beta2 power compared to controls. Source localization revealed that areas of greater theta band activity were in areas related to pain processing. Imaging parameters were significantly correlated to emergency department visits, which indicate disease severity and chronic pain intensity. Conclusion: The present results support the pain mechanism referred to as thalamocortical dysrhythmia. This mechanism causes increased theta power in patients. Significance: Our findings show that EEG can be used to quantitatively evaluate differences between controls and SCD patients. Our results show the potential of EEG to differentiate between different levels of pain in an unbiased setting, where specific frequency bands could be used as biomarkers for chronic pain. Keywords: sickle cell disease, electroencephalography, chronic pain, electrophysiological source imaging, thalamocortical dysrhythmia

  17. Iliopsoas hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielonka, Benjamin; Cohen, Alan R; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Doshi, Bhavya S

    2018-03-12

    Although musculoskeletal pain in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) is most frequently the result of vaso-occlusive episodes, clinicians often consider other etiologies including osteomyelitis, avascular necrosis, and trauma. In this study, we report the case of a young female with SCD with hip and back pain secondary to a nontraumatic iliopsoas periosteal hematoma with evidence of adjacent bone infarction. The pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, and management of periosteal hematomas in SCD are reviewed. This case highlights the need for recognition of unusual causes of musculoskeletal pain in SCD. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Modeling neurodegenerative diseases with patient-derived induced pluripotent cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Anna; Zhang, Yu; Chandrasekaran, Abinaya

    2017-01-01

    The rising prevalence of progressive neurodegenerative diseases coupled with increasing longevity poses an economic burden at individual and societal levels. There is currently no effective cure for the majority of neurodegenerative diseases and disease-affected tissues from patients have been...... the opportunity to model disease development, uncover novel mechanisms and test potential therapeutics. Here we review findings from iPSC-based modeling of selected neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and spinocerebellar ataxia. Furthermore, we discuss...

  19. Early occurrence of red blood cell alloimmunization in patients with sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sins, Joep W. R.; Biemond, Bart J.; van den Bersselaar, Sil M.; Heijboer, H.; Rijneveld, Anita W.; Cnossen, Marjon H.; Kerkhoffs, Jean-Louis H.; van Meurs, Alfred H.; von Ronnen, F. B.; Zalpuri, Saurabh; de Rijke, Yolanda B.; Ellen van der Schoot, C.; de Haas, Masja; van der Bom, Johanna G.; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization is a major complication of transfusion therapy in sickle cell disease (SCD). Identification of high-risk patients is hampered by lack of studies that take the cumulative transfusion exposure into account. In this retrospective cohort study among previously

  20. Pregnancy outcome among patients with sickle cell disease in Jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: With advances in management, education, awareness and improved nutrition, men and women with sickle cell disease are enjoying an improved quality of life well into adulthood, when they elect to plan a family. As a result, sickle cell disease is a common haemoglobinopathy encountered during pregnancy in ...

  1. Pregnancy Outcome among Patients with Sickle Cell Disease in Jos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zamzar

    Background: With advances in management, education, awareness and improved nutrition, men and women with sickle cell disease are enjoying an improved quality of life well into adulthood, when they elect to plan a family. As a result, sickle cell disease is a common haemoglobinopathy encountered during pregnancy in ...

  2. Managing acute complications of sickle cell disease in pediatric patients [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sathyaseelan; Chao, Jennifer H; Chaudhari, Pradip

    2016-11-22

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic hematologic disease with a variety of acute, and often recurring, complications. Vaso-occlusive crisis, a unique but common presentation in sickle cell disease, can be challenging to manage. Acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease, occurring in more than half of patients who are hospitalized with a vaso-occlusive crisis. Uncommon diagnoses in children, such as stroke, priapism, and transient red cell aplasia, occur more frequently in patients with sickle cell disease and necessitate a degree of familiarity with the disease process and its management. Patients with sickle cell trait generally have a benign course, but are also subject to serious complications. This issue provides a current review of evidence-based management of the most common acute complications of sickle cell disease seen in pediatric patients in the emergency department. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  3. End-stage renal disease in patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M Alkhunaizi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell nephropathy is a severe complication of sickle cell disease (SCD that has a wide range of manifestations, from asymptomatic microalbuminuria to end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The data on patients with SCD who develop ESRD are scarce. The aim of this study was to explore the course of patients with SCD who developed ESRD and received renal replacement therapy (RRT. The course of patients with SCD who developed ESRD and started dialysis at two centers in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia was retrospectively analyzed. Parameters included age at initiation of dialysis, survival until death or kidney transplantation, hospitalization due to pain crisis, disease-related parameters, and requirement for blood transfusion. Sixteen patients with SCD developed ESRD and started RRT with either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The mean age at initiation of dialysis was 46.6 years. The majority of patients (10 out of 16 were resistant to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA and required blood transfusion repeatedly. Pain crises were infrequently encountered. Median survival was 54 months. Four patients received kidney transplantation with good outcome. In conclusion, most patients with SCD who developed ESRD were resistant to ESA and required repeated blood transfusion. The rate of hospitalization due to pain crisis was relatively low. Survival on dialysis was comparable to that of patients with no SCD, and the post-transplant course was relatively benign.

  4. GVHD (Graft-Versus-Host Disease): A Guide for Patients and Families After Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease): A guide for patients and families after stem cell transplant The immune system is the body's tool ... and attacking them. When you receive a donor's stem cells (the “graft”), the stem cells recreate the donor's ...

  5. Evaluation of transfusion practices in sickle cell disease in Senegal: cohort study of 1078 patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seck, M; Tall, A; Faye, B F; Bah, D Sy; Guéye, Y; Sall, A; Touré, A O; Diop, S

    2017-11-01

    Blood transfusion is an essential therapeutic tool in the treatment of sickle cell disease. Its indications and modalities vary from one country to another as a function of the clinical severity of the disease and the availability of blood products. This study seeks to evaluate the frequency and modalities of blood transfusions as well as their indications in patients with sickle cell syndrome at the Dakar hematology department from 1995 through 2015. This retrospective study reviewed the records of a cohort of 1078 patients with SS, SC, Sβ0 and Sβ + thalassemia sickle cell syndromes and collected data about the type of blood products, indications, modalities, and acute transfusion complications. The frequency of transfusion was adjusted for age, sex, and sickle cell profile. The patients' mean age was 23 years (2-44 years) and the sex ratio 0.9. SS disease was predominant (87.4 %); 28.5% had transfusions during the study period. Patients older than 20 years received more transfusions (P = 0.047). The frequency of transfusions did not differ significantly by gender (P = 0.12), but did by profile: a higher percentage of patients with SS disease required transfusion (P = 0.043). Acute anemia was the most common indication for transfusion (50.03 %). Acute transfusion complications were rare (5.8 %). This study shows that less than one third of sickle cell anemia patients in Senegal have transfusions, a finding that confirms that our patients have fewer transfusions than patients in other countries in Africa or in the West. This limited use of transfusion therapy may be related to a less severe level of disease among patients in Senegal, but also to the availability of blood products.

  6. ABDOMINAL PAIN IN ADULT SICKLE CELL DISEASE PATIENTS: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    had vasoocclusive crises and the reliability index between the provisional diagnosis and the final diagnosis was 67%. Conclusion: Abdominal pain in sickle cell disease may present in different ways and it is important to recognize that the possible diagnoses are numerous. Not all cases are due to vasoocclusive crises.

  7. Growth parametrs among sickle cell disease patients in the Niger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sickle cell disease has been associated with a lot of morbidity and mortality, with an attendant emotional, physical, and financial burden on the affected population. The degree of its burden probably has been on the decline as a result of a combination of better education, counselling and better Medicare.

  8. Abdominal Pain in Adult Sickle Cell Disease Patients: A Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A prospective case series of 20 patients was done in which data was collected on demographic characteristics, hemoglobin electrophoresis patterns, a description of the abdominal pain including sites, severity, and type of pain, packed cell volume and the provisional and final diagnosis. Results: Haemoglobin S ...

  9. Liver Function In Patients With Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using the sensitive ELISA technique, 213 patients with sickle cell anemia (112 males and 101 females) aged 6 months to 18 years were screened for Hepatitis B infection using Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to Hepatitis B core antigen. A biochemical evaluation of liver function was carried out on all ...

  10. Patient-derived stem cells: pathways to drug discovery for brain diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eMackay-Sim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept of drug discovery through stem cell biology is based on technological developments whose genesis is now coincident. The first is automated cell microscopy with concurrent advances in image acquisition and analysis, known as high content screening (HCS. The second is patient-derived stem cells for modelling the cell biology of brain diseases. HCS has developed from the requirements of the pharmaceutical industry for high throughput assays to screen thousands of chemical compounds in the search for new drugs. HCS combines new fluorescent probes with automated microscopy and computational power to quantify the effects of compounds on cell functions. Stem cell biology has advanced greatly since the discovery of genetic reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. There is now a rush of papers describing their generation from patients with various diseases of the nervous system. Although the majority of these have been genetic diseases, iPSCs have been generated from patients with complex diseases (schizophrenia and sporadic Parkinson’s disease. Some genetic diseases are also modelled in embryonic stem cells generated from blastocysts rejected during in vitro fertilisation. Neural stem cells have been isolated from post-mortem brain of Alzheimer’s patients and neural stem cells generated from biopsies of the olfactory organ of patients is another approach. These olfactory neurosphere-derived cells demonstrate robust disease-specific phenotypes in patients with schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease. High content screening is already in use to find small molecules for the generation and differentiation of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. The challenges for using stem cells for drug discovery are to develop robust stem cell culture methods that meet the rigorous requirements for repeatable, consistent quantities of defined cell types at the industrial scale necessary for high

  11. Blood Transfusion in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease Requiring Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz, Amr Mostafa; Meshikhes, Abdul-Wahed N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Surgery in patients with sickle cell disease is associated with high morbidity. To reduce this high morbidity, different preoperative transfusion regimens were introduced. However, blood transfusion is associated with problems. This prospective study aims to establish the safety of conducting laparoscopic cholecystectomy without transfusion in sickle cell disease patients. Methods: Forty patients (16 males and 24 females; mean age 26.6 years) undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectom...

  12. [Acute painful crisis in a female Nigerian patient with sickle cell disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nin, Sayaka; Seki, Masanori; Maie, Koichiro; Kuroda, Akihiro; Miyamoto, Kana; Ogawa, Shinichi; Ito, Yufu; Kurita, Naoki; Yokoyama, Yasuhisa; Sakata Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Obara, Naoshi; Hasegawa, Yuichi; Ogino, Yasuko; Ito, Takayoshi; Chiba, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    We report a 38-year-old Nigerian woman with sickle cell disease. Sickle cell disease had been diagnosed when she experienced her first sickle cell crisis episode at age 8 years. Thereafter, she had infrequent minor episodes. She visited a hospital presenting with fever, anemia, jaundice, and systemic pain, and was then transferred to our hospital. Together with rehydration and red blood cell transfusion, analgesics and antibiotics were prescribed, and produced gradual improvement of all symptoms and signs. The patient was discharged on day 9 of hospitalization. Sickle cell crisis is an acute painful episode caused by occlusion of arterioles. The degree of pain and accompanying symptoms, as well as the frequencies of crises, are variable. Moreover, one third of individuals with sickle cell disease never experience a crisis. As our society becomes increasingly globalized, the probabilities of encountering sickle cell disease patients will be higher.

  13. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Patients with Sickle Cell Disease Display Intact Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Elizabeth O; Chinnadurai, Raghavan; Yuan, Shala; Garcia, Marco; Arafat, Dalia; Gibson, Greg; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Galipeau, Jacques

    2017-05-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only cure for sickle cell disease (SCD), but engraftment remains challenging in patients lacking matched donors. Infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) at the time of HCT may promote hematopoiesis and ameliorate graft-versus-host disease. Experimental murine models suggest MSC major histocompatibility complex compatibility with recipient impacts their in vivo function, suggesting autologous MSCs could be superior to third-party MSCs for promoting HCT engraftment. Here we tested whether bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs from SCD subjects have comparable functionality compared with MSCs from healthy volunteers. SCD MSC doubling time and surface marker phenotype did not differ significantly from non-SCD. Third-party and autologous (SCD) T cell proliferation was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by all MSCs. SCD MSCs comparably expressed indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, which based on transwell and blocking experiments appeared to be the dominant immunomodulatory pathway. The expression of key genes involved in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-MSC interactions was minimally altered between SCD and non-SCD MSCs. Expression was, however, altered by IFN-γ stimulation, particularly CXCL14, CXCL26, CX3CL1, CKITL, and JAG1, indicating the potential to augment MSC expression by cytokine stimulation. These data demonstrate the feasibility of expanding BM-derived MSCs from SCD patients that phenotypically and functionally do not differ per International Society of Cell Therapy essential criteria from non-SCD MSCs, supporting initial evaluation (primarily for safety) of autologous MSCs to enhance haploidentical HSC engraftment in SCD. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Histamine release from gut mast cells from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolte, Hendrik; Spjeldnæs, Nikolaj; Kruse, Aksel

    1990-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators from intestinal mast cells may serve as initiators of acute and delayed inflammation. Mast cell histamine release was measured in 19 patients with inflammatory bowel diseases using gut mast cells from enzymatically dispersed endoscopic forceps biopsy specimens...... of macroscopically inflamed and normal tissue. Mast cells and corresponding basophils were challenged with anti-IgE, anti-IgG, subclass anti-IgG4, and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and results were compared with those from nine patient control subjects. The mast cell count in patients with ulcerative...... colitis was increased compared with that in control subjects and patients with Crohn's disease, and the mast cell count obtained from inflamed tissue was greater than that of normal tissue. The study also shows the heterogeneity of the responsiveness of the histamine releasing cells to various...

  15. Phenotypic differences of CD4(+) T cells in response to red blood cell immunization in transfused sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingert, Benoît; Tamagne, Marie; Habibi, Anoosha; Pakdaman, Sadaf; Ripa, Julie; Elayeb, Rahma; Galacteros, Frédéric; Bierling, Philippe; Ansart-Pirenne, Hélène; Bartolucci, Pablo; Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2015-06-01

    Alloimmunization against red blood cells (RBCs) is the main immunological risk associated with transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). However, about 50-70% of SCD patients never get immunized despite frequent transfusion. In murine models, CD4(+) T cells play a key role in RBC alloimmunization. We therefore explored and compared the CD4(+) T-cell phenotypes and functions between a group of SCD patients (n = 11) who never became immunized despite a high transfusion regimen and a group of SCD patients (n = 10) who had become immunized (at least against Kidd antigen b) after a low transfusion regimen. We studied markers of CD4(+) T-cell function, including TLR, that directly control lymphocyte function, and their spontaneous cytokine production. We also tested responders for the cytokine profile in response to Kidd antigen b peptides. Low TLR2/TLR3 expression and, unexpectedly, strong expression of CD40 on CD4(+) T cells were associated with the nonresponder status, whereas spontaneous expression of IL-10 by CD4(+) T cells and weak Tbet expression were associated with the responder status. A Th17 profile was predominant in responders when stimulated by Jb(k) . These findings implicate CD4(+) T cells in alloimmunization in humans and suggest that they may be exploited to differentiate responders from nonresponders. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Changing practice: red blood cell typing by molecular methods for patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Jessica; Friedman, David F; Jackson, Tannoa; Vege, Sunitha; Westhoff, Connie M; Chou, Stella T

    2015-06-01

    Extended red blood cell (RBC) antigen matching is recommended to limit alloimmunization in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). DNA-based testing to predict blood group phenotypes has enhanced availability of antigen-negative donor units and improved typing of transfused patients, but replacement of routine serologic typing for non-ABO antigens with molecular typing for patients has not been reported. This study compared the historical RBC antigen phenotypes obtained by hemagglutination methods with genotype predictions in 494 patients with SCD. For discrepant results, repeat serologic testing was performed and/or investigated by gene sequencing for silent or variant alleles. Seventy-one typing discrepancies were identified among 6360 antigen comparisons (1.1%). New specimens for repeat serologic testing were obtained for 66 discrepancies and retyping agreed with the genotype in 64 cases. One repeat Jk(b-) serologic phenotype, predicted Jk(b+) by genotype, was found by direct sequencing of JK to be a silenced allele, and one N typing discrepancy remains under investigation. Fifteen false-negative serologic results were associated with alleles encoding weak antigens or single-dose Fy(b) expression. DNA-based RBC typing provided improved accuracy and expanded information on RBC antigens compared to hemagglutination methods, leading to its implementation as the primary method for extended RBC typing for patients with SCD at our institution. © 2015 AABB.

  17. How I manage red cell transfusions in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, David C; Robinson, Susan; Howard, Jo

    2018-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest serious inherited diseases in the world, and red cell transfusion is still one of the few effective treatments for acute and chronic complications. Transfusion corrects anaemia and dilutes out the number of red cells able to cause vaso-occlusion and vascular damage. Urgent red cell transfusions are used to correct acute anaemia, treat acute chest syndrome and patients with acute neurological symptoms. We use elective transfusions preoperatively for moderate risk surgery, and in some pregnant women. There is good evidence for the use of long-term regular transfusions in primary stroke prevention, with the aim of keeping the percentage of sickle haemoglobin below 30%. Long-term transfusions are also used in secondary stroke prevention, and the management of progressive organ damage, including renal impairment and pulmonary hypertension. Blood needs to be matched for ABO, RH and Kell, although alloantibodies may still develop and require more careful, extended cross-matching. Delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions are relatively common, difficult to diagnose and manage, and potentially fatal. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Sickle cell disease retinopathy: characterization among pediatric and teenage patients from northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Oliveira, Dayse Cury; Carvalho, Magda O.S.; do Nascimento, Valma Maria Lopes; Villas-Bôas, Flávia Silva; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Goncalves, Marilda Souza

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to characterize sickle cell disease retinopathy in children and teenagers from Bahia, the state in northeastern Brazil with the highest incidence and prevalence of sickle cell disease. Methods A group of 51 sickle cell disease patients (36 hemoglobin SS and 15 hemoglobin SC) with ages ranging from 4 to 18 years was studied. Ophthalmological examinations were performed in all patients. Moreover, a fluorescein angiography was also performed in over 10-year-old patients. Results The most common ocular lesions were vascular tortuosity, which was found in nine (25%) hemoglobin SS patients, and black sunburst, in three (20%) hemoglobin SC patients. Peripheral arterial closure was observed in five (13.9%) hemoglobin SS patients and in three (13.3%) hemoglobin SC patients. Arteriovenous anastomoses were present in six (16.5%) hemoglobin SS patients and six (37.5%) hemoglobin SC patients. Neovascularization was not identified in any of the patients. Conclusions This study supports the use of early ophthalmological examinations in young sickle cell disease patients to prevent the progression of retinopathy to severe disease and further blindness. PMID:25305166

  19. Enteric Neural Cells From Hirschsprung Disease Patients Form Ganglia in Autologous Aneuronal ColonSummary

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    Benjamin N. Rollo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is caused by failure of cells derived from the neural crest (NC to colonize the distal bowel in early embryogenesis, resulting in absence of the enteric nervous system (ENS and failure of intestinal transit postnatally. Treatment is by distal bowel resection, but neural cell replacement may be an alternative. We tested whether aneuronal (aganglionic colon tissue from patients may be colonized by autologous ENS-derived cells. Methods: Cells were obtained and cryopreserved from 31 HSCR patients from the proximal resection margin of colon, and ENS cells were isolated using flow cytometry for the NC marker p75 (nine patients. Aneuronal colon tissue was obtained from the distal resection margin (23 patients. ENS cells were assessed for NC markers immunohistologically and by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and mitosis was detected by ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine labeling. The ability of human HSCR postnatal ENS-derived cells to colonize the embryonic intestine was demonstrated by organ coculture with avian embryo gut, and the ability of human postnatal HSCR aneuronal colon muscle to support ENS formation was tested by organ coculture with embryonic mouse ENS cells. Finally, the ability of HSCR patient ENS cells to colonize autologous aneuronal colon muscle tissue was assessed. Results: ENS-derived p75-sorted cells from patients expressed multiple NC progenitor and differentiation markers and proliferated in culture under conditions simulating Wnt signaling. In organ culture, patient ENS cells migrated appropriately in aneural quail embryo gut, and mouse embryo ENS cells rapidly spread, differentiated, and extended axons in patient aneuronal colon muscle tissue. Postnatal ENS cells derived from HSCR patients colonized autologous aneuronal colon tissue in cocultures, proliferating and differentiating as neurons and glia. Conclusions: NC-lineage cells can be obtained from HSCR patient

  20. Astrocytes generated from patient induced pluripotent stem cells recapitulate features of Huntington’s disease patient cells

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    Juopperi Tarja A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington’s Disease (HD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that clinically manifests as motor dysfunction, cognitive impairment and psychiatric symptoms. There is currently no cure for this progressive and fatal disorder. The causative mutation of this hereditary disease is a trinucleotide repeat expansion (CAG in the Huntingtin gene that results in an expanded polyglutamine tract. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to explain the preferential striatal and cortical degeneration that occurs with HD, including non-cell-autonomous contribution from astrocytes. Although numerous cell culture and animal models exist, there is a great need for experimental systems that can more accurately replicate the human disease. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are a remarkable new tool to study neurological disorders because this cell type can be derived from patients as a renewable, genetically tractable source for unlimited cells that are difficult to acquire, such as neurons and astrocytes. The development of experimental systems based on iPSC technology could aid in the identification of molecular lesions and therapeutic treatments. Results We derived iPSCs from a father with adult onset HD and 50 CAG repeats (F-HD-iPSC and his daughter with juvenile HD and 109 CAG repeats (D-HD-iPSC. These disease-specific iPSC lines were characterized by standard assays to assess the quality of iPSC lines and to demonstrate their pluripotency. HD-iPSCs were capable of producing phenotypically normal, functional neurons in vitro and were able to survive and differentiate into neurons in the adult mouse brain in vivo after transplantation. Surprisingly, when HD-iPSCs were directed to differentiate into an astrocytic lineage, we observed the presence of cytoplasmic, electron clear vacuoles in astrocytes from both F-HD-iPSCs and D-HD-iPSCs, which were significantly more pronounced in D-HD-astrocytes. Remarkably, the vacuolation in

  1. Juvenile fibromyalgia in an adolescent patient with sickle cell disease presenting with chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprakash, Stalin; Fishman, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile fibromyalgia in children with sickle cell disease has not been reported in the literature. We report an adolescent patient with sickle cell whose pain symptoms progressed from having recurrent acute sickle cell pain crisis episodes to a chronic pain syndrome over several years. He was eventually diagnosed with juvenile fibromyalgia based on the clinical history and myofascial tender points and his pain symptoms responded better to multidisciplinary strategies for chronic fibromyalgia pain. Chronic pain in sickle cell disease is an area of poor research, and in addition there is inconsistency in the definition of chronic pain in sickle cell disease. Central sensitisation to pain is shown to occur after recurrent painful stimuli in a genetically vulnerable individual. In a chronic pain condition such as fibromyalgia central sensitisation is thought to play a key role. Fibromyalgia should be considered as one of the main differential diagnosis in any sickle cell patient with chronic pain. PMID:26430233

  2. Juvenile fibromyalgia in an adolescent patient with sickle cell disease presenting with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprakash, Stalin; Fishman, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Juvenile fibromyalgia in children with sickle cell disease has not been reported in the literature. We report an adolescent patient with sickle cell whose pain symptoms progressed from having recurrent acute sickle cell pain crisis episodes to a chronic pain syndrome over several years. He was eventually diagnosed with juvenile fibromyalgia based on the clinical history and myofascial tender points and his pain symptoms responded better to multidisciplinary strategies for chronic fibromyalgia pain. Chronic pain in sickle cell disease is an area of poor research, and in addition there is inconsistency in the definition of chronic pain in sickle cell disease. Central sensitisation to pain is shown to occur after recurrent painful stimuli in a genetically vulnerable individual. In a chronic pain condition such as fibromyalgia central sensitisation is thought to play a key role. Fibromyalgia should be considered as one of the main differential diagnosis in any sickle cell patient with chronic pain. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Patients with sickle cell disease taking hydroxyurea in the Hemocentro Regional de Montes Claros

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    Fernanda Kelle de Souza Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of therapies for sickle cell disease has received special attention, particularly those that reduce the polymerization of hemoglobin S. Hydroxyurea is a commonly used medication because it has the ability to raise levels of fetal hemoglobin, decrease the frequency of vaso-occlusive episodes and thus improve the clinical course of sickle cell disease patients. OBJECTIVE: To study hematological data and the clinical profile of sickle cell disease patients taking hydroxyurea in a regional blood center. METHODS: From the charts of 20 patients with sickle cell anemia, the clinical outcomes and a number of hematological variables were analyzed before and during treatment with hydroxyurea. RESULTS: The patients' ages ranged from 6 to 41 years old, most were dark skinned and there was a predominance of women. The main symptom that defined whether patients were prescribed hydroxyurea was painful crises followed by hospitalizations. During treatment with hydroxyurea there were significant increases in hemoglobin, fetal hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin. The reticulocyte and white blood cell counts dropped significantly with treatment. A positive correlation was found between fetal hemoglobin and mean corpuscular volume before and during treatment. Additionally, a correlation was found between the white blood cell and reticulocyte counts before treatment with hydroxyurea. CONCLUSION: Most patients showed improvements with treatment as demonstrated by increases in hemoglobin, fetal hemoglobin and mean corpuscular volume, as well as by reductions in the reticulocyte and white blood cell counts. Clinically, more than 50% of patients had a significant reduction of events.

  4. [Evaluation of hemogram in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease: about 87 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmani, Fatima; Benkirane, Souad; Kouzih, Jaafar; Woumki, Aziz; Mamad, Hassan; Masrar, Azlarab

    2016-01-01

    Homozygous sickle cell disease is one of the most frequent haemoglobinopathies in Morocco. Sickle cell disease is characterized by a large clinical and biological expression variability which depends on modulating genetic and environmental factors. Clinical manifestation includes regenerative anemia whose severity may vary among individuals. In the absence of treatment, it results in premature death. Sickle cell disease is characterized by a large clinical and biological expression variability which depends on genetic and environmental factors. A severe clinical picture marked by high early transfusion frequency, severe infectious complications and early mortality. A constant inflammatory condition characterized by elevated inflammatory proteins and compromised nutritional status. The objective of this study is to determine the hematological parameters profile in moroccan patients with homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease during stationary phases. We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study of 87 patients with sickle cell (SS) disease. We performed a biological study based on: Hemogram with morphological assessment of red blood cells stained with MGG and automated reticulocyte counting; Hemoglobin electrophoresis test performed on alkaline agarose gel (pH 8.8) and densitometric integration. The average age is 13.22 years ± 16.36, ranging betrween 0.6 and 36 years, with a sex ratio (M/F) of 1.175. Biological effects of anemia were intense in 88.5% of patients; 67.8% of patients had normocytic anemia compared with 29.9% with microcytosis, and 2.3% with macrocytosis. The degree of anisocytosis was related to the degree of anemia, very evocative in patients with homozygous S/S (95.4%). Reticulocytosis was observed in 81.6% of patients; 52.9% of patients had thrombocytosis. Leukocytosis was observed in 64.4% of patients; 80.5% of patients had neutropenia. The parameters of the hemogram will serve as a basis for comparison during crises and will make it possible to

  5. Lactate dehydrogenase as a biomarker for early renal damage in patients with sickle cell disease

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    Mohammad S Alzahri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among many complications of sickle cell disease, renal failure is the main contributor to early mortality. It is present in up to 21% of patients with sickle cell disease. Although screening for microalbuminuria and proteinuria is the current acceptable practice to detect and follow renal damage in patients with sickle cell disease, there is a crucial need for other, more sensitive biomarkers. This becomes especially true knowing that those biomarkers start to appear only after more than 60% of the kidney function is lost. The primary purpose of this study is to determine whether lactate dehydrogenase (LDH correlates with other, direct and indirect bio-markers of renal insufficiency in patients with sickle cell disease and, therefore, could be used as a biomarker for early renal damage in patients with sickle cell disease. Fifty-five patients with an established diagnosis of sickle cell disease were recruited to in the study. Blood samples were taken and 24-h urine collection samples were collected. Using Statcrunch, a data analysis tool available on the web, we studied the correlation between LDH and other biomarkers of kidney function as well as the distribution and relationship between the variables. Regression analysis showed a significant negative correlation between serum LDH and creatinine clearance, R (correlation coefficient = -0.44, P = 0.0008. This correlation was more significant at younger age. This study shows that in sickle cell patients LDH correlates with creatinine clearance and, therefore, LDH could serve as a biomarker to predict renal insufficiency in those patients.

  6. Uremia causes premature ageing of the T cell compartment in end-stage renal disease patients

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    Meijers Ruud WJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background End-stage renal disease (ESRD patients treated with renal replacement therapy (RRT have premature immunologically aged T cells which may underlie uremia-associated immune dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether uremia was able to induce premature ageing of the T cell compartment. For this purpose, we examined the degree of premature immunological T cell ageing by examining the T cell differentiation status, thymic output via T cell receptor excision circle (TREC content and proliferative history via relative telomere length in ESRD patients not on RRT. Results Compared to healthy controls, these patients already had a lower TREC content and an increased T cell differentiation accompanied by shorter telomeres. RRT was able to enhance CD8+ T cell differentiation and to reduce CD8+ T cell telomere length in young dialysis patients. An increased differentiation status of memory CD4+ T cells was also noted in young dialysis patients. Conclusion Based on these results we can conclude that uremia already causes premature immunological ageing of the T cell system and RRT further increases immunological ageing of the CD8+ T cell compartment in particular in young ESRD patients.

  7. thirst perception in dehydrated sickle cell disease patients in steady

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daniel Owu

    Ingram, 1956). It is prevalent especially among people with ancestry in ..... thalassemia and sickle polymerization tendency on the urine concentrating defect of individual with sickle cell trait. J. Clin. Invest., 88: 1963-. 1968. Igbokwe, VU. and Obika ...

  8. Nursing Diagnoses and Caring for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Fran

    1990-01-01

    This continuing education article is designed to teach nurses to describe sickle cell anemia, identify complications, specify signs and symptoms, and describe nursing interventions. It concludes with a multiple-choice test. (SK)

  9. Thirst perception in dehydrated sickle cell disease patients in steady ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using the Visual Analogue Scale we studied thirst perception (TP) in 20 euhydrated SCA patients and 28 control (HbA) subjects, as well as during dehydration in 13 SCA patients and 9 HbA subjects. Serum and urine samples were collected and analyzed for Na, K ions, creatinine concentrations and haematocrit and ...

  10. Juvenile fibromyalgia in an adolescent patient with sickle cell disease presenting with chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ramprakash, Stalin; Fishman, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile fibromyalgia in children with sickle cell disease has not been reported in the literature. We report an adolescent patient with sickle cell whose pain symptoms progressed from having recurrent acute sickle cell pain crisis episodes to a chronic pain syndrome over several years. He was eventually diagnosed with juvenile fibromyalgia based on the clinical history and myofascial tender points and his pain symptoms responded better to multidisciplinary strategies for chronic fibromyalgia...

  11. Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Type 1 Diabetic Patients: Relation with Patients’ Age and Disease Duration

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    Adolfo Arcangeli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesCirculating endothelial progenitor cells (cEPCs have been reported to be dysfunctional in diabetes mellitus (DM patients, accounting for the vascular damage and the ensuing high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD characteristic of this disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the number of circulating cEPCs in type 1 DM (T1DM patients, without clinical vascular damage, of different ages and with different disease duration.MethodsAn observational, clinical-based prospective study was performed on T1DM patients enrolled in two clinical centers. cEPCs were determined by flow cytometry, determining the number of CD34/CD133/VEGFR2-positive cells within peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs.ResultsThe number of cEPCs was lower in adult T1DM patients, whilst higher in childhood/young patients, compared to controls of the same age range. When patients were grouped into two age groups (≥ or <20 years (and categorized on the basis of the duration of the disease, the number of cEPCs in young (<20 years patients was higher compared with older subjects, regardless of disease duration. A subset of patients with very high cEPCs was identified in the <20 years group.ConclusionThere is an association between the number of cEPCs and patients’ age: childhood/young T1DM patients have significantly higher levels of cEPCs, respect to adult T1DM patients. Such difference is maintained also when the disease lasts for more than 10 years. The very high levels of cEPCs, identified in a subset of childhood/young patients, might protect vessels against endothelial dysfunction and damage. Such protection would be less operative in older subjects, endowed with lower cEPC numbers, in which complications are known to develop more easily.

  12. Cytotoxic T cells are preferentially activated in the duodenal epithelium from patients with florid coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Caroline; Burri, Philipp; Bähler, Peter; Straumann, Alex; Müller-Schenker, Beatrice; Birrer, Stefan; Mueller, Christoph

    2005-06-01

    Villous atrophy and increased numbers of intraepithelial T cells in duodenal biopsies represent a hallmark of coeliac disease. In the present study, an attempt has been made to define whether cytotoxic cell subsets are activated in situ in the affected mucosa of susceptible individuals early after ingestion of a gluten-containing diet. Duodenal biopsies from 11 patients with coeliac disease who repeatedly underwent endoscopic biopsy after ingestion of individually dosed amounts of gluten were used for immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. To identify the cell subsets expressing perforin mRNA and protein, in situ hybridization and FACS analyses were performed on cells isolated from fresh biopsies. Compared with normal mucosa, the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes containing perforin mRNA and protein increased significantly in tissue samples showing moderate or florid coeliac disease and closely paralleled the severity of morphological alteration, whereas the frequency of perforin-expressing lamina propria lymphocytes increased only moderately. Cells isolated from florid biopsies that expressed perforin mRNA and protein were preferentially T-cell receptor (TCR) alphabeta T cells. The increase in both the absolute number and the percentage of lymphocytes expressing perforin mRNA indicates in situ activation of lymphocytes within the epithelial compartment in florid coeliac disease upon ingestion of a gluten-containing diet in patients predisposed to coeliac disease. Copyright 2005 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland

  13. Target organ localization of memory CD4(+) T cells in patients with chronic beryllium disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Andrew P; Canavera, Scott J; Gharavi, Laia; Newman, Lee S; Kotzin, Brian L

    2002-11-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is caused by exposure to beryllium in the workplace, and it remains an important public health concern. Evidence suggests that CD4(+) T cells play a critical role in the development of this disease. Using intracellular cytokine staining, we found that the frequency of beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells in the lungs (bronchoalveolar lavage) of 12 CBD patients ranged from 1.4% to 29% (mean 17.8%), and these T cells expressed a Th1-type phenotype in response to beryllium sulfate (BeSO(4)). Few, if any, beryllium-specific CD8(+) T cells were identified. In contrast, the frequency of beryllium-responsive CD4(+) T cells in the blood of these subjects ranged from undetectable to 1 in 500. No correlation was observed between the frequency of beryllium-responsive bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) CD4(+) T cells as detected by intracellular staining and lymphocyte proliferation in culture after BeSO(4) exposure. Staining for surface marker expression showed that nearly all BAL T cells exhibit an effector memory cell phenotype. These results demonstrate a dramatically high frequency and compartmentalization of antigen-specific effector memory CD4(+) cells in the lungs of CBD patients. These studies provide insight into the phenotypic and functional characteristics of antigen-specific T cells invading other inaccessible target organs in human disease.

  14. Establishment and directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells from glycogen storage disease type Ib patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Daisuke; Maeda, Tohru; Ito, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Yoko; Ohte, Mariko; Ukai, Akane; Nakamura, Katsunori; Enosawa, Shin; Toyota, Masashi; Miyagawa, Yoshitaka; Okita, Hajime; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Akutsu, Hidenori; Umezawa, Akihiro; Matsunaga, Tamihide

    2013-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSDIb) is caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT), which leads to neutrophil dysfunction. However, the underlying causes of these dysfunctions and their relationship with glucose homeostasis are unclear. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold a great promise for advances in developmental biology, cell-based therapy and modeling of human disease. Here, we examined the use of iPSCs as a model for GSDIb. In this study, one 2-year-old patient was genetically screened and diagnosed with GSDIb. We established iPSCs and differentiated these cells into hepatocytes and neutrophils, which comprise the main pathological components of GSDIb. Cells that differentiated into hepatocytes exhibited characteristic albumin secretion and indocyanine green uptake. Moreover, iPSC-derived cells generated from patients with GSDIb metabolic abnormalities recapitulated key pathological features of the diseases affecting the patients from whom they were derived, such as glycogen, lactate, pyruvate and lipid accumulation. Cells that were differentiated into neutrophils also showed the GSDIb pathology. In addition to the expression of neutrophil markers, we showed increased superoxide anion production, increased annexin V binding and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, consistent with the GSDIb patient's neutrophils. These results indicate valuable tools for the analysis of this pathology and the development of future treatments. © 2013 The Authors Genes to Cells © 2013 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Nonblack patients with sickle cell disease have African. beta. sup s gene cluster haplotypes

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    Rogers, Z.R.; Powars, D.R.; Williams, W.D. (Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA)); Kinney, T.R. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA)); Schroeder, W.A. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (USA))

    1989-05-26

    Of 18 nonblack patients with sickle cell disease, 14 had sickle cell anemia, 2 had hemoglobin SC disease, and 2 had hemoglobin S-{beta}{sup o}-thalassemia. The {beta}{sup s} gene cluster haplotypes that were determined in 7 patients were of African origin and were identified as Central African Republic, Central African Republic minor II, Benin, and Senegal. The haplotype Central African Republic minor II was present on the {beta}{sup o}-thalassemia chromosome in 2 patients. None of 10 patients whose {alpha}-gene status was determined had {alpha}-thalassemia-2. These data strongly support the concept that the {beta}{sup s} gene on chromosome 11 of these individuals is of African origin and that the {alpha}-gene locus on chromosome 16 is of white or native American origin. The clinical severity of the disease in these nonblack patients is appropriate to their haplotype without {alpha}-thalassemia-2 and is comparable with that of black patients. All persons with congenital hemolytic anemia should be examined for the presence of sickle cell disease regardless of physical appearance or ethnic background.

  16. Visual Function in Asymptomatic Patients With Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease and Temporal Macular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gilles C; Dénier, Charlotte; Zambrowski, Olivia; Grévent, David; Bruère, Lenaïc; Brousse, Valentine; de Montalembert, Mariane; Brémond-Gignac, Dominique; Robert, Matthieu P

    2017-10-01

    Temporal macular involvement in sickle cell disease can now easily be detected by optical coherence tomography (OCT). However, while recent studies have demonstrated its high prevalence, little is known about its potential consequences on visual function. To assess the visual function of patients with sickle cell disease with no visual symptoms despite temporal macular atrophy. This retrospective case series included data collection and explorations made in a single referral center for sickle cell disease in 2016. Three patients with sickle cell disease exhibiting preserved visual acuity but showing temporal macular retinal atrophy were included. Patients underwent the following explorations: best-corrected distance and near visual acuity evaluation; dilated fundus examination; OCT with 12 × 6-mm thickness map; horizontal, vertical, and en face sections; OCT angiography of the 6 × 6-mm perifoveal retina; 30° and 12° central visual fields; Lanthony 15-hue color vision test; automated static contrast sensitivity test; and global electroretinography. The OCT thickness maps were checked for areas of retinal thinning, appearing as blue patches. When present, these areas were compared with the areas of superficial and deep capillary flow loss on OCT angiography and with the scotomas on visual fields. Contrast sensitivity and color vision loss were quantified. All 3 patients included had homozygous sickle cell disease. They presented with a 20/20 distance visual acuity, and Parinaud 1,5 near visual acuity in both eyes. They were all followed up for a severe cerebral vasculopathy related to sickle cell disease. The areas of atrophy involved the inner retinal layers and were associated with an absence of signal in the deep capillary plexuses in OCT angiography. These patches of retinal thinning were also matching with scotomas in the automated visual fields. Color vision ability and contrast sensitivity were impaired in all patients. Global electroretinography

  17. T regulatory cells are markers of disease activity in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacia Dalla Libera

    Full Text Available FoxP3⁺ Treg cells are believed to play a role in the occurrence of autoimmunity and in the determination of clinical recurrences. Contradictory reports are, however, available describing frequency and function of Treg cells during autoimmune diseases. We examined, by both polychromatic flow cytometry, and real-time RT-PCR, several Treg markers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, an autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system. We found that Tregs, as defined by CD25, CD39, FoxP3, CTLA4, and GITR expression, were significantly decreased in stable MS patients as compared to healthy donors, but, surprisingly, restored to normal levels during an acute clinical attack. We conclude that Treg cells are not involved in causing clinical relapses, but rather react to inflammation in the attempt to restore homeostasis.

  18. ABO (H) secretor status of sickle cell disease patients in Zaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Certain individuals secrete ABO blood group antigens in body fluids and secretions while others do not. In this study, the presence of water soluble agglutinogens in body fluids such as blood, saliva and urine of 64 sickle cell disease patients and 75 AA genotype subjects who served as control were taken and tested by ...

  19. Mortality rate in Sickle Cell Disease Patients in Crisis at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Haematology Day Care Unit (HDCU) of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria was established in 1975 with the main goal of providing immediate and specialized care to haematological emergencies, particularly sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Since inception, a systematic analysis of its effectiveness has ...

  20. Anterior Horn Cell Diseases

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    Merve Firinciogullari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The anterior horn cells control all voluntary movement. Motor activity, respiratory, speech, and swallowing functions are dependent upon signals from the anterior horn cells. Diseases that damage the anterior horn cells, therefore, have a profound impact. Symptoms of anterior horn cell loss (weakness, falling, choking lead patients to seek medical attention. In this article, anterior horn diseases were reviewed, diagnostic criteria and management were discussed in detail. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 269-303

  1. [The outcome of thirteen patients with nonmalignant hematologic diseases treated with HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuan; Wu, Bingyi; Du, Qingfeng; Sun, Can; Lin, Xia; Huang, Yuxian; Tu, Sanfang; Song, Chaoyang; Lu, Zhigang; Chen, Tuzhen; Sun, Caixia

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haploidentical stem cell transplantation in nonmalignant hematologic diseases. To analyze the outcome of 13 patients with nonmalignant hematologic diseases who underwent HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation from September 2001 to October 2013. Thirteen patients including 9 of severe aplastic anemia, 3 of severe β thalassemia, 1 of congenital pure red cell aplastic anemia underwent HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation. Three HLA loci mismatched in 4 cases, two HLA loci mismatched in 8 cases and one HLA locus mismatched in 1 case. The conditioning regime consisted of Fludarabine (30 mg×m(-2)×d(-1)×5 d ), Busulfan(0.8 mg×kg(-1)×6h(-1)×4 d), Cyclophosphamide (60 mg×kg(-1)×d(-1)×2 d ), rabbit anti-human lymphocyte globulin ( 2.5 mg×kg(-1)×d(-1)×5 d ). To prevent from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), cyclosporin A and short term methotrexate (MTX) were used. All patients were successfully engrafted. The incidence of grade 1-2 acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) was 3/13, and that of grade 3-4 was 1/13. The cumulative incidence of total chronic GVHD (cGVHD) was 3/13. Eleven patients survived free of disease at a median follow-up period of 13 months (2-145). HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation is an effective and safe therapy for nonmalignant hematologic diseases.

  2. Pain measurement as part of primary healthcare of adult patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreza Aparecida Felix Signorelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this exploratory, cross-sectional study was to evaluate pain in sickle cell disease patients and aspects related to primary healthcare. METHODS: Data were obtained through home interviews. The assessment instruments (body diagram, Numerical Pain Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire collected information on the underlying disease and on pain. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences program for Windows. Associations between the subgroups of sickle cell disease patients (hemoglobin SS, hemoglobin SC, sickle β-thalassemia and others and pain were analyzed using contingency tables and non-parametric tests of association (classic chi-square, Fisher's and Kruskal-Wallis with a level of 5% (p-value < 0.05 being set for the rejection of the null hypothesis. RESULTS: Forty-seven over 18-year-old patients with sickle cell disease were evaluated. Most were black (78.7% and female (59.6% and the mean age was 30.1 years. The average number of bouts of pain annually was 7.02; pain was predominantly reported by individuals with sickle cell anemia (hemoglobin SS. The intensity of pain (Numeric Pain Scale was 5.5 and the quantitative index (McGill was 35.9. This study also shows that patients presented a high frequency of moderately painful crises in their own homes. CONCLUSION: According to these facts, it is essential that pain related to sickle cell disease is properly identified, quantified, characterized and treated at the three levels of healthcare. In primary healthcare, accurate measurement of pain combined with better care may decrease acute painful episodes and consequently minimize tissue damage, thus improving the patient's overall health.

  3. Patients welcome the Sickle Cell Disease Mobile Application to Record Symptoms via Technology (SMART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirmish; Jonassaint, Jude; De Castro, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The widespread use of mobile phones among patients provides a unique opportunity for the development of mobile health intervention designed specifically for sickle cell disease, which will improve self-management as well as health care delivery. Our objective was to determine the receptiveness of patients with sickle cell disease to technology and a mobile application (app) designed for sickle cell disease. Phase I included 100 patients who completed a survey inquiring about receptiveness to technology and use of mobile devices to self-manage and communicate with providers. Phase II surveyed 17 additional patients who tested a newly developed sickle cell disease app, to report its usability and utility. In Phase I, on a 0-10 Likert scale where 0 is not comfortable, and 10 is extremely comfortable, 87.0% of participants reported >5 comfort level using a mobile device for health care management. Participants were comfortable with texting (81.0%) and emailing (77.0%) but not with social media (40.0%). Most participants (84.0%) owned computer devices (desktops, laptops, tablets, or iPads), and 92.0% owned mobile devices. In Phase II, participants reported that the app tested was useful to track pain (88.0%), and 94.0% reported that it was easy to use, practical, and useful for health self-management. All reported that the app was useful to help one communicate with providers. Following the use of our app, patients found it an extremely valuable tool for tracking pain, health management, and communicating with providers. We conclude that mobile technology might provide an appropriate venue for sickle cell disease healthcare management.

  4. Quality of life in patients with sickle cell disease in Jamaica: rural-urban differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnani, Monika R; Reid, Marvin E; Ali, Susanna B; Lipps, Garth; Williams-Green, Pauline

    2008-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) refers to people's ability to function in the ordinary tasks of living. It moves beyond direct manifestations of illness to the patient's personal morbidity. These assessments are an important aspect of chronic disease management. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a chronic and potentially, quite a debilitating disease. The disease is severe and may result in significant morbidity, as well as a shortened life span. It is the most common genetic disorder seen in Jamaica and impacts on physical, psychological, social and occupational wellbeing. Jamaica is a developing country where support systems that exist for patients with SCD are sparse. Health related QOL has been shown to be poorer in people living in the rural areas as compared with urban populations. Utilization of comprehensive sickle cells disease services has also been shown to be lower for individuals with the disease living in rural areas than for those living in urban areas. As there are rural-urban differences in Jamaica's health services, it is hypothesized that there may be rural-urban differences in the experiences of the disease and the QOL of these patients in these subgroups. The SF 36 v2 (Short Form 36) questionnaire has been validated for use in the Jamaican SCD population. This validated questionnaire was interviewer-administered to 166 patients presenting to an urban clinic for routine health maintenance visits and to 90 patients presenting to the rural clinics for routine visits. Socio-demographic information was also collected on these two groups. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to study predictors of QOL in these two sub-populations. The study received ethical approval from the University of the West Indies/University Hospital of the West Indies Ethics Committee. There were no significant differences in the measured socio-demographic characteristics of the rural and urban patients. Living in rural areas compared with urban areas (p <0.001), being

  5. Pain control in sickle cell disease patients: use of complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Wendy E; Eriator, Ike

    2014-02-01

    To examine the factors associated with the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as reported by patients attending an adult sickle cell clinic at a tertiary institution. Cross-sectional survey. This study was conducted in a university tertiary care adult sickle cell clinic. Adult sickle cell patients. Following Institutional Review Board approval, a questionnaire was administered to patients in a sickle cell clinic to examine their use of CAM for managing pain at home and while admitted to the hospital. Of the 227 respondents who completed the questionnaire, 92% experienced pain lasting from 6 months to more than 2 years. Two hundred and eight (91.6%) indicated that they have used CAM within the last 6 months to control pain. The frequency of CAMs use was higher among females, singles, those with more education, and higher household income. This study shows that a substantial majority of sickle cell patients live with pain on a regular basis and that there is substantial CAM use in the adult Sickle cell disease population. Being female and having a high school or higher education were significantly correlated with the use of CAM in sickle cell patients. A variety of CAM therapies are used, with the most common being prayer. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The composition of T cell subtypes in duodenal biopsies are altered in coeliac disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janni V Steenholt

    Full Text Available One of the hallmarks of Celiac disease (CD is intraepithelial lymphocytosis in the small intestine. Until now, investigations to characterize the T cell subpopulations within the epithelial layer have not discriminated between the heterodimeric co-receptor molecule, CD8αβ, and the possibly immunoregulatory CD8αα homodimer molecule. Besides TCRαβ+ CD4+ cells, no other phenotypes have been shown to be gluten-reactive. Using flow cytometry on lymphocytes from duodenal biopsies, we determined that the number of B cells (CD3- CD19+ and the number of CD3+ CD4- CD8- double-negative (DN T cells were elevated 6-7 fold in children with CD. We next isolated and quantified intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs from biopsies obtained from patients (both children and adults with CD, potential CD and non-CD controls. Flow cytometric analysis of the duodenal T cell subpopulations was performed including the markers TCRαβ, TCRγδ, CD4, CD8α and CD8β. Proportions of γδ T cells and CD8αβ+ cells among IELs were increased in CD patients, whereas proportions of CD4+ CD8αα+ and CD4+ single-positive T cells were decreased. Additionally, two gluten-reactive T cell lines (TCLs derived from CD biopsies were analyzed for changes in proportions of T cell subsets before and after gluten stimulation. In a proliferation assay, dividing cells were tracked with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE, and both αβ and γδ T cells proliferated in response to gluten. Changes in duodenal T cell subpopulations in potential CD patients followed the same pattern as for CD patients, but with less pronounced effect.

  7. Partial Red Blood Cell Exchange in Children and Young Patients with Sickle Cell Disease: Manual Versus Automated Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Carlos; Moniz, Marta; Nunes, Pedro; Abadesso, Clara; Ferreira, Teresa; Barra, António; Lichtner, Anabela; Loureiro, Helena; Dias, Alexandra; Almeida, Helena

    2017-10-31

    The benefits of manual versus automated red blood cell exchange have rarely been documented and studies in young sickle cell disease patients are scarce. We aim to describe and compare our experience in these two procedures. Young patients (≤ 21 years old) who underwent manual- or automated-red blood cell exchange for prevention or treatment of sickle cell disease complications were included. Clinical, technical and hematological data were prospectively recorded and analyzed. Ninety-four red blood cell exchange sessions were performed over a period of 68 months, including 57 manual and 37 automated, 63 for chronic complications prevention, 30 for acute complications and one in the pre-operative setting. Mean decrease in sickle hemoglobin levels was higher in automated-red blood cell exchange (p sickle hemoglobin level decrease per volume removed (p cell exchange and access alarm on automated-red blood cell exchange. No major complication or alloimunization was recorded. Automated-red blood cell exchange decreased sickle hemoglobin levels more efficiently than manual procedure in the setting of acute and chronic complications of sickle cell disease, with minor technical concerns mainly due to vascular access. The threshold of sickle hemoglobin should be individualized for clinical and hematological goals. In our cohort of young patients, the need for an acceptable venous access was a limiting factor, but iron-overload was avoided. Automated red blood cell exchange is safe and well tolerated. It permits a higher sickle hemoglobin removal efficacy, better volume status control and iron-overload avoidance.

  8. Plerixafor enables the safe, rapid, efficient mobilization of haematopoietic stem cells in sickle cell disease patients after exchange transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Lefrère, François; Magrin, Elisa; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Romano, Oriana; Weber, Leslie; Magnani, Alessandra; Sadek, Hanem; Plantier, Clémence; Gabrion, Aurélie; Ternaux, Brigitte; Félix, Tristan; Couzin, Chloé; Stanislas, Aurélie; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Lamhaut, Lionel; Joseph, Laure; Delville, Marianne; Miccio, Annarita; André-Schmutz, Isabelle; Cavazzana, Marina

    2018-02-22

    Sickle cell disease is characterized by chronic anaemia and vaso-occlusive crises, which eventually lead to multi-organ damage and premature death. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only curative treatment but it is limited by toxicity and poor availability of HLA-compatible donors. A gene therapy approach based on the autologous transplantation of lentiviral-corrected haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was shown to be efficacious in one patient. However, alterations of the bone marrow environment and the red blood cells' properties hamper the harvesting and immunoselection of patient stem cells from bone marrow. The use of Filgrastim to mobilize large numbers of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) in the circulation has been associated with severe adverse events in sickle cell patients. Thus, broader application of the gene therapy approach requires the development of alternative mobilization methods. We set up a Phase I/II clinical trial whose primary objective was to assess the safety of a single injection of Plerixafor in sickle cell patients under RBC exchanges to decrease Haemoglobin S level below 30%. The secondary objective was to measure the efficiency of HSPC mobilization and isolation. No adverse events were observed. Large numbers of CD34+ cells were mobilized extremely quickly. Importantly, the mobilized cells contained high numbers of haematopoietic stem cells, expressed high levels of stemness genes, and engrafted very efficiently in immunodeficient mice. Thus, Plerixafor can be safely used to mobilize haematopoietic stem cells in sickle cell patients; this finding opens up new avenues for treatment approaches based on gene addition and genome editing. Copyright © 2018, Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  9. Comparison of mesenchymal stromal cells from young healthy donors and patients with severe chronic coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Tina; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Hansen, Susanne Kofoed

    2011-01-01

    It has been questioned whether bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from patients with ischemic heart disease are suitable for use in regenerative stem cell therapy. We compared MSCs from patients with chronic coronary artery disease (CAD) and MSCs from young healthy donors...

  10. Treatment with adipose stem cells in a patient with moderate Alzheimer's disease: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsolaki M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Magda Tsolaki,1,2 Stelios Zygouris,1,3 Vassilis Tsoutsikas,2 Doxakis Anestakis,2,4,5 George Koliakos6,7 1Third Department of Neurology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Greek Association of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders, Thessaloniki, Greece; 3CND+, 4Laboratory of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 5Laboratory of General Biology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 6Biohellenika Stem Cells Bank, Thessaloniki, Greece; 7Department of Biological Chemistry, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece Objective: This article presents the case of a female patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD. The patient was treated with cholinesterase inhibitors and also with intravenous administration of autologous adipose stem cells.Methods: The patient was assessed with a neuropsychological battery including measures of general cognition, functional problems, neuropsychiatric issues, memory (verbal, visual and episodic, verbal learning and visuospatial abilities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans were conducted before and after the treatment with stem cells.Results: A transient and mild improvement of scores in measures of general cognition and neuropsychiatric issues was evident. A rapid deterioration followed the initial improvement. The first MRI scan showed ischemic areas in periventricular white matter of both hemispheres, as well as in both temporal and parietal lobes. The second MRI scan revealed the same picture with no significant changes.Conclusion: This case report indicates that the administration of stem cells is feasible in a clinical setting however its effectiveness in the treatment of AD is uncertain. The improvement of the patient's condition highlights the potential therapeutic action of stem cells, however the rapid deterioration poses

  11. Kidney Disease among Patients with Sickle Cell Disease, Hemoglobin SS and SC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawz, Paul; Ayyappan, Sabarish; Nouraie, Mehdi; Saraf, Santosh; Gordeuk, Victor; Hostetter, Thomas; Gladwin, Mark T; Little, Jane

    2016-02-05

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited anemia that afflicts millions worldwide. Kidney disease is a major contributor to its morbidity and mortality. We examined contemporary and historical SCD populations to understand how renal disease behaved in hemoglobin SS (HbSS) compared with HbSC. Kidney function was examined in the multicentered Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension and Sickle Cell Disease with Sildenafil Therapy (Walk-PHaSST) Trial (HbSS=463; HbSC=127; years 2007-2009) and historical comparator populations from the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease (CSSCD; HbSS=708) and the Multicenter Study of Hydroxyurea in Sickle Cell Disease (MSH; HbSS=299). In adults with SCD, eGFR was lower among older individuals: -1.78 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year of age (95% confidence interval [95% CI], -2.06 to -1.50; Walk-PHaSST Trial), -1.75 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year of age (95% CI, -2.05 to -1.44; MSH), and -1.69 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year of age (95% CI, -2.00 to -1.38; CSSCD) in HbSS compared with -1.09 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year of age (95% CI, -1.39 to -0.75) in HbSC (Walk-PHaSST Trial). Macroalbuminuria was seen in 20% of participants with SCD (HbSS or HbSC; P=0.45; Walk-PHaSST Trial), but microalbuminuria was more prevalent in HbSS (44% versus 23% in HbSC; P<0.002). In the Walk-PHaSST Trial, albuminuria was associated with hemolysis (higher lactate dehydrogenase, P<0.001; higher absolute reticulocyte count, P<0.02; and lower Hb, P=0.07) and elevated systolic BP (P<0.001) in HbSS. One half of all participants with HbSS (20 of 39) versus one fifth without (41 of 228) elevated tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (≥3 m/s; adverse prognostic indicator in SCD) had macroalbuminuria (P<0.001). In the CSSCD, overt proteinuria, detected (less sensitively) by urine dipstick, associated with higher 3-year mortality (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.07 to 5.77). Serum bicarbonate was lower in HbSS (23.8 versus 24.8 mEq/dl in HbSC; P<0.05) and associated with

  12. Illness Perception in Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphomas: What Patients Believe About Their Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Johanna; Kammerstätter, Martina; Erhart, Friedrich; Mairhofer-Muri, Daniela; Trautinger, Franz

    2016-03-01

    There is currently no information available on illness perception in primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). The aim of this study was therefore to gather initial information on disease understanding and interpretation in patients with CTCL. Consecutive patients from a hospital-based primary cutaneous lymphoma ward completed the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) on 2 consecutive visits. A total of 24 patients with different variants of CTCL were included in the study. Patients experienced their condition as being long-lasting, but not fundamentally affecting their lives. Patients had poor belief in personal control, but strong belief in treatment control. They did not show a good understanding of their disease, and had a moderately negative emotional response to their illness. In conclusion, the IPQ-R provides a feasible and reproducible tool for measurement and better understanding of illness perception in patients with CTCL. Knowledge of patients' attitudes towards their disease should enable optimization of the patient-physician relationship and patient care.

  13. [Blood transfusion assessment to 112 homozygous sickle-cell disease patients in university hospital of Brazzaville].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokekias, A Elira; Ossini, L Ngolet; Tsiba, F O Atipo; Malanda, F; Koko, I; De Montalembert, M

    2009-01-01

    Homozygous, sickle-cell disease (SCD) is responsible for acute complication, especially anaemic crisis and special situation such as acute chest syndrome, stroke and acute priapism. Pregnancy sickle-cell disease presents high risk for the mother and the fetus. In these indications, blood transfusion is the main therapy aiming to reduce anaemia in order to restore hemoglobin's rate or to increase normal Hb proportion. This study aims to assess the short-term efficiency of the red cell transfusion in SCD homozygous form. One hundred and twelve homozygous sickle-cell patients were enrolled in this prospective study: 59 females and 53 males, median age is 21,8 years (extremes: 2 and 45 years). These patients are mostly with very low income. Two groups of patients are included in this study. In the first group, patients present acute anemia crisis caused by infections disease (malaria, bacterial infections). In the second group (20 cases), SCD patients have particularly situations: pregnancy (10 cases); stroke (six cases); cardiac failure (two cases) and priapism (two cases). Transfusion treatment in first group is simple regimen. Transfusion of EC increased median Hb level at 2,9 g/dl (extremes: 1,1 and 4,7). In the second group of patients, 16 cases were transfused by manual partial exchange (1-3) and four patients received simple regimen of transfusion. Median Hb level was 3,1g/dl (extremes: 2,4-4,9 g/dl). HbS percentage reduction was after PTE between -30 and -66,8% (median: -52,6%). According to our diagnostic possibilities (blood serologic test), we have not found any contamination by HIV, HBV and HCV (virus).

  14. Oral chronic graft-versus-host disease in pediatric patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treister, Nathaniel S; Woo, Sook-Bin; O'Holleran, Eileen W; Lehmann, Leslie E; Parsons, Susan K; Guinan, Eva C

    2005-09-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a serious and potentially life-threatening complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This study, which is the largest single-center series of oral disease in pediatric patients with cGVHD, describes the oral findings in 49 consecutive patients seen in a pediatric multidisciplinary cGVHD clinic. All consecutive patients seen at the multidisciplinary pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation/cGVHD clinic at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (Boston, MA) from July 2001 through October 2003 were included in this study. Subjective and objective assessments of mucosal, salivary gland, and sclerotic pathology were performed for each patient, and specific therapy was initiated when indicated. Oral mucosal cGVHD was identified in 22 (45%) of 49 patients. Only 4 (8%) of 49 patients reported mouth pain, and all patients reported being able to eat well. All patients who required specific therapy for their oral mucosal cGVHD (45%) were already taking at least 1 immunomodulatory agent; however, efficacy of treatment was difficult to assess because of inconsistent follow-up periods. Subjective and objective salivary gland and sclerotic disease were observed far less often. Oral mucosal pathology is common in these patients, and appropriate diagnosis and management of oral lesions is critical to reduce patient morbidity and to improve quality of life. The apparent lack of salivary gland involvement was notable. Developing validated age-appropriate evaluation strategies and identifying effective treatment guidelines will be invaluable in the future management of these patients.

  15. Metabolic rescue in pluripotent cells from patients with mtDNA disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong; Folmes, Clifford D L; Wu, Jun; Morey, Robert; Mora-Castilla, Sergio; Ocampo, Alejandro; Ma, Li; Poulton, Joanna; Wang, Xinjian; Ahmed, Riffat; Kang, Eunju; Lee, Yeonmi; Hayama, Tomonari; Li, Ying; Van Dyken, Crystal; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Koski, Amy; Mitalipov, Nargiz; Amato, Paula; Wolf, Don P; Huang, Taosheng; Terzic, Andre; Laurent, Louise C; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2015-08-13

    Mitochondria have a major role in energy production via oxidative phosphorylation, which is dependent on the expression of critical genes encoded by mitochondrial (mt)DNA. Mutations in mtDNA can cause fatal or severely debilitating disorders with limited treatment options. Clinical manifestations vary based on mutation type and heteroplasmy (that is, the relative levels of mutant and wild-type mtDNA within each cell). Here we generated genetically corrected pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) from patients with mtDNA disease. Multiple induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines were derived from patients with common heteroplasmic mutations including 3243A>G, causing mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), and 8993T>G and 13513G>A, implicated in Leigh syndrome. Isogenic MELAS and Leigh syndrome iPS cell lines were generated containing exclusively wild-type or mutant mtDNA through spontaneous segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA in proliferating fibroblasts. Furthermore, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) enabled replacement of mutant mtDNA from homoplasmic 8993T>G fibroblasts to generate corrected Leigh-NT1 PSCs. Although Leigh-NT1 PSCs contained donor oocyte wild-type mtDNA (human haplotype D4a) that differed from Leigh syndrome patient haplotype (F1a) at a total of 47 nucleotide sites, Leigh-NT1 cells displayed transcriptomic profiles similar to those in embryo-derived PSCs carrying wild-type mtDNA, indicative of normal nuclear-to-mitochondrial interactions. Moreover, genetically rescued patient PSCs displayed normal metabolic function compared to impaired oxygen consumption and ATP production observed in mutant cells. We conclude that both reprogramming approaches offer complementary strategies for derivation of PSCs containing exclusively wild-type mtDNA, through spontaneous segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA in individual iPS cell lines or mitochondrial replacement by SCNT in homoplasmic mtDNA-based disease.

  16. Renal papillary necrosis in patients with sickle cell disease: How to recognize this 'forgotten' diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderickx, Michaël M E L; Brits, Tim; De Baets, Karen; Seghers, Mattias; Maes, Philip; Trouet, Dominique; De Wachter, Stefan; De Win, Gunter

    2017-06-01

    Renal papillary necrosis is not commonly seen in daily practice, but can have severe consequences when it is not diagnosed in time. It is known to be associated with sickle cell hemoglobinopathies; however a wide range of etiologies are possible, and it is therefore not the first diagnosis clinicians consider in patients with sickle cell disease who present with hematuria. A literature search was performed to summarize the current knowledge about renal papillary necrosis associated with sickle cell disease. These findings are illustrated with a case of a 9-year old girl with sickle cell disease who was referred with painless gross hematuria. Typical radiologic signs for renal papillary necrosis are necrotic cavities that fill with contrast, small collections of contrast peripheral to the calyces in the papillary region (ball-on-tee sign), calcification of the papillary defect, filling defects, hydronephrosis, blunted papillary tip, clefts in the renal medulla filled with contrast, hyperattenuated medullary calcifications, non-enhanced lesions surrounded by rings of excreted contrast, and clubbed calyces. This study focuses on the pathophysiology of renal papillary necrosis associated with sickle cell disease, the possible symptoms, as well as the diagnostic steps, with a special interest in particular presentation on old (retrograde pyelography) and new (computed tomography) gold standard in radiologic imaging, and the management for this pathology. This study aims to remind clinicians of this "forgotten" diagnosis and what signs to look for in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease who present with hematuria. In pediatric cases radiation protection is important, therefore knowing what radiologic signs can be found on retrograde pyelography can lead to early identification of this pathology without having to proceed to computed tomography. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms in children with sickle cell disease: analysis of 18 aneurysms in 5 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Surbhi; Speller-Brown, Barbara; Wyse, Emily; Meier, Emily R; Carpenter, Jessica; Fasano, Ross M; Pearl, Monica S

    2015-05-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are rare in the general pediatric population and account for <2% of all cerebral aneurysms. Only 7 children with sickle hemoglobinopathy and IAs have been reported, the majority of which were discovered after rupture. To report the prevalence of unruptured IAs in a selected population of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and to describe the aneurysm morphology, hematologic characteristics, and management in this patient population. A retrospective review of the electronic database for all children with SCD who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging or angiography from January 2002 to August 2013 at a single institution was performed. Records were reviewed for IA, age, sex, sickle cell genotype, neurological symptoms, hematologic indexes, transcranial Doppler findings, and management. Five of 179 children (2.8%) with SCD imaged by brain magnetic resonance imaging or angiography were diagnosed with IAs. None presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Four patients (80%) had HbSS disease, and 1 patient had hemoglobin sickle cell HbSC disease. A total of 18 aneurysms were detected; the majority of patients had multiple aneurysms (80%) and bilateral involvement (60%). Children with SCD are at risk for developing multiple intracranial aneurysms, and a high index of suspicion must be maintained during the interpretation of routine magnetic resonance imaging or angiography of the brain.

  18. Clinical characteristics and peripheral T cell subsets in Parkinson’s disease patients with constipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhua; Yu, Meiling; Liu, Xiaolin; Qu, Hongdang; Chen, Qiming; Qian, Weidong; Wei, Daoxiang; Xu, Wenfang; Ma, Bo; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Constipation is frequently reported in Parkinson’s disease (PD). We evaluated the characteristics of patients with PD and constipation and explored the role of T cell subsets in PD-associated constipation. One hundred and two patients with PD treated at the First Affiliated Hospital of Bengbu Medical College were enrolled in this study between January 2012 and October 2013. All patients completed KESS questionnaires and constipation was rated. The proportions of peripheral blood Thl7 and Treg cells were assessed by flow cytometry in 45 patients. Colonoscopies were performed in six patients. Thirty-one patients with PD reported slow-transit constipation (STC), 15 rectal evacuation disorder (RED) and 33 mixed constipation (Mixed). STC most frequently occurred before onset of PD motor symptoms, while Mixed occurred before or after motor symptoms, and RED occurred most frequently after motor symptoms. CD4+ T cell infiltration in the colonic mucosa was observed in patients with PD and constipation. The frequency of Th17 and Treg cells in patients with PD and constipation was significantly higher than in those without constipation (Pconstipation, the frequency of Th17 and Treg cells in STC was the highest. However, there was no difference in the ratio of Th17/Tregs between the patients with PD with and without constipation, or patients with PD and different types of constipations (P>0.05). Constipation reported before the onset of PD motor symptoms was most often STC or Mixed, and PD constipation may be associated with immune activation in the colonic mucosa. PMID:26045755

  19. Hematological differences between patients with different subtypes of sickle cell disease on hydroxyurea treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabia Neves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Sickle cell anemia and the interaction S/Beta thalassemia differ in hematological values due to microcytosis and hypochromia caused by the thalassemic mutation. The clinical benefit of long-term hydroxyurea treatment is undeniable in sickle cell disease with monitoring of the biological action of the drug being by the complete blood count. The objective of this work is to compare changes in some of the erythrocytic indexes between S/Beta thalassemia and sickle cell anemia patients on long-term hydroxyurea treatment. METHODS: The values of erythrocyte indexes (mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin were compared in a retrospective study of two groups of patients (Sickle cell anemia and S/Beta thalassemia on hydroxyurea treatment over a mean of six years. RESULTS: The quantitative values of the two parameters differed between the groups. Increases in mean corpuscular volume and reductions in mean corpuscular hemoglobin delay longer in S/Beta thalassemia patients (p-value = 0.018. CONCLUSION: Hematological changes are some of the beneficial effects of hydroxyurea in sickle cell disease as cellular hydration increases and the hemoglobin S concentration is reduced. The complete blood count is the best test to monitor changes, but the interpretation of the results in S/Beta thalassemia should be different.

  20. Fecal bacteria from treatment-naive Crohn's disease patients can skew helper T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Zhang, Yi; Xing, Junjie; Song, Xiaoling; Huang, Ling; Weng, Hao; Wu, Xiangsong; Walker, Emma; Wang, Zhongchuan

    2017-12-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the inflamed mucosa of Crohn's disease (CD) patients presented a disturbed gut commensal community, and the shift in microbial composition and species variety is associated with disease severity. To establish a link between changes in the intestinal bacterial composition and the alteration of inflammation, we obtained fecal bacteria from CD patients and non-CD controls. The bacteria were then used to stimulate the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from one non-CD individual. We found that the frequency of IFN-γ- and IL-17-expressing CD4 T cells was significantly higher after stimulation with CD bacteria than with non-CD bacteria, while the frequency of IL-4- and IL-10-expressing CD4 T cells was significantly decreased after stimulation with CD bacteria. A similar trend was observed in the level of cytokine expression and transcription expression. However, this difference was not clear-cut, as overlapping regions were observed between the two groups. With longer stimulation using CD bacteria, the skewing toward Th1/Th17 responses were further increased. This increase depended on the presence of monocytes/macrophages. Interestingly, we also found that B cells presented an inhibitory effect in CD bacteria-mediated skewing toward Th1/Th17 cells and promoted IL-10 secretion in CD bacteria-stimulated PBMCs. Together, our results demonstrated that CD bacteria could promote Th1/Th17 inflammation in a host factor-independent fashion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of acute osteomyelitis with indium-111 labeled white blood cells in a patient with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Ulloa, M.; Vasavada, P.J.; Black, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    A young patient with sickle cell disease (SCD) and multiple hospitalizations for crisis was admitted because of suspected osteomyelitis. Initial laboratory work, radiographs, and bone images were not contributory. An In-111 white blood cell (WBC) study demonstrated two areas of increased radionuclide uptake consistent with osteomyelitis. One of these had associated soft tissue infection. No other areas of active osteomyelitis were visualized, in spite of the presence of several additional infection sites. Imaging with In-111 WBC is probably not justified for routine diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis in areas free of previous disease, where conventional bone images are highly efficient. In-111 WBC imaging, however, may be helpful in detecting osteomyelitis in selected patients with SCD in whom Tc-99m bone images and radiographs are usually abnormal and difficult to interpret due to previous bone infarcts. Localization of the infection focus is very important in choosing the aspiration site for bacteriologic studies. A negative study, however, should be interpreted cautiously

  2. Detection of acute osteomyelitis with indium-111 labeled white blood cells in a patient with sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Ulloa, M.; Vasavada, P.J.; Black, R.R.

    1989-02-01

    A young patient with sickle cell disease (SCD) and multiple hospitalizations for crisis was admitted because of suspected osteomyelitis. Initial laboratory work, radiographs, and bone images were not contributory. An In-111 white blood cell (WBC) study demonstrated two areas of increased radionuclide uptake consistent with osteomyelitis. One of these had associated soft tissue infection. No other areas of active osteomyelitis were visualized, in spite of the presence of several additional infection sites. Imaging with In-111 WBC is probably not justified for routine diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis in areas free of previous disease, where conventional bone images are highly efficient. In-111 WBC imaging, however, may be helpful in detecting osteomyelitis in selected patients with SCD in whom Tc-99m bone images and radiographs are usually abnormal and difficult to interpret due to previous bone infarcts. Localization of the infection focus is very important in choosing the aspiration site for bacteriologic studies. A negative study, however, should be interpreted cautiously.

  3. Blood transfusion and 30-day readmission rate in adult patients hospitalized with sickle cell disease crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouraie, Mehdi; Gordeuk, Victor R

    2015-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients hospitalized with vasoocclusive pain crisis tend to have prolonged length of stay (LOS) and high 30-day readmission rates. We investigated the associations of demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and blood transfusion during hospitalization with these outcomes. Repeated regression analysis was used to analyze 39,324 admissions of 4348 adults with sickle cell crisis from 2007 to 2012 in the Truven Health MarketScan Medicaid Databases. The mean (95% range) LOS was 5.9 (1.0-19.0) days and the 30-day readmission rate was 39.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39.1%-40.0%). Older age; chronic cardiopulmonary, renal, or liver disease; and sepsis were associated with both longer LOS and greater 30-day readmission rate. Female sex, iron overload, acute chest syndrome, acute renal failure, and stroke were additional predictors of longer LOS. Simple red blood cell transfusion was administered in 31.8% of the admissions, and these patients tended to have more severe disease (chronic cardiopulmonary or kidney disease, acute chest syndrome, acute kidney or liver failure, sepsis). Nevertheless, transfusion was associated with a reduced estimated odds ratio (OR) of inpatient mortality of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.57-0.99) and a decreased OR of 30-day readmission of 0.78 (95% CI, 0.73-0.83). Our findings point to blood transfusion as a potential means to reduce the 30-day readmission rate among Medicaid patients hospitalized with sickle cell crisis. There is a need for a prospective study to examine the potential benefit and safety of simple blood transfusion for this purpose. © 2015 AABB.

  4. Cellular function reinstitution of offspring red blood cells cloned from the sickle cell disease patient blood post CRISPR genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jianguo; Tao, Wenjing; Hao, Suyang; Zu, Youli

    2017-06-13

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a disorder of red blood cells (RBCs) expressing abnormal hemoglobin-S (HbS) due to genetic inheritance of homologous HbS gene. However, people with the sickle cell trait (SCT) carry a single allele of HbS and do not usually suffer from SCD symptoms, thus providing a rationale to treat SCD. To validate gene therapy potential, hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from the SCD patient blood and treated with CRISPR/Cas9 approach. To precisely dissect genome-editing effects, erythroid progenitor cells were cloned from single colonies of CRISPR-treated cells and then expanded for simultaneous gene, protein, and cellular function studies. Genotyping and sequencing analysis revealed that the genome-edited erythroid progenitor colonies were converted to SCT genotype from SCD genotype. HPLC protein assays confirmed reinstallation of normal hemoglobin at a similar level with HbS in the cloned genome-edited erythroid progenitor cells. For cell function evaluation, in vitro RBC differentiation of the cloned erythroid progenitor cells was induced. As expected, cell sickling assays indicated function reinstitution of the genome-edited offspring SCD RBCs, which became more resistant to sickling under hypoxia condition. This study is an exploration of genome editing of SCD HSPCs.

  5. Cellular function reinstitution of offspring red blood cells cloned from the sickle cell disease patient blood post CRISPR genome editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Wen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sickle cell disease (SCD is a disorder of red blood cells (RBCs expressing abnormal hemoglobin-S (HbS due to genetic inheritance of homologous HbS gene. However, people with the sickle cell trait (SCT carry a single allele of HbS and do not usually suffer from SCD symptoms, thus providing a rationale to treat SCD. Methods To validate gene therapy potential, hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from the SCD patient blood and treated with CRISPR/Cas9 approach. To precisely dissect genome-editing effects, erythroid progenitor cells were cloned from single colonies of CRISPR-treated cells and then expanded for simultaneous gene, protein, and cellular function studies. Results Genotyping and sequencing analysis revealed that the genome-edited erythroid progenitor colonies were converted to SCT genotype from SCD genotype. HPLC protein assays confirmed reinstallation of normal hemoglobin at a similar level with HbS in the cloned genome-edited erythroid progenitor cells. For cell function evaluation, in vitro RBC differentiation of the cloned erythroid progenitor cells was induced. As expected, cell sickling assays indicated function reinstitution of the genome-edited offspring SCD RBCs, which became more resistant to sickling under hypoxia condition. Conclusions This study is an exploration of genome editing of SCD HSPCs.

  6. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Model for Accelerated Patient- and Disease-specific Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Gunaseeli, I.; Doss, M.X.; Antzelevitch, C.; Hescheler, J.; Sachinidis, A.

    2010-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells hold great promise for therapy of a number of degenerative diseases such as ischemic heart failure, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes mellitus, sickle cell anemia and Huntington disease. They also have the potential to accelerate drug discovery in 3 ways. The first involves the delineation of chemical components for efficient reprogramming of patient’s blood cells or cells from biopsies, obviating the need for cellular delivery of re...

  7. Six Months of Hydroxyurea Reduces Albuminuria in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Anoosha; Stehlé, Thomas; Di Liberto, Gaetana; Rakotoson, Marie Georgine; Gellen-Dautremer, Justine; Loric, Sylvain; Moutereau, Stéphane; Sahali, Dil; Wagner-Ballon, Orianne; Remy, Philippe; Lang, Philippe; Grimbert, Philippe; Audureau, Etienne; Godeau, Bertrand; Galacteros, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The earliest symptom of glomerular injury in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) is microalbuminuria. The effect of hydroxyurea (HU) on urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) is unclear and should be determined, because increasing numbers of patients with SCD take this drug to improve red blood cell function. In this cohort study of 58 SS-homozygous adults with SCD who initiated HU therapy, we evaluated ACR changes and relationships of these changes with demographic, clinical, and biologic parameters at HU initiation (baseline) and 6 months later (follow-up). Between baseline and follow-up, ACR declined significantly for the entire population (3.0–1.7 mg/mmol; P<0.01), but this was primarily driven by the ACR reduction in the microalbuminuria subgroup (8.1–2.3 mg/mmol; P=0.03; n=23). According to bivariate analyses on 39 patients who did not receive a blood transfusion during the study period, the baseline to follow-up ACR decline was strongly associated with decreases in levels of hemolysis markers, percentage of dense red blood cells, and systolic BP. Bivariate analysis also revealed a close association between the ACR decrease and high baseline levels of hemolysis markers and percentage of dense red blood cells. These results show that urine ACR decreased significantly after 6 months of HU and confirm a close relationship between ACR and hemolysis evolution in patients with SCD. PMID:26586692

  8. Combined analysis of circulating epithelial cells and serum thyroglobulin for distinguishing disease status of the patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hung-Chih; Liou, Miaw-Jene; Hsu, Hsung-Ling; Hsieh, Jason Chia-Hsun; Chen, Yi-An; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Lin, Jen-Der

    2015-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) accounts for about 80% of the cases in thyroid cancer. Routine surveillance by serum thyroglobulin (Tg) and medical imaging is the current practice to monitor disease progression of the patients. Whether enumeration of circulating epithelial cells (CECs) helps to define disease status of PTC patients was investigated. CECs were enriched from the peripheral blood of the healthy control subjects (G1, n = 17) and the patients at disease-free status (G2, n = 26) ...

  9. Better survival of renal cell carcinoma in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Nissen, Loes H C; Drenth, Joost P H; van Herpen, Carla M; Kievit, Wietske; Verhoeven, Rob H A; Mulders, Peter F A; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A; Boers-Sonderen, Marye J; van den Heuvel, Tim R A; Pierik, Marieke; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Hoentjen, Frank

    2015-11-10

    Immunosuppressive therapy may impact cancer risk in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cancer specific data regarding risk and outcome are scarce and data for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are lacking. We aimed(1) to identify risk factors for RCC development in IBD patients (2) to compare RCC characteristics, outcome and survival between IBD patients and the general population. A PALGA (Dutch Pathology Registry) search was performed to establish a case group consisting of all IBD patients with incident RCC in The Netherlands (1991-2013). Cases were compared with two separate control groups: (A) with a population-based IBD cohort for identification of risk factors (B) with a RCC cohort from the general population to compare RCC characteristics and outcomes. 180 IBD patients with RCC were identified. Pancolitis (OR 1.8-2.5), penetrating Crohn's disease (OR 2.8), IBD related surgery (OR 3.7-4.5), male gender (OR 3.2-5.0) and older age at IBD onset (OR 1.0-1.1) were identified as independent risk factors for RCC development. IBD patients had a significantly lower age at RCC diagnosis (p risk to develop RCC. They are diagnosed with RCC at a younger age and at an earlier disease stage compared to the general population. This translates into a better survival independent of immunosuppressive or anti-TNFα therapy.

  10. Disease signatures for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmuff, Bradley; Berkovitch, Shaunna S; Huang, Joanne H; Iaconelli, Jonathan; Toffel, Steven; Karmacharya, Rakesh

    2016-06-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are complex psychiatric disorders that present unique challenges in the study of disease biology. There are no objective biological phenotypes for these disorders, which are characterized by complex genetics and prominent roles for gene-environment interactions. The study of the neurobiology underlying these severe psychiatric disorders has been hindered by the lack of access to the tissue of interest - neurons from patients. The advent of reprogramming methods that enable generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient fibroblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells has opened possibilities for new approaches to study relevant disease biology using iPSC-derived neurons. While early studies with patient iPSCs have led to promising and intriguing leads, significant hurdles remain in our attempts to capture the complexity of these disorders in vitro. We present here an overview of studies to date of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using iPSC-derived neuronal cells and discuss potential future directions that can result in the identification of robust and valid cellular phenotypes that in turn can lay the groundwork for meaningful clinical advances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cytomegalovirus disease in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients: current and future therapeutic options.

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    Fuji, Shigeo; Einsele, Hermann; Kapp, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) has become one of the standard treatment for hematological diseases. Although the clinical outcome has improved significantly during the last decades, the morbidity and mortality after allo-HSCT are still obstacles to cure. Out of major morbidities, opportunistic virus infections such as cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection are important complications, in particular in patients who received human leukocyte antigen-mismatched HSCT. Here, we aim to summarize information about current and future therapeutic options in CMV disease after allo-HSCT. Recently, not only new drugs but also adoptive T-cell therapy are tested in the setting of clinical trials. CMV prophylaxis using letermovir significantly reduced the incidence of CMV disease in comparison to placebo in a phase III clinical trial. Meanwhile, adoptive T-cell therapies which are fully adapted to good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions are now available. A recent multicenter study in Germany showed a promising result using Streptamer-isolated T-cell therapy. With the recent development of CMV-targeted therapy, treatment strategies of CMV infection would be further sophisticated in the near future. VIDEO ABSTRACT: http://links.lww.com/COID/A19.

  12. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis detects low body cell mass and dehydration in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, R; Mereu, R M; Putzu, P F; Floris, G; Marini, E

    2010-12-01

    This paper evaluates the nutritional status in patients with mild-moderate and severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) by bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA). Cross-sectional study. Alzheimer Center, SS. Trinita Hospital, Cagliari, and "Monsignor Angioni" Nursing Home, Quartu Sant'Elena (Cagliari, Italy). 83 free-living patients with mild-moderate Alzheimer's disease (29 men, 54 women), 9 institutionalized women in the severe stage; 468 age-matched controls (202 men, 266 women). Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), anthropometric (height, weight, BMI), bioelectrical (R, Xc) and biochemical variables (serum albumin) were assessed. Bioelectrical characteristics were significantly different in the patients with mild-moderate AD with respect to controls, indicating low body cell mass (men, T2= 12.8; women, T2=34.9; p Alzheimer's disease is characterized by a tendency to malnutrition, present even in the mild-moderate stages, and a tendency to dehydration that appears in the severe stage. The BIVA technique is a promising tool for the screening and monitoring of nutrition and hydration status in Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Role of hydroxycarbamide in prevention of complications in patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NM Wiles

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available NM Wiles, J HowardDepartment of Haematology, St Thomas’ Hospital, Westminster, Bridge Road, London, SE1 7EH, UKAbstract: Sickle cell disease (SCD is a genetically inherited condition caused by a point mutation in the beta globin gene. This results in the production of the abnormal hemoglobin, sickle hemoglobin (HbS. Hydroxycarbamide, is an antimetabolite/cytotoxic which works by inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase, blocking the synthesis of DNA and arresting cells in the S phase. In sickle cell anemia, it promotes fetal hemoglobin (HbF synthesis, improves red cell hydration, decreases neutrophil and platelet count, modifies red cell endothelial cell interactions and acts as a nitric oxide donor. Trials have shown the clinical benefit of hydroxycarbamide in a subpopulation of adult patients with SCD, with a 44% reduction in the median annual rate of painful crises, a decrease in the incidence of acute chest syndrome and an estimated 40% reduction in overall mortality over a 9-year observational period. Its use in pediatrics has also been well established; trials have shown it is well tolerated and does not impair growth or development. In addition it decreases the number and duration of hospital attendences. A number of emerging uses of hydroxycarbamide currently are being investigated, such as stroke prevention.Keywords: sickle cell anemia, hydroxycarbamide, hydroxyurea, maximum tolerated dose, vaso-occlusive crisis

  14. Generation of disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaecheol; Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Diecke, Sebastian; Kim, Juryun; Jung, Hyerin; Rim, Yeri Alice; Jung, Seung Min; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yong Goo; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2014-02-04

    Since the concept of reprogramming mature somatic cells to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was demonstrated in 2006, iPSCs have become a potential substitute for embryonic stem cells (ESCs) given their pluripotency and "stemness" characteristics, which resemble those of ESCs. We investigated to reprogram fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) to generate iPSCs using a 4-in-1 lentiviral vector system. A 4-in-1 lentiviral vector containing Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc was transduced into RA and OA FLSs isolated from the synovia of two RA patients and two OA patients. Immunohistochemical staining and real-time PCR studies were performed to demonstrate the pluripotency of iPSCs. Chromosomal abnormalities were determined based on the karyotype. SCID-beige mice were injected with iPSCs and sacrificed to test for teratoma formation. After 14 days of transduction using the 4-in-1 lentiviral vector, RA FLSs and OA FLSs were transformed into spherical shapes that resembled embryonic stem cell colonies. Colonies were picked and cultivated on matrigel plates to produce iPSC lines. Real-time PCR of RA and OA iPSCs detected positive markers of pluripotency. Immunohistochemical staining tests with Nanog, Oct4, Sox2, Tra-1-80, Tra-1-60, and SSEA-4 were also positive. Teratomas that comprised three compartments of ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm were formed at the injection sites of iPSCs. Established iPSCs were shown to be compatible by karyotyping. Finally, we confirmed that the patient-derived iPSCs were able to differentiate into osteoblast, which was shown by an osteoimage mineralization assay. FLSs derived from RA and OA could be cell resources for iPSC reprogramming. Disease- and patient-specific iPSCs have the potential to be applied in clinical settings as source materials for molecular diagnosis and regenerative therapy.

  15. Evaluation of renal function in sickle cell disease patients in Brazil

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    G.B. Silva Junior

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate renal function in a cohort of 98 patients with sickle cell disease (SCD followed up at a tertiary hospital in Brazil. Clinical and laboratory characteristics at the time of the most recent medical examination were analyzed. Renal function was evaluated by the estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR by the criteria of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI. We compared patients with normal GFR to patients with decreased GFR (120 mL·min-1·(1.73 m²-1. Comparison between patients according to the use of hydroxyurea and comparison of clinical and laboratory parameters according to GFR were also carried out. Average patient age was 33.8 ± 13.3 years (range 19-67 years, and 57 (58.1% patients were females. The comparison of patients according to GFR showed that patients with decreased GFR (<60 mL·min-1·(1.73 m²-1 were older, had lower levels of hematocrit, hemoglobin and platelets and higher levels of urea and creatinine. Independent risk factors for decreased GFR were advanced age (OR = 21.6, P < 0.0001 and anemia (OR = 39.6, P < 0.0001. Patients with glomerular hyperfiltration tended to be younger, had higher levels of hematocrit, hemoglobin and platelets and lower levels of urea and creatinine, with less frequent urinary abnormalities. Hydroxyurea, at the dosage of 500-1000 mg/day, was being administered to 28.5% of the patients, and there was no significant difference regarding renal function between the two groups. Further studies are required to establish the best therapeutic approach to renal abnormalities in SCD.

  16. Foetal haemoglobin and disease severity in sickle cell anaemia patients in Kampala, Uganda

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    Mpalampa Lena

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sickle cell anaemia (SCA is a major chronic health problem in Uganda. In patients with SCA, the level of foetal haemoglobin (HbF has been found to be important in influencing the clinical course of the disease. Thus populations with high levels of HbF like those in Saudi Arabia have been described as having a milder clinical course with fewer complications as compared to populations with lower levels. Disease modifying drugs can increase the Hb F levels and modify the presentation of SCA. Methods This was a cross sectional study in which we determined foetal haemoglobin levels and examined the relationship between HbF levels and disease severity in SCA patients in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. We consecutively enrolled 216 children aged 1 year to 18 years with SCA attending the Sickle Cell Clinic at Mulago Hospital whose guardians had given consent. The history included age at onset of initial symptoms and diagnosis, number of hospitalisations and blood transfusions and other complications of SCA (cardiovascular accidents, avascular hip necrosis and priapism. A detailed physical examination was performed to assess the current state and help describe the disease severity for each patient. Blood samples were drawn for HbF levels. HbF levels ≥10% was defined as high. Results Of the 216 children, (80 37% had HbF levels ≥10%. Significant correlations were observed between HbF level and several clinical parameters independent of age including age at diagnosis (p value 0.013, number of hospitalisations (p value 0.024 and transfusions (p value 0.018 since birth. Conclusion A third of the children with SCA attending the Sickle cell clinic in Mulago Hospital have high HbF levels. Higher HbF level is associated with later onset of symptoms and presentation, and less severe disease characterised by fewer hospitalisations and blood transfusions. We suggest HbF levels should be determined at initial contact for patients with SCA to

  17. Variant RH alleles and Rh immunisation in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippert, Emilia; Fujita, Claudia R; Machado, Debora; Guelsin, Glaucia; Gaspardi, Ane C; Pellegrino, Jordão; Gilli, Simone; Saad, Sara S T O; Castilho, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunisation is a major complication in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) receiving red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and despite provision of Rh phenotyped RBC units, Rh antibodies still occur. These antibodies in patients positive for the corresponding Rh antigen are considered autoantibodies in many cases but variant RH alleles found in SCD patients can also contribute to Rh alloimmunisation. In this study, we characterised variant RH alleles in 31 SCD patients who made antibodies to Rh antigens despite antigen-positive status and evaluated the clinical significance of the antibodies produced. RHD and RHCE BeadChip™ from BioArray Solutions and/or amplification and sequencing of exons were used to identify the RH variants. The serological features of all Rh antibodies in antigen-positive patients were analysed and the clinical significance of the antibodies was evaluated by retrospective analysis of the haemoglobin (Hb) levels before and after transfusion; the change from baseline pre-transfusion Hb and the percentage of HbS were also determined. We identified variant RH alleles in 31/48 (65%) of SCD patients with Rh antibodies. Molecular analyses revealed the presence of partial RHD alleles and variant RHCE alleles associated with altered C and e antigens. Five patients were compound heterozygotes for RHD and RHCE variants. Retrospective analysis showed that 42% of antibodies produced by the patients with RH variants were involved in delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions or decreased survival of transfused RBC. In this study, we found that Rh antibodies in SCD patients with RH variants can be clinically significant and, therefore, matching patients based on RH variants should be considered.

  18. Lesional accumulation of CD163-expressing cells in the gut of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

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    Eleonora Franzè

    Full Text Available Monocytes/macrophages displaying different markers of activation/differentiation infiltrate the inflamed gut of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, but the role that each monocyte/macrophage subpopulation plays in the pathogenesis of IBD is not fully understood. The hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163, a specific marker of monocytes/macrophages, has been associated with either anti-inflammatory or inflammatory functions of macrophages in several pathologies. In this study we examined the tissue distribution and function of CD163-expressing monocytes/macrophages in IBD. CD163 RNA and protein expression was more pronounced in IBD in comparison to normal controls, with no significant difference between Crohn's disease and Ulcerative colitis. In IBD, over-expression of CD163 was restricted to areas with active inflammation and not influenced by current therapy. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the accumulation of CD163-expressing cells in IBD, mostly around and inside blood vessels, thus suggesting that these cells are partly recruited from the systemic circulation. Indeed, FACS analysis of circulating mononuclear cells showed that the fractions of CD163-positive monocytes were increased in IBD patients as compared to controls. Functionally, interleukin-6 up-regulated CD163 expression in lamina propria mononuclear cells and mucosal explants of normal subjects. In IBD blood and mucosal cell cultures, cross-linking of CD163 with a specific monoclonal anti-CD163 antibody enhanced tumor necrosis factor-α synthesis. These findings indicate that IBD mucosa is abundantly infiltrated with CD163-positive cells, which could contribute to amplify the inflammatory cytokine response.

  19. Altered circadian rhythms of natural killer (NK) cell activity in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masera, R G; Carignola, R; Staurenghi, A H; Sartori, M L; Lazzero, A; Griot, G; Angeli, A

    1994-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are a lymphocyte subset actively involved in cytotoxicity against tumor-transformed and virus-infected cells; they are a reliable model for the study of neuroendocrine-immune interactions. In previous works we demonstrated that in healthy subjects NK activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and susceptibility to endogenous modifiers display statistically validated circadian rhythms. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in other autoimmune rheumatic diseases abnormalities of the circadian rhythm of serum cortisol and altered levels of NK cell activity have been reported. We evaluated the circadian pattern of NK cell activity in 7 hospitalized patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (4 RA, 1 scleroderma, 2 mixed connective tissue disease). Temporal variations of in vitro responses to either positive recombinant (immune interferon, r IFN-gamma IFN-gamma: 650 IU/ml; recombinant interleukin-2, r IL-2 IL-2: 100 IU/ml) or negative (cortisol: 10(-6) M) modifiers were also studied. Blood was drawn at 4h intervals for 24 h, starting at 0800. PBMC preparations were immediately separated and incubated for 20h in the presence or absence of modifiers. NK activity was assessed with a direct non-radiometric 4h cytolytic assay, using K 562 cells as targets. Significant circadian variations of spontaneous NK activity were documented only in women with RA, with a peak in the evening hours and a minimum in the night or in the early morning (p < 0.05, PR 51.5%, phi 1829). Population-mean cosinor analysis did not yield detection of significant circadian variations of in vitro responsiveness to modifiers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Genome-wide association study of erythrocyte density in sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilboudo, Yann; Bartolucci, Pablo; Rivera, Alicia; Sedzro, Josepha-Clara; Beaudoin, Mélissa; Trudel, Marie; Alper, Seth L; Brugnara, Carlo; Galactéros, Frédéric; Lettre, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    Deoxy-hemoglobin S polymerization into rigid fibers is the direct cause of the clinical sequelae observed in sickle cell disease (SCD). The rate of polymerization of sickle hemoglobin is determined primarily by intracellular hemoglobin concentration, itself dependent on the amount of sickle hemoglobin and on red blood cell (RBC) volume. Dense, dehydrated RBC (DRBC) are observed in SCD patients, and their number correlates with hemolytic parameters and complications such as renal dysfunction, leg ulcers and priapism. To identify new genes involved in RBC hydration in SCD, we performed the first genome-wide association study for DRBC in 374 sickle cell anemia (HbSS) patients. We did not find genome-wide significant results, indicating that variants that modulate DRBC have modest-to-weak effects. A secondary analysis demonstrated a nominal association (P=0.003) between DRBC in SCD patients and a variant associated with mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) in non-anemic individuals. This intronic variant controls the expression of ATP2B4, the main calcium pump in erythrocytes. Our study highlights ATP2B4 as a promising target for modulation of RBC hydration in SCD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. How we treat delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Kate; Hoppe, Carolyn; Mijovic, Aleksandar; Thein, Swee L

    2015-09-01

    Transfusion therapy is effective in the prevention and treatment of many complications of sickle cell disease (SCD). However, its benefits must be balanced against its risks, including delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions (DHTR). Not only is the relative rate of alloimmunization higher in patients with SCD than in other patient populations, but attendant risks associated with DHTR are even greater in SCD. Clinicians' awareness of DHTR events is poor because symptoms of DHTR mimic acute vaso-occlusive pain and immunohaematology findings are often negative. Transfusions delivered in the acute rather than elective setting appear to confer a higher risk of DHTR. Management of DHTR in SCD depends on the clinical severity, ranging from supportive care to immunosuppression, and optimization of erythropoiesis. DHTR must be considered in any recently transfused patient presenting with acute sickle cell pain. Meticulous documentation of transfusion and immunohaematology history is key. We anticipate an increase in DHTR events in SCD patients with the increasing use of red blood cell transfusion therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Heart valve surgery in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease: A management strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutaouekkil, El Mehdi; Najib, Abdelmalek; Ajaja, Rida; Arji, Moha; Slaoui, Anas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with the homozygous sickle cell disease have increased perioperative mortality. Some indications like heart valve surgery, may justify an exchange blood transfusion to reduce the proportion of hemoglobin S (HbS) and complications. Subjects and Methods: We report two female cases aged 20 and 27, of African origin with homozygous sickle cell anemia who underwent heart valve surgery to treat mitral valve regurgitation. This presentation describes the perioperative considerations including anesthesia and postoperative care. Results: A partial exchange blood transfusion decreased HbS levels from respectively, 90% and 84%, 9% to 27% and 34%, and simultaneously treated the anemia. Neither sickling crisis nor acidosis occurred in any patient, and no special postoperative complication occurred. Average hospital stay was 10 days. Currently, the two patients remain alive and free of cardiac symptoms. Discussion: Although the presence of sickle cell disorders is associated with increased risk of sickling and thus vaso-occlusive complications, they should not be taken as a contraindication for heart valve surgery. Nevertheless, monitoring of certain parameters such as venous, arterial oxygen content, pH, and body temperature is mandatory for a better outcome. Furthermore, preoperative exchange transfusion has a positive influence on the outcome of surgery and on the survival of patients undergoing heart valves surgery. Avoiding intraoperative hypoxia, hypothermia, and vaso-constrictive agents, minimizing HbS levels with preoperative exchange transfusion, and ensuring a stress-free environment with the judicious use of sedatives made surgery relatively safe in these cases. PMID:26139741

  3. Heart valve surgery in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease: A management strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Mehdi Moutaouekkil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with the homozygous sickle cell disease have increased perioperative mortality. Some indications like heart valve surgery, may justify an exchange blood transfusion to reduce the proportion of hemoglobin S (HbS and complications. Subjects and Methods: We report two female cases aged 20 and 27, of African origin with homozygous sickle cell anemia who underwent heart valve surgery to treat mitral valve regurgitation. This presentation describes the perioperative considerations including anesthesia and postoperative care. Results: A partial exchange blood transfusion decreased HbS levels from respectively, 90% and 84%, 9% to 27% and 34%, and simultaneously treated the anemia. Neither sickling crisis nor acidosis occurred in any patient, and no special postoperative complication occurred. Average hospital stay was 10 days. Currently, the two patients remain alive and free of cardiac symptoms. Discussion: Although the presence of sickle cell disorders is associated with increased risk of sickling and thus vaso-occlusive complications, they should not be taken as a contraindication for heart valve surgery. Nevertheless, monitoring of certain parameters such as venous, arterial oxygen content, pH, and body temperature is mandatory for a better outcome. Furthermore, preoperative exchange transfusion has a positive influence on the outcome of surgery and on the survival of patients undergoing heart valves surgery. Avoiding intraoperative hypoxia, hypothermia, and vaso-constrictive agents, minimizing HbS levels with preoperative exchange transfusion, and ensuring a stress-free environment with the judicious use of sedatives made surgery relatively safe in these cases.

  4. Effects of insulin on glucose uptake and leg blood flow in patients with sickle cell disease and normal subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC; Serne, EH; Bakker, SJL; van Eps, WS; Donker, AJM; Gans, ROB

    The hemodynamic concept of insulin resistance assumes that vasodilatory effects of insulin determine glucose uptake. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by microangiopathy and microvascular occlusion. Therefore, we hypothesized that patients with SCD have a reduced insulin-mediated glucose

  5. Exercise-induced mobilisation of endothelial progenitor cells in patients with premature coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaźmierski, Maciej; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Michalewska-Włudarczyk, Aleksandra; Podolecka, Ewa; Kotowski, Maciej; Machaliński, Bogusław; Tendera, Michał

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) derive from bone marrow and participate in both endothelial regeneration and development of new blood vessels. EPC also play a role in the atherosclerotic process, and their number correlates negatively with the presence of classical risk factors. To evaluate circulating EPC count and their exercise-induced mobilisation in patients with premature coronary artery disease (CAD). The study group included 60 patients with stable CAD diagnosed before 45 years of age. The control group consisted of 33 healthy age- and gender-matched volunteers. Venous blood was sampled 3 times in order to assess circulating EPC count immediately before an exercise test (EPC 0) and at 15 min (EPC 15) and 60 min (EPC 60) after the exercise test. Circulating EPC count in the study group at rest and at 15 min after exercise was comparable (2.1 vs. 2.1 cell/μL, p = 0.35) and increased significantly at 60 min after exercise in comparison to resting values (2.1 vs. 3.2 cell/μL, p exercise (2.0 vs. 3.5 cell/μL, p exercise, although it remained greater than at rest (2.7 vs. 2.0 cell/μL, p exercise was comparable in the two groups (2.1 vs. 2.0 cell/μL, p = 0.96; and 3.2 vs. 2.7 cell/μL, p = 0.13, respectively) but it was significantly lower in the study group compared to the control group at 15 min after exercise (2.1 vs. 3.5 cell/μL, p exercise did not correlate with the number of stenosed coronary arteries but at 60 min after exercise it was greater in patients with one-vessel disease compared to those with two- or three-vessel disease (4.2 vs. 3.4 cell/μL, p = 0.01; and 4.2 vs. 2.3 cell/μL, p = 0.00003). However, no difference in circulating EPC count was seen at 60 min after exercise between patients with two- or three-vessel disease (3.4 vs. 2.3 cell/μL, p = 0.3). 1. Circulating EPC count at rest is comparable between subjects with premature atherosclerosis and healthy volunteers. 2. A single bout of physical exercise causes a significant increase

  6. EMOTIONAL REACTIONS TO PAIN PREDICT PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE (SCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDWARDS, CHRISTOPHER L.; KILLOUGH, ALVIN; WOOD, MARY; DOYLE, TODD; FELIU, MIRIAM; BARKER, CAMELA S.; UPPAL, PRIYANKA; DeCASTRO, LAURA; WELLINGTON, CHANTÉ; WHITFIELD, KEITH E.; TRAMBADIA, JAY; GUINYARD, DARIENE; MUHAMMAD, MALIK; O’GARO, KEISHA-GAYE N.; MORGAN, KAI; EDWARDS ALESII, LEKISHA Y.; BYRD, GOLDIE S.; McCABE, MELANIE; GOLI, VEERAINDAR; KEYS, ABIGAIL; HILL, LABARRON; COLLINS-McNEIL, JANICE; McDONALD, PATRICIA; SCHMECHEL, DONALD E.; ROBINSON, ELWOOD

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating somatic from emotional influences on the experience of chronic pain has been of interest to clinicians and researchers for many years. Although prior research has not well specified these pathways at the anatomical level, some evidence, both theoretical and empirical, suggest that emotional reactions influence the experience of disease and non-disease-related pains. Other studies suggest that treatments directed at negative emotional responses reduce suffering associated with pain. The current study was conducted to explore the influence of emotional reactions to pain as a predictor of psychological distress in a sample of adult Blacks with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). Using cross-sectional survey data, we evaluated whether negative emotional reactions to the experience of pain were predictive of psychological distress after controlling for the somatic dimension of pain and age in n = 67 Black patients with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). Results showed that greater negative emotion associated with pain predicted Somatization (p < .01), Anxiety (p < .05), Phobic Anxiety (p < .05), and Psychoticism (p < .05). Increased negative emotion associated with pain was also predictive of the General Symptoms Index (p < .05) and the Positive Symptoms Total from the SCL-90-R (p < .01). We believe the current study demonstrates that negative emotional reactions to the experience of pain in adults with SCD are predictive of psychological distress above and beyond the influences of age and the direct nociceptive experience. We also believe these data to be valuable in conceptualizing the allocation of treatment resources toward a proactive approach with early identification of patients who are responding poorly for the purpose of potentially reducing later psychopathology. A deeper understanding of the ways that subpopulations cope with chronic disease-related pain may produce models that can be ultimately generalized to the consumers of the majority of healthcare

  7. Emotional reactions to pain predict psychological distress in adult patients with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Christopher L; Killough, Alvin; Wood, Mary; Doyle, Todd; Feliu, Miriam; Barker, Camela S; Uppal, Priyanka; DeCastro, Laura; Wellington, Chante; Whitfield, Keith E; O'Garo, Keisha-Gaye N; Morgan, Kai; Edwards Alesii, Lekisha Y; Byrd, Goldie S; McCabe, Melanie; Goli, Veeraindar; Keys, Abigail; Hill, Labarron; Collins-McNeil, Janice; Trambadia, Jay; Guinyard, Dariene; Muhammad, Malik; McDonald, Patricia; Schmechel, Donald E; Robinson, Elwood

    2014-01-01

    Differentiating somatic from emotional influences on the experience of chronic pain has been of interest to clinicians and researchers for many years. Although prior research has not well specified these pathways at the anatomical level, some evidence, both theoretical and empirical, suggest that emotional reactions influence the experience of disease and non-disease-related pains. Other studies suggest that treatments directed at negative emotional responses reduce suffering associated with pain. The current study was conducted to explore the influence of emotional reactions to pain as a predictor of psychological distress in a sample of adult Blacks with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). Using cross-sectional survey data, we evaluated whether negative emotional reactions to the experience of pain were predictive of psychological distress after controlling for the somatic dimension of pain and age in n = 67 Black patients with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). Results showed that greater negative emotion associated with pain predicted Somatization (p emotion associated with pain was also predictive of the General Symptoms Index (p emotional reactions to the experience of pain in adults with SCD are predictive of psychological distress above and beyond the influences of age and the direct nociceptive experience. We also believe these data to be valuable in conceptualizing the allocation of treatment resources toward a proactive approach with early identification of patients who are responding poorly for the purpose of potentially reducing later psychopathology. A deeper understanding of the ways that subpopulations cope with chronic disease-related pain may produce models that can be ultimately generalized to the consumers of the majority of healthcare resources.

  8. East Mediterranean region sickle cell disease mortality trial: retrospective multicenter cohort analysis of 735 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacaoglu, Pelin Kardaş; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Aslı; Solmaz, Soner; Buyukkurt, Nurhilal Turgut; Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Kasar, Mutlu; Ozbalcı, Demircan; Unal, Selma; Kaya, Hasan; Gurkan, Emel; Yeral, Mahmut; Sariturk, Çagla; Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), one of the most common genetic disorders worldwide, is characterized by hemolytic anemia and tissue damage from the rigid red blood cells. Although hydroxyurea and transfusion therapy are administered to treat the accompanying tissue injury, whether either one prolongs the lifespan of patients with SCD is unknown. SCD-related mortality data are available, but there are few studies on mortality-related factors based on evaluations of surviving patients. In addition, ethnic variability in patient registries has complicated detailed analyses. The aim of this study was to investigate mortality and mortality-related factors among an ethnically homogeneous population of patients with SCD. The 735 patients (102 children and 633 adults) included in this retrospective cohort study were of Eti-Turk origin and selected from 1367 patients seen at 5 regional hospitals. A central population management system was used to control for records of patient mortality. Data reliability was checked by a data supervision group. Mortality-related factors and predictors were identified in univariate and multivariate analyses using a Cox regression model with stepwise forward selection. The study group included patients with homozygous hemoglobin S (Hgb S) disease (67 %), Hb S-β(0) thalassemia (17 %), Hgb S-β(+) thalassemia (15 %), and Hb S-α thalassemia (1 %). They were followed for a median of 66 ± 44 (3-148) months. Overall mortality at 5 years was 6.1 %. Of the 45 patients who died, 44 (6 %) were adults and 1 (0.1 %) was a child. The mean age at death was 34.1 ± 10 (18-54) years for males, 40.1 ± 15 (17-64) years for females, and 36.6 ± 13 (17-64) years overall. Hydroxyurea was found to have a notable positive effect on mortality (p = 0.009). Mortality was also significantly related to hypertension and renal damage in a univariate analysis (p = 0.015 and p = 0.000, respectively). Acute chest syndrome

  9. Early disease progression in patients with localized NK/T-cell lymphoma treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Motoko; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Kim, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Hyeh; Oguchi, Masahiko; Asano, Naoko; Miyazaki, Kana; Terui, Yasuhiko; Kubota, Nobuko; Maeda, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Yukio; Amaki, Jun; Soejima, Toshinori; Saito, Bungo; Shimoda, Emiko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Tsukamoto, Norifumi; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Choi, Ilseung; Utsumi, Takahiko; Ejima, Yasuo; Kim, Won Seog; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2018-03-30

    The prognosis of patients with localized nasal extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKL) has been improved by non-anthracycline-containing treatments such as concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). However, some patients experience early disease progression. To clarify the clinical features and outcomes of these patients, data from 165 patients with localized nasal ENKL who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2013 at 31 institutes in Japan and who received radiotherapy with dexamethasone, etoposide, ifosfamide, and carboplatin (RT-DeVIC) were retrospectively analyzed. Progression of disease within 2 years after diagnosis (POD24) was used as the definition of early progression. An independent dataset of 60 patients with localized nasal ENKL who received CCRT at Samsung Medical Center was used in the validation analysis. POD24 was documented in 23% of patients who received RT-DeVIC and 25% of patients in the validation cohort. The overall survival (OS) from risk-defining events of the POD24 group was inferior to that of the reference group in both cohorts (P < 0.00001). In the RT-DeVIC cohort, pretreatment elevated levels of serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R), lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein, and detectable Epstein-Barr virus DNA in peripheral blood were associated with POD24. In the validation cohort, no pretreatment clinical factor associated with POD24 was identified. Our study indicates that POD24 is a strong indicator of survival in localized ENKL, despite the different CCRT regimens adopted. In the treatment of localized nasal ENKL, POD24 is useful for identifying patients who have unmet medical needs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Gene expression profiling of CD8+ T cells predicts prognosis in patients with Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James C.; Lyons, Paul A.; McKinney, Eoin F.; Sowerby, John M.; Carr, Edward J.; Bredin, Francesca; Rickman, Hannah M.; Ratlamwala, Huzefa; Hatton, Alexander; Rayner, Tim F.; Parkes, Miles; Smith, Kenneth G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are increasingly common, chronic forms of inflammatory bowel disease. The behavior of these diseases varies unpredictably among patients. Identification of reliable prognostic biomarkers would enable treatment to be personalized so that patients destined to experience aggressive disease could receive appropriately potent therapies from diagnosis, while those who will experience more indolent disease are not exposed to the risks and side effects of unnecessary immunosuppression. Using transcriptional profiling of circulating T cells isolated from patients with CD and UC, we identified analogous CD8+ T cell transcriptional signatures that divided patients into 2 otherwise indistinguishable subgroups. In both UC and CD, patients in these subgroups subsequently experienced very different disease courses. A substantially higher incidence of frequently relapsing disease was experienced by those patients in the subgroup defined by elevated expression of genes involved in antigen-dependent T cell responses, including signaling initiated by both IL-7 and TCR ligation — pathways previously associated with prognosis in unrelated autoimmune diseases. No equivalent correlation was observed with CD4+ T cell gene expression. This suggests that the course of otherwise distinct autoimmune and inflammatory conditions may be influenced by common pathways and identifies what we believe to be the first biomarker that can predict prognosis in both UC and CD from diagnosis, a major step toward personalized therapy. PMID:21946256

  11. Adverse Reactions to Pneumococcal Vaccine in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin; Kemiki, Opeyemi; Hsu, Lewis L; Rivers, Angela E

    2015-07-01

    To review five cases of severe adverse reactions after vaccination with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) in pediatric and adolescent patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), and to evaluate the prevalence of adverse reactions to PPSV23 in patients with SCD by analyzing data from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Case series and retrospective analysis of data from the VAERS. Medical records from a tertiary care hospital and the VAERS database. Five cases of severe adverse reactions after vaccination with PPSV23 in pediatric and adolescent patients with SCD (aged 2-22 years) were reviewed. The adverse reactions occurred within 24 hours after immunization, and all five patients required medical attention. Analysis of data from the VAERS found that PPSV23 was the most commonly reported vaccine causing adverse events in patients with SCD, accounting for 62% of all vaccine-induced adverse events. This rate is significantly higher than the rate of adverse events related to PPSV23 in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or asthma (62% vs 16%, padverse reactions in pediatric patients (adverse reactions to PPSV23 is greater in patients with SCD than in patients with HIV or asthma, and especially in pediatric and adolescent patients with SCD compared with their adult counterparts. Health care professionals should closely monitor for potential adverse events after PPSV23 vaccination or revaccination in patients with SCD, adhere to the recommended time interval between PCV13 and PPSV23 administration, and possibly consider avoiding simultaneous administration of other vaccines with PPSV23. © 2015 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  12. Dyspnea, pulmonary function and exercise capacity in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alameri, Hatem F.; Alem, A.; Al-Momen, A.; Kardas, W.; Owais, M.; Jehangir, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to examine pulmonary function, dyspnea, and exercise capacity in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. The patients were recruited from the hematology clinic at King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh from January to December 2005. The study involved 39 patients with stable SCD 20 women and 19 men, with a mean age of 22.7+/- 7.1 years, hemoglobin level of 95.5+/-14.6g/L and hemoglobin F level of 13.7+/08.6. Patients underwent pulmonary function tests PFT forced expiratory volume in first second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide [DLco] data are presented as a percentage of the normal prediction, a 6- minute walk test 6MWT and echocardiography. Dyspnea was assessed using the Borg score. The 6MWT data were compared to body mass index matched healthy controls. Forty-one percent of SCD patients had mild dyspnea at rest and this increased to 61% at the end of the 6MWT. Pulmonary function tests were abnormal in 51%, 36% of patients had a restrictive pattern, 10% had isolated decrease in DLco and 5% had a mixed restrictive-obstrutive pattern. The 6MWD was shorter in SCD patients compared to the controls 368+/-67 versus 407+/-47m, p=0.005. No hematological variables correlated with outcome variables. Chronic pulmonary complications in adult Saudi SCD patients are relatively mild but common. Pulmonary function in these patients differs from that published for African-origin SCD patients. The difference may reflect a different natural history of SCD in the 2 populations. (author)

  13. A Patient-Centered Emergency Department Management Strategy for Sickle-Cell Disease Super-Utilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Grant G; Hahn, Hallie R; Powel, Alex A; Leverence, Robert R; Morris, Linda A; Thompson, Lara G; Zumberg, Marc S; Borde, Deepa J; Tyndall, Joseph A; Shuster, Jonathan J; Yealy, Donald M; Allen, Brandon R

    2017-04-01

    A subpopulation of sickle-cell disease patients, termed super-utilizers, presents frequently to emergency departments (EDs) for vaso-occlusive events and may consume disproportionate resources without broader health benefit. To address the healthcare needs of this vulnerable patient population, we piloted a multidisciplinary intervention seeking to create and use individualized patient care plans that alter utilization through coordinated care. Our goals were to assess feasibility primarily, and to assess resource use secondarily. We evaluated the effects of a single-site interventional study targeted at a population of adult sickle-cell disease super-utilizers using a pre- and post-implementation design. The pre-intervention period was 06/01/13 to 12/31/13 (seven months) and the post-intervention period was 01/01/14 to 02/28/15 (14 months). Our approach included patient-specific best practice advisories (BPA); an ED management protocol; and formation of a "medical home" for these patients. For 10 subjects targeted initially we developed and implemented coordinated care plans; after deployment, we observed a tendency toward reduction in ED and inpatient utilization across all measured indices. Between the annualized pre- and post-implementation periods we found the following: ED visits decreased by 16.5 visits/pt-yr (95% confidence interval [CI] [-1.32-34.2]); ED length of state (LOS) decreased by 115.3 hours/pt-yr (95% CI [-82.9-313.5]); in-patient admissions decreased by 4.20 admissions/pt-yr (95% CI [-1.73-10.1]); in-patient LOS decreased by 35.8 hours/pt-yr (95% CI [-74.9-146.7]); and visits where the patient left before treatment were reduced by an annualized total of 13.7 visits. We observed no patient mortality in our 10 subjects, and no patient required admission to the intensive care unit 72 hours following discharge. This effort suggests that a targeted approach is both feasible and potentially effective, laying a foundation for broader study.

  14. Acute Chest Syndrome in Sickle Cell Disease Patients Post Caesarean Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YM Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is the most common inherited disease worldwide and is associated with anaemia and intermittent painful crisis. Pregnant women who are affected are known to have increased maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Acute chest syndrome (ACS is an uncommon but serious complication in pregnant women with SCD that can lead to death. We present two cases of patients with SCD, both of whom had severe ACS within 24 hours post Caesarean section. By accurate diagnosis and appropriate management by a multidisciplinary team, both mothers and fetuses had excellent outcomes. It is suggested that prompt recognition of ACS in a pregnant woman with SCD and collaborative medical and obstetric management are essential to optimize maternal and fetal outcomes.

  15. Patients' views on improving sickle cell disease management in primary care: focus group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljuburi, Ghida; Phekoo, Karen J; Okoye, Nv Ogo; Anie, Kofie; Green, Stuart A; Nkohkwo, Asaah; Ojeer, Patrick; Ndive, Comfort; Banarsee, Ricky; Oni, Lola; Majeed, Azeem

    2012-12-01

    To assess sickle cell disease (SCD) patient and carer perspectives on the primary care services related to SCD that they receive from their general practitioner (GP). A focus group discussion was used to elicit the views of patients about the quality of care they receive from their primary health-care providers and what they thought was the role of primary care in SCD management. The focus group discussion was video recorded. The recording was then examined by the project team and recurring themes were identified. A comparison was made with notes made by two scribes also present at the discussion. Sickle Cell Society in Brent, UK. Ten participants with SCD or caring for someone with SCD from Northwest London, UK. Patients' perceptions about the primary care services they received, and a list of key themes and suggestions. Patients and carers often bypassed GPs for acute problems but felt that GPs had an important role to play around repeat prescriptions and general health care. These service users believed SCD is often ignored and deemed unimportant by GPs. Participants wanted the health service to support primary health-care providers to improve their knowledge and understanding of SCD. Key themes and suggestions from this focus group have been used to help develop an educational intervention for general practice services that will be used to improve SCD management in primary care.

  16. Proteinuria in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease is not associated with identifiable risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Aamer

    2010-09-01

    Renal involvement in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Proteinuria is common in patients with SCD and is a risk factor for future development of renal failure. We sought to identify risk factors, if any, associated with proteinuria in adult Saudi patients with SCD. We studied 67 patients with SCD followed-up at the King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All patients underwent 24-hour urine collection to measure creatinine clearance and to quantify proteinuria. In addition, blood was examined for evaluation of hematological and biochemical parameters. Clinical information was gathered from review of the patients' charts. A urine protein level of more than 0.150 grams/24 hours was considered abnormal. Urine protein was correlated with various clinical and laboratory parameters. Thirty-one males and 36 females were evaluated. The mean age of the cohort was 23.8 (± 7.2) years. Twenty-seven patients (40.3%) had proteinuria of more than 0.150 grams/24 hours. The study group had a mean hemoglobin level of 8.5 (± 2.8) g/dL and mean fetal hemoglobin (HbF) level of 14.4% (± 7.3%). Majority of the patients (61) had hemoglobin SS genotype and six patients had S-ß⁰ thalassemia. None of the parameters evaluated correlated with proteinuria although there was a borderline association with older age and higher systolic blood pressure (P = 0.073 and 0.061 respectively). Hydroxyurea use for more than a year was not beneficial. In conclusion, our study suggests that proteinuria in adult Saudi patients is not associated with any clear identifiable risk factors.

  17. Arterio-venous fistula for automated red blood cells exchange in patients with sickle cell disease: Complications and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delville, Marianne; Manceau, Sandra; Ait Abdallah, Nassim; Stolba, Jan; Awad, Sameh; Damy, Thibaud; Gellen, Barnabas; Sabbah, Laurent; Debbache, Karima; Audard, Vincent; Beaumont, Jean-Louis; Arnaud, Cécile; Chantalat-Auger, Christelle; Driss, Françoise; Lefrère, François; Cavazzana, Marina; Franco, Gilbert; Galacteros, Frederic; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Gellen-Dautremer, Justine

    2017-02-01

    Erythrocytapheresis (ER) can improve outcome in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). A good vascular access is required but frequently it can be difficult to obtain for sickle cell patients. Arterio-venous fistulas (AVFs) have been suggested for ER in SCD supported by limited evidence. We report the largest cohort of ER performed with AVFs from three French SCD reference centers. Data of SCD patients undergoing ER with AVFs in the French SCD reference center were retrospectively collected. The inclusion criteria were: SS or Sβ-Thalassemia and AVF surgery for ER. SCD-related complications, transfusion history, details about AVF surgical procedure, echocardiographic data before and after AVF, AVF-related surgical and hemodynamical complications were collected. Twenty-six patients (mean age 20.5 years, mean follow-up 68 months [11-279]) were included. Twenty-three patients (88.5%) required central vascular access before AVF. Fifteen AVFs (58%) were created on the forearm and 11 (42%) on the arm. Nineteen patients (73%) had stenotic, thrombotic or infectious AVF complications. A total of 0.36 stenosis per 1,000 AVF days, 0.37 thrombosis per 1,000 AVF days and 0.078 infections per 1.000 AVF days were observed. The mean AVF lifespan was 51 months [13-218]. One patient with severe pulmonary hypertension worsened after AVF creation and died. We report the first series of SCD patients with AVF for ER, demonstrating that AVFs could be considered as a potential vascular access for ER. Patients with increased risk for hemodynamic intolerance of AVFs must be carefully identified, so that alternative vascular accesses can be considered. Am. J. Hematol. 92:136-140, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Frequency of red cell, leukocytic and platelet alloantibodies in patients with hematological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available History of multiple transfusions in patients with hematological diseases increases the likelihood of immunization to donor blood cells antigensand immunological complications development. Incidence of alloantibodies development in this patients was assessed in this work. Alloantibodies detection was performed in patients with aplastic anemia, acute leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and autoimmune thrombocytopenia. 9696 patients were included in this study. Frequency of alloantibodies to red cell antigens was 3.8 %, with 0.9 % of the antibody belong to the immunoglobulin G, and 2.9 % of the cases – to immunoglobulin M. Most of the IgG antibodies had following specificity:monospecific anti-D antibody (21 cases, anti-DC and anti-DE antibodies (4 cases, anti-C (8 cases, anti-E (15, anti-c (13, and anti-K (11. Anti-e (1, anti-Fya (2, anti-Lea (4, anti-S (2, anti-s (2, anti-Jka (2 antibodies were less common. Granulocytes antibodies were found in 66.7 % of 384 patients, with results dependent on the detection method used. The presence of antiplatelet alloantibodies studied in 285 serum samples, of which antibodies were detected in 99 patients (34.7 %. Specificity of platelet antibodies was determined in three serum samples only: anti-2b, anti-1a, anti-1b. In other patients, probably present antibodies to several antigens simultaneously, and to identify them was not possible.

  19. Study of Seminal Fluid Parameters and Fertility of Male Sickle Cell Disease Patients and Potential Impact of Hydroxyurea Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Lulup Kumar; Kullu, Bipin Kishore; Patel, Siris; Patel, Nayan Kumar; Rout, Pragyan; Purohit, Prasanta; Meher, Satyabrata

    2017-06-01

    Male Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients often have moderate to severe hypogonadism resulting in abnormal seminal fluid parameters due to testicular dysfunction. Hydroxyurea (HU), the only drug found to be effective in preventing morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease patients has been found to further aggravate the testicular dysfunction. This was a prospective study done at a tertiary care hospital over 26 months between September 2011 to October 2013. 100 male sickle cell disease patients of age group 15 to 45 years were recruited in the study. We evaluated seminal fluid indices in all patients and the effect of hydroxyurea on seminal fluid parameters. Hydroxyurea was given at low dose of 10mg/kg/day orally to patients with frequent vaso-occlusive crisis and frequent need of blood transfusion. Seminal fluid analysis was done according to WHO criteria before starting hydroxyurea and every 3 months after initiation of hydroxyurea. Patients with abnormal seminal parameters before hydroxyurea therapy were not given hydroxyurea therapy. Patients with abnormal sperm parameters were subjected for FNAC of testis. In sickle cell disease patients with hydroxyurea therapy, who developed abnormal seminal fluid parameters, hydroxyurea was stopped for 3 months and seminal fluid parameters were re-evaluated. Patients who had recovery of seminal indices after hydroxyurea cessation were restarted with hydroxyurea therapy at low dose. Among Sickle cell disease patients without hydroxyurea therapy, 18% of patients developed oligospermia and 4% developed azoospermia. Among sickle cell disease patients with hydroxyurea therapy, 20% of patients developed oligospermia and 10% developed azoospermia. Seminal fluid parameters reverted back to normal after stoppage of hydroxyurea for 3 months in 73% of patients. Alteration of sperm parameters is seen in a significant number of sickle cell disease patients. Also, alterations of seminal fluid parameters are exacerbated by hydroxyurea

  20. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in bronchoalveolar lavage cells of patients with interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branley, Howard M.; Bois, Roland M. du; Wells, Athol U.; Jones, Hazel A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: PK11195 is a ligand with high affinity for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs), which are present in large numbers in macrophages. PBRs play a role in antioxidant pathways and apoptosis, key factors in control of lung health. Intrapulmonary PBRs, assessed in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET), are decreased in interstitial lung disease (ILD) despite increased macrophage numbers. We wished to ascertain whether the observed decrease in in vivo expression of PBRs in the PET scans could be accounted for by a reduction in PBRs per cell by saturation-binding assays of R-PK11195 in cells obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Methods: We performed receptor saturation-binding assays with [ 3 H]-R-PK11195 on a mixed population of cells recovered by BAL to quantify the number of R-PK11195 binding sites per macrophage in 10 subjects with ILD and 10 normal subjects. Results: Receptor affinity [dissociation constant (Kd)] was similar in ILD patients and controls. However, R-PK11195 binding sites per cell [(maximal binding sites available (B max )] were decreased in macrophages obtained by BAL from subjects with ILD compared to normal (P<.0005). Microautoradiography confirmed localization of R-PK11195 to macrophages in a mixed inflammatory cell population obtained by BAL. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that in vitro PBR expression per cell on macrophages obtained by BAL is reduced in patients with ILD indicating a potentially functionally different macrophage phenotype. As PBRs are involved in the orchestration of lung inflammatory responses, this finding offers further insight into the role of macrophages in the pathogenesis of ILDs and offers a potential avenue for pharmacological strategy

  1. Parkinson’s Disease in a Dish: What Patient Specific-Reprogrammed Somatic Cells Can Tell Us about Parkinson’s Disease, If Anything?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Drouin-Ouellet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Technologies allowing for the derivation of patient-specific neurons from somatic cells are emerging as powerful in vitro tools to investigate the intrinsic cellular pathological behaviours of the diseases that affect these patients. While the use of patient-derived neurons to model Parkinson’s disease (PD has only just begun, these approaches have allowed us to begin investigating disease pathogenesis in a unique way. In this paper, we discuss the advances made in the field of cellular reprogramming to model PD and discuss the pros and cons associated with the use of such cells.

  2. Proteinuria in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease is not associated with identifiable risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleem Aamer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal involvement in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD is associated with signi-ficant morbidity and mortality. Proteinuria is common in patients with SCD and is a risk factor for future development of renal failure. We sought to identify risk factors, if any, associated with pro-teinuria in adult Saudi patients with SCD. We studied 67 patients with SCD followed-up at the King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All patients underwent 24-hour urine collection to measure creatinine clearance and to quantify proteinuria. In addition, blood was examined for evaluation of hematological and biochemical parameters. Clinical information was gathered from review of the patients′ charts. A urine protein level of more than 0.150 grams/24 hours was consi-dered abnormal. Urine protein was correlated with various clinical and laboratory parameters. Thirty-one males and 36 females were evaluated. The mean age of the cohort was 23.8 (± 7.2 years. Twenty-seven patients (40.3% had proteinuria of more than 0.150 grams/24 hours. The study group had a mean hemoglobin level of 8.5 (± 2.8 g/dL and mean fetal hemoglobin (HbF level of 14.4% (± 7.3%. Majority of the patients (61 had hemoglobin SS genotype and six patients had S-β0 thala-ssemia. None of the parameters evaluated correlated with proteinuria although there was a border-line association with older age and higher systolic blood pressure (P = 0.073 and 0.061 respec-tively. Hydroxyurea use for more than a year was not beneficial. In conclusion, our study suggests that proteinuria in adult Saudi patients is not associated with any clear identifiable risk factors.

  3. Regulatory B and T cell responses in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur due to faulty self-tolerance. Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) are classic examples of organ-specific autoimmune diseases. GD is an auto-antibody-mediated disease where autoantibodies are produced against the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR......). HT is primarily a T-cell mediated disease, and whether B cells play a pathogenic role in the pathogenesis is still unclear. Both GD and HT are characterized by infiltration of the thyroid gland by self-reactive T cells and B cells. In the first paper of this thesis, the role of regulatory B cells...... (Bregs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were investigated in the context of GD and HT. First, we studied the role of the thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin (TG) in healthy donors. The self-antigen TG, but not the foreign recall antigen tetanus toxoid (TT), was able to induce interleukin 10 (IL-10...

  4. Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells in neurological disease modeling: the importance of nonhuman primate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Z

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhifang Qiu,1,2 Steven L Farnsworth,2 Anuja Mishra,1,2 Peter J Hornsby1,21Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, TX, USA; 2Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USAAbstract: The development of the technology for derivation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells from human patients and animal models has opened up new pathways to the better understanding of many human diseases, and has created new opportunities for therapeutic approaches. Here, we consider one important neurological disease, Parkinson's, the development of relevant neural cell lines for studying this disease, and the animal models that are available for testing the survival and function of the cells, following transplantation into the central nervous system. Rapid progress has been made recently in the application of protocols for neuroectoderm differentiation and neural patterning of pluripotent stem cells. These developments have resulted in the ability to produce large numbers of dopaminergic neurons with midbrain characteristics for further study. These cells have been shown to be functional in both rodent and nonhuman primate (NHP models of Parkinson's disease. Patient-specific iPS cells and derived dopaminergic neurons have been developed, in particular from patients with genetic causes of Parkinson's disease. For complete modeling of the disease, it is proposed that the introduction of genetic changes into NHP iPS cells, followed by studying the phenotype of the genetic change in cells transplanted into the NHP as host animal, will yield new insights into disease processes not possible with rodent models alone.Keywords: Parkinson's disease, pluripotent cell differentiation, neural cell lines, dopaminergic neurons, cell transplantation, animal models

  5. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgul, Guler; Seyhan, Ekrem Cengiz; Özgül, Mehmet Akif; Günlüoğlu, Mehmet Zeki

    2017-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is accepted as a powerful predictor of outcomes in patients with CVD. To study RDW in patients with COPD, and to compare the value of this measurement with clinical, echocardiographic, nutritional and laboratory status. Secondly, we aimed to determine the effect of smoking on RDW values in healthy subjects. One hundred and seventy-five patients with stable COPD and 210 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Demographic, clinical, nutritional status, echocardiographic, and laboratory characteristics, RDW values were recorded and compared. RDW values were higher in the COPD group than in controls (15±2.3% vs. 13.8±2.5%, p<0.001). In COPD patients, RDW levels positively correlated with CRP levels (r=0.27, P<.001), albumin levels (r=0.23, P=.04), right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) (r=0.24, P=.001), pulmonary hypertension (PAH) (r=0.1, P=.02), and presence of CVD (r=0.24, P=.02). In multivariable logistic regression suggested that presence of CVD (4.3; 95% CI: 1.3 to 11; P=.01), and presence of RVD (3.1; 95% CI: 1.7 to 8.3; P=.02) were independently related to elevated RDW levels in COPD patients. In the healthy population, correlations analysis showed only a significant correlation between RDW and cigarette smoking years (r=0.57, P<.001). RDW is independently associated with CVD and RVD in patients with COPD. In the healthy population, RDW is also associated with smoking status. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Circulating gluten-specific FOXP3+CD39+regulatory T cells have impaired suppressive function in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laura; Munier, C Mee Ling; Seddiki, Nabila; van Bockel, David; Ontiveros, Noé; Hardy, Melinda Y; Gillies, Jana K; Levings, Megan K; Reid, Hugh H; Petersen, Jan; Rossjohn, Jamie; Anderson, Robert P; Zaunders, John J; Tye-Din, Jason A; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2017-12-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disorder of the gut triggered by dietary gluten. Although the effector T-cell response in patients with celiac disease has been well characterized, the role of regulatory T (Treg) cells in the loss of tolerance to gluten remains poorly understood. We sought to define whether patients with celiac disease have a dysfunction or lack of gluten-specific forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) + Treg cells. Treated patients with celiac disease underwent oral wheat challenge to stimulate recirculation of gluten-specific T cells. Peripheral blood was collected before and after challenge. To comprehensively measure the gluten-specific CD4 + T-cell response, we paired traditional IFN-γ ELISpot with an assay to detect antigen-specific CD4 + T cells that does not rely on tetramers, antigen-stimulated cytokine production, or proliferation but rather on antigen-induced coexpression of CD25 and OX40 (CD134). Numbers of circulating gluten-specific Treg cells and effector T cells both increased significantly after oral wheat challenge, peaking at day 6. Surprisingly, we found that approximately 80% of the ex vivo circulating gluten-specific CD4 + T cells were FOXP3 + CD39 + Treg cells, which reside within the pool of memory CD4 + CD25 + CD127 low CD45RO + Treg cells. Although we observed normal suppressive function in peripheral polyclonal Treg cells from patients with celiac disease, after a short in vitro expansion, the gluten-specific FOXP3 + CD39 + Treg cells exhibited significantly reduced suppressive function compared with polyclonal Treg cells. This study provides the first estimation of FOXP3 + CD39 + Treg cell frequency within circulating gluten-specific CD4 + T cells after oral gluten challenge of patients with celiac disease. FOXP3 + CD39 + Treg cells comprised a major proportion of all circulating gluten-specific CD4 + T cells but had impaired suppressive function, indicating that Treg cell dysfunction might be a key

  7. IMPACT OF MANNOSE-BINDING PROTEIN GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN OMANI SICKLE CELL DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Zachariah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Our objective was to study mannose binding protein (MBP polymorphisms in exonic and promoter region and correlate associated infections and vasoocculsive (VOC episodes, since MBP plays an important role in innate immunity by activating the complement system. Methods: We studied the genetic polymorphisms in the Exon 1 (alleles A/O and promoter region (alleles Y/X; H/L, P/Q of the MBL2 gene, in sickle cell disease (SCD patients as increased incidence of infections is seen in these patients. A PCR-based, targeted genomic DNA sequencing of MBL2 was used to study 68 SCD Omani patients and 44 controls (voluntary blood donors. Results: The observed frequencies of MBL2 promoter polymorphism (-221, Y/X were 44.4% and 20.5% for the heterozygous genotype Y/X and 3.2% and 2.2% for the homozygous (X/X respectively between SCD patients and controls. MBL2 Exon1 gene mutations were 29.4% and 50% for the heterozygous genotype A/O and 5.9% and 6.8% respectively for the homozygous (O/O genotype between SCD patients and controls. The distribution of variant MBL2 polymorphisms did not show any correlation in SCD patients with or without vasoocculsive crisis (VOC attacks (p=0.162; OR-0.486; CI=0.177 -1.33, however, it was correlated with infections (p=0.0162; OR-3.55; CI 1.25-10.04. Conclusions: Although the frequency of the genotypes and haplotypes of MBL2 in SCD patients did not differ from controls, overall in the SCD patient cohort the increased representation of variant alleles was significantly correlated with infections (p<0.05. However, these variant MBL2 polymorphisms did not seem to play a significant role in the VOC episodes in this SCD cohort. Keywords: Mannose-binding lectin, polymorphism, promoter, Sickle cell disease, MBL2, MBP

  8. Effector T-cells are expanded in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with high disease activity and damage indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantoni, S; Regola, F; Zanola, A; Andreoli, L; Dall'Ara, F; Tincani, A; Airo', P

    2018-01-01

    Background and objectives T-cell activation may be one of the pathogenic mechanisms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). After repeated antigenic stimulation, T-cells undergo different modifications, leading to the differentiation into effector memory T-cells (CCR7-CD45RA-) and terminally differentiated effector memory (TDEM) T-cells (CCR7-CD45RA+). Similarly, down-modulation of CD28 may lead to the expansion of the CD28- T-cells, a subpopulation with peculiar effector activities. The aim of this study was the characterization of T-cell phenotype in a cohort of patients with SLE according to disease activity and damage index. Materials and methods Phenotypic analysis of peripheral blood T lymphocytes of 51 SLE patients and 21 healthy controls was done by flow-cytometry. SLE disease activity was evaluated by SLE Disease Activity Index-2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and damage by the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology damage index (SDI). The variations between different groups were evaluated by Mann-Whitney test. Bonferroni correction was applied to adjust for multiple comparisons ( p adj ). Spearman rank test was used to evaluate the correlations between quantitative variables. Results CD4+ lymphopenia was found among SLE patients. Patients showed a trend for a higher percentage of TDEM among the CD4+ T-cell subpopulation in comparison with healthy controls ( p = .04). SLE patients were divided into two groups according to disease activity: patients with SLEDAI-2K ≥ 6 ( n = 13) had a higher percentage of circulating CD4+ T-cells with CD28- phenotype ( p adj  = .005) as well as those with an effector memory ( p adj  = .004) and TDEM ( p adj  = .002) phenotype and a trend of decrease of regulatory T-cells (TREGs) ( p = .02), in comparison with patients with low disease activity ( n = 38). Patients with damage (SDI ≥ 1) tended to show an expansion of TDEM among CD4+ T-cells as compared with

  9. Relevance of blood groups in transfusion of sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2013-03-01

    Blood groups are clinically significant in sickle cell disease (SCD) as transfusion remains a key treatment in this pathology. The occurrence of a delayed haemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) is not rare and is a life-threatening event. The main cause of DHTR is the production of alloantibodies against red blood cell antigens. The high rate of alloimmunization in SCD patients is mainly due to the differences of red blood groups between patients of African descent, and the frequently Caucasian donors. From an immuno-haematological point of view, DHTR in SCD patients has specific features: classical antibodies known to be haemolytic can be encountered, but otherwise non significant antibodies, autoantibodies and antibodies related to partial and rare blood groups are also frequently found in individuals of African descent. In some cases, there are no detectable antibodies. As alloimmunization remains the main cause of DHTR, it is extremely important to promote blood donation by individuals of African ancestry to make appropriate blood available. Copyright © 2012 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Barriers to conceiving sibling donors for sickle cell disease: perspectives from patients and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae, Gina A; Lewkowitz, Adam K; Yang, Joanna C; Shen, Liang; Rahman, Amal; Del Toro, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The lack of matched sibling donors poses a significant barrier to utilizing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), the only proven cure for children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Little is known about current patient and parent perspectives towards HCT for SCD. This study examines the perceived barriers of transplant, and the use of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), when there is no pre-existing sibling donor. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with adult patients with SCD and parents of children with SCD in an urban medical center in the US. Transcribed data was analyzed using qualitative methods. Of 23 participants, 17 reported having heard of HCT for SCD. Fewer knew of IVF or PGD as a means for conceiving an unaffected child (n =7) or to select a potential umbilical cord blood donor (n =1). The financial cost of IVF and PGD was perceived as a significant initial barrier to accessing these technologies, with the clinical risks of HCT and the ethical appropriateness of using PGD also identified as barriers. The value of informing families of these options was a recurring theme, even among respondents who personally disagreed with their application. The low utilization of curative strategies for SCD appears to be partly attributable to a lack of information about the technologies available to facilitate transplantation. Ethical reservations, while present, were not static and did not preclude patients' and parents' desire to be informed. We discuss the implications of these perceived barriers to the dissemination of advanced medical technologies for SCD.

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for pediatric patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases at All Children's Hospital/University of South Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, A; Dorsey, M; Miotke, J; Shepherd, C; Day, N

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the transplantation outcomes of 31 patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases treated at our center (All Children's Hospital, University of South Florida) since its inception in 1986. The primary immune diseases included severe combined immunodeficiency, Wiscott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease. The age of the patient's at the time of transplant ranged from 1 month to 19 years, and conditioning regimens varied based on the patients underlying disease. In 23 patients, the graft source was bone marrow, 4 patients received umbilical cord blood grafts and 4 patients received peripheral blood stem cell grafts. Better survival rates were observed in those patients transplanted at a younger age and free of infections, demonstrating that transplantation at an early age before significant infections, autoimmune manifestation and malignant transformation have occurred is beneficial.

  12. Hydroxyurea Therapy Mobilises Arachidonic Acid from Inner Cell Membrane Aminophospholipids in Patients with Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Daak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxic compound hydroxyurea (HU is effective therapy for sickle cell disease. However, its effect on unsaturated membrane lipids is unknown. Red cell fatty acids were investigated in HU-treated (n=19 and HU-untreated (n=17 sickle cell patients and controls (n=20. The HU-treated compared with the HU-untreated patients had lower arachidonic (AA acid level in ethanolamine, physphoglycerids (EPG (22.9±1.2   versus   24.0±1.1%,  P<0.05 serine SPG (22.13±2.2   versus   24.9±2.3%,  P<0.01 phosphoglycerides. The treated patients and controls had comparable levels of docosahexaenoic (DHA and total n-3 fatty acids in EPG and choline phosphoglycerides (CPG. In contrast, the untreated group had significantly (P<0.05 lower DHA and total n-3 compared with the controls in EPG (2.7±0.4   versus   3.2±0.6% and 4.6±0.5   versus   5.2±0.7% and CPG (0.7±0.2   versus   1.0±0.2% and 1.2±0.2   versus   1.4±0.3. HU is known to activate cytosolic phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenase 2, and from this study, it appears to induce mobilisation of AA from the inner cell membrane EPG and SPG. Hence, eicosanoids generated from the released AA may play a role in clinical improvements which occur in HU-treated patients.

  13. CD8+ T cell profiles in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and their relationship to disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalheiro, Helena; Duarte, Cátia; Silva-Cardoso, Sandra; Da Silva, José A P; Souto-Carneiro, M. Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Objective. CD8+ T cells are abundant in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, their role in disease pathogenesis is poorly defined. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between disease activity and CD8+ T cell phenotypes, production of cytokines, and production of cytotoxic

  14. Genomic analyses of RH alleles to improve transfusion therapy in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Marion E; Halter Hipsky, Christine; Hue-Roye, Kim; Hoppe, Carolyn

    2014-04-01

    Red cell (RBC) blood group alloimmunization remains a major problem in transfusion medicine. Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at particularly high risk for developing alloantibodies to RBC antigens compared to other multiply transfused patient populations. Hemagglutination is the classical method used to test for blood group antigens, but depending on the typing methods and reagents used may result in discrepancies that preclude interpretation based on serologic reactivity alone. Molecular methods, including customized DNA microarrays, are increasingly used to complement serologic methods in predicting blood type. The purpose of this study was to determine the diversity and frequency of RH alleles in African Americans and to assess the performance of a DNA microarray for RH allele determination. Two sets of samples were tested: (i) individuals with known variant Rh types and (ii) randomly selected African American donors and patients with SCD. Standard hemagglutination tests were used to establish the Rh phenotype, and cDNA- and gDNA-based analyses (sequencing, PCR-RFLP, and customized RHD and RHCE microarrays were used to predict the genotype). In a total of 829 samples (1658 alleles), 72 different alleles (40 RHD and 32 RHCE) were identified, 22 of which are novel. DNA microarrays detected all nucleotides probed, allowing for characterization of over 900 alleles. High-throughput DNA testing platforms provide a means to test a relatively large number of donors and potentially prevent immunization by changing the way antigen-negative blood is provided to patients. Because of the high RH allelic diversity found in the African American population, determination of an accurate Rh phenotype often requires DNA testing, in conjunction with serologic testing. Allele-specific microarrays offer a means to perform high-throughput donor Rh typing and serve as a valuable adjunct to serologic methods to predict Rh type. Because DNA microarrays test for only a fixed

  15. Pharmacological rescue of mitochondrial deficits in iPSC-derived neural cells from patients with familial Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Oliver; Seo, Hyemyung; Andrabi, Shaida

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder caused by genetic and environmental factors that results in degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway in the brain. We analyzed neural cells generated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from PD patients ...

  16. Hydroxyurea in Pediatric Patients With Sickle Cell Disease: What Nurses Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Allison L

    2016-09-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited disorder in which sickled red blood cells occlude the small vessels of the body, reducing oxygen delivery to tissues and ultimately negatively affecting many of the body's major organs. Hydroxyurea has proven beneficial in the treatment of SCD and prevention of disease-related complications. The 2014 guidelines put forth by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommend hydroxyurea treatment in infants 9 months and older, children, and adolescents with SCD-SS or SCD-Sβ(0) thalassemia regardless of clinical severity. This is a change from the 2002 guidelines in which hydroxyurea was recommended for adolescents and children with SCD-SS or SCD-Sβ(0) thalassemia with frequent episodes of pain, a history of acute chest syndrome, severe and symptomatic anemia or other severe vaso-occlusive events. Nurses play a critical role in working with patients and families to provide education, guidance, and support to improve compliance to mitigate the long-term effects of SCD. © 2015 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  17. MRA of the intracranial circulation in asymptomatic patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillams, A.R.; McMahon, L.; Weinberg, G.; Carter, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Background. MR angiography (MRA) provides a mechanism for non-invasively studying blood flow, thus providing a new opportunity to study the intracranial circulation in asymptomatic sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Although conventional angiography is the gold standard for the depiction of vascular anatomy, this is too invasive for an asymptomatic population. Objective. To establish the range of appearances in asymptomatic SCD patients and to correlate brain MRI results (either sub-clinical abnormalities or normal brain parenchyma) with the MRA findings. Materials and methods. Brain MRI and MRA of the intracranial circulation was performed on 22 patients (13 male and 9 female, median age 7.5 years, range 1.3-20 years). Fourteen were homozygous SS and eight were SC. The median haematocrit at the time of MRI was 25.9 (range 13.8-33.3). Results. On MR imaging, four patients had infarcts in eight vascular territories (six anterior and two posterior). In 3/4 of anterior vascular territories with infarction, long (≥ 6 mm) segments of abnormal signal were seen at the internal carotid artery bifurcation with associated reduced distal flow. Short focal areas of abnormal signal were commonly seen where vessels branched, bifurcated or curved and were not associated with infarcts. These areas probably represent turbulence-related dephasing secondary to high velocity flow found in SCD. Conclusion. Long segments (≥ 6 mm) of abnormal signal with reduced distal flow correlated with sub-clinical infarction. (orig.)

  18. Phenotypic Diversity of Sickle Cell Disease in Patients with a Double Heterozygosity for Hb S and Hb D-Punjab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lidiane S; Okumura, Jéssika V; Belini-Júnior, Édis; Oliveira, Renan G; Nascimento, Patrícia P; Silva, Danilo G H; Lobo, Clarisse L C; Oliani, Sonia M; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia R

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity for sickle cell disease is associated to several genetic factors such as genotype for sickle cell disease, β-globin gene cluster haplotypes and Hb F levels. The coinheritance of Hb S (HBB: c.20A > T) and Hb D-Punjab (HBB: c.364G > C) results in a double heterozygosity, which constitutes one of the genotypic causes of sickle cell disease. This study aimed to assess the phenotypic diversity of sickle cell disease presented by carriers of the Hb S/Hb D-Punjab genotype and the Bantu [- + - - - -] haplotype. We evaluated medical records from 12 patients with sickle cell disease whose Hb S/Hb D-Punjab genotype and Bantu haplotype were confirmed by molecular analysis. Hb S and Hb D-Punjab levels were quantified by chromatographic analysis. Mean concentrations of Hb S and Hb D-Punjab were 44.8 ± 2.3% and 43.3 ± 1.8%, respectively. Painful crises were present in eight (66.7%) patients evaluated, representing the most common clinical event. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) was the second most prevalent manifestation, occurring in two individuals (16.7%). Three patients were asymptomatic, while another two exhibited greater diversity of severe clinical manifestations. Medical records here analyzed reported a significant clinical diversity in sickle cell disease ranging from the absence of symptoms to wide phenotypic variety. The sickle cell disease genotype, Bantu haplotype and hemoglobin (Hb) levels did not influence the clinical diversity. Thus, we concluded that the phenotypic variation in sickle cell disease was present within a specific genotype for disease regardless of the β-globin gene cluster haplotypes.

  19. Correlation of low levels of nitrite and high levels of fetal hemoglobin in patients with sickle cell disease at baseline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcielle Bruna Dias Elias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sickle cell disease is a hemoglobinopathy characterized by hemolytic anemia, increased susceptibility to infections and recurrent vaso-occlusive crises that reduces the quality of life of sufferers. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation of the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, malonaldehyde and nitrite to fetal hemoglobin in patients with sickle cell disease not under treatment with hydroxyurea in outpatients at a university hospital in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. METHODS: Forty-four patients diagnosed with sickle cell disease were enrolled at baseline. Diagnosis was confirmed by evaluating the beta globin gene using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The concentration of fetal hemoglobin was obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography. Serum levels of nitrite, malonaldehyde and lactate dehydrogenase were measured by biochemical methods. RESULTS: Significantly higher levels of lactate dehydrogenase, nitrite and malonaldehyde were observed in patients with sickle cell disease compared to a control group. The study of the correlation between fetal hemoglobin levels and these variables showed a negative correlation with nitrite levels. No correlation was found between fetal hemoglobin and malonaldehyde or lactate dehydrogenase. When the study population was stratified according to fetal hemoglobin levels, a decrease in the levels of nitrite was observed with higher levels of fetal hemoglobin (p-value = 0.0415. CONCLUSION: The results show that, similar to fetal hemoglobin levels, the concentration of nitrite can predict the clinical course of the disease, but should not be used alone as a modulator of prognosis in patients with sickle cell disease.

  20. In silico mutation analysis of human beta globin gene in sickle cell disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hira Mubeen; Rubab Zahra Naqvi; Ammara Masood; Muhammad Waseem Shoaib; Shahid Raza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder that affects red blood cells. People with sickle cell conditions make a different form of hemoglobin a called hemoglobin S. Sickle cell conditions are inherited from parents in much the same way as blood type, hair color and texture, eye color and other physical traits. Sickle cell disease occurs due to a single mutation on the b-globin gene, namely, a substitution of glutamic acid for valine at position 6 of the b chain. Several ...

  1. Predictive value of red blood cell distribution width for coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiyan; Fu, Songling; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Jian; Gao, Lichao; Zhu, Weihua; Gong, Fangqi

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that elevated red blood cell distribution width is associated with poor outcome in cardiovascular diseases. In order to assess the predictive value of red blood cell distribution width, before treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins, for coronary artery lesions in patient with Kawasaki disease, we compared 83 patients with coronary artery lesions and 339 patients without coronary artery lesions before treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin. Clinical, echocardiographic, and biochemical values were evaluated along with red blood cell distribution width. A total of 422 consecutive patients with Kawasaki disease were enrolled into our study. According to receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the optimal red blood cell distribution width cut-off value for predicting coronary artery lesions was 14.55% (area under the curve was 0.721; p=0.000); eighty-three patients (19.7%) had coronary artery lesions, and 70% of the patients with coronary artery lesions had red blood cell distribution width level >14.55%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that fever duration >14 days (odds ratio was 3.42, 95% confidence interval was 1.27-9.22; p=0.015), intravenous immunoglobulin resistance (odds ratio was 2.33, 95% confidence interval was 1.02-5.29; p=0.04), and red blood cell distribution width >14.55% (odds ratio was 3.49, 95% confidence interval was 2.01-6.05; p=0.000) were independent predictors of coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease. In Conclusion, red blood cell distribution width may be helpful for predicting coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease.

  2. Peripheral blood and intrathyroidal T cell clones from patients with thyroid autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, C; Caroff, G; Maugendre, D; Genetet, N; Gibassier, J

    1999-01-01

    For a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune diseases, we have studied morphological and functional properties of T clones from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and from intrathyroidal lymphocytes (ITL) obtained from 3 patients with Graves' disease or 1 Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Investigations were carried out on clones cultured alone or cocultured with autologous thyrocytes. Clonage efficiency ranged from 30% to 33% for PBL and 10% to 36% for ITL. A predominance of CD4-positive clones was observed whatever the origin of the lymphocytes or the autoimmune pathology. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detected in the majority (17/19) of the clones tested. Intracytoplasmic interleukin (IL-4) was secreted in 7/19 clones and both cytokines were produced in 5/19 clones. In coculture a proliferative response and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) production were observed with 6 clones (4 from Graves thyrocytes and 2 from thyroiditis). No cytotoxic clone was derived from Graves or thyroiditis tissues. These data demonstrate that the large majority of T clones are principally CD4-T cells; all the clones secreted TNF-alpha and a large majority produced IFN-gamma. Only a few clones produced IL-4 alone or associated with IFN-gamma. Six T clones induced proliferative response and of TNF-alpha secretion in coculture. Further investigations must be performed on these antigen-reactive T clones to analyse their role in the pathogenesis of the human thyroid autoimmune diseases.

  3. Persistence and compliance of deferoxamine versus deferasirox in Medicaid patients with sickle-cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, L B; Vekeman, F; Sengupta, A; Corral, M; Guo, A; Duh, M S

    2012-04-01

    Patients with sickle-cell disease (SCD) receiving chronic transfusions of red blood cells are at risk of developing serious adverse effects. Iron chelation therapy (ICT) helps eliminate iron overload by binding with plasma iron to form a non-toxic conjugate that can be safely excreted from the body. Two iron chelating agents are currently available in the United States: Deferoxamine (DFO) is an injectable formulation, and deferasirox (Exjade(®) ) is an oral suspension. This study compared the frequency of hospitalizations, persistence and compliance of patients with SCD from Medicaid programmes treated with DFO vs. deferasirox. Health care claims from Medicaid Florida (1998-2007), Missouri (1993-2008) and New Jersey (1996-2008) were analysed. Patients with continuous enrolment for ≥6months prior to ICT initiation and ≥1 SCD diagnosis were included in the analysis. Patients were divided into four cohorts: patients treated with DFO (any-DFO group) and patients treated with deferasirox (any-deferasirox group); the latter was further divided into patients initiated on DFO and then switched to deferasirox (deferasirox switchers), and patients treated with deferasirox-only (deferasirox-only group). Frequency of hospitalization for crisis conditions related to SCD as well as length of stay pre- and post-ICT treatment initiation were assessed. Persistence was defined as time to drug discontinuation with ≥1 Rx gap, using Kaplan-Meier approach. Compliance was estimated using a medication possession ratio (MPR) based on the drug exposure approach. Adjusted analyses of persistence and compliance were also conducted. A total of 217 (mean age: 19·4years, 39·2 men), 275 (20·1years, 41·5% men), 105 (19·4years, 42·9% men) and 166 (20·4years, 41·6% men) patients were included in the any-DFO, any-deferasirox, deferasirox switchers and deferasirox-only groups, respectively. After ICT initiation, the any-deferasirox and deferasirox-only groups experienced a statistically

  4. Th1 Th2, Tc1 Tc2 cells of patients with otolaryngological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Ohta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are important regulatory mediators secreted by T cells and other immunoactive cells. Based on the cytokine synthesis patterns, CD4 T cells can often be classified into at least two populations with different immune regulatory functions. The Th1 cells, producing interleukin (IL-2 and interferon (IFN-γ, are often associated with cell-mediated immune responses such as delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH, whereas Th2 cells, secreting IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, usually provide B cell help and enhance allergic reactions. Naïve CD8 T cells, similar to CD4 T cells, can differentiate into at least two subsets of cytolytic effector cells with distinct cytokine patterns. The Tc1 cells secrete a Th 1 - like cytokine pattern, including IL-2 and IFN-γ. The Tc2 cells produce Th2 cytokines, including IL-4, IL-5 and 11—10. There is increasing evidence that Th1/Th2 and Tc1/Tc2 cytokine imbalance has been of patho- genetic importance in various diseases, such as allergic and autoimmune diseases. The present review article focuses on the evidence that the imbalance of Th1/Th2 and Tc1/Tc2 cytokines plays an important role in various otolaryngological diseases, such as Kimura's disease, Wegener's granulomatosism, acute perceptive hearing loss and Meniere's disease. It is concluded that the predominance of Th 1 or Th2 and Tc1 or Tc2 cells may contribute to the mechanism in the pathogenesis of these otolaryngological diseases.

  5. Long time enzyme replacement therapy stabilizes obstructive lung disease and alters peripheral immune cell subsets in Fabry patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odler, Balázs; Cseh, Áron; Constantin, Tamás; Fekete, György; Losonczy, György; Tamási, Lilla; Benke, Kálmán; Szilveszter, Bálint; Müller, Veronika

    2017-11-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, causing accumulation of globotriaosylceramid in different organs. Glycolipids are activators of different immune cell subsets the resulting inflammation is responsible for organ damage. Pulmonary involvement leads to airway inflammation; however, data on severity, as well as the effect of enzyme replacement therapy on lung function parameters and changes in peripheral immune cell subsets on lung involvement are sparse. Seven Fabry patients and four carriers underwent detailed clinical examinations screening for pulmonary manifestations. Repetitive measurements were performed on five patients on ERT (average follow-up 5 years). Patients with Fabry disease and control volunteers were included into peripheral blood cell measurements. Lung involvement was present in all patients. Symptoms suggestive for lung disease were mild, however, obstructive ventilatory disorder, dominantly affecting small airways accompanied by hyperinflation was demonstrated in all affected patients. ERT resulted in small improvement of FEV1 in most treated patients. Decreased ratio of myeloid DC, Th17 cells while increase in T helper (Th)1 cells, and no change in Th2 and regulatory T (Treg) cells were detected in Fabry patients. Fabry disease results mainly in mild symptoms related to lung involvement, characterized by moderate non-reversible obstructive ventilatory disorder. Stabilization of airway obstruction during follow-up was observed using ERT in most patients, emphasizing the importance of this treatment in respect of pulmonary manifestations. Changes of immune cell subsets in the peripheral blood might play a role in inflammatory process, including small airways in Fabry patient's lung. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The Effectiveness of Self-Management Programs on Self-Efficacy in Patients With Sickle Cell Disease

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    Ahmadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients with sickle cell disease suffer from various complications during their lifetime. In order to cope with the disease, they must adapt themselves to a complex set of behaviors that promote self-management and prevent complications associated with the disease. Chronic disease self-management programs are a combination of strategies that increase self-efficacy and promote self-management behaviors. Objectives This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of self-management programs on self-efficacy in patients with sickle cell disease. Patients and Methods In this quasi-experimental study, 69 patients with sickle cell disease who were referred to the Thalassemia Clinic of Ahvaz Shafa Hospital were entered into the study through the census method. Then, the self-management program was implemented using the 5A method for 12 weeks. The Levels of pre and post intervention self-efficacy were assessed using the sickle cell self-efficacy scale (SCSES, while descriptive statistics, paired t-test and Wilcoxon test were used to analyze the data. Results Before the intervention, the majority of subjects (50.7% had moderate self-efficacy, whereas after the intervention, the majority of patients (81.2% showed high self-efficacy. The overall scores and scores of the post-intervention self-efficacy sub-groups were significantly increased (P < 0.001. Conclusions The results of this study showed that self-management interventions are effective in promoting self-efficacy in patients with sickle cell disease. Thus, the use of self-management programs is advisable to change behaviors and promote self-efficacy in such patients.

  7. T cell responses in senior patients with community-acquired pneumonia related to disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Lu-Qin; Bi, Ying; Zhou, Shao-Wei; Chen, Zi-Dan; Wen, Jun; Shi, Jin; Mao, Ling; Wang, Ling

    2017-12-01

    Senior individuals older than 65 years of age are at a disproportionally higher risk of developing pneumonia. Impaired capacity to defend against airway infections may be one of the reasons. It is generally believed that weaker regulatory T cell responses may be beneficial to host defense against pathogens. In senior patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, we investigated the frequencies and functions of regulatory T cells. Interestingly, we found that compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls, senior pneumonia patients presented lower frequencies of Foxp3-expressing and Helios-expressing CD4 + T cells. The quantity of Foxp3 and Helios being expressed, measured by their mRNA transcription levels, was also lower in CD4 + T cells from pneumonia patients. Furthermore, following TCR and TGF-β stimulation, pneumonia patients presented impaired capacity to upregulate Foxp3 and Helios. Functional analyses revealed that CD4 + T cells from pneumonia patients secreted lower amounts of IL-10 and TGF-β, two cytokines critical to regulatory T cell-mediated suppression. Also, the expression of granzyme B and perforin, which were cytolytic molecules potentially utilized by regulatory T cells to mediate the elimination of antigen-presenting cells and effector T cells, were reduced in CD4 + CD25 + T cells from senior pneumonia patients. In addition, the CD4 + CD25 + T cells from senior pneumonia patients presented reduced capacity to suppress effector CD4 + and CD8 + T cell proliferation. Moreover, the value of pneumonia severity index was inversely correlated with several parameters of regulatory T cell function. Together, our results demonstrated that senior pneumonia patients presented a counterintuitive impairment in regulatory T cell responses that was associated with worse prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Successful orthotopic liver transplantation in an adult patient with sickle cell disease and review of the literature

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    Morey Blinder

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease can lead to hepatic complications ranging from acute hepatic crises to chronic liver disease including intrahepatic cholestasis, and iron overload. Although uncommon, intrahepatic cholestasis may be severe and medical treatment of this complication is often ineffective. We report a case of a 37 year-old male patient with sickle cell anemia, who developed liver failure and underwent successful orthotopic liver transplantation. Both pre and post-operatively, he was maintained on red cell transfusions. He remains stable with improved liver function 42 months post transplant. The role for orthotopic liver transplantation is not well defined in patients with sickle cell disease, and the experience remains limited. Although considerable challenges of post-transplant graft complications remain, orthotopic liver transplantation should be considered as a treatment option for sickle cell disease patients with end-stage liver disease who have progressed despite conventional medical therapy. An extended period of red cell transfusion support may lessen the post-operative complications.

  9. Study on the relationship between red blood cell immunity and lipid peroxidation in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongxia

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between red blood cell immunity and lipid peroxidation in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease. Methods: The red blood cell C3b receptor (RBC-C3bR) and red blood cell immune complex rosette (RBC-ICR) were measured in 42 patients with hand-foot-mouth disease as well as in 35 controls. The serum levels of MDA, SOD and GSH-PX were also measured with colorimetry in these subjects. Results: RBC-ICRR and MDA levels were significantly higher in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease than those in controls(P<0.01), while the RBC-C3bR, SOD, GSH-PX levels were significantly lower in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease than those in controls (P<0.01). RBC-C3bR was negatively correlated with MDA (r=-0.5014, P<0.05), but RBC-ICR was positively correlated with MDA (r=0.5942, P<0.01). Conclusion: The lowered red cell immune function was closely associated with the lipid peroxidation injury in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease. (authors)

  10. Circulating endothelial cells and serum visfatin are indicators of cardiovascular disease risk in psoriasis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamia Elgarhy

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Both numbers of CECs and serum visfatin levels were increased in PS patients compared with controls and also increased in CVD risk positive when compared with CVD risk negative PS patients. Both correlated with disease severity suggesting the possibility of increased CVD risk in PS patients.

  11. Tuberculous spondylodiscitis in a patient with a sickle-cell disease: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupniewski, Leszek; Palczewski, Piotr; Gołębiowski, Marek; Kosińska-Kaczyńska, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Although sickle-cell anemia (SCA) is common in black Americans, Sub-Saharan Africa and in the Mediterranean area, the disease is rare in the temperate climate zone. The manifestations of the disease are related mainly to the production of abnormal hemoglobin that leads to organ ischemia and increased susceptibility to infection caused by functional asplenia. The authors present CT findings in a 39-year-old black woman diagnosed due to abdominal pain, lymphadenopathy and fever. CT of the thorax and abdomen demonstrated changes in the liver, spleen, and skeletal system suggestive of SCA complicated with spondylodiscitis in the thoracic spine. Hepatomegaly and small calcified spleen are typical findings in older homozygotic patients with SCA. The lesions in the skeleton may be related either to intramedullary hematopoiesis or osteonecrosis and osteomyelitis. In the latter case, diffuse osteosclerosis and H-shaped vertebrae are most typical. Tuberculous spondylodiscitis is characterized by the location in the thoracic region, preferential involvement of anterior elements, relative sparing of intervertebral discs, and cold abscesses

  12. Hemoglobin Variants Acquired Post-Exchange Transfusion in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Soumya; Cottler-Fox, Michele; Drobena, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Many SCD patients receive chronic transfusions for prevention or treatment of disease related complications. Complications of the chronic transfusion noted in these patients include allergic reactions, transfusion transmitted infections, iron overload, and alloantibody formation. Even though hemoglobin (Hb) variants are prevalent in the general population, reports of transfusion-acquired Hb variants are rare. We performed a retrospective analysis on all SCD patients who underwent red cell exchange (RBCEx) transfusions at our institution during 2011-2013 to identify the presence of Hb variants acquired as a result of RBCEx. We found 66 occurrences of acquired Hb variants in 30 SCD patients during the period examined. The most commonly acquired Hb variant was Hemoglobin C (HbC) (64/66 occurrences). More than half of the patients (19/30) acquired HbC on multiple occasions (2-6 times). One patient acquired HbJ and another patient acquired HbD/G in addition to HbC. The segments from donor units were available in some of these cases and hemoglobin electrophoresis (HBE) was performed to confirm the presence of the variant Hb in the donor segments corresponding to that seen on the post-RBCEx sample. Heterozygous donors are asymptomatic and show no abnormalities during donor screening. Since HBE is not routinely performed on the donor specimen, it may go unrecognized until the post-transfusion recipient results pose diagnostic difficulties. There are no definitive guidelines on deferring these donors; hence one should be cognizant of these findings to prevent misdiagnosis. In a population where HbS negative blood is routinely requested, the effect of other Hb variants remains unknown. None of the patients in our study showed any adverse events due to the acquired Hb variants; however, this is of special concern in the pediatric population where a single RBC unit can contribute a significant portion of the exchanged blood volume. Additionally, donor centers may need

  13. Factor V Leiden G1691A and prothrombin G20210A mutations among Palestinian patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarah, Fekri; Srour, Mahmoud A

    2018-01-01

    Vascular thrombosis is an important pathophysiological aspect of sickle cell disease (SCD). This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical impact of factor V Leiden G1691A (FVL) and prothrombin G20210A mutations among Palestinian sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. A total of 117 SCD patients, including 59 patients with sickle cell anemia (SS), 33 patients with sickle β-thalassemia and 25 individuals with sickle cell trait (AS) were studied. The control group consisted of 118 healthy individuals. FVL and prothrombin G20210A mutations were determined by RFLP PCR. Analysis of the clinical history of SCD patients revealed that seven patients have had vascular complications such as ischemic stroke or deep vein thrombosis. In SCD patients, the inheritance of the FVL mutation showed a significantly higher incidence of pain in joints, chest and abdomen as well as regular dependence on blood transfusion compared to SCD with the wild type. Age- and sex-adjusted logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association between FVL and sickle cell anemia with an odds ratio (OR) of 5.6 (95% confidence intervals [CI] of 1.91-39.4, P  = 0.039) in SS patients. However, increased prevalence of the FVL in AS subjects and sickle β-thalassemia patients was not statistically significant compared to controls (OR 3.97, 95% CI 0.51-28.6, P  = 0.17 and OR 3.59, 95% CI 0.35-41.6, P  = 0.26, respectively). The distribution of prothrombin G20210A mutation among SCD patients compared to controls was not significantly different, thus our findings do not support an association of this mutation with SCD. FVL was more prevalent among SS patients compared to controls and it was associated with higher incidence of disease complications among SCD patients.

  14. Evaluation of red cell and reticulocyte parameters as indicative of iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease

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    Ana Beatriz Barbosa Torino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mature red cell and reticulocyte parameters under three conditions: iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease, and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency.Methods:Peripheral blood cells from 117 adult patients with anemia were classified according to iron status, and inflammatory activity, and the results of a hemoglobinopathy investigation as: iron deficiency anemia (n = 42, anemia of chronic disease (n = 28, anemia of chronic disease associated with iron deficiency anemia (n = 22, and heterozygous β thalassemia (n = 25. The percentage of microcytic red cells, hypochromic red cells, and levels of hemoglobin content in both reticulocytes and mature red cells were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters in differentiating between the different types of anemia.Results:There was no significant difference between the iron deficient group and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency in respect to any parameter. The percentage of hypochromic red cells was the best parameter to discriminate anemia of chronic disease with and without absolute iron deficiency (area under curve = 0.785; 95% confidence interval: 0.661–0.909, with sensitivity of 72.7%, and specificity of 70.4%; cut-off value 1.8%. The formula microcytic red cells minus hypochromic red cells was very accurate in differentiating iron deficiency anemia and heterozygous β thalassemia (area under curve = 0.977; 95% confidence interval: 0.950–1.005; with sensitivity of 96.2%, and specificity of 92.7%; cut-off value 13.8.Conclusion:The indices related to red cells and reticulocytes have a moderate performance in identifying absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease.

  15. Self-efficacy, transition, and patient outcomes in the sickle cell disease population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molter, Brittany L; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Severe pain is a common symptom of sickle cell disease (SCD). Transitions between adult and pediatric care are a point of particular vulnerability for patients, increasing the risk for poor pain management. The purpose of this literature review was to investigate the relationships among self-efficacy, transition, and SCD health outcomes. A systematic literature search was performed within CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, MEDLINE, and PubMed on published papers between 2003 and 2013. After applying exclusion criteria, 20 articles were used in the final review. Few studies were identified that directly tested the relationship between self-efficacy and SCD outcomes. Although there are few studies on this topic, most demonstrated positive correlations between self-efficacy during transition and positive patient outcomes in the SCD population. Additional studies are needed to support causation. Studies were commonly limited by small sample sizes and attrition. Furthermore, there is a large gap in the literature regarding how self-efficacy can be increased in these patients. Interventions that promote self-efficacy have the potential to improve SCD pain outcomes, but more research is needed to develop interventions to increase these adolescents' self-efficacy. If providers can identify individuals in this population with low self-efficacy, they may be able to intervene early to improve patient outcomes. Most identified studies point to the positive correlation between self-efficacy and positive health outcomes in adolescents with SCD. Self-efficacy has the potential to guide self-care interventions and further research with the SCD population. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An Evaluation of Central Sensitization in Patients With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Claudia M; Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Carroll, C Patrick; Kiley, Kasey; Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Hand, Matthew; Edwards, Robert R; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A

    2016-05-01

    Central sensitization (CS), nociceptive hyperexcitability known to amplify and maintain clinical pain, has been identified as a leading culprit responsible for maintaining pain in several chronic pain conditions. Recent evidence suggests that it may explain differences in the symptom experience of individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD). Quantitative sensory testing (QST) can be used to examine CS and identify individuals who may have a heightened CS profile. The present study categorized patients with SCD on the basis of QST responses into a high or low CS phenotype and compared these groups according to measures of clinical pain, vaso-occlusive crises, psychosocial factors, and sleep continuity. Eighty-three adult patients with SCD completed QST, questionnaires, and daily sleep and pain diaries over a 3-month period, weekly phone calls for 3 months, and monthly phone calls for 12 months. Patients were divided into CS groups (ie, no/low CS [n = 17] vs high CS [n = 21]), on the basis of thermal and mechanical temporal summation and aftersensations, which were norm-referenced to 47 healthy control subjects. High CS subjects reported more clinical pain, vaso-occlusive crises, catastrophizing, and negative mood, and poorer sleep continuity (Ps < .05) over the 18-month follow-up period. Future analyses should investigate whether psychosocial disturbances and sleep mediate the relationship between CS and pain outcomes. In general, SCD patients with greater CS had more clinical pain, more crises, worse sleep, and more psychosocial disturbances compared with the low CS group. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for Treatment of Patients with Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease (MyStromalCell Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Mygind, Naja Dam

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of intramyocardial injections of autologous VEGF-A165-stimulated adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) in patients with refractory angina. MyStromalCell trial is a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study including sixty patients with CCS/NYHA class II...

  18. p75 neurotrophin receptor positive dental pulp stem cells: new hope for patients with neurodegenerative disease and neural injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jie-wen; Yuan, Hao; Shen, Shun-yao; Lu, Jing-ting; Zhu, Xiao-fang; Yang, Tong; Zhang, Jiang-fei; Shen, Guo-fang

    2013-08-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases and neural injury are 2 of the most feared disorders that afflict humankind by leading to permanent paralysis and loss of sensation. Cell based treatment for these diseases had gained special interest in recent years. Previous studies showed that dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) could differentiate toward functionally active neurons both in vitro and in vivo, and could promote neuranagenesis through both cell-autonomous and paracrine neuroregenerative activities. Some of these neuroregenerative activities were unique to tooth-derived stem cells and superior to bone marrow stromal cells. However, DPSCs used in most of these studies were mixed and unfractionated dental pulp cells that contain several types of cells, and most were fibroblast cells while just contain a small portion of DPSCs. Thus, there might be weaker ability of neuranagenesis and more side effects from the fibroblast cells that cannot differentiate into neural cells. p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) positive DPSCs subpopulation was derived from migrating cranial neural crest cells and had been isolated from DPSCs, which had capacity of differentiation into neurons and repairing neural system. In this article, we hypothesize that p75NTR positive DPSCs simultaneously have greater propensity for neuronal differentiation and fewer side effects from fibroblast, and in vivo transptantation of autologous p75NTR positive DPSCs is a novel method for neuranagenesis. This will bring great hope to patients with neurodegenerative disease and neural injury.

  19. Long-chain PUFA in Granulocytes, Mononuclear Cells, and RBC in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis: Relation to Liver Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Marianne H.; Ott, Peter; Michaelsen, Kim F.

    2012-01-01

    -related liver disease were matched with 20 CF patients without. Blood samples were analysed for liver biochemistry and haematology. Granulocytes, mononuclear cells, and RBC were separated by density gradient centrifugation, and fatty acid composition was measured by gas chromatography. Hepatic ultrasound......Background and Aim: Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have low levels of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) in plasma or red blood cells (RBC), as also seen in other chronic and acute liver diseases. The differences may be more pronounced in CF transmembrane conductance...... of liver disease was negatively associated with LCPUFA n-3 levels in CFTR-expressing white blood cells but unrelated to those levels in CFTR-negative RBC....

  20. DNAM-1 mediates epithelial cell-specific cytotoxicity of aberrant intraepithelial lymphocyte lines from refractory celiac disease type II patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjon, Jennifer M-L; Kooy-Winkelaar, Yvonne M C; Tack, Greetje J; Mommaas, A Mieke; Schreurs, Marco W J; Schilham, Marco W; Mulder, Chris J; van Bergen, Jeroen; Koning, Frits

    2011-06-01

    In refractory celiac disease (RCD), intestinal epithelial damage persists despite a gluten-free diet. Characteristic for RCD type II (RCD II) is the presence of aberrant surface TCR-CD3(-) intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) that can progressively replace normal IELs and eventually give rise to overt lymphoma. Therefore, RCD II is considered a malignant condition that forms an intermediate stage between celiac disease (CD) and overt lymphoma. We demonstrate in this study that surface TCR-CD3(-) IEL lines isolated from three RCD II patients preferentially lyse epithelial cell lines. FACS analysis revealed that DNAM-1 was strongly expressed on the three RCD cell lines, whereas other activating NK cell receptors were not expressed on all three RCD cell lines. Consistent with this finding, cytotoxicity of the RCD cell lines was mediated mainly by DNAM-1 with only a minor role for other activating NK cell receptors. Furthermore, enterocytes isolated from duodenal biopsies expressed DNAM-1 ligands and were lysed by the RCD cell lines ex vivo. Although DNAM-1 on CD8(+) T cells and NK cells is known to mediate lysis of tumor cells, this study provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence that (pre)malignant cells themselves can acquire the ability to lyse epithelial cells via DNAM-1. This study confirms previous work on epithelial lysis by RCD cell lines and identifies a novel mechanism that potentially contributes to the gluten-independent tissue damage in RCD II and RCD-associated lymphoma.

  1. Expression of Regulatory Platelet MicroRNAs in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shilpa; Kapetanaki, Maria G.; Raghavachari, Nalini; Woodhouse, Kimberly; Yu, Guoying; Barge, Suchitra; Coronnello, Claudia; Benos, Panayiotis V.; Kato, Gregory J.; Kaminski, Naftali; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased platelet activation in sickle cell disease (SCD) contributes to a state of hypercoagulability and confers a risk of thromboembolic complications. The role for post-transcriptional regulation of the platelet transcriptome by microRNAs (miRNAs) in SCD has not been previously explored. This is the first study to determine whether platelets from SCD exhibit an altered miRNA expression profile. Methods and Findings We analyzed the expression of miRNAs isolated from platelets from a primary cohort (SCD = 19, controls = 10) and a validation cohort (SCD = 7, controls = 7) by hybridizing to the Agilent miRNA microarrays. A dramatic difference in miRNA expression profiles between patients and controls was noted in both cohorts separately. A total of 40 differentially expressed platelet miRNAs were identified as common in both cohorts (p-value 0.05, fold change>2) with 24 miRNAs downregulated. Interestingly, 14 of the 24 downregulated miRNAs were members of three families - miR-329, miR-376 and miR-154 - which localized to the epigenetically regulated, maternally imprinted chromosome 14q32 region. We validated the downregulated miRNAs, miR-376a and miR-409-3p, and an upregulated miR-1225-3p using qRT-PCR. Over-expression of the miR-1225-3p in the Meg01 cells was followed by mRNA expression profiling to identify mRNA targets. This resulted in significant transcriptional repression of 1605 transcripts. A combinatorial approach using Meg01 mRNA expression profiles following miR-1225-3p overexpression, a computational prediction analysis of miRNA target sequences and a previously published set of differentially expressed platelet transcripts from SCD patients, identified three novel platelet mRNA targets: PBXIP1, PLAGL2 and PHF20L1. Conclusions We have identified significant differences in functionally active platelet miRNAs in patients with SCD as compared to controls. These data provide an important inventory of differentially expressed mi

  2. Association of γδ T Cells with Disease Severity and Mortality in Septic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormo-Calandín, Constantino; Garcia-Ballesteros, Carlos; Pérez-Griera, J.; Amigó, Victoria; Almela-Quilis, Amadeo; Ruiz del Castillo, Juan; Peñarroja-Otero, Carlos; Ballester, Ferran

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-delta T cells are the most abundant of all epithelial-resident lymphocytes and are considered a first line of defense against pathogens in the mucosa. Our objective was to confirm the reduction in γδ T cell subsets and its relationship with mortality in patients with sepsis. We studied 135 patients with sepsis attended in the emergency department and intensive care unit of two hospitals and compared them with a similar control group of healthy subjects. The αβ and γδ T cell subsets were determined via flow cytometry according to the stage of the sepsis and its relationship with mortality. All the lymphocyte subsets were reduced with respect to the corresponding subsets in the control group. All the γδ T cell populations decreased significantly as the septic picture worsened. Furthermore, γδ T cells showed decreases at days 2, 3, and 4 from the start of sepsis. Twenty-six patients with sepsis died (19.3%). The γδ T cells, specifically, the CD3+ CD56+ γδ T cells, were significantly reduced in those septic patients who died. Our results indicate that, during sepsis, γδ T cells show the largest decrease and this reduction becomes more intense when the septic process becomes more severe. Mortality was associated with a significant decrease in γδ T cells. PMID:23515014

  3. Regulatory B and T cell responses in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Birte; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    , we found increased proportions of naïve Th17 cells after stimulation with the thyroid self-antigen thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and the Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (E. coli LPS). The proportions of Th10 cells were similar in healthy donors and in HT patients after antigen-specific stimulation...... for human Th17 differentiation and, accordingly, HT patients showed higher baseline production of IL-6 and TGF-β1 than healthy donors. Moreover, the baseline expression of mRNA encoding the transcription factor Forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) was similar in HT patients and healthy donors, but HT patients...

  4. Evaluation of IgG4+ Plasma Cell Infiltration in Patients with Systemic Plasmacytosis and Other Plasma Cell-infiltrating Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Takeoka

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Systemic plasmacytosis is a rare skin disorder characterized by marked infiltration of plasma cells in the dermis. IgG4-related disease is pathologically characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis, accompanied by elevated levels of serum IgG4. Reports of cases of systemic plasmacytosis with abundant infiltration of IgG4+ plasma cells has led to discussion about the relationship between systemic plasmacytosis and IgG4-related disease. This study examined IgG4+/IgG+ plasma cell ratios in 4 patients with systemic plasmacytosis and 12 patients with other skin diseases that show marked infiltration of plasma cells. Furthermore, we examined whether these cases met one of the pathological diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related disease (i.e. IgG4+/IgG plasma cells ratio of over 40%. Only one out of 4 patients with systemic plasmacytosis met the criterion. These results suggest that systemic plasmacytosis and IgG4-related disease are distinct diseases.

  5. Which Patients with Giant Cell Arteritis Will Develop Cardiovascular or Cerebrovascular Disease? A Clinical Practice Research Datalink Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Joanna C; Kiran, Amit; Maskell, Joe; Hutchings, Andrew; Arden, Nigel; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Hamilton, William; Emin, Akan; Culliford, David; Luqmani, Raashid

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the risk of cerebrovascular disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA), and to identify predictors. The UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink 1991-2010 was used for a parallel cohort study of 5827 patients with GCA and 37,090 age-, sex-, and location-matched controls. A multivariable competing risk model (non-cerebrovascular/CV-related death as the competing risk) determined the relative risk [subhazard ratio (SHR)] between patients with GCA compared with background controls for cerebrovascular disease, CVD, or either. Each cohort (GCA and controls) was then analyzed individually using the same multivariable model, with age and sex now present, to identify predictors of CVD or cerebrovascular disease. Patients with GCA, compared with controls, had an increased risk SHR (95% CI) of cerebrovascular disease (1.45, 1.31-1.60), CVD (1.49, 1.37-1.62), or either (1.47, 1.37-1.57). In the GCA cohort, predictors of "cerebrovascular disease or CVD" included increasing age, > 80 years versus cerebrovascular disease or CVD than age-, sex-, and location-matched controls. In common with the non-GCA cohort, patients who are older, male, and from the most deprived compared with least deprived areas have a higher risk of cerebrovascular disease or CVD. Further work is needed to understand how this risk may be mediated by specific behavioral, social, and economic factors.

  6. Autologous blood stem-cell transplantation in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease and prior radiation to the pelvic site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerbling, M.H.; Holle, R.; Haas, R.; Knauf, W.; Doerken, B.H.; Ho, A.D.; Kuse, R.; Pralle, H.; Fliedner, T.M.; Hunstein, W.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with relapsed Hodgkin's disease who respond to salvage therapy are successfully treated with cyclophosphamide, carmustine (BCNU), and etoposide (VP-16) (CBV) followed by autologus bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). Because of heavy pretreatment including radiation to the pelvic site, marrow harvest was not feasible in those patients. We therefore used blood-derived hemopoietic precursor cells as an alternative stem-cell source to rescue them after superdose chemotherapy. Hemopoietic precursor cells were mobilized into the peripheral blood either by chemotherapeutic induction of transient myelosuppression followed by an overshooting of blood stem-cell concentration, or by continuous intravenous (IV) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) administration. The median time to reach 1,000 WBC per microliter, 500 polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) per microliter, or 20,000 platelets per microliter was 10, 20.5, and 38 days, respectively, for 50% of all patients. The platelet counts of two patients never dropped below 20,000/microL following autologous blood stem-cell transplantation (ABSCT), whereas two other patients had to be supported with platelets for 75 and 86 days posttransplant until a stable peripheral platelet count of 20,000/microL was attained. Among the 11 assessable patients, seven are in unmaintained complete remission (CR) at a median follow-up of 318 days. This is a first report on a series of ABSCTs in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease proving that, despite prior damage to the marrow site, the circulating stem-cell pool is still a sufficient source of hemopoietic precursor cells for stem-cell rescue

  7. Increased Numbers of NK Cells, NKT-Like Cells, and NK Inhibitory Receptors in Peripheral Blood of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Tang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available T cells and B cells participate in the pathogenesis of COPD. Currently, NK cells and NKT cells have gained increasing attention. In the present study, 19 COPD patients and 12 healthy nonsmokers (HNS were recruited, and their pulmonary function was assessed. The frequencies of CD3+ T, CD4+ T, CD8+ T, B, NK, and NKT-like cells were determined using flow cytometry. The frequencies of spontaneous and inducible IFN-γ+ or CD107a+ NK and NKT-like cells as well as activating or inhibitory receptors were also detected. The potential association of lymphocyte subsets with disease severity was further analyzed. Significantly decreased numbers of CD3+ and CD4+ T cells, and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio, but increased numbers of CD3−CD56+ NK and CD3+CD56+ NKT-like cells were observed in COPD patients compared to HNS. The frequencies of inducible IFN-γ-secreting NK and NKT-like cells were less in COPD patients. The frequencies of CD158a and CD158b on NK cells and CD158b on NKT-like cells were greater. The frequency of CD158b+ NK cells was negatively correlated with FEV1% prediction and FEV1/FVC. Our data indicate that COPD patients have immune dysfunction, and higher frequencies of inhibitory NK cells and NKT-like cells may participate in the pathogenesis of COPD.

  8. Imaging manifestations of acquired elastopathy resembling pseudoxanthoma elasticum in patients with beta thalassaemia major and sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayana, Harish; Cheng, Ken; Lau, Ken; Harish, Radhika; Bowden, Donald K.

    2016-01-01

    Development of an acquired systemic elastopathy resembling pseudoxanthoma elasticum in patients with chronic haemoglobinopathies such as beta thalassaemia major and sickle cell disease is well documented. There is paucity of any comprehensive literature on the radiological manifestations of this entity. This pictorial review aims to describe and illustrate the multi system and multi modality imaging findings of this condition.

  9. Electrocardiographic Study in Adult Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease Patients in Lagos, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Dosunmu, Adedoyin; Akinbami, Akinsegun; Uche, Ebele; Adediran, Adewumi; John-Olabode, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study sought to identify the pattern of electrocardiographic changes in steady state adult sickle cell anaemia. Methods. A case-control, cross-sectional study was conducted amongst sickle cell patients attending the sickle cell clinic of Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, and HbAA controls. All consenting participants had haemoglobin electrophoresis done and were subjected to electrocardiography (ECG). The descriptive data were given as means ? standard deviatio...

  10. Increased circulating progenitor cells in Alzheimer's disease patients with moderate to severe dementia: evidence for vascular repair and tissue regeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellos, Konstantinos; Panagiota, Victoria; Sachsenmaier, Saskia; Trunk, Theresia; Straten, Guido; Leyhe, Thomas; Seizer, Peter; Geisler, Tobias; Gawaz, Meinrad; Laske, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrovascular dysfunction is a common finding in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may contribute to cognitive decline. Abundant evidence suggests that vascular and neuronal repair mechanisms are mediated by circulating progenitor cells in vivo. Whether CD34+ and, specifically, CD34+/CD133+ progenitor cells are involved in the pathophysiology of AD is poorly understood so far. In the present study, peripheral blood concentrations of circulating CD34+/CD133+ and CD34+ progenitor cells were measured in 45 AD patients and in 30 healthy elderly controls by flow cytometry. The severity of dementia was assessed by Mini-Mental Status Examination and Clinical Dementia Rating scale. AD patients were stratified into two groups showing mild (n=17) and moderate to severe (n= 28) dementia. In the present study, AD patients with moderate to severe dementia, but not those with mild dementia, showed significantly increased circulating CD34+/CD133+ and CD34+ progenitor cells compared to healthy elderly controls independent of cardiovascular risk factors and medication. In addition, the number of circulating CD34+/CD133+ progenitor cells in AD patients was significantly inversely correlated with cognitive function, age, and plasma levels of SDF-1, the most potent chemokine for progenitor cells. Our findings suggest a stage-dependent upregulation of circulating CD34+/CD133+ and CD34+ progenitor cells in AD patients, which could take part in tissue healing processes of the brain in AD.

  11. Effects of aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with Chagas' heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Haline; Teixeira, Maxelle Martins; Sousa, Rodrigo Cunha de; Silva, Marcos Vinícius da; Correia, Dalmo; Rodrigues Junior, Virmondes; Levy, Bruce David; Rogério, Alexandre de Paula

    2016-04-15

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). In some patients with Chagas disease, symptoms progress to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Endogenously, inflammation is resolved in the presence of lipid mediators such as aspirin-triggered RvD1 (AT-RvD1) which has anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution effects. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, the effects of AT-RvD1 on T. cruzi antigen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with Chagas heart disease. The levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-13 increased in PBMCs from cardiac-form Chagas patients in stage B1 (patients with fewer heart abnormalities) stimulated with T. cruzi antigen compared to those in non-stimulated PBMCs. AT-RvD1 reduced the IFN-γ concentrations in PBMCs from patients with Chagas disease stimulated with T. cruzi antigen compared to stimulated with T. cruzi antigen cells. AT-RvD1 treatment resulted in no observable changes in TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-13 levels. AT-RvD1 significantly decreased the percentage of necrotic cells and caused a significant reduction in the proliferation rate of T. cruzi antigen-stimulated PBMCs from patients with Chagas disease. These findings demonstrate that AT-RvD1 modulates the immune response in Chagas disease patients and might have potential to be used as an alternative approach for slowing the development of further heart damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of sickle cell disease patients from a low-income region of northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales Allyrio Araújo de Medeiros Fernandes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize the socioeconomic and demographic aspects of sickle cell disease patients from the state of Rio Grande do Norte (RN, Northeast Brazil, and their adherence to the recommended treatment. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed at referral centers for the treatment of hematological diseases. One hundred and fifty-five unrelated individuals with sickle cell disease who went to these centers for outpatient visits were analyzed. All the patients, or their caregivers, were informed about the research procedures and objectives, and answered a standardized questionnaire. Results: The patients were predominantly younger than 12 years old, self-declared as mulatto, lived in small towns fairly distant from the referral center, and had low education and socioeconomic levels. Individuals who were ten or younger were diagnosed at an earlier age. Almost 50% of the patients were taking hydroxyurea, 91.4% reported having received pneumococcal/meningococcal vaccinations and 76.1% received penicillin as antibiotic prophylaxis. However, the majority of them reported having difficulties following the recommendations of the physicians, mainly in respect to attaining the prescribed medications and transportation to the referral centers. Conclusion: These individuals have a vulnerable socioeconomic situation that can lead to an aggravation of their general health and thus deserve special attention from the medical and psychosocial perspectives. Thus, it is necessary to improve public policies that provide Brazilian sickle cell disease patients with better access to medical treatment, living conditions, and integration into society.

  13. Priapism in paediatric patients with sickle cell disease - a report of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Of the 185 SCD cases, three (1.6%) had priapism. They were adolescents aged 17years, 11years and 10 years 9months respectively. Two patients had never attended a sickle cell clinic, never been on routine drugs nor received advice on oral liberal fluids intake. One patient had stuttering priapism, 24hours before ...

  14. Psychopathology in Sickle Cell Disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We reviewed the existing literature regarding the psychological sequelae among patients with SCD. We then recommend how to better identify and treat psychopathology associated with this condition. Keywords: Sickle cell disease, Psychopathology, Depression,. Anxiety, Psychosis, Posttraumatic stress disorder PTSD.

  15. Lack of functional relevance of isolated cell damage in transplants of Parkinson's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Oliver; Astradsson, Arnar; Hallett, Penny

    2009-01-01

    Postmortem analyses from clinical neural transplantation trials of several subjects with Parkinson's disease revealed surviving grafted dopaminergic neurons after more than a decade. A subset of these subjects displayed isolated dopaminergic neurons within the grafts that contained Lewy body......-like structures. In this review, we discuss why this isolated cell damage is unlikely to affect the overall graft function and how we can use these observations to help us to understand age-related neurodegeneration and refine our future cell replacement therapies....

  16. Factors associated with disease-specific survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Mirian Carvalho de; Cruz, Oswaldo Gonçalves; Vasconcelos, Ana Glória Godoi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a global public health problem and is associated with high mortality. Lung cancer could be largely avoided by reducing the prevalence of smoking. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of social, behavioral, and clinical factors on the survival time of patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated at Cancer Hospital I of the José Alencar Gomes da Silva National Cancer Institute, located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between 2000 and 2003. This was a retrospective hospital cohort study involving 1,194 patients. The 60-month disease-specific survival probabilities were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method for three stage groups. The importance of the studied factors was assessed with a hierarchical theoretical model after adjustment by Cox multiple regression. The estimated 60-month specific-disease lethality rate was 86.0%. The 60-month disease-specific survival probability ranged from 25.0% (stages I/II) to 2.5% (stage IV). The performance status, the intention to treat, and the initial treatment modality were the major prognostic factors identified in the study population. In this cohort of patients, the disease-specific survival probabilities were extremely low. We identified no factors that could be modified after the diagnosis in order to improve survival. Primary prevention, such as reducing the prevalence of smoking, is still the best method to reduce the number of people who will suffer the consequences of lung cancer. O câncer de pulmão é um problema de saúde pública global e é associado a elevada mortalidade. Ele poderia ser evitado em grande parte com a redução da prevalência do tabagismo. O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar os efeitos de fatores sociais, comportamentais e clínicos sobre o tempo de sobrevida de pacientes com câncer de pulmão de células não pequenas atendidos, entre 2000 e 2003, no Hospital do Câncer I do Instituto Nacional de Câncer José Alencar Gomes da Silva, localizado na

  17. Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for Treatment of Patients with Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease (MyStromalCell Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Mygind, Naja Dam

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of intramyocardial injections of autologous VEGF-A165-stimulated adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) in patients with refractory angina. MyStromalCell trial is a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study including sixty patients with CCS/NYHA class II...... capacity compared to placebo. However, exercise capacity increased in the ASC but not in the placebo group. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01449032....

  18. Effects of Submaximal Aerobic Exercise on Regulatory T Cell Markers of Male Patients Suffering from Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raygan, Fariba; Sayyah, Mansour; Janesar Qamsari, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Sehat, Mojtaba

    2017-02-01

    There are confirmed beneficiary effects of exercise on atherosclerotic inflammation of ischemia-associated heart diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of aerobic exercise on T-regulatory cell markers of IL-35 as well as FoxP3 and T-helper2 marker of IL-33 in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). This research was performed on 44 asymptomatic male patients with ischemic heart disease. The participants were randomly assigned into two groups of submaximal aerobic exercise and control group. Blood samples were collected before and after the termination of the exercise protocol. Serum levels of IL-35 and IL-33 as well as the amount of FoxP3 gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were measured by Elisa and Real time PCR, respectively. Serum levels of IL-35 (p=0.001) as well as the amount of FoxP3 gene expression increased significantly (p=0.012)  in exercise group even after controlling the likely confounding effects of age, length of ischemia, duration of the disease, and the amount of such factors before exercise (p≤0.042). It seems that exercise may yield a better control of atherosclerotic inflammation in patients with ischemic heart disease through the induction of regulatory T cells.

  19. The composition of T cell subtypes in duodenal biopsies are altered in coeliac disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagner Steenholt, Janni; Nielsen, Christian; Baudewijn, Leen

    2017-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of Celiac disease (CD) is intraepithelial lymphocytosis in the small intestine. Until now, investigations to characterize the T cell subpopulations within the epithelial layer have not discriminated between the heterodimeric co-receptor molecule, CD8αβ, and the possibly...

  20. secretor status of sickle cell disease patients in Zaria, Kaduna State

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Keywords: ABH secretor status, Sickle cell disease, Saliva, Urine, Morbidity susceptibility .... sickling test was carried out at a slightly acidic pH of ... collected and diluted with an equal volume of normal saline. Determination of ABO blood group in blood, urine and saliva. Determination of the ABH secretor status was done.

  1. Cerebrovascular reserve capacity is impaired in patients with sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nur, Erfan; Kim, Yu-Sok; Truijen, Jasper; van Beers, Eduard J.; Davis, Shyrin C. A. T.; Brandjes, Dees P.; Biemond, Bart J.; van Lieshout, Johannes J.

    2009-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with a high incidence of ischemic stroke. SCD is characterized by hemolytic anemia, resulting in reduced nitric oxide-bioavailability, and by impaired cerebrovascular hemodynamics. Cerebrovascular CO2 responsiveness is nitric oxide dependent and has been

  2. Combined analysis of circulating epithelial cells and serum thyroglobulin for distinguishing disease status of the patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Chih; Liou, Miaw-Jene; Hsu, Hsung-Ling; Hsieh, Jason Chia-Hsun; Chen, Yi-An; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Lin, Jen Der

    2016-03-29

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) accounts for about 80% of the cases in thyroid cancer. Routine surveillance by serum thyroglobulin (Tg) and medical imaging is the current practice to monitor disease progression of the patients. Whether enumeration of circulating epithelial cells (CECs) helps to define disease status of PTC patients was investigated. CECs were enriched from the peripheral blood of the healthy control subjects (G1, n = 17) and the patients at disease-free status (G2, n = 26) or with distant metastasis (G3, n = 22). The number of CECs expressing epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) or thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) was determined by immunofluorescence microscopy analyses. The medium number of EpCAM+-CECs was 6 (interquartile range 1-11), 12 (interquartile range 7-16) and 91 (interquartile range 31-206) cells/ml of blood for G1, G2 and G3, respectively. EpCAM+-CEC counts were significantly higher in G3 than in G1 (p interquartile range 3-13), 16 (interquartile range 10-24) and 100 (interquartile range 31-226) cells/ml of blood for G1, G2 and G3, respectively. The TSHR+-CEC counts also distinguished G3 from G1 (p < 0.05) and G2 (p < 0.05). With an appropriate cut off value of CEC count, the disease status for 97.9% (47/48) of the cases was clearly defined. Notably, the metastatic disease for all patients in G3 (22/22) was revealed by combined analysis of serum Tg and CEC. This study implicates that CEC testing can supplement the current standard methods for monitoring disease status of PTC.

  3. Intra coronary freshly isolated bone marrow cells transplantation improve cardiac function in patients with ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozdag-Turan Ilkay

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autologous bone marrow cell transplantation (BMCs-Tx is a promising novel option for treatment of cardiovascular disease. In this study we analyzed whether intracoronary autologous freshly isolated BMCs-Tx have beneficial effects on cardiac function in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD. Results In this prospective nonrandomized study we treated 12 patients with IHD by freshly isolated BMCs-Tx by use of point of care system and compared them with a representative 12 control group without cell therapy. Global ejection fraction (EF and infarct size area were determined by left ventriculography. Intracoronary transplantation of autologous freshly isolated BMCs led to a significant reduction of infarct size (p  Conclusions These results demonstrate that intracoronary transplantation of autologous freshly isolated BMCs by use of point of care system is safe and may lead to improvement of cardiac function in patients with IHD. Trial registration Registration number: ISRCTN54510226

  4. Cell Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Madani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Recently, cell therapy has sparked a revolution in ischemic heart disease that will in the future help clinicians to cure patients. Earlier investigations in animal models and clinical trials have suggested that positive paracrine effects such as neoangiogenesis and anti-apoptotic can improve myocardial function. In this regard the Royan cell therapy center designed a few trials in collaboration with multi hospitals such as Baqiyatallah, Shahid Lavasani, Tehran Heart Center, Shahid rajaee, Masih daneshvari, Imam Reza, Razavi and Sasan from 2006. Their results were interesting. However, cardiac stem cell therapy still faces great challenges in optimizing the treatment of patients. Keyword: Cardiovascular disease, Cell therapy.  

  5. FOXP3+ T Regulatory Cell Modifications in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Treated with Anti-TNFα Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Guidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treg modulation has been hypothesized as one of the mechanisms by which antitumor necrosis factor α (TNFα agents exert their action in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. However, data in IBD are still conflicting. We evaluated CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ (Tregs by flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 32 adult IBD patient before (T0 and after the induction of anti-TNFα therapy (T1. Eight healthy controls (HCs were included. We also evaluated the number of FOXP3+ cells in the lamina propria (LP in biopsies taken in a subset of patients and controls. Treg frequencies were significantly increased in peripheral blood from our patients after anti-TNFα therapy compared to T0. T1 but not T0 levels were higher than HC. The increase was detectable only in clinical responders to the treatment. A negative correlation was found among delta Treg levels and the age of patients or disease duration and with the activity score of Crohn’s disease (CD. No significant differences were found in LP FOXP3+ cells. Our data suggest the possibility that in IBD patients the treatment with anti-TNFα may affect Treg percentages and that Treg modifications may correlate with clinical response, but differently in early versus late disease.

  6. Increased population of immature enteric glial cells in the resected proximal ganglionic bowel of Hirschsprung's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Gakuto; Tomuschat, Christian; O'Donnell, Anne Marie; Coyle, David; Puri, Prem

    2017-10-01

    Enteric glial cells are essential for normal gastrointestinal function. Abnormalities in glial structure, development, or function lead to disturbances in gastrointestinal physiology. Fatty acid-binding protein 7 (FABP7) is a marker of immature enteric glial cells, whereas S100 is expressed only by mature glial cells. Patients with Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) often suffer from dysmotility and enterocolitis despite proper surgery. We designed this study to determine the distribution and expression of glial cells in patients with HSCR compared to normal controls. We investigated FABP7, S100, and PGP 9.5 expressions in both the ganglionic and aganglionic bowel of patients with HSCR (n = 6) versus normal control colon (n = 6). Protein distribution was assessed by using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Gene and protein expressions were quantified using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Western blot analysis, and densitometry. qPCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated a significantly increased FABP7 expression in ganglionic specimens compared to control specimen (P cells lie under the colonic epithelium and in close apposition to enteric neurons in the ganglionic bowel. The significantly increased number of immature enteric glial cells (EGCs) in the ganglionic bowel of HSCR patients may have adverse effect on the function of enteric neurons and intestinal barrier and thus predispose these patients to intestinal motility problems and enterocolitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They ... last as long as normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also ...

  8. Acute care of pediatric patients with sickle cell disease: a simulation performance assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Tracy L; DeBaun, Michael R; Boulet, John R; Murray, Gayle M; Murray, David J; Fehr, James J

    2013-09-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a rare disorder with cardinal features including hospitalization for vaso-occlusive pain episodes, acute pulmonary injury, and increased infection rates. For physician-trainees, learning optimal SCD management is challenging because of limited exposure to life threatening complications requiring timely interventions. To create, demonstrate reliability, and validate simulation-based, acute care SCD scenarios for physician-trainees, seven scenarios were derived from SCD patient cases. For each scenario, participants had 5 minutes to complete diagnostic and treatment interventions. Participants were divided into two groups based on clinical experience: interns or residents/fellows. Two raters scored performances using diagnostic and therapeutic checklists--indicating whether specific actions were performed and a global, 1 (poor) to 9 (excellent), rating. Scenario scores were calculated by averaging rater scores on each metric. Reliability was defined through uniformity in rater scoring and consistency of participant performance over scenarios. Validity was demonstrated by the performance gradient where the more experienced trainees outperform those early in training. Twenty-eight pediatric residents and hematology fellows took part in the study. Reliability for assessment scores overall was moderate. Performance on all but one scenario was moderately predictive of overall performance. Senior resident/fellows performed significantly better than interns. Positive associations existed between overall performance scores (P training (P < 0.01). Mannequin-based simulation is a novel method for teaching pediatric residents SCD-specific acute care skills. The assessment provided reliable and valid measures of trainees' performance. Further studies are needed to determine simulation's utility in education and evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α): A marker of disease burden in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dana; Bjørnager, Louise; Langkilde, Anne; Andersen, Ove; Jøns, Christian; Agner, Bue F R; Dixen, Ulrik; Landex, Nadia L

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor 1a (SDF-1α), is a chemokine and is able to home hematopoietic progenitor cells to injured areas of heart tissue for structural repair. Previous studies have found increased levels of SDF-1α in several cardiac diseases, but only few studies have investigated SDF-1α in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to test SDF-1α in a large cohort of patients with AF and its role as a prognostic marker. Between January 1st 2008 to December 1st 2012, 290 patients with ECG documented AF were enrolled from the in- and outpatient clinics at the Department of Cardiology, Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre, Denmark. Plasma levels of SDF-1α were measured using ELISA technique. Clinical data were registered and patient follow-up was conducted. Patients with permanent AF had significantly higher SDF-1α levels (2199.5 pg/ml) than the patients with paroxysmal AF (1982.0 pg/ml) and persistent AF (1906.0 pg/ml), p SDF-1α level was associated with longer time spent in the hospital per readmission, p SDF-1α level was found in patients with a more progressive state of arrhythmia and was associated with longer hospitalizations. These findings suggest that SDF-1α could prove valuable in risk stratification and evaluating the disease burden in AF patients.

  10. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the sickle cell gene on to their kids. Symptoms of sickle cell disease Anemia is a common symptom of SCD. It occurs from a lack of ... SCD cannot be prevented since it is genetic. Sickle cell disease treatment ... of SCD, your symptoms, and your overall health. Most treatment options aim ...

  11. Establishment of induced pluripotent stem cell line (ZZUi010-A from an Alzheimer's disease patient carrying an APP gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilei Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. Previous studies have identified mutations in several genes, such as amyloid precursor protein (APP, presenilin-1 (PSEN1, and presenilin-2 (PSEN2, in patients with early-onset (<65 years familial AD. Recently, a patient with an APP gene mutation was identified; the dermal fibroblasts of the patient were obtained and a line of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs was successfully generated using the Sendai-virus (SeV delivery system. The iPSC line will be useful for further study of the pathomechanism and drug screening for AD.

  12. Assessment of intracellular cytokines and regulatory cells in patients with autoimmune diseases and primary immunodeficiencies - novel tool for diagnostics and patient follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osnes, Liv T; Nakken, Britt; Bodolay, Edit; Szodoray, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Serum and intracytoplasmic cytokines are mandatory in host defense against microbes, but also play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases by initiating and perpetuating various cellular and humoral autoimmune processes. The intricate interplay and fine balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory processes drive, whether inflammation and eventually organ damage will occur, or the inflammatory cascade quenches. In the early and late, as well as inactive and active stages of autoimmune diseases, different cellular and molecular patterns can dominate in these patients. However, the simultaneous assessment of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers aids to define the immunological state of a patient. A group of the most useful inflammatory biomarkers are cytokines, and with increasing knowledge during the last decade their role have been well-defined in patients with autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies. Multiple pathological processes drive the development of autoimmunity and immunodeficiencies, most of which involve quantitative and qualitative disturbances in regulatory cells, cytokine synthesis and signaling pathways. The assessment of these biomarkers does not aid only in the mechanistic description of autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies, but further helps to subcategorize diseases and to evaluate therapy responses. Here, we provide an overview, how monitoring of cytokines and regulatory cells aid in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies furthermore, we pinpoint novel cellular and molecular diagnostic possibilities in these diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of cerebrovascular disease in patients with sickle cell disease using transcranial Doppler sonography: correlation with MRI, MRA and conventional angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verlhac, S.; Bernaudin, F.; Tortrat, D.; Brugieres, P.; Mage, K.; Gaston, A.; Reinert, P.

    1995-01-01

    A prospective study of 58 patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) included both MRI and MRA in patients over 7 years of age and those with abnormal TCD. Arteriography was performed in cases where a stenosis was suspected on TCD. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) and basilar artery (BA) velocities were significantly higher in the sickle cell hemoglobin SS group than in the hemoglobin SC group. Patients with a MCA mean velocity of over 1.90 m/s had stenoses found by arteriography. Patients with unilaterally undetectable MCA flow had experienced a stroke and MCA thrombosis was confirmed at MRA and arteriography. We concluded that TCD is valuable in detecting arterial stenosis in SCD and will lead to consideration of these patients for intensive therapy, such as bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or transfusion regimes. (orig.)

  14. Disease modeling and lentiviral gene transfer in patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells from late-onset Pompe disease patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Sato

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA. Glycogen accumulation is seen in the affected organ such as skeletal muscle, heart, and liver. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is frequently seen in the infantile onset Pompe disease. On the other hand, cardiovascular complication of the late-onset Pompe disease is considered as less frequent and severe than that of infantile onset. There are few investigations which show cardiovascular complication of late onset Pompe disease due to the shortage of appropriate disease model. We have generated late-onset Pompe disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC and differentiated them into cardiomyocytes. Differentiated cardiomyocyte shows glycogen accumulation and lysosomal enlargement. Lentiviral GAA rescue improves GAA enzyme activity and glycogen accumulation in iPSC. The efficacy of gene therapy is maintained following the cardiomyocyte differentiation. Lentiviral GAA transfer ameliorates the disease-specific change in cardiomyocyote. It is suggested that Pompe disease iPSC-derived cardiomyocyte is replicating disease-specific changes in the context of disease modeling, drug screening, and cell therapy.

  15. Electrocardiographic Study in Adult Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease Patients in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adedoyin Dosunmu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study sought to identify the pattern of electrocardiographic changes in steady state adult sickle cell anaemia. Methods. A case-control, cross-sectional study was conducted amongst sickle cell patients attending the sickle cell clinic of Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, and HbAA controls. All consenting participants had haemoglobin electrophoresis done and were subjected to electrocardiography (ECG. The descriptive data were given as means ± standard deviation (SD. The differences were considered to be statistically significant when the p value obtained was <0.05. Results. A total of ninety-three sickle cell anaemia (SCA patients and ninety haemoglobin AA (controls were enrolled. There was no significant difference in the age of the participants with SCA and that of the controls but the body mass index was significantly higher in controls (p=0.0001. Overall, 73.1% (68 of 93 had abnormal ECG while only 2 of 90 (2.2% of controls had abnormal ECG. The common abnormalities observed were left ventricular hypertrophy, biventricular hypertrophy, and right ventricular hypertrophy. Conclusion. Patients with SCA in steady state tend to have normal heart rate but about 50% of them would have had ECG changes before the age of 20 years. ECG being a noninvasive test may be used to identify patients at risk for early intervention.

  16. Orbital wall infarction mimicking periorbital cellulitis in a patient with sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozkavukcu, Esra; Fitoz, Suat; Erden, Ilhan [Ankara University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Yagmurlu, Banu [Kirikkale University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kirikkale (Turkey); Ciftci, Ergin [Ankara University School of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Infectious Diseases, Ankara (Turkey); Ertem, Mehmet [Ankara University School of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Haematology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    Orbital wall infarction and subperiosteal haematomas are unusual manifestations of sickling disorders. Here we report an 11-year-old girl with sickle cell anaemia having multiple skull infarctions including the orbital bony structures associated with subperiosteal haematomas. The diagnosis was made by MRI, which showed bone marrow changes and associated haemorrhagic collections. The patient was successfully managed without surgical intervention. (orig.)

  17. Radioactive seed localization of renal cell carcinoma in a patient with Von Hippel-Lindau disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassing, Christina Marie Schiottz; Tvedskov, Tove Filtenborg; Kroman, Niels

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the case of a patient, who had successful radioactive seed localization (RSL) performed to improve the identification and excision of a renal cell carcinoma. RSL is a new method of preoperative localization, which can ease the surgical procedure, minimize tissue trauma...

  18. Orbital wall infarction mimicking periorbital cellulitis in a patient with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozkavukcu, Esra; Fitoz, Suat; Erden, Ilhan; Yagmurlu, Banu; Ciftci, Ergin; Ertem, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    Orbital wall infarction and subperiosteal haematomas are unusual manifestations of sickling disorders. Here we report an 11-year-old girl with sickle cell anaemia having multiple skull infarctions including the orbital bony structures associated with subperiosteal haematomas. The diagnosis was made by MRI, which showed bone marrow changes and associated haemorrhagic collections. The patient was successfully managed without surgical intervention. (orig.)

  19. Sickle cell disease : Pathogenesis and biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, M.

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a monogenetic disease wherein the haemoglobin complex of erythrocytes is affected, resulting in sickle haemoglobin. Sickle cell patients suffer from haemolytic anaemia, recurrent painful (micro)-vascular occlusions, secondary organ damage and early death. The

  20. Intrathoracic manifestations of sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, P.; Pfeiffer, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of 50 patients with sickle cell disease was performed. The majority of patients was admitted because of sickle cell crisis, pneumonia or congestive heart failure. Global casdiomegaly, pulmonary vascular engorgement, pneumonia and infiltrative lung parenchymal abnormalities were encountered. Our study shows a very high prevalence of intrathoracic abnormalities in patients afflicted with sickle cell disease. (orig.) [de

  1. MR marrow signs of iron overload in transfusion-dependent patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, T.L.; Sheth, S.S.; Hurlet, A.; Comerci, S.C.; Ruzal-Shapiro, C.; Piomelli, S.; Berdon, W.E.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) marrow signal in the axial and appendicular skeleton of 13 transfusion-dependent and chelated pediatric patients with sickle cell anemia (SSD) was compared with marrow signal in six non-transfusion-dependent patients with SSD. Hepatic, pancreatic, and renal MR signal were also evaluated. Indication for hypertransfusion therapy was primarily prior history of stroke. Transfusion-dependent patients had evidence of iron deposition throughout the imaged marrow and the liver, despite deferoxamine chelation therapy. Non-transfusion-dependent patients did not demonstrate grossly apparent signs of iron overload. Red marrow restoration was present in the spine, pelvis, and long bones and, in some patients, within the epiphyses. Marrow edema secondary to vaso-occlusive crises was evident in the metaphyses and diaphyses of long bones in areas of both red and fatty marrow and was best seen using fat-saturated T2-weighted imaging techniques. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Prognostic factors for patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer, limited disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaasa, S.; Mastekaasa, A.; Lund, E.

    1989-01-01

    In a prospective controlled clinical trial, 102 patients with inoperable non-small lung cancer (NSCLC), limited disease, stage II and III were treated with combination chemotherapy, cisplatin 70 mg/m 2 i.v. on day one and etoposide 100 mg/m 2 i.v. on day one, and etoposide 200 mg/m 2 orally on days 2 and 3, or radiotherapy given in 15 fractions of 2.8 Gy with two anterior/posterior fields during a period of three weeks. The patients completed a validated self-administered questionnaire before the start of treatment that assessed their psychosocial well-being, disease-related symptoms, personal functioning, and every day activity. These subjective varibles were evaluated together with treatment modality, WHO performance status, weight loss, and stage of disease, with regard to their value in predicting survival. Univariate survival analyses were undertaken for each individual factor, median survival was calculated according to life-table analyses. A step-wise multiple regression analysis was used to measure the prognostic value of the various factors. In the univariate analysis, general symptons (p=0.0006) psychosocial well-being (p=0.0002) and stage of disease (p=0.007) were the best predictive factors. In the multiple regression analyses the subjective variables, general symptons (p<0.01) and psychosocial well-being (p<0.05) were shown to have the best predictive value for the patients' survival. (author). 20 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  3. Multicenter COMPACT study of COMplications in patients with sickle cell disease and utilization of iron chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Lanetta; Adams-Graves, Patricia; Kanter-Washko, Julie; Oneal, Patricia A; Sasane, Medha; Vekeman, Francis; Bieri, Christine; Magestro, Matthew; Marcellari, Andrea; Duh, Mei Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Over the past few decades, lifespans of sickle cell disease (SCD) patients have increased; hence, they encounter multiple complications. Early detection, appropriate comprehensive care, and treatment may prevent or delay onset of complications. We collected longitudinal data on sickle cell disease (SCD) complication rates and associated resource utilization relative to blood transfusion patterns and iron chelation therapy (ICT) use in patients aged ≥16 years to address a gap in the literature. Medical records of 254 SCD patients ≥16 years were retrospectively reviewed at three US tertiary care centers. We classified patients into cohorts based on cumulative units of blood transfused and ICT history: ICT (Cohort 1 [C1]), ≥15 units, no ICT (Cohort 2 [C2]), and ≥15 units with ICT (Cohort 3 [C3]). We report SCD complication rates per patient per year; cohort comparisons use rate ratios (RRs). Cohorts had 69 (C1), 91 (C2), and 94 (C3) patients. Pain led to most hospitalizations (76%) and emergency department (ED) (82%) visits. Among transfused patients (C2+C3), those receiving ICT were less likely to experience SCD complications than those who did not (RR [95% CI] C2 vs. C3: 1.33 [1.25-1.42]). Similar trends (RR [95% CI]) were observed in ED visits and hospitalizations associated with SCD complications (C2 vs. C3, ED: 1.94 [1.70-2.21]; hospitalizations: 1.61 [1.45-1.78]), but not in outpatient visits. Although the most commonly reported SCD complication among all patients was pain, patients who received ICT were less likely to experience pain and other complications than those who did not. These results highlight the need for increased patient and provider education on the importance of comprehensive disease management.

  4. Correlation of transcranial Doppler ultrasonography with MRI and MRA in the evaluation of sickle cell disease patients with prior stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogutt, M.S.; Goldwag, S.S.; Gupta, K.L.; Kaneko, K.; Humbert, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated a group of patients with sickle cell disease and a clinical history of prior stroke, comparing transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) to both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to determine its efficacy for the detection of flow abnormalities associated with prior cerebral infarction. Using MRI as the standard examination, there was 94 % sensitivity and 30 % specificity, and using MRA as the standard examination, there was 91 % sensitivity and 22 % specificity. We concur with other reports that the transcranial Doppler examination is a highly sensitive study. In our group of sickle cell disease patients with prior stroke, TCD reliably detected flow abnormalities that correlated to areas of prior cerebral infarction. (orig.)

  5. Correlation of transcranial Doppler ultrasonography with MRI and MRA in the evaluation of sickle cell disease patients with prior stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogutt, M.S. (Dept. of Radiology SL54, Tulane Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Goldwag, S.S. (Dept. of Radiology SL54, Tulane Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Gupta, K.L. (Dept. of Radiology SL54, Tulane Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Kaneko, K. (Dept. of Radiology SL54, Tulane Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Humbert, J.R. (Dept. of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Tulane Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States))

    1994-06-01

    We prospectively evaluated a group of patients with sickle cell disease and a clinical history of prior stroke, comparing transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) to both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to determine its efficacy for the detection of flow abnormalities associated with prior cerebral infarction. Using MRI as the standard examination, there was 94 % sensitivity and 30 % specificity, and using MRA as the standard examination, there was 91 % sensitivity and 22 % specificity. We concur with other reports that the transcranial Doppler examination is a highly sensitive study. In our group of sickle cell disease patients with prior stroke, TCD reliably detected flow abnormalities that correlated to areas of prior cerebral infarction. (orig.)

  6. Role of T. cruzi exposure in the pattern of T cell cytokines among chronically infected HIV and Chagas disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Regina Tozetto-Mendoza

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The impact of Chagas disease (CD in HIV-infected patients is relevant throughout the world. In fact, the characterization of the adaptive immune response in the context of co-infection is important for predicting the need for interventions in areas in which HIV and Chagas disease co-exist. METHODS: We described and compared the frequency of cytokine-producing T cells stimulated with soluble antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi using a cytometric assay for the following groups: individuals with chronic Chagas disease (CHR, n=10, those with Chagas disease and HIV infection (CO, n=11, those with only HIV (HIV, n=14 and healthy individuals (C, n=15. RESULTS: We found 1 a constitutively lower frequency of IL-2+ and IFN-γ+ T cells in the CHR group compared with the HIV, CO and healthy groups; 2 a suppressive activity of soluble T. cruzi antigen, which down-regulated IL-2+CD4+ and IFN-γ+CD4+ phenotypes, notably in the healthy group; 3 a down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines on CD8+ T cells in the indeterminate form of Chagas disease; and 4 a significant increase in IL-10+CD8+ cells distinguishing the indeterminate form from the cardiac/digestive form of Chagas disease, even in the presence of HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our data suggest the presence of an immunoregulatory response in chronic Chagas disease, which seems to be driven by T. cruzi antigens. Our findings provide new insights into immunotherapeutic strategies for people living with HIV/AIDS and Chagas disease.

  7. Role of T. cruzi exposure in the pattern of T cell cytokines among chronically infected HIV and Chagas disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozetto-Mendoza, Tania Regina; Vasconcelos, Dewton de Moraes; Ibrahim, Karim Yaqub; Sartori, Ana Marli Christovam; Bezerra, Rita C; Freitas, Vera Lúcia Teixeira de; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida

    2017-11-01

    The impact of Chagas disease (CD) in HIV-infected patients is relevant throughout the world. In fact, the characterization of the adaptive immune response in the context of co-infection is important for predicting the need for interventions in areas in which HIV and Chagas disease co-exist. We described and compared the frequency of cytokine-producing T cells stimulated with soluble antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) using a cytometric assay for the following groups: individuals with chronic Chagas disease (CHR, n=10), those with Chagas disease and HIV infection (CO, n=11), those with only HIV (HIV, n=14) and healthy individuals (C, n=15). We found 1) a constitutively lower frequency of IL-2+ and IFN-γ+ T cells in the CHR group compared with the HIV, CO and healthy groups; 2) a suppressive activity of soluble T. cruzi antigen, which down-regulated IL-2+CD4+ and IFN-γ+CD4+ phenotypes, notably in the healthy group; 3) a down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines on CD8+ T cells in the indeterminate form of Chagas disease; and 4) a significant increase in IL-10+CD8+ cells distinguishing the indeterminate form from the cardiac/digestive form of Chagas disease, even in the presence of HIV infection. Taken together, our data suggest the presence of an immunoregulatory response in chronic Chagas disease, which seems to be driven by T. cruzi antigens. Our findings provide new insights into immunotherapeutic strategies for people living with HIV/AIDS and Chagas disease.

  8. Red blood cell alloimmunization in patients with sickle cell disease in Turkey: a single center retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner Solmaz

    2016-12-01

    Results: Of 216 SCD patients included in the study. Alloimmunization was detected in 67 (31.0% out of 216 patients who underwent transfusion, and in 17 (30.4% out of 56 patients in Group 1 and in 50 (31.3% out of 160 patients in Group 2. When the patients were analyzed according to alloimmunization development, our study revealed that neither SCD complications are a risk factor for alloimmunization nor alloimmunization increases mortality rates. Conclusion: High alloimmunization frequency found in our study suggests the insufficient adherence of alloimmunization-prevention policies in RBC transfusions performed except experienced institutions. Therefore alloimmunization may be reduced or prevented through performing extended red cell typing among SCD patients. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 622-627

  9. Atypical NK-cell proliferation of the gastrointestinal tract in a patient with antigliadin antibodies but not celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Francisco; Chang, Chung-Che; Schwartz, Mary R; Preti, Hector Alejandro; Younes, Mamoun; Ewton, April; Verm, Ray; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2006-04-01

    We describe a unique case of atypical natural killer (NK)-cell proliferation likely related to gluten sensitivity, mimicking NK-cell lymphoma. The patient, a 32-year-old man, has had persistent multiple erythematous bull-eye lesions in the stomach, small bowel, and large bowel for 3 years. Histologically, the lesions were well circumscribed and relatively superficial, composed of atypical medium-sized to large-sized lymphocytes with slightly irregular nuclear contours, a dispersed chromatin pattern, and clear cytoplasm. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry showed that the cells were NK cells expressing CD56 (aberrantly bright), T-cell intracellular antigen (TIA)-1, cytoplasmic CD3, and CD94, but not surface CD3, with bright aberrant expression of CD7 and a lack of other NK cell-associated markers. Polymerase chain reaction for rearrangement of the T-cell receptor-gamma chain gene showed no evidence of a clonal T-cell population, and in situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus encoded RNA was negative. There was no evidence of the involvement of peripheral blood or bone marrow. Although a diagnosis of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma was considered because of the atypical morphology and immunophenotypic aberrancy, no chemotherapy was given because of the relatively superficial nature of the infiltrates, lack of significant symptoms, and negativity for Epstein-Barr virus. Two years after initial presentation, the patient was found to have high titers of antigliadin antibodies with no other evidence of celiac disease. After instituting a gluten-free diet, many of the lesions regressed, suggesting that this atypical NK-cell proliferation may be driven by an anomalous immune response. Awareness of this case may prevent pathologists from misdiagnosing similar lesions as NK/T-cell lymphomas. It is as yet unknown whether this process occurs more commonly in patients with gluten sensitivity, or in other settings, and the pathogenesis is as yet undetermined.

  10. Less aggressive disease in patients with primary squamous cell carcinomas of the thyroid gland and coexisting lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asik, Mehmet; Binnetoglu, Emine; Sen, Hacer; Gunes, Fahri; Muratli, Asli; Kankaya, Duygu; Uysal, Fatma; Sahin, Mustafa; Ukinc, Kubilay

    2015-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the thyroid gland is extremely rare. Infrequently, primary SCC of the thyroid gland is accompanied by other thyroid diseases such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Recently, studies have demonstrated that differentiated thyroid cancer with coexisting HT has a better prognosis. However, the prognosis of patients with primary SCC of the thyroid gland and coexistent HT has not been clearly identified. We compared the clinical characteristics and disease stages of patients with primary SCC with and without lymphocytic thyroiditis (LT). We reviewed reports of primary SCC of the thyroid gland published in the English literature. We identified 46 papers that included 17 cases of primary SCC of the thyroid gland with LT and 77 cases of primary SCC of the thyroid gland without LT. Lymph node metastasis and local invasion rates did not differ between these two groups. Distant metastases were absent in patients with LT, and were observed in 13 (16.9%) patients without LT. A greater proportion of patients without LT had advanced stage disease (stage IV A-B-C) than patients with LT (p thyroid gland and coexisting LT had lower tumour-node-metastasis stage and frequency of distant metastasis than those without LT. Lymphocytic infiltration in patients with SCC appears to limit tumour growth and distant metastases.

  11. Changes seen on computed tomography of the chest in mildly symptomatic adult patients with sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Ursula David; Lopes, Agnaldo Jose; Maioli, Maria Christina Paixao; Soares, Andrea Ribeiro; Melo, Pedro Lopes de; Mogami, Roberto, E-mail: agnaldolopes.uerj@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-15

    Objective: To describe and quantify the main changes seen on computed tomography of the chest in mildly symptomatic adult patients with sickle cell disease, as well as to evaluate the radiologist accuracy in determining the type of haemoglobinopathy. Materials and Methods: A prospective study involving 44 adult patients with sickle cell disease who underwent inspiration and expiration computed tomography of the chest. The frequency of tomography findings and the extent of involvement are reported. We also calculated radiologist accuracy in determining the type of haemoglobinopathy by analyzing the pulmonary alterations and morphology of the spleen. Results: The changes found on computed tomography scans, in descending order of frequency, were as follows: fibrotic opacities (81.8%); mosaic attenuation (56.8%); architectural distortion (31.8%); cardiomegaly (25.0%); lobar volume reduction (18.2%); and increased caliber of peripheral pulmonary arteries (9.1%). For most of the findings, the involvement was considered mild, five or fewer lung segments being affected. The accuracy in determining the type of haemoglobinopathy (HbSS group versus not HbSS group) was 72.7%. Conclusion: In adult patients with sickle cell disease, the main tomography findings reflect fibrotic changes. In addition, computed tomography can be helpful in differentiating among haemoglobinopathies. (author)

  12. Changes seen on computed tomography of the chest in mildly symptomatic adult patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Ursula David; Lopes, Agnaldo Jose; Maioli, Maria Christina Paixao; Soares, Andrea Ribeiro; Melo, Pedro Lopes de; Mogami, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe and quantify the main changes seen on computed tomography of the chest in mildly symptomatic adult patients with sickle cell disease, as well as to evaluate the radiologist accuracy in determining the type of haemoglobinopathy. Materials and Methods: A prospective study involving 44 adult patients with sickle cell disease who underwent inspiration and expiration computed tomography of the chest. The frequency of tomography findings and the extent of involvement are reported. We also calculated radiologist accuracy in determining the type of haemoglobinopathy by analyzing the pulmonary alterations and morphology of the spleen. Results: The changes found on computed tomography scans, in descending order of frequency, were as follows: fibrotic opacities (81.8%); mosaic attenuation (56.8%); architectural distortion (31.8%); cardiomegaly (25.0%); lobar volume reduction (18.2%); and increased caliber of peripheral pulmonary arteries (9.1%). For most of the findings, the involvement was considered mild, five or fewer lung segments being affected. The accuracy in determining the type of haemoglobinopathy (HbSS group versus not HbSS group) was 72.7%. Conclusion: In adult patients with sickle cell disease, the main tomography findings reflect fibrotic changes. In addition, computed tomography can be helpful in differentiating among haemoglobinopathies. (author)

  13. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Timothy M; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J; Macey, Tara A; Korkola, James E; Koppie, Theresa M; Corless, Christopher L; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient's resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor.

  14. Communication skills and cultural awareness courses for healthcare professionals who care for patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Veronica J; Cohn, Tom

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports a project evaluating the efficacy and impact of a pilot communication skills and cultural awareness course for healthcare professionals who care for patients with sickle cell disease. Poor communication between patients with sickle cell disease and healthcare professionals causes suspicion and mistrust. Many patients feel that they are negatively labelled by the healthcare system and are sceptical of opening themselves to an unsympathetic system. They may therefore appear hostile and aggressive when interacting with healthcare professionals, which in turn leads to distortions and misunderstandings between both groups. The use of good communication skills by healthcare professionals is therefore vital for good healthcare practice. Forty-seven healthcare professionals took part in a series of three pilot courses each lasting 3 days. Healthcare professionals were taught a repertoire of communication skills and cultural awareness strategies to use in challenging situations that arise in their care of sickle cell patients. Expert facilitators used a variety of teaching techniques, such as professionally-made videos, role-play, and group exercises. Participants' confidence in dealing with challenging situations was assessed at baseline, immediately after the intervention, and at 3- and 6-month postintervention. A repeated measures anova revealed a statistically significant increase in confidence from pre- to postcourse scores. Confidence scores further increased from immediately postcourse and 3 months postcourse follow-up. These were then maintained at 6 months postcourse. The overall findings of this local study demonstrated that this type of communication skills and cultural awareness training had a positive and enduring impact on professionals' perceived ability and confidence in communicating with patients with sickle cell disease. Participants attributed this to the learner-centred approach of the course that provided them with the opportunity to

  15. Hospitalist management of vaso-occlusive pain crisis in patients with sickle cell disease using a pathway of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen Liles, Edmund; Kirsch, Jonathan; Gilchrist, Michael; Adem, Mukhtar

    2014-04-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) suffer from intermittent vaso-occlusive pain crises (VOCs). These crises lead to frequent hospitalizations, significant morbidity, and increased mortality risk. Care pathways can enhance efficiency and quality of care. Our study sought to evaluate the development and implementation of a care pathway for patients with SCD experiencing VOCs. The University of North Carolina (UNC) Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program provides all levels of care for a large population of patients with sickle cell anemia. All patients admitted to UNC Hospitals with SCD VOCs from January 2009 through June 2011 were evaluated. During this time period, we also assessed sequential prospective cohorts during progressive phases of developing and implementing a quality improvement and pathway of care program for this patient population in our study. The developed pathway entailed geographic localization for VOC patients, a single group of faculty physicians caring for these patients, and early use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) to achieve pain control. Physicians from the UNC Hospital Medicine Program were responsible for the initiatives. Cohorts were compared to a baseline historical control. Outcomes of interest included patient length of stay (LOS) in the hospital, 30-day readmission rate, need for transfusion, incidence of acute chest syndrome, use of naloxone, and use of PCA. Compared with an historical baseline cohort, the development and implementation of a VOC care pathway for patients with SCD led to reduction in average hospital LOS by 1.44 days (P management of patients with SCD VOCs using a care pathway that emphasizes early, aggressive PCA-based pain control is associated with reduced hospital LOS. The LOS reduction seen in our study is clinically meaningful. Notably, other measures of patient outcomes and quality of care metrics did not change significantly, and some trended towards improvement.

  16. Multiple bone and joint disease in a sickle cell anaemia patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ayodele Olaniyi

    2012-05-01

    Multidisciplinary approach was applied to her management and she was finally discharged home on a wheelchair. This case reflects not only the high susceptibility of SCD patients to infection, but also the morbidity and the attendant complications. It also highlights the need to forestall vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC which often predisposes them to developing osteomyelitis. There is a need to have a highly organized, well-equipped and highly subsidized Sickle Cell and rehabilitation Center in order to further improve the care of SCD patients.

  17. Generation of an integration-free induced pluripotent stem cell line (CSC-43 from a patient with sporadic Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Marote

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line was generated from a 36-year-old patient with sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD. Skin fibroblasts were reprogrammed using the non-integrating Sendai virus technology to deliver OCT3/4, SOX2, c-MYC and KLF4 factors. The generated cell line (CSC-43 exhibits expression of common pluripotency markers, in vitro differentiation into three germ layers and normal karyotype. This iPSC line can be used to study the mechanisms underlying the development of PD.

  18. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line (CSC-42 from a patient with sporadic form of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Savchenko

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Skin fibroblasts were collected from a 44-year-old patient with sporadic case of Parkinson's disease (PD. The non-integrating Sendai virus vector encoding OCT3/4, SOX2, c-MYC and KLF4 was used to reprogram fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. Generated iPSCs had normal karyotypes, expressed common stem cell markers, and were capable of differentiating into all three germ layers. Generated line could be used for PD modeling to understand the mechanisms that influence the disorder.

  19. Differential expression of NK receptors CD94 and NKG2A by T cells in rheumatoid arthritis patients in remission compared to active disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Ceara E

    2011-01-01

    TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have revolutionised the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Natural killer (NK) cells and Natural Killer Cell Receptor+ T (NKT) cells comprise important effector lymphocytes whose activity is tightly regulated through surface NK receptors (NKRs). Dysregulation of NKRs in patients with autoimmune diseases has been shown, however little is known regarding NKRs expression in patients with TNFi-induced remission and in those who maintain remission vs disease flare following TNFi withdrawal.

  20. Natural history of neck disease in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of oropharynx and pharyngolarynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataini, J.P.; Bernier, J.; Brugere, J.; Jaulerry, Ch.; Picco, Ch.; Brunin, F.

    1985-01-01

    1666 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of oropharynx and pharyngolarynx, were evaluated on admission regarding the characteristic metastases patterns to their cervical lymph nodes. Preliminary therapeutic implications are derived from this nodal distribution. Comparisons are established between the 1978 UICC and 1976 AJC classifications, showing a good correlation despite multiple differences in staging criteria. It is shown that assessment combining both the multiplicity and the volume of cervical metastases allows to evaluate more accurately the aggressiveness of the primary. (Auth.)

  1. HCV in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohamed; Hasan, Syed; Castro, Oswaldo; Giday, Samuel; Banks, Alpha; Smoot, Duane

    2003-09-01

    The sickle cell gene is common in the U.S. In fact 8% of African Americans are healthy carriers of the sickle cell trait (HbAS). People who are homozygous (HbSS) have severe disease. They have life-long anemia, chronic hemolysis, and also have at times hematological crises, which can worsen the anemia. Many patients require chronic transfusions and as a result, substantial proportions of sickle cell patients are at high risk for infection with blood-borne diseases-such as Hepatitis C Virus infection (HCV). The HCV antibody positivity is directly related to the number of transfusions given, and on average the prevalence rate in transfused patients is more than 10%. It is known that the combination of iron overload and HCV can lead to a more rapidly progressive liver disease. The treatment of HCV in sickle cell patients poses a challenge to clinicians. A novel approach described by some is the pre-treatment of these patients with hydroxyurea to increase the fetal hemoglobin, therefore decreasing the severity of Ribavirin-related hemolysis. Treatment with Peg-interferon alone has not been used to treat HCV in sickle cell patients, but in the setting of controlled clinical trials it would be feasible. This review explores the impact of HCV in sickle cell patients and the possible therapeutic options available to them.

  2. The Fc Receptor Polymorphisms and Expression of Neutrophil Activation Markers in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease from Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshada K. Kangne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Sickle cell disease has variable clinical manifestations. Activation of neutrophils plays an important role in the initiation and propagation of vaso occlusive crises which can be analysed by determining the expression of neutrophil antigens such as CD16, CD32, and CD62L. The common FcγR polymorphisms (FcγRIIA and FcγRIIIB are considered to influence clinical presentation. This study focuses on distribution of FcγR polymorphisms and their association with neutrophil activity among the patients from western India. Methods. In this paper 127 sickle cell anemia patients and 58 patients with sickle-β-thalassemia (median age 12±8.58 years with variable clinical phenotypes along with 175 normals were investigated. FcγRs polymorphisms were analysed by RFLP and AS-PCR. Activation of neutrophils was measured by flow cytometry. Results. The genotypic frequency of the H/R genotype of FcγRIIA and the NA1/NA1 genotype of FcγRIIIB was significantly decreased in patients compared to normals (P-0.0074, P-0.0471, resp.. We found a significant difference in the expression of CD32 and CD62L among the patients as against normals. A significantly higher expression of CD32 was seen in the milder patients with the H/H genotype (P-0.0231, whereas the expression of CD16 was higher in severe patients with the NA2/NA2 genotype (P-0.0312. Conclusion. The two FcγR polymorphisms had significant association with variable phenotypes of sickle cell disease. The expression of CD62L decreased in our patients indicating activation of neutrophils.

  3. Scintigraphic follow-up of the effects of therapy with hydroxyurea on splenic function in patients with sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Allan [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Campinas State University (UNICAMP), Campinas (Brazil); Servico de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital das Clinicas da UNICAMP, Campina (Brazil); Pinheiro, Vitoria; Anjos, Ana Claudia; Brandalise, Silvia [Centro Infantil Domingos A. Boldrini, Campinas (Brazil); Fahel, Fernanda; Lima, Mariana; Etchebehere, Elba; Ramos, Celso; Camargo, Edwaldo E. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Campinas State University (UNICAMP), Campinas (Brazil)

    2002-04-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) may develop functional asplenia as a chronic complication, secondary to repeated episodes of polymerisation of haemoglobin S. It is known that increased plasma concentrations of fetal haemoglobin (HbF) reduce the polymerisation of haemoglobin S. Hydroxyurea is a chemotherapeutic agent capable of increasing HbF levels in the red blood cells and its use has recently been proposed in the treatment of SCD. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term therapy with hydroxyurea on recovery of splenic function. Twenty-one patients (aged 3-22 years; 14 with SS haemoglobinopathy, 7 with S{beta}{sup 0} haemoglobinopathy) were studied with liver/spleen scintigraphy before and after 6 and 12 months of treatment. All studies were submitted to visual inspection and semi-quantitative analyses using spleen/liver ratios. Imaging prior to treatment demonstrated functional asplenia in nine SS patients and one S{beta}{sup 0} patient and impaired splenic function in five SS patients and six S{beta}{sup 0} patients. After treatment, splenic function improved in ten patients, remained unchanged in eight and worsened in three. Using liver/spleen imaging, it was possible to demonstrate that hydroxyurea is capable of improving splenic function in some SCD patients. Improvement is not always possible and frequently does not lead to a normal splenic function even after 1 year of treatment. (orig.)

  4. Traumatic Exposure History as a Risk Factor for Chronic Pain in Adult Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Works, Teresa; Jones, Sasia; Grady, James; Andemariam, Biree

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the impact of the integration of a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) with expertise in behavioral health on identification of risk factors for chronic pain in a cohort of adults with sickle cell disease. Authors conducted a retrospective chart review of all visits to the adult sickle cell center during the first six months of LCSW integration. Demographics, clinical history, and LCSW notes were reviewed. Overall, 71 patients were introduced to the LCSW; 55 percent of them had chronic pain. Patients with chronic pain were older, used opioids daily, took hydroxyurea, reported higher daily pain scores, and underwent more acute care visits and hospitalizations for pain with longer stays. Fifty-eight (81 percent) patients requested concrete social work services such as transportation and housing. Thirty-two patients (55 percent) expressed a desire for mental health counseling while receiving concrete services. Twenty-two (69 percent) of these patients self-disclosed at least one traumatic experience. In fact, a statistically significant relationship between chronic pain and a history of trauma was identified (p = 0.001). Results suggest that sickle cell patients should receive clinical social work services to assess for traumatic exposures that may influence chronic pain.

  5. Interventions for patients and caregivers to improve knowledge of sickle cell disease and recognition of its related complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnani, Monika R; Quimby, Kim R; Bennett, Nadia R; Francis, Damian K

    2016-10-06

    Sickle cell disease is a group of genetic diseases which is especially prevalent in tropical and subtropical regions; however, forced migration and ongoing population movement have spread it throughout the world, with estimated birth rates reaching 0.49 per 1000 in the Americas, 0.07 per 1000 in Europe, 0.68 per 1000 in South and Southeast Asia, and 10.68 per 1000 in Africa. Life for individuals with sickle cell disease can be affected by repeated acute complications and compounded by progressive organ damage. Studies reveal that when people with chronic illness learn self-management, their clinical outcomes and quality of life improves; and they show lower dependence on healthcare services. There are, however, no reviews identifying which interventions improve knowledge and little is known about the impact of patient or care-giver knowledge on clinical and psychosocial outcomes in people with sickle cell disease. 1. To determine the effectiveness of patient- and caregiver-centred educational interventions for changing knowledge and understanding of sickle cell disease among patients as well as caregivers of people with the disease.2. To assess the effectiveness and safety of patient- and caregiver-centred educational interventions and programs for the recognition of signs and symptoms of disease-related morbidity, adherence to treatment and healthcare utilization in patients with sickle cell disease. The authors searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. Additional trials were sought from the reference lists of the trials and reviews identified by the search strategy.Date of last search: 11 April 2016. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials which evaluate the effectiveness of individual- and group-based interventions for either the patient with sickle cell disease or their caregivers, or both

  6. Sickle Cell Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease, such as hemoglobin SC disease or sickle beta thalassemia . How Is Sickle Cell Disease Diagnosed? Sickle cell ... Test: Hemoglobin Electrophoresis Prenatal Genetic Counseling Genetic Testing Beta Thalassemia Sickle Cell Disease The Truth About Transfusions About ...

  7. What is Sickle Cell Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Congenital Anemias Including Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) and Beta-Thalassemia. Are you an adult with sickle cell disease ... Severe Congenital Anemias Including Sickle Cell Disease and Beta-Thalassemia. Are you 16 or older with sickle cell ...

  8. Quantitation of cell-associated borrelial DNA in the blood of Lyme disease patients with erythema migrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liveris, D; Schwartz, I; McKenna, D; Nowakowski, J; Nadelman, R B; DeMarco, J; Iyer, R; Cox, M E; Holmgren, D; Wormser, G P

    2012-05-01

    Bloodstream invasion is an important event in the pathogenesis of the more serious manifestations of Lyme disease. The number of spirochetes in the blood of infected patients, however, has not been determined, and, therefore, it is unknown whether the number of spirochetes can be correlated with particular clinical or laboratory features. This study was designed to measure the level of Borrelia burgdorferi in the plasma of Lyme disease patients and correlate these levels with selected clinical and laboratory findings. Nested and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was employed to detect cell-associated flaB gene DNA in the plasma of untreated early Lyme disease patients with erythema migrans (EM). Twenty-nine (45.3%) of 64 patients had evidence of B. burgdorferi in their plasma by at least one of the PCR methods. For the 22 qPCR-positive patients, the mean number of flaB gene copies per mL of plasma was 4,660, with a range of 414 to 56,000. The number of flaB gene copies did not significantly correlate with any of the clinical, demographic, or laboratory variables assessed. For reasons discussed, we suggest caution in extrapolating an estimate of the number of viable Borrelia in plasma from the observed number of flaB copies.

  9. Mast cell activation disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Blood basophils also participate in allergic and other inflammatory reactions in the same way as mast cells.4. The capacity of mast cells and basophil to release mediators of anaphylaxis in response to cell activation, also termed releasability, depends on a number of different factors, including the primary underlying disease ...

  10. Copper induces hepatocyte injury due to the endoplasmic reticulum stress in cultured cells and patients with Wilson disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oe, Shinji, E-mail: ooes@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Miyagawa, Koichiro, E-mail: koichiro@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Honma, Yuichi, E-mail: y-homma@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Harada, Masaru, E-mail: msrharada@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp

    2016-09-10

    Copper is an essential trace element, however, excess copper is harmful to human health. Excess copper-derived oxidants contribute to the progression of Wilson disease, and oxidative stress induces accumulation of abnormal proteins. It is known that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays an important role in proper protein folding, and that accumulation of misfolded proteins disturbs ER homeostasis resulting in ER stress. However, copper-induced ER homeostasis disturbance has not been fully clarified. We treated human hepatoma cell line (Huh7) and immortalized-human hepatocyte cell line (OUMS29) with copper and chemical chaperones, including 4-phenylbutyrate and ursodeoxycholic acid. We examined copper-induced oxidative stress, ER stress and apoptosis by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analyses. Furthermore, we examined the effects of copper on carcinogenesis. Excess copper induced not only oxidative stress but also ER stress. Furthermore, excess copper induced DNA damage and reduced cell proliferation. Chemical chaperones reduced this copper-induced hepatotoxicity. Excess copper induced hepatotoxicity via ER stress. We also confirmed the abnormality of ultra-structure of the ER of hepatocytes in patients with Wilson disease. These findings show that ER stress plays a pivotal role in Wilson disease, and suggests that chemical chaperones may have beneficial effects in the treatment of Wilson disease.

  11. Copper induces hepatocyte injury due to the endoplasmic reticulum stress in cultured cells and patients with Wilson disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oe, Shinji; Miyagawa, Koichiro; Honma, Yuichi; Harada, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace element, however, excess copper is harmful to human health. Excess copper-derived oxidants contribute to the progression of Wilson disease, and oxidative stress induces accumulation of abnormal proteins. It is known that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays an important role in proper protein folding, and that accumulation of misfolded proteins disturbs ER homeostasis resulting in ER stress. However, copper-induced ER homeostasis disturbance has not been fully clarified. We treated human hepatoma cell line (Huh7) and immortalized-human hepatocyte cell line (OUMS29) with copper and chemical chaperones, including 4-phenylbutyrate and ursodeoxycholic acid. We examined copper-induced oxidative stress, ER stress and apoptosis by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analyses. Furthermore, we examined the effects of copper on carcinogenesis. Excess copper induced not only oxidative stress but also ER stress. Furthermore, excess copper induced DNA damage and reduced cell proliferation. Chemical chaperones reduced this copper-induced hepatotoxicity. Excess copper induced hepatotoxicity via ER stress. We also confirmed the abnormality of ultra-structure of the ER of hepatocytes in patients with Wilson disease. These findings show that ER stress plays a pivotal role in Wilson disease, and suggests that chemical chaperones may have beneficial effects in the treatment of Wilson disease.

  12. [Adhesion molecules and mononuclear cell subpopulations in the coronary and pulmonary arteries of patients with coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumachenko, P V; Ivanova, A G; Belokon, E V; Akchurin, R S

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactor disease, in which dysfunction of the endothelium leads to the emergence of its adhesion molecules. to investigate the expression of the endothelial adhesion molecules PECAM (CD31), ICAM, and VCAM, as well as adherent endothelial T cells and monocytes. The material examined was en face pulmonary and coronary artery samples taken during autopsies (10 men), and en face specimens obtained from the coronary artery fragments taken from coronary heart disease patients during endarterectomy (37 men). This investigation used antibodies to the adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and PECAM and those to CD3, CD4, CD8 T-cells and CD68 monocytes. The endothelial cells in the atherosclerotically intact coronary arteries had an elongated shape and were aligned along the blood flow. Those located above atheromas and fibroatheromas changed their shape from elongated to polygonal. Above the fatty streaks and atheromas, the reaction with antibodies to CD31 antigens became weaker at the edge of endothelial cells and disappeared in places. While the atherosclerotic process progressed, the reaction with the CD31 antigen at the edge of endothelial cells was similar in intensity to that on the surface of the endothelium. Adhesion of T cells and monocytes to the endothelium of coronary arteries increased as the atherosclerotic vascular process progressed. T cells and monocytes more often adhered to the endothelium at the sites where the endothelial cells contacted each other. Heterogeneity was found in the endothelial cells: their shape, the expression of adhesion molecules, and the adhesion of lymphocytes and monocytes to them changed during the progression of the atherosclerotic process.

  13. Interim assessment of liver damage in patients with sickle cell disease using new non-invasive techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drasar, Emma; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Gardner, Kate; Awogbade, Moji; Dhawan, Anil; Bomford, Adrian; Suddle, Abid; Thein, Swee Lay

    2016-01-01

    We explored transient elastography (TE) and enhanced liver fibrosis (ELF™) score with standard markers of liver function to assess liver damage in 193 well patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Patients with HbSS or HbSβ0 thalassaemia (sickle cell anaemia, SCA; N=134), had significantly higher TE results and ELF scores than those with HbSC (N=49) disease (TE, 6.8 vs 5.3, p<0.0001 and ELF, 9.2 vs 8.6 p <0.0001). In SCA patients, TE and ELF correlated significantly with age and all serum liver function tests (LFTs). Additionally, (weak) positive correlation was found with lactate dehydrogenase (TE: r = 0.24, p=0.004; ELF: r = 0.26 p=0.002), and (weak) negative correlation with haemoglobin (TE: r= −0.25, p=0.002; ELF: r = −0.25 p=0.004). In HbSC patients, correlations were weaker or not significant between TE or ELF, and serum LFTs. All markers of iron loading correlated with TE values when corrected for sickle genotype (serum ferritin, β = 0.25, p <0.0001, total blood transfusion units, β = 0.25, p <0.0001 and LIC β = 0.32, p=0.046). The exploratory study suggests that, while TE could have a role, the utility of ELF score in monitoring liver damage in SCD, needs further longitudinal studies. PMID:27984631

  14. Brief Report: Elevated Red Cell Distribution Width Identifies Elevated Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Patients With HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Kim, Chang H; Morris, Stephen R; Freeman, Michael L; Funderburg, Nicholas T; Rodriguez, Benigno; McComsey, Grace A; Dalton, Jarrod E; Simon, Daniel I; Lederman, Michael M; Longenecker, Chris T; Zidar, David A

    2017-03-01

    Red cell distribution width (RDW) is linked to cardiovascular risk in the general population, an association that might be driven by inflammation. Whether this relationship holds for patients with HIV infection has not been previously studied. Using a large clinical registry, we show that elevated RDW (>14.5%) is independently associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease {odds ratio [OR] 1.39 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.25 to 1.55]}, peripheral vascular disease [OR 1.41 (95% CI: 1.29 to 1.53)], myocardial infarction [1.43 (95% CI: 1.25 to 1.63)], heart failure [OR 2.23 (95% CI: 1.99 to 2.49)], and atrial fibrillation [OR 1.96 (95% CI: 1.64 to 2.33)]. In conclusion, in the context of the inflammatory milieu that accompanies HIV infection, RDW remains a powerful marker of cardiovascular disease.

  15. Trehalose reverses cell malfunction in fibroblasts from normal and Huntington's disease patients caused by proteosome inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angeles Fernandez-Estevez

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor, cognitive and psychiatric deficits, associated with predominant loss of striatal neurons and is caused by polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein. Mutant huntingtin protein and its fragments are resistant to protein degradation and produce a blockade of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS. In HD models, the proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin aggravates protein accumulation and the inductor of autophagy, trehalose, diminishes it. We have investigated the effects of epoxomicin and trehalose in skin fibroblasts of control and HD patients. Untreated HD fibroblasts have increased the levels of ubiquitinized proteins and higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, huntingtin and the autophagy marker LAMP2A. Baseline replication rates were higher in HD than in controls fibroblasts but that was reverted after 12 passages. Epoxomicin increases the activated caspase-3, HSP70, huntingtin, ubiquitinated proteins and ROS levels in both HD and controls. Treatment with trehalose counteracts the increase in ROS, ubiquitinated proteins, huntingtin and activated caspase-3 levels induced by epoxomicin, and also increases the LC3 levels more in HD fibroblast than controls. These results suggest that trehalose could revert protein processing abnormalities in patients with Huntington's Disease.

  16. Monocyte/macrophage and T-cell infiltrates in peritoneum of patients with ovarian cancer or benign pelvic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Qing

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously showed that tumor-free peritoneum of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC exhibited enhanced expression of several inflammatory response genes compared to peritoneum of benign disease. Here, we examined peritoneal inflammatory cell patterns to determine their concordance with selected enhanced genes. Methods Expression patterns of selected inflammatory genes were mined from our previously published data base. Bilateral pelvic peritoneal and subjacent stromal specimens were obtained from 20 women with EOC and 7 women with benign pelvic conditions. Sections were first stained by indirect immunoperoxidase and numbers of monocytes/macrophages (MO/MA, T cells, B cells, and NK cells counted. Proportions of CD68+ cells and CD3+ cells that coexpressed MO/MA differentiation factors (CD163, CCR1, CXCR8, VCAM1, and phosphorylated cytosolic phospholipase A2 [pcPLA2], which had demonstrated expression in EOC peritoneal samples, were determined by multicolor immunofluorescence. Results MO/MA were present on both sides of the pelvic peritoneum in EOC patients, with infiltration of the subjacent stroma and mesothelium. CD68+ MO/MA, the most commonly represented population, and CD3+ T cells were present more often in EOC than in benign pelvic tumors. NK cells, B cells, and granulocytes were rare. CXCL8 (IL-8 and the chemokine receptor CCR1 were coexpressed more frequently on MO/MA than on CD3+ cells contrasting with CD68+/CD163+ cells that coexpressed CXCL8 less often. An important activated enzyme in the eicosanoid pathway, pcPLA2, was highly expressed on both CD68+ and CD163+ cells. The adherence molecule Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM1 was expressed on CD31+ endothelial cells and on a proportion of CD68+ MO/MA but rarely on CD3+ cells. Conclusion The pelvic peritoneum in EOC exhibits a general pattern of chronic inflammation, represented primarily by differentiated MO/MA, and distinct from that in benign

  17. Effectiveness of surgical revascularization for stroke prevention in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease and moyamoya syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wuyang; Xu, Risheng; Porras, Jose L; Takemoto, Clifford M; Khalid, Syed; Garzon-Muvdi, Tomas; Caplan, Justin M; Colby, Geoffrey P; Coon, Alexander L; Tamargo, Rafael J; Huang, Judy; Ahn, Edward S

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Sickle cell disease (SCD) in combination with moyamoya syndrome (MMS) represents a rare complication of SCD, with potentially devastating neurological outcomes. The effectiveness of surgical revascularization in this patient population is currently unclear. The authors' aim was to determine the effectiveness of surgical intervention in their series of SCD-MMS patients by comparing stroke recurrence in those undergoing revascularization and those undergoing conservative transfusion therapy. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients with MMS who were seen at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institution between 1990 and 2013. Pediatric patients (age < 18 years) with confirmed diagnoses of SCD and MMS were included. Intracranial stroke occurrence during the follow-up period was compared between surgically and conservatively managed patients. RESULTS A total of 15 pediatric SCD-MMS patients (28 affected hemispheres) were included in this study, and all were African American. Seven patients (12 hemispheres) were treated with indirect surgical revascularization. The average age at MMS diagnosis was 9.0 ± 4.0 years, and 9 patients (60.0%) were female. Fourteen patients (93.3%) had strokes before diagnosis of MMS, with an average age at first stroke of 6.6 ± 3.9 years. During an average follow-up period of 11.6 years, 4 patients in the conservative treatment group experienced strokes in 5 hemispheres, whereas no patient undergoing the revascularization procedure had any strokes at follow-up (p = 0.029). Three patients experienced immediate postoperative transient ischemic attacks, but all recovered without subsequent strokes. CONCLUSIONS Indirect revascularization is suggested as a safe and effective alternative to the best medical therapy alone in patients with SCD-MMS. High-risk patients managed on a regimen of chronic transfusion should be considered for indirect revascularization to maximize the effect of stroke prevention.

  18. Differences in pain management between hematologists and hospitalists caring for patients with sickle cell disease hospitalized for vasoocclusive crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirmish; Rollins, Margo; Landi, Daniel; Shah, Radhika; Bae, Jonathan; De Castro, Laura M

    2014-03-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a chronic disease characterized by multiple vaso-occlusive complications and is increasingly cared for by hospitalists. The purpose of this study is to examine differences in pain management between hematologists and hospitalists. We performed a single-institution, retrospective review of pain management patterns and outcomes in adult SCD patients hospitalized for vaso-occlusive crisis. Over 26 months, we found a total of 298 patients (120 cared for by the hematologists and 178 by hospitalists), with a mean age of 32 (range 19-58). Patients cared for by hospitalists had a lower total number of hours on a patient controlled analgesia (PCA) device (171 vs. 212 hours, P=0.11). Hospitalists also were significantly more likely to utilize demand only PCA (42% vs. 23%, P=0.002) and had a significantly lower rate of using both continuous and demand PCA (54% vs. 67%, P=0.04). In addition, patients cared for by hospitalists had a significantly shorter hospitalization (8.4 days) compared to hematologists (10 days, P=0.04) with a non-significant difference in 7 and 30 day readmission rates (7.2% vs. 6.7% and 40% vs. 35% respectively). We found patients cared for by hospitalists more frequently utilized home oral pain medication during admission, had shorter lengths of hospitalization, and did not have a significant increase in readmission rates.

  19. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation in patients with decompensated alcoholic liver disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Spahr

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Impaired liver regeneration is associated with a poor outcome in patients with decompensated alcoholic liver disease (ALD. We assessed whether autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation (BMMCT improved liver function in decompensated ALD. DESIGN: 58 patients (mean age 54 yrs; mean MELD score 19, all with cirrhosis, 81% with alcoholic steatohepatitis at baseline liver biopsy were randomized early after hospital admission to standard medical therapy (SMT alone (n = 30, including steroids in patients with a Maddrey's score ≥32, or combined with G-CSF injections and autologous BMMCT into the hepatic artery (n = 28. Bone marrow cells were harvested, isolated and reinfused the same day. The primary endpoint was a ≥3 points decrease in the MELD score at 3 months, corresponding to a clinically relevant improvement in liver function. Liver biopsy was repeated at week 4 to assess changes in Ki67+/CK7+ hepatic progenitor cells (HPC compartment. RESULTS: Both study groups were comparable at baseline. After 3 months, 2 and 4 patients died in the BMMCT and SMT groups, respectively. Adverse events were equally distributed between groups. Moderate alcohol relapse occurred in 31% of patients. The MELD score improved in parallel in both groups during follow-up with 18 patients (64% from the BMMCT group and 18 patients (53% from the SMT group reaching the primary endpoint (p = 0.43 (OR 1.6, CI 0.49-5.4 in an intention to treat analysis. Comparing liver biopsy at 4 weeks to baseline, steatosis improved (p<0.001, and proliferating HPC tended to decrease in both groups (-35 and -33%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Autologous BMMCT, compared to SMT is a safe procedure but did not result in an expanded HPC compartment or improved liver function. These data suggest either insufficient regenerative stimulation after BMMCT or resistance to liver regenerative drive in patients with decompensated alcoholic cirrhosis. TRIAL REGISTRATION

  20. Atypical hodgkin and reed-sternberg cells in peripheral blood of a patient with advanced stage of Hodgkin's disease - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Rajko

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of abnormal Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg cells in the peripheral blood in a patient suffering from Hodgkin's disease has been noticed exceptionally rare in a previous period, and especially rare in last ten years primarily due to successfull treatment of this disease. The presence of atypical mononuclear cells in peripheral blood which cytomorphologically resembled Reed-Sternberg cells was registered in 8 patients till 1966. During the last decade, the presence of atypical mononuclear cells in the peripheral blood was used for their isolation cultivation, and detailed immunophenotypic and genetic analysis. The analysis of mononuclear cells in rare patients with Hodgkin's disease was established that they belong to the B-lymphoid cells with expression of CD30 and CD15 antigens. The examination of presence of Hodgkin's cells in the peripheral blood of patients with Hodgkin's disease is important for patients with advanced stage of the disease in which autologous stem cell transplantation and high dose chmeotherapy is planned. The authors present a 33-year-old patient, who noticed enlarged neck lymph nodes in September 2000, high temperature and loss in weight. On physical examination enlarged neck lymph nodes 5x8 cm and hepatosplenomegaly were found. There was anemia and thrombo-cytopenia, and normal WBC count with 24% of lymphoid elements in differential formula. On histologic examination of lymph nodes Hodgkin¢s disease, type nodular sclerosis with mixed cellularity was found. Histology of bone marrow showed nodal lymphomatous infiltration. Immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies of concentrate of peripheral blood cells showed expression of CD30+ and CD15+, immunophenotypically and morphologically matching Reed-Sternberg cells. Cytogentic analysis of mononuclear cells of the bone marrow showed normal karyotype. The patient was in clinical stage IV/V of the disease and chemotherapy with 9 cycles of ABVD+Mp protocol was

  1. Calcitonin stimulation tests for the early diagnosis and follow-up of patients with C cell disease: a descriptive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainas, I; Marthopoulos, A; Chrisoulidou, A; Raptou, K; Tziomalos, K; Pazaitou-Panayiotou, K

    2013-07-01

    Residual or recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) after thyroidectomy is diagnosed by elevated serum calcitonin (CT) levels. However, in minimal residual MTC or C-cell hyperplasia (CCH), where imaging studies are often negative, basal CT levels are frequently normal and CT stimulation tests are required. We aimed to compare CT stimulation tests with calcium, pentagastrin and their combination in identifying minimal residual MTC and CCH. We studied 10 post-thyroidectomy patients with MTC and 20 first-degree relatives of the patients who had no clinically apparent MTC. We performed 54 combined (calcium plus pentagastrin) stimulation tests, 35 calcium stimulation tests and 26 pentagastrin stimulation tests. Basal CT levels were abnormal (≥500 pg/ml) in 4 patients with apparent metastatic disease (Group 1A) and in 2 patients with minimal residual disease (Group 1B) but were normal (0-300 pg/ml) in 4 patients with no residual disease (Group 1C) and in the relatives (Group 2). In Groups 1A, 1B and 1C, maximal elevation in CT levels was greater after the combined stimulation test than after calcium or pentagastrin tests. The combined stimulation test induced the greatest increases (920, 700 and 706 pg/ml, respectively) in 3 relatives (Group 2); CCH was confirmed histologically in these patients. Side-effects were mild, short-lasting and of similar intensity and duration during all tests. Patients with subclinical MTC (minimal residual or recurrent MTC) or their relatives (with CCH) usually have normal basal CT levels and stimulation tests are necessary. Combined test represents the most sensitive and safe stimulation test for the diagnosis of subclinical hypercalcitonemia.

  2. Stem cell treatment for patients with autoimmune disease by systemic infusion of culture-expanded autologous adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ra Jeong Chan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prolonged life expectancy, life style and environmental changes have caused a changing disease pattern in developed countries towards an increase of degenerative and autoimmune diseases. Stem cells have become a promising tool for their treatment by promoting tissue repair and protection from immune-attack associated damage. Patient-derived autologous stem cells present a safe option for this treatment since these will not induce immune rejection and thus multiple treatments are possible without any risk for allogenic sensitization, which may arise from allogenic stem cell transplantations. Here we report the outcome of treatments with culture expanded human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSCs of 10 patients with autoimmune associated tissue damage and exhausted therapeutic options, including autoimmune hearing loss, multiple sclerosis, polymyotitis, atopic dermatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. For treatment, we developed a standardized culture-expansion protocol for hAdMSCs from minimal amounts of fat tissue, providing sufficient number of cells for repetitive injections. High expansion efficiencies were routinely achieved from autoimmune patients and from elderly donors without measurable loss in safety profile, genetic stability, vitality and differentiation potency, migration and homing characteristics. Although the conclusions that can be drawn from the compassionate use treatments in terms of therapeutic efficacy are only preliminary, the data provide convincing evidence for safety and therapeutic properties of systemically administered AdMSC in human patients with no other treatment options. The authors believe that ex-vivo-expanded autologous AdMSCs provide a promising alternative for treating autoimmune diseases. Further clinical studies are needed that take into account the results obtained from case studies as those presented here.

  3. Managing sickle cell disease

    OpenAIRE

    Claster, Susan; Vichinsky, Elliott P

    2003-01-01

    Advances are being made in the management of sickle cell disease for all age groups. This review discusses the progress in amelioration of symptoms, problems unique to particular age groups, and the types of drugs and treatments currently under investigation

  4. CD209-336A/G promotor polymorphism and its clinical associations in sickle cell disease Egyptian Pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Rasha Abdel-Raouf; Kamal, Dina; Sayed, Riham El; Ekladious, Sherif M M; Shaheen, Gehan H; Yousry, Sherif M; Hussein, Rania Elsayed

    2017-10-26

    To detect the frequency of CD209 A>G polymorphism in sickle cell disease (SCD) Egyptian patients and to evaluate the use of CD209 A>G polymorphism as a genetic predictor of SCD clinical heterogeneity. A total of 100 Egyptian children with SCD and 100 Egyptian controls were tested for CD209 A>G polymorphism and were followed up prospectively between June 2012 and December 2014. Comparison of CD209 A>G polymorphism among cases and controls did not show statistically significant difference (p = .742). In addition, comparison of the allelic frequency did not show statistically significant difference (p = .738). Infections occurred more frequently among the heterozygous genotype (AG; 60.5%) and homozygous genotype (GG; 75%) patients than among the wild (AA) genotype (24.1%; p G polymorphism. Infections occurred more frequently among the heterozygous genotype (AG) and homozygous genotype (GG) patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Muscle cramps and neuropathies in patients with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Peter D; Wolff, Daniel; Grauer, Oliver; Angstwurm, Klemens; Jarius, Sven; Wandinger, Klaus P; Holler, Ernst; Schulte-Mattler, Wilhelm; Kleiter, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is an immune-mediated multisystemic disorder and the leading cause of morbidity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Peripheral nervous system manifestations of GVHD are rare but often disabling. Whereas immune-mediated neuropathies are an established feature of GVHD, muscle cramps are not well characterized. In a single-centre retrospective cohort we studied 27 patients (age 23 to 69 years) with GVHD (acute n = 6, chronic n = 21) who complained of symptoms suggestive of peripheral nervous system complications. Clinical, laboratory and neurophysiological findings were evaluated by descriptive statistics and regression analysis to detect factors associated with muscle cramps. Patient's sera were examined for anti-neuronal antibodies. Nine patients had polyneuropathy, 4 had muscle cramps, and 14 had both. Median onset of polyneuropathy and muscle cramps was 6 and 9 months after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, respectively. Neurophysiology revealed a predominantly axonal polyneuropathy in 20 of 26 patients. In 4 of 19 patients electromyography showed signs of myopathy or myositis. Muscle cramps were more frequent during chronic than acute GVHD and affected muscles other than calves in 15 of 18 patients. They typically occurred daily, lasted 1 to 10 minutes with medium to severe pain intensity, compromised daily activity or sleep in 12, and were refractory to therapy in 4 patients. Muscle cramps were less likely with tacrolimus treatment and signs of severe polyneuropathy, but more likely with myopathic changes in electromyography and with incipient demyelinating polyneuropathy, shown by increased high frequency attenuation of the tibial nerve. Serological studies revealed antinuclear or antimitochondrial antibodies in a subset of patients. Two of 16 patients had a serum reactivity against peripheral nervous tissue. Muscle cramps are associated with chronic GVHD, often compromise daily

  6. Early recovery of circulating immature B cells in B-lymphoblastic leukemia patients after CD19 targeted CAR T cell therapy: A pitfall for minimal residual disease detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wenbin; Salem, Dalia; McCoy, Catharine S; Lee, Daniel; Shah, Nirali N; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Yuan, Constance M

    2017-09-09

    CD19-targeted chimeric-antigen receptor-modified T-cells (CAR-T) are promising in the treatment of refractory B-lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Minimal residual disease (MRD) detection by multicolor flow cytometry (FCM) is critical to distinguish B-ALL MRD from regenerating, non-neoplastic B-cell populations. FCM was performed on samples from 9 patients with B-ALL treated with CAR-T. All 9 patients showed response to CAR-T. Additionally, FCM revealed circulating CD10 + B cells, potentially mimicking MRD. Circulating CD10+ B-cells were detected in blood from 3 days to 3 months after CAR-T, comprising 73% (median) of B-cells (52-83%, 95%CI). They expressed CD19, CD10, CD20, bright CD9, CD22, CD24, moderate CD38 and dim CD58, but were CD34 (-), with bright CD45 and polyclonal surface light chain immunoglobulin (sIg) expression. A similar CD10 + B-cell subpopulation was detected by marrow FCM, amidst abundant B-cell precursors. These circulating CD10 + B-cells are compatible with immature B-cells, and are a reflection of B-cell recovery within the marrow. They are immunophenotypically distinguishable from residual B-ALL. Expression of light chain sIg and key surface antigens characterizing regenerating B-cell precursors can distinguish immature B-cells from B-ALL MRD and prevent misdiagnosis. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  7. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoga Yuniadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4±7.40 yo preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5±4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87±0.41, 0.63±0.66, 99.00±2.60, and 3.22±3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22±5.68 versus 26.8±7.93, p<0.001 during short and long term observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity.

  8. Constitutive STAT3 activation in intestinal T cells from patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lovato, Paola; Brender, Christine; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Via cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways, cytokines induce a variety of biological responses and modulate the outcome of inflammatory diseases and malignancies. Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. Perturbation of the intestinal cytokine homeostasis is ...

  9. The Impact of Coexisting Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Tuberculosis on Survival in Patients with Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yang Huang

    Full Text Available Pulmonary diseases [asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and tuberculosis (TB] are associated with lung cancer mortality. However, the relationship between coexisting pulmonary diseases and survival in patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC has not been well defined.Patients newly diagnosed with SqCC between 2003 and 2008 were identified by linking the National Health Insurance Research Database and Taiwan Cancer Registry Database. Cases with SqCC were followed up until death, loss to follow-up, or study end in 2010. Information on health status, date of death and the main causes of death was ascertained from the National Death Registry Database. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR of coexisting asthma, COPD and/or TB.During the study period, a total of 5406 cases with SqCC were enrolled. For all cause-mortality, HRs were 1.08 [95% confidence interval (CI, 0.99-1.18], 1.04 (95% CI, 0.97-1.12, and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.00-1.31 for individuals with asthma, COPD, and TB, respectively. Specifically, among men with coexisting pulmonary diseases, the HRs were 1.56 (95% CI, 1.23-1.97 and 1.11 (95% CI, 1.00-1.24 for individuals with asthma+COPD+TB and asthma+COPD, respectively. Among male patients with stage III SqCC, HRs were 3.41 (95%CI, 1.27-9.17 and 1.65 (95%CI, 1.10-2.47 for individuals with asthma+TB and asthma+COPD+TB, respectively. Among male patients with stage IV SqCC, HRs were 1.40 (95%CI, 1.00-1.97 and 1.25 (95%CI, 1.03-1.52 for individuals with asthma+ COPD+TB and asthma. Among female patients with stage I and II, HR was 0.19 (95%CI, 005-0.77 for individuals with asthma.Coexisting pulmonary diseases increased the risk of mortality from SqCC in male patients. For female patients with early stage SqCC, pre-existing asthma decreased mortality. These patients deserve greater attention while undergoing cancer treatment.

  10. Patent Foramen Ovale in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease and Stroke: Case Presentations and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Razdan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD are at increased risk for stroke, the underlying pathophysiology is incompletely understood. Intracardiac shunting via a patent foramen ovale (PFO is associated with cryptogenic stroke in individuals without SCD. Recent evidence suggests that PFOs are associated with stroke in children with SCD, although the role of PFOs in adults with stroke and SCD is unknown. Here, we report 2 young adults with SCD, stroke, and PFOs. The first patient had hemoglobin SC and presented with a transient ischemic attack and a subsequent ischemic stroke. There was no evidence of cerebral vascular disease on imaging studies and the PFO was closed. The second patient had hemoglobin SS and two acute ischemic strokes. She had cerebral vascular disease with moyamoya in addition to a peripheral deep venous thrombosis (DVT. Chronic transfusion therapy was recommended, and the DVT was managed with warfarin. The PFO was not closed, and the patients' neurologic symptoms were stabilized. We review the literature on PFOs and stroke in SCD. Our cases and the literature review illustrate the dire need for further research to evaluate PFO as a potential risk factor for stroke in adults with SCD.

  11. Effective vitamin B12 treatment can reduce serum antigastric parietal cell antibody titer in patients with oral mucosal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Andy; Chang, Julia Yu-Fong; Wang, Yi-Ping; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2016-10-01

    Patients with serum antigastric parietal cell antibody (GPCA) positivity may have vitamin B12 deficiency and some oral symptoms. This study assessed the changes of serum GPCA titer in GPCA-positive patients after effective vitamin B12 treatment. Two hundred and ten GPCA-positive oral mucosal disease patients became oral symptom free (complete response) after 1.0-67.1 months of treatment with regular and continuous intramuscular injection of vitamin B12 once per week. The changes of serum GPCA titers after treatment were evaluated in these 210 patients. We found a significant drop of the GPCA positive rate from 100% to 42.9% in our 210 complete response patients after effective vitamin B12 treatment (p vitamin BC capsules (containing 10 μg of vitamin B12) plus deficient hematinic supplements per day after a follow-up period of 2.7-27 months. A maintenance vitamin B12 treatment once a month could retain the GPCA-negative status in 87% of treated-to GPCA-negative patients compared with those (10%) without further maintenance vitamin B12 treatment. Regular and continuous effective vitamin B12 treatment can reduce the relatively higher serum GPCA titers to significantly lower or undetectable levels in GPCA-positive patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis in adult patients--a disease with many faces. Experience of a centre and an overview of the disease symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Z; Pour, L; Krejcí, M; Neubauer, J; Vanícek, J; Vasků, V; Hájek, R

    2008-11-01

    Over a period of 18 years, 17 patients with proven Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) were treated at the Haematological Clinic in Brno. In 13 of them, the disease was diagnosed at adult age, and 4 patients were referred to the centre with LCH diagnosed at early child age. One of these 4 patients suffered from repeated recurrences of the disease at adult age and was diagnosed with progressive neurodegenerative damage of the CNS at the age of 25 which in its terminal phase resulted in the patient's immobility, loss of sphincter control, incapacity to communicate and death at the age of 32. LCH was diagnosed at adult age in 13 patients. The form with primary bone involvement was detected in 8 out of 13 patients (62%). Only 2 of 13 patients (15%) had multiple bone lesions upon diagnosis, the remaining 6 patients (46%) had only one lesion at the time of diagnosis. Repeated recurrence of bone involvement was only recorded in 3 out of 13 patients (23%). The combination of recurrent bone involvement and the development of lung affection (dyspnoea, irritating cough, nodularities and cysts in HRCT images) were documented in 2 out of 13 patients (15%). One of the patients diagnosed with LCH at the age of37 had repeated recurrence of bone involvement, which was also treated by 2 cycles of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous transplantation. He died of bronchopneumonia due to the affection of the lungs by LCH at 48 years of age. Primary extraoseal (extamedular) involvement was diagnosed in 5 out of 13 patients (38%) (mandibular gum infiltration, single cervical node infiltration, hand skin infiltration, infiltration of the perineal region and infiltration of the hypophysial infundibular and primary lung form of LCH). In the 1st case, excision was the solution applied to the infiltration of the lingual side ofthe gums, without further recurrence. In the 2nd case, the infiltrated region of skin over the metacarpophalangeal joint was irradiated and the infiltration disappeared

  13. Utility of Iron Staining in Identifying the Cause of Renal Allograft Dysfunction in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingchun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN is associated with iron/heme deposition in proximal renal tubules and related acute tubular injury (ATI. Here we report the utility of iron staining in differentiating causes of renal allograft dysfunction in patients with a history of sickle cell disease. Case 1: the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction two years after renal transplant. Her renal biopsy showed ATI, supported by patchy loss of brush border and positive staining of kidney injury molecule-1 in proximal tubular epithelial cells, where diffuse increase in iron staining (2+ was present. This indicated that ATI likely resulted from iron/heme toxicity to proximal tubules. Electron microscope confirmed aggregated sickle RBCs in glomeruli, indicating a recurrent SCN. Case 2: four years after renal transplant, the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction and became positive for serum donor-specific antibody. His renal biopsy revealed thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA and diffuse positive C4d stain in peritubular capillaries. Iron staining was negative in the renal tubules, implying that TMA was likely associated with acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR, type 2 rather than recurrent SCN. These case reports imply that iron staining is an inexpensive but effective method in distinguishing SCN-associated renal injury in allograft kidney from other etiologies.

  14. Chronic graft-versus-host disease of the kidney in patients with allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, Pilar; Pilar, Fraile; Vazquez, Lourdes; Lourdes, Vazquez; Caballero, Dolores; Dolores, Caballero; Garcia-Cosmes, Pedro; Pedro, Garcia-Cosmes; López, Lucia; Lucia, López; San Miguel, Jesus; Jesus, San Miguel; Tabernero, Jose Matias; Jose Matias, Tabernero

    2013-08-01

    Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) is the treatment of choice for several hematological diseases. Although rare, patients could present nephrotic syndrome as a clinical feature of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD). The objective of our study is to screen patients with allo-HSCT to determine who developed a glomerular pathology in the context of cGVHD. We studied patients who underwent allo-HSCT treatment in our center between October 1995 and October 2012 and who developed glomerular pathology. cGVHD was defined as a pathology when it appeared after 100 d post-allo-HSCT. Five hundred eighty-three allo-HSCT were performed. The prevalence of cGVHD of the kidney was 1.03%. All patients with cGVHD of the kidney were hosts who received peripheral blood from an identical HLA match donor. GVHD prophylaxis with calcineurin inhibitors plus methotrexate was administered in five cases, and prophylaxis with sirolimus was used in another case. cGVHD of the kidney was seen to appear after the removal of the prophylaxis for GVHD, within 33 ± 11.54 months intervals after allo-HSCT in five patients and in another patient, it appeared despite immunosuppressive therapy being administered. All patients had proteinuria, within 11.82 ± 9.03 g/d ranges. The kidney biopsies revealed membranous glomerulonephritis (four patients), focal segmental glomerulonephritis (one patient) and lupus nephropathy class III (one patient). It seems, immunosuppressive therapy achieved complete remission, within the first year of treatment in four patients. Although in three of them, the proteinuria recurred when we tried to remove the therapy; two patients have recently started treatment, being in partial remission now. cGVHD of the kidney is a rare complication after allo-HSCT, related with the removal of the immunosuppression. Monitoring proteinuria in these patients may be useful. In our patients, a complete remission was achieved; although the removal of the

  15. Effects of vaccines in patients with sickle cell disease: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiyeh, Alison Beriliy; Abdullahi, Leila Hussein; Wonkam, Ambroise; Wiysonge, Charles Shey; Kaba, Mamadou

    2018-03-25

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited haematological disorder caused by a single point mutation (Glub6Val) that promotes polymerisation of haemoglobin S and sickling of erythrocytes. Inflammation, haemolysis, microvascular obstruction and organ damage characterise the highly variable clinical expression of SCD. People with SCD are at increased risk of severe infections, hence the need for vaccination against common disease-causing organisms in this population. We aim to review the evidence on the efficacy and safety of vaccines in people with SCD. The present systematic review will examine the current data as indexed in PubMed, CENTRAL, EMBASE and EBSCOHost. We will consult Strategic Advisory Group of Experts practice statements, conference abstracts, reference lists of relevant articles, WHO ICTRP trial registry and experts in the field. Two authors will independently screen search outputs, select studies, extract data and assess risk of bias; resolving discrepancies by discussion and consensus between the two authors or arbitration by a third author when necessary. We will perform a meta-analysis for clinically homogenous studies. Evidence from clinically diverse studies will be aggregated using narrative synthesis of the findings. In either case, we will use the GRADE approach to assess the strength of the available evidence. The study draws on data that are readily available in the public domain, hence no formal ethical review and approval is required. The findings of this review will be disseminated through conference presentations and a publication in a peer-reviewed journal. CRD42018084051. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. GM-CSF Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Activity on Endothelial Cells Derived from Chronic Venous Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Tisato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty patients affected by chronic venous disease (CVD in tertiary venous network and/or saphenous vein were analyzed before surgical ablation by echo-color-doppler for the hemodynamic parameters reflux time (RT and resistance index (RI, a negative and a positive prognostic factor, respectively. RT and RI were next correlated with relevant in vitro parameters of venous endothelial cells (VEC obtained from surgical specimens, such as cell migration in response to serum gradient, proliferation index, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1 expression, as well as cytokines release. Of interest, ICAM-1 expression in patient-derived VEC cultures correlated positively with RT and negatively with RI. Moreover, RT showed a positive correlation with the baseline osteoprotegerin (OPG expression by VEC and an inverse correlation with VEC proliferation index. On the other hand, RI correlated positively with TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL expression. Among the cytokines released by VEC, GM-CSF showed a positive correlation with VEC proliferation and TRAIL expression and a negative correlation with OPG, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. Since in vitro recombinant GM-CSF induced VEC proliferation and counteracted the induction of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and OPG upon exposure to TNF-α, our data suggest an anti-inflammatory activity of GM-CSF on venous endothelial cells.

  17. Effects of o-vanillin on K⁺ transport of red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannemann, A; Cytlak, U M C; Gbotosho, O T; Rees, D C; Tewari, S; Gibson, J S

    2014-01-01

    Aromatic aldehydes like o-vanillin were designed to reduce the complications of sickle cell disease (SCD) by interaction with HbS, to reduce polymerisation and RBC sickling. Present results show that o-vanillin also directly affects RBC membrane permeability. Both the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC) and the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (or Gardos channel) were inhibited with IC50 of about 0.3 and 1 mM, respectively, with activities almost completely abolished by 5 mM. Similar effects were observed in RBCs treated with the thiol reacting reagent N-ethylmaleimide or with the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, to circumvent any action via HbS polymerisation. The deoxygenation-induced cation conductance (sometimes termed P(sickle)) was partially inhibited, whilst deoxygenation-induced exposure of phosphatidylserine was completely abrogated. Na(+)/K(+) pump activity was also reduced. Notwithstanding, o-vanillin stimulated K(+) efflux through an unidentified pathway and resulted in reduction in cell volume (as measured by wet weight-dry weight). These actions are relevant to understanding how aromatic aldehydes may affect RBC membrane permeability per se as well as HbS polymerisation and thereby inform design of compounds most efficacious in ameliorating the complications of SCD. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Prognostic role of patient gender in limited-disease small-cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roengvoraphoj, Olarn; Eze, Chukwuka; Niyazi, Maximilian; Li, Minglun; Belka, Claus; Manapov, Farkhad; Hildebrandt, Guido; Fietkau, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that female gender could be a prognostic factor in limited-disease (LD) small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), but the correlation between patient gender and survival parameters remains unclear. Data from 179 LD SCLC patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) were reviewed. Influence of patient gender on time to progression (TTP), local control (LC), brain metastasis-free (BMFS), distant metastasis-free (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) was analysed. Definitive CRT was completed by 179 (110 men/69 women) patients. Of these, 68 (38%; 34 men/34 women) patients were treated in concurrent and 111 (62%; 76 men/35 women) in sequential mode. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was subsequently applied in 70 (39%; 36 men/34 women) patients with partial or complete response after CRT. Median OS was 20 (95% confidence interval [CI] 10-22) and 14 (95% CI 10-18) months in female and male patients, respectively (p = 0.021). In subgroups defined by remission status (complete and partial response) after CRT, an OS benefit for females compared to males was also detected. There was no correlation between patient gender and TTP, LC or DMFS, and no difference in OS in the female and male subgroups treated with PCI. The incidence of metachronous brain metastases (BMs) in the male and female subgroups differed significantly (40/110 men vs. 18/69 women, p = 0.03). Also, mean BMFS was significantly longer in women (p = 0.023). Patient gender also significantly correlated with OS on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other prognostic factors (p = 0.04, HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.08-1.92). In this heterogeneous LD SCLC patient cohort treated with definitive CRT, female gender was significantly associated with longer BMFS and OS, as well as with a lower incidence of metachronous brain failure. (orig.) [de

  19. [Impact of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease on Risk of Recurrence in Patients with Resected Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Guangliang; Yu, Qiduo; Liang, Chaoyang; Song, Zhiyi; Shi, Bin; Guo, Yongqing; Liu, Deruo

    2018-03-20

    Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are both common diseases in respiratory system and the leading causes of deaths worldwide. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the severity of COPD affects long-term survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after surgical resection. A retrospective research was performed on 421 consecutive patients who had undergone lobectomy for NSCLC. Classification of COPD severity was based on guidelines of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Characteristics among the three subgroups were compared and recurrence-free survivals were analyzed. A total of 172 patients were diagnosed with COPD, 124 as mild (GOLD-1), 46 as moderate(GOLD-2), and 2 as severe (GOLD-3). The frequencies of recurrence were significantly higher in higher COPD grades group (P<0.001). Recurrence-free survival at five years were 78.1%, 70.4%, and 46.4% in Non-COPD, GOLD-1 COPD, and GOLD-2/3 COPD groups, respectively (P<0.001). In univariate analysis, age, gender, smoking history, COPD severity, tumor size, histology and pathological stage were associated with recurrence-free survival. Multivariate analyses showed that older age, male, GOLD-2/3 COPD, and advanced stage were independent risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival. NSCLC patients with COPD are at higher risk for postoperative recurrence, and moderate/severe COPD is an independent unfavorable prognostic factor. The severity of COPD based on pulmonary function test can be a useful indicator to identify patients at high risk for recurrence. Therefore, it can contribute to adequate selection of the appropriate individualized treatment.

  20. Successful pulmonary thromboendarterectomy in a patient with sickle cell disease and associated resolution of a leg ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Agrawal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a relatively frequent and severe complication of sickle cell disease (SCD. PH associated with SCD is classified as Group 5 PH. The exact pathogenesis of PH in SCD in not known. There are also very limited treatment options available at this time for such patients with Group 5 PH. Patients with SCD are predisposed to a hypercoagulable state and thus can also suffer from chronic thromboembolism. These patients can have associated chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH, thus being classified as Group 4 PH. We present such a case of a patient with SCD diagnosed with severe PH who was found to have CTEPH and successfully underwent a thromboendarterectomy with resolution of his symptoms such as reduction of his oxygen requirements and healing of chronic leg ulcer. This case illustrates the importance of screening patients with SCD and elevated pulmonary artery pressures for CTEPH as this would offer possible treatment options such as pulmonary thromboendarterectomy and/or riociguat in this subset of patients.

  1. Significance of electronic health records: A comparative study of vaccination rates in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korur, Asli; Asma, Süheyl; Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Solmaz, Soner; Boga, Can; Ozsahin, Akatlı Kürsat; Kut, Altug

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of electronic health records (EHR) and electronic vaccination schedule applications on the vaccination status of patients who were admitted to our Center for the treatment of sickle cell disease (SCD). The vaccination status against influenza and pneumococcus infection was determined in 93 patients who were admitted to the hematology outpatient clinic, Baskent University Adana Hospital from April 2004 to March 2009. The vaccination status was then re-evaluated following establishment of EHR and electronic vaccination schedules in 2012. Of the 93 patients with SCD 21.5% (n = 20) were vaccinated against pneumococcus and 21.5% (n = 20) were regularly vaccinated against influenza. When the vaccination rates of 59 of 93 patients who presented for their regular control examinations were analyzed following establishment of EHR and vaccination schedules in 2012, these rates were 49.2% (n = 29) and 50.8% (n = 30) for influenza and pneumococcus, respectively, after EHR; there were 23.7% (n = 14) and 20.3% (n = 12), respectively, before EHR. A statistically significant difference was found between the vaccination rates before and after EHR (p < 0.05). Although viral and bacterial infections are life-threatening health problems in patients with SCD, the vaccination rates were low in high-risk patients. However, these rates increased after application of electronic vaccination schedules.

  2. Imaging of sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, J.J. [Department of Pediatric Imaging, Children`s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit (United States); Sarnaik, S. [Sickle Cell Center, Children`s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit (United States)

    1999-09-01

    Sickle cell disease is an important health care issue in the United States and in certain areas in Africa, the Middle East and India. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the disease at the molecular and pathophysiologic level, specific treatment which is safe and accessible for most patients is still elusive. Going into the next millennium, the management of this disease is still largely dependent on early diagnosis and the treatment of complications with supportive care. Thus, diagnosis and evaluation of the complications of the disease are crucial in directing clinical care at the bedside. Modern imaging modalities have greatly improved, and their application in the patient with the sickling disorders has enhanced the decision - making process. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical aspects of common complications of the disease and to discuss imaging approaches which are useful in their evaluation. (orig.) With 15 figs., 102 refs.

  3. Imaging of sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, J.J.; Sarnaik, S.

    1999-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an important health care issue in the United States and in certain areas in Africa, the Middle East and India. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the disease at the molecular and pathophysiologic level, specific treatment which is safe and accessible for most patients is still elusive. Going into the next millennium, the management of this disease is still largely dependent on early diagnosis and the treatment of complications with supportive care. Thus, diagnosis and evaluation of the complications of the disease are crucial in directing clinical care at the bedside. Modern imaging modalities have greatly improved, and their application in the patient with the sickling disorders has enhanced the decision - making process. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical aspects of common complications of the disease and to discuss imaging approaches which are useful in their evaluation. (orig.)

  4. The safety and efficacy of carboplatin plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Yuichiro; Hattori, Yoshihiro; Tohnai, Rie; Ito, Shoichi; Kawa, Yoshitaka; Kono, Yuko; Urata, Yoshiko; Nogami, Munenobu; Takenaka, Daisuke; Negoro, Shunichi; Satouchi, Miyako

    2018-01-01

    The optimal chemotherapy regimen for non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease is unclear. We therefore investigated the safety and efficacy of carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel as a first-line regimen for non-small cell lung cancer in patients with interstitial lung disease. We retrospectively reviewed advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease who received carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel as a first-line chemotherapy regimen at Hyogo Cancer Center between February 2013 and August 2016. interstitial lung disease was diagnosed according to the findings of pretreatment chest high-resolution computed tomography. Twelve patients were included (male, n = 11; female, n = 1). The overall response rate was 67% and the disease control rate was 100%. The median progression free survival was 5.1 months (95% CI: 2.9-8.3 months) and the median overall survival was 14.9 months (95% CI: 4.8-not reached). A chemotherapy-related acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease was observed in one patient; the extent of this event was Grade 2. There were no treatment-related deaths. Carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel, as a first-line chemotherapy regimen for non-small cell lung cancer, showed favorable efficacy and safety in patients with preexisting interstitial lung disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Progressive rise in red blood cell distribution width predicts mortality and cardiovascular events in end-stage renal disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hye Eun; Kim, Sung Jun; Hwang, Hyeon Seok; Chung, Sungjin; Yang, Chul Woo; Shin, Seok Joon

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a robust marker of adverse clinical outcomes in various populations. However, the clinical significance of a progressive rise in RDW is undetermined in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic importance of a change in RDW in ESRD patients. Three hundred twenty-six incident dialysis patients were retrospectively analyzed. Temporal changes in RDW during 12 months after dialysis initiation were assessed by calculating the coefficients by linear regression. Patients were divided into two groups: an RDW-decreased group who had negative coefficient values (n = 177) and an RDW-increased group who had positive values (n = 149). The associations between rising RDW and mortality and cardiovascular (CV) events were investigated. During a median follow-up of 2.7 years (range, 1.0-7.7 years), 75 deaths (24.0%) and 60 non-fatal CV events (18.4%) occurred. The event-free survival rate for the composite of end-points was lower in the RDW-increased group (P = 0.004). After categorizing patients according to baseline RDW, the event-free survival rate was lowest in patients with a baseline RDW >14.9% and increased RDW, and highest in patients with a baseline RDW ≤14.9% and decreased RDW (P = 0.02). In multivariate analysis, rising RDW was independently associated with the composite of end-points (hazard ratio = 1.75, P = 0.007), whereas the baseline RDW was not. This study shows that a progressive rise in RDW independently predicted mortality and CV events in ESRD patients. Rising RDW could be an additive predictor for adverse CV outcomes ESRD patients.

  6. Impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on postoperative recurrence in patients with resected non-small-cell lung cancer

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    Qiang GL

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Guangliang Qiang, Chaoyang Liang, Fei Xiao, Qiduo Yu, Huanshun Wen, Zhiyi Song, Yanchu Tian, Bin Shi, Yongqing Guo, Deruo Liu Department of Thoracic Surgery, China–Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Purpose: This study aimed to determine whether the severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD affects recurrence-free survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients after surgical resection.Patients and methods: A retrospective study was performed on 421 consecutive patients who had undergone lobectomy for NSCLC from January 2008 to June 2011. Classification of COPD severity was based on guidelines of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD. Characteristics among the three subgroups were compared and recurrence-free survivals were analyzed.Results: A total of 172 patients were diagnosed with COPD (124 as GOLD-1, 46 as GOLD-2, and two as GOLD-3. The frequencies of recurrence were significantly higher in patients with higher COPD grades (P<0.001. Recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 78.1%, 70.4%, and 46.4% in non-COPD, mild COPD, and moderate/severe COPD groups, respectively (P<0.001. By univariate analysis, the age, sex, smoking history, COPD severity, tumor size, histology, and pathological stage were associated with recurrence-free survival. Multivariate analysis showed that older age, male, moderate/severe COPD, and advanced stage were independent risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival.Conclusion: NSCLC patients with COPD are at high risk for postoperative recurrence, and moderate/severe COPD is an independent unfavorable prognostic factor. Keywords: lung neoplasms, surgery, pulmonary function test, prognosis

  7. The Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score as a Measure of Disease Activity in Patients with Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermani, TA; Cuthbertson, D; Carette, S; Hoffman, GS; Khalidi, NA; Koening, CL; Langford, CA; McKinnon-Maksimowicz, K; McAlear, CA; Monach, PA; Seo, P; Warrington, KJ; Ytterberg, SR; Merkel, PA; Matteson, EL

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS) in the assessment of disease activity in giant cell arteritis (GCA). Methods Patients with GCA enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal study with symptoms of active vasculitis during any visit were included. Spearman’s rank correlation was used to explore the association of the BVAS with other measures of disease activity. Results During a mean (SD) follow-up of 2.3 (1.6) years, symptoms of active GCA were present in 236 visits in 136 subjects (100 female, 74%). Median (range) BVAS1 (new/worse symptoms) was 1 (0–10) and median (range) BVAS2 (persistent symptoms) was 0 (0–5). Median (range) physician global assessment (PGA) was 4 (0–9) for disease activity in the past 28 days and 2 (0–9) for activity on the day of the visit. Important ischemic manifestations of active vasculitis not captured by the BVAS included tongue/jaw claudication (27%), upper extremity claudication (15%), lower extremity claudication (5%), carotidynia (7%), ischemic retinopathy (5%). During 25 visits (11%) with active disease, all symptoms of active vasculitis were captured in the “Other” category yet still resulted in a BVAS 1 and BVAS 2 of 0. BVAS1 moderately correlated with PGA for the past 28 days (Spearman’s correlation 0.50) and physician-rated disease activity for the past 28 days (Spearman’s correlation 0.46). Conclusions The BVAS has limited utility in GCA. Patients with active GCA can have a BVAS of 0. Many important ischemic symptoms attributable to active vasculitis are not captured in the composite score. PMID:27036388

  8. Sickle cell disease patients in eastern province of Saudi Arabia suffer less severe acute chest syndrome than patients with African haplotypes

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    Alabdulaali M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Genetic studies suggest that the sickle cell mutation has arisen on at least four separate occasions in Africa and as a fifth independent mutation in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia or India. The pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD is essentially similar in these different areas although the frequency and severity of complications may vary between areas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and outcome of acute chest syndrome (ACS in SCD patients from Eastern province of Saudi Arabia in comparison with patients with African haplotypes. Materials and Methods : This was a retrospective study involving 317 SCD patients who were two years or older, admitted to King Fahad Hospital Hofuf between January-May 2003 for different etiologies. Twenty six patients presented with different causes of ACS; 11 patients presented with different pathologies other than ACS, but had past history of ACS; 280 patients presented with different pathologies and never presented with ACS. Clinical features, CBC, Hb-electrophoresis, G6PD activity, cultures, chest X-ray, arterial oxygen saturation, blood transfusion rates and outcome were studied. Univariate and multiple regression analysis were carried out to evaluate influence on ACS. Comparison between SCD patients with ACS from this study and from Eastern province of Saudi Arabia to patients with African haplotypes were carried out, using data reported in the literature. Results : During the period of this study, 37 patients with new or previous episodes of ACS were studied (accounting for 11.67% of admitted SCD patients. Most of the patients with ACS had only one episode, but five patients (13.51% had had episodes or more. One patient died giving an in-hospital mortality rate of 1/26 (3.85%. Comparison of recurrence of ACS and mortality between SCD patients in Eastern province of Saudi Arabia to that of patients with African haplotype showed that recurrence is

  9. Circulating Zonulin Correlates with Density of Enteroviruses and Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells in the Small Bowel Mucosa of Celiac Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Raikkerus, Helerin; Kadaja, Lumme; Talja, Ija; Uibo, Oivi; Heilman, Kaire; Uibo, Raivo

    2017-02-01

    Impaired intestinal integrity, including increased permeability of the small bowel mucosa, has been shown in patients with celiac disease (CD) as well as with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Zonulin (ZO, pre-haptoglobin), a tight junction regulator, plays a particular role in the regulation of intestinal barrier function and in the pathogenesis of the above-mentioned diseases. To investigate whether enteroviruses (EVs) and immunoregulatory cells are associated with intestinal permeability in patients with CD alone and with coexistent T1D. Altogether 80 patients (mean age 10.68 ± 6.69 years) who had undergone small bowel biopsy were studied. Forty patients with functional dyspepsia and normal small bowel mucosa formed the control group. The circulating ZO level in sera was evaluated using ELISA. The densities of EV, FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO+) dendritic cells (DCs) and glutamic acid dexarboxylase (GAD)65+ cells in small bowel mucosa were investigated by immunohistochemistry. The expression analysis of FOXP3, tight junction protein 1 (TJP1), gap junction (GJA1), IDO and CD103 genes was evaluated by real-time PCR. The ZO level was higher in CD patients compared to subjects with a normal small bowel mucosa, particularly in those with Marsh IIIc atrophy (p = 0.01), and correlated with the density of EV (r = 0.63; p = 0.0003) and IDO+ DCs (r = 0.58; p = 0.01) in the small bowel mucosa. The density of GAD65+ epithelial cells was correlated with the density of EV (r = 0.59; p = 0.03) and IDO+ DCs (r = 0.78; p = 0.004) in CD patients. The relative expression of FOXP3 mRNA in the small bowel mucosa tissue was significantly higher in patients with CD, compared to subjects with a normal mucosa, and correlated with the density of EV (r = 0.62; p = 0.017) as well as with the relative expression of IDO mRNA (r = 0.54; p = 0.019). The CD is associated with elevation of the circulating ZO level, the value of which

  10. Detection of parvovirus B19 IgM in patients with sickle cell disease in Lagos, Nigeria

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    Christianah Idowu Ayolabi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine anti-B19V IgM seroprevalence among sickle cell disease (SCD patients and patients with other blood genotypes. Methods: In this study, a commercially available ELISA kit (Parvovirus B19 RIDASCREEN Biopharma, Germany was used to analyze 93 serum samples, comprising 68 SCD patients and 25 control samples from individuals with other blood genotypes aged between 1 and 35 years. Results: Anti-B19V IgM was detected in 10 (~15% samples of the SCD patients, in which amongst the SC, 1 (25% positive was recorded, CC had 2 (~67% positive cases and SS had 7 (~11% positives. Among the study control group, a 16% seropositivity was observed, in which among those with genotype AA, 1 (20% was positive, for those with AS, 1 (~7% positive was recorded, for AC, 3 (50% were positive. The age range of 11–20 years showed a positivity of 3 (~4%, those of 21–30 years showed 12 (~24% positivity and both 1–10 years and > 30 years had no positive case recorded. Conclusions: This study showed that B19V is a significant blood borne pathogen in our environment and concerted effort is needed to advance strategies to curb this infection and diminish the common severe complications usually associated with this virus infection among SCD patients.

  11. Characterization of Peripheral Immune Cell Subsets in Patients with Acute and Chronic Cerebrovascular Disease: A Case-Control Study

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    Peter Kraft

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Immune cells (IC play a crucial role in murine stroke pathophysiology. However, data are limited on the role of these cells in ischemic stroke in humans. We therefore aimed to characterize and compare peripheral IC subsets in patients with acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (AIS/TIA, chronic cerebrovascular disease (CCD and healthy volunteers (HV. We conducted a case-control study of patients with AIS/TIA (n = 116 or CCD (n = 117, and HV (n = 104 who were enrolled at the University Hospital Würzburg from 2010 to 2013. We determined the expression and quantity of IC subsets in the three study groups and performed correlation analyses with demographic and clinical parameters. The quantity of several IC subsets differed between the AIS/TIA, CCD, and HV groups. Several clinical and demographic variables independently predicted the quantity of IC subsets in patients with AIS/TIA. No significant changes in the quantity of IC subsets occurred within the first three days after AIS/TIA. Overall, these findings strengthen the evidence for a pathophysiologic role of IC in human ischemic stroke and the potential use of IC-based biomarkers for the prediction of stroke risk. A comprehensive description of IC kinetics is crucial to enable the design of targeted treatment strategies.

  12. Bone Marrow as a Hematopoietic Stem Cell Source for Gene Therapy in Sickle Cell Disease: Evidence from Rhesus and SCD Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Naoya; Fujita, Atsushi; Hsieh, Matthew M; Bonifacino, Aylin C; Krouse, Allen E; Metzger, Mark E; Donahue, Robert E; Tisdale, John F

    2017-09-01

    Steady state bone marrow (BM) is the preferred hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) source for gene therapy in sickle cell disease (SCD) due to the recognized risk of vaso-occlusive crisis during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilization. We previously established clinically relevant HSC gene transfer in the rhesus model following transplantation of mobilized peripheral blood (PB) CD34 + cells transduced with lentiviral vectors. In this study, we examined steady state bone marrow (BM) in the rhesus competitive repopulation model and demonstrate similar gene marking in vitro and in vivo, as compared with mobilized PB CD34 + cells. We then evaluated PB and steady state BM in subjects with SCD and observed a higher frequency of CD34 + cells when compared with controls, likely due to enhanced hematopoiesis. However, CD34 + cell counts were reduced in both the PB and BM in patients treated with hydroxyurea, and hydroxyurea treatment strongly inhibited iPS cell generation from SCD subjects. Our data support that steady state BM is a useful HSC source for SCD gene therapy with similar transduction. The lower CD34 + percentages observed with hydroxyurea treatment warrants withholding hydroxyurea temporarily prior to harvesting HSCs. Our results are important for the design of gene targeting strategies for SCD.

  13. S1 nuclease analysis of α-globin gene expression in preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease after transfer to mouse erythroleukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helder, J.; Deisseroth, A.

    1987-01-01

    The loss of α-globin gene transcriptional activity rarely occurs as an acquired abnormality during the evolution of myeloproliferative disease or preleukemia. To test whether the mutation responsible for the loss of α-globin gene expression (hemoglobin H disease) in these patients is linked with the α-globin genes on chromosome 16, the authors transferred chromosome 16 from preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease to mouse erythroleukemia cells and measured the transcriptional activity of the human α-globin genes. After transfer to mouse erythroleukemia cells, the expression of human α-globin genes from the peripheral blood or marrow cells of preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease was similar to that of human α-globin genes transferred to mouse erythroleukemia cells from normal donors. These data showed that factor(s) in the mouse erythroleukemia cell can genetically complement the α-globin gene defect in these preleukemia patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease and suggest that altered expression of a gene in trans to the α-globin gene may be responsible for the acquisition of hemoglobin H disease in these patients

  14. Sickle Cell Disease (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sickle Cell Disease KidsHealth / For Teens / Sickle Cell Disease What's in ... Well? Print en español Anemia falciforme What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell disease is a blood disorder that's ...

  15. INCREASED VASOOCCLUSIVE CRISIS IN “O” BLOOD GROUP SICKLE CELL DISEASE PATIENTS: ASSOCIATION WITH UNDERLYING THROMBOSPONDIN LEVELS.

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    M. Al Huneini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objectives: To explore the incidence of vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC in Blood Group “O” sickle cell disease (SCD patients, and correlate it with the blood group and thrombospondin (TSP levels. Methods: In 89 consecutive SCD patients, blood samples were obtained for vWF antigen, collagen binding activity, blood group typing, C-reactive protein, variant hemoglobin analysis (HPLC, Serum TSP 1 and TSP 2 levels, complete blood counts, liver function tests, LDH and renal function tests during VOC episodes and in steady state conditions. Results: In the steady state SCD patients (n=72, “O” blood group patients (n=37 showed significantly higher median serum TSP 1 and TSP 2 levels than the non “O” blood group patients [n=35] [p <0.05, Mann-Whitney test], with an inverse relation between VWF:Ag, Factor VIII:C and TSP levels. Furthermore, the serum TSP 1 and TSP 2 levels were significantly higher in patients presenting with acute VOC [n=17], and in those with repeated VOC’s (group 1, n=16 especially amongst those patients with blood group “O” [p, <0.05, Mann-Whitney test]. Conclusions: The study shows that there was an inverse relation between TSP and vWF levels, in blood group “O” SCD patients with an upregulation of the TSP levels. Expectedly, during active VOC crisis, the TSP 1 and TSP 2 levels were significantly elevated.    Key Words: VOC; SCD; TSP; vWD; Blood groups

  16. Secondary Circulating Prostate Cells Predict Biochemical Failure in Prostate Cancer Patients after Radical Prostatectomy and without Evidence of Disease

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    Nigel P. Murray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although 90% of prostate cancer is considered to be localized, 20%–30% of patients will experience biochemical failure (BF, defined as serum PSA >0.2 ng/mL, after radical prostatectomy (RP. The presence of circulating prostate cells (CPCs in men without evidence of BF may be useful to predict patients at risk for BF. We describe the frequency of CPCs detected after RP, relation with clinicopathological parameters, and association with biochemical failure. Methods and Patients. Serial blood samples were taken during followup after RP, mononuclear cells were obtained by differential gel centrifugation, and CPCs identified using standard immunocytochemistry using anti-PSA monoclonal antibodies. Age, pathological stage (organ confined, nonorgan confined, pathological grade, margin status (positive, negative, extracapsular extension, perineural, vascular, and lymphatic infiltration (positive, negative were compared with the presence/absence of CPCs and with and without biochemical failure. Kaplan Meier methods were used to compare the unadjusted biochemical failure free survival of patients with and without CPCs. Results. 114 men participated, and secondary CPCs were detected more frequently in patients with positive margins, extracapsular extension, and vascular and lymphatic infiltration and were associated with biochemical failure independent of these clinicopathological variables, and with a shorter time to BF. Conclusions. Secondary CPCs are an independent risk factor associated with increased BF in men with a PSA <0.2 ng/mL after radical prostatectomy, but do not determine if the recurrence is due to local or systemic disease. These results warrant larger studies to confirm the findings.

  17. Prognostic utility of admission cell-free DNA levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avriel, Avital; Rozenberg, Dmitry; Raviv, Yael; Heimer, Dov; Bar-Shai, Amir; Gavish, Rachel; Sheynin, Jony; Douvdevani, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations (COPDEs) are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is a novel biomarker associated with clinical outcomes in several disease states but has not been studied in COPD. The objectives of this study were to assess cfDNA levels during a COPDE, to evaluate the association of cfDNA with clinical parameters and to explore the prognostic implications of cfDNA levels on long-term survival. This was an observational study that assessed cfDNA levels in patients admitted to hospital for a COPDE. Plasma cfDNA levels of COPDE patients were compared to those of matched stable COPD patients and healthy controls. Multivariable and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the association of cfDNA levels with blood gas parameters and long-term survival. A total of 62 patients (46 males, forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV 1 ] 38%±13%) were included. The median cfDNA levels on admission for COPDE patients was 1,634 ng/mL (interquartile range [IQR] 1,016-2,319) compared to 781 ng/mL (IQR 523-855) for stable COPD patients, matched for age and disease severity, and 352 ng/mL (IQR 209-636) for healthy controls ( P <0.0001, for both comparisons). cfDNA was correlated with partial arterial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO 2 , r =0.35) and pH ( r =-0.35), P =0.01 for both comparisons. In a multivariable analysis, PaCO 2 was the only independent predictor of cfDNA. Using a cfDNA level of 1,924 ng/mL (threshold for abnormal PaCO 2 ), those with high levels had a trend for increased 5-year mortality risk adjusted for age, sex and FEV 1 % (hazard ratio 1.92, 95% confidence interval 0.93-3.95, P =0.08). Plasma cfDNA might offer a novel technique to identify COPD patients at increased risk of poor outcomes, but the prognostic utility of this measurement requires further study.

  18. Molecular blood typing augments serologic testing and allows for enhanced matching of red blood cells for transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Katie; Harris, Samantha; Gaur, Prashant; Haile, Askale; Armour, Rosalind; Teramura, Gayle; Delaney, Meghan

    2012-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients have dissimilar red blood cell (RBC) phenotypes compared to the primarily Caucasian blood donor base due, in part, to underlying complex Rh and silenced Duffy expression. Gene array-based technology offers high-throughput antigen typing of blood donors and can identify patients with altered genotypes. The purpose of the study was to ascertain if RBC components drawn from predominantly Caucasian donors could provide highly antigen-matched products for molecularly typed SCD patients. SCD patients were genotyped by a molecular array (HEA Beadchip, BioArray Solutions). The extended antigen phenotype (C, c, E, e, K, k, Jk(a) , Jk(b) , Fy(a) , Fy(b) , S, s) was used to query the inventory using different matching algorithms; the resulting number of products was recorded. A mean of 96.2 RBC products was available for each patient at basic-level, 34 at mid-level, and 16.3 at high-level stringency. The number of negative antigens correlated negatively with the number of available products. The Duffy silencing mutation in the promoter region (67T>C) (GATA) was found in 96.5% of patients. Allowing Fy(b+) products for patients with GATA increased the number of available products by up to 180%, although it does not ensure prevention of Duffy antibodies in all patients. This feasibility study provides evidence that centers with primarily Caucasian donors may be able to provide highly antigen-matched products. Knowledge of the GATA status expands the inventory of antigen-matched products. Further work is needed to determine the most clinically appropriate match level for SCD patients. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  19. Altered expression of signalling lymphocyte activation molecule receptors in T-cells from lupus nephritis patients-a potential biomarker of disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratigou, Victoria; Doyle, Anne F; Carlucci, Francesco; Stephens, Lauren; Foschi, Valentina; Castelli, Marco; McKenna, Nicola; Cook, H Terence; Lightstone, Liz; Cairns, Thomas D; Pickering, Matthew C; Botto, Marina

    2017-07-01

    The aim was to investigate whether the signalling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) signalling pathways contribute to LN and whether SLAM receptors could be valuable biomarkers of disease activity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 30National Research Ethics Service SLE patients with biopsy-proven LN were analysed by flow cytometry. Clinical measures of disease activity were assessed. The expression of the SLAM family receptors on T-cell subpopulations [CD4, CD8 and double negative (DN) T cells] was measured and compared between lupus patients with active renal disease and those in remission. The frequency of CD8 T cells expressing SLAMF3, SLAMF5 and SLAMF7 was significantly lower in LN patients who were in remission. In contrast, these subsets were similar in patients with active renal disease and in healthy individuals. Patients with active nephritis had an increased percentage of circulating monocytes, consistent with a potential role played by these cells in glomerular inflammation. Changes in the frequency of DN T cells positive for SLAMF2, SLAMF4 and SLAMF7 were observed in lupus patients irrespective of the disease activity. We detected alterations in the cellular expression of the SLAM family receptors, but these changes were less obvious and did not reveal any specific pattern. The percentage of DN T cells expressing SLAMF6 could predict the clinical response to B-cell depletion in patients with LN. Our study demonstrates altered expression of the SLAM family receptors in SLE T lymphocytes. This is consistent with the importance of the SLAM-associated pathways in lupus pathogenesis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.

  20. Indoxyl Sulfate Impairs Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Might Contribute to Vascular Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Cheng-Jui Lin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Indoxyl sulfate (IS is a protein-bound uremic toxin that accumulates in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. We explored the effect of IS on human early endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and analyzed the correlation between serum IS levels and parameters of vascular function, including endothelial function in a CKD-based cohort. Methods: A cross-sectional study with 128 stable CKD patients was conducted. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD, pulse wave velocity (PWV, ankle brachial index, serum IS and other biochemical parameters were measured and analyzed. In parallel, the activity of early EPCs was also evaluated after exposure to IS. Results: In human EPCs, a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect of IS on chemotactic motility and colony formation was observed. Additionally, serum IS levels were significantly correlated with CKD stages. The total IS (T-IS and free IS (F-IS were strongly associated with age, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, blood pressure, PWV, blood urea nitrogen, creatine and phosphate but negatively correlated with FMD, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and calcium. A multivariate linear regression analysis also showed that FMD was significantly associated with IS after adjusting for other confounding factors. Conclusions: In humans, IS impairs early EPCs and was strongly correlated with vascular dysfunction. Thus, we speculate that this adverse effect of IS may partly result from the inhibition of early EPCs.

  1. MANAGEMENT OF SICKLE CELL DISEASE

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    Rajesh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is a genetically transmitted multisystem disease1 which includes a group of disorders that differs in severity sign and symptoms, The disease is not uniformly seen everywhere but it has some topographical distribution. In India, it is frequently seen in Central India, in and around the vicinity of Chhattisgarh in some religions in caste like kurmis, satnami, mahar, other backward caste and some tribes, it has great pathological significance considering the high morbidity and mortality resulting from the disease process. We have studied the cases of SCD from 2001 to 2015 series of such patients, since there is no cure of this disease, in regards to prevention of this genetic autosomal recessive disorder by marriage counseling, the incidence can be significantly reduced by avoiding consanguineous marriages in the susceptible community.

  2. Expression of platelet-bound stromal cell-derived factor-1 in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellos, Konstantinos; Rahmann, A; Kilias, A; Ruf, M; Sopova, K; Stamatelopoulos, K; Jorbenadze, R; Weretka, S; Geisler, T; Gawaz, M; Weig, H-J; Bigalke, B

    2012-01-01

    Blood cell infiltration and inflammation are involved in atrial remodelling during atrial fibrillation (AF) although the exact mechanisms of inflammatory cell recruitment remain poorly understood. Platelet-bound stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is increased in cases of ischemic myocardium and regulates recruitment of CXCR4(+) cells on the vascular wall. Whether platelet-bound SDF-1 expression is differentially influenced by non-valvular paroxysmal or permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP) or acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has not been reported so far. A total of 1291 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing coronary angiography were recruited. Among the patients with SAP, platelet-bound-SDF-1 is increased in patients with paroxysmal AF compared with SR or to persistent/permanent AF (P disease. Further in vivo studies are required to elucidate the role of SDF-1 in atrial remodeling and the atrial fibrillation course.

  3. An acute hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-IH in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S A; Shirey, R S; King, K E; Ness, P M

    2000-07-01

    A hemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) due to anti-IH is reported in a patient with sickle cell disease (SCD). An 18-year-old woman with SCD and a complete phenotype on file had been identified as group B-positive with negative antibody-screening tests and had received 1 unit of packed RBCs. Ten days later, she was readmitted in painful crisis with a Hb of 4.2 g per dL. Antibody-screening tests and panel cells were positive at all test phases with a negative autocontrol, which suggested alloantibodies. Phenotypically matched group O RBCs were issued emergently. After the transfusion of 100 mL, the patient had an HTR with chills, fever, and tachycardia and laboratory findings of hemoglobinemia, hemoglobinuria, and negative DATs. A high-titer, IgM anti-IH with a high thermal amplitude (reactive with group O, but not group B RBCs at 37 degrees C) was identified. Autologous RBCs appeared to have normal I antigen expression, but less H antigen than pooled group B RBCs. She was given group B RBCs, uneventfully, by use of a blood warmer. This is a rare case of anti-IH as the cause of a HTR, as a serologic problem that may be seen in SCD, and as an autoantibody that may mimic an alloantibody. Ironically, this HTR resulted from the effort to provide phenotypically matched RBCs, which necessitated the selection of group O RBCs.

  4. The effect of endurance training on cell metabolism and exercise tolerance in patients with ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Rychlewski

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effect of endurance training on cell metabolism and exercise tolerance in patients with ischemic heart disease. Study population consisted of 24 survivors of myocardial infarction. Patients were assigned to the training group (n=18, mean age 48.2 years or to the control group (n=6, mean age 42.6 years. Directly before (ExTest I and after completing a 3-week endurance training program (ExTest II patients performed bicycle ergometry with computer analysis of ventilatory expired gas (CardioO2, Medical Graphics Corporation. The exercise intensity increased gradually until ventilatory threshold was reached. ExTest II was finished at the same workload level as ExTest I. ECG was recorded and blood pressure was assessed during each ergometry. Prior to and 3 minutes after finishing each test, capillary blood samples were taken for measurements of acid-base equilibrium parameters and lactate concentrations and venous blood samples were collected for assessment of oxypurines and uric acid levels (HPLC method. The training consisted of five 40-min sessions of continuos working on a bicycle ergometer weekly. The workload was 25 W lower than the load at which ventilatory threshold had been reached by the patient. Subjects in the control group did not participate in endurance training. During exercise tests performed after the rehabilitation program, heart rate and rate-pressure product at particular workload were lower than on admission. Similarly, the increases in lactate concentrations and changes in base excess were reduced during ExTest II. The oxypurines pool was reduced after the training, which reflects improvement in cell metabolism. No influence of training on uric acid concentrations was observed.

  5. Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Multiple Bowen's Disease in a Patient with a History of Consumption of Traditional Chinese Herbal Balls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Seok

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic has been classified as a class I human carcinogen, meaning that there is sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity to humans. Arsenic, however, remains a common contaminant in a number of traditional Chinese herbal balls. A 64-year-old man presented with an erythematous erosive patch on the left palm, multiple yellowish scaly patches on the right palm and an erythematous hyperkeratotic patch with bleeding on the left foot dorsum. He also had similar skin lesions on the back and buttock. He had a past medical history of chronic exposure to arsenic through consumption of traditional Chinese herbal balls. Skin biopsy revealed Bowen's disease on the left palm and squamous cell carcinoma on left foot dorsum. We report this case to emphasize that we should investigate patient's history thoroughly, including the use of Chinese herbal balls to find out arsenicism.

  6. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes and alpha-thalassemia in sickle cell disease patients from Trinidad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Lecointe, Altheia; Smith, Erskine; Romana, Marc; Gilbert, Marie-Georges; Charles, Waveney P; Saint-Martin, Christian; Kéclard, Lisiane

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we have determined the frequency of beta(S) haplotypes in 163 sickle cell disease patients from Trinidad. The alpha(3.7) globin gene deletion status was also studied with an observed gene frequency of 0.17. Among the 283 beta(S) chromosomes analyzed, the Benin haplotype was the most prevalent (61.8%) followed by Bantu (17.3%), Senegal (8.5%), Cameroon (3.5%), and Arab-Indian (3.2%), while 5.7% of them were atypical. This beta(S) haplotypes distribution differed from those previously described in other Caribbean islands (Jamaica, Guadeloupe, and Cuba), in agreement with the known involvement of the major colonial powers (Spain, France, and Great Britain) in the slave trade in Trinidad and documented an Indian origin of the beta(S) gene.

  7. Serum calcium and vitamin D status of patients with sickle cell disease in Curacao

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderDijs, FPL; vanderKlis, FRM; Muskiet, FD; Muskiet, FAJ

    We measured parameters of calcium homeostasis and vitamin D status in HbSS patients (median age 8 years, range 3-19; 8 females, 10 males) and matched HbAA controls living in the tropical island of Curacao. Serum calcium concentration in HbSS patients [2.32(0.07)mmol/L] was lower (ANCOVA, P = 0.002)

  8. Differential expression of NK receptors CD94 and NKG2A by T cells in rheumatoid arthritis patients in remission compared to active disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceara E Walsh

    Full Text Available TNF inhibitors (TNFi have revolutionised the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Natural killer (NK cells and Natural Killer Cell Receptor+ T (NKT cells comprise important effector lymphocytes whose activity is tightly regulated through surface NK receptors (NKRs. Dysregulation of NKRs in patients with autoimmune diseases has been shown, however little is known regarding NKRs expression in patients with TNFi-induced remission and in those who maintain remission vs disease flare following TNFi withdrawal.Patients with RA were recruited for this study, (i RA patients in clinical remission following a minimum of one year of TNFi therapy (n = -15; (2 Active RA patients, not currently or ever receiving TNFi (n = 18; and healthy control volunteers (n = 15. Patients in remission were divided into two groups: those who were maintained on TNFi and those who withdrew from TNFi and maintained on DMARDS. All patients underwent full clinical assessment. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and NKR (CD94, NKG2A, CD161, CD69, CD57, CD158a, CD158b expression on T-(CD3+CD56-, NK-(CD3-CD56+ and NKT-(CD3+CD56+ cells was determined by flow cytometry.Following TNFi withdrawal, percentages and numbers of circulating T cells, NK cells or NKT cell populations were unchanged in patients in remission versus active RA or HCs. Expression of the NKRs CD161, CD57, CD94 and NKG2A was significantly increased on CD3+CD56-T cells from patients in remission compared to active RA (p<0.05. CD3+CD56-T cell expression of CD94 and NKG2A was significantly increased in patients who remained in remission compared with patients whose disease flared (p<0.05, with no differences observed for CD161 and CD57. CD3+CD56- cell expression of NKG2A was inversely related to DAS28 (r = -0.612, p<0.005.High CD94/NKG2A expression by T cells was demonstrated in remission patients following TNFi therapy compared to active RA, while low CD94/NKG2A were associated with

  9. Calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease: value of multidetector CT in patients with acute chest syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staser, Jonathan A. [Indiana University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Alam, Tariq [Medical College of Ohio, Department of Radiology, Toledo, OH (United States); Applegate, Kimberly [Indiana University Medical Center, Sections of Pediatric Radiology and Health Services Research, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The incidence of pulmonary embolism in children is not clearly known, but is believed to be low. Risk factors for pulmonary thromboembolism include central venous catheter, malignancy, surgery, infection, trauma, and congenital hypercoagulable disorders. Children with sickle cell disease are prothrombotic and are at an increased risk of thromboembolism. The incidence of this event is unknown because these children are often not thoroughly imaged. We report here a case of a calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease and emphasize the use of multidetector CT in detection of pulmonary thromboembolism in children with sickle cell disease. (orig.)

  10. Calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease: value of multidetector CT in patients with acute chest syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staser, Jonathan A.; Alam, Tariq; Applegate, Kimberly

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of pulmonary embolism in children is not clearly known, but is believed to be low. Risk factors for pulmonary thromboembolism include central venous catheter, malignancy, surgery, infection, trauma, and congenital hypercoagulable disorders. Children with sickle cell disease are prothrombotic and are at an increased risk of thromboembolism. The incidence of this event is unknown because these children are often not thoroughly imaged. We report here a case of a calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease and emphasize the use of multidetector CT in detection of pulmonary thromboembolism in children with sickle cell disease. (orig.)

  11. Antibodies against Apoptotic Cells Present in End-stage Lung Disease Patients Do Not Correlate with Clinical Outcome after Lung Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budding, Kevin; van de Graaf, Eduard A.; Kardol-Hoefnagel, Tineke; Oudijk, Erik-Jan D.; Kwakkel-van Erp, Johanna M.; Hack, C. Erik; Otten, Henny G.

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies against HLA and non-HLA are associated with transplantation outcome. Recently, pretransplant serum IgG antibody levels against apoptotic cells were found to correlate with kidney allograft loss. We investigated the presence of these antibodies in lung transplantation (LTx) patients and evaluated the correlation of pre-LTx serum levels of IgG antibodies against apoptotic cells with LTx outcome. These cells included donor lung endothelial cells (ECs) obtained from lung perfusion fluid collected during LTx procedure. Cells were isolated, expanded in vitro, and analyzed as targets for antiapoptotic cell reactivity. Cultured cells exhibited EC morphology and were CD31+, CD13+, and vWF+. End-stage lung disease patients showed elevated serum IgG levels against apoptotic lung EC (p = 0.0018) compared to healthy controls. Interestingly, the levels of circulating antibodies directed against either apoptotic Jurkat cells or apoptotic lung ECs did not correlate, suggesting a target cell specificity. We observed no correlation between chronic or acute rejection and pre-LTx serum levels of antiapoptotic antibodies. Also, these levels did not differ between matched patients developing chronic rejection or not during follow-up or at the time of diagnosis, as they remained as high as prior to transplantation. Thus, circulating levels of antiapoptotic cell antibodies are elevated in end-stage lung disease patients, but our data do not correlate with outcome after LTx. PMID:28377770

  12. Pedunculopontine cholinergic cell loss in hallucinating Parkinson disease patients but not in dementia with Lewy bodies patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hepp, D.H.; Ruiter, A.M.; Galis, Y.; van der Voorn, J.P.; Rozemuller, A.J.M.; Berendse, H.W.; Foncke, E.M.J.; van de Berg, W.D.J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a cholinergic deficit in Parkinson disease (PD) and in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) that plays a role in a variety of clinical symptoms, including visual hallucinations (VH). The aim of this study was to assess cholinergic neuronal loss and PD and Alzheimer disease pathology in the

  13. CTSH regulates β-cell function and disease progression in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløyel, Tina; Brorsson, Caroline; Nielsen, Lotte B

    2014-01-01

    of CTSH protected insulin-secreting cells against cytokine-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic studies indicated that CTSH exerts its antiapoptotic effects through decreased JNK and p38 signaling and reduced expression of the proapoptotic factors Bim, DP5, and c-Myc. CTSH overexpression also up-regulated Ins2...

  14. Cutoff Values of Serum IgG4 and Histopathological IgG4+ Plasma Cells for Diagnosis of Patients with IgG4-Related Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasufumi Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available IgG4-related disease is a new disease classification established in Japan in the 21st century. Patients with IgG4-related disease display hyper-IgG4-gammaglobulinemia, massive infiltration of IgG4+ plasma cells into tissue, and good response to glucocorticoids. Since IgG4 overexpression is also observed in other disorders, it is necessary to diagnose IgG4-related disease carefully and correctly. We therefore sought to determine cutoff values for serum IgG4 and IgG4/IgG and for IgG4+/IgG+ plasma cells in tissue diagnostic of IgG4-related disease. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed serum IgG4 concentrations and IgG4/IgG ratio and IgG4+/IgG+ plasma cell ratio in tissues of 132 patients with IgG4-related disease and 48 patients with other disorders. Result. Serum IgG4 >135  mg/dl demonstrated a sensitivity of 97.0% and a specificity of 79.6% in diagnosing IgG4-related disease, and serum IgG4/IgG ratios >8% had a sensitivity and specificity of 95.5% and 87.5%, respectively. IgG4+cell/IgG+ cell ratio in tissues >40% had a sensitivity and specificity of 94.4% and 85.7%, respectively. However, the number of IgG4+ cells was reduced in severely fibrotic parts of tissues. Conclusion. Although a recent unanimous consensus of all relevant researchers in Japan recently established the diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related disease, findings such as ours indicate that further discussion is needed.

  15. Precision of SPECT/CT allows the diagnosis of a hidden Brodie's abscess of the talus in a patient with sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al jafar, Hassan [Dept. of Hematology, Amiri Hospital, Kuwait (Kuwait); Al Shemmeri, Eman [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Farwaniya Hospital, Al-Farwania (Kuwait); Al Shemmeri, Jehan; Al Enizi, Saud [Faculty of Medicine, Nuclear Medicine Dept, Kuwait University, Kuwait (Kuwait); Aytglu, Leena [Molecular Imaging Center, Jaber Al-Ahmad Center, Kuwait (Kuwait); Afzai, Uzma [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Farwaniya Hospital, Al-Farwania (Kuwait)

    2015-06-15

    Brodie's abscess is a rare subacute osteomyelitis that can be found in sickle cell disease along with other bone complications. A 21-year-old female with sickle cell disease was presenting frequently to the medical casualty department for painful vasoocclusive crises and for persistent ankle pain and swelling. Hybrid imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) incidentally revealed Brodie's abscess in the talus bone of the ankle, causing persisting long-standing pain. SPECT-CT is a modern technology used to scan bone to detect both anatomical and functional abnormalities with high specificity. Brodie's abscess is a rare bone inflammation that could be a hidden cause of pain and infection in sickle cell disease. Although rare, this lesion requires more attention in patients with sickle cell disease because their immunocompromised status renders them prone to this infection.

  16. Precision of SPECT/CT allows the diagnosis of a hidden Brodie's abscess of the talus in a patient with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al jafar, Hassan; Al Shemmeri, Eman; Al Shemmeri, Jehan; Al Enizi, Saud; Aytglu, Leena; Afzai, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Brodie's abscess is a rare subacute osteomyelitis that can be found in sickle cell disease along with other bone complications. A 21-year-old female with sickle cell disease was presenting frequently to the medical casualty department for painful vasoocclusive crises and for persistent ankle pain and swelling. Hybrid imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) incidentally revealed Brodie's abscess in the talus bone of the ankle, causing persisting long-standing pain. SPECT-CT is a modern technology used to scan bone to detect both anatomical and functional abnormalities with high specificity. Brodie's abscess is a rare bone inflammation that could be a hidden cause of pain and infection in sickle cell disease. Although rare, this lesion requires more attention in patients with sickle cell disease because their immunocompromised status renders them prone to this infection

  17. An observational study of autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells transplantation in seven patients with nervous system diseases: a 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chao; Geng, Run-lu; Ge, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Hao; Wan, Mei-Rong; Geng, De-Qin

    2014-05-01

    Currently, autologous bone marrow-derived stem cell is one of the most innovative areas of stem cells research. Previous studies on animal models of nervous system diseases have shown that these cells have a good effect on nervous system disorders. The alternative treatment with stem cells for the nervous system diseases has also gradually reached to clinical application stage. The prospect is captivating, but the safety and efficacy of this procedure need further research. To observe the clinical efficacy and side effects of the treatment for autologous mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem/progenitor cells which are in differentiated form by inducing with cerebrospinal fluid in the patients with nervous system diseases, thirty patients were selected from our hospital (2009-10 to 2012-07) and were followed at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after the treatment with autologous mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem/progenitor cells in differentiated form was introduced. In this paper, we will introduce the process to make cells accessible for the clinical application by the description of the changes observed in 7 cases were followed for 2 years. The time for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells could be available for clinical needs is as early as 5 days, not later than 10 days, and the median time is 8 days, while neural stem/progenitor cells in differentiated form can be available for clinical needs in as early as 12 days, not later than 15 days, and the median time is 13.5 days (statistical explanation: Case 5 only uses autologous mesenchymal stem cells, and Case 7 has two times bone marrow punctures). The neurological function of the patients was improved in 1-month follow-up, and the patients have a better discontinuous trend (statistical explanation: sometimes the neurological function of the patients between two adjacent follow-ups does not change significantly). After transplantation, four patients appeared to have transient fever, but it was

  18. Transcranial Doppler, MRA, and MRI as a screening examination for cerebrovascular disease in patients with sickle cell anemia: an 8-year study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibert, J.J.; Glasier, C.M.; Allison, J.W.; James, C.A.; Kinder, D.L.; Cox, K.S.; Lairry, F.; Graves, R.A.; Becton, D.L.; Jackson, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. The authors previously reported five transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) findings as significant in detecting clinical cerebrovascular disease in a 4-year study in patients with sickle cell disease. This is a follow-up to evaluate the validity of the original findings over another 4-year period during which the study population doubled. A clinical follow-up of the original asymptomatic sickle cell patients with positive TCD, MRA, and MRI was also made. Results. Of the 4 out of original 46 control patients in 1992 who had positive MRA and TCD, 3 have subsequently had clinical stroke. None of the 9 original patients with positive TCD and positive MRI but negative MRA have developed stroke. All five original TCD indicators of disease were still significant (P 35 cm/s, mean velocity in middle cerebral artery (MCA) >170 cm/s, resistive index (RI) in OA 200 cm/s. (orig.)

  19. Modeling Red Blood Cell and Iron Dynamics in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    As in the previous class, cells that lack a full complement of iron have increased mortality. As in class P4, we have cδ5,γ (µ5) = m5µ5 + b5 , m5 > 0...Mark J. Koury and Prem Ponka, New insights in erythropoiesis: The roles of Folate, Vitamin B12, and Iron, Annual Review of Nutrition, 24 (2004), 105–131

  20. Quality of life of patients with graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Sibéli de Fátima Ferraz Simão; Machado, Celina Mattos; Coelho, Raquel de Castro Figueiredo Pereira; Sarquis, Leila Maria Mansano; Guimarães, Paulo Ricardo Bittencourt; Kalinke, Luciana Puchalski

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the quality of life of adult patients with hematological cancer in the 100 days after transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells and verifying whether the variable graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is predictive of worse results. An observational correlational and quantitative study with 36 adult participants diagnosed with hematologic cancer who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from September 2013 to June 2015. The mean age was 37 years, 52.78% were female, and 61.11% were diagnosed with leukemia. Quality of life scores showed a significant impact between pre-transplantation and pre-hospital discharge, and also within the 100 days post-transplantation. The statistical analysis between the scores for the groups with and without GvHD showed a significant difference between the presence of the complication and worse results. Quality of life is altered as a result of hematopoietic stem cells transplantation, especially in patients who have graft-versus-host disease. Avaliar a qualidade de vida de pacientes adultos com câncer hematológico nos 100 dias do transplante de células-tronco hematopoéticas e verificar se a variável doença do enxerto contra o hospedeiro é preditiva de piores resultados. Estudo observacional, correlacional e quantitativo, com 36 participantes adultos, diagnosticados com câncer hematológico que se submeteram ao transplante de células-tronco hematopoéticas de setembro de 2013 a junho de 2015. A média de idade foi 37 anos, 52,78% eram do sexo feminino, e 61,11% com diagnóstico de leucemia. Os escores de qualidade de vida demonstraram impacto significativo entre o pré-transplante e a pré-alta hospitalar e entre os 100 dias pós-transplante. A análise estatística entre os escores dos grupos com e sem doença do enxerto contra o hospedeiro evidenciou significância entre a presença desta complicação e piores resultados. A qualidade de vida é alterada em decorrência do transplante de c

  1. Clinical utility of neuronal cells directly converted from fibroblasts of patients for neuropsychiatric disorders: studies of lysosomal storage diseases and channelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Shin-ichi; Yuan, Ming; Cardarelli, Ross A.; Maegawa, Gustavo; Higurashi, Norimichi; Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Wilson, Ashley M.; Tristan, Carlos; Kondo, Mari A.; Chen, Yian; Koga, Minori; Obie, Cassandra; Ishizuka, Koko; Seshadri, Saurav; Srivastava, Rupali; Kato, Takahiro A.; Horiuchi, Yasue; Sedlak, Thomas W.; Lee, Yohan; Rapoport, Judith L.; Hirose, Shinichi; Okano, Hideyuki; Valle, David; O'Donnell, Patricio; Sawa, Akira; Kai, Mihoko

    2015-01-01

    Methodologies for generating functional neuronal cells directly from human fibroblasts [induced neuronal (iN) cells] have been recently developed, but the research so far has only focused on technical refinements or recapitulation of known pathological phenotypes. A critical question is whether this novel technology will contribute to elucidation of novel disease mechanisms or evaluation of therapeutic strategies. Here we have addressed this question by studying Tay-Sachs disease, a representative lysosomal storage disease, and Dravet syndrome, a form of severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy, using human iN cells with feature of immature postmitotic glutamatergic neuronal cells. In Tay-Sachs disease, we have successfully characterized canonical neuronal pathology, massive accumulation of GM2 ganglioside, and demonstrated the suitability of this novel cell culture for future drug screening. In Dravet syndrome, we have identified a novel functional phenotype that was not suggested by studies of classical mouse models and human autopsied brains. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that human iN cells are useful for translational neuroscience research to explore novel disease mechanisms and evaluate therapeutic compounds. In the future, research using human iN cells with well-characterized genomic landscape can be integrated into multidisciplinary patient-oriented research on neuropsychiatric disorders to address novel disease mechanisms and evaluate therapeutic strategies. PMID:25732146

  2. Liver Cirrhosis in a Patient with Sickle Cell Trait (Hb Sβ+ Thalassemia without Other Known Causes of Hepatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Santi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver involvement in patients with sickle cell anemia/trait includes a wide range of alterations, from mild liver function test abnormalities to cirrhosis and acute liver failure. Approximately 15–30% of patients with sickle cell anemia present cirrhosis at autopsy. The pathogenesis of cirrhosis is usually related to chronic hepatitis B or C infection or to iron overload resulting from the many transfusions received by these patients in their lifetime. Thus, cirrhosis has been described almost exclusively in patients with sickle cell anemia, while only mild liver abnormalities have been associated with the sickle cell trait. In the present case study, we describe a young Mediterranean man carrying a sickle cell trait (Hb Sβ+ thalassemia who developed liver cirrhosis being negative for hepatitis C and B viruses or for other causes of cirrhosis and not receiving chronic blood transfusions.

  3. Standardization method for measurement of hydroxyurea by Ultra High Efficiency Liquid Chromatography in plasma of patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcielle Bruna Dias Elias

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia (SCA is a recessively inherited disease characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, chronic inflammation, and acute episodes of hemolysis. Hydroxyurea (HU is widely used to increase the levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF. The objective of this study was to standardize and validate a method for the quantification of HU in human plasma by using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC in order to determine the plasma HU levels in adult patients with SCA who had been treated with HU. We used an analytical reverse phase column (Nucleosil C18 with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile/water (16.7/83.3. The retention times of HU, urea, and methylurea were 6.7, 7.7, and 11.4 min, respectively. All parameters of the validation process were defined. To determine the precision and accuracy of quality controls, HU in plasma was used at concentrations of 100, 740, and 1600 µM, with methylurea as the internal standard. Linearity was assessed in the range of 50-1600 µM HU in plasma, obtaining a correlation coefficient of 0.99. The method was accurate and precise and can be used for the quantitative determination of HU for therapeutic monitoring of patients with SCA treated with HU.

  4. Age-related treatment patterns in sickle cell disease patients and the associated sickle cell complications and healthcare costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinder, Morey A; Vekeman, Francis; Sasane, Medha; Trahey, Alex; Paley, Carole; Duh, Mei Sheng

    2013-05-01

    This study explored the blood transfusion patterns, SCD complications, utilization of iron chelation therapies (ICT), healthcare resource use, and costs in pediatric, transitioning (18 years old) and adult patients with SCD. Data from Florida (1998-2009), New Jersey (1996-2009), Missouri (1997-2010), Kansas (2001-2009), and Iowa (1998-2010) state Medicaid were used. Patients with ≥2 SCD diagnoses and ≥1 transfusion event were included. Rates of transfusion events, SCD complications, and proportion of eligible patients receiving ICT were calculated. ICT eligibility was defined as receiving ≥10 transfusions over lifetime. SCD complications included pain, pulmonary event, infection event, renal, cardiovascular, stroke, leg ulcers, and avascular necrosis. Regressions were used to assess risk factors for transfusion and identify the main drivers of costs. The sample included 3,208 patients. The transfusion rate increased from 1-year-old to a peak at 16 years old, then dropped until age 26 and remained stable thereafter. In contrast the frequency of diagnoses for SCD complications increased markedly after age 16. Post-transition patients (≥18 years old) were significantly associated with fewer transfusions (odds ratio: 0.80, P = 0.002). Among eligible patients for ICT, there was no statistically significant difference in total cost between the ICT and no ICT groups (adjusted cost difference, $136, P = 0.114). Patients transitioning to adult care received less transfusions and hydroxyurea, less ICT when eligible for chelation therapy, had higher healthcare costs and suffered from more frequent SCD related complications than pediatric patients. These findings highlight the changes in treatment patterns corresponding to transition to adult care. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Prognostic role of patient gender in limited-disease small-cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roengvoraphoj, Olarn; Eze, Chukwuka; Niyazi, Maximilian; Li, Minglun; Belka, Claus; Manapov, Farkhad [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Hildebrandt, Guido [University of Rostock, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that female gender could be a prognostic factor in limited-disease (LD) small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), but the correlation between patient gender and survival parameters remains unclear. Data from 179 LD SCLC patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) were reviewed. Influence of patient gender on time to progression (TTP), local control (LC), brain metastasis-free (BMFS), distant metastasis-free (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) was analysed. Definitive CRT was completed by 179 (110 men/69 women) patients. Of these, 68 (38%; 34 men/34 women) patients were treated in concurrent and 111 (62%; 76 men/35 women) in sequential mode. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was subsequently applied in 70 (39%; 36 men/34 women) patients with partial or complete response after CRT. Median OS was 20 (95% confidence interval [CI] 10-22) and 14 (95% CI 10-18) months in female and male patients, respectively (p = 0.021). In subgroups defined by remission status (complete and partial response) after CRT, an OS benefit for females compared to males was also detected. There was no correlation between patient gender and TTP, LC or DMFS, and no difference in OS in the female and male subgroups treated with PCI. The incidence of metachronous brain metastases (BMs) in the male and female subgroups differed significantly (40/110 men vs. 18/69 women, p = 0.03). Also, mean BMFS was significantly longer in women (p = 0.023). Patient gender also significantly correlated with OS on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other prognostic factors (p = 0.04, HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.08-1.92). In this heterogeneous LD SCLC patient cohort treated with definitive CRT, female gender was significantly associated with longer BMFS and OS, as well as with a lower incidence of metachronous brain failure. (orig.) [German] Studien haben gezeigt, dass weibliches Geschlecht ein prognostischer Faktor beim kleinzelligen Lungenkarzinom (SCLC) im Stadium &apos

  6. Inhibitory Effect of Natural Anti-Inflammatory Compounds on Cytokines Released by Chronic Venous Disease Patient-Derived Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Tisato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Large vein endothelium plays important roles in clinical diseases such as chronic venous disease (CVD and thrombosis; thus to characterize CVD vein endothelial cells (VEC has a strategic role in identifying specific therapeutic targets. On these bases we evaluated the effect of the natural anti-inflammatory compounds α-Lipoic acid and Ginkgoselect phytosome on cytokines/chemokines released by CVD patient-derived VEC. For this purpose, we characterized the levels of a panel of cytokines/chemokines (n=31 in CVD patients’ plasma compared to healthy controls and their release by VEC purified from the same patients, in unstimulated and TNF-α stimulated conditions. Among the cytokines/chemokines released by VEC, which recapitulated the systemic profile (IL-8, TNF-α, GM-CSF, INF-α2, G-CSF, MIP-1β, VEGF, EGF, Eotaxin, MCP-1, CXCL10, PDGF, and RANTES, we identified those targeted by ex vivo treatment with α-Lipoic acid and/or Ginkgoselect phytosome (GM-CSF, G-CSF, CXCL10, PDGF, and RANTES. Finally, by investigating the intracellular pathways involved in promoting the VEC release of cytokines/chemokines, which are targeted by natural anti-inflammatory compounds, we documented that α-Lipoic acid significantly counteracted TNF-α-induced NF-κB and p38/MAPK activation while the effects of Ginkgo biloba appeared to be predominantly mediated by Akt. Our data provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of CVD pathogenesis, highlighting new potential therapeutic targets.

  7. Erythrocyte Aggregation and Blood Viscosity is Similar in Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease Patients with and without Leg Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Andre S A; Duncan, Walworth W; Pepple, D J

    2018-03-01

    Background  There is no consensus regarding the role of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in the pathogenesis of leg ulcers (LUs) in sickle cell disease (SCD). Objectives  We sought to evaluate whether the cross-sectional determination of RBC aggregation and hematological indices were associated with the presence of LU in homozygous SCD. Methods  Twenty-seven patients with LU and 23 with no history of ulceration were recruited into the study. A laser-assisted rotational red cell analyzer (LoRRca) was used in the determination of the aggregation index (AI), aggregation half-time ( t 1/2 ), and the RBC aggregate strength (AMP). Hematological indices were determined using a CELL-DYN Ruby analyzer. Whole blood viscosity (WBV) and plasma viscosity (PV) were measured using a Vilastic bioprofiler. The data were presented as means ± standard deviation or median, interquartile range. Two-sample t -test was used to test for associations between the AIs, WBV, and PV in patients with and without LU. Statistical significance was taken as p  < 0.05. All analyses were conducted using Stata/SE v . 12.1 (StataCorp, College Station, TX). Results  The AI was comparable in the group with and without ulcers (68.6, 16.7 versus 67.7, 16.9; p  = 0.74); t 1/2 (1.7, 1.3 versus 1.8, 1.3; p  = 0.71); AMP (18.8, 14.5 versus 19.1, 13.3; p  = 0.84), WBV (3.8, 1.2 versus 3.8, 0.7; p  = 0.77); and the PV (1.3, 0.08 versus 1.4, 0.1; p  = 0.31) and were also not statistically different between the groups of participants. Conclusion  RBC aggregation and aggregate strength are not associated with leg ulceration in SCD.

  8. Differential expression of C-Reactive protein and Serum amyloid A in different cell types in the lung tissue of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic systemic inflammatory syndrome has been implicated in the pathobiology of extrapulmonary manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to investigate which cell types within lung tissue are responsible for expressing major acute-phase reactants in COPD patients and disease-free (“resistant”) smokers. Methods An observational case–control study was performed to investigate three different cell types in surgical lung samples of COPD patients and resistant smokers via expression of the C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA1, SAA2 and SAA4) genes. Epithelial cells, macrophages and fibroblasts from the lung parenchyma were separated by magnetic microbeads (CD326, CD14 and anti-fibroblast), and gene expression was evaluated by RT-PCR. Results The sample consisted of 74 subjects, including 40 COPD patients and 34 smokers without disease. All three cell types were capable of synthesizing these biomarkers to some extent. In fibroblasts, gene expression analysis of the studied biomarkers demonstrated increased SAA2 and decreased SAA1 in patients with COPD. In epithelial cells, there was a marked increase in CRP, which was not observed in fibroblasts or macrophages. In macrophages, however, gene expression of these markers was decreased in COPD patients compared to controls. Conclusions These results provide novel information regarding the gene expression of CRP and SAA in different cell types in the lung parenchyma. This study revealed differences in the expression of these markers according to cell type and disease status and contributes to the identification of cell types that are responsible for the secretion of these molecules. PMID:24884805

  9. Sickle cell disease and pregnancy: analysis of 34 patients followed at the Regional Blood Center of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Silva-Pinto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to verify the evolution of pregnancies in sickle cell patients followed at one institution over a period of 12 years (January 2000 to June 2012. Methods: The study evaluated 34 pregnant women with sickle cell disease with a mean age of 23.9 ± 5.3 years. The incidence of obstetric complications, non-obstetric complications linked to sickle cell disease and complications in the newborn were analyzed. Results: A total of 26% of the cases reported previous miscarriages, 20% had preterm labor, 10% had pre-eclampsia, and 5% had gestational diabetes. Forty-one percent of the deliveries were cesarean sections and 29% of patients required blood transfusions. In respect to sickle cell disease, 62% of patients had vaso-occlusive crises, 29% had acute chest syndrome, 23% had urinary tract infection, 15% had impaired cardiac function and 6% developed pulmonary hypertension. Only one patient died in the postnatal period due to acute chest syndrome. The mean gestational age was 37.8 ± 2.63 weeks, and mean newborn weight was 2.809 ± 643.8 g. There were seven fetal losses, including three stillbirths and four miscarriages. The impact of transfusion therapy on the incidence of maternal–fetal complications during pregnancy was evaluated. Conclusions: Pregnancy in sickle cell patients is still associated with complications. Although no statistical difference was observed between transfused and non-transfused women, there were no deaths (fetal or maternal in transfused patients whereas one maternal death and three stillbirths occurred in non-transfused women. A larger study of sickle cell pregnant women will be necessary to elucidate the actual role of transfusion during pregnancy in sickle cell disease.

  10. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA-repair and mutations in immuncompetent cells from patients with rheumatic diseases and corresponding animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmann, H.

    1977-01-01

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis was investigated in lymphocytes of patients with different inflammatory rheumatic diseases. After γ-irradiation H 3 -thymidin incorporation in DNA and DNA rejoining was reduced. After UV-irradiation the first step (90 min) of unscheduled DNA synthesis was above the controls. Some animal models for human diseases showed the same trend. An infectious ethiology was discussed for some of these diseases. (author)

  12. A retrospective review of acupuncture use for the treatment of pain in sickle cell disease patients: Descriptive analysis from a single institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kit; Cheng, M. Jennifer; Ge, Xiaoying; Berger, Ann; Xu, Dihua; Kato, Gregory J.; Minniti, Caterina P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This retrospective study describes the use of acupuncture for adult sickle cell patients in a single institution. Methods We identified 47 sickle cell disease (SCD) patients referred for acupuncture at the National Institutes of Health between January, 2005 and September, 2011. All patients were enrolled in a Study of the Natural History of SCD and signed consent. We reviewed patient demographics, location of acupuncture treatment sessions (inpatient versus outpatient), number of sessions received, sites of pain, patient pain reporting, and the use of other complementary therapies. Results Of the 47 patients (60% women, median age 36 years) referred for acupuncture, 42 had homozygous SS disease (89%) and 5 had SC disease (11%). Over half of the patients (51%) reported more than 3 sites of pain. Only 24 patients (51%) underwent acupuncture treatment. Of those who elected not to receive acupuncture, a majority (87%) accepted some other forms of complementary therapies. Nine patients underwent only inpatient acupuncture for acute vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC). Eleven patients received only outpatient acupuncture treatment for chronic pain, and four patients received both inpatient and outpatient treatments. For the patients who received inpatient acupuncture treatment for acute VOC, there was a significant reduction of reported pain score immediately after acupuncture treatment with an average pain reduction of 2.1 points on the numeric pain scale (ppain as improved compared to prior session. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the largest retrospective review of acupuncture use in the sickle cell population. This analysis describes the use of acupuncture and raises the possibility of its use as an adjuvant for pain management in this population. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate acupuncture’s efficacy and effectiveness for pain management in different treatment settings and for various types of pain etiologies among the sickle cell population

  13. Effect of Hereditary Hemochromatosis Gene H63D and C282Y Mutations on Iron Overload in Sickle Cell Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Kasım Terzi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disease that is one of the most important reasons for iron overload. Sickle cell disease is a hemoglobinopathy that occurs as a result of a homozygous mutation in the hemoglobin gene. Erythrocyte transfusion is frequently used in the treatment of this disease. Iron overload as a result of transfusion is important in the mortality and morbidity of sickle cell anemia patients as well as in other hemoglobinopathies. In this study, the effect of hemochromatosis gene (HFE p.H63D and p.C282Y mutations on transfusion-related cardiac and liver iron overload in sickle cell disease patients who carry homozygous hemoglobin S mutation has been investigated. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective single-center crosssectional study in patients with homozygous hemoglobin S mutation between the years 2008 and 2013. The patients were divided into two groups. The first group (group A, n=31 was receiving chelation therapy and the second group (group B, n=13 was not. Direct and indirect iron loads were analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging and biochemically, respectively. HFE gene mutations were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Statistical analyses were performed by independent samples t-test. Results: p.H63D mutation was detected in 10 (32.3% patients in group A and in only 1 patient (7.7% in group B. When the 2 groups were compared for iron overload, iron deposition in the liver was significantly higher in group B (p=0.046. In addition, in group A, iron deposition was significantly higher in HFE mutation carriers compared to patients without the mutation (p=0.05. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that HFE gene mutations are important in iron deposition in the liver in patients with sickle cell disease.

  14. Eliminating Hairy Cell Leukemia Minimal Residual Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have disease-related symptoms that require treatment will be randomly assigned to receive cladribine with either concurrent rituximab or rituximab at least 6 months after completing cladribine therapy.

  15. Low Rate of Detection of Mucosal High-Risk-Type Human Papillomavirus in Korean Patients with Extragenital Bowen's Disease and Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Especially in Digital Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Rim Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV infection has been demonstrated in some of the nonmelanoma skin cancers as well as in precancerous lesions. Multiple infections of mucosal high-risk HPV may contribute to the onset of digital Bowen's disease through, if any, digital-genital transmission. We screened for the presence of the mucosal HPV DNA in patients with extragenital Bowen's disease (, squamous cell carcinoma (, bowenoid papulosis (, verrucous carcinoma (, actinic keratosis (, and basal cell carcinoma (. We used a PANArray HPV Genotyping Chip for high-risk and low-risk mucosal types. Genotyping data was confirmed using a conventional direct DNA sequencing method. Two cases of extragenital Bowen's disease were positive for types 16 and 33 of mucosal HPV, respectively. None of the squamous cell carcinoma cases were positive. Neither patients with digital Bowen's disease ( nor those with squamous cell carcinoma ( showed any mucosal high-risk HPV. Mucosal high-risk HPV DNA was confirmed in 5 (55.6% of the 9 patients with bowenoid papulosis. HPV 16 was most prevalent (, while the DNA of HPVs 35 and 67 was detected in one sample for each of the two types. Our study demonstrated that two (6.7% of the patients with 30 extragenital Bowen's disease were positive for types 16 and 33 of mucosal HPV, respectively. HPVs belonging to the mucosal high-risk group may participate in the development of extragenital Bowen's disease. However, we could not find any relationship between the mucosal high-risk HPV and Bowen's disease or squamous cell carcinoma in the fingers.

  16. The significance of one-station N2 disease in the prognosis of patients with nonsmall-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misthos, Panagiotis; Sepsas, Evangelos; Kokotsakis, John; Skottis, Ion; Lioulias, Achilleas

    2008-11-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to define the characteristics and the prognosis of N2 disease subgroups according to their patterns of spread. From January 1993 to December 2004, 1,329 patients underwent lung resection for bronchogenic carcinoma The records of all patients with positive mediastinal lymph nodes at the surgical specimen (pIIIA/N2) after radical resection were analyzed, and the pattern of mediastinal lymphatic spread was classified according to regional spread, to skip metastasis, and to one or two or more lymph node stations, in relation to primary tumor location. Age, sex, type of resection, right or left lesion, T status, primary tumor location, tumor size, tumor central or peripheral location, histology, and survival were recorded and analyzed. Survival was analyzed according to regional spread or not, number of mediastinal lymph node stations involved, and skip metastasis status. Among 302 cases (22.7%) with positive mediastinal lymph nodes pIIIA/N2, 66 (22%) were skip metastases, 72 (24%) had a nonregional mode of spread, and 199 (66%) included two or more stations of mediastinal lymph node invasion. Cox regression analysis of all cases disclosed malignant invasion in only one mediastinal lymph node station as the only favorable factor of survival (p < 0.001, odds ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval: 0.42 to 0.78). The presence of one-station mediastinal lymph node metastasis in patients with nonsmall-cell lung cancer who underwent major lung resection with complete mediastinal lymph node dissection proved to be a good prognostic factor that should be taken into account in the future.

  17. Tissue Banks and Cell Lines Derived from Patients with a High Risk of Breast Cancer and in situ Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gusterson, Barry

    1998-01-01

    .... These cells are from patients who are mutation carriers of BRCA1, BRCA2, and p53. Samples have been received from 46 women, five of which have a Li-Fraumeni - phenotype, with confirmed mutations...

  18. ADAM10 gene expression in the blood cells of Alzheimer's disease patients and mild cognitive impairment subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manzine, Patricia Regina; Marcello, Elena; Borroni, Barbara; Kamphuis, Willem; Hol, Elly; Padovani, Alessandro; Nascimento, Carla Crispim; De Godoy Bueno, Patricia; Assis Carvalho Vale, Francisco; Iost Pavarini, Sofia Cristina; Di Luca, Monica; Cominetti, Márcia Regina

    2015-01-01

    ADAM10 is a potential biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). ADAM10 protein levels are reduced in platelets of AD patients. The aim was to verify the total blood and platelet ADAM10 gene expression in AD patients and to compare with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy subjects. No

  19. SUPPLEMENTATION OF PATIENTS WITH HOMOZYGOUS SICKLE-CELL DISEASE WITH ZINC, ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL, VITAMIN-C, SOYBEAN OIL, AND FISH OIL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MUSKIET, FAJ; MUSKIET, FD; MEIBORG, G; SCHERMER, JG

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen patients (aged 0.7-17.9 y) with homozygous sickle cell disease were supplemented with alpha-tocopherol, vitamin C, zinc, and soybean oil (suppl 1; for 8 mo) and alpha-tocopherol, vitamin C, and fish oil (suppl 2; for 7 mo). Urinary zinc (suppl 1), plasma vitamin C, plasma cholesterol ester

  20. Varied autopsy findings in five treated patients with Gaucher disease and parkinsonism include the absence of Gaucher cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monestime, Gianina; Borger, Daniel K; Kim, Jenny; Lopez, Grisel; Allgaeuer, Michael; Jain, Dhanpat; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Wang, Hao-Wei; Sidransky, Ellen

    2016-05-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy is standard of care for patients with Gaucher disease, as it significantly improves skeletal, visceral, and hematological symptoms. Few pathological studies have documented the extent of pathological findings in treated patients. Autopsy findings in five treated patients, who ultimately developed parkinsonism, ranged from the complete absence of Gaucher pathology to extensive involvement of multiple tissues, without correlation to age, genotype, spleen status, or dose/duration of therapy. Additional autopsies may elucidate modifiers and biomarkers contributing to disease burden and response to therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. The Associations Between Body Cell Mass and Nutritional and Inflammatory Markers in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and in Subjects Without Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymarz, Aleksandra; Bartoszewicz, Zbigniew; Szamotulska, Katarzyna; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    Body cell mass (BCM), a component of lean tissue mass (LTM), is a metabolically active part of the body. Lean tissue loss is one of the diagnostic criteria of protein energy wasting. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), a decrease of lean tissue, including BCM, may be replaced by an increase of extracellular water. Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) enables the assessment of the amount of BCM, LTM, and fluid overload. The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between BCM measured by BIS and anthropometric measurements, biochemical markers of nutrition and also inflammatory markers. Forty-eight patients treated with hemodialysis (HD; 32 males and 16 females) with a mean age 59.8 ± 15.5 (HD group), 61 patients with CKD Stage 4 to 5 (35 males and 26 females) with a mean age of 60.1 ± 17.7 (predialysis group) and 33 individuals with normal renal function (18 males and 15 women) with a mean age 58.7 ± 17.0 (control group) were included. Body mass index, handgrip strength (HGS), body composition measured by BIS, and biochemical analyses were performed on all of them. Positive correlations were observed between BCM and LTM, HGS, serum creatinine and insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations in all groups. Serum prealbumin concentration correlated positively with BCM only in the predialysis group (r = 0.406; P = .001). The amount of lymphocytes also correlated passively with BCM in predialysis group (r = 0.314; P = .024). Negative correlations were noted between BCM and fat mass in all groups and between BCM and interleukin 6 concentrations only in the HD group. In this study, BCM neither correlated with body mass index and serum albumin nor with C-reactive protein. BCM is strongly associated with biochemical determinants of muscle mass (serum creatinine, insulin-like growth factor 1) and muscle function (HGS) in patients treated with HD, with CKD Stage 4 to 5 and in individuals without kidney disease. Its significance requires further investigation

  2. Expression of Foxp3 in colorectal cancer but not in Treg cells correlates with disease progression in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells (Treg expressing the transcription factor forkhead-box protein P3 (Foxp3 have been identified to counteract anti-tumor immune responses during tumor progression. Besides, Foxp3 presentation by cancer cells itself may also allow them to evade from effector T-cell responses, resulting in a survival benefit of the tumor. For colorectal cancer (CRC the clinical relevance of Foxp3 has not been evaluated in detail. Therefore the aim of this study was to study its impact in colorectal cancer (CRC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene and protein analysis of tumor tissues from patients with CRC was performed to quantify the expression of Foxp3 in tumor infiltrating Treg and colon cancer cells. The results were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and patients overall survival. Serial morphological analysis demonstrated Foxp3 to be expressed in cancer cells. High Foxp3 expression of the cancer cells was associated with poor prognosis compared to patients with low Foxp3 expression. In contrast, low and high Foxp3 level in tumor infiltrating Treg cells demonstrated no significant differences in overall patient survival. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings strongly suggest that Foxp3 expression mediated by cancer cells rather than by Treg cells contribute to disease progression.

  3. Impact of cervical disease and its definitive radiotherapeutic management on survival: Experience in 2013 patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx and pharyngolarynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataini, J.P.; Bernier, J.; Jaulerry, C.; Brunin, F.; Pontvert, D.

    1990-01-01

    Two thousand thirteen patients with squamous cell carcinoma of oropharynx and pharyngolarynx were reviewed with regard to neck disease presentation and disease-free survival after radical radiotherapy. All patients were staged according to both the AJCC 1976 and the UICC 1978 classifications. Causes of failure, disease-free survival, and complication rates were assessed. Sixty percent had a clinically positive neck. The 3-year disease-free survival rates were 58%, 44%, 38%, and 25% for AJCC N0, N1, N2, and N3 cases, respectively. Corresponding UICC figures were 58%, 46%, 26%, and 29%. Analyzed parameters were nodal stage, size, site and fixity, and location of primary. Complications attributed to neck disease did not exceed 3%. A critical appraisal of the nodal staging systems is derived from these sets of data

  4. Duodenal endocrine cells in adult coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölund, K; Alumets, J; Berg, N O; Håkanson, R; Sundler, F

    1979-01-01

    Using immunohistochemical techniques we studied duodenal biopsies from 18 patients with coeliac disease and 24 patients with normal duodenal morphology. We had access to antisera against the following gastrointestinal peptides: cholecystokinin (CCK), gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), gastrin-17, glucagon-enteroglucagon, motilin, neurotensin, pancreatic peptide (PP), secretin, somatostatin, substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). The somatostatin, GIP, CCK, and glucagon cells were increased in number in coeliac disease. The number of motilin cells was slightly increased, while secretin cells were reduced. Cells storing gastrin-17, substance P, or neurotensin were rare in all patients regardless of diagnosis. No PP immunoreactive cells were found and VIP was localised to neurons only. In biopsies from patients having a mucosa with ridging of villi the number of the various endocrine cell types did not differ from that in the control group. Images Fig. 2 PMID:385455

  5. Increased blood clearance rate of indium-111 oxine-labeled autologous CD4+ blood cells in untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimfors, G.; Holm, G.; Mellstedt, H.; Schnell, P.O.; Tullgren, O.; Bjoerkholm, M.

    1990-01-01

    Untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) have a blood T-lymphocytopenia mainly caused by a reduction of the CD4+ subset. Indirect support for a sequestration of T cells in the spleen and tumor-involved lymphoid tissue has accumulated. To test the hypothesis that the blood CD4 T-lymphocytopenia in patients with HD is caused by an altered lymphocyte traffic, 12 untreated HD patients and five in complete clinical remission (CCR) were studied. Blood lymphocytes were collected by leukapheresis and gradient centrifugation, and were further purified by an adherence step. The cells were labeled with indium-111 oxine and reinfused intravenously into the patient. The radioactivity of CD4+ and CD8+ blood lymphocytes separated by immunoabsorption was measured from serial blood samples. CD4+ cells were eliminated more rapidly in untreated patients than patients in CCR. Repeated gamma camera imaging after autotransfusion of indium-111 oxine labeled cells demonstrated an accumulation of radioactivity in tumor-involved tissue of untreated patients. These findings support the concept of an enhanced elimination of CD4+ cells in patients with active HD that may contribute to the observed blood T-lymphocytopenia and may reflect a biologic response to the tumor

  6. B Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2012-01-01

    The role of B cells in autoimmune diseases involves different cellular functions, including the well-established secretion of autoantibodies, autoantigen presentation and ensuing reciprocal interactions with T cells, secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and the generation of ectopic germinal centers. Through these mechanisms B cells are involved both in autoimmune diseases that are traditionally viewed as antibody mediated and also in autoimmune diseases that are commonly classified as T cell...

  7. No Correlation Exists between Disease Activity and the Expression of Killer-Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Kogure

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The genes for killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs have been cloned and their functions and expression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA have been partially clarified. However, the correlation between their expression and disease activity has not been analyzed in patients with RA. Thus, we measured KIR expression on lymphocytes in patients with RA, and assessed the correlation between KIR expression and disease activity. Patients and Methods. In the cross-sectional study, 15 patients (9 females and 6 males who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for RA were assessed. In the longitudinal study, patients who were followed-up for 3 months were assessed. CD158a/b expression on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of RA patients was analyzed using flow cytometry. Results. No significant correlation between KIR expression and CRP, ESR, or IgM-RF was observed. There was no remarkable change in the expression of KIRs between the baseline and after 3 months. Additionally, in the 5 patients whose expression of KIRs particularly changed, the time-related changes in the expression of KIRs were independent from those of inflammation parameters and IgM-RF. Conclusion. There was no correlation between KIR expression and disease activity; therefore, the clinical use of KIR expression should be limited, while unnatural KIR expression may be involved in the pathogenesis of RA, but not a recruitment of chronic inflammation to induce joint damage.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells transplantation in hematological patients with acute graft-versus-host disease: characteristics and risk factors for infectious complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoma, Igor; Karpov, Igor; Krivenko, Svetlana; Iskrov, Igor; Milanovich, Natalia; Koritko, Alla; Uss, Anatoly

    2018-05-01

    The role of MSCs in infection prevention and treatment is still discussed in transplant and hematological patients. The spectrum and risk factors for infections after MSCs transplantation in patients with acute GVHD have not been studied before. To determine the risk factors and spectrum of infectious complications in patients received mesenchymal stem cell transplantation as a treatment for acute GVHD. A prospective observational study was performed to evaluate the risk factors and characteristics of infectious complications after MSCs transplantation in adult patients having acute GVHD. Thirty-four episodes of MSCs transplantation in patients with acute GVHD after allogeneic HSCT were enrolled in the study. MSCs were given at a median dose of 1.32 (interquartile range 0.87-2.16) mln cells/kg per infusion at 91 days (interquartile range 31-131 days) after HSCT. Data relating to age, gender, date, and type of transplantation, characteristics of MSCs, infectious agents, and antimicrobial therapy and prevention regimens were prospectively collected in all of the enrolled patients. The episode of proven infectious complication was set as a primary outcome. There were totally 68 patients with acute GVHD in the study; among them there were 34 cases of MSCs transplantation performed. Among the registered infectious episodes were viral infections (CMV-associated disease, EBV-associated disease), invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, bacterial bloodstream infections, and pneumonia. MSCs transplantation has shown no statistically significant association with risk of infectious complications in patients with acute GVHD in a performed multivariate analysis. Among the most frequent infections in acute GVHD, we have described CMV, invasive aspergillosis, and bacterial infections (bloodstream infections or pneumonia). Among risk factors for infectious complications in patients with acute GVHD with/without MSCs transplantation are progression of main disease and neutropenia below

  9. Malignant pleural disease is highly associated with subsequent peritoneal metastasis in patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer independent of oncogene status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Tejas; Aisner, Dara L; Noonan, Sinead A; Bunn, Paul A; Purcell, William T; Carr, Laurie L; Camidge, D Ross; Doebele, Robert C

    2016-06-01

    Peritoneal metastasis from lung cancer is an uncommon clinical event and there are limited data on what factors predict peritoneal progression. This study retrospectively investigated whether patterns of metastatic spread and oncogene status in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are associated with peritoneal metastasis. Patients with metastatic non-squamous NSCLC (n=410) were identified at the University of Colorado Cancer Center. Sites of metastatic disease and baseline oncogene status (EGFR, ALK, KRAS, or triple negative) were documented via a retrospective chart review. In patients with EGFR mutations who developed peritoneal disease, we documented the presence of known resistance mechanisms. Median time to peritoneal metastasis, time from peritoneal disease to death, and overall survival were collected. Eight percent (33/410) patients in this study developed peritoneal metastasis. Malignant pleural disease at baseline was significantly associated with subsequent peritoneal spread. There was no association between oncogene status and peritoneal metastasis. Three patients with EGFR mutations who developed peritoneal metastasis had documented resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the ascitic fluid. Median time from stage IV disease to peritoneal metastasis was 16.5 months (range 0.6-108 months). There were no differences in overall survival between patients who developed peritoneal metastasis and those who did not. Malignant pleural disease is highly associated with peritoneal metastasis in patients with advanced NSCLC. The underlying mechanism is not clear. The presence of resistance mutations in ascitic fluid implies that poor drug penetration is unlikely to be the dominant mechanism. Despite being a late clinical finding, there were no differences in overall survival between patients who developed peritoneal metastasis and those who did not. Additional studies exploring treatment related factors in patients with malignant

  10. Retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion cell complex thickness assessment in patients with Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment. Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tiganov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to investigate the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL and the macular ganglion cell complex (GCC in patients with Alzheimer`s disease and mild cognitive impairment.Methods: this study included 10 patients (20 eyes with Alzheimer`s disease, 10 patients with mild cognitive impairment and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy controls that had no history of dementia. All the subjects underwent psychiatric examination, including the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, and complete ophthalmological examination, comprising optical coherence tomography and scanning laser polarimetry.Results: there was a significant decrease in GCC thickness in patients with Alzheimer`s disease compared to the control group, global loss volume of ganglion cells was higher than in control group. there was no significant difference among the groups in terms of RNFL thickness. Weak positive correlation of GCC thickness and MMSE results was observed.Conclusion: Our data confirm the retinal involvement in Alzheimer`s disease, as reflected by loss of ganglion cells. Further studies will clear up the role and contribution of dementia in pathogenesis of optic neuropathy.

  11. Long-term disease-free survival in patients with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Schetelig, Johannes; Fetscher, Sebastian; Reichle, Albrecht; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Beguin, Yves; Brunet, Salut; Caballero, Dolores; Majolino, Ignazio; Hagberg, Hans; Johnsen, Hans E; Kimby, Eva; Montserrat, Emilio; Stewart, Douglas; Copplestone, Adrian; Rosler, Wolf

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patients with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AIL) have a poor prognosis with conventional treatment. DESIGN AND METHODS: We initiated an EBMT-based survey studying the impact of high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with AIL. Data on 29 patients, who were transplanted between 1992 and 1998 in 16 transplant centers, were collected on standardized documentation forms. RESULTS: The median age at transplant...

  12. Celiac Disease, Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma, and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis in One Patient: A Very Rare Association and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Majid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL is a very rare peripheral T-cell lymphoma which is mostly associated with celiac disease. However, the association of primary sclerosing cholangitis and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma is uncommon. Herein we report and discuss the first case of patient who presented simultaneously with these two rare diseases. It is a 54-year-old man who stopped gluten-free diet after 15 years history of celiac disease. The diagnosis was based on the histological examination of duodenal biopsy and the diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis was made on liver biopsy, as well as the magnetic resonance cholangiogram. The treatment of EATL is mainly based on chemotherapy in addition to the optimal management of complications and adverse events that impact on the response to treatment and clinical outcomes, although the prognosis remains remarkably very poor.

  13. Combination of infliximab with thiopurines significantly reduces white cell and neutrophil counts in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, V; Maceneaney, O; Maguire, S; Garry, C; O'Sullivan, M; Kennedy, M; Safaya, K; Smyth, C; Farrell, R

    2017-05-01

    The effects of thiopurines on white cell count are well documented. We compared the effects of infliximab 5 mg/kg monotherapy and combination of infliximab with thiopurines on the total and differential white cell count (WBC). 13 IBD patients treated with infliximab monotherapy and 18 IBD patients treated with a combination of infliximab and thiopurines were included in the study. Using retrospective data, cell counts were examined prior to induction of infliximab, and at 6 weeks and 1 year post-induction. The patients on combination therapy had an absolute WBC at 52 weeks of 5.7 whereas that of patients on Infliximab monotherapy at the same time point was 8.3 with comparable neutrophil count of 3.4 and 5.4. The results showed a significant reduction in white cell count and neutrophils at 6 weeks which persisted at 52 weeks in both groups (p infliximab and thiopurine (p Infliximab monotherapy. There was no significant change in the lymphocyte count. Full blood counts should be closely monitored in all patients starting infliximab therapy, in particular patients receiving concomitant thiopurines.

  14. Sickle Cell Anemia Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sickle Cell Disease KidsHealth / For Kids / Sickle Cell Disease What's ... to stay in the hospital. What Causes Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell disease is an inherited (say: ...

  15. DNA damage and apoptosis in blood neutrophils of inflammatory bowel disease patients and in Caco-2 cells in vitro exposed to betanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Olejnik, Anna; Dobrowolska-Zachwieja, Agnieszka; Łuczak, Michał; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2016-04-06

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic, relapsing, inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and continuing colonic inflammation is considered an important risk factor in the development of colorectal cancer. Our previous studies showed that beetroot (Beta vulgaris var. rubra) products and their major component betanin modulate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils of healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of betanin on the oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis in neutrophils isolated from blood of patients with inflammatory bowel disease--ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The results were compared with those obtained in colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 cells. Betanin treatment at the concentration of 100 μM for 24 h increased DNA damage assessed by comet assay in IBD patients' neutrophils. A similar effect although less pronounced was observed in Caco-2 cells. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with H2O2 caused a 4-fold increase of DNA strand breaks in comparison to untreated cells, but pre-treatment with betanin reduced DNA damage in these cells. Betanin also induced procaspase-3 cleavage and caspase-3 activity accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, indicating its pro-apoptotic activity. These results suggest that betanin may support mechanisms that lead to the release of ROS and apoptotic cell death. In this way betanin may exert anti-inflammatory and potentially cancer preventive activity.

  16. Induction of systemic CTL responses in melanoma patients by dendritic cell vaccination: Cessation of CTL responses is associated with disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M.H.; Keikavoussi, P.; Brocker, E.B.

    2001-01-01

    Two HLA-A2-positive patients with advanced stage IV melanoma were treated with monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with either tumor peptide antigens from gp100, MART-1 and MAGE- 3 alone or in combination with autologous oncolysates. Clinically, the rapid progression of disease...... was substantially stalled and both patients were alive for more than 15 months after initiation of therapy. Specific CTL reactivity against several tumor antigens was detectable in peripheral blood, which declined just before reactivation of disease progression. Furthermore, CD3 zeta -chain expression detected...... by Western blotting was decreased in PBL at this time. In summary, our data confirm that DC-based vaccinations induce peptide-specific T cells in the peripheral blood of advanced-stage melanoma patients. Although successful induction of systemic tumor antigen-specific CTL may not lead to objective clinical...

  17. The relationship between genotype, psychiatric symptoms and quality of life in adult patients with sickle cell disease in São Paulo, Brazil: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastandréa, Érika Bergamini; Lucchesi, Fátima; Kitayama, Marcela Mayumi Gomes; Figueiredo, Maria Stella; Citero, Vanessa de Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) may be worsened in sickle cell patients due to the presence of psychiatric disorders. The aims of this study were to describe the psychiatric symptoms in Brazilian sickle cell patients and to evaluate the relationship of these symptoms to the genotype of the disease and the subject's HRQoL. Cross-sectional study conducted at the hematology outpatient clinic, Hospital São Paulo. Adult patients with sickle cell disease completed the Medical Outcome Study - Short Form 36 and the Patients' Health Questionnaire. Clinical data were gathered from their medical files. Linear regression models were developed to study the dependency of HRQoL domains on the genotype controlling for psychiatric symptoms. In the study period, 110 patients were evaluated. The most frequent psychiatric symptom was depression (30%), followed by anxiety (12.7%) and alcohol abuse (9.1%). Patients with the more severe genotype (SS and Sβthal0) showed lower scores for the "general health" and "role-physical" HRQoL domains, without interference from psychiatric symptoms. In the "role-physical" domain, the more severe genotype operated as a protective factor for HRQoL (β = 0.255; P = 0.007). The more severe genotypes worsened HRQoL in two domains of physical health (general health and role-physical), but they did not have any influence on mental health, thus suggesting that physicians should be more attentive to aspects of HRQoL relating to the functionality of sickle cell disease patients, so as to be aware of the limitations that these patient live with.

  18. The relationship between genotype, psychiatric symptoms and quality of life in adult patients with sickle cell disease in São Paulo, Brazil: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Bergamini Mastandréa

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL may be worsened in sickle cell patients due to the presence of psychiatric disorders. The aims of this study were to describe the psychiatric symptoms in Brazilian sickle cell patients and to evaluate the relationship of these symptoms to the genotype of the disease and the subject's HRQoL. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study conducted at the hematology outpatient clinic, Hospital São Paulo. METHODS: Adult patients with sickle cell disease completed the Medical Outcome Study - Short Form 36 and the Patients' Health Questionnaire. Clinical data were gathered from their medical files. Linear regression models were developed to study the dependency of HRQoL domains on the genotype controlling for psychiatric symptoms. RESULTS: In the study period, 110 patients were evaluated. The most frequent psychiatric symptom was depression (30%, followed by anxiety (12.7% and alcohol abuse (9.1%. Patients with the more severe genotype (SS and Sβthal0 showed lower scores for the "general health" and "role-physical" HRQoL domains, without interference from psychiatric symptoms. In the "role-physical" domain, the more severe genotype operated as a protective factor for HRQoL (β = 0.255; P = 0.007. CONCLUSION: The more severe genotypes worsened HRQoL in two domains of physical health (general health and role-physical, but they did not have any influence on mental health, thus suggesting that physicians should be more attentive to aspects of HRQoL relating to the functionality of sickle cell disease patients, so as to be aware of the limitations that these patient live with.

  19. Chest pain in sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonino, S. H.; Nur, E.; Otten, H. M.; Wykrzykowska, J. J.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; Biemond, B. J.

    2013-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of chest pain in a patient with sickle cell disease is difficult and may encompass several serious conditions, including chest syndrome, pulmonary embolism and infectious complications. In this manuscript we provide an overview on the various underlying diseases that may

  20. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and dexamethasone increase interleukin-10 production in CD4+ T cells from patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Lars Erik; Jørgensen, Søren Peter; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    patients and HC. Cells were activated by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 in the presence of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and/or DEX. Cytokine levels, proliferation, and apoptosis were measured following 7 days of culture. RESULTS: In T cells from CD patients, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and DEX increased IL-10 production...... increased from 0.3 ng/ml to 0.5 ng/ml (pproduction from 2.5 ng/ml to 6.1 ng/ml (pproliferation and reduced viability of T cells......BACKGROUND AND AIM: In Crohn's disease (CD), epidemiological data and animal studies suggest that vitamin D (vitD) has protective immune-modulating properties. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and dexamethasone (DEX) induce interleukin (IL)-10 productions in healthy controls (HC) T cells. We studied if 1...

  1. Cryopreserved Off-the-Shelf Allogeneic Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease and Heart Failure-A Safety Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Juhl, Morten

    2017-01-01

    The present first-in-human clinical trial evaluated the safety and feasibility of a newly developed and cryopreserved Cardiology Stem Cell Centre adipose-derived stromal cell (CSCC_ASC) product from healthy donors for intramyocardial injection in ten patients with ischemic heart disease...... and ischemic heart failure (IHF). Batches of CSCC_ASC were isolated from three healthy donors by liposuction from abdominal adipose tissue. Adipose mesenchymal stromal cells were culture expanded in bioreactors without the use of animal constituents, cryopreserved, and stored in vials in nitrogen dry...... developed cryopreserved product CSCC_ASC from healthy donors was a safe and feasible treatment. We observed a tendency toward efficacy in patients with IHF. These findings have to be confirmed in larger placebo controlled clinical trials. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1963-1971....

  2. Mortality by sickle cell disease in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, Giovanna Abadia Oliveira; Rodrigues, Letícia Pinto; Trovó de Marqui, Alessandra Bernadete

    This work aimed to characterize mortality by sickle cell disease in Brazil. The MEDLINE electronic database was searched using the terms 'mortality' and 'sickle cell disease' and 'Brazil' for articles published in the last five years aiming to provide a current analysis of the subject in question. Eight studies on mortality by sickle cell disease were carried out in the Brazilian states of Maranhão, Bahia, Minas Gerais, Rio de Janeiro and Mato Grosso do Sul. The majority of the deaths occurred in patients with sickle cell anemia, which is the most common genotype and causes the most severe clinical manifestation of the disease. In summary, there are few published studies on mortality related to sickle cell disease in Brazil, and most are from the state of Minas Gerais. This study emphasizes the importance of developing more studies on sickle cell disease mortality, so that it may be possible to profile gene carriers and give health professionals more data to strategize the delivery of more effective assistance to these individuals. Despite the early diagnosis of sickle cell disease by the Neonatal Screening Program and the use of preventive and therapeutic measures (penicillin, immunization and hydroxyurea), mortality by sickle cell disease on the world stage is still significant. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  3. Sensitivity of whole-body CT and MRI versus projection radiography in the detection of osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Maya B., E-mail: m.mueller-wolf@dkfz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Murray, Fritz, E-mail: fritz.murray@hotmail.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Kilk, Kerstin, E-mail: k_fechtner@hotmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Hillengass, Jens, E-mail: jens.hillengass@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan, E-mail: s.delorme@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heiss, Christiane, E-mail: c.heiss@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Neben, Kai, E-mail: k.neben@klinikum-mittelbaden.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Goldschmidt, Hartmut, E-mail: hartmut.goldschmidt@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg and National Center for Tumour Diseases, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare sensitivity of whole-body Computed Tomography (wb-CT) and whole-body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (wb-MRI) with Projection Radiography (PR) regarding each method's ability to detect osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease. Patients and methods: The bone status of 171 patients was evaluated. All patients presented with multiple myeloma (MM) of all stages, monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) or solitary plasmacytoma. Two groups were formed. Group A consisted of 52 patients (26 females, 26 males) with an average age of 62 years (range, 45–89 years) who received, both, PR and wb-CT as part of their diagnostic work-up. Group B comprised 119 patients (58 females, 61 males) averaging 57 years of age (range, 20–80 years) who received, both, PR and wb-MRI. Two experienced radiologists were blinded regarding the disease status and assessed the number and location of osteolyses in consensus. A distinction was made between axial and extra-axial lesions. Results: In group A, wb-CT revealed osteolyses in 12 patients (23%) that were not detected in PR. CT was superior in detecting lesions in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis. Compared with PR, wb-CT was significantly more sensitive in detecting osteolyses than PR (p < 0.001). This was particularly true for axial lesions. Additionally, CT revealed clinically relevant incidental findings in 33 patients (63%). In group B, wb-MRI revealed lesions in 19 patients (16%) that were not detected in PR. All lesions detected by PR were also detected by wb-MRI and wb-CT. Wb-MRI and wb-CT are each superior to PR in detecting axial lesions. Conclusion: Wb-CT can detect 23% more focal lesions than PR, especially in the axial skeleton. Therefore, this imaging method should be preferred over PR in the diagnostic work-up and staging of patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease.

  4. Thyroid Disease in the Older Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Older Patients and Thyroid Disease Older Patients and Thyroid Disease DEFINITION: WHAT DO THE FOLLOWING PATIENTS OVER THE ... Nodules in Children and Adolescents Older Patients and Thyroid Disease Resources Older Patients and Thyroid Disease Brochure PDF ...

  5. Renal cell carcinoma co-existent with other renal disease: clinico-pathological features in pre-dialysis patients and those receiving dialysis or renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Martínez-Ara, Jorge; Miguel, José Luis; Arrieta, Javier; Costero, Olga; Górriz, José Luis; Picazo, Mari-Luz; Fresno, Manuel

    2004-11-01

    Patients on chronic dialysis are prone to developing acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD), which may lead to the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The risk factors for the development of RCC so far have not been determined in pre-dialysis patients with co-existent renal disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinico-pathological features of RCC in pre-dialysis patients with associated renal diseases or in those undergoing chronic dialysis and renal transplantation. We studied 32 kidneys from 31 patients with RCC and associated renal diseases. Of those, 18 kidneys were from 17 patients not on renal replacement therapy (RRT) when diagnosed with RCC; 14 patients received dialysis or dialysis followed by renal transplantation. Several clinico-pathological features were analysed and compared between the two groups. Overall, there was a preponderance of males (75%); nephrosclerosis was the predominant co-existent disease (31%). The median intervals from renal disease to RCC in the dialysis and transplanted groups were significantly longer than in the pre-dialysis group (15.8+/-1.1 vs 2.4+/-0.7 years, P<0.0001). In contrast to pre-dialysis RCC, the dialysis and transplant RCC groups had greater frequency of ACKD (100 vs 28%, P<0.0001), papillary type RCC (43 vs 11%, P<0.05) and multifocal tumours (43 vs 5%, P<0.05). At the end of the study, 71% of dialysis and transplanted patients and 72% of pre-dialysis patients were alive. ACKD develops in dialysis patients, as it does in those with renal disease prior to RRT. The duration of renal disease, rather than the dialysis procedure itself, appears to be the main determinant of ACKD and RCC. The RCC occurring in patients with ACKD and prolonged RRT is more frequently of the papillary type and multifocal than the RCC occurring in patients with no or few acquired cysts and a short history of renal disease. Long-term outcomes did not differ between the two groups.

  6. Characterizing the circulating, gliadin-specific CD4+ memory T cells in patients with celiac disease: linkage between memory function, gut homing and Th1 polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Horin, Shomron; Green, Peter H R; Bank, Ilan; Chess, Leonard; Goldstein, Itamar

    2006-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder of the gut, driven by T cells reacting locally to a distinct antigen, gliadin. Thus, CD offers the opportunity to study the T cell memory response to gliadin and whether gut tropism and T helper cell type 1 (Th1) polarization, which characterize the effector phase, are preserved in the memory progeny. It is notable that previous studies yielded conflicting results as to the presence of gliadin-specific memory CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood of CD patients. However, we used a different and highly sensitive approach based on fluorescein-derived label dilution, whereby the memory cells are identified operationally by their greater capacity to proliferate upon re-encounter with antigen. Thus, using flow cytometry, we could resolve multiple successive generations as well as immunophenotype the dividing cells. Here, we show that the peripheral blood lymphocyte of some CD patients on a gliadin-free diet, but not healthy donors, contains a detectable population of CD4+ memory T cells specific for deamidated gliadin. Moreover, these gliadin-specific memory T cells are marked by a distinctive phenotype: They express high levels of the gut-homing beta7 integrins and primarily produce interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha. We conclude that memory for gliadin-derived antigens within the circulating CD4+ T cells is linked with gut tropism as well as Th1 polarization.

  7. Effect of Exercise Training on Red Blood Cell Distribution Width as a Marker of Impaired Exercise Tolerance in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Niiyama, Hiroshi; Harada, Haruhito; Katou, Atsushi; Yoshida, Noriko; Ikeda, Hisao

    2016-09-28

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) can predict mortality in cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of the beneficial prognostic marker remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the RDW is related to impaired exercise tolerance and exercise training (ET) effect on RDW in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).Seventy-eight patients who underwent ET by supervised bicycle ergometer during 3 weeks served as the ET group whereas 30 patients who did not undergo ET were the control group. Exercise stress test with cardiopulmonary analysis was performed in the ET group. Peak oxygen uptake (from 14.1 ± 4.0 to 15.1 ± 3.8 mL/kg/minute, P exercise tolerance and decreases RDW in association with increased oxygen uptake in patients with CAD.

  8. Normal inhibition of DNA synthesis following γ-irradiation of radiosensitive cell lines from patients with Down's syndrome and Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavin, M.F.; Le poidevin, P.; Chen, P.C.; Bates, P.

    1989-01-01

    Inhibition of DNA synthesis was studied in γ-iradiated lymphoblastoid cells from patients with Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. A normal biphasic pattern of inhibition was observed over a dose range of 0-4 krad of γ-rays in all of the cell lines 3 out of 4 Down's and all the Alzheimer's cell lines were shown to be hypersensitive to ionizing radiation based on induced chromosomal aberrations. Increased G2 phase delay, comparable to that occurring in ataxia-telangiectasia cells, was observed for some of the cell lines, after exposure to γ-rays. Contrary to other data in the literature these results demonstrate that radioresistand DNA synthesis is not an intrinsic feature of all disorders characterized by radiosensitivitey. (author).; 25 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  9. Stem cell transplantation and mesenchymal cells to treat autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyndall, Alan; van Laar, Jacob M.

    2016-01-01

    Since the start of the international stem cell transplantation project in 1997, over 2000 patients have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), mostly autologous, as treatment for a severe autoimmune disease, the majority being multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and

  10. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) and IL-37: Intestinal and peripheral expression by T and B regulatory cells in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Camarillo, Gabriela; Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús K

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize and to quantify peripheral and tissue. IL-35- and IL-37-producing cells in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) patients. We studied a total of 38 active UC, 31 inactive UC, 17 active CD, and 13 inactive CD and 50 non-inflamed tissues as control group. Gene expression was measured by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and protein expression was evaluated in tissue by immunohistochemistry and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by flow cytometry. Higher levels of IL-35 was produced by intestinal regulatory B cells and circulating regulatory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in active vs. inactive disease or healthy donors (P<0.05). The IL-37 was conspicuously synthesized by circulating B cells, active natural killer cells and monocytes. These results suggest that down-regulation of inflammation in active IBD patients might be based on the increased expression of IL-35 and IL-37. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Alzheimer's Disease and Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sung S.; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Seung U.; Lee, Hong J.

    2014-01-01

    The loss of neuronal cells in the central nervous system may occur in many neurodegenerative diseases. Alzheimer's disease is a common senile disease in people over 65 years, and it causes impairment characterized by the decline of mental function, including memory loss and cognitive impairment, and affects the quality of life of patients. However, the current therapeutic strategies against AD are only to relieve symptoms, but not to cure it. Because there are only a few therapeutic strategie...

  12. Assessing the Effect of an Educational Intervention on Nurses' and Patient Care Assistants' Comprehension and Documentation of Functional Ability in Pediatric Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Katherine M; Strobel, Megan; Lucas, Ruth

    2018-04-13

    In 2014, the Youth Acute Pain Functional Ability Questionnaire (YAPFAQ) was developed to investigate patient's self-rated functional ability during times of acute pain in the inpatient clinical setting. Although it has great potential, the application of this tool has not been made a standard of care. The purpose of this multiple methods study was to determine if, through an educational intervention, hospital staff could consistently document the YAPFAQ in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) during a vaso-occlusive episode. Twenty-two staff members participated in an educational intervention and semi-structured group discussions. Pre/post surveys measured knowledge of the YAPFAQ before and after the intervention. Group discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for thematic clusters. Retrospective chart reviews of children with SCD were reviewed for YAPFAQ documentation frequency before and after the intervention. Staff knowledge of who completes the YAPFAQ increased after the intervention, (pcontinues to hold high potential for directing nursing care, but requires staff investment for clinical practice change. A seamless integration between nursing education and translation through EHR is recommended as technology continues to integrate into nursing practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Increased incidence of chronic GvHD and CMV disease in patients with vitamin D deficiency before allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bahr, L; Blennow, O; Alm, J; Björklund, A; Malmberg, K-J; Mougiakakos, D; Le Blanc, A; Oefner, P J; Labopin, M; Ljungman, P; Le Blanc, K

    2015-09-01

    Vitamin D has emerged as a central player in the immune system, with its deficiency being implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, including chronic GvHD. This is a retrospective cohort analysis of 166 patients, who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at the Karolinska University Hospital, evaluating GvHD, graft failure, infectious complications and survival after HSCT in relation to pre-transplantation vitamin D levels. Most of the patients were deficient in vitamin D before HSCT (median 42 nmol/L). In multivariate analysis, vitamin D level before HSCT was identified as a significant independent risk factor for development of cGvHD. The increased incidence of cGvHD was not coupled to better disease-free survival; instead there was a trend towards lower overall survival in the vitamin D-deficient patients. In addition, we found a significant correlation between vitamin D deficiency and incidence of CMV disease, with no case of CMV disease occurring in patients with sufficient levels of vitamin D before HSCT. Our results support a role of vitamin D in immune tolerance following HSCT. These findings could be highly relevant for the care of HSCT patients, and prospective, randomized studies on the effect of vitamin D supplementation are therefore needed.

  14. Cell therapies for Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Adriana Bastos; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli Dos Santos; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos

    2017-11-01

    In this review of cell therapies in Chagas disease, we cover aspects related to the disease, its treatment and world demographics, before proceeding to describe the preclinical and clinical trials performed using cell therapies in the search for an alternative therapy for the most severe and lethal form of this disease, chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for detection and localization of residual or recurrent disease in patients with multiple myeloma after stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derlin, Thorsten; Wisotzki, Christian; Klutmann, Susanne [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); Weber, Christoph; Habermann, Christian R.; Herrmann, Jochen [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Ayuk, Francis; Wolschke, Christine; Kroeger, Nicolaus [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Clinic for Stem Cell Transplantation, Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The aim of the study was to determine the diagnostic performance of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT for the detection and localization of residual or recurrent disease in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) after stem cell transplantation. A total of 197 whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 99 patients with MM at different time points in the course of disease after autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Post-transplant PET/CT scans and clinical remission status as determined by the clinical gold standard (Uniform Response Criteria) were analysed and compared. A total of 576 focal osseous and extramedullary lesions were detected in 79 scans. Additional diffuse bone marrow involvement was detected in 17 patients. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT had a sensitivity of 54.6%, a specificity of 82.1%, a positive predictive value of 82.3%, a negative predictive value of 54.2% and an overall accuracy of 65.5%. The sensitivity of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was shown to depend on the disease category according to the Uniform Response Criteria for myeloma. In patients with MM in the post-transplant setting, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT may (1) contribute to the detection and localization of disease, (2) provide information about the extent of distinct myeloma manifestations and the total disease burden and (3) add information about the metabolic activity of disease, but (4) has substantially lower sensitivity for this purpose compared to the pretreatment setting. (orig.)

  16. The clinical significance of EBV DNA in the plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with or without EBV diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakry, Jennifer A; Hegde, Aparna M; Durand, Christine M; Massie, Allan B; Greer, Amy E; Ambinder, Richard F; Valsamakis, Alexandra

    2016-04-21

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous virus that establishes a latent infection within the host and in some cases can lead to the development of EBV-associated lymphomas, lymphoproliferative disorders, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, solid tumors, and other diseases. We studied the clinical significance of detecting EBV DNA in the plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 2146 patients who had blood specimens sent to the Johns Hopkins Hospital clinical laboratory for viral quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay over a 5-year period. Within this largely immunocompromised and hospitalized cohort, 535 patients (25%) had EBV detected in plasma or PBMCs. When EBV was detected in the absence of an EBV(+)disease (n = 402), it was present only in PBMCs in 69% of cases. Immunocompromised patients were less likely to have EBV in plasma than in PBMCs in the absence of EBV(+)disease. In patients with active, systemic EBV(+)diseases (n = 105), EBV was detected in plasma in 99% of cases but detected in PBMCs in only 54%. Across a range of copy number cutoffs, EBV in plasma had higher specificity and sensitivity for EBV(+)disease as compared with EBV in PBMCs. EBV copy number in plasma distinguished untreated, EBV(+)lymphoma from EBV(+)lymphoma in remission and EBV(-)lymphoma, and also distinguished untreated, EBV(+)posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) from EBV(+)PTLD in remission and EBV(-)PTLD. EBV copy number quantification is a useful diagnostic marker across the spectrum of EBV(+)diseases, even among immunocompromised patients, with plasma specimens more indicative of EBV(+)disease than PBMCs. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. Flow cytometric sensitivity and characteristics of plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma or its precursor disease: influence of biopsy site and anticoagulation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasanch, Elisabet E; Salem, Dalia A; Yuan, Constance M; Tageja, Nishant; Bhutani, Manisha; Kwok, Mary; Kazandjian, Dickran; Carter, George; Steinberg, Seth M; Zuchlinski, Diamond; Mulquin, Marcia; Calvo, Katherine; Maric, Irina; Roschewski, Mark; Korde, Neha; Braylan, Raul; Landgren, Ola; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice

    2015-05-01

    Flow cytometry has increasing relevance for prognosis in myeloma and precursor disease (monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance/smoldering myeloma), yet it has been reported that plasma cell enumeration by flow varies depending on the quality of marrow aspirate and field biopsied in patchy disease. We demonstrated increased sensitivity of flow over immunohistochemistry in abnormal-plasma cell detection in monoclonal gammopathy (n = 59)/smoldering myeloma (n = 87). We prospectively evaluated treatment-na ve smoldering myeloma (n = 9)/myeloma (n = 11) patients for the percentage of abnormal plasma cells/total plasma cell compartment, plasma cell viability/infiltration and flow immunophenotype depending on anticoagulant use, biopsy site and pull sequence in uni-and-bilateral bone marrow biopsies and aspirates. We found no statistical difference regarding the percentage of abnormal plasma cells, their immunophenotype or number/distribution in marrow samples even when obtained by different sequence in aspirates, or anticoagulants (p > 0.05). Our results show that plasma cell enumeration and immunophenotyping by flow cytometry is consistent under different conditions in these populations.

  18. Evidence for T Cell Help in the IgG Response against Tandemly Repetitive Trypanosoma cruzi B13 Protein in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients

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    Marcia Duranti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The tandemly repetitive Trypanosoma cruzi B13 protein is an immunodominant antigen among Chagas disease patients. Such repetitive domains may behave as T-independent antigens. However, T cells can recognize B13 epitopes in an HLA class II-restricted fashion and could potentially provide cognate T cell help and boost antibody titers. We assessed whether the presence of HLA class II molecules able to present B13 epitopes to T cells could affect anti-B13 IgG levels in a cognate fashion, in both major clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. We found no difference between anti-B13 IgG antibody levels between patients carrying HLA class II molecules associated to T cell responses or other alleles. The predominant anti-B13 IgG subclass was IgG1, with negligible IgG2, suggesting a T-dependent, noncognate help for antibody production. In addition, the finding of increased anti-B13 IgG levels in sera from CCC patients indicates that clinical presentation is associated with increased anti-B13 antibody levels.

  19. Evidence for T Cell Help in the IgG Response against Tandemly Repetitive Trypanosoma cruzi B13 Protein in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duranti, Marcia; Camargo, Ludmila; Victora, Gabriel; Ianni, Barbara; Buck, Paula; Mady, Charles; Kalil, Jorge; Zingales, Bianca; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2012-01-01

    The tandemly repetitive Trypanosoma cruzi B13 protein is an immunodominant antigen among Chagas disease patients. Such repetitive domains may behave as T-independent antigens. However, T cells can recognize B13 epitopes in an HLA class II-restricted fashion and could potentially provide cognate T cell help and boost antibody titers. We assessed whether the presence of HLA class II molecules able to present B13 epitopes to T cells could affect anti-B13 IgG levels in a cognate fashion, in both major clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. We found no difference between anti-B13 IgG antibody levels between patients carrying HLA class II molecules associated to T cell responses or other alleles. The predominant anti-B13 IgG subclass was IgG1, with negligible IgG2, suggesting a T-dependent, noncognate help for antibody production. In addition, the finding of increased anti-B13 IgG levels in sera from CCC patients indicates that clinical presentation is associated with increased anti-B13 antibody levels. PMID:22523642

  20. Phase II study of a 3-day schedule with topotecan and cisplatin in patients with previously untreated small cell lung cancer and extensive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M.; Lassen, Ulrik Niels; Jensen, Peter Buhl

    2008-01-01

    and cisplatin are needed. The aim of this phase II study was to establish the response rate and response duration in chemo-naive patients with SCLC receiving a 3-day topotecan and cisplatin schedule. METHODS: Simons optimal two-stage design was used. Patients with previously untreated extensive disease SCLC......INTRODUCTION: Treatment with a topoisomerase I inhibitor in combination with a platinum results in superior or equal survival compared with etoposide-based treatment in extensive disease small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Five-day topotecan is inconvenient and therefore shorter schedules of topotecan......, adequate organ functions and performance status less than 3 were eligible. Topotecan (2.0 mg/m, intravenously) was administered on days 1 to 3 with cisplatin (50 mg/m, intravenously) on day 3 every 3 weeks for a total of six cycles. RESULTS: Forty-three patients received 219 cycles of chemotherapy. Median...

  1. Prolonged hospitalization, primary refractory disease, performance status and age are prognostic factors for survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and transformed indolent lymphoma undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arboe, Bente; Halgren Olsen, Maja; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine

    2018-01-01

    In patients with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is standard treatment. Here, we aim to identify factors associated with survival in patients undergoing ASCT. A total of 369 patients with relapsed DLBCL...... survival was 6.8 years, median progression-free survival was 2.6 years, and treatment-related mortality at Day 100 was 6%. Factors associated with a significant adverse impact on survival were age, primary refractory disease, prolonged hospitalization during salvage treatment, and performance status >0...

  2. ALS Patient Stem Cells for Unveiling Disease Signatures of Motoneuron Susceptibility: Perspectives on the Deadly Mitochondria, ER Stress and Calcium Triad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, Anjoscha; Sareen, Dhruv

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a largely sporadic progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting upper and lower motoneurons (MNs) whose specific etiology is incompletely understood. Mutations in superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TARDBP/TDP-43) and C9orf72, have been identified in subsets of familial and sporadic patients. Key associated molecular and neuropathological features include ubiquitinated TDP-43 inclusions, stress granules, aggregated dipeptide proteins from mutant C9orf72 transcripts, altered mitochondrial ultrastructure, dysregulated calcium homeostasis, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and an unfolded protein response (UPR). Such impairments have been documented in ALS animal models; however, whether these mechanisms are initiating factors or later consequential events leading to MN vulnerability in ALS patients is debatable. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a valuable tool that could resolve this “chicken or egg” causality dilemma. Relevant systems for probing pathophysiologically affected cells from large numbers of ALS patients and discovering phenotypic disease signatures of early MN susceptibility are described. Performing unbiased ‘OMICS and high-throughput screening in relevant neural cells from a cohort of ALS patient iPSCs, and rescuing mitochondrial and ER stress impairments, can identify targeted therapeutics for increasing MN longevity in ALS. PMID:26635528

  3. Decreased CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28– T cell ratio can sensitively predict poor outcome for patients with complicated Crohn disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shi-xue; Gu, Hong-xiang; Lin, Qian-yi; Wu, Yan-kun; Wang, Xiao-yan; Huang, Shao-zhuo; Xing, Tiao-si; Chen, Min-hua; Zhang, Qing-fang; Zheng, Zhong-wen; Sha, Wei-hong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Crohn disease (CD) with complications such as penetrating, stricturing, and perianal disease is called complicated CD. The aim of this study is to test the efficiency with which the CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28– cell balance can predict a subsequent active stage in patients with newly diagnosed complicated CD. Seventeen patients with complicated CD and 48 CD patients with no complications were enrolled. Blood CD8+ T cells were tested from all of the 65 newly diagnosed CD patients upon enrollment. The potential risk factors were compared between the 2 groups. A 30-week follow-up was performed, and the efficiency of the CD8+ cell balance at predicting active CD was analyzed using receiver-operating characteristic curves. The cumulative remission lasting rates (CRLRs) were analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Compared with the control CD group, patients with complicated CD were predominantly male and younger in age; they also had lower body mass indices (BMIs), higher Crohn disease activity indices (CDAIs), higher immunosuppressant and steroid prescription rates, and significantly higher surgical rates. The CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28– balance was associated with BMI, CDAI, steroids, and surgery. The CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28– ratios were significantly lower at week 0 and on the 6th, 22nd, and 30th week during follow-up with a shorter lasting time of remission for the complicated CD patients. The CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28– ratio could accurately predict the active stage for the patients with complicated CD, and the highest sensitivity (89.2%) and specificity (85.3%) were found when the ratio was 1.03. Treatment with steroids and surgery, along with a significantly lower CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28– ratio and lower CRLRs, was closely related to a worse outcome for the patients with complicated CD. Patients requiring steroids and surgery experience more severe disease activity and thus a disequilibrated immunological balance, which could be the main reason for a decreased CD8+CD28+/CD8

  4. When Blood Cells Bend: Understanding Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe April 2012 Print this issue When Blood Cells Bend Understanding Sickle Cell Disease Send us your ... Diabetes? Sound Health Wise Choices Living with Sickle Cell Disease See a sickle cell disease expert regularly. ...

  5. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cell line, CSSi002-A (2851, from a patient with juvenile Huntington Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Rosati

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Huntington Disease (HD is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by motor, cognitive and behavioral features caused by a CAG expansion in the HTT gene beyond 35 repeats. The juvenile form (JHD may begin before the age of 20 years and is associated with expanded alleles as long as 60 or more CAG repeats. In this study, induced pluripotent stem cells were generated from skin fibroblasts of a 8-year-old child carrying a large size mutation of 84 CAG repeats in the HTT gene. HD appeared at age 3 with mixed psychiatric (i.e. autistic spectrum disorder and motor (i.e. dystonia manifestations.

  6. Establishment of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line from a 57-year old patient with sporadic Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ochalek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were collected from a clinically characterised 57-year old woman with sporadic Alzheimer's disease. The PMBCs were reprogrammed with the human OSKM transcription factors using the Sendai-virus delivery system. The transgene-free iPSC showed pluripotency verified by immunocytochemistry for pluripotency markers and differentiated spontaneously towards the 3 germ layers in vitro. Furthermore, the iPSC line showed normal karyotype. Our model might offer a good platform to further study the pathomechanism of sporadic AD, to identify early biomarkers and also for drug testing and gene therapy studies.

  7. CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28-T cell equilibrium can predict the active stage for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shi-Xue; Gu, Hong-Xiang; Lin, Qian-Yi; Huang, Shao-Zhuo; Xing, Tiao-Si; Zhang, Qing-Fang; Wu, Gang; Chen, Min-Hua; Tan, Wan-Er; Jian, Hong-Jian; Zheng, Zhong-Wen; Zhong, Tao; Zhang, Min-Hai; Cheng, Xing-Fang; Huang, Peng; Liao, Guang-Jie; Sha, Wei-Hong

    2017-12-01

    The balance of blood CD8 + CD28 + /CD8 + CD28 - T cells has been verified to be vital for patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), but their role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unknown. This investigation aimed to evaluate the efficiency of the balance in predicting the active stage in IBD patients. Fifty-three IBD subjects, including 31 UC and 22 Crohn's disease (CD) patients, were enrolled, and their peripheral blood CD8 + CD28 + and CD8 + CD28 - T cell levels were tested using flow cytometry. The risk factors related to prognosis were compared between UC and CD patients. A 1-year follow-up was performed for all the IBD patients, and the CD8 + T cells and their ratio were compared at the 3rd, 6th, 9th, and 12th months during follow-up. The sensitivity and specificity of the CD8 + T cell level and balance were analyzed through receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. The cumulative remission lasting rates (CRLRs) under the different factors were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Higher prescription rates of immunosuppressants, steroids, probiotics, and biological agents (BAs) were found in CD subjects in comparison to UC subjects (P=0.005, 0.024, 0.034, and 0.001), as was a higher active rate during follow-up (95.5% of CD patients vs 67.7% of UC patients, P=0.035). The CD8 + CD28 + T cell level and the CD8 + CD28 + /CD8 + CD28 - T cell ratio were significantly higher in UC patients than in CD patients, but the reverse was true for CD8 + CD28 - T cells during follow-up at the 9th and 12th month (all PCD8 + CD28 + and CD8 + CD28 - T cell numbers and the CD8 + CD28 + /CD8 + CD28 - T cell ratio in predicting the active stage were found to be significant, with areas under the curves (AUCs) of 0.883, 0.098, and 0.913 for UC subjects (with 95% CI: 0.709-0.940, 0.009-0.188, and 0.842-1.003; P=0.001, 0.00, and 0.000) and 0.812, 0.078, and 0.898 for CD subjects (with 95% CI: 0.683-0.957, 0.003-0.158, and 0.837-0.998; P=0.003, 0.00, and 0.000). The cut

  8. Alemtuzumab and Glucocorticoids in Treating Newly Diagnosed Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Who Have Undergone a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Graft Versus Host Disease; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Diseases; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  9. Rapid tumor progression in a patient with HPV type 16 associated anal squamous cell carcinoma suffering from long-standing Crohn's disease: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer AK

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is the most common cancer of the anal region, typically associated with high-risk (hr HPV infection. Furthermore, there is evidence that Crohn's disease predisposes to adenocarcinoma in patients with perianal disease. Materials and methods: A 57-year old patient presenting with long history of Crohn's disease since the age of mid-twenties, went through several surgeries including ileocolectomy and anal fistula resection, combined with immunosuppressive therapy additionally periodically since 2008. One year before death (in 2015 a painful fistula was diagnosed with extensive high grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN-HG and evidence of invasive growth as non-keratinizing SCC. Tissue samples from several previous and current resection specimens were re-evaluated and extensively investigated for Crohn´s type inflammation, dysplasia and HPV both by immunohistochemistry (p16/Ki67 and molecular subtyping of HPV. Results: AIN-HG and invasive anal squamous cell carcinoma turned out to be strongly positive for p16/Ki67 staining and molecular analysis disclosed a HPV-16 subtype. In contrast, HPV-analysis was negative in all available previous tissue samples including one anal fistula resected five years before (in 2009 which was lined by non-keratinized squamous epithelium without any evidence of dysplasia. Thus, the patient was diagnosed as Crohn's disease with hr-HPV infection that rapidly (< 5ys progressed to AIN-HG and anal SCC. Finally, osseous metastases occurred and the patient died shortly after. Conclusions: This case of a patient diagnosed with SCC of the anal canal in combination with Crohn's disease as well as HPV Type 16 infection, points to the pathomechanism leading to dysplasia and finally cancer. We assume that immunosuppressive therapy in Crohn's disease may predispose to both persistent HPV infection and HPV related invasive anal carcinoma. The accelerated progression of HPV

  10. Veno-occlusive disease of the liver in the absence of elevation in bilirubin in pediatric patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kasiani C; Dandoy, Christopher; El-Bietar, Javier; Davies, Stella M; Jodele, Sonata

    2015-02-01

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver is a well-described and significant complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), with limited successful therapeutic options in severe cases. Prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatment is crucial to restrict the extent of disease. However, a subset of patients may not meet all current diagnostic criteria at presentation, and waiting for these to be met may delay therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 794 HSCT patients treated at our institution between 2003 and 2013, identifying 17 (2.1%) who developed VOD. Of these, 5 (29%) were noted to have an absence of elevated bilirubin at the time of VOD diagnosis and reversal of portal venous flow on ultrasound. Median total and conjugated bilirubin at VOD diagnosis were 1.0 and 0.2 mg/dL, respectively. All 5 patients were subsequently diagnosed with multiorgan failure associated with VOD, including 1 with encephalopathy. Four were treated with intravenous high-dose methylprednisolone (500 mg/m(2) per dose every 12 hours for 6 doses). One patient received defibrotide therapy in addition to steroids and another supportive care alone. VOD resolved in 4 of 5 patients, with median time to resolution of VOD, defined as recovery of all organ function and normalization of bilirubin and portal venous flow, of 8 days. Two patients died later from progressive primary disease and chronic graft-versus-host disease, respectively. We conclude that a high index of suspicion for VOD should be maintained in patients despite lack of bilirubin elevation in the presence of other diagnostic criteria such as hepatomegaly, abdominal pain, ascites, or weight gain. Early ultrasound evaluation in these patients may lead to more timely diagnosis and therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Binding of immunoglobulin G from patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases to solubilized guinea pig fat cell membranes crosslinked with 125I-TSH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Yasuhiro; Konishi, Junji; Misaki, Takashi; Kasagi, Kanji; Endo, Keigo; Torizuka, Kanji; Kuma, Kanji.

    1986-01-01

    Binding of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to Triton-solubilized fat cell membranes crosslinked with 125 I-TSH was studied by an indirect immunoprecipitation method. Guinea pig fat cell membranes (FCM) containing TSH receptors with an association constant of 1.92 x 10 9 M -1 were first reacted with 125 I-TSH, then treated with a crosslinker, dissuccinimidyl suberate. The dissociation of 125 I-TSH from the crosslinked 125 I-TSH-FCM complexes due to the addition of 100 mU/ml unlabeled TSH was 9.0 %, while it was 33 % without the treatment. To the Triton-solubilized FCM crosslinked with 125 I-TSH, 50 μg each of IgG from 20 normal controls, 20 patients with Graves' disease and 20 with Hashimoto's disease was added and precipitation was effected by adding antihuman IgG. In patients with Graves' disease, 125 I-TSH-FCM complexes immunoprecipitated ranged from 1.10 to 4.18 % with an average of 2.4 ± 0.99 (S. D.) % which was significantly higher than those in normal controls (1.6 ± 0.29 %). The values in the patients with Hashimoto's disease averaged 1.7 ± 0.53 (S. D.) which did not differ significantly from those of controls. The value did not correlate with either TSH-binding inhibiting activities or titers of anti-microsomal antibodies. These data suggest the presence of TSH-receptor antibodies which react with antigens other than TSH-binding sites in the patients with Graves' disease. (author)

  12. DNA damage and apoptosis in blood neutrophils of inflammatory bowel disease patients and in Caco-2 cells in vitro exposed to betanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Zielińska-Przyjemska

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD are chronic, relapsing, inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and continuing colonic inflammation is considered an important risk factor in the development of colorectal cancer. Our previous studies showed that beetroot (Beta vulgaris var. rubra products and their major component betanin modulate the reactive oxygen species (ROS production and DNA damage in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils of healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of betanin on the oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis in neutrophils isolated from blood of patients with inflammatory bowel disease– ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn’s disease (CD. The results were compared with those obtained in colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 cells. Betanin treatment at the concentration of 100 μM for 24 h increased DNA damage assessed by comet assay in IBD patients’ neutrophils. A similar effect although less pronounced was observed in Caco-2 cells. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with H2O2 caused a 4-fold increase of DNA strand breaks in comparison to untreated cells, but pre-treatment with betanin reduced DNA damage in these cells. Betanin also induced procaspase-3 cleavage and caspase-3 activity accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, indicating its pro-apoptoticactivity. These results suggest that betanin may support mechanisms that lead to the release of ROS and apoptotic cell death. In this way betanin may exert anti-inflammatory and potentially cancer preventive activity.

  13. Nationwide Survey of Patient Knowledge and Attitudes towards Human Experimentation Using Stem Cells or Bee Venom Acupuncture for Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveStem cell treatment is a well-recognized experimental treatment among patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD, for which there are high expectations of a positive impact. Acupuncture with bee venom is one of the most popular complementary and alternative treatments for PD. Patient knowledge and attitudes towards these experimental treatments are unknown. MethodsUsing a 12-item questionnaire, a nationwide survey was conducted of 963 PD patients and 267 caregivers in 44 Korean Movement Disorders Society member hospitals from April 2013 to June 2013. The survey was performed by trained interviewers using conventional methods. ResultsRegarding questions on experimental treatments using stem cells or bee venom acupuncture, 5.1–17.7% of PD patients answered questions on safety, efficacy, and evidence-based practice incorrectly; however, more than half responded that they did not know the correct answer. Although safety and efficacy have not been established, 55.5% of PD patients responded that they were willing to receive stem cell treatment. With regard to participating in experimental treatments, there was a strong correlation between stem cell treatment and bee venom acupuncture (p < 0.0001, odds ratio = 5.226, 95% confidence interval 3.919–6.969. Younger age, higher education, and a longer duration of PD were all associated with a correct understanding of experimental treatments. ConclusionsOur data suggest that relatively few PD patients correctly understand the safety and efficacy of experimental treatments and that PD patients are greatly interested in new treatments. We hope that our data will be used to educate or to plan educational programs for PD patients and caregivers.

  14. Distribution and clonality of the vα and vβ T-cell receptor repertoire of regulatory T cells in leukemia patients with and without graft versus host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhenyi; Wu, Xiuli; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Lijian; Liu, Qifa; Li, Yangqiu

    2014-03-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is the main complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Recent data indicated that regulatory T (Treg) cells might relate to GVHD, and such functions might be mediated by certain T-cell receptor (TCR) subfamily of Treg cells. Thus, we analyzed the distribution and clonality of the TCR Vα and Vβ repertoire of Treg cells from leukemia patients with and without GVHD after allo-HSCT. Numerous TCR Vα subfamilies, including Vα1, Vα9, Vα13, Vα16-19, and Vα24-29, were absent in Treg cells after allo-HSCT. The usage numbers for the TCR Vα and Vβ subfamilies in Treg cells from patients without GVHD appeared more widely. The expression frequencies of Vα10 or Vα20 between both groups were significantly different. Moreover, the expression frequency of TCR Vβ2 subfamily in patients without GVHD was significantly higher than that in patients with GVHD. Oligoclonally expanded TCR Vα and Vβ Treg cells were identified in a few samples in both groups. Restricted utilization of the Vα and Vβ subfamilies and the absence of some important TCR rearrangements in Treg cells may be related to GVHD due to a lower regulating function of Treg subfamilies.

  15. Association between Th17-related cytokines and risk of non-small cell lung cancer among patients with or without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chen; Yu, Zu-Bin; Meng, Gang; Wang, Li; Liu, Qing-Yun; Chen, Liu-Tong; Feng, Shuang-Shuang; Tu, Hong-Bo; Li, Ya-Fei; Bai, Li

    2015-09-01

    CD4 (+) T helper 17 (Th17) cells play critical roles in inflammation and tumor development. The involvement of Th17 cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-type inflammation-associated lung cancer has also been confirmed in animal models. However, to the authors' knowledge, it is unknown whether the role of Th17 cells is different in patients with lung cancer complicated with COPD compared with those without COPD. In the current study, the authors attempted to determine the association between the circulating levels of Th17-related cytokines and the clinical characteristics of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with or without COPD. The authors designed a matched case-control study that included 70 patients with NSCLC with COPD, 148 patients with NSCLC without COPD, and 148 healthy controls. The data regarding the clinicopathological features of these participants were collected. Circulating levels of Th17-related cytokines, including interleukin (IL) 23 (IL-23), IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, and tumor necrosis factor-α, were measured. The circulating levels of IL-23, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, and tumor necrosis factor-α were found to be significantly higher in the patients with NSCLC compared with the healthy controls (Pdisease compared with those with stage IIIB to stage IV disease (P<.05). In addition, the 5 Th17-related cytokines demonstrated pairwise correlations, with Spearman rank correlation coefficients of 0.646 to 0.888 (P<.05). The results of the current study indicate a clear association between the Th17-related cytokine profile and the risk of NSCLC complicated by the presence or absence of COPD. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  16. Asthma: Eosinophil Disease, Mast Cell Disease, or Both?

    OpenAIRE

    Bradding, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Although there is much circumstantial evidence implicating eosinophils as major orchestrators in the pathophysiology of asthma, recent studies have cast doubt on their importance. Not only does anti-interleukin-5 treatment not alter the course of the disease, but some patients with asthma do not have eosinophils in their airways, whereas patients with eosinophilic bronchitis exhibit a florid tissue eosinophilia but do not have asthma. In contrast, mast cells are found in all airways and loca...

  17. FoxP3+CD4+CD25+ T cells with regulatory properties can be cultured from colonic mucosa of patients with Crohn's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, J; Agnholt, J; Hoffmann, H J; Rømer, J L; Hvas, C L; Dahlerup, J F

    2005-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance and ensure a balanced immune response competent of fighting pathogens and at the same time recognizing commensals as harmless. This feature is lost in Crohn's disease (CD). The forkhead/winged helix transcription factor FoxP3 is a master gene for Treg function and defects in the FoxP3 gene lead to a clinical picture similar to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Murine colitis can be cured by adoptive transfer of Tregs and ex vivo-generated gut-specific Tregs represent an attractive option for therapy in CD. Thus, defective Tregs could contribute to the development of CD. We cultured biopsies of colonic mucosa in the presence of high concentrations of interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-4 to overcome the anergic nature of naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ Tregs in the mucosa. We investigated the expression of FoxP3 and regulatory potential of gut-derived CD4+CD25+ T cells cultured from patients with CD and healthy individuals. The FoxP3 expression was analysed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the suppressive effect of FoxP3+CD4+CD25+ T cells on proliferation and cytokine production of autologous CD4+ T cells was assessed by flow cytometry. Cultured gut-derived T cells with CD4+CD25+ phenotype expressed FoxP3 and were able as the freshly isolated Tregs from peripheral blood to suppress proliferation and cytokine production of autologous CD4+ T cells. Thus, we demonstrate that FoxP3+CD4+CD25+ T cells with regulatory properties can be propagated in vitro from inflamed mucosa of CD patients, which may be of interest in adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:16045746

  18. Learning about Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Sickle Cell Disease Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions Funding ...

  19. Cytokine production but lack of proliferation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from chronic Chagas' disease cardiomyopathy patients in response to T. cruzi ribosomal P proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia A Longhi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal P proteins, P2β and P0, induce high levels of antibodies in patients with chronic Chagas' disease Cardiomyopathy (CCC. It is well known that these antibodies alter the beating rate of cardiomyocytes and provoke apoptosis by their interaction with β1-adrenergic and M2-muscarinic cardiac receptors. Based on these findings, we decided to study the cellular immune response to these proteins in CCC patients compared to non-infected individuals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated proliferation, presence of surface activation markers and cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC stimulated with P2β, the C-terminal portion of P0 (CP0 proteins and T. cruzi lysate from CCC patients predominantly infected with TcVI lineage. PBMC from CCC patients cultured with P2β or CP0 proteins, failed to proliferate and express CD25 and HLA-DR on T cell populations. However, multiplex cytokine assays showed that these antigens triggered higher secretion of IL-10, TNF-α and GM-CSF by PBMC as well as both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subsets of CCC subjects. Upon T. cruzi lysate stimulation, PBMC from CCC patients not only proliferated but also became activated within the context of Th1 response. Interestingly, T. cruzi lysate was also able to induce the secretion of GM-CSF by CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that although the lack of PBMC proliferation in CCC patients in response to ribosomal P proteins, the detection of IL-10, TNF-α and GM-CSF suggests that specific T cells could have both immunoregulatory and pro-inflammatory potential, which might modulate the immune response in Chagas' disease. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate for the first time that GM-CSF was produced by PBMC of CCC patients in response not only to recombinant ribosomal P proteins but also to parasite lysate, suggesting the value of this cytokine to evaluate T cells responses in T

  20. Derivation, Characterization, and Neural Differentiation of Integration-Free Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Parkinson's Disease Patients Carrying SNCA, LRRK2, PARK2, and GBA Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momcilovic, Olga; Sivapatham, Renuka; Oron, Tal Ronnen

    2016-01-01

    We report generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from ten Parkinson's disease (PD) patients carrying SNCA, PARK2, LRRK2, and GBA mutations, and one age-matched control. After validation of pluripotency, long-term genome stability, and integration-free reprogramming, eight...... not be sufficient to determine the cause or mechanism of the disease, and highlights the need to use more focused strategies for large-scale data analysis........ We further examined gene expression in a stress model (MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal death) using two clones from the SNCA triplication line, and detected changes in genes associated with mitophagy. Our data suggested that even a well-characterized line of a monogenic disease may...

  1. Impairment of Several Immune Functions and Redox State in Blood Cells of Alzheimer’s Disease Patients. Relevant Role of Neutrophils in Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Vida

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since aging is considered the most risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, the age-related impairment of the immune system (immunosenescence, based on a chronic oxidative-inflammatory stress situation, could play a key role in the development and progression of AD. Although AD is accompanied by systemic disturbance, reflecting the damage in the brain, the changes in immune response and redox-state in different types of blood cells in AD patients have been scarcely studied. The aim was to analyze the variations in several immune functions and oxidative-inflammatory stress and damage parameters in both isolated peripheral neutrophils and mononuclear blood cells, as well as in whole blood cells, from patients diagnosed with mild (mAD and severe AD, and of age-matched controls (elderly healthy subjects as well as of adult controls. The cognitive decline of all subjects was determined by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE test (mAD stage was established at 20 ≤ MMSE ≤ 23 score; AD stage at <18 MMSE; elderly subjects >27 MMSE. The results showed an impairment of the immune functions of human peripheral blood neutrophils and mononuclear cells of mAD and AD patients in relation to healthy elderly subjects, who showed the typical immunosenescence in comparison with the adult individuals. However, several alterations were only observed in severe AD patients (lower chemotaxis, lipopolysaccharide lymphoproliferation, and interleukin (IL-10 release; higher basal proliferation, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α release, and IL-10/TNF-α ratio, others only in mAD subjects (higher adherence, meanwhile others appeared in both mAD and AD patients (lower phytohemaglutinin lymphoproliferation and higher IL-6 release. This impairment of immune functions could be mediated by: (1 the higher oxidative stress and damage also observed in blood cells from mAD and AD patients and in isolated neutrophils [lower glutathione (GSH levels, high oxidized

  2. Impairment of Several Immune Functions and Redox State in Blood Cells of Alzheimer’s Disease Patients. Relevant Role of Neutrophils in Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, Carmen; Martinez de Toda, Irene; Garrido, Antonio; Carro, Eva; Molina, José Antonio; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2018-01-01

    Since aging is considered the most risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), the age-related impairment of the immune system (immunosenescence), based on a chronic oxidative-inflammatory stress situation, could play a key role in the development and progression of AD. Although AD is accompanied by systemic disturbance, reflecting the damage in the brain, the changes in immune response and redox-state in different types of blood cells in AD patients have been scarcely studied. The aim was to analyze the variations in several immune functions and oxidative-inflammatory stress and damage parameters in both isolated peripheral neutrophils and mononuclear blood cells, as well as in whole blood cells, from patients diagnosed with mild (mAD) and severe AD, and of age-matched controls (elderly healthy subjects) as well as of adult controls. The cognitive decline of all subjects was determined by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) test (mAD stage was established at 20 ≤ MMSE ≤ 23 score; AD stage at 27 MMSE). The results showed an impairment of the immune functions of human peripheral blood neutrophils and mononuclear cells of mAD and AD patients in relation to healthy elderly subjects, who showed the typical immunosenescence in comparison with the adult individuals. However, several alterations were only observed in severe AD patients (lower chemotaxis, lipopolysaccharide lymphoproliferation, and interleukin (IL)-10 release; higher basal proliferation, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release, and IL-10/TNF-α ratio), others only in mAD subjects (higher adherence), meanwhile others appeared in both mAD and AD patients (lower phytohemaglutinin lymphoproliferation and higher IL-6 release). This impairment of immune functions could be mediated by: (1) the higher oxidative stress and damage also observed in blood cells from mAD and AD patients and in isolated neutrophils [lower glutathione (GSH) levels, high oxidized glutathione (GSSG)/GSH ratio, and GSSG

  3. Growth hormone and prolactin responses to corticotrophin-releasing-hormone in patients with Cushing's disease: a paracrine action of the adenomatous corticotrophic cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loli, P; Boccardi, E; Branca, V; Bramerio, M; Barberis, M; Losa, M; Terreni, M T; Lodrini, S; Pollo, B; Vignati, F

    1998-10-01

    In patients with Cushing's disease multihormonal responses to ovine corticotrophin releasing hormone (oCRH) have been detected in blood from inferior petrosal sinuses. This finding has been explained by co-secretion of other hormones, in addition to ACTH, by the pituitary adenoma itself or by paracrine effects exerted by the adenoma on normal periadenomatous pituitary cells. To assess these hypotheses we compared the presence of a CRH induced GH and/or PRL response during inferior petrosal sinus sampling to the immunohistochemical detection of PRL and GH in adenomatous tissue removed from patients with Cushing's disease. Twenty-two patients with Cushing's disease and two patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome due to a bronchial carcinoid were studied; each patient had undergone preoperative inferior petrosal sinus sampling for diagnostic purposes with determination of GH and PRL in addition to ACTH, before and after administration of oCRH. Immunohistochemical studies for ACTH, GH and PRL detection were carried out on adenomatous tissue removed at surgery in the patients with pituitary dependent Cushing's disease and on the carcinoid tumours from the two patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome. All pituitary adenomas immunostained for ACTH, and four adenomas immunostained for GH or PRL in addition to ACTH. A PRL increase in the inferior petrosal sinus after oCRH administration was found in 11 of 22 patients, but none of their tumours immunostained for PRL. Immunostaining for PRL was found in the pituitary tumours from two patients but in neither patient was there a PRL response after oCRH. A GH response was found in 13 of 20 patients in whom it was sought; no patient showed immunostaining in their tumour. GH immunostaining was found in two tumours but in neither patient was there a GH response after oCRH. The oCRH-induced increase of GH and PRL was always recorded in the dominant inferior petrosal sinus. The ACTH response to oCRH was significantly higher in patients who

  4. T Cell Repertoire and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Croitoru

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of the T cell receptor repertoire is generated through rearrangement of the variable, junctional and constant region genes. Selection processes in the thymus and periphery serve to eliminate self-reacting T cells, thereby preventing autoimmune disease. The possibility that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an autoimmune disease has led to the search for an auto-antigen. In addition, studies are exploring the T cell receptor repertoire in IBD patients for changes that may provide clues regarding etiopathogenesis. Using monoclonal antibodies to T cell receptor variable-gene products or polymerase chain reaction analysis of variable-gene mRNA expression, the mucosal T cell repertoire has been examined in humans. The intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes show a significant degree of oligoclonal expansion that may represent local antigen exposure or unique selection processes. This is in keeping with studies that show that murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes undergo positive and possibly negative selection independent of the thymus. In the inflamed human gut, shifts in the T cell receptor repertoire may also reflect recruitment of peripheral T cells to the gut. In one study, a subset of Crohn’s disease patients was shown to have an increase in the proportion of variable β8 peripheral blood lymphocyte and mesenteric lymph node cells, suggesting a superantigen effect. The authors hypothesized that changes in the functional T cell receptor repertoire can also occur which might be independent of changes in the distribution of T cells expressing variable β T cell receptors. In fact, the authors have shown there is a selective decrease in the cytotoxic function of peripheral variable β8 T cells in Crohn’s disease. Furthermore, stimulation with the variable β8 selective bacterial enterotoxin staphylococcal enterotoxin E failed to increase the cytotoxic function in this subset of Crohn’s disease patients compared with

  5. Associations of B cell-activating factor (BAFF) and anti-BAFF autoantibodies with disease activity in multi-ethnic Asian systemic lupus erythematosus patients in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, H S; Thong, B Y H; Kong, K O; Chng, H H; Lian, T Y; Chia, F L; Tay, K S S; Lau, T C; Law, W G; Koh, E T; Leung, B P

    2017-09-01

    To measure the levels of B cell-activating factor (BAFF) and endogenous anti-BAFF autoantibodies in a cohort of multi-ethnic Asian systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients in Singapore, to determine their correlation with disease activity. Serum samples from 121 SLE patients and 24 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were assayed for BAFF and anti-BAFF immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The lowest reliable detection limit for anti-BAFF-IgG antibody levels was defined as 2 standard deviations (s.d.) from blank. Correlation of serum BAFF and anti-BAFF IgG levels with disease activity [scored by SLE Activity Measure revised (SLAM-R)], and disease manifestations were determined in these 121 patients. SLE patients had elevated BAFF levels compared to controls; mean 820 ± 40 pg/ml and 152 pg ± 45/ml, respectively [mean ± standard error of the mean (s.e.m.), P < 0·01], which were correlated positively with anti-dsDNA antibody levels (r = 0·253, P < 0·03), and SLAM-R scores (r = 0·627, P < 0·01). In addition, SLE patients had significantly higher levels of anti-BAFF IgG, which were correlated negatively with disease activity (r = -0·436, P < 0·01), levels of anti-dsDNA antibody (r = -0·347, P < 0·02) and BAFF (r = -0·459, P < 0·01). The majority of patients in this multi-ethnic Asian SLE cohort had elevated levels of BAFF and anti-BAFF antibodies. Anti-BAFF autoantibody levels correlated negatively with clinical disease activity, anti-dsDNA and BAFF levels, suggesting that they may be disease-modifying. Our results provide further information about the complexity of BAFF pathophysiology in different SLE disease populations and phenotypes, and suggest that studies of the influence of anti-cytokine antibodies in different SLE populations will be required when selecting patients for trials using targeted anti-cytokine therapies. © 2017 British Society for

  6. Long-term follow-up of autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with diffuse mantle cell lymphoma in first disease remission: the prognostic value of beta2-microglobulin and the tumor score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khouri, Issa F; Saliba, Rima M; Okoroji, Grace-Julia; Acholonu, Sandra A; Champlin, Richard E

    2003-12-15

    The current study was conducted to analyze the long-term results of autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with diffuse mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) in first disease remission. Thirty-three patients were treated. Thirty-one patients had Ann Arbor Stage III or Stage IV disease. The hyper-CVAD regimen (hyperfractionated intense-dose cyclophosphamide, vincristine, continuous intravenous infusion of doxorubicin, and dexamethasone, alternating with high doses of cytarabine and methotrexate plus leucovorin rescue) was used for cytoreduction before ASCT. Patients were consolidated with high-dose cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg), total body irradiation, and ASCT. At a median follow-up of 49 months, the overall survival and disease-free-survival rates at 5 years were estimated to be 77% and 43%, respectively. Patients whose M. D. Anderson Lymphoma Tumor Score (TS) was 1 (P = 0.02). A beta2-microglobulin (beta2m)level 3 mg/L) (P = 0.0001). ASCT may prolong the overall survival in a subset of patients with MCL. This improvement has been observed for the most part in patients with low beta2m levels (< or = 3 mg/L) and TS (< or = 1). Randomized trials are required to fully assess the benefits of this strategy. Copyright 2003 American Cancer Society.

  7. Alloimmunization in multitransfused liver disease patients: Impact of underlying disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Bajpai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transfusion support is vital to the management of patients with liver diseases. Repeated transfusions are associated with many risks such as transfusion-transmitted infection, transfusion immunomodulation, and alloimmunization. Materials and Methods: A retrospective data analysis of antibody screening and identification was done from February 2012 to February 2014 to determine the frequency and specificity of irregular red-cell antibodies in multitransfused liver disease patients. The clinical and transfusion records were reviewed. The data was compiled, statistically analyzed, and reviewed. Results: A total of 842 patients were included in our study. Alloantibodies were detected in 5.22% of the patients. Higher rates of alloimmunization were seen in patients with autoimmune hepatitis, cryptogenic liver disease, liver damage due to drugs/toxins, and liver cancer patients. Patients with alcoholic liver disease had a lower rate of alloimmunization. The alloimmunization was 12.7% (23/181 in females and 3.17% (21/661 in males. Antibodies against the Rh system were the most frequent with 27 of 44 alloantibodies (61.36%. The most common alloantibody identified was anti-E (11/44 cases, 25%, followed by anti-C (6/44 cases, 13.63%. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that alloimmunization rate is affected by underlying disease. Provision of Rh and Kell phenotype-matched blood can significantly reduce alloimmunization.

  8. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  9. Late recurrence and second primary malignancy among 139 patients with germ cell tumors. Long-term outcome of the disease in a single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Sasai, Masamichi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Masumori, Naoya; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2010-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated long-term oncological outcomes in patients with germ cell tumors (GCTs) primarily treated at our institution and assessed late recurrence and second primary malignancies. This study included a total of 139 males with newly diagnosed GCTs of the testis or extragonadal origin who received treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, at our hospital between 1980 and 2005. We reviewed late recurrence that occurred at least 2 years after the initial disease-free status and secondary malignancies as well as oncological outcomes. In patients with seminoma, 5-year progression-free survival and cause-specific survival rates were 87.2% and 100% for Stage I, 88.9% and 100% for Stage II, and 50.0% and 50.0% for Stage III, respectively, whereas in those with non-seminomatous GCTs, they were 79.1% and 96.3% for Stage I, 89.5% and 89.4% for Stage II, and 85.7% and 78.4% for Stage III, respectively. Late recurrence was found in five (3.6%) patients and all of them responded to salvage treatment and achieved disease-free status. Second primary hematological neoplasms occurred in three (2.2%), although they had a long-term free of the primary disease. All died of the second primary disease. Late recurrence was successfully managed with appropriate treatments, although its incidence was not negligible. Periodic follow-up may be necessary for >5 years in patients with GCTs for early detection of late recurrence. In addition, care should be taken to watch for the development of life-threatening second primary malignant disease during long-term follow-up. (author)

  10. Autotransplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells from bone-marrow to heart in patients with severe stable coronary artery disease and refractory angina — Final 3-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Jørgensen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The study assessed long-term safety and efficacy of intramyocardial injection of autologous bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMMSCs) in patients with severe stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and refractory angina.......The study assessed long-term safety and efficacy of intramyocardial injection of autologous bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMMSCs) in patients with severe stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and refractory angina....

  11. Patients with sickle cell disease are frequently excluded from the benefits of transcranial doppler screening for the risk of stroke despite extensive and compelling evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Laranja Gomes Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Transcranial doppler (TCD is a strategic component of primary stroke prevention in children with sickle cell disease (SCD. This study was conducted to examine the TCD characteristics of children with SCD in nine different medical centers in Brazil. Methods: Transcranial doppler was performed in accordance with the Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia Protocol. Results: Of the 396 patients, 69.5% had homozygous SS hemoglobin. The TCD result was abnormal in 4.8%, conditional in 12.6%, inadequate in 4.3% and abnormally low in 1% of patients. The highest mean flow velocities were 121±23.83cm/s and 124±27.21cm/s in the left and right middle cerebral artery respectively. A total of 28.8% patients (mean age 9.19±5.92 years were evaluated with TCD for the first time. Conclusions: The SCD patients were evaluated with TCD at an older age, representing an important missed opportunity for stroke prevention. Since TCD screening in patients with SCD is important to detect those at high risk for stroke, it is recommended that this screening should be made more readily available.

  12. Comparison of the effect of stem cell therapy and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty on diabetic foot disease in patients with critical limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubský, Michal; Jirkovská, Alexandra; Bem, Robert; Fejfarová, Vladimíra; Pagacová, Libuse; Nemcová, Andrea; Sixta, Bedrich; Chlupac, Jaroslav; Peregrin, Jan H; Syková, Eva; Jude, Edward B

    2014-12-01

    The aim of our study was to compare the effect of autologous stem cell therapy (SCT) and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) on diabetic foot disease (DFD) in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). Thirty-one patients with DFD and CLI treated by autologous stem cells and 30 patients treated by PTA were included in the study; 23 patients with the same inclusion criteria who could not undergo PTA or SCT formed the control group. Amputation-free survival, transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO2) and wound healing were assessed over 12 months. Amputation-free survival after 6 and 12 months was significantly greater in the SCT and PTA groups compared with controls (P = 0.001 and P = 0.0029, respectively) without significant differences between the active treatment groups. Increase in TcPO2 did not differ between SCT and PTA groups until 12 months (both Ps diabetic foot and an observable effect of SCT on wound healing. Our results support SCT as a potential promising treatment in patients with CLI and diabetic foot. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Socio-demographic characteristics and psychosocial consequences of sickle cell disease: the case of patients in a public hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzika, Vincent A; Glozah, Franklin N; Ayim-Aboagye, Desmond; Ahorlu, Collins S K

    2017-01-31

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is of major public health concern globally, with majority of patients living in Africa. Despite its relevance, there is a dearth of research to determine the socio-demographic distribution and psychosocial impact of SCD in Ghana. The objective of this study was to examine the socio-demographic distribution and psychosocial consequences of SCD among patients in Ghana and to assess their quality of life and coping mechanisms. A cross-sectional research design was used that involved the completion of questionnaires on socio-demographic characteristics, quality of life, coping mechanisms, anxiety and depression. Participants were 387 male and female patients attending a sickle cell clinic in a public hospital. Results showed that majority of the patients were single, female, less than 39 years old and had attained secondary school level of education or less. Also, patients were more satisfied by the presence of love, friends and relatives as well as home, community and neighbourhood environment. While pains of varied nature and severity were the major reasons for attending hospital in SCD condition, going to the hospital as well as having faith in God was the most frequently reported mechanisms for coping with an unbearable SCD attacks. Results of multiple regression analysis showed that some socio-demographic and quality of life indicators had strong associations with anxiety and/or depression. It is recommended that a holistic intervention strategy incorporating psychosocial dimensions should be considered in the treatment and management of SCD.

  14. Progressive rise in red cell distribution width is associated with disease progression in ambulatory patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauthen, Clay A; Tong, Wilson; Jain, Anil; Tang, W H Wilson

    2012-02-01

    Single red cell distribution width (RDW) assessment is a consistent prognostic marker of poor outcomes in heart failure as well as in other patient cohorts. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of sequential RDW assessment in ambulatory patients with chronic heart failure. We reviewed 6,159 consecutive ambulatory patients with chronic heart failure between 2001-2006 and examined changes in RDW values from baseline to 1-year follow-up. Clinical, demographic, laboratory, and ICD-9 coding data were extracted from electronic health records, and all-cause mortality was followed over a mean follow-up of 4.4 ± 2.4 years. In this study cohort, median baseline RDW was 14.9%. RDW >16% at baseline (18.5% of cohort) was associated with a higher mortality rates than RDW ≤16%. For each +1% increment of baseline RDW, the risk ratio for all-cause mortality was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15-1.19; P < .0001). At 12-month follow-up (n = 1,601), a large majority of subjects (68% in first tertile, 56% in second tertile of baseline RDW) showed rising RDW and correspondingly higher risk for all-cause mortality (risk ratio for +1% increase in changes in RDW was 1.08 (95% CI 1.03-1.13; P = .001). This effect was independent of anemia status or other baseline cardiac or renal indices, and particularly strong in those with lower baseline RDW. In our ambulatory cohort of patients with chronic heart failure, baseline and serial increases in RDW were associated with poor long-term outcomes independently from standard cardiac, hematologic, and renal indices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical impact of factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T mutations among sickle cell disease patients of Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishank, Sudhansu Sekhar; Singh, Mendi Prema Shyam Sunder; Yadav, Rajiv

    2013-11-01

    It is known that patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) present activation of the blood coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, especially during vaso-occlusive crises and also during the steady state of the disease. We determined whether the presence of the factor prothrombin gene G20210A variant, factor V gene G1691A mutation (factor V Leiden), and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphisms may be risk factors for vascular complications in individuals with SCD. The study involved 150 patients with sickle cell anemia and 150 healthy controls of Central India. Genotyping of three thrombophilic mutations was carried out by PCR-RFLP methods using MnlI, Hind III, and Hinf I, respectively, for factor V Leiden, prothrombin, and MTHFR mutations. Patients with SCD had significantly higher prevalence of mutant variants of MTHFR gene (28.0% heterozygotes and 14.6% homozygotes) and FVL gene (14.6% heterozygotes) as compared to normal/control individuals, but complete absence of mutant variants of prothrombin gene. The patients with SCD having mutant variants of MTHFR and FVL genes showed higher incidence of pain in chest, abdomen, and bone joints along with early age of onset of clinical manifestations as well as frequent dependence on blood transfusion than those patients with SCD having wild variants of these thrombotic genes. As compared to control subjects, SCD individuals having mutant variants of FVL and MTHFR genes had significant association with higher levels of prothrombin fragment (F1+2), D-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin (TAT), and lower level of protein C. MTHFR C677T and FVL G1691A polymorphisms may be risk factors for increased vascular complications in patient with SCD. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [Partial splenectomy in sickle cell disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Díaz, A I; Svarch, E; Arencibia Núñez, A; Sabournin Ferrier, V; Machín García, S; Menendez Veitía, A; Ramón Rodriguez, L; Serrano Mirabal, J; García Peralta, T; López Martin, L G

    2015-04-01

    Total splenectomy in sickle cell disease is related to a high risk of fulminant sepsis and increased incidence of other events, which have not been reported in patients with partial splenectomy. In this study we examined the patients with sickle cell disease and partial splenectomy and compared the clinical and laboratory results with non-splenectomized patients. We studied 54 patients with sickle cell disease who underwent partial splenectomy in childhood from 1986 until 2011 at the Institute of Hematology and Immunology. They were compared with 54 non-splenectomized patients selected by random sampling with similar characteristics. Partial splenectomy was performed at a mean age of 4.1 years, with a higher frequency in homozygous hemoglobin S (70.4%), and the most common cause was recurrent splenic sequestration crisis. The most common postoperative complications were fever of unknown origin (14.8%) and acute chest syndrome (11.1%). After splenectomy there was a significant increase in leukocytes, neutrophils, and platelets, the latter two parameters remained significantly elevated when compared with non-splenectomized patients. There was no difference in the incidence of clinical events, except hepatic sequestration, which was more common in splenectomized patients. Partial splenectomy was a safe procedure in patients with sickle cell disease. There were no differences in the clinical picture in children splenectomized and non-splenectomized except the greater frequency of hepatic sequestration crisis in the first group. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Sickle cell disease in childhood in Madina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawasawi, Zakaria M.; Nabi, G.; Al-Magamci, M.S.F.; Awad, Khalid S.

    1998-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a common disease in Saudi Arabia, with ahigh prevalence in the Eastern and Southern regions. This study reports on 53cases of SCD encountered in the Madina area. In a retrospective study of 6000pediatric patients, 53 children (0.88%) with sickle cell disease wereadmitted in the Maternity and Children's Hospital Madina, between November1990 and October 1991. Of these, 39 patients (73.58%) were Saudis and 14(26.41%) were non-Saudis. Thirty-six patients were homozygous SS and 17 weresickle thalassemic. The main causes of admission were vaso-occlusive crisis(77.35%), infection (67.92%), acute chest syndrome (22.64%), anemia (12.6%)and cerebrovascular accident (9.43%). The lowest and highest age groupsrecorded in this study were six months and 12 years, respectively. About 70%of patients are still being followed-up, and none of the patients has died.This disease is one of the major causes of morbidity in this region of SaudiArabia. Measures required include neonatal screening programs for the earlydetection of the disease as well as research into new drugs to counter thedisease. (author)

  18. Pilot randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of aquatic and land physical therapy on musculoskeletal dysfunction of sickle cell disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Tatiana Zanoni

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the effect of aquatic and land-based physiotherapy in reducing musculoskeletal hip and lower back pain and increasing overall physical capabilities of sickle cell disease patients. Methods: Informed written consent was obtained from all volunteers who were submitted to evaluations using different functional scales: Lequesne's Algofunctional Questionnaire and Oswestry Disability Index, trunk and hip range of motion, goniometry, trunk and hip muscle strength assessment using load cell, and surface electromyography of the iliocostalis, long dorsal (longissimus, gluteus maximus, gluteus medius and tensor fasciae latae muscles. Ten patients were randomized into two groups: aquatic physiotherapy with a mean age of 42 years (range: 25-67 and conventional physiotherapy with a mean age of 49 years (range: 43-59. Both groups were submitted to a twelve-week program of two sessions weekly. Results: After the intervention, significant improvements were observed regarding the Lequesne index (p-value = 0.0217, Oswestry Disability Index (p-value = 0.0112, range of motion of trunk extension (p-value = 0.0320, trunk flexion muscle strength (p-value = 0.0459, hip extension and abduction muscle strength (p-value = 0.0062 and p-value = 0.0257, respec- tively. Range of motion of trunk and hip flexion, extension, adduction and abduction, trunk extensor muscle strength and all surface electromyography variables showed no significant statistical difference. Conclusion: Physical therapy is efficient to treat musculoskeletal dysfunctions in sickle cell disease patients, irrespective of the technique; however, aquatic therapy showed a trend toward improvement in muscle strength. Further studies with a larger patient sample and longer periods of therapy are necessary to confirm these results.

  19. Pilot randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of aquatic and land physical therapy on musculoskeletal dysfunction of sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, Camila Tatiana; Galvão, Fábio; Cliquet Junior, Alberto; Saad, Sara Teresinha Olalla

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effect of aquatic and land-based physiotherapy in reducing musculoskeletal hip and lower back pain and increasing overall physical capabilities of sickle cell disease patients. Informed written consent was obtained from all volunteers who were submitted to evaluations using different functional scales: Lequesne's Algofunctional Questionnaire and Oswestry Disability Index, trunk and hip range of motion, goniometry, trunk and hip muscle strength assessment using load cell, and surface electromyography of the iliocostalis, long dorsal (longissimus), gluteus maximus, gluteus medius and tensor fasciae latae muscles. Ten patients were randomized into two groups: aquatic physiotherapy with a mean age of 42 years (range: 25-67) and conventional physiotherapy with a mean age of 49 years (range: 43-59). Both groups were submitted to a twelve-week program of two sessions weekly. After the intervention, significant improvements were observed regarding the Lequesne index (p-value=0.0217), Oswestry Disability Index (p-value=0.0112), range of motion of trunk extension (p-value=0.0320), trunk flexion muscle strength (p-value=0.0459), hip extension and abduction muscle strength (p-value=0.0062 and p-value=0.0257, respectively). Range of motion of trunk and hip flexion, extension, adduction and abduction, trunk extensor muscle strength and all surface electromyography variables showed no significant statistical difference. Physical therapy is efficient to treat musculoskeletal dysfunctions in sickle cell disease patients, irrespective of the technique; however, aquatic therapy showed a trend toward improvement in muscle strength. Further studies with a larger patient sample and longer periods of therapy are necessary to confirm these results. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. High-intensity training and cardiopulmonary exercise testing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and non-small-cell lung cancer undergoing lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanelli, Francesco; Meoli, Ilernando; Cobuccio, Raffaele; Curcio, Carlo; Amore, Dario; Casazza, Dino; Tracey, Maura; Rocco, Gaetano

    2013-10-01

    Peak VO2, as measure of physical performance is central to a correct preoperative evaluation in patients with both non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) because it is closely related both to operability criteria and the rate of postoperative complications. Strategies to improve peak VO2, as a preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation programme (PRP), should be considered favourably in these patients. In order to clarify the role of pulmonary rehabilitation, we have evaluated the effects of 3-week preoperative high-intensity training on physical performance and respiratory function in a group of patients with both NSCLC and COPD who underwent lobectomy. We studied 40 patients with both NSCLC and COPD, age Patients were randomly divided into two groups (R and S): Group R underwent an intensive preoperative PRP, while Group S underwent only lobectomy. We evaluated peak VO2 in all patients at Time 0 (T0), after PRP/before surgery in Group R/S (T1) and 60 days after surgery, respectively, in both groups (T2). There was no difference between groups in peak VO2 at T0, while a significant difference was observed both at T1 and T2. In Group R, peak VO2 improves significantly from T0 to T1: 14.9 ± 2.3-17.8 ± 2.1 ml/kg/min ± standard deviation (SD), P patients with both NSCLC and COPD and this advantage was also maintained after surgery.

  1. Cerebro vascular accident in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, M.; Lodhi, M.A.; Khan, D.

    2003-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a common inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by the presence of sickle shaped erythrocytes in the blood. It can cause stroke in around 10% of children. Repeated blood transfusions are often used in an attempt to dilute blood thus reducing the risk of vaso-occlusion and stroke. We report a case of an 11 years old girl, known patient of sickle cell disease, who did not follow regular blood transfusion protocol and as a result presented with recurrent stroke. (author)

  2. Advanced sickle cell associated interstitial lung disease presenting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous studies have reported abnormal pulmonary function and pulmonary hypertension among Nigerians with sickle cell disease, but there is no report of interstitial lung disease among them. We report a Nigerian sickle cell patient who presented with computed tomography proven interstitial lung disease complicated by ...

  3. Minimal residual disease (MRD detection with translocations and T-cell receptor and immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge Sayitoglu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Monitoring minimal residual disease has become increasingly important in clinical practice of ALL management. Break-point fusion regions of leukaemia related chromosomal aberrations and rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig and T cell-receptor (TCR genes are used as leukaemia specific markers in genetic studies of MRD.Material and Methods: A total of 31 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed ALL were screened for eligibility criteria. Of those 26 were included in the study. One patient with partial response following induction therapy and four patients who were lost to follow-up after induction were excluded from the study; thus 21 patients were evaluated for MRD by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR, heteroduplex analysis, sequencing and quantitative real time PCR techniques. Results: Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 5 (24% of the patients and were used for MRD monitoring. Three patients had t(9;22 translocation, the other 2 had t(4;11 and t(1;19. MRD-based risk stratification of the16 patients analysed for Ig/TCR rearrangements revealed 3 low-risk, 11 intermediate-risk and 2 high-risk patients.Conclusion: MRD monitoring is progressively getting to be a more important predictive factor in adult ALL patients. As reported by others confirmed by our limited data there is a good correlation between MRD status and clinical outcome in patients receiving chemotherapy. The pilot-study presented here is the first that systematically and consecutively performs a molecular MRD monitoring of ALL patients in Turkey.

  4. CHARACTERISTICS OF TAND B-CELL SUBPOPULATION PROFILE IN THE PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE TREATED WITH VACCINE AGAINST PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Borisov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate subpopulational profiles of Tand B-lymphocytes in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD under the influence of a multivalent vaccine against Pseudomonas pathogens, in order to justify its usage as a potential immune stimulator of microbial origin. Sixty patients (39 males and 21 females aged 40 – 58 years old with verified diagnosis of COPD II-III degree were included into the study group. All the patients received a standard COPD therapy. In accordance with planned treatment, this cohort was divided into two groups using a simple randomization. Group 1 included thirty COPD patients (20 men and 10 women who received standard treatment. Group 2 consisted of thirty COPD patients (19 men and 11 women who received treatment according to conventional schedule, but further, they were additionally treated with «Pseudovac» vaccine used as a infection-preventing measure. The «Pseudovac» vaccine was injected, according to appropriate instructions for the drug use. Immunological evaluation was performed three times: at admission, as well as 10 and 20 days of treatment. As a control group, 35 healthy individuals (19 men and 16 women of a similar age range have been examined. Assessment of Tand Bcellspecific immune phenotypes was determined by means of flow cytometry using direct immunofluorescence of leukocytes whole peripheral blood using specific monoclonal antibodies. We have found that Tand Blymphocyte profiles in the COPD patients are characterized by decreased numbers of T-cells (due to drop in cytotoxic T-cells, and increased B-lymphocyte contents. Relative amounts of NKTand γδT-lymphocytes showed an increase in cases of developing bacterial infection. The T-lymphocyte subpopulations in patients with COPD are characterized by increase in relative numbers of regulatory T-cells, Th2-lymphocytes, and T-cells expressing activation markers. B-lymphocyte population in COPD patients was

  5. Two-year intraocular delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor by encapsulated cell technology implants in patients with chronic retinal degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauper, Konrad; McGovern, Cahil; Sherman, Sandy; Heatherton, Pam; Rapoza, Rob; Stabila, Paul; Dean, Brenda; Lee, Alice; Borges, Suzanna; Bouchard, Bruce; Tao, Weng

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) delivered over a period of up to 2 years by an intraocular encapsulated cell technology (ECT) implant in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and geographic atrophy (GA). Patients from phase 1 RP (CNTF1); phase 2 GA (CNTF2); and phase 2 late and early stage RP (CNTF3, and CNTF4) studies received an ECT-CNTF implant, designated as "NT-501," in one eye. Per protocol, all implants (n = 10) were removed at 6 months from the CNTF1 study patients. Explant for the phase 2 studies was optional, but several patients were explanted at 12, 18, and 24 months post implant. A small amount of vitreous sample was collected at the time of explant. The rate of CNTF secretion from the explants and the corresponding vitreous CNTF levels were evaluated for each time point. Serum samples from these patients were evaluated for CNTF, anti-CNTF antibodies, and antibodies to the encapsulated cells. NT-501 implants produced CNTF consistently over a 2-year period. The calculated half-life of CNTF in the vitreous continuously delivered by ECT implants was 51 months, with CNTF levels statistically equivalent between the 6- and 24-month implant period. CNTF, anti-CNTF antibodies, and antibodies to the encapsulated cells were not detected in the serum of patients. This retrospective study demonstrated that the intraocular ECT implant has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile for the treatment of chronic retinal degenerative diseases without systemic exposure. (ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00063765, NCT00447954, NCT00447980, NCT00447993.).

  6. Childhood and adolescent growth of patients with sickle cell disease in Aracaju, Sergipe, north-east Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolotti, R; Caskey, M F; Franco, R P; Mello, E V; Dal Fabbro, A L; Gurgel, R Q; Cuevas, L E

    2000-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most prevalent inherited monogenic pathology in South America. Although children with SCD have normal birthweight, weight deficit is often seen from early childhood. On the other hand, paradoxically, normal final height associated with delayed puberty has been reported from Brazil and Jamaica. This cross-sectional study describes the growth pattern by age and sex in 76 children and adolescents with SCD in Sergipe, north-east Brazil with a median age of 110 months. Median weights and heights for age were below the NCHS standards. The weight and height deficits were statistically significant for boys of all ages, except for 7-year-olds. Most girls have median weights and heights below the NCHS standards but this only becomes statistically significant at 15 years of age. Family channels were calculated from the parents' heights. The observed height was lower than the expected percentile value for the family in seven (41%) children, equal to expected family height in six (35%) and above expected family height in four (24%) of 17 teenagers. Our findings suggest that Brazilian children with SCD do not attain normal height and weight. It is therefore likely that, although maximum height and weight velocity occur significantly later than normal due to delayed puberty, the magnitude of this spurt is less than normal.

  7. Multiple squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity in a young patient with graft-versus-host disease following allogenic bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montebugnoli, L; Gissi, D B; Marchetti, C; Foschini, M P

    2011-05-01

    The development of secondary malignancies is a potential long-term complication after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In particular, a higher incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been reported in patients experiencing chronic graft versus host disease (cGvHD) secondary to HSCT. This report describes the development of two synchronous SCC of the buccal mucosa in a young female patient treated with HSCT for beta thalassemia major. She had undergone HSCT at the age of 9 years and developed oral GvHD 6 months after transplant. 17 years after HSCT she developed two synchronous carcinomatous lesions on the tongue and floor of the mouth. The current case highlights the association between oral cGvHD and OSCC, and the possible development of OSCC in young patients even many years after HSCT. This evidence suggests closer follow-up for all patients treated with HSCT who developed cGvHD, and more effective strategies to prevent and treat cGvHD. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy in small cell lung cancer limited-disease. Dose response, feasibility and outcome for patients treated in western Sweden, 1998-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallqvist, Andreas; Rylander, Hillevi; Bjoerk-Eriksson, Thomas; Nyman, Jan [ Dept. of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2007-10-15

    Addition of thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) to chemotherapy (CHT) can increase overall survival in patients with small cell lung cancer limited-disease (SCLC-LD). Accelerated fractionation and early concurrent platinum-based CHT, in combination with prophylactic cranial irradiation, represent up-front treatment for this group of patients. Optimised and tailored local and systemic treatment is important. These concepts were applied when a new regional treatment programme was designed at Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital in 1997. The planned treatment consisted of six courses of CHT (carboplatin/etoposide)+TRT{+-}prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI). Standard TRT was prescribed as 1.5 Gy BID to a total of 60 Gy during 4 weeks, starting concomitantly with the second or third course of CHT. However, patients with large tumour burdens, poor general condition and/or poor lung function received 45 Gy, 1.5 Gy BID, during 3 weeks. PCI in 15 fractions to a total dose of 30 Gy was administered to all patients with complete remission (CR) and 'good' partial remission (PR) at response evaluation. Eighty consecutive patients were treated between January 1998 and December 2004. Forty-six patients were given 60 Gy and 34 patients 45 Gy. Acute toxicity occurred as esophagitis grade III (RTOG/EORTC) in 16% and as pneumonitis grade I-II in 10%. There were no differences in toxicity between the two groups. Three- and five-year overall survival was 25% and 16%, respectively. Median survival was 20.8 months with no significant difference between the two groups. In conclusion, TRT with a total dose of 60 or 45 Gy is feasible with comparable toxicity and no difference in local control or survival. Distant metastasis is the main cause of death in this disease; the future challenge is thus further improvement of the systemic therapy combined with optimised local TRT.

  9. Serum levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigens 1 and 2 reflect disease severity and clinical type of atopic dermatitis in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Yukie; Kou, Kenzen; Ono, Junya; Azuma, Yoshinori; Komitsu, Noriko; Inoue, Yusuke; Kohno, Masumi; Matsukura, Setsuko; Kambara, Takeshi; Ohta, Shoichiro; Izuhara, Kenji; Aihara, Michiko

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that serum levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) 1 and 2 induced by type 2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13, are increased in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). However, no clinical studies have analyzed serum levels of SCCA2 in larger series of AD patients or their association with various clinical characteristics. This study was performed to clarify whether serum levels of SCCA2 are associated with disease severity and clinical phenotypes of adult AD patients. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to examine serum SCCA2 levels in 240 adult patients with AD and 25 healthy controls in this study. Serum SCCA2 levels were analyzed with clinical characteristics and laboratory parameters including thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), blood eosinophils, total IgE, and specific IgE (Japanese cedar pollen, Dermatophagoides farina, Candida, malassezia, Staphylococcal enterotoxin B). Expression of SCCA2 in AD eruption was examined by immunohistochemistry. The effect of treatment on serum SCCA2 was also assessed. Serum SCCA2 level showed a positive correlation with disease severity, levels of TARC, LDH, eosinophil counts, and IgE levels. Robust expression of SCCA2 was detected in the supra basal keratinocytes in the epidermis of AD patients. Serial measurements of serum SCCA2 revealed decreased levels of SCCA2 after treatment for AD. Serum SCCA2 levels reflected disease severity and clinical type of AD. Serum SCCA2 may thus be a relevant biomarker for AD. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Expressions of adenosine A2Areceptors in coronary arteries and peripheral blood mononuclear cells are correlated in coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariboldi, Vlad; Vairo, Donato; Guieu, Régis; Marlingue, Marion; Ravis, Eléonore; Lagier, David; Mari, Alissa; Thery, Elsa; Collart, Frédéric; Gaudry, Marine; Bonello, Laurent; Paganelli, Franck; Condo, Jocelyne; Kipson, Nathalie; Fenouillet, Emmanuel; Ruf, Jean; Mottola, Giovanna

    2017-03-01

    Altered coronary blood flow occurs in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Adenosine strongly impacts blood flow mostly via adenosine A 2A receptor (A 2A R) expressed in coronary tissues. As part of a systemic regulation of the adenosinergic system, we compared A 2A R expression in situ, and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in CAD patients. Aortic and coronary tissues, and PBMC were sampled in 20 CAD patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery and consecutively included. Controls were PBMC obtained from 15 healthy subjects. Expression and activity of A 2A R were studied by Western blotting and cAMP measurement, respectively. A 2A R expression on PBMC was lower in patients than in controls (0.83±0.31 vs 1.2±0.35 arbitrary units; pcoronary and aortic tissues (Pearson's r: 0.77 and 0.59, pcoronary artery and aortic tissues in CAD patients, A 2A R activity of PBMC matched that observed in aorta, and A 2A R expression and activity in PBMC were found reduced as compared to controls. Measuring the expression level of A 2A R on PBMC represents a good tool to address in situ expression in coronary tissues of CAD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bevacizumab Demonstrates Prolonged Disease Stabilization in Patients with Heavily Pretreated Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Agostino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are now a variety of therapies approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC. These include the immunotherapeutics, alfa-interferon, and interleukin-2, and agents that target the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR via its tyrosine kinase, such as sorafenib, sunitinib, and pazopanib, or the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, such as temsirolimus and everolimus. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against the ligand, VEGF, has shown activity against RCC as a single agent in patients who had failed prior cytokine therapy and as first line therapy in combination with interferon. The activity of bevacizumab in patients who had received and failed prior therapy has not been described. We report our experience in 4 patients with metastatic RCC who had failed prior cytokine, TKI, and mTOR inhibitors who were treated with bevacizumab as single agent therapy. These heavily pretreated patients sustained very prolonged periods of stable disease (median of 12 months with very little toxicity and excellent quality of life. The activity of this agent in patients who had failed prior therapies directed against the VEGFR and mTOR suggests that therapy targeting the ligand, VEGF, is still a viable approach in these patients and deserves further study.

  12. Annexin A1 in blood mononuclear cells from patients with coronary artery disease: Its association with inflammatory status and glucocorticoid sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bergström

    Full Text Available Annexin A1 (AnxA1 is a key player in resolution of inflammation and a mediator of glucocorticoid actions. In atherosclerotic tissue, increased expression of AnxA1 has been associated with protective plaque-stabilizing effects. Here, we investigated the expression of AnxA1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. Blood was collected from 57 patients with stable CAD (SCAD and 41 healthy controls. We also included a minor group (n = 10 with acute coronary syndrome (ACS. AnxA1 mRNA was measured in PBMCs. Expression of AnxA1 protein (total and surface-bound and glucocorticoid receptors (GR were detected in PBMC subsets by flow cytometry. Also, salivary cortisol, interleukin(IL-6 and IL-10 in plasma, and LPS-induced cytokine secretion from PBMCs, with or without dexamethasone, were assessed. AnxA1 mRNA was found to be slightly increased in PBMCs from SCAD patients compared with controls. However, protein expression of AnxA1 or GRs in PBMC subsets did not differ between SCAD patients and controls, despite SCAD patients showing a more proinflammatory cytokine profile ex vivo. Only surface expression of AnxA1 on monocytes correlated with dexamethasone-mediated suppression of cytokines. In ACS patients, a marked activation of AnxA1 was seen involving both gene expression and translocation of protein to cell surface probably reflecting a rapid glucocorticoid action modulating the acute inflammatory response in ACS. To conclude, surface expression of AnxA1 on monocytes may reflect the degree of glucocorticoid sensitivity. Speculatively, "normal" surface expression of AnxA1 indicates that anti-inflammatory capacity is impaired in SCAD patients.

  13. Annexin A1 in blood mononuclear cells from patients with coronary artery disease: Its association with inflammatory status and glucocorticoid sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Ida; Lundberg, Anna K; Jönsson, Simon; Särndahl, Eva; Ernerudh, Jan; Jonasson, Lena

    2017-01-01

    Annexin A1 (AnxA1) is a key player in resolution of inflammation and a mediator of glucocorticoid actions. In atherosclerotic tissue, increased expression of AnxA1 has been associated with protective plaque-stabilizing effects. Here, we investigated the expression of AnxA1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Blood was collected from 57 patients with stable CAD (SCAD) and 41 healthy controls. We also included a minor group (n = 10) with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). AnxA1 mRNA was measured in PBMCs. Expression of AnxA1 protein (total and surface-bound) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) were detected in PBMC subsets by flow cytometry. Also, salivary cortisol, interleukin(IL)-6 and IL-10 in plasma, and LPS-induced cytokine secretion from PBMCs, with or without dexamethasone, were assessed. AnxA1 mRNA was found to be slightly increased in PBMCs from SCAD patients compared with controls. However, protein expression of AnxA1 or GRs in PBMC subsets did not differ between SCAD patients and controls, despite SCAD patients showing a more proinflammatory cytokine profile ex vivo. Only surface expression of AnxA1 on monocytes correlated with dexamethasone-mediated suppression of cytokines. In ACS patients, a marked activation of AnxA1 was seen involving both gene expression and translocation of protein to cell surface probably reflecting a rapid glucocorticoid action modulating the acute inflammatory response in ACS. To conclude, surface expression of AnxA1 on monocytes may reflect the degree of glucocorticoid sensitivity. Speculatively, "normal" surface expression of AnxA1 indicates that anti-inflammatory capacity is impaired in SCAD patients.

  14. Dysregulation of endothelial colony-forming cell function by a negative feedback loop of circulating miR-146a and -146b in cardiovascular disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Yu Chang

    Full Text Available Functional impairment of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs, a specific cell lineage of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs is highly associated with the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD, the most common type of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Emerging evidence show that circulating microRNAs (miRNAs in CAD patients' body fluid hold a great potential as biomarkers. However, our knowledge of the role of circulating miRNA in regulating the function of ECFCs and the progression of CAD is still in its infancy. We showed that when ECFCs from healthy volunteers were incubated with conditioned medium or purified exosomes of cultured CAD ECFCs, the secretory factors from CAD ECFCs dysregulated migration and tube formation ability of healthy ECFCs. It is known that exosomes influence the physiology of recipient cells by introducing RNAs including miRNAs. By using small RNA sequencing (smRNA-seq, we deciphered the circulating miRNome in the plasma of healthy individual and CAD patients, and found that the plasma miRNA spectrum from CAD patients was significantly different from that of healthy control. Interestingly, smRNA-seq of both healthy and CAD ECFCs showed that twelve miRNAs that had a higher expression in the plasma of CAD patients also showed higher expression in CAD ECFCs when compared with healthy control. This result suggests that these miRNAs may be involved in the regulation of ECFC functions. For identification of potential mRNA targets of the differentially expressed miRNA in CAD patients, cDNA microarray analysis was performed to identify the angiogenesis-related genes that were down-regulated in CAD ECFCs and Pearson's correlation were used to identify miRNAs that were negatively correlated with the identified angiogenesis-related genes. RT-qPCR analysis of the five miRNAs that negatively correlated with the down-regulated angiogenesis-related genes in plasma and ECFC of CAD patients showed miR-146a-5p and miR-146b-5p up

  15. NKT cells in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Puijvelde, Gijs H M; Kuiper, Johan

    2017-12-05

    Despite life-style advice and the prescription of cholesterol-lowering and anti-thrombotic drugs, cardiovascular diseases are still the leading cause of death worldwide. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic strategies focussing on atherosclerosis, the major underlying pathology of cardiovascular diseases characterized by an accumulation of lipids in an inflamed arterial/vessel wall. CD1d-restricted lipid-sensing natural killer T (NKT) cells, bridging the innate and adaptive immunity, and CD1d-expressing antigen-presenting cells are detected in atherosclerotic lesions of mice and humans. In this review we will summarize studies that point to a critical role for NKT cells in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases by the secretion of pro-atherogenic cytokines and cytotoxins. These pro-atherogenic NKT cells are potential targets for new therapeutic strategies in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Additionally, proteins transferring lipids during atherosclerosis, which are also important in the loading of lipids onto CD1d and possible endogenous ligands responsible for the activation of NKT cells during atherosclerosis will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sirolimus, Tacrolimus, Thymoglobulin and Rituximab as Graft-versus-Host-Disease Prophylaxis in Patients Undergoing Haploidentical and HLA Partially Matched Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-26

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Graft Versus Host Disease; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

  17. Enhanced interferon-gamma production and B7-2 expression in isolated intestinal mononuclear cells from patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, M; Hiwatashi, N; Liu, Z; Toyota, T

    1995-11-01

    Many of the in vivo activities of interferon (IFN)-gamma match the changes found in inflammatory bowel disease, but its importance is controversial. Interferon (IFN)-gamma induces the expression of B7-2 costimulatory molecules on monocytes. We measured levels of IFN-gamma production in intestinal mucosa and isolated lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). We also investigated the induction of B7-2 on the LPMC by flow cytometry. Mucosal IFN-gamma production was higher than the control level in patients with CD, but this was not the case in UC. IFN-gamma production and B7-2 expression in the LPMC of CD were higher than in the LPMC of UC and controls, and high levels of B7-2 expression were observed on the LPMC of CD after incubation with endotoxin. The induction of B7-2 on the LPMC of CD may provide a mechanism for the amplification of T cell proliferation and lymphokine production by IFN-gamma-activated LPMC.

  18. Mast Cell Activation Disease and Microbiotic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Khoruts, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the diagnostically challenging presentation of mast cell activation disease (MCAD) and current thoughts regarding interactions between microbiota and MCs. A search for all studies on interactions between mast cells, mast cell activation disease, and microbiota published on pubmed.gov and scholar.google.com between 1960 and 2015 was conducted using the search terms mast cell, mastocyte, mastocytosis, mast cell activation, mast cell activation disease, mast cell activation syndrome, microbiome, microbiota. A manual review of the references from identified studies was also conducted. Studies were excluded if they were not accessible electronically or by interlibrary loan. Research increasingly is revealing essential involvement of MCs in normal human biology and in human disease. Via many methods, normal MCs-present sparsely in every tissue-sense their environment and reactively exert influences that, directly and indirectly, locally and remotely, improve health. The dysfunctional MCs of the "iceberg" of MCAD, on the other hand, sense abnormally, react abnormally, activate constitutively, and sometimes (in mastocytosis, the "tip" of the MCAD iceberg) even proliferate neoplastically. MCAD causes chronic multisystem illness generally, but not necessarily, of an inflammatory ± allergic theme and with great variability in behavior among patients and within any patient over time. Furthermore, the range of signals to which MCs respond and react include signals from the body's microbiota, and regardless of whether an MCAD patient has clonal mastocytosis or the bulk of the iceberg now known as MC activation syndrome (also suspected to be clonal but without significant MC proliferation), dysfunctional MCs interact as dysfunctionally with those microbiota as they interact with other human tissues, potentially leading to many adverse consequences. Interactions between microbiota and MCs are complex at baseline. The potential for both pathology and benefit

  19. Defective mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced AP endonuclease 1 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Alzheimer's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Hejl, Anne-Mette; Dinh, Tran Thuan Son

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are badly needed. Recent reports suggest that dysfunctional mitochondria and DNA damage are associated with AD development. In this report, we measured various cellular parameters, related to mitochondrial bioenergetics...... and DNA damage, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of AD and control participants, for biomarker discovery. METHODS: PBMCs were isolated from 53 patients with AD of mild to moderate degree and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Tests were performed on the PBMCs from as many of these participants...... on adjustments for gender and/or age. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals impaired mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced DNA repair activity in PBMCs of AD patients, thus suggesting that these biochemical activities may be useful as biomarkers for AD....

  20. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  1. CONTENTS OF THYROID HORMONES, CYTOKINES AND α2-MACROGLOBULIN IN BLOOD SERA AND IN CULTURE SUPERNATES OF BLOOD CELLS FROM THE GRAVES DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Zorina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We had investigated levels of TTG, T4, TNFα, IL-6, IFNγ, and α2-MG in blood serum and supernates of short-term blood cultures in the patients with verified Graves disease before treatment and after reaching of euthyroid status, as compared with healthy controls. We have revealed that initial blood concentrations of free Т4 in the patients were increased, along with decrease in TSH, higher IL-6, IFNγ levels, as well as concentrations of α2-MG which participates in cytokine transport and synthesis. Thiamazole treatment normalized the hormonal profile and reduced blood levels of IL-6, IFNγ and α2-MG, however, without complete normalization, along with increase of serum TNFα contents. It was shown, that the patients before treatment had decreased in vitro response of cells to the mitogenic stimulation as shown by decreased induction of TNFα and IFNγ production, along with, increased spontaneous IFNγ levels. When reaching euthyroid state after Thiamazole administration, we observed an increased spontaneous IFNγ synthesis, decreased IL-6 production in resting cultures. In mitogen-stimulated cell cultures from the treated patients, IFNγ contents became normal, however, TNFα secretion remained lower than in controls. The α2-MG levels in supernates were stable and significantly lower, than in serum. We may presume that thyrotoxicosis treatment with Thiamazole causes stabilization of the endocrine state, however, being not sufficient for normalized production of cytokines, as well as α2-MG, with its regulatory and transporter functions, thus promoting recurrence of disease and reactivation of autoimmune events. 

  2. Outcome in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with successful rechallenge after recovery from epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced interstitial lung disease.

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    Kashiwabara, Kosuke; Semba, Hiroshi; Fujii, Shinji; Tsumura, Shinsuke

    2017-04-01

    Several non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases of successful rechallenge with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) after recovery from gefitinib or erlotinib-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD) have been reported, but it is not clear whether the rechallenge affects the outcome. We retrospectively evaluated the difference in the outcome between advanced NCLC patients with active EGFR mutations who received EGFR-TKI rechallenge after recovery from EGFR-TKI-induced ILD and those who did not. EGFR-TKI-induced ILD occurred in 11 (10%) of 110 patients receiving gefitinib, five (7%) of 73 patients receiving erlotinib and one (8%) of 13 patients receiving afatinib. Diffuse alveolar damage pattern ILD was observed in six cases, four of which had chemotherapy-related death. Five of 13 patients who had recovered from ILD received EGFR-TKI rechallenge with concurrent oral administration of prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg after the strict informed consent of the risk for the recurrence of severe ILD. All of the five patients achieved a partial response. The median overall survival from the occurrence of EGFR-TKI-induced ILD was longer in patients with EGFR-TKI rechallenge than that in patients without (15.5 vs. 3.5 months, p = 0.029). The adverse events of EGFR-TKI rechallenge were tolerable, but one case receiving EGFR-TKI rechallenge with the suspected drug exhibited the recurrence of grade 3 ILD after the discontinuation of prednisolone. EGFR-TKI rechallenge with concurrent prednisolone therapy might be salvage therapy in advanced NSCLC patients with active EGFR mutations after recovery from EGFR-TKI-induced ILD.

  3. Interstitial lung disease in gefitinib-treated Japanese patients with non-small cell lung cancer – a retrospective analysis: JMTO LC03-02

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    Tada Harue

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Japan, high incidences of interstitial lung disease (ILD and ILD-related deaths have been reported among gefitinib-treated patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We investigated the efficacy of gefitinib, the incidence of ILD and risk factors for ILD in these patients. Findings We obtained patient data retrospectively using questionnaires sent to 22 institutions. We asked for demographic and clinical data on NSCLC patients for whom gefitinib treatment had begun between July 2002 and February 2003. Data from a total of 526 patients were analyzed. The patient characteristics were as follows: 64% male, 69% with adenocarcinoma, 61% with a performance score of 0–1, and 5% with concurrent interstitial pneumonitis. The objective response proportion was 80/439 (18.2%; 95% CI: 14.7–22.0. ILD developed in 17 patients (3.2%; 95% CI 1.9–5.1%, of whom 7 died. According to multivariate analysis, female sex, history of prior chemotherapy, low absolute neutrophil count before gefitinib treatment, and adenocarcinoma histology were associated with response to gefitinib treatment. None of the factors we evaluated were associated with the development of ILD. Conclusion The results of this study are consistent with previously published values for treatment response proportions and incidence of ILD during gefitinib treatment in Japanese patients. Future studies should be aimed at identifying factors indicating that a patient has a high probability of receiving benefit from gefitinib and a low risk of developing ILD.

  4. Asthma: Eosinophil Disease, Mast Cell Disease, or Both?

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    Bradding Peter

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Although there is much circumstantial evidence implicating eosinophils as major orchestrators in the pathophysiology of asthma, recent studies have cast doubt on their importance. Not only does anti-interleukin-5 treatment not alter the course of the disease, but some patients with asthma do not have eosinophils in their airways, whereas patients with eosinophilic bronchitis exhibit a florid tissue eosinophilia but do not have asthma. In contrast, mast cells are found in all airways and localize specifically to key tissue structures such as the submucosal glands and airway smooth muscle within asthmatic bronchi, irrespective of disease severity or phenotype. Here they are activated and interact exclusively with these structural cells via adhesive pathways and through the release of soluble mediators acting across the distance of only a few microns. The location of mast cells within the airway smooth muscle bundles seems particularly important for the development and propagation of asthma, perhaps occurring in response to, and then serving to aggravate, an underlying abnormality in asthmatic airway smooth muscle function. Targeting this mast cell-airway smooth muscle interaction in asthma offers exciting prospects for the treatment of this common disease.

  5. The Injection of Air/Oxygen Bubble into the Anterior Chamber of Rabbits as a Treatment for Hyphema in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

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    Emre Ayintap

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the changes of partial oxygen pressure (PaO2 in aqueous humour after injecting air or oxygen bubble into the anterior chamber in sickle cell hyphema. Methods. Blood samples were taken from the same patient with sickle cell disease. Thirty-two rabbits were divided into 4 groups. In group 1 (n=8, there was no injection. Only blood injection constituted group 2 (n=8, both blood and air bubble injection constituted group 3 (n=8, and both blood and oxygen bubble injection constituted group 4 (n=8. Results. The PaO2 in the aqueous humour after 10 hours from the injections was 78.45 ± 9.9 mmHg (Mean ± SD for group 1, 73.97 ± 8.86 mmHg for group 2, 123.35 ± 13.6 mmHg for group 3, and 306.47 ± 16.5 mmHg for group 4. There was statistically significant difference between group 1 and group 2, when compared with group 3 and group 4. Conclusions. PaO2 in aqueous humour was increased after injecting air or oxygen bubble into the anterior chamber. We offer to leave an air bubble in the anterior chamber of patients with sickle cell hemoglobinopathies and hyphema undergoing an anterior chamber washout.

  6. Regulatory T cell frequency in patients with melanoma with different disease stage and course, and modulating effects of high-dose interferon-α 2b treatment

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    Ascierto Paolo A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-dose interferon-alpha 2b (IFN-α 2b is the only approved systemic therapy in the United States for the adjuvant treatment of melanoma. The study objective was to explore the immunomodulatory mechanism of action for IFN-α 2b by measuring serum regulatory T cell (Treg, serum transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β, interleukin (IL-10, and autoantibody levels in patients with melanoma treated with the induction phase of the high-dose IFN-α 2b regimen. Methods Patients with melanoma received IFN-α 2b administered intravenously (20 MU/m2 each day from day 1 to day 5 for 4 consecutive weeks. Serum Treg levels were measured as whole lymphocytes in CD4+ cells using flow cytometry while TGF-β, IL-10, and autoantibody levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results Twenty-two patients with melanoma received IFN-α 2b treatment and were evaluated for Treg levels. Before treatment, Treg levels were significantly higher in patients with melanoma when compared with data from 20 healthy subjects (P = 0.001; Mann-Whitney test. Although a trend for reduction of Treg levels following IFN-α 2b treatment was observed (average decrease 0.29% per week, statistical significance was not achieved. Subgroup analyses indicated higher baseline Treg levels for stage III versus IV disease (P = 0.082, early recurrence versus no recurrence (P = 0.017, deceased versus surviving patients (P = 0.021, and preoperative neoadjuvant versus postoperative adjuvant treatment groups (not significant. No significant effects were observed on the levels of TGF-β, IL-10, and autoantibodies in patients with melanoma treated with IFN-α 2b. Conclusions Patients with melanoma in this study showed increased basal levels of Treg that may be relevant to their disease and its progression. Treg levels shifted in patients with melanoma treated with IFN-α 2b, although no firm conclusions regarding the role of Tregs as a marker of treatment response

  7. Increased Expression Profile and Functionality of TLR6 in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Hepatocytes of Morbidly Obese Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

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    Arias-Loste, María Teresa; Iruzubieta, Paula; Puente, Ángela; Ramos, David; Santa Cruz, Carolina; Estébanez, Ángel; Llerena, Susana; Alonso-Martín, Carmen; San Segundo, David; Álvarez, Lorena; López Useros, Antonio; Fábrega, Emilio; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Crespo, Javier

    2016-11-10

    Current evidence suggests that gut dysbiosis drives obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR6 specifically recognize components of Gram-positive bacteria. Despite the potential implications of TLR2 in NAFLD pathogenesis, the role of TLR6 has not been addressed. Our aim is to study a potential role of TLR6 in obesity-related NAFLD. Forty morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery were prospectively studied. Cell surface expression of TLR2 and TLR6 was assessed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by flow cytometry. Freshly isolated monocytes were cultured with specific TLR2/TLR6 agonists and intracellular production of cytokines was determined by flow-cytometry. In liver biopsies, the expression of TLR2 and TLR6 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and cytokine gene expression using RT-qPCR. TLR6 expression in PBMCs from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) patients was significantly higher when compared to those from simple steatosis. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to TLR2/TLR6 stimulation was also significantly higher in patients with lobular inflammation. Hepatocyte expression of TLR6 but not that of TLR2 was increased in NAFLD patients compared to normal liver histology. Deregulated expression and activity of peripheral TLR6 in morbidly obese patients can mirror the liver inflammatory events that are well known drivers of obesity-related NASH pathogenesis. Moreover, TLR6 is also significantly overexpressed in the hepatocytes of NAFLD patients compared to their normal counterparts. Thus, deregulated TLR6 expression may potentiate TLR2-mediated liver inflammation in NAFLD pathogenesis, and also serve as a potential peripheral biomarker of obesity-related NASH.

  8. Treatment Of Sickle Cell Disease

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2014-12-04

    The present invention includes embodiments for treatment and/or prevention of sickle cell disease that employ Hydroxyfasudil or Isocoronarin D alone or either in conjunction with each other or an inducer of HbF production. The compounds may act synergistically, and the compounds employed circumvent the side effects seen with Hydroxyurea.

  9. Quantitative sensory testing is feasible and is well-tolerated in patients with sickle cell disease following a vaso-occlusive episode

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    Bakshi N

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitya Bakshi,1 Ines Lukombo,1,2 Inna Belfer,3 Lakshmanan Krishnamurti1 1Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA, 2University of Pittsburgh, 3Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Introduction: Sickle cell disease (SCD is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormally shaped sickle cells. The hallmark of this disease is intermittent, painful vaso-occlusive episodes (VOE, but a subset of individuals with SCD experience chronic pain. The mechanism of transition to chronic pain is not well understood in SCD, but there is evidence of altered pain processing in individuals with SCD. The impact of VOE on pain sensitivity is not established. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and tolerability of quantitative sensory testing (QST in SCD following a VOE to better understand the contribution of VOE to the development of chronic pain. Methods: As part of a larger pain sensitivity study, pediatric patients with SCD were offered QST following a VOE-related Emergency Room visit or inpatient hospitalization. The feasibility of recruitment and completion of QST was measured, and tolerability of QST was determined using post-QST assessments of pain, and compared with measurements at steady state. Results: Ten participants completed QST following a VOE. The median age was 16.5, and 60% were female. Overall, 10 of 16 (62.5% patients approached for QST following VOE completed QST. This included 8 of 12 patients who had previously completed QST at steady state. There were no statistically significant differences in pain intensity and Gracely Box scores after QST following a VOE, when compared to steady-state QST. Conclusion: QST is feasible and is well-tolerated following a VOE in patients with SCD. Large prospective studies are needed to determine the impact of VOE on experimental pain sensitivity and must

  10. Blocking of CD1d Decreases Trypanosoma cruzi-Induced Activation of CD4-CD8- T Cells and Modulates the Inflammatory Response in Patients With Chagas Heart Disease.

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    Passos, Lívia Silva Araújo; Villani, Fernanda Nobre Amaral; Magalhães, Luísa Mourão Dias; Gollob, Kenneth J; Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro do Vale; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira; Dutra, Walderez Ornelas

    2016-09-15

    The control of inflammatory responses to prevent the deadly cardiac pathology in human Chagas disease is a desirable and currently unattained goal. Double-negative (DN) T cells are important sources of inflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokines in patients with Chagas heart disease and those with the indeterminate clinical form of Chagas disease, respectively. Given the importance of DN T cells in immunoregulatory processes and their potential as targets for controlling inflammation-induced pathology, we studied the involvement of CD1 molecules in the activation and functional profile of Trypanosoma cruzi-specific DN T cells. We observed that parasite stimulation significantly increased the expression of CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD1d by CD14(+) cells from patients with Chagas disease. Importantly, among the analyzed molecules, only CD1d expression showed an association with the activation of DN T cells, as well as with worse ventricular function in patients with Chagas disease. Blocking of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation led to a clear reduction of DN T-cell activation and a decrease in the expression of interferon γ (IFN-γ) by DN T cells. Thus, our results showed that antigen presentation via CD1d is associated with activation of DN T cells in Chagas disease and that CD1d blocking leads to downregulation of IFN-γ by DN T cells from patients with Chagas heart disease, which may be a potential target for preventing progression of inflammation-mediated dilated cardiomyopathy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Anemia and hematinic deficiencies in gastric parietal cell antibody-positive and -negative oral mucosal disease patients with microcytosis

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    Hung-Pin Lin

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: We conclude that GPCA in microcytosis patients' sera may have caused significantly lower mean vitamin B12 level as well as significantly higher mean RDW and serum homocysteine level in our GPCA+/microcytosis patients than in GPCA−/microcytosis patients. Herein, iron deficiency anemia was the most common type of anemia in anemic GPCA+/microcytosis and GPCA−/microcytosis patients.

  12. Alterações hemostáticas em pacientes com doença falciforme Changes in hemostasis in sickle cell disease patients

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    Jaíne B. Stypulkowski

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A doença falciforme (DF é uma doença hereditária que tem uma fisiopatologia complexa e diversificada. Além da falcização dos eritrócitos, responsável pelos fenômenos de vaso-oclusão e hemólise, alterações no sistema de coagulação parecem ter papel importante nas várias manifestações clínicas desta doença. Aproximadamente todos os componentes da hemostasia, incluindo função plaquetária, mecanismos procoagulantes, anticoagulantes e sistema fibrinolítico, estão alterados nesta patologia, mesmo em pacientes clinicamente estáveis. A presença da fosfatidilserina (FS na superfície externa da membrana do eritrócito e o aumento dos anticorpos antifosfolipídeos e do fator tecidual (FT marcam o início da ativação da coagulação nestes pacientes. Também a destruição dos eritrócitos diminui a biodisponibilidade do óxido nítrico (NO e, como consequência, modifica a hemostasia vascular, aumentando a ativação plaquetária e a adesão de moléculas ao endotélio. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi abordar as diferentes alterações hemostáticas que ocorrem nos pacientes com doença falciforme, a fim de melhor compreender o estado "hipercoagulável" como é descrito nesta doença.Sickle cell disease is an inherited disease characterized by a complex and varied physiopathology. Apart from the sickle red blood cells, responsible for vascular occlusion and hemolytic anemia, changes in the coagulation system seem to play an important role in the clinical manifestations of this disorder. Nearly every component of hemostasis, including platelet function and the procoagulant, anticoagulant, and fibrinolytic systems, are altered in sickle Cell Disease even in non-crisis steady-state patients. The presence of phosphatidylserine on the external membrane of the red blood cell and the increase in antiphosphatidylserine antibodies and tissue factor mark the beginning of coagulation activation in these patients. Moreover, red

  13. Pain management trend of vaso-occulsive crisis (VOC) at a community hospital emergency department (ED) for patients with sickle cell disease.

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    Inoue, Susumu; Khan, Isra'a; Mushtaq, Rao; Sanikommu, Srinivasa Reddy; Mbeumo, Carline; LaChance, Jenny; Roebuck, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Pain management at the emergency department (ED) for vaso-occulsive crisis (VOC) for patients with sickle cell disease has not been optimum, with a long delay in giving the initial analgesic. We conducted a retrospective survey over a 7-year period to determine our ED's timing in giving pain medication to patients with VOC as a quality improvement project. We compared different periods, children vs adults, and the influence of gender in the analgesic administration timing. This is a retrospective chart review of three different periods: (1) years 2007-2008, (2) years 2011-2012, and (3) year 2013. We extracted relevant information from ED records. Data were analyzed using Student t test, chi-square analysis, and the Kruskal-Wallis test. There was a progressive improvement in the time interval to the 1st analgesic over these three periods. Children received analgesics more quickly than adults in all periods. Male adult patients received pain medication faster than female adult patients, although initial pain scores were higher in female than in male patients. Progressively fewer pediatric patients utilized ED over these three periods, but no difference for adult patients was observed. The proportion of pediatric patients admitted to the hospital increased with each period. The progressive decrease in both the number of patients and the number of visits to the ED by children suggested that the collective number of VOC in children has decreased, possibly secondary to the dissemination of hydroxyurea use. We failed to observe the same trend in adult patients. The need for IV access, and ordering laboratory tests or imaging studies tends to delay analgesic administration. Delay in administration of the first analgesic was more pronounced for female adult patients than male adult patients in spite of their higher pain score. Health care providers working in ED should make conscious efforts to respect pain in women as well as pain in men. Though not proven from this study

  14. Genetic engineering with endothelial nitric oxide synthase improves functional properties of endothelial progenitor cells from patients with coronary artery disease: an in vitro study.

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    Kaur, Savneet; Kumar, T R Santhosh; Uruno, Akira; Sugawara, Akira; Jayakumar, Karunakaran; Kartha, Chandrasekharan Cheranellore

    2009-11-01

    Recent studies have reported a marked impairment in the number and functions of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In view of an important role of eNOS in angiogenesis, in the present study, we evaluated the effects of eNOS gene transfer in ex vivo expanded EPCs isolated from patients with CAD. The expanded EPCs were transfected with mammalian expression vector pcDNA3.1-eNOS containing the full-length human eNOS gene using lipofectamine. About 35-40% of the eNOS-EPCs had higher expression of eNOS as compared to untransfected EPCs. EPCs transfected with pcDNA3.0-EGFP, the plasmid vector expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were used as control. The untransfected, GFP-transfected and eNOS-transfected EPCs were compared in terms of important functional attributes of angiogenesis such as proliferation, migration, differentiation and adhesion/integration into tube-like structures in vitro. Functional studies revealed that in the presence of defined growth conditions, compared to the untransfected and GFP-transfected cells, eNOS-EPCs from patients with CAD have a significant increase in [3H] thymidine-labeled DNA (P < 0.01), migration (14.6 +/- 1.8 and 16.5 +/- 1.9 vs. 23.5 +/- 3.4 cells/field, P < 0.01), ability to differentiate into endothelial-like spindle-shaped cells (46 +/- 4.5 and 56.5 +/- 2.1 vs. 93.2 +/- 6.6 cells/field, P < 0.001) and also incorporation into tube-like structures on the matrigel (GFP-EPCs: 21.25 +/- 2.9 vs. GFP-eNOS-EPCs: 34.5 +/- 5.5 cells/field, P < 0.05). We conclude that eNOS gene transfection is a valuable approach to augment angiogenic properties of ex vivo expanded EPCs and eNOS-modified EPCs may offer significant advantages than EPCs alone in terms of their clinical use in patients with myocardial ischemia.

  15. Empowering Patients with Chronic Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bestek, Mate; Meglič, Matic; Kurent, Blaž

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic diseases require most of the resources in todays healthcare systems. Healthcare systems, as such, are thus not sustainable in the long term. Solutions to this problem are needed and a lot of research is focused on finding new approaches to more sustainable healthcare systems...... himself to become empowered. The patient needs to see data about his health in order to start thinking about new decisions in life that can lead to change in his behaviour. Objective: We have approached the problem of empowering patients with chronic diseases from a biological, psychological, sociological....... We want to develop extensible technology to support even more new interventions for different chronic diseases. We want the technology to enable semantic interoperability with other systems. Methods: We have collaborated with doctors in order to model the care plans for different chronic diseases...

  16. Decreased Expression of Innate Immunity-Related Genes in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Patients with IgG4-Related Disease.

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    Akio Nakajima

    Full Text Available IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD is a new clinical entity of unknown etiology characterized by elevated serum IgG4 and tissue infiltration by IgG4-positive plasma cells. Although aberrancies in acquired immune system functions, including increases in Th2 and Treg cytokines observed in patients with IgG4-RD, its true etiology remains unclear. To investigate the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD, this study compared the expression of genes related to innate immunity in patients with IgG4-RD and healthy controls.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were obtained from patients with IgG4-RD before and after steroid therapy and from healthy controls. Total RNA was extracted and DNA microarray analysis was performed in two IgG4-RD patients to screen for genes showing changes in expression. Candidate genes were validated by real-time RT-PCR in 27 patients with IgG4-RD and 13 healthy controls.DNA microarray analysis identified 21 genes that showed a greater than 3-fold difference in expression between IgG4-RD patients and healthy controls and 30 genes that showed a greater than 3-fold change in IgG4-RD patients following steroid therapy. Candidate genes related to innate immunity, including those encoding Charcot-Leyden crystal protein (CLC, membrane-spanning 4-domain subfamily A member 3 (MS4A3, defensin alpha (DEFA 3 and 4, and interleukin-8 receptors (IL8R, were validated by real-time RT-PCR. Expression of all genes was significantly lower in IgG4-RD patients than in healthy controls. Steroid therapy significantly increased the expression of DEFA3, DEFA4 and MS4A3, but had no effect on the expression of CLC, IL8RA and IL8RB.The expression of genes related to allergy or innate immunity, including CLC, MS4A3, DEFA3, DEFA4, IL8RA and IL8RB, was lower in PBMCs from patients with IgG4-RD than from healthy controls. Although there is the limitation in the number of patients applied in DNA microarray, impaired expression of genes related to innate immunity may be

  17. Skeletal MR imaging in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effmann, E.L.; Kinney, T.R.; Utz, J.A.; Merten, D.F.; Herfkens, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors evaluated eight patients with sickle cell disease (mean age, 15.75 years; range 5-19 years) using MR imaging performed 24-72 hours after hospital admission for crisis. Coronal images of the lower extremities were obtained with a General Electric 1.5-T system and pulse sequences of TR/TE = 500/25 msec and 2,000/40, 80 msec. In three patients a mild decrease in signal intensity was seen on both T1- and T2-weighted images, probably secondary to marrow hyperplasia. In two