WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell death machinery

  1. The Autophagy Machinery Controls Cell Death Switching between Apoptosis and Necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, Megan L; Fitzwalter, Brent E; Zahedi, Shadi; Wu, Min; Rodriguez, Diego; Mulcahy-Levy, Jean M; Green, Douglas R; Morgan, Michael; Cramer, Scott D; Thorburn, Andrew

    2016-05-23

    Although autophagy controls cell death and survival, underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, and it is unknown whether autophagy affects only whether or not cells die or also controls other aspects of programmed cell death. MAP3K7 is a tumor suppressor gene associated with poor disease-free survival in prostate cancer. Here, we report that Map3k7 deletion in mouse prostate cells sensitizes to cell death by TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand). Surprisingly, this death occurs primarily through necroptosis, not apoptosis, due to assembly of the necrosome in association with the autophagy machinery, mediated by p62/SQSTM1 recruitment of RIPK1. The mechanism of cell death switches to apoptosis if p62-dependent recruitment of the necrosome to the autophagy machinery is blocked. These data show that the autophagy machinery can control the mechanism of programmed cell death by serving as a scaffold rather than by degrading cargo.

  2. HIPK2: a versatile switchboard regulating the transcription machinery and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzado, Marco A; Renner, Florian; Roscic, Ana; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2007-01-15

    Homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is an evolutionary conserved serine/threonine kinase that regulates gene expression by phosphorylation of transcription factors and accessory components of the transcription machinery. HIPK2 is activated in response to DNA-damaging agents or morphogenic signals and accordingly HIPK2-guided gene expression programs trigger differentiation and development or alternatively apoptosis. The kinase contributes to the regulation of remarkably diverse pathways such as p53 activation or Wnt signaling. Here we discuss recent findings from biochemical and functional experiments that allow a deeper understanding of the pleiotropic effects mediated by HIPK2.

  3. A near death experience: Shigella manipulates host death machinery to silence innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Denise N; O'Riordan, Mary Xd

    2014-10-01

    Release of mitochondrial contents often triggers inflammation and cell death, and modulating this process can be advantageous to invading pathogens. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Andree and colleagues reveal new findings that an intracellular bacterial pathogen exploits apoptotic machinery to suppress host immune signaling, yet avoids cell death. This study emphasizes the need to expand our understanding of the roles played by pro‐apoptotic proteins in non‐death scenarios.

  4. Machinery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ China Council for the Promotion of International Trade, Machin-ery Sub-Council (referred to as CCPIT MSC) & China Chamber of International Commerce, Machinery Chamber of Commerce was founded in 1988 as one of the first group of industrial trade promotion agencies approved by the governing authorities of China.

  5. The SNARE machinery in mast cell secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel eLorentz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are known as inflammatory cells which exert their functions in allergic and anaphylactic reactions by secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators. During an allergic response, the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, becomes cross-linked by receptor-bound IgE and antigen resulting in immediate release of pre-synthesized mediators – stored in granules – as well as in de novo synthesis of various mediators like cytokines and chemokines. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor (NSF Attachment Protein (SNAP Receptors (SNARE proteins were found to play a central role in regulating membrane fusion events during exocytosis. In addition, several accessory regulators like Munc13, Munc18, Rab GTPases, SCAMPs, complexins or synaptotagmins were found to be involved in membrane fusion. In this review we summarize our current knowledge about the SNARE machinery and its mechanism of action in mast cell secretion.

  6. Programmed cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  7. Role of polyphenols in cell death control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Claudio; Masella, Roberta

    2012-05-01

    Dietary consumption of fruit, vegetables, fish, and olive oil has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on human health. This finding may be due to the high content of antioxidant compounds including polyphenols. Current evidence strongly supports a contribution of polyphenols to the prevention of several chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, central nervous system disorders, as well as aging. Apoptosis is a genetically controlled and evolutionarily conserved form of cell death of critical importance for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis in the adult organism. The malfunction of the death machinery may play a primary role in various pathologic processes, leading to proliferative or degenerative diseases. Polyphenols can interact with specific steps and/or proteins regulating the apoptotic process in different ways depending on their concentration, the cell system, the type or stage of the pathological process. Because of their ability to modulate cell death, polyphenols have been proposed as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents. This paper reviews and discusses the last 3-year findings related to the principal molecular mechanisms involved in the control of the balance between apoptosis and cell proliferation exerted by polyphenols. PMID:22584012

  8. Cell surface recycling in yeast: mechanisms and machineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Chris; Piper, Robert C

    2016-04-15

    Sorting internalized proteins and lipids back to the cell surface controls the supply of molecules throughout the cell and regulates integral membrane protein activity at the surface. One central process in mammalian cells is the transit of cargo from endosomes back to the plasma membrane (PM) directly, along a route that bypasses retrograde movement to the Golgi. Despite recognition of this pathway for decades we are only beginning to understand the machinery controlling this overall process. The budding yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae, a stalwart genetic system, has been routinely used to identify fundamental proteins and their modes of action in conserved trafficking pathways. However, the study of cell surface recycling from endosomes in yeast is hampered by difficulties that obscure visualization of the pathway. Here we briefly discuss how recycling is likely a more prevalent process in yeast than is widely appreciated and how tools might be built to better study the pathway.

  9. Stem cell death and survival in heart regeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Kalvelyte, Audrone; Stulpinas, Aurimas; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Foldes, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis disrupts cardiac function and leads to cardiac decompensation and terminal heart failure. Delineating the regulatory signaling pathways that orchestrate cell survival in the heart has significant therapeutic implications. Cardiac tissue has limited capacity to regenerate and repair. Stem cell therapy is a successful approach for repairing and regenerating ischemic cardiac tissue; however, transplanted cells display very high death percentage, a problem that affects success of tissue regeneration. Stem cells display multipotency or pluripotency and undergo self-renewal, however these events are negatively influenced by upregulation of cell death machinery that induces the significant decrease in survival and differentiation signals upon cardiovascular injury. While efforts to identify cell types and molecular pathways that promote cardiac tissue regeneration have been productive, studies that focus on blocking the extensive cell death after transplantation are limited. The control of cell death includes multiple networks rather than one crucial pathway, which underlies the challenge of identifying the interaction between various cellular and biochemical components. This review is aimed at exploiting the molecular mechanisms by which stem cells resist death signals to develop into mature and healthy cardiac cells. Specifically, we focus on a number of factors that control death and survival of stem cells upon transplantation and ultimately affect cardiac regeneration. We also discuss potential survival enhancing strategies and how they could be meaningful in the design of targeted therapies that improve cardiac function.

  10. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Estrela

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  11. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  12. DNA damage-induced cell death: lessons from the central nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helena Lobo Borges; Rafael Linden; Jean YJ Wang

    2008-01-01

    DNA damage can, but does not always, induce cell death. While several pathways linking DNA damage signals to mitochondria-dependent and -independent death machineries have been elucidated, the connectivity of these pathways is subject to regulation by multiple other factors that are not well understood. We have proposed two conceptual models to explain the delayed and variable cell death response to DNA damage: integrative surveillance versus autonomous pathways. In this review, we discuss how these two models may explain the in vivo regulation of cell death induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in the developing central nervous system, where the death response is regulated by radiation dose, cell cycle status and neuronal development.

  13. Aquatic viruses induce host cell death pathways and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshi, Latif; Wu, Jen-Leih; Wang, Hao-Ven; Hong, Jiann-Ruey

    2016-01-01

    Virus infections of mammalian and animal cells consist of a series of events. As intracellular parasites, viruses rely on the use of host cellular machinery. Through the use of cell culture and molecular approaches over the past decade, our knowledge of the biology of aquatic viruses has grown exponentially. The increase in aquaculture operations worldwide has provided new approaches for the transmission of aquatic viruses that include RNA and DNA viruses. Therefore, the struggle between the virus and the host for control of the cell's death machinery is crucial for survival. Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites and, as such, must modulate apoptotic pathways to control the lifespan of their host to complete their replication cycle. This paper updates the discussion on the detailed mechanisms of action that various aquatic viruses use to induce cell death pathways in the host, such as Bad-mediated, mitochondria-mediated, ROS-mediated and Fas-mediated cell death circuits. Understanding how viruses exploit the apoptotic pathways of their hosts may provide great opportunities for the development of future potential therapeutic strategies and pathogenic insights into different aquatic viral diseases.

  14. Mechanism of heavy ion radiation-induced cancer cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported that the carbon beam triggers apoptosis in radio-resistant cancer cell lines via extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)- and mitochondrial Bcl-2 family protein-dependant mechanism. Here, we further examined the further apoptosis-inducing mechanism of carbon beam in two glioma cell lines (T98G, U251). ERK1/2 knockdown experiments revealed that ERK regulates this apoptosis-inducing machinery upstream of mitochondria. Furthermore, we also found that both T98G cell and U251 cell stably expressing dominant-negative ERK2 suppress cell death induced by carbon beam irradiation. We also found proapoptotic PUMA and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 dynamically chang their expression levels corresponding to ERK activation after CB irradiation in U251 cell, and knockdown of PUMA decreased CB-induced U251 cell death. These data suggest that kinase action of ERK is essential for CB-induced glioma cell death, and proapoptotic PUMA and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 might be downstream targets of ERK in CB-induced glioma cell death mechanism. (author)

  15. Polycation-mediated integrated cell death processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Andersen, Helene; Wu, Linping;

    2014-01-01

    standard. PEIs are highly efficient transfectants, but depending on their architecture and size they induce cytotoxicity through different modes of cell death pathways. Here, we briefly review dynamic and integrated cell death processes and pathways, and discuss considerations in cell death assay design...

  16. Mitochondria: pharmacological manipulation of cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchier-Hayes, Lisa; Lartigue, Lydia; Newmeyer, Donald D.

    2005-01-01

    Cell death by apoptosis or necrosis is often important in the etiology and treatment of disease. Since mitochondria play important roles in cell death pathways, these organelles are potentially prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we discuss the mechanisms through which mitochondria participate in the cell death process and also survey some of the pharmacological approaches that target mitochondria in various ways.

  17. Apoptotic-like programed cell death in fungi: the benefits in filamentous species

    OpenAIRE

    Shlezinger, Neta; Goldfinger, Nir; Sharon, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Studies conducted in the early 1990s showed for the first time that Saccharomyces cerevisiae can undergo cell death with hallmarks of animal apoptosis. These findings came as a surprise, since suicide machinery was unexpected in unicellular organisms. Today, apoptosis in yeast is well-documented. Apoptotic death of yeast cells has been described under various conditions and S. cerevisiae homologs of human apoptotic genes have been identified and characterized. These studies also revealed fund...

  18. Cell death in the cardiovascular system

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Murray; Bennett, Martin; Littlewood, Trevor

    2006-01-01

    Cell death is important for both development and tissue homeostasis in the adult. As such, it is tightly controlled and deregulation is associated with diverse pathologies; for example, regulated cell death is involved in vessel remodelling during development or following injury, but deregulated death is implicated in pathologies such as atherosclerosis, aneurysm formation, ischaemic and dilated cardiomyopathies and infarction. We describe the mechanisms of cell death and its role in the norm...

  19. Programmed Cell Death in Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pedro Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death has been studied for decades in mammalian cells, but simpler organisms, including prokaryotes, plants, and fungi, also undergo regulated forms of cell death. We highlight the usefulness of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa as a model organism for the study of programmed cell death. In N. crassa, cell death can be triggered genetically due to hyphal fusion between individuals with different allelic specificities at het loci, in a process called “heterokaryon incompatibility.” Chemical induction of cell death can also be achieved upon exposure to death-inducing agents like staurosporine, phytosphingosine, or hydrogen peroxide. A summary of the recent advances made by our and other groups on the discovery of the mechanisms and mediators underlying the process of cell death in N. crassa is presented.

  20. Detection of Cell Death in Drosophila Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Deepika; Ryoo, Hyung Don

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila has served as a particularly attractive model to study cell death due to the vast array of tools for genetic manipulation under defined spatial and temporal conditions in vivo as well as in cultured cells. These genetic methods have been well supplemented by enzymatic assays and a panel of antibodies recognizing cell death markers. This chapter discusses reporters, mutants and assays used by various laboratories to study cell death in the context of development and in response to external insults. PMID:27108437

  1. Programmed Cell Death During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradt, Barbara; Wu, Yi-Chun; Xue, Ding

    2016-08-01

    Programmed cell death is an integral component of Caenorhabditis elegans development. Genetic and reverse genetic studies in C. elegans have led to the identification of many genes and conserved cell death pathways that are important for the specification of which cells should live or die, the activation of the suicide program, and the dismantling and removal of dying cells. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical studies have revealed the underlying mechanisms that control these three phases of programmed cell death. In particular, the interplay of transcriptional regulatory cascades and networks involving multiple transcriptional regulators is crucial in activating the expression of the key death-inducing gene egl-1 and, in some cases, the ced-3 gene in cells destined to die. A protein interaction cascade involving EGL-1, CED-9, CED-4, and CED-3 results in the activation of the key cell death protease CED-3, which is tightly controlled by multiple positive and negative regulators. The activation of the CED-3 caspase then initiates the cell disassembly process by cleaving and activating or inactivating crucial CED-3 substrates; leading to activation of multiple cell death execution events, including nuclear DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial elimination, phosphatidylserine externalization, inactivation of survival signals, and clearance of apoptotic cells. Further studies of programmed cell death in C. elegans will continue to advance our understanding of how programmed cell death is regulated, activated, and executed in general. PMID:27516615

  2. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  3. Special characteristics of the transcription and splicing machinery in photoreceptor cells of the mammalian retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlig, Kristin; Giessl, Andreas; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut; Enz, Ralf; Dahlhaus, Regina

    2015-11-01

    Chromatin organization and the management of transcription and splicing are fundamental to the correct functioning of every cell but, in particular, for highly active cells such as photoreceptors, the sensory neurons of the retina. Rod photoreceptor cells of nocturnal animals have recently been shown to have an inverted chromatin architecture compared with rod photoreceptor cells of diurnal animals. The heterochromatin is concentrated in the center of the nucleus, whereas the genetically active euchromatin is positioned close to the nuclear membrane. This unique chromatin architecture suggests that the transcription and splicing machinery is also subject to specific adaptations in these cells. Recently, we described the protein Simiate, which is enriched in nuclear speckles and seems to be involved in transcription and splicing processes. Here, we examine the distribution of Simiate and nuclear speckles in neurons of mouse retinae. In retinal neurons of the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layer, Simiate is concentrated in a clustered pattern in the nuclear interior, whereas in rod and cone photoreceptor cells, Simiate is present at the nuclear periphery. Further staining with markers for the transcription and splicing machinery has confirmed the localization of nuclear speckle components at the periphery. Comparing the distribution of nuclear speckles in retinae of the nocturnal mouse with the diurnal degu, we found no differences in the arrangement of the transcription and splicing machinery in their photoreceptor cells, thus suggesting that the organization of these machineries is not related to the animal's lifestyle but rather represents a general characteristic of photoreceptor organization and function.

  4. Morphological classification of plant cell deaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Doorn, W.G.; Beers, E.P.; Dangl, J.L.;

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about...... the classification of PCD in plants. Here we suggest a classification based on morphological criteria. According to this classification, the use of the term 'apoptosis' is not justified in plants, but at least two classes of PCD can be distinguished: vacuolar cell death and necrosis. During vacuolar cell death......, the cell contents are removed by a combination of autophagy-like process and release of hydrolases from collapsed lytic vacuoles. Necrosis is characterised by early rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinkage of the protoplast and absence of vacuolar cell death features. Vacuolar cell death is common during...

  5. A High-Throughput Small Molecule Screen for C. elegans Linker Cell Death Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendeman, Andrew R.; Shaham, Shai

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death is a ubiquitous process in metazoan development. Apoptosis, one cell death form, has been studied extensively. However, mutations inactivating key mammalian apoptosis regulators do not block most developmental cell culling, suggesting that other cell death pathways are likely important. Recent work in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans identified a non-apoptotic cell death form mediating the demise of the male-specific linker cell. This cell death process (LCD, linker cell-type death) is morphologically conserved, and its molecular effectors also mediate axon degeneration in mammals and Drosophila. To develop reagents to manipulate LCD, we established a simple high-throughput screening protocol for interrogating the effects of small molecules on C. elegans linker cell death in vivo. From 23,797 compounds assayed, 11 reproducibly block linker cell death onset. Of these, five induce animal lethality, and six promote a reversible developmental delay. These results provide proof-of principle validation of our screening protocol, demonstrate that developmental progression is required for linker cell death, and suggest that larger scale screens may identify LCD-specific small-molecule regulators that target the LCD execution machinery. PMID:27716809

  6. Mitochondrial dynamics and cell death in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-García, José; Akhmedov, Alexander T

    2016-03-01

    The highly regulated processes of mitochondrial fusion (joining), fission (division) and trafficking, collectively called mitochondrial dynamics, determine cell-type specific morphology, intracellular distribution and activity of these critical organelles. Mitochondria are critical for cardiac function, while their structural and functional abnormalities contribute to several common cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure (HF). The tightly balanced mitochondrial fusion and fission determine number, morphology and activity of these multifunctional organelles. Although the intracellular architecture of mature cardiomyocytes greatly restricts mitochondrial dynamics, this process occurs in the adult human heart. Fusion and fission modulate multiple mitochondrial functions, ranging from energy and reactive oxygen species production to Ca(2+) homeostasis and cell death, allowing the heart to respond properly to body demands. Tightly controlled balance between fusion and fission is of utmost importance in the high energy-demanding cardiomyocytes. A shift toward fission leads to mitochondrial fragmentation, while a shift toward fusion results in the formation of enlarged mitochondria and in the fusion of damaged mitochondria with healthy organelles. Mfn1, Mfn2 and OPA1 constitute the core machinery promoting mitochondrial fusion, whereas Drp1, Fis1, Mff and MiD49/51 are the core components of fission machinery. Growing evidence suggests that fusion/fission factors in adult cardiomyocytes play essential noncanonical roles in cardiac development, Ca(2+) signaling, mitochondrial quality control and cell death. Impairment of this complex circuit causes cardiomyocyte dysfunction and death contributing to heart injury culminating in HF. Pharmacological targeting of components of this intricate network may be a novel therapeutic modality for HF treatment. PMID:26872674

  7. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development

    OpenAIRE

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2013-01-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucle...

  8. Apoptosis: A Review of Programmed Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Elmore, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The process of programmed cell death, or apoptosis, is generally characterized by distinct morphological characteristics and energy-dependent biochemical mechanisms. Apoptosis is considered a vital component of various processes including normal cell turnover, proper development and functioning of the immune system, hormone-dependent atrophy, embryonic development and chemical-induced cell death. Inappropriate apoptosis (either too little or too much) is a factor in many human conditions incl...

  9. A force-generating machinery maintains the spindle at the cell center during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzon-Coral, Carlos; Fantana, Horatiu A; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-27

    The position and orientation of the mitotic spindle is precisely regulated to ensure the accurate partition of the cytoplasm between daughter cells and the correct localization of the daughters within growing tissue. Using magnetic tweezers to perturb the position of the spindle in intact cells, we discovered a force-generating machinery that maintains the spindle at the cell center during metaphase and anaphase in one- and two-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The forces increase with the number of microtubules and are larger in smaller cells. The machinery is rigid enough to suppress thermal fluctuations to ensure precise localization of the mitotic spindle, yet compliant enough to allow molecular force generators to fine-tune the position of the mitotic spindle to facilitate asymmetric division.

  10. Lysosomal cell death at a glance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomes serve as the cellular recycling centre and are filled with numerous hydrolases that can degrade most cellular macromolecules. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the consequent leakage of the lysosomal content into the cytosol leads to so-called "lysosomal cell death". This form...... of cell death is mainly carried out by the lysosomal cathepsin proteases and can have necrotic, apoptotic or apoptosis-like features depending on the extent of the leakage and the cellular context. This article summarizes our current knowledge on lysosomal cell death with an emphasis on the upstream...

  11. Analyzing the complex machinery of cell wall biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Timmers, J.F.P.

    2009-01-01

    The plant cell wall polymers make up most of the plant biomass and provide the raw material for many economically important products including food, feed, bio-materials, chemicals, textiles, and biofuel. This broad range of functions and applications make the biosynthesis of these polysaccharides a highly interesting target of scientific research. In this thesis a protein-protein interaction strategy was used to gain insight in the cell wall biosynthesis of Arabidopsis thaliana and to identif...

  12. Stress Management in Cyst-Forming Free-Living Protists: Programmed Cell Death and/or Encystment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Iqbal, Junaid

    2015-01-01

    In the face of harsh conditions and given a choice, a cell may (i) undergo programmed cell death, (ii) transform into a cancer cell, or (iii) enclose itself into a cyst form. In metazoans, the available evidence suggests that cellular machinery exists only to execute or avoid programmed cell death, while the ability to form a cyst was either lost or never developed. For cyst-forming free-living protists, here we pose the question whether the ability to encyst was gained at the expense of the programmed cell death or both functions coexist to counter unfavorable environmental conditions with mutually exclusive phenotypes. PMID:25648302

  13. Stress Management in Cyst-Forming Free-Living Protists: Programmed Cell Death and/or Encystment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Ahmed Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the face of harsh conditions and given a choice, a cell may (i undergo programmed cell death, (ii transform into a cancer cell, or (iii enclose itself into a cyst form. In metazoans, the available evidence suggests that cellular machinery exists only to execute or avoid programmed cell death, while the ability to form a cyst was either lost or never developed. For cyst-forming free-living protists, here we pose the question whether the ability to encyst was gained at the expense of the programmed cell death or both functions coexist to counter unfavorable environmental conditions with mutually exclusive phenotypes.

  14. Analyzing the complex machinery of cell wall biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J.F.P.

    2009-01-01

    The plant cell wall polymers make up most of the plant biomass and provide the raw material for many economically important products including food, feed, bio-materials, chemicals, textiles, and biofuel. This broad range of functions and applications make the biosynthesis of these polysaccharides a

  15. Apoptotic-like Leishmania exploit the host´s autophagy machinery to reduce T-cell-mediated parasite elimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crauwels, Peter; Bohn, Rebecca; Thomas, Meike; Gottwalt, Stefan; Jäckel, Florian; Krämer, Susi; Bank, Elena; Tenzer, Stefan; Walther, Paul; Bastian, Max; van Zandbergen, Ger

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a well-defined cellular process in which a cell dies, characterized by cell shrinkage and DNA fragmentation. In parasites like Leishmania, the process of apoptosis-like cell death has been described. Moreover upon infection, the apoptotic-like population is essential for disease development, in part by silencing host phagocytes. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism of how apoptosis in unicellular organisms may support infectivity remains unclear. Therefore we investigated the fate of apoptotic-like Leishmania parasites in human host macrophages. Our data showed—in contrast to viable parasites—that apoptotic-like parasites enter an LC3+, autophagy-like compartment. The compartment was found to consist of a single lipid bilayer, typical for LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP). As LAP can provoke anti-inflammatory responses and autophagy modulates antigen presentation, we analyzed how the presence of apoptotic-like parasites affected the adaptive immune response. Macrophages infected with viable Leishmania induced proliferation of CD4+ T-cells, leading to a reduced intracellular parasite survival. Remarkably, the presence of apoptotic-like parasites in the inoculum significantly reduced T-cell proliferation. Chemical induction of autophagy in human monocyte-derived macrophage (hMDM), infected with viable parasites only, had an even stronger proliferation-reducing effect, indicating that host cell autophagy and not parasite viability limits the T-cell response and enhances parasite survival. Concluding, our data suggest that apoptotic-like Leishmania hijack the host cells´ autophagy machinery to reduce T-cell proliferation. Furthermore, the overall population survival is guaranteed, explaining the benefit of apoptosis-like cell death in a single-celled parasite and defining the host autophagy pathway as a potential therapeutic target in treating Leishmaniasis. PMID:25801301

  16. Induction of apoptotic cell death by putrescine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takao, Koichi; Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Hegardt, Cecilia;

    2006-01-01

    for their growth. The induction of cell death was correlated with a dramatic increase in cellular putrescine levels. Analysis using flow cytometry revealed perturbed cell cycle kinetics, with a large accumulation of cells with sub-G1 amounts of DNA, which is a typical sign of apoptosis. Another strong indication...

  17. Programmed cell death in cereal aleurone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, A; Bethke, P; Lonsdale, J; Meza-Romero, R; Jones, R

    2000-10-01

    Progress in understanding programmed cell death (PCD) in the cereal aleurone is described. Cereal aleurone cells are specialized endosperm cells that function to synthesize and secrete hydrolytic enzymes that break down reserves in the starchy endosperm. Unlike the cells of the starchy endosperm, aleurone cells are viable in mature grain but undergo PCD when germination is triggered or when isolated aleurone layers or protoplasts are incubated in gibberellic acid (GA). Abscisic acid (ABA) slows down the process of aleurone cell death and isolated aleurone protoplasts can be kept alive in media containing ABA for up to 6 months. Cell death in barley aleurone occurs only after cells become highly vacuolated and is manifested in an abrupt loss of plasma membrane integrity. Aleurone cell death does not follow the apoptotic pathway found in many animal cells. The hallmarks of apoptosis, including internucleosomal DNA cleavage, plasma membrane and nuclear blebbing and formation of apoptotic bodies, are not observed in dying aleurone cells. PCD in barley aleurone cells is accompanied by the accumulation of a spectrum of nuclease and protease activities and the loss of organelles as a result of cellular autolysis.

  18. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.;

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids....... However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death...... occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development...

  19. Programmed cell death and hybrid incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, S A; Barr, C M

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new theory to explain developmental aberrations in plant hybrids. In our theory, hybrid incompatibilities arise from imbalances in the mechanisms that cause male sterility in hermaphroditic plants. Mitochondria often cause male sterility by killing the tapetal tissue that nurtures pollen mother cells. Recent evidence suggests that mitochondria destroy the tapetum by triggering standard pathways of programmed cell death. Some nuclear genotypes repress mitochondrial male sterility and restore pollen fertility. Normal regulation of tapetal development therefore arises from a delicate balance between the disruptive effects of mitochondria and the defensive countermeasures of the nuclear genes. In hybrids, incompatibilities between male-sterile mitochondria and nuclear restorers may frequently upset the regulatory control of programmed cell death, causing tapetal abnormalities and male sterility. We propose that hybrid misregulation of programmed cell death may also spill over into other tissues, explaining various developmental aberrations observed in hybrids.

  20. The regulation of apoptotic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.P. Amarante-Mendes

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biological phenomenon in which the death of a cell is genetically and biochemically regulated. Different molecules are involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Death receptors, coupled to distinct members of the caspases as well as other adapter molecules, are involved in the initiation of the stress signals (The Indictment. Members of the Bcl-2 family control at the mitochondrial level the decision between life and death (The Judgement. The effector caspases are responsible for all morphological and biochemical changes related to apoptosis including the "eat-me" signals perceived by phagocytes and neighboring cells (The Execution. Finally, apoptosis would have little biological significance without the recognition and removal of the dying cells (The Burial.

  1. The regulation of apoptotic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarante-Mendes G.P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biological phenomenon in which the death of a cell is genetically and biochemically regulated. Different molecules are involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Death receptors, coupled to distinct members of the caspases as well as other adapter molecules, are involved in the initiation of the stress signals (The Indictment. Members of the Bcl-2 family control at the mitochondrial level the decision between life and death (The Judgement. The effector caspases are responsible for all morphological and biochemical changes related to apoptosis including the "eat-me" signals perceived by phagocytes and neighboring cells (The Execution. Finally, apoptosis would have little biological significance without the recognition and removal of the dying cells (The Burial.

  2. Electrical stimulation of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells modulates cell phenotype and genetic machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llucià-Valldeperas, A; Sanchez, B; Soler-Botija, C; Gálvez-Montón, C; Prat-Vidal, C; Roura, S; Rosell-Ferrer, J; Bragos, R; Bayes-Genis, A

    2015-11-01

    A major challenge of cardiac tissue engineering is directing cells to establish the physiological structure and function of the myocardium being replaced. Our aim was to examine the effect of electrical stimulation on the cardiodifferentiation potential of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs). Three different electrical stimulation protocols were tested; the selected protocol consisted of 2 ms monophasic square-wave pulses of 50 mV/cm at 1 Hz over 14 days. Cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs were grown on biocompatible patterned surfaces. Cardiomyogenic differentiation was examined by real-time PCR and immunocytofluorescence. In cardiac ATDPCs, MEF2A and GATA-4 were significantly upregulated at day 14 after stimulation, while subcutaneous ATDPCs only exhibited increased Cx43 expression. In response to electrical stimulation, cardiac ATDPCs elongated, and both cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs became aligned following the linear surface pattern of the construct. Cardiac ATDPC length increased by 11.3%, while subcutaneous ATDPC length diminished by 11.2% (p = 0.013 and p = 0.030 vs unstimulated controls, respectively). Compared to controls, electrostimulated cells became aligned better to the patterned surfaces when the pattern was perpendicular to the electric field (89.71 ± 28.47º for cardiac ATDPCs and 92.15 ± 15.21º for subcutaneous ATDPCs). Electrical stimulation of cardiac ATDPCs caused changes in cell phenotype and genetic machinery, making them more suitable for cardiac regeneration approaches. Thus, it seems advisable to use electrical cell training before delivery as a cell suspension or within engineered tissue.

  3. Time-Lapse Imaging of Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallberg, Fredrik; Tenev, Tencho; Meier, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    The best approach to distinguish between necrosis and apoptosis is time-lapse video microscopy. This technique enables a biological process to be photographed at regular intervals over a period, which may last from a few hours to several days, and can be applied to cells in culture or in vivo. We have established two time-lapse microscopy methods based on different ways of calculating cell death: semiautomated and automated. In the semiautomated approach, cell death can be visualized by staining with combinations of Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated Annexin V and Sytox Green (SG), or Annexin V(FITC) and Propidium iodide (PI). The automated method is similar except that all cells are labeled with dyes. This allows faster quantification of data. To this end Cell Tracker Green is used to label all cells at time zero in combination with PI and Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated Annexin V. Necrotic cell death is accompanied by either simultaneous labeling with Annexin V and PI or SG (double-positive), or direct PI or SG staining. Additionally, necrotic cells display characteristic morphology, such as cytoplasmic swelling. In contrast to necrosis where membrane permeabilization is an early event, cells that die by apoptosis lose their membrane permeability relatively late. Therefore, the time between Annexin V staining and PI or SG uptake (double-positive) can be used to distinguish necrosis from apoptosis. This protocol describes the analysis of cell death by time-lapse imaging of HT1080 and L929 cells stained with these dyes, but it can be readily adapted to other cell types of interest. PMID:26933245

  4. Cell death signalling mechanisms in heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Mughal, Wajihah; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2003, cardiovascular disease was the most costly disease in Canada, and it is still on the rise. The loss of properly functioning cardiomyocytes leads to cardiac impairment, which is a consequence of heart failure. Therefore, understanding the pathways of cell death (necrosis and apoptosis) has potential implications for the development of therapeutic strategies. In addition, the role of B-cell lymphoma-2 family members is discussed and the importance of mitochondria in directing cell deat...

  5. Inducible cell death in plant immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Tsitsigiannis, Dimitrios I; Jones, Jonathan D G;

    2006-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) occurs during vegetative and reproductive plant growth, as typified by autumnal leaf senescence and the terminal differentiation of the endosperm of cereals which provide our major source of food. PCD also occurs in response to environmental stress and pathogen attack......, and these inducible PCD forms are intensively studied due their experimental tractability. In general, evidence exists for plant cell death pathways which have similarities to the apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic forms described in yeast and metazoans. Recent research aiming to understand these pathways...... and their molecular components in plants are reviewed here....

  6. ETosis: A Microbicidal Mechanism beyond Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson B. Guimarães-Costa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Netosis is a recently described type of neutrophil death occurring with the release to the extracellular milieu of a lattice composed of DNA associated with histones and granular and cytoplasmic proteins. These webs, initially named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs, ensnare and kill microorganisms. Similarly, other cell types, such as eosinophils, mast cells, and macrophages, can also dye by this mechanism; thus, it was renamed as ETosis, meaning death with release of extracellular traps (ETs. Here, we review the mechanism of NETosis/etosis, emphasizing its role in diseases caused by protozoan parasites, fungi, and viruses.

  7. The deaths of a cell: how language and metaphor influence the science of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Andrew S

    2014-12-01

    Multicellular development and tissue maintenance involve the regular elimination of damaged and healthy cells. The science of this genetically regulated cell death is particularly rich in metaphors: 'programmed cell death' or 'cell suicide' is considered an 'altruistic' act on the part of a cell for the benefit of the organism as a whole. It is also considered a form of 'social control' exerted by the body/organism over its component cells. This paper analyzes the various functions of these metaphors and critical discussion about them within the scientific community. Bodies such as the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) have been charged with bringing order to the language of cell death to facilitate scientific progress. While the NCCD recommends adopting more objective biochemical terminology to describe the mechanisms of cell death, the metaphors in question retain an important function by highlighting the broader context within which cell death occurs. Scientific metaphors act as conceptual 'tools' which fulfill various roles, from highlighting a phenomenon as of particular interest, situating it in a particular context, or suggesting explanatory causal mechanisms.

  8. Alpha-latrotoxin Triggers Extracellular Ca2+-dependent Exocytosis and Sensitizes Fusion Machinery in Endocrine Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Tao HU; Ping ZHAO; Jie LIU; Zheng-Xing WU; Tao XU

    2006-01-01

    α-Latrotoxin from the venom of black widow spider induces and augments neurotransmitter and hormone release by way of extracellular Ca2+ influx and cellular signal transduction pathways. By using whole cell current and capacitance recording, the photolysis of caged Ca2+, and Ca2+ microfluorometry and amperometry, we investigated the stimulating effect and mechanism of o-latrotoxin on exocytosis in rat pancreatic β cells, LβT2 cells and latrophilin plasmid-transfected INS-1 cells. Our data indicated that: (1) α-latrotoxin increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration through the formation of cation-permitting pores and subsequent Ca2+ influx with the presence of extracellular Ca2+; (2) α-latrotoxin stimulated exocytosis in normal bath solution and its stimulating effect on secretion was eradicated in Ca2+-free bath solution; and (3) α-latrotoxin sensitized the molecular machinery of fusion through activation of protein kinase C and increased the response of cells to Ca2+ photolysed by a flash of ultraviolet light. In summary, α-latrotoxin induced exocytosis by way of Ca2+ influx and accelerated vesicle fusion by the sensitization of fusion machinery.

  9. Hormone activities and the cell cycle machinery in immunity-triggered growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, M U; Gifford, M L; Schäfer, P

    2015-04-01

    Biotic stress and diseases caused by pathogen attack pose threats in crop production and significantly reduce crop yields. Enhancing immunity against pathogens is therefore of outstanding importance in crop breeding. However, this must be balanced, as immune activation inhibits plant growth. This immunity-coupled growth trade-off does not support resistance but is postulated to reflect the reallocation of resources to drive immunity. There is, however, increasing evidence that growth-immunity trade-offs are based on the reconfiguration of hormone pathways, shared by growth and immunity signalling. Studies in roots revealed the role of hormones in orchestrating growth across different cell types, with some hormones showing a defined cell type-specific activity. This is apparently highly relevant for the regulation of the cell cycle machinery and might be part of the growth-immunity cross-talk. Since plants are constantly exposed to Immuno-activating microbes under agricultural conditions, the transition from a growth to an immunity operating mode can significantly reduce crop yield and can conflict our efforts to generate next-generation crops with improved yield under climate change conditions. By focusing on roots, we outline the current knowledge of hormone signalling on the cell cycle machinery to explain growth trade-offs induced by immunity. By referring to abiotic stress studies, we further introduce how root cell type-specific hormone activities might contribute to growth under immunity and discuss the feasibility of uncoupling the growth-immunity cross-talk.

  10. Optical imaging of cancer and cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Bangwen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the work included in this PhD thesis was to explore the diverse application possibility of using NIR fluorescent probes with specific properties to visualize and characterize cancer and cell death. In this thesis, we mainly focus on optical imaging and its application, both at microscopic

  11. mTOR inhibition by everolimus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia induces caspase-independent cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Baraz

    Full Text Available Increasingly, anti-cancer medications are being reported to induce cell death mechanisms other than apoptosis. Activating alternate death mechanisms introduces the potential to kill cells that have defects in their apoptotic machinery, as is commonly observed in cancer cells, including in hematological malignancies. We, and others, have previously reported that the mTOR inhibitor everolimus has pre-clinical efficacy and induces caspase-independent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, everolimus is currently in clinical trial for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we characterize the death mechanism activated by everolimus in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We find that cell death is caspase-independent and lacks the morphology associated with apoptosis. Although mitochondrial depolarization is an early event, permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane only occurs after cell death has occurred. While morphological and biochemical evidence shows that autophagy is clearly present it is not responsible for the observed cell death. There are a number of features consistent with paraptosis including morphology, caspase-independence, and the requirement for new protein synthesis. However in contrast to some reports of paraptosis, the activation of JNK signaling was not required for everolimus-induced cell death. Overall in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells everolimus induces a cell death that resembles paraptosis.

  12. Metallomics insights into the programmed cell death induced by metal-based anticancer compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cai-Ping; Lu, Yi-Ying; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2014-05-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin more than 40 years ago, enormous research efforts have been dedicated to developing metal-based anticancer agents and to elucidating the mechanisms involved in the action of these compounds. Abnormal metabolism and the evasion of apoptosis are important hallmarks of malignant transformation, and the induction of apoptotic cell death has been considered to be a main pathway by which cytotoxic metal complexes combat cancer. However, many cancers have cellular defects involving the apoptotic machinery, which results in an acquired resistance to apoptotic cell death and therefore reduced chemotherapeutic effectiveness. Over the past decade, it has been revealed that a growing number of cell death pathways induced by metal complexes are not dependent on apoptosis. Metal complexes specifically triggering these alternative cell death pathways have been identified and explored as novel cancer treatment options. In this review, we discuss recent examples of metallomics studies on the different types of cell death induced by metal-based anticancer drugs, especially on the three major forms of programmed cell death (PCD) in mammalian cells: apoptosis, autophagy and regulated necrosis, also called necroptosis.

  13. Direct activation of the apoptosis machinery as a mechanism to target cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jack T; Wells, James A

    2003-06-24

    Apoptosis plays a pivotal role in the cytotoxic activity of most chemotherapeutic drugs, and defects in this pathway provide a basis for drug resistance in many cancers. Thus the ability to restore apoptosis by using small molecules could have important therapeutic implications. Using a cell-free assay to simultaneously target multiple components of the apoptosis pathway, we identified a class of compounds that activate caspases in a cytochrome c-dependent manner and induce apoptosis in whole cells. By reconstituting the apoptosis pathway with purified proteins, we determined that these compounds promote the protein-protein association of Apaf-1 into the functional apoptosome. These compounds exert cytostatic and cytotoxic effects on a variety of cancer cell lines while having little or no activity against the normal cell lines tested. These findings suggest that direct activation of the basic apoptosis machinery may be a viable mechanism to selectively target cancer.

  14. Novel cell death by downregulation of eEF1A1 expression in tetraploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y; Yonehara, S

    2009-01-01

    When duplicated sister chromatids are not properly compacted in mitosis, chromosomes are mis-segregated, inducing genetically unstable tetraploidy known to facilitate aneuploid malignancies. Here, we show that tetraploid cells produced by impaired chromosomal condensation are eliminated by a novel type of cell death different from caspase-dependent apoptosis. The cell death was associated with downregulation of eukaryotic translation elongation factor-1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1/EF-1alpha) expression in conjunction with accumulation of its mRNA in processing bodies (P bodies). Importantly, expression of exogenous eEF1A1 was shown to inhibit the caspase-independent cell death, and a similar cell death was observed after inducing the expression of short hairpin RNA specific for eEF1A1. Furthermore, the number of spontaneously arising binucleated cells was indicated to increase several fold during 1- to 2-week cultivation after initiation of exogenous eEF1A expression. Taken together, the novel cell death machinery should help to eliminate abnormal tetraploid cells and inhibit tumorigenesis. PMID:18820646

  15. Stress Management in Cyst-Forming Free-Living Protists: Programmed Cell Death and/or Encystment

    OpenAIRE

    Naveed Ahmed Khan; Junaid Iqbal; Ruqaiyyah Siddiqui

    2015-01-01

    In the face of harsh conditions and given a choice, a cell may (i) undergo programmed cell death, (ii) transform into a cancer cell, or (iii) enclose itself into a cyst form. In metazoans, the available evidence suggests that cellular machinery exists only to execute or avoid programmed cell death, while the ability to form a cyst was either lost or never developed. For cyst-forming free-living protists, here we pose the question whether the ability to encyst was gained at the expense of the ...

  16. Programmed cell death and cell extrusion in rat duodenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauser, Kirsten; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2005-01-01

    The small intestinal epithelium is continously renewed through a balance between cell division and cell loss. How this balance is achieved is uncertain. Thus, it is unknown to what extent programmed cell death (PCD) contributes to intestinal epithelial cell loss. We have used a battery of techniq...

  17. UV-Induced Cell Death in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ho Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400–700 nm, plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm, UV-B (280–320 nm and UV-A (320–390 nm. The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS. Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8 is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1 gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD.

  18. Regulation of cell death in cancer - possible implications for immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Simone eFulda

    2013-01-01

    Since most anticancer therapies including immunotherapy trigger programmed cell death in cancer cells, defective cell death programs can lead to treatment resistance and tumor immune escape. Therefore, evasion of programmed cell death may provide one possible explanation as to why cancer immunotherapy has so far only shown modest clinical benefits for children with cancer. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate sensitivity and resistance to programmed cell death is e...

  19. TNF α and reactive oxygen species in necrotic cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael J Morgan; You-Sun Kim; Zheng-gang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Death receptors, including the TNF receptor-1 (TNF-RI), have been shown to be able to initiate caspase-independent cell death. This form of "necrotic cell death" appears to be dependent on the generation of reactive oxygen species. Recent data have indicated that superoxide generation is dependent on the activation of NADPH oxidases, which form a complex with the adaptor molecules RIP1 and TRADD. The mechanism of superoxide generation further establishes RIP1 as the central molecule in ROS production and cell death initiated by TNFa and other death receptors. A role for the sustained JNK activation in necrotic cell death is also suggested. The sensitization of virus-infected cells to TNFa indicates that necrotic cell death may represent an alternative cell death pathway for clearance of infected cells.

  20. When supply does not meet demand-ER stress and plant programmed cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Verchot, Jeanmarie; Dickman, Martin B.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the central organelle in the eukaryotic secretory pathway. The ER functions in protein synthesis and maturation and is crucial for proper maintenance of cellular homeostasis and adaptation to adverse environments. Acting as a cellular sentinel, the ER is exquisitely sensitive to changing environments principally via the ER quality control machinery. When perturbed, ER-stress triggers a tightly regulated and highly conserved, signal transduction pathway known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) that prevents the dangerous accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins. In situations where excessive UPR activity surpasses threshold levels, cells deteriorate and eventually trigger programmed cell death (PCD) as a way for the organism to cope with dysfunctional or toxic signals. The programmed cell death that results from excessive ER stress in mammalian systems contributes to several important diseases including hypoxia, neurodegeneration, and diabetes. Importantly, hallmark features and markers of cell death that are associated with ER stress in mammals are also found in plants. In particular, there is a common, conserved set of chaperones that modulate ER cell death signaling. Here we review the elements of plant cell death responses to ER stress and note that an increasing number of plant-pathogen interactions are being identified in which the host ER is targeted by plant pathogens to establish compatibility. PMID:24926295

  1. Epigenetic therapy of cancer stem and progenitor cells bytargeting DNA methylation machineries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patompon Wongtrakoongate

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in stem cell biology have shed light onhow normal stem and progenitor cells can evolve to acquiremalignant characteristics during tumorigenesis. The cancercounterparts of normal stem and progenitor cells might beoccurred through alterations of stem cell fates includingan increase in self-renewal capability and a decreasein differentiation and/or apoptosis. This oncogenicevolution of cancer stem and progenitor cells, which oftenassociates with aggressive phenotypes of the tumorigeniccells, is controlled in part by dysregulated epigeneticmechanisms including aberrant DNA methylation leadingto abnormal epigenetic memory. Epigenetic therapy bytargeting DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) 1, DNMT3Aand DNMT3B via 5-Azacytidine (Aza) and 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Aza-dC) has proved to be successfultoward treatment of hematologic neoplasms especially forpatients with myelodysplastic syndrome. In this review,I summarize the current knowledge of mechanismsunderlying the inhibition of DNA methylation by Aza andAza-dC, and of their apoptotic- and differentiation-inducingeffects on cancer stem and progenitor cells in leukemia,medulloblastoma, glioblastoma, neuroblastoma, prostatecancer, pancreatic cancer and testicular germ cell tumors.Since cancer stem and progenitor cells are implicatedin cancer aggressiveness such as tumor formation,progression, metastasis and recurrence, I proposethat effective therapeutic strategies might be achievedthrough eradication of cancer stem and progenitor cellsby targeting the DNA methylation machineries to interferetheir "malignant memory".

  2. Identification of sugarcane cDNAs encoding components of the cell cycle machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrietta Mírian Helene

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on cell cycle research in plants indicate that the majority of the fundamental regulators are conserved with other eukaryotes, but the controlling mechanisms imposed on them, and their integration into growth and development is unique to plants. To date, most studies on cell division have been conducted in dicot plants. However, monocot plants have distinct developmental strategies that will affect the regulation of cell division at the meristems. In order to advance our understanding how cell division is integrated with the basic mechanisms controlling cell growth and development in monocots, we took advantage of the sugarcane EST Project (Sucest to carry an exhaustive data mining to identify components of the cell cycle machinery. Results obtained include the description of distinct classes of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs; A, B, D, and H-type cyclins; CDK-interacting proteins, CDK-inhibitory and activating kinases, pRB and E2F transcription factors. Most sugarcane cell cycle genes seem to be member of multigene families. Like in dicot plants, CDKa transcription is not restricted to tissues with elevated meristematic activity, but the vast majority of CDKb-related ESTs are found in regions of high proliferation rates. Expression of CKI genes is far more abundant in regions of less cell division, notably in lateral buds. Shared expression patterns for a group of clusters was unraveled by transcriptional profiling, and we suggest that similar approaches could be used to identify genes that are part of the same regulatory network.

  3. Programmed cell death and its role in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Yang; Ge-Ning Jiang; Peng Zhang; Jie Fan

    2015-01-01

    Cell death plays an important role in the regulation of inflammation and may be the result of inflammation. The maintenance of tissue homeostasis necessitates both the recognition and removal of invading microbial pathogens as well as the clearance of dying cells. In the past few decades, emerging knowledge on cell death and inflammation has enriched our molecular understanding of the signaling pathways that mediate various programs of cell death and multiple types of inflammatory responses. This review provides an overview of the major types of cell death related to inflammation. Modification of cell death pathways is likely to be a logical therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases.

  4. Programmed cell death in plants and caspase-like activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaussand, Gwénael Martial Daniel Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms involves an important balance between cell growth, cell division and cell death. In animals, programmed cell death (PCD) plays a key role by forming and deleting structures, controlling cell numbers and eliminating abnormal damaged cells. Caspases were foun

  5. Inhibition of caspases prevents ototoxic and ongoing hair cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Ogilvie, Judith M.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory hair cells die after acoustic trauma or ototoxic insults, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate hair cell death are not known. Here we identify several important signaling events that regulate the death of vestibular hair cells. Chick utricles were cultured in media supplemented with the ototoxic antibiotic neomycin and selected pharmacological agents that influence signaling molecules in cell death pathways. Hair cells that were treated with neomycin exhibited classically defined apoptotic morphologies such as condensed nuclei and fragmented DNA. Inhibition of protein synthesis (via treatment with cycloheximide) increased hair cell survival after treatment with neomycin, suggesting that hair cell death requires de novo protein synthesis. Finally, the inhibition of caspases promoted hair cell survival after neomycin treatment. Sensory hair cells in avian vestibular organs also undergo continual cell death and replacement throughout mature life. It is unclear whether the loss of hair cells stimulates the proliferation of supporting cells or whether the production of new cells triggers the death of hair cells. We examined the effects of caspase inhibition on spontaneous hair cell death in the chick utricle. Caspase inhibitors reduced the amount of ongoing hair cell death and ongoing supporting cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In isolated sensory epithelia, however, caspase inhibitors did not affect supporting cell proliferation directly. Our data indicate that ongoing hair cell death stimulates supporting cell proliferation in the mature utricle.

  6. Integration of Signaling Pathways with the Epigenetic Machinery in the Maintenance of Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Fagnocchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells balance their self-renewal and differentiation potential by integrating environmental signals with the transcriptional regulatory network. The maintenance of cell identity and/or cell lineage commitment relies on the interplay of multiple factors including signaling pathways, transcription factors, and the epigenetic machinery. These regulatory modules are strongly interconnected and they influence the pattern of gene expression of stem cells, thus guiding their cellular fate. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs represent an invaluable tool to study this interplay, being able to indefinitely self-renew and to differentiate towards all three embryonic germ layers in response to developmental cues. In this review, we highlight those mechanisms of signaling to chromatin, which regulate chromatin modifying enzymes, histone modifications, and nucleosome occupancy. In addition, we report the molecular mechanisms through which signaling pathways affect both the epigenetic and the transcriptional state of ESCs, thereby influencing their cell identity. We propose that the dynamic nature of oscillating signaling and the different regulatory network topologies through which those signals are encoded determine specific gene expression programs, leading to the fluctuation of ESCs among multiple pluripotent states or to the establishment of the necessary conditions to exit pluripotency.

  7. Programmed Cell Death in Unicellular Phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidle, Kay D

    2016-07-11

    Unicellular, planktonic, prokaryotic and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) have an ancient evolutionary history on Earth during which time they have played key roles in the regulation of marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Since they represent the basis of aquatic ecosystems, the manner in which phytoplankton die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining nutrient flow. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of abiotic (nutrient, light, osmotic) and biotic (virus infection, allelopathy) environmental stresses, have an integral grip on cell fate, and have shaped the ecological success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages. A combination of physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques in model algal systems has demonstrated a conserved molecular and mechanistic framework of stress surveillance, signaling, and death activation pathways, involving collective and coordinated participation of organelles, redox enzymes, metabolites, and caspase-like proteases. This mechanistic understanding has provided insight into the integration of sensing and transduction of stress signals into cellular responses, and the mechanistic interfaces between PCD, cell stress and virus infection pathways. It has also provided insight into the evolution of PCD in unicellular photoautotrophs, the impact of PCD on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages and its role in aquatic biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27404255

  8. Drosophila cells use nanotube-like structures to transfer dsRNA and RNAi machinery between cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlikow, Margot; Goic, Bertsy; Mongelli, Vanesa; Salles, Audrey; Schmitt, Christine; Bonne, Isabelle; Zurzolo, Chiara; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2016-01-01

    Tunnelling nanotubes and cytonemes function as highways for the transport of organelles, cytosolic and membrane-bound molecules, and pathogens between cells. During viral infection in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, a systemic RNAi antiviral response is established presumably through the transport of a silencing signal from one cell to another via an unknown mechanism. Because of their role in cell-cell communication, we investigated whether nanotube-like structures could be a mediator of the silencing signal. Here, we describe for the first time in the context of a viral infection the presence of nanotube-like structures in different Drosophila cell types. These tubules, made of actin and tubulin, were associated with components of the RNAi machinery, including Argonaute 2, double-stranded RNA, and CG4572. Moreover, they were more abundant during viral, but not bacterial, infection. Super resolution structured illumination microscopy showed that Argonaute 2 and tubulin reside inside the tubules. We propose that nanotube-like structures are one of the mechanisms by which Argonaute 2, as part of the antiviral RNAi machinery, is transported between infected and non-infected cells to trigger systemic antiviral immunity in Drosophila. PMID:27255932

  9. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  10. Leptin stimulates protein synthesis-activating translation machinery in human trophoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; Maymó, Julieta; Gambino, Yésica; Dueñas, José L; Goberna, Raimundo; Varone, Cecilia; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2009-11-01

    Leptin was originally considered as an adipocyte-derived signaling molecule for the central control of metabolism. However, pleiotropic effects of leptin have been identified in reproduction and pregnancy, particularly in placenta, where it may work as an autocrine hormone, mediating angiogenesis, growth, and immunomodulation. Leptin receptor (LEPR, also known as Ob-R) shows sequence homology to members of the class I cytokine receptor (gp130) superfamily. In fact, leptin may function as a proinflammatory cytokine. We have previously found that leptin is a trophic and mitogenic factor for trophoblastic cells. In order to further investigate the mechanism by which leptin stimulates cell growth in JEG-3 cells and trophoblastic cells, we studied the phosphorylation state of different proteins of the initiation stage of translation and the total protein synthesis by [(3)H]leucine incorporation in JEG-3 cells. We have found that leptin dose-dependently stimulates the phosphorylation and activation of the translation initiation factor EIF4E as well as the phosphorylation of the EIF4E binding protein EIF4EBP1 (PHAS-I), which releases EIF4E to form active complexes. Moreover, leptin dose-dependently stimulates protein synthesis, and this effect can be partially prevented by blocking mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PIK3) pathways. In conclusion, leptin stimulates protein synthesis, at least in part activating the translation machinery, via the activation of MAPK and PIK3 pathways.

  11. Active oxygen and cell death in cereal aleurone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, Angelika; Bethke, Paul; Beligni, Veronica; Jones, Russell

    2002-05-01

    The cereal aleurone layer is a secretory tissue whose function is regulated by gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Aleurone cells lack functional chloroplasts, thus excluding photosynthesis as a source of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell death. Incubation of barley aleurone layers or protoplasts in GA initiated the cell death programme, but incubation in ABA delays programmed cell death (PCD). Light, especially blue and UV-A light, and H(2)O(2) accelerate PCD of GA-treated aleurone cells, but ABA-treated aleurone cells are refractory to light and H(2)O(2) and are not killed. It was shown that light elevated intracellular H(2)O(2), and that the rise in H(2)O(2) was greater in GA-treated cells compared to cells in ABA. Experiments with antioxidants show that PCD in aleurone is probably regulated by AOS. The sensitivity of GA-treated aleurone to light and H(2)O(2) is a result of lowered amounts of enzymes that metabolize AOS. mRNAs encoding catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase are all reduced during 6-18 h of incubation in GA, but these mRNAs were present in higher amounts in cells incubated in ABA. The amounts of protein and enzyme activities encoded by these mRNAs were also dramatically reduced in GA-treated cells. Aleurone cells store and metabolize neutral lipids via the glyoxylate cycle in response to GA, and glyoxysomes are one potential source of AOS in the GA-treated cells. Mitochondria are another potential source of AOS in GA-treated cells. AOS generated by these organelles bring about membrane rupture and cell death.

  12. Dynamic expression of the translational machinery during Bacillus subtilis life cycle at a single cell level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Rosenberg

    Full Text Available The ability of bacteria to responsively regulate the expression of translation components is crucial for rapid adaptation to fluctuating environments. Utilizing Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis as a model organism, we followed the dynamics of the translational machinery at a single cell resolution during growth and differentiation. By comprehensive monitoring the activity of the major rrn promoters and ribosomal protein production, we revealed diverse dynamics between cells grown in rich and poor medium, with the most prominent dissimilarities exhibited during deep stationary phase. Further, the variability pattern of translational activity varied among the cells, being affected by nutrient availability. We have monitored for the first time translational dynamics during the developmental process of sporulation within the two distinct cellular compartments of forespore and mother-cell. Our study uncovers a transient forespore specific increase in expression of translational components. Finally, the contribution of each rrn promoter throughout the bacterium life cycle was found to be relatively constant, implying that differential expression is not the main purpose for the existence of multiple rrn genes. Instead, we propose that coordination of the rrn operons serves as a strategy to rapidly fine tune translational activities in a synchronized fashion to achieve an optimal translation level for a given condition.

  13. Genetic regulation of programmed cell death in Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Programmed cell death plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis during animal development, and has been conserved in animals as different as nematodes and humans. Recent studies of Drosophila have provided valuable information toward our understanding of genetic regulation of death. Different signals trigger the novel death regulators rpr, hid, and grim, that utilize the evolutionarily conserved iap and ark genes to modulate caspase function. Subsequent removal of dying cells also appears to be accomplished by conserved mechanisms. The similarity between Drosophila and human in cell death signaling pathways illustrate the promise of fruit flies as a model system to elucidate the mechanisms underlying regulation of programmed cell death.

  14. Mechanisms of manganese-induced rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell death and cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jerome A; Horbinski, Craig; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela; Garrick, Michael D

    2002-07-01

    Mn is a neurotoxin that leads to a syndrome resembling Parkinson's disease after prolonged exposure to high concentrations. Our laboratory has been investigating the mechanism by which Mn induces neuronal cell death. To accomplish this, we have utilized rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells as a model since they possess much of the biochemical machinery associated with dopaminergic neurons. Mn, like nerve growth factor (NGF), can induce neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells but Mn-induced cell differentiation is dependent on its interaction with the cell surface integrin receptors and basement membrane proteins, vitronectin or fibronectin. Similar to NGF, Mn-induced neurite outgrowth is dependent on the phosphorylation and activation of the MAP kinases, ERK1 and 2 (p44/42). Unlike NGF, Mn is also cytotoxic having an IC50 value of approximately 600 microM. Although many apoptotic signals are turned on by Mn, cell death is caused ultimately by disruption of mitochondrial function leading to loss of ATP. RT-PCR and immunoblotting studies suggest that some uptake of Mn into PC12 cells depends on the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1). DMT1 exists in two isoforms resulting from alternate splicing of a single gene product with one of the two mRNA species containing an iron response element (IRE) motif downstream from the stop codon. The presence of the IRE provides a binding site for the iron response proteins (IRP1 and 2); binding of either of these proteins could stabilize DMT1 mRNA and would increase expression of the +IRE form of the transporter. Iron and Mn compete for transport into PC12 cells via DMT1, so removal of iron from the culture media enhances Mn toxicity. The two isoforms of DMT1 (+/-IRE) are distributed in different subcellular compartments with the -IRE species selectively present in the nucleus of neuronal and neuronal-like cells. PMID:12224755

  15. Plant programmed cell death, ethylene and flower senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Jong, de A.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina, V.

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) applies to cell death that is part of the normal life of multicellular organisms. PCD is found throughout the animal and plant kingdoms; it is an active process in which a cell suicide pathway is activated resulting in controlled disassembly of the cell. Most cases of PCD

  16. Analysis of cell death inducing compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spicker, Jeppe; Pedersen, Henrik Toft; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2007-01-01

    Biomarkers for early detection of toxicity hold the promise of improving the failure rates in drug development. In the present study, gene expression levels were measured using full-genome RAE230 version 2 Affymetrix GeneChips on rat liver tissue 48 h after administration of six different compounds......), ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) and Cytochrome P450, subfamily IIC (mephenytoin 4-hydroxylase) (Cyp2C29). RT-PCR for these three genes was performed and four additional compounds were included for validation. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed the findings based on the microarray data and using the...... three genes a classification rate of 55 of 57 samples was achieved for the classification of not toxic versus toxic. The single most promising biomarker (OAT) alone resulted in a surprisingly 100% correctly classified samples. OAT has not previously been linked to toxicity and cell death in the...

  17. Stroke and cardiac cell death: Two peas in a pod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-03-01

    A close pathological link between stroke brain and heart failure may exist. Here, we discuss relevant laboratory and clinical reports demonstrating neural and cardiac myocyte cell death following ischemic stroke. Although various overlapping risk factors exist between cerebrovascular incidents and cardiac incidents, stroke therapy has largely neglected the cardiac pathological consequences. Recent preclinical stroke studies have implicated an indirect cell death pathway, involving toxic molecules, that originates from the stroke brain and produces cardiac cell death. In concert, previous laboratory reports have revealed a reverse cell death cascade, in that cardiac arrest leads to ischemic cell death in the brain. A deeper understanding of the crosstalk of cell death pathways between stroke and cardiac failure will facilitate the development of novel treatments designed to arrest the global pathology of both diseases thereby improving the clinical outcomes of patients diagnosed with stroke and heart failure.

  18. Programmed cell death: a way of life for plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, J T

    1996-01-01

    Cell death in higher plants has been widely observed in predictable patterns throughout development and in response to pathogenic infection. Genetic, biochemical, and morphological evidence suggests that these cell deaths occur as active processes and can be defined formally as examples of programmed cell death (PCD). Intriguingly, plants have at least two types of PCD, an observation that is also true of PCD in animals [Schwartz, L. M., Smith, W.W., Jones, M. E. E. & Osborne, B. A. (1993) Pr...

  19. Senescence and programmed cell death : substance or semantics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    The terms senescence and programmed cell death (PCD) have led to some confusion. Senescence as visibly observed in, for example, leaf yellowing and petal wilting, has often been taken to be synonymous with the programmed death of the constituent cells. PCD also obviously refers to cells, which show

  20. Diatom-derived polyunsaturated aldehydes activate cell death in human cancer cell lines but not normal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clementina Sansone

    Full Text Available Diatoms are an important class of unicellular algae that produce bioactive polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs that induce abortions or malformations in the offspring of invertebrates exposed to them during gestation. Here we compare the effects of the PUAs 2-trans,4-trans-decadienal (DD, 2-trans,4-trans-octadienal (OD and 2-trans,4-trans-heptadienal (HD on the adenocarcinoma cell lines lung A549 and colon COLO 205, and the normal lung/brunch epithelial BEAS-2B cell line. Using the viability MTT/Trypan blue assays, we show that PUAs have a toxic effect on both A549 and COLO 205 tumor cells but not BEAS-2B normal cells. DD was the strongest of the three PUAs tested, at all time-intervals considered, but HD was as strong as DD after 48 h. OD was the least active of the three PUAs. The effect of the three PUAs was somewhat stronger for A549 cells. We therefore studied the death signaling pathway activated in A549 showing that cells treated with DD activated Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1 and Fas Associated Death Domain (FADD leading to necroptosis via caspase-3 without activating the survival pathway Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP. The TNFR1/FADD/caspase pathway was also observed with OD, but only after 48 h. This was the only PUA that activated RIP, consistent with the finding that OD causes less damage to the cell compared to DD and HD. In contrast, cells treated with HD activated the Fas/FADD/caspase pathway. This is the first report that PUAs activate an extrinsic apoptotic machinery in contrast to other anticancer drugs that promote an intrinsic death pathway, without affecting the viability of normal cells from the same tissue type. These findings have interesting implications also from the ecological viewpoint considering that HD is one of the most common PUAs produced by diatoms.

  1. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  2. Death of mitochondria during programmed cell death of leaf mesophyll cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selga, Tūrs; Selga, Maija; Pāvila, Vineta

    2005-12-01

    The role of plant mitochondria in the programmed cell death (PCD) is widely discussed. However, spectrum and sequence of mitochondrial structural changes during different types of PCD in leaves are poorly described. Pea, cucumber and rye plants were grown under controlled growing conditions. A part of them were sprinkled with ethylene releaser to accelerate cell death. During yellowing the palisade parenchyma mitochondria were attracted to nuclear envelope. Mitochondrial matrix became electron translucent. Mitochondria entered vacuole by invagination of tonoplast and formed multivesicular bodies. Ethephon treatment increased the frequency of sticking of mitochondria to the nuclear envelope or chloroplasts and peroxisomes. Mitochondria divided by different mechanisms and became enclosed in Golgi and ER derived authopagic vacuoles or in the central vacuole. Several fold increase of the diameter of cristae became typical. In all cases mitochondria were attached to nuclear envelope. It can be considered as structural mechanism of promoting of PCD.

  3. Apoptotic-like programmed cell death in fungi: the benefits in filamentous species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neta eShlezinger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies conducted in the early 1990's showed for the first time that Saccahromyces cerevisiae can undergo cell death with hallmarks of animal apoptosis. These findings came as a surprise, since suicide machinery was unexpected in unicellular organisms. Today, apoptosis in yeast is well documented. Apoptotic death of yeast cells has been described under various conditions and S. cerevisiae homologues of human apoptotic genes have been identified and characterized. These studies also revealed fundamental differences between yeast and animal apoptosis; in S. cerevisiae apoptosis is mainly associated with ageing and stress adaptation, unlike animal apoptosis, which is essential for proper development. Further, many apoptosis regulatory genes are either missing, or highly divergent in S. cerevisiae. Therefore, in this review we will use the term apoptosis-like programmed cell death (PCD instead of apoptosis. Despite these significant differences, S. cerevisiae has been instrumental in promoting the study of heterologous apoptotic proteins, particularly from human. Work in fungi other than S. cerevisiae revealed differences in the manifestation of PCD in single cell (yeasts and multi-cellular (filamentous species. Such differences may reflect the higher complexity level of filamentous species, and hence the involvement of PCD in a wider range of processes and life styles. It is also expected that differences might be found in the apoptosis apparatus of yeast and filamentous species. In this review we focus on aspects of PCD that are unique or can be better studied in filamentous species. We will highlight the similarities and differences of the PCD machinery between yeast and filamentous species and show the value of using S. cerevisiae along with filamentous species to study apoptosis.

  4. Sensitization of radiation-induced cell death by genistein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Rim; Kim, In Gyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    A number of epidemiological studies as well as biological experiments, showed that genistein, one of the isoflavone, prevents prostate cancer occurrence. In this study, we showed that genistein inhibited the cell proliferation of human promyeoltic leukemia HL-60 cells and induced G2/M phase arrest. In addition, combination of genistein treatment and {gamma}-irradiation displayed synergistic effect in apoptotic cell death of HL-60 cells. This means that the repair of genistein-induced DNA damage was hindered by {gamma}-irradiation and thus cell death was increased. In conclusion, genistein is one of the important chemicals that sensitize radiation-induced cell death.

  5. Actin as deathly switch? How auxin can suppress cell-death related defence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chang

    Full Text Available Plant innate immunity is composed of two layers--a basal immunity, and a specific effector-triggered immunity, which is often accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Initiation of cell death depends on a complex network of signalling pathways. The phytohormone auxin as central regulator of plant growth and development represents an important component for the modulation of plant defence. In our previous work, we showed that cell death is heralded by detachment of actin from the membrane. Both, actin response and cell death, are triggered by the bacterial elicitor harpin in grapevine cells. In this study we investigated, whether harpin-triggered actin bundling is necessary for harpin-triggered cell death. Since actin organisation is dependent upon auxin, we used different auxins to suppress actin bundling. Extracellular alkalinisation and transcription of defence genes as the basal immunity were examined as well as cell death. Furthermore, organisation of actin was observed in response to pharmacological manipulation of reactive oxygen species and phospholipase D. We find that induction of defence genes is independent of auxin. However, auxin can suppress harpin-induced cell death and also counteract actin bundling. We integrate our findings into a model, where harpin interferes with an auxin dependent pathway that sustains dynamic cortical actin through the activity of phospholipase D. The antagonism between growth and defence is explained by mutual competition for signal molecules such as superoxide and phosphatidic acid. Perturbations of the auxin-actin pathway might be used to detect disturbed integrity of the plasma membrane and channel defence signalling towards programmed cell death.

  6. Analysis of cell death inducing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicker, Jeppe S; Pedersen, Henrik Toft; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Brunak, Søren

    2007-11-01

    Biomarkers for early detection of toxicity hold the promise of improving the failure rates in drug development. In the present study, gene expression levels were measured using full-genome RAE230 version 2 Affymetrix GeneChips on rat liver tissue 48 h after administration of six different compounds, three toxins (ANIT, DMN and NMF) and three non-toxins (Caeruelein, Dinitrophenol and Rosiglitazone). We identified three gene transcripts with exceptional predictive performance towards liver toxicity and/or changes in histopathology. The three genes were: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) and Cytochrome P450, subfamily IIC (mephenytoin 4-hydroxylase) (Cyp2C29). RT-PCR for these three genes was performed and four additional compounds were included for validation. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed the findings based on the microarray data and using the three genes a classification rate of 55 of 57 samples was achieved for the classification of not toxic versus toxic. The single most promising biomarker (OAT) alone resulted in a surprisingly 100% correctly classified samples. OAT has not previously been linked to toxicity and cell death in the literature and the novel finding represents a putative hepatotoxicity biomarker. PMID:17503021

  7. Chemical- and pathogen-induced programmed cell death in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Atanassov, A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on recent update in the understanding of programmed cell death regarding the differences and similarities between the diverse types of cell death in animal and plant systems and describes the morphological and some biochemical determinants. The role of PCD in plant development an

  8. TRAIL restores DCA/metformin-mediated cell death in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; An, Sungkwan; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Song, Jie-Young; Lee, Jin Kyung; Hong, Jungil; Kim, Jong-Il; Noh, Woo Chul; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Park, In-Chul

    2016-09-23

    Previous studies have shown that hypoxia can reverse DCA/metformin-induced cell death in breast cancer cells. Therefore, targeting hypoxia is necessary for therapies targeting cancer metabolism. In the present study, we found that TRAIL can overcome the effect of hypoxia on the cell death induced by treatment of DCA and metformin in breast cancer cells. Unexpectedly, DR5 is upregulated in the cells treated with DCA/metformin, and sustained under hypoxia. Blocking DR5 by siRNA inhibited DCA/metformin/TRAIL-induced cell death, indicating that DR5 upregulation plays an important role in sensitizing cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. Furthermore, we found that activation of JNK and c-Jun is responsible for upregulation of DR5 induced by DCA/metformin. These findings support the potential application of combining TRAIL and metabolism-targeting drugs in the treatment of cancers under hypoxia. PMID:27569287

  9. Activation-Induced Cell Death in T Cells and Autoimmunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhang; Xuemei Xu; Yong Liu

    2004-01-01

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD), which results from the interaction between Fas and Fas ligand, is responsible for maintaining tolerance to self-antigen. A defect in AICD may lead to development of autoimmunity. During the last several years, much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism(s) of AICD and its potential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the most recent progress on the regulation of the susceptibility of T cells to AICD and its possible involvement in autoimmune diseases.

  10. Chemical -induced apoptotic cell death in tomato cells : involvement of caspase-like proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.J.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Yakimova, E.T.; Maximova, E.; Woltering, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    A new system to study programmed cell death in plants is described. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were induced to undergo programmed cell death by treatment with known inducers of apoptosis in mammalian cells. This chemical-induced cell death was accompanied by the characte

  11. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte;

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the P...

  12. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte;

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the Par...

  13. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Ziko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CisPt is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death. Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death.

  14. Programmed Cell Death and Postharvest Deterioration of Horticultural Produce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Iakimova, E.T.

    2010-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a process where cells or tissues are broken down in an orderly and predictable manner, whereby nutrients are re-used by other cells, tissues or plant parts. The process of (petal) senescence shows many similarities to autophagic PCD in animal cells including a massive

  15. Cell division and death inhibit glassy behaviour of confluent tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Matoz-Fernandez, D A; Sknepnek, Rastko; Barrat, J L; Henkes, S

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effects of cell division and apopotosis on collective dynamics in two-dimensional epithelial tissues. Our model includes three key ingredients observed across many epithelia, namely cell-cell adhesion, cell death and a cell division process that depends on the surrounding environment. We show a rich non-equilibrium phase diagram depending on the ratio of cell death to cell division and on the adhesion strength. For large apopotosis rates, cells die out and the tissue disintegrates. As the death rate decreases, however, we show, consecutively, the existence of a gas-like phase, a gel-like phase, and a dense confluent (tissue) phase. Most striking is the observation that the tissue is self-melting through its own internal activity, ruling out the existence of any glassy phase.

  16. Cell biology: Death drags down the neighbourhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Claudia G.; Martin, Adam C.

    2015-02-01

    An analysis of dying cells reveals that they play an active part in modifying tissue shape by pulling on neighbouring cells. This induces neighbouring cells to contract at their apices, which results in tissue folding. See Letter p.245

  17. The Impact of Autophagy on Cell Death Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W. Ryter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy represents a homeostatic cellular mechanism for the turnover of organelles and proteins, through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy facilitates cell survival through the recycling of metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can modulate other vital processes such as programmed cell death (e.g., apoptosis, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms and thereby influence disease pathogenesis. Selective pathways can target distinct cargoes (e.g., mitochondria and proteins for autophagic degradation. At present, the causal relationship between autophagy and various forms of regulated or nonregulated cell death remains unclear. Autophagy can occur in association with necrosis-like cell death triggered by caspase inhibition. Autophagy and apoptosis have been shown to be coincident or antagonistic, depending on experimental context, and share cross-talk between signal transduction elements. Autophagy may modulate the outcome of other regulated forms of cell death such as necroptosis. Recent advances suggest that autophagy can dampen inflammatory responses, including inflammasome-dependent caspase-1 activation and maturation of proinflammatory cytokines. Autophagy may also act as regulator of caspase-1 dependent cell death (pyroptosis. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases in which apoptosis or other forms of regulated cell death may play a cardinal role.

  18. Autophagic components contribute to hypersensitive cell death in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Schultz-Larsen, Torsten; Joensen, Jan;

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy has been implicated as a prosurvival mechanism to restrict programmed cell death (PCD) associated with the pathogen-triggered hypersensitive response (HR) during plant innate immunity. This model is based on the observation that HR lesions spread in plants with reduced autophagy gene...... expression. Here, we examined receptor-mediated HR PCD responses in autophagy-deficient Arabidopsis knockout mutants (atg), and show that infection-induced lesions are contained in atg mutants. We also provide evidence that HR cell death initiated via Toll/Interleukin-1 (TIR)-type immune receptors through...... the defense regulator EDS1 is suppressed in atg mutants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PCD triggered by coiled-coil (CC)-type immune receptors via NDR1 is either autophagy-independent or engages autophagic components with cathepsins and other unidentified cell death mediators. Thus, autophagic cell death...

  19. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  20. Prodigiosin inhibits motility and activates bacterial cell death revealing molecular biomarkers of programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darshan, N; Manonmani, H K

    2016-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin from Serratia nematodiphila darsh1, a bacterial pigment was tested against few food borne bacterial pathogens Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The mode of action of prodigiosin was studied. Prodigiosin induced bactericidal activity indicating a stereotypical set of biochemical and morphological feature of Programmed cell death (PCD). PCD involves DNA fragmentation, generation of ROS, and expression of a protein with caspase-like substrate specificity in bacterial cells. Prodigiosin was observed to be internalized into bacterial cells and was localized predominantly in the membrane and the nuclear fraction, thus, facilitating intracellular trafficking and then binding of prodigiosin to the bacterial DNA. Corresponding to an increasing concentration of prodigiosin, the level of certain proteases were observed to increase in bacteria studied, thus initiating the onset of PCD. Prodigiosin at a sub-inhibitory concentration inhibits motility of pathogens. Our observations indicated that prodigiosin could be a promising antibacterial agent and could be used in the prevention of bacterial infections. PMID:27460563

  1. Plant programmed cell death and the point of no return

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.

    2005-01-01

    The point of no return during programmed cell death (PCD) is defined as the step beyond which the cell is irreversibly committed to die. Some plant cells can be saved before this point by inducing the formation of functional chloroplasts. A visibly senescent tissue will then become green again and l

  2. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75NTR, a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75NTR. For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75NTR. This latter signaling through p75NTR promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75NTR mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer

  3. Cbl negatively regulates JNK activation and cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew A Sproul; Zhiheng Xu; Michael Wilhelm; Stephen Gire; Lloyd A Greene

    2009-01-01

    Here, we explore the role of Cbl proteins in regulation of neuronal apoptosis. In two paradigms of neuron apopto-sis--nerve growth factor (NGF) deprivation and DNA damage--cellular levels of c-Cbl and Cbl-b fell well before the onset of cell death. NGF deprivation also induced rapid loss of tyrosine phosphorylation (and most likely, activa-tion) of c-Cbl. Targeting e-Cbl and Cbl-b with siRNAs to mimic their loss/inactivation sensitized neuronal cells to death promoted by NGF deprivation or DNA damage. One potential mechanism by which Cbl proteins might affect neuronal death is by regulation of apoptotic c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. We demonstrate that Cbl pro-teins interact with the JNK pathway components mixed lineage kinase (MLK) 3 and POSH and that knockdown of Cbl proteins is sufficient to increase JNK pathway activity. Furthermore, expression of c-Cbl blocks the ability of MLKs to signal to downstream components of the kinase cascade leading to JNK activation and protects neuronal cells from death induced by MLKs, but not from downstream JNK activators. On the basis of these findings, we propose that Cbls suppress cell death in healthy neurons at least in part by inhibiting the ability of MLKs to activate JNK signaling. Apoptotic stimuli lead to loss of Cbl protein/activity, thereby removing a critical brake on JNK acti-vation and on cell death.

  4. Measuring Cell Death by Propidium Iodide Uptake and Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Lisa C; Scott, Adrian P; Marfell, Brooke J; Boughaba, Jeanne A; Chojnowski, Grace; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Propidium iodide (PI) is a small fluorescent molecule that binds to DNA but cannot passively traverse into cells that possess an intact plasma membrane. PI uptake versus exclusion can be used to discriminate dead cells, in which plasma membranes become permeable regardless of the mechanism of death, from live cells with intact membranes. PI is excited by wavelengths between 400 and 600 nm and emits light between 600 and 700 nm, and is therefore compatible with lasers and photodetectors commonly available in flow cytometers. This protocol for PI staining can be used to quantitate cell death in most modern research facilities and universities. PMID:27371595

  5. Transcriptomics and functional genomics of ROS-induced cell death regulation by RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Brosché

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant responses to changes in environmental conditions are mediated by a network of signaling events leading to downstream responses, including changes in gene expression and activation of cell death programs. Arabidopsis thaliana RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1 has been proposed to regulate plant stress responses by protein-protein interactions with transcription factors. Furthermore, the rcd1 mutant has defective control of cell death in response to apoplastic reactive oxygen species (ROS. Combining transcriptomic and functional genomics approaches we first used microarray analysis in a time series to study changes in gene expression after apoplastic ROS treatment in rcd1. To identify a core set of cell death regulated genes, RCD1-regulated genes were clustered together with other array experiments from plants undergoing cell death or treated with various pathogens, plant hormones or other chemicals. Subsequently, selected rcd1 double mutants were constructed to further define the genetic requirements for the execution of apoplastic ROS induced cell death. Through the genetic analysis we identified WRKY70 and SGT1b as cell death regulators functioning downstream of RCD1 and show that quantitative rather than qualitative differences in gene expression related to cell death appeared to better explain the outcome. Allocation of plant energy to defenses diverts resources from growth. Recently, a plant response termed stress-induced morphogenic response (SIMR was proposed to regulate the balance between defense and growth. Using a rcd1 double mutant collection we show that SIMR is mostly independent of the classical plant defense signaling pathways and that the redox balance is involved in development of SIMR.

  6. Transcriptomics and functional genomics of ROS-induced cell death regulation by RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosché, Mikael; Blomster, Tiina; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Cui, Fuqiang; Sipari, Nina; Leppälä, Johanna; Lamminmäki, Airi; Tomai, Gloria; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Reddy, Ramesha A; Keinänen, Markku; Overmyer, Kirk; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2014-02-01

    Plant responses to changes in environmental conditions are mediated by a network of signaling events leading to downstream responses, including changes in gene expression and activation of cell death programs. Arabidopsis thaliana RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) has been proposed to regulate plant stress responses by protein-protein interactions with transcription factors. Furthermore, the rcd1 mutant has defective control of cell death in response to apoplastic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combining transcriptomic and functional genomics approaches we first used microarray analysis in a time series to study changes in gene expression after apoplastic ROS treatment in rcd1. To identify a core set of cell death regulated genes, RCD1-regulated genes were clustered together with other array experiments from plants undergoing cell death or treated with various pathogens, plant hormones or other chemicals. Subsequently, selected rcd1 double mutants were constructed to further define the genetic requirements for the execution of apoplastic ROS induced cell death. Through the genetic analysis we identified WRKY70 and SGT1b as cell death regulators functioning downstream of RCD1 and show that quantitative rather than qualitative differences in gene expression related to cell death appeared to better explain the outcome. Allocation of plant energy to defenses diverts resources from growth. Recently, a plant response termed stress-induced morphogenic response (SIMR) was proposed to regulate the balance between defense and growth. Using a rcd1 double mutant collection we show that SIMR is mostly independent of the classical plant defense signaling pathways and that the redox balance is involved in development of SIMR. PMID:24550736

  7. Stem Cell Therapies for Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Immune Privilege Reinforcement by Fas/FasL Regulating Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chi-Jiao; Liu, Xu; Che, Lu; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Samartzis, Dino; Wang, Hai-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    As a main contributing factor to low back pain, intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the fundamental basis for various debilitating spinal diseases. The pros and cons of current treatment modalities necessitate biological treatment strategies targeting for reversing or altering the degeneration process in terms of molecules or genes. The advances in stem cell research facilitate the studies aiming for possible clinical application of stem cell therapies for IDD. Human NP cells are versatile with cell morphology full of variety, capable of synthesizing extracellular matrix components, engulfing substances by autophagy and phagocytosis, mitochondrial vacuolization indicating dysfunction, expressing Fas and FasL as significant omens of immune privileged sites. Human discs belong to immune privilege organs with functional FasL expression, which can interact with invasive immune cells by Fas-FasL regulatory machinery. IDD is characterized by decreased expression level of FasL with dysfunctional FasL, which in turn unbalances the interaction between NP cells and immune cells. Certain modulation factors might play a role in the process, such as miR-155. Accumulating evidence indicates that Fas-FasL network expresses in a variety of stem cells. Given the expression of functional FasL and insensitive Fas in stem cells (we term as FasL privilege), transplantation of stem cells into the disc may regenerate the degenerative disc by not only differentiating into NP-like cells, increasing extracellular matrix, but also reinforce immune privilege via interaction with immune cells by Fas-FasL network.

  8. Acetaminophen induces human neuroblastoma cell death through NFKB activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Posadas

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the aggressive behavior of this tumor. Therefore, it would be relevant to activate endogenous cellular death mechanisms as a way to improve neuroblastoma therapy. We used the neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as a model to study the mechanisms involved in acetaminophen (AAP-mediated toxicity by measuring CYP2E1 enzymatic activity, NFkB p65 subunit activation and translocation to the nucleus, Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase activation. AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. AAP metabolism is partially responsible for this activation, because blockade of the cytochrome CYP2E1 significantly reduced but did not totally prevent, AAP-induced SH-SY5Y cell death. AAP also induced NFkB p65 activation by phosphorylation and its translocation to the nucleus, where NFkB p65 increased IL-1β production. This increase contributed to neuroblastoma cell death through a mechanism involving Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase3 activation. Blockade of NFkB translocation to the nucleus by the peptide SN50 prevented AAP-mediated cell death and IL-1β production. Moreover, overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-x(L did not decrease AAP-mediated IL-1β production, but prevented both AAP and IL-1β-mediated cell death. We also confirmed the AAP toxic actions on SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma and U87MG glioblastoma cell lines. The results presented here suggest that AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in neuroblastoma cells through a mechanism involving NFkB and IL-1β.

  9. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A; Navarro-Villarán, E; González, R; Pereira, S; Soriano-De Castro, L B; Sarrias-Giménez, A; Barrera-Pulido, L; Álamo-Martínez, J M; Serrablo-Requejo, A; Blanco-Fernández, G; Nogales-Muñoz, A; Gila-Bohórquez, A; Pacheco, D; Torres-Nieto, M A; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J; Suárez-Artacho, G; Bernal-Bellido, C; Marín-Gómez, L M; Barcena, J A; Gómez-Bravo, M A; Padilla, C A; Padillo, F J; Muntané, J

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells.

  10. Cell Death Mechanisms Induced by Cytotoxic Lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ch(a)vez-Gal(a)n L; Arenas-Del Angel MC; Zenteno E; Ch(a)vez R; Lascurain R

    2009-01-01

    One of the functions of the immune system is to recognize and destroy abnormal or infected cells to maintain homeostasis. This is accomplished by cytotoxic lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity is a highly organized multifactor process. Here, we reviewed the apoptosis pathways induced by the two main cytotoxic lymphocyte subsets, natural killer (NK) cells and CD8+T cells. In base to recent experimental evidence, we reviewed NK receptors involved in recognition of target-cell, as well as lytic molecules such as perforin, granzymes-A and -B, and granulysin. In addition, we reviewed the Fas-FasL intercellular linkage mediated pathway, and briefly the cross-linking of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and TNF receptor pathway. We discussed three models of possible molecular interaction between lyric molecules from effector cytotoxic cells and target-cell membrane to induction of apoptosis.

  11. Staurosporine induces different cell death forms in cultured rat astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astroglial cells are frequently involved in malignant transformation. Besides apoptosis, necroptosis, a different form of regulated cell death, seems to be related with glioblastoma genesis, proliferation, angiogenesis and invasion. In the present work we elucidated mechanisms of necroptosis in cultured astrocytes, and compared them with apoptosis, caused by staurosporine. Cultured rat cortical astrocytes were used for a cell death studies. Cell death was induced by different concentrations of staurosporine, and modified by inhibitors of apoptosis (z-vad-fmk) and necroptosis (nec-1). Different forms of a cell death were detected using flow cytometry. We showed that staurosporine, depending on concentration, induces both, apoptosis as well as necroptosis. Treatment with 10−7 M staurosporine increased apoptosis of astrocytes after the regeneration in a staurosporine free medium. When caspases were inhibited, apoptosis was attenuated, while necroptosis was slightly increased. Treatment with 10−6 M staurosporine induced necroptosis that occurred after the regeneration of astrocytes in a staurosporine free medium, as well as without regeneration period. Necroptosis was significantly attenuated by nec-1 which inhibits RIP1 kinase. On the other hand, the inhibition of caspases had no effect on necroptosis. Furthermore, staurosporine activated RIP1 kinase increased the production of reactive oxygen species, while an antioxidant BHA significantly attenuated necroptosis. Staurosporine can induce apoptosis and/or necroptosis in cultured astrocytes via different signalling pathways. Distinction between different forms of cell death is crucial in the studies of therapy-induced necroptosis

  12. The Apoptosome: Heart and Soul of the Cell Death Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul M. Chinnaiyan

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biologic process by which metazoan cells orchestrate their own self-demise. Genetic analyses of the nematode C elegans identified three core components of the suicide apparatus which include CED-3, CED-4, and CED-9. An analogous set of core constituents exists in mammalian cells and includes caspase-9, Apaf-1, and bcl-2/xL, respectively. CED-3 and CED-4, along with their mammalian counterparts, function to kill cells, whereas CED-9 and its mammalian equivalents protect cells from death. These central components biochemically intermingle in a ternary complex recently dubbed the “apoptosome.” The C elegans protein EGL-1 and its mammalian counterparts, pro-apoptotic members of the bcl-2 family, induce cell death by disrupting apoptosome interactions. Thus, EGL-1 may represent a primordial signal integrator for the apoptosome. Various biochemical processes including oligomerization, adenosine triphosphate ATP/dATP binding, and cytochrome c interaction play a role in regulating the ternary death complex. Recent studies suggest that cell death receptors, such as CD95, may amplify their suicide signal by activating the apoptosome. These mutual associations by core components of the suicide apparatus provide a molecular framework in which diverse death signals likely interface. Understanding the apoptosome and its cellular connections will facilitate the design of novel therapeutic strategies for cancer and other disease states in which apoptosis plays a pivotal role.

  13. Early cell death detection with digital holographic microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Pavillon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Digital holography provides a non-invasive measurement of the quantitative phase shifts induced by cells in culture, which can be related to cell volume changes. It has been shown previously that regulation of cell volume, in particular as it relates to ionic homeostasis, is crucially involved in the activation/inactivation of the cell death processes. We thus present here an application of digital holographic microscopy (DHM dedicated to early and label-free detection of cell death. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We provide quantitative measurements of phase signal obtained on mouse cortical neurons, and caused by early neuronal cell volume regulation triggered by excitotoxic concentrations of L-glutamate. We show that the efficiency of this early regulation of cell volume detected by DHM, is correlated with the occurrence of subsequent neuronal death assessed with the widely accepted trypan blue method for detection of cell viability. CONCLUSIONS: The determination of the phase signal by DHM provides a simple and rapid optical method for the early detection of cell death.

  14. Immunohistochemistry of Programmed Cell Death in Archival Human Pathology Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Takami Matsuyama; Yoshito Eizuru; Takuro Kanekura; Yoshifumi Kawano; Shuji Izumo; Xinshan Jia; Katsuyuki Aozasa; Taku Nagai; Jia Wang; Kazuhisa Hasui

    2012-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for detecting key signal molecules involved in programmed cell death (PCD) in archival human pathology specimens is fairly well established. Detection of cleaved caspase-3 in lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and gastric surface foveolar glandular epithelia but not in synoviocytes in RA, gastric fundic glandular epithelia, or nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) cells suggests anti-apoptotic mechanisms in cell differentiation and in oncogenesis such as the induct...

  15. Programmed cell death in plants: A chloroplastic connection

    OpenAIRE

    Ambastha, Vivek; Tripathy, Baishnab C; Tiwari, Budhi Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral cellular program by which targeted cells culminate to demise under certain developmental and pathological conditions. It is essential for controlling cell number, removing unwanted diseased or damaged cells and maintaining the cellular homeostasis. The details of PCD process has been very well elucidated and characterized in animals but similar understanding of the process in plants has not been achieved rather the field is still in its infancy that ...

  16. Porcine circovirus-2 capsid protein induces cell death in PK15 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walia, Rupali; Dardari, Rkia, E-mail: rdardari@ucalgary.ca; Chaiyakul, Mark; Czub, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Studies have shown that Porcine circovirus (PCV)-2 induces apoptosis in PK15 cells. Here we report that cell death is induced in PCV2b-infected PK15 cells that express Capsid (Cap) protein and this effect is enhanced in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-treated cells. We further show that transient PCV2a and 2b-Cap protein expression induces cell death in PK15 cells at rate similar to PCV2 infection, regardless of Cap protein localization. These data suggest that Cap protein may have the capacity to trigger different signaling pathways involved in cell death. Although further investigation is needed to gain deeper insights into the nature of the pathways involved in Cap-induced cell death, this study provides evidence that PCV2-induced cell death in kidney epithelial PK15 cells can be mapped to the Cap protein and establishes the need for future research regarding the role of Cap-induced cell death in PCV2 pathogenesis. - Highlights: • IFN-γ enhances PCV2 replication that leads to cell death in PK15 cells. • IFN-γ enhances nuclear localization of the PCV2 Capsid protein. • Transient PCV2a and 2b-Capsid protein expression induces cell death. • Cell death is not dictated by specific Capsid protein sub-localization.

  17. Entamoeba histolytica induces cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells via NOX1-derived ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Min, Arim; Bahk, Young Yil; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2013-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans, is able to induce host cell death. However, signaling mechanisms of colon cell death induced by E. histolytica are not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling role of NOX in cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica. Incubation of HT29 cells with amoebic trophozoites resulted in DNA fragmentation that is a hallmark of apoptotic cell death. In addition, E. histolytica generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a contact-dependent manner. Inhibition of intracellular ROS level with treatment with DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases (NOXs), decreased Entamoeba-induced ROS generation and cell death in HT29 cells. However, pan-caspase inhibitor did not affect E. histolytica-induced HT29 cell death. In HT29 cells, catalytic subunit NOX1 and regulatory subunit Rac1 for NOX1 activation were highly expressed. We next investigated whether NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-derived ROS is closely associated with HT29 cell death induced by E. histolytica. Suppression of Rac1 by siRNA significantly inhibited Entamoeba-induced cell death. Moreover, knockdown of NOX1 by siRNA, effectively inhibited E. histolytica-triggered DNA fragmentation in HT29 cells. These results suggest that NOX1-derived ROS is required for apoptotic cell death in HT29 colon epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica.

  18. Cell death by mitotic catastrophe: a molecular definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castedo, M.; Perfettini, J.-L.; Roumier, T.; Andreau, K.; Medema, R.H.; Kroemer, G.

    2004-01-01

    The current literature is devoid of a clearcut definition of mitotic catastrophe, a type of cell death that occurs during mitosis. Here, we propose that mitotic catastrophe results from a combination of deficient cell-cycle checkpoints (in particular the DNA structure checkpoints and the spindle ass

  19. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted. PMID:26028028

  20. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted.

  1. Non-apoptotic cell death associated with perturbations of macropinocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Maltese

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although macropinocytosis is widely recognized as a distinct form of fluid-phase endocytosis in antigen-presenting dendritic cells, it also occurs constitutively in many other normal and transformed cell types. Recent studies have established that various genetic or pharmacological manipulations can hyperstimulate macropinocytosis or disrupt normal macropinosome trafficking pathways, leading to accumulation of greatly enlarged cytoplasmic vacuoles. In some cases, this extreme vacuolization is associated with a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death termed ‘methuosis’, from the Greek methuo (to drink to intoxication. It remains unclear whether cell death related to dysfunctional macropinocytosis occurs in normal physiological contexts. However, the finding that some types of cancer cells are particularly vulnerable to this unusual form of cell death has raised the possibility that small molecules capable of altering macropinosome trafficking or function might be useful as therapeutic agents against cancers that are resistant to drugs that work by inducing apoptosis. Herein we review examples of cell death associated with dysfunctional macropinocytosis and summarize what is known about the underlying mechanisms.

  2. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl3-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 ¿M AlCl3 showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation.

  3. Cell death and autophagy: cytokines, drugs, and nutritional factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursch, Wilfried; Karwan, Anneliese; Mayer, Miriam; Dornetshuber, Julia; Fröhwein, Ulrike; Schulte-Hermann, Rolf; Fazi, Barbara; Di Sano, Federica; Piredda, Lucia; Piacentini, Mauro; Petrovski, Goran; Fésüs, László; Gerner, Christopher

    2008-12-30

    Cells may use multiple pathways to commit suicide. In certain contexts, dying cells generate large amounts of autophagic vacuoles and clear large proportions of their cytoplasm, before they finally die, as exemplified by the treatment of human mammary carcinoma cells with the anti-estrogen tamoxifen (TAM, < or = 1 microM). Protein analysis during autophagic cell death revealed distinct proteins of the nuclear fraction including GST-pi and some proteasomal subunit constituents to be affected during autophagic cell death. Depending on the functional status of caspase-3, MCF-7 cells may switch between autophagic and apoptotic features of cell death [Fazi, B., Bursch, W., Fimia, G.M., Nardacci R., Piacentini, M., Di Sano, F., Piredda, L., 2008. Fenretinide induces autophagic cell death in caspase-defective breast cancer cells. Autophagy 4(4), 435-441]. Furthermore, the self-destruction of MCF-7 cells was found to be completed by phagocytosis of cell residues [Petrovski, G., Zahuczky, G., Katona, K., Vereb, G., Martinet, W., Nemes, Z., Bursch, W., Fésüs, L., 2007. Clearance of dying autophagic cells of different origin by professional and non-professional phagocytes. Cell Death Diff. 14 (6), 1117-1128]. Autophagy also constitutes a cell's strategy of defense upon cell damage by eliminating damaged bulk proteins/organelles. This biological condition may be exemplified by the treatment of MCF-7 cells with a necrogenic TAM-dose (10 microM), resulting in the lysis of almost all cells within 24h. However, a transient (1h) challenge of MCF-7 cells with the same dose allowed the recovery of cells involving autophagy. Enrichment of chaperones in the insoluble cytoplasmic protein fraction indicated the formation of aggresomes, a potential trigger for autophagy. In a further experimental model HL60 cells were treated with TAM, causing dose-dependent distinct responses: 1-5 microM TAM, autophagy predominant; 7-9 microM, apoptosis predominant; 15 microM, necrosis. These phenomena

  4. Programmed Cell Death During Female Gametophyte Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drews, Gary, N.

    2004-09-15

    Endosperm is a storage tissue in the angiosperm seed that is important both biologically and agriculturally. Endosperm is biologically important because it provides nutrients to the embryo during seed development and agriculturally important because it is a significant source of food, feed, and industrial raw materials. Approximately two-thirds of human calories are derived from endosperm, either directly or indirectly through animal feed. Furthermore, endosperm is used as a raw material for numerous industrial products including ethanol. A major event in endosperm development is the transition between the syncytial phase, during which the endosperm nuclei undergo many rounds of mitosis without cytokinesis, and the cellularized phase, during which cell walls form around the endosperm nuclei. Understanding how the syncytial-cellular transition is regulated is agriculturally important because it influences seed size, seed sink strength, and grain weight. However, the molecular processes controlling this transition are not understood. This project led to the identification of the AGL62 gene that regulates the syncytial-cellular transition during endosperm development. AGL62 is expressed during the syncytial phase and suppresses endosperm cellularization during this period. AGL62 most likely does so by suppressing the expression of genes required for cellularization. At the end of the syncytial phase, the FIS PcG complex suppresses AGL62 expression, which allows expression of the cellularization genes and triggers the initiation of the cellularized phase. Endosperm arises following fertilization of the central cell within the female gametophyte. This project also led to the identification of the AGL80 gene that is required for development of the central cell into the endosperm. Within the ovule and seed, AGL80 is expressed exclusively in the central cell and uncellularized endosperm. AGL80 is required for expression of several central cell-expressed genes, including

  5. Quantum algorithm for programmed cell death of Caenorhabditis elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the development of Caenorhabditis elegans, through cell divisions, a total of exactly 1090 cells are generated, 131 of which undergo programmed cell death (PCD) to result in an adult organism comprising 959 cells. Of those 131, exactly 113 undergo PCD during embryogenesis, subdivided across the cell lineages in the following fashion: 98 for AB lineage; 14 for MS lineage; and 1 for C lineage. Is there a law underlying these numbers, and if there is, what could it be? Here we wish to show that the count of the cells undergoing PCD complies with the cipher laws related to the algorithms of Shor and of Grover

  6. Hydrogen Peroxide Produced by Oral Streptococci Induces Macrophage Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Nakata, Masanobu; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by members of the mitis group of oral streptococci plays important roles in microbial communities such as oral biofilms. Although the cytotoxicity of H2O2 has been widely recognized, the effects of H2O2 produced by oral streptococci on host defense systems remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of H2O2 produced by Streptococcus oralis on human macrophage cell death. Infection by S. oralis was found to stimulate cell death of a THP-1 ...

  7. Activation of intracellular angiotensin AT2 receptors induces rapid cell death in human uterine leiomyosarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yi; Lützen, Ulf; Fritsch, Jürgen;

    2015-01-01

    densities in mitochondria. Activation of the cell membrane AT2 receptors by a concomitant treatment with angiotensin II and the AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan, induces apoptosis but does not affect the rate of cell death. We demonstrate for the first time that the high-affinity, non-peptide AT2 receptor...... of apoptosis and cell death in cultured human uterine leiomyosarcoma (SK-UT-1) cells and control human uterine smooth muscle cells (HutSMC). The intracellular levels of the AT2 receptor are low in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells but the receptor is substantially up-regulated in quiescent SK-UT-1 cells with high...... agonist, Compound 21 (C21) penetrates the cell membrane of quiescent SK-UT-1 cells, activates intracellular AT2 receptors and induces rapid cell death; approximately 70% of cells died within 24 h. The cells, which escaped from the cell death, displayed activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, i...

  8. Sculpting MHC class II-restricted self and non-self peptidome by the class I Ag-processing machinery and its impact on Th-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Charles T; Dragovic, Srdjan M; Conant, Stephanie B; Gray, Jennifer J; Zheng, Mu; Samir, Parimal; Niu, Xinnan; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Van Kaer, Luc; Sette, Alessandro; Link, Andrew J; Joyce, Sebastian

    2013-05-01

    It is generally assumed that the MHC class I antigen (Ag)-processing (CAP) machinery - which supplies peptides for presentation by class I molecules - plays no role in class II-restricted presentation of cytoplasmic Ags. In striking contrast to this assumption, we previously reported that proteasome inhibition, TAP deficiency or ERAAP deficiency led to dramatically altered T helper (Th)-cell responses to allograft (HY) and microbial (Listeria monocytogenes) Ags. Herein, we tested whether altered Ag processing and presentation, altered CD4(+) T-cell repertoire, or both underlay the above finding. We found that TAP deficiency and ERAAP deficiency dramatically altered the quality of class II-associated self peptides suggesting that the CAP machinery impacts class II-restricted Ag processing and presentation. Consistent with altered self peptidomes, the CD4(+) T-cell receptor repertoire of mice deficient in the CAP machinery substantially differed from that of WT animals resulting in altered CD4(+) T-cell Ag recognition patterns. These data suggest that TAP and ERAAP sculpt the class II-restricted peptidome, impacting the CD4(+) T-cell repertoire, and ultimately altering Th-cell responses. Together with our previous findings, these data suggest multiple CAP machinery components sequester or degrade MHC class II-restricted epitopes that would otherwise be capable of eliciting functional Th-cell responses.

  9. Stem Cell Therapies for Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Immune Privilege Reinforcement by Fas/FasL Regulating Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chi-Jiao; Liu, Xu; Che, Lu; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Samartzis, Dino; Wang, Hai-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    As a main contributing factor to low back pain, intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the fundamental basis for various debilitating spinal diseases. The pros and cons of current treatment modalities necessitate biological treatment strategies targeting for reversing or altering the degeneration process in terms of molecules or genes. The advances in stem cell research facilitate the studies aiming for possible clinical application of stem cell therapies for IDD. Human NP cells are versatile with cell morphology full of variety, capable of synthesizing extracellular matrix components, engulfing substances by autophagy and phagocytosis, mitochondrial vacuolization indicating dysfunction, expressing Fas and FasL as significant omens of immune privileged sites. Human discs belong to immune privilege organs with functional FasL expression, which can interact with invasive immune cells by Fas-FasL regulatory machinery. IDD is characterized by decreased expression level of FasL with dysfunctional FasL, which in turn unbalances the interaction between NP cells and immune cells. Certain modulation factors might play a role in the process, such as miR-155. Accumulating evidence indicates that Fas-FasL network expresses in a variety of stem cells. Given the expression of functional FasL and insensitive Fas in stem cells (we term as FasL privilege), transplantation of stem cells into the disc may regenerate the degenerative disc by not only differentiating into NP-like cells, increasing extracellular matrix, but also reinforce immune privilege via interaction with immune cells by Fas-FasL network. PMID:25381758

  10. Hydrogen peroxide produced by oral Streptococci induces macrophage cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Okahashi

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 produced by members of the mitis group of oral streptococci plays important roles in microbial communities such as oral biofilms. Although the cytotoxicity of H2O2 has been widely recognized, the effects of H2O2 produced by oral streptococci on host defense systems remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of H2O2 produced by Streptococcus oralis on human macrophage cell death. Infection by S. oralis was found to stimulate cell death of a THP-1 human macrophage cell line at multiplicities of infection greater than 100. Catalase, an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2, inhibited the cytotoxic effect of S. oralis. S. oralis deletion mutants lacking the spxB gene, which encodes pyruvate oxidase, and are therefore deficient in H2O2 production, showed reduced cytotoxicity toward THP-1 macrophages. Furthermore, H2O2 alone was capable of inducing cell death. The cytotoxic effect seemed to be independent of inflammatory responses, because H2O2 was not a potent stimulator of tumor necrosis factor-α production in macrophages. These results indicate that streptococcal H2O2 plays a role as a cytotoxin, and is implicated in the cell death of infected human macrophages.

  11. CSR1 induces cell death through inactivation of CPSF3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z-H; Yu, Y P; Shi, Y-K; Nelson, J B; Luo, J-H

    2009-01-01

    CSR1 (cellular stress response 1), a newly characterized tumor-suppressor gene, undergoes hypermethylation in over 30% of prostate cancers. Re-expression of CSR1 inhibits cell growth and induces cell death, but the mechanism by which CSR1 suppresses tumor growth is not clear. In this study, we screened a prostate cDNA library using a yeast two-hybrid system and found that the cleavage and polyadenylation-specific factor 3 (CPSF3), an essential component for converting heteronuclear RNA to mRNA, binds with high affinity to the CSR1 C terminus. Further analyses determined that the binding motifs for CPSF3 are located between amino acids 440 and 543. The interaction between CSR1 and CPSF3 induced CPSF3 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, resulting in inhibition of polyadenylation both in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of CPSF3 using small interfering RNA induced cell death in a manner similar to CSR1 expression. A CSR1 mutant unable to bind to CPSF3 did not alter CPSF3 subcellular distribution, did not inhibit its polyadenylation activity and did not induce cell death. In summary, CSR1 appears to induce cell death through a novel mechanism by hijacking a critical RNA processing enzyme. PMID:18806823

  12. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na(+), K(+), and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino eMollinedo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Crytococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+ and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Hydrogen Peroxide-induced Cell Death in Arabidopsis : Transcriptional and Mutant Analysis Reveals a Role of an Oxoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenase Gene in the Cell Death Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, Tsanko S.; Minkov, Ivan N.; Hille, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a major regulator of plant programmed cell death (PCD) but little is known about the downstream genes from the H2O2-signaling network that mediate the cell death. To address this question, a novel system for studying H2O2-induced programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana was

  15. Coordinate reduction in cell proliferation and cell death in mouse olfactory epithelium from birth to maturity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fung, KM; Peringa, J; Venkatachalam, S; Lee, VMY; Trojanowski, JQ

    1997-01-01

    We investigated cell proliferation and cell death in the olfactory epithelium (OE) of mice from birth to maturity using bromodeoxyuridine and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling. We show that cell death events and proliferative activity diminish concomitantly with age in the OE.

  16. Melatonin antagonizes cadmium-induced neurotoxicity by activating the transcription factor EB-dependent autophagy-lysosome machinery in mouse neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Pi, Huifeng; Yang, Zhiqi; Reiter, Russel J; Xu, Shangcheng; Chen, Xiaowei; Chen, Chunhai; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Min; Li, Yuming; Guo, Pan; Li, Gaoming; Tu, Manyu; Tian, Li; Xie, Jia; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Zhong, Min; Zhang, Yanwen; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a highly ubiquitous heavy metal, induces neurotoxicity. Melatonin, a major secretory product of the pineal gland, protects against Cd-induced neurotoxicity. However, the mechanism that accounts for this protection remains to be elucidated. Herein, we exposed mouse neuroblastoma cells (Neuro-2a cells) to different concentrations of cadmium chloride (CdCl2 ) (12.5, 25, and 50 μ mol L(-1) ) for 24 hours. We showed that Cd inhibits autophagosome-lysosome fusion and impairs lysosomal function, subsequently leading to nerve cell death. In addition, Cd decreases the level of transcription factor EB (TFEB) but induces the nuclear translocation of TFEB, associated with compromised lysosomal function or a compensatory effect after the impairment of the autophagic flux. Moreover, compared to the 50-μ mol L(-1) Cd group, administration of 1 μ mol L(-1) melatonin increased "TFEB-responsive genes" (Pfusion (0.05±0.00 vs 0.21±0.01, Pnuclear translocation (2.81±0.08 vs 3.82±0.05, P<.05). Tfeb siRNA blocked the melatonin-mediated elevation in autophagy-lysosome machinery in Cd-induced neurotoxicity (P<.01). Taken together, these results uncover a potent role for TFEB-mediated autophagy in the pathogenesis of Cd-induced neurotoxicity, suggesting that control of the autophagic pathway by melatonin might provide an important clue for exploring potential targets for novel therapeutics of Cd-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:27396692

  17. Mastoparan-Induced Cell Death Signalling in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yordanova, Z.P.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.; Cristescu, S.M.; Harren, F.J.M.; Yakimova, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    The present study was focused on the elucidation of stress-induced cell death signaling events in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to treatment with wasp venom mastoparan. By applying pharmacological approach with specific inhibitors, we have investigated the involvement of eth

  18. Mitochondrial and Cell Death Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J. Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal cell death are unresolved. Morphological, biochemical, genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations, triggering neurodegeneration according to a cell death matrix theory. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This review summarizes how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to neuronal death in AD, PD, and ALS and could serve as a target for drug therapy.

  19. Calcium and cell death signaling in neurodegeneration and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaili, Soraya; Hirata, Hanako; Ureshino, Rodrigo; Monteforte, Priscila T; Morales, Ana P; Muler, Mari L; Terashima, Juliana; Oseki, Karen; Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Lopes, Guiomar S; Bincoletto, Claudia

    2009-09-01

    Transient increase in cytosolic (Cac2+) and mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca m2+) are essential elements in the control of many physiological processes. However, sustained increases in Ca c2+ and Ca m2+ may contribute to oxidative stress and cell death. Several events are related to the increase in Ca m2+, including regulation and activation of a number of Ca2+ dependent enzymes, such as phospholipases, proteases and nucleases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) play pivotal roles in the maintenance of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and regulation of cell death. Several lines of evidence have shown that, in the presence of some apoptotic stimuli, the activation of mitochondrial processes may lead to the release of cytochrome c followed by the activation of caspases, nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. The aim of this review was to show how changes in calcium signaling can be related to the apoptotic cell death induction. Calcium homeostasis was also shown to be an important mechanism involved in neurodegenerative and aging processes.

  20. Retinal Cell Death Caused by Sodium Iodate Involves Multiple Caspase-Dependent and Caspase-Independent Cell-Death Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Balmer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we have investigated retinal cell-death pathways in response to the retina toxin sodium iodate (NaIO3 both in vivo and in vitro. C57/BL6 mice were treated with a single intravenous injection of NaIO3 (35 mg/kg. Morphological changes in the retina post NaIO3 injection in comparison to untreated controls were assessed using electron microscopy. Cell death was determined by TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. The activation of caspases and calpain was measured using immunohistochemistry. Additionally, cytotoxicity and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells, primary retinal cells, and the cone photoreceptor (PRC cell line 661W were assessed in vitro after NaIO3 treatment using the ApoToxGlo™ assay. The 7-AAD/Annexin-V staining was performed and necrostatin (Nec-1 was administered to the NaIO3-treated cells to confirm the results. In vivo, degenerating RPE cells displayed a rounded shape and retracted microvilli, whereas PRCs featured apoptotic nuclei. Caspase and calpain activity was significantly upregulated in retinal sections and protein samples from NaIO3-treated animals. In vitro, NaIO3 induced necrosis in RPE cells and apoptosis in PRCs. Furthermore, Nec-1 significantly decreased NaIO3-induced RPE cell death, but had no rescue effect on treated PRCs. In summary, several different cell-death pathways are activated in retinal cells as a result of NaIO3.

  1. Combinatorial strategies for the induction of immunogenic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo eGalluzzi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The term immunogenic cell death (ICD is commonly employed to indicate a peculiar instance of regulated cell death (RCD that engages the adaptive arm of the immune system. The inoculation of cancer cells undergoing ICD into immunocompetent animals elicits a specific immune response associated with the establishment of immunological memory. Only a few agents are intrinsically endowed with the ability to trigger ICD. These include a few chemotherapeutics that are routinely employed in the clinic, like doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, oxaliplatin and cyclophosphamide, as well as some agents that have not yet been approved for use in humans. Accumulating clinical data indicate that the activation of adaptive immune responses against dying cancer cells is associated with improved disease outcome in patients affected by various neoplasms. Thus, novel therapeutic regimens that trigger ICD are urgently awaited. Here, we discuss current combinatorial approaches to convert otherwise non-immunogenic instances of RCD into bona fide ICD.

  2. The DNA damage-induced cell death response: a roadmap to kill cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Sonja; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2016-08-01

    Upon massive DNA damage cells fail to undergo productive DNA repair and trigger the cell death response. Resistance to cell death is linked to cellular transformation and carcinogenesis as well as radio- and chemoresistance, making the underlying signaling pathways a promising target for therapeutic intervention. Diverse DNA damage-induced cell death pathways are operative in mammalian cells and finally culminate in the induction of programmed cell death via activation of apoptosis or necroptosis. These signaling routes affect nuclear, mitochondria- and plasma membrane-associated key molecules to activate the apoptotic or necroptotic response. In this review, we highlight the main signaling pathways, molecular players and mechanisms guiding the DNA damage-induced cell death response. PMID:26791483

  3. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Lilibeth Lanceta; Mattingly, Jacob M.; Chi Li; Eaton, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer) and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by "loose" (probably in...

  4. Networked T cell death following macrophage infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H-F Macdonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depletion of T cells following infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb impairs disease resolution, and interferes with clinical test performance that relies on cell-mediated immunity. A number of mechanisms contribute to this T cell suppression, such as activation-induced death and trafficking of T cells out of the peripheral circulation and into the diseased lungs. The extent to which Mtb infection of human macrophages affects T cell viability however, is not well characterised. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that lymphopenia (<1.5 × 10(9 cells/l was prevalent among culture-positive tuberculosis patients, and lymphocyte counts significantly improved post-therapy. We previously reported that Mtb-infected human macrophages resulted in death of infected and uninfected bystander macrophages. In the current study, we sought to examine the influence of infected human alveolar macrophages on T cells. We infected primary human alveolar macrophages (the primary host cell for Mtb or PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells with Mtb H37Ra, then prepared cell-free supernatants. The supernatants of Mtb-infected macrophages caused dose-dependent, caspase-dependent, T cell apoptosis. This toxic effect of infected macrophage secreted factors did not require TNF-α or Fas. The supernatant cytotoxic signal(s were heat-labile and greater than 50 kDa in molecular size. Although ESAT-6 was toxic to T cells, other Mtb-secreted factors tested did not influence T cell viability; nor did macrophage-free Mtb bacilli or broth from Mtb cultures. Furthermore, supernatants from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille de Calmette et Guerin (BCG- infected macrophages also elicited T cell death suggesting that ESAT-6 itself, although cytotoxic, was not the principal mediator of T cell death in our system. CONCLUSIONS: Mtb-Infected macrophages secrete heat-labile factors that are toxic to T cells, and may contribute to the immunosuppression seen in tuberculosis as well as

  5. Internalization of NK cells into tumor cells requires ezrin and leads to programmed cell-in-cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wang; Zhen Guo; Peng Xia; Tingting Liu; Jufang Wang; Shan Li; Lihua Sun; Jianxin Lu; Qian Wen; Mingqian Zhou; Li Ma; Xia Ding; Xiaoning Wang; Xuebiao Yao

    2009-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes are key players in the orchestration of immune response and elimination of defective cells. We have previously reported that natural killer (NK) cells enter target tumor cells, leading to either target cell death or self-destruction within tumor cells. However, it has remained elusive as to the fate of NK cells after internaliza-tion and whether the heterotypic cell-in-cell process is different from that of the homotypic cell-in-cell event recently named entosis. Here, we show that NK cells undergo a cell-in-cell process with the ultimate fate of apoptosis within tumor cells and reveal that the internalization process requires the actin cytoskeletal regulator, ezrin. To visualize how NK cells enter into tumor cells, we carried out real-time dual color imaging analyses of NK cell internalization into tumor cells. Surprisingly, most NK cells commit to programmed cell death after their entry into tumor cells, which is distinctively different from entosis observed in the homotypic cell-in-cell process. The apoptotic cell death of the internalized NK cells was evident by activation of caspase 3 and DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, NK cell death after internalization is attenuated by the caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, confirming apoptosis as the mode of NK cell death within tumor cells. To determine protein factors essential for the entry of NK cells into tumor cells, we car-ried out siRNA-based knockdown analysis and discovered a critical role of ezrin in NK cell internalization. Impor-tantly, PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ezrin promotes the NK cell internalization process. Our findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism by which ezrin governs NK cell internalization into tumor cells.

  6. Ras signalling linked to the cell-cycle machinery by the retinoblastoma protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeper, D.S.; Upton, T.M.; Ladha, M.H.; Neuman, E.; Zalvide, J.; Bernards, R.A.; DeCaprio, J.A.; Ewen, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    The Ras proto-oncogene is a central component of mitogenic signal-transduction pathways, and is essential for cells both to leave a quiescent state (GO) and to pass through the GI/S transition of the cell cycle. The mechanism by which Ras signalling regulates cell-cycle progression is unclear, howev

  7. Molecular and Translational Classifications of DAMPs in Immunogenic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek D Garg

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The immunogenicity of malignant cells has recently been acknowledged as a critical determinant of efficacy in cancer therapy. Thus, besides developing direct immunostimulatory regimens including dendritic cell-based vaccines, checkpoint-blocking therapies, and adoptive T-cell transfer, researchers have started to focus on the overall immunobiology of neoplastic cells. It is now clear that cancer cells can succumb to some anticancer therapies by undergoing a peculiar form of cell death that is characterized by an increased immunogenic potential, owing to the emission of so-called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. The emission of DAMPs and other immunostimulatory factors by cells succumbing to immunogenic cell death (ICD favors the establishment of a productive interface with the immune system. This results in the elicitation of tumor-targeting immune responses associated with the elimination of residual, treatment-resistant cancer cells, as well as with the establishment of immunological memory. Although ICD has been characterized with increased precision since its discovery, several questions remain to be addressed. Here, we summarize and tabulate the main molecular, immunological, preclinical and clinical aspects of ICD, in an attempt to capture the essence of this clinically relevant phenomenon, and identify future challenges for this rapidly expanding field of investigation.

  8. Investigating cell death mechanisms in Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using transcriptomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Roy Heath

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a motor neuron disease characterised by degeneration and loss of upper and lower motor neurons from the motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord although evidence is suggesting that there is further involvement of other cell types in the surrounding tissue. Transcriptomic analysis by gene expression profiling using microarray technology has enabled the determination of patterns of cell death in the degenerating tissues. This work has examined gene expression at the level of the tissue and individual cell types in both sporadic and familial forms of the disease. In addition, further studies have examined the differential vulnerability of neuronal cells in different regions of the central nervous system. Model systems have also provided further information to help unravel the mechanisms that lead to death of the motor neurons in disease and also provided novel insights. In this review we shall describe the methods that have been used in these investigations and describe how they have contributed to our knowledge of the cell death mechanisms in ALS.

  9. Flow cytometry in the study of cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro L Bertho

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In this report we present a concise review concerning the use of flow cytometric methods to characterize and differentiate between two different mechanisms of cell death, apoptosis and necrosis. The applications of these techniques to clinical and basic research are also considered. The following cell features are useful to characterize the mode of cell death: (1 activation of an endonuclease in apoptotic cells results in extraction of the low molecular weight DNA following cell permeabilization, which, in turn, leads to their decreased stainability with DNA-specific fluorochromes. Measurements of DNA content make it possible to identify apoptotic cells and to recognize the cell cycle phase specificity of apoptotic process; (2 plasma membrane integrity, which is lost in necrotic but not in apoptotic cells; (3 the decrease in forward light scatter, paralleled either by no change or an increase in side scatter, represent early changes during apoptosis. The data presented indicate that flow cytometry can be applied to basic research of the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of apoptosis, as well as in the clinical situations, where the ability to monitor early signs of apoptosis in some systems may be predictive for the outcome of some treatment protocols.

  10. Immunohistochemistry of Programmed Cell Death in Archival Human Pathology Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takami Matsuyama

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemistry (IHC for detecting key signal molecules involved in programmed cell death (PCD in archival human pathology specimens is fairly well established. Detection of cleaved caspase-3 in lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and gastric surface foveolar glandular epithelia but not in synoviocytes in RA, gastric fundic glandular epithelia, or nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL cells suggests anti-apoptotic mechanisms in cell differentiation and in oncogenesis such as the induction of survivin. Enzymatically pretreated and ultra-super sensitive detection of beclin-1 in synoviocytes in RA and gastric fundic glandular epithelia suggests enhanced autophagy. The deposition of beclin-1 in fibrinoid necrosis in RA and expression of beclin-1 in detached gastric fundic glandular cells suggest that enhanced autophagy undergoes autophagic cell death (ACD. NKTCL exhibited enhanced autophagy through LC3 labeling and showed densely LC3 labeled cell-debris in regions of peculiar necrosis without deposition of beclin-1, indicating massive ACD in NKTCL and the alternative pathway enhancing autophagy following autophagic vesicle nucleation. Autophagy progression was monitored by labeling aggregated mitochondria and cathepsin D. The cell-debris in massive ACD in NKTCL were positive for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, suggesting DNA oxidation occurred in ACD. Immunohistochemical autophagy and PCD analysis in archival human pathology specimens may offer new insights into autophagy in humans.

  11. Influence of chlorine dioxide on cell death and cell cycle of human gingival fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Nishikiori, Ryo; Nomura, Yuji; Sawajiri, Masahiko; Masuki, Kohei; Hirata, Isao; Okazaki, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The effects of chlorine dioxide (ClO2), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on cell death and the cell cycle of human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells were examined. Methods: The inhibition of HGF cell growth was evaluated using a Cell Counting Kit-8. The cell cycle was assessed with propidium iodide-stained cells (distribution of cells in G0/G1, S, G2/M phases) using flow cytometry. The patterns of cell death (necrosis and apoptosis) were analyzed using f...

  12. Ras signalling linked to the cell-cycle machinery by the retinoblastoma protein

    OpenAIRE

    Peeper, D.S.; Upton, T.M.; Ladha, M H; Neuman, E; Zalvide, J; Bernards, R.A.; DeCaprio, J A; Ewen, M E

    1997-01-01

    The Ras proto-oncogene is a central component of mitogenic signal-transduction pathways, and is essential for cells both to leave a quiescent state (GO) and to pass through the GI/S transition of the cell cycle. The mechanism by which Ras signalling regulates cell-cycle progression is unclear, however. Here we report that the retinoblastoma tumour-suppressor protein (Rb), a regulator of GI exit, functionally links Ras to passage through the Gl phase. Inactivation of Ras in cycling cells cause...

  13. Chronic use of pravastatin reduces insulin exocytosis and increases β-cell death in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorza-Gil, Estela; Salerno, Alessandro G; Wanschel, Amarylis C B A; Vettorazzi, Jean F; Ferreira, Mônica S; Rentz, Thiago; Catharino, Rodrigo R; Oliveira, Helena C F

    2016-02-17

    We have previously demonstrated that hypercholesterolemic LDL receptor knockout (LDLr(-/-)) mice secrete less insulin than wild-type mice. Removing cholesterol from isolated islets using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin reversed this defect. In this study, we hypothesized that in vivo treatment of LDLr(-/-) mice with the HMGCoA reductase inhibitor pravastatin would improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Female LDLr(-/-) mice were treated with pravastatin (400mg/L) for 1-3 months. Isolated pancreatic islets were assayed for insulin secretion rates, intracellular calcium oscillations, cholesterol levels, NAD(P)H and SNARE protein levels, apoptosis indicators and lipidomic profile. Two months pravastatin treatment reduced cholesterol levels in plasma, liver and islets by 35%, 25% and 50%, respectively. Contrary to our hypothesis, pravastatin treatment increased fasting and fed plasma levels of glucose and decreased markedly (40%) fed plasma levels of insulin. In addition, ex vivo glucose stimulated insulin secretion was significantly reduced after two and three months (36-48%, pinsulin secretion and insulinemia, two months pravastatin treatment did not affect glucose tolerance because it improved global insulin sensitivity. Pravastatin induced islet dysfunction was associated with marked reductions of exocytosis-related SNARE proteins (SNAP25, Syntaxin 1A, VAMP2) and increased apoptosis markers (Bax/Bcl2 protein ratio, cleaved caspase-3 and lower NAD(P)H production rates) observed in pancreatic islets from treated mice. In addition, several oxidized phospholipids, tri- and diacylglycerols and the proapoptotic lipid molecule ceramide were identified as markers of pravastatin-treated islets. Cell death and oxidative stress (H2O2 production) were confirmed in insulin secreting INS-1E cells treated with pravastatin. These results indicate that chronic treatment with pravastatin impairs the insulin exocytosis machinery and increases β-cell death. These findings suggest

  14. [Selective "death programs" or pleiotropic"life programs"? Looking for programmed cell death in the light of evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameisen, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution", wrote Theodosius Dobzhansky, one of the founders of the Modern Synthesis that led to the unification of evolutionary theory and genetics in the midst of the 20th century. Programmed cell death is a genetically regulated process of cell suicide that is central to the development, homeostasis and integrity of multicellular organisms. Conversely, the dysregulation of mechanisms controlling cell suicide plays a role in the pathogenesis of a wide range of diseases. While great progress has been achieved in the unveiling of the molecular mechanisms of programmed cell death, a new, and somehow puzzling level of complexity has recently begun to emerge, suggesting i) that several different self destruction pathways may exist and operate in parallel in our cells, and ii) that molecular effectors of cell suicide might also perform other functions unrelated to cell death induction and crucial to cell survival, such as cell differentiation, metabolism, and the regulation of the cell cycle. These new findings, with important physiopathological and therapeutic implications, seem at odds with the paradigm of programmed cell death derived from the studies of Caenorhabditis elegans, which led to the concept of the existence of selective, bona fide death genes that emerged and became selected for their sole capacity to execute or repress cell death. In this review, I will argue that this new level of complexity might only make sense and be understood when considered in a broader evolutionary context than that of our phylogenetic divergence from C. elegans. A new view of the regulated cell death pathways emerges when one attempts to ask the question of when and how they may have become selected during a timeline of 4 billion years, at the level of ancestral single-celled organisms, including the bacteria. I will argue that there may be no such thing as a bona fide genetic cell death program. Rather, in the framework of

  15. Different Types of Cell Death Induced by Enterotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yuan Hong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The infection of bacterial organisms generally causes cell death to facilitate microbial invasion and immune escape, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. In addition to the intercellular infectious processes, pathogen-produced/secreted enterotoxins (mostly exotoxins are the major weapons that kill host cells and cause diseases by inducing different types of cell death, particularly apoptosis and necrosis. Blocking these enterotoxins with synthetic drugs and vaccines is important for treating patients with infectious diseases. Studies of enterotoxin-induced apoptotic and necrotic mechanisms have helped us to create efficient strategies to use against these well-characterized cytopathic toxins. In this article, we review the induction of the different types of cell death from various bacterial enterotoxins, such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B, staphylococcal alpha-toxin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, alpha-hemolysin of Escherichia coli, Shiga toxins, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1, heat-labile enterotoxins, and the cholera toxin, Vibrio cholerae. In addition, necrosis caused by pore-forming toxins, apoptotic signaling through cross-talk pathways involving mitochondrial damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and lysosomal injury is discussed.

  16. In vitro apoptotic cell death during erythroid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamai, L; Burattini, S; Luchetti, F; Canonico, B; Ferri, P; Melloni, E; Gonelli, A; Guidotti, L; Papa, S; Falcieri, E

    2004-03-01

    Erythropoiesis occurs in bone marrow and it has been shown that during in vivo erythroid differentiation some immature erythroblasts undergo apoptosis. In this regard, it is known that immature erythroblasts are FasL- and TRAIL-sensitive and can be killed by cells expressing these ligand molecules. In the present study, we have investigated the cell death phenomenon that occurs during a common unilineage model of erythroid development. Purified CD34+ human haemopoietic progenitors were cultured in vitro in the presence of SCF, IL-3 and erythropoietin. Their differentiation stages and apoptosis were followed by multiple technical approaches. Flow cytometric evaluation of surface and intracellular molecules revealed that glycophorin A appeared at day 3-4 of incubation and about 75% of viable cells co-expressed high density glycophorin A (Gly(bright)) and adult haemoglobin at day 14 of culture, indicating that this system reasonably recapitulates in vivo normal erythropoiesis. Interestingly, when mature (Gly(bright)) erythroid cells reached their higher percentages (day 14) almost half of cultured cells were apoptotic. Morphological studies indicated that the majority of dead cells contained cytoplasmic granular material typical of basophilic stage, and DNA analysis by flow cytometry and TUNEL reaction revealed nuclear fragmentation. These observations indicate that in vitro unilineage erythroid differentiation, as in vivo, is associated with apoptotic cell death of cells with characteristics of basophilic erythroblasts. We suggest that the interactions between different death receptors on immature basophilic erythroblasts with their ligands on more mature erythroblasts may contribute to induce apoptosis in vitro. PMID:15004520

  17. The role of the cell cycle machinery in resumption of postembryonic development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barroco, R.M.; Poucke, van K.; Bergervoet, J.H.W.; Veylder, de L.; Groot, S.P.C.; Inze, D.; Engler, G.

    2005-01-01

    Cell cycle activity is required for plant growth and development, but its involvement in the early events that initiate seedling development remains to be clarified. We performed experiments aimed at understanding when cell cycle progression is activated during seed germination, and what its contrib

  18. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-09-01

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A₂. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death. PMID:26402700

  19. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Jung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A2. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death.

  20. Effect of conditions of three dimensional clinostating on testicular cell machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uva, Bianca Maria; Strollo, Felice; Ricci, Franco; Pastorino, Martina; Mason, Ian J.; Angela Masini, Maria

    2007-02-01

    Our scope was to study the effects of on ground random positioning machine rotation on swine testicular cells in culture. Cells of the 2n karyotype line, from trypsinized swine testes, were submitted to modeled microgravity (μG) using a 3D RPM from 15 min to 24 h. The cultured cells were then fixed and submitted to immunohistochemistry using antibodies to steroid dehydrogenases, heat shock proteins and the sodium pump (Na+/K+ ATPase). The results revealed that, after 15 min at modeled μG, all the cells showed damages at cytoskeletal level. The immunoreactions for 3βHSD, 17βHSD and Na+/K+ ATPase were almost abolished. After 24 h of treatment, the presence of the enzymes was restored, and small heat shock proteins were strongly immunostainable. On the other hand, in the 1×G cultures, the expression of HSPs was very weak. We conclude that modeled μG by random positioning of cells affects testicular cells in culture for a short time, while the normal activity of the cells is restored after 24 h.

  1. A Novel Cell Death Gene Acts to Repair Patterning Defects in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Kentaro M.; Takahashi, Aya; Fuse, Naoyuki; Takano-Shimizu-Kouno, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Cell death is a mechanism utilized by organisms to eliminate excess cells during development. Here, we describe a novel regulator of caspase-independent cell death, Mabiki (Mabi), that is involved in the repair of the head patterning defects caused by extra copies of bicoid in Drosophila melanogaster. Mabiki functions together with caspase-dependent cell death mechanisms to provide robustness during development.

  2. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Lopez, Mariana; Perez, Francisco J.; Triana, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Instituto Canario de Investigacion del Cancer, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Leon, Francisco [Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Avda. Astrofisico F. Sanchez 3, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Estevez, Francisco, E-mail: festevez@dbbf.ulpgc.es [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  3. Cell Death Characterization In Tumor Constructs Using Irreversible Electroporation

    OpenAIRE

    Prokop, Katherine Jane

    2013-01-01

    Cell Death Characterization in Tumor Constructs Using Irreversible Electroporation Katherine Jane Prokop ABSTRACT Pancreatic and prostate cancer are both prevalent cancers in the United States with pancreatic being one of the most aggressive of all cancers and prostate cancer being one of the most common, ranking as the number one cancer in men. Treatment of both cancers can be quite challenging as the anatomy of the pancreas and prostate, as well as the development and diagnos...

  4. Pneumolysin causes neuronal cell death through mitochondrial damage

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Johann S.; Hoffmann, Olaf; Schickhaus, Miriam; Freyer, Dorette; Dagand, Emilie; Bermpohl, Daniela; Mitchell, Tim J.; Bechmann, Ingo; Weber, Joerg R.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial toxins such as pneumolysin are key mediators of cytotoxicity in infections. Pneumolysin is a pore-forming toxin released by Streptococcus pneumoniae, the major cause of bacterial meningitis. We found that pneumolysin is the pneumococcal factor that accounts for the cell death pathways induced by live bacteria in primary neurons. The pore-forming activity of pneumolysin is essential for the induction of mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Pneumolysin colocalized with mitochondrial me...

  5. Two programmed cell death systems in Escherichia coli: an apoptotic-like death is inhibited by the mazEF-mediated death pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Erental

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, the classical form of programmed cell death (PCD is apoptosis, which has as its specific characteristics DNA fragmentation and membrane depolarization. In Escherichia coli a different PCD system has been reported. It is mediated by the toxin-antitoxin system module mazEF. The E. coli mazEF module is one of the most thoroughly studied toxin-antitoxin systems. mazF encodes a stable toxin, MazF, and mazE encodes a labile antitoxin, MazE, which prevents the lethal effect of MazF. mazEF-mediated cell death is a population phenomenon requiring the quorum-sensing pentapeptide NNWNN designated Extracellular Death Factor (EDF. mazEF is triggered by several stressful conditions, including severe damage to the DNA. Here, using confocal microscopy and FACS analysis, we show that under conditions of severe DNA damage, the triggered mazEF-mediated cell death pathway leads to the inhibition of a second cell death pathway. The latter is an apoptotic-like death (ALD; ALD is mediated by recA and lexA. The mazEF-mediated pathway reduces recA mRNA levels. Based on these results, we offer a molecular model for the maintenance of an altruistic characteristic in cell populations. In our model, the ALD pathway is inhibited by the altruistic EDF-mazEF-mediated death pathway.

  6. Epigenetic regulations in the IFNγ signalling pathway: IFNγ-mediated MHC class I upregulation on tumour cells is associated with DNA demethylation of antigen-presenting machinery genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlková, Veronika; Štěpánek, Ivan; Hrušková, Veronika; Šenigl, Filip; Mayerová, Veronika; Šrámek, Martin; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Indrová, Marie; Hejhal, Tomáš; Dérian, Nicolas; Klatzmann, David; Six, Adrien; Reiniš, Milan

    2014-08-30

    Downregulation of MHC class I expression on tumour cells, a common mechanism by which tumour cells can escape from specific immune responses, can be associated with coordinated silencing of antigen-presenting machinery genes. The expression of these genes can be restored by IFNγ. In this study we documented association of DNA demethylation of selected antigen-presenting machinery genes located in the MHC genomic locus (TAP-1, TAP-2, LMP-2, LMP-7) upon IFNγ treatment with MHC class I upregulation on tumour cells in several MHC class I-deficient murine tumour cell lines (TC-1/A9, TRAMP-C2, MK16 and MC15). Our data also documented higher methylation levels in these genes in TC-1/A9 cells, as compared to their parental MHC class I-positive TC-1 cells. IFNγ-mediated DNA demethylation was relatively fast in comparison with demethylation induced by DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine, and associated with increased histone H3 acetylation in the promoter regions of APM genes. Comparative transcriptome analysis in distinct MHC class I-deficient cell lines upon their treatment with either IFNγ or epigenetic agents revealed that a set of genes, significantly enriched for the antigen presentation pathway, was regulated in the same manner. Our data demonstrate that IFNγ acts as an epigenetic modifier when upregulating the expression of antigen-presenting machinery genes.

  7. Targeted cancer cell death induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic micro and nanomaterials are increasingly interesting for biomedical applications since they possess many advantageous properties: they can become biocompatible, they can be functionalized to target specific cells and they can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields. The goal of this study is to use antibody-functionalized nickel nanowires (Ab-NWs) as an alternative method in cancer therapy overcoming the limitations of current treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Ab-NWs have been incubated with cancer cells and a 12% drop on cell viability was observed for a treatment of only 10 minutes and an alternating magnetic field of low intensity and low frequency. It is believed that the Ab-NWs vibrate transmitting a mechanical force to the targeted cells inducing cell death. © 2014 IEEE.

  8. Thymoquinone causes multiple effects, including cell death, on dividing plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, Sameh E; Ramadan, Ahmed M; Azeiz, Ahmed Z Abdel; Mohammed, Rasha A; Hassan, Sabah M; Shokry, Ahmed M; Atef, Ahmed; Kamal, Khalid B H; Rabah, Samar; Sabir, Jamal S M; Abuzinadah, Osama A; El-Domyati, Fotouh M; Martin, Gregory B; Bahieldin, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a major constituent of Nigella sativa oil with reported anti-oxidative activity and anti-inflammatory activity in animal cells. It also inhibits proliferation and induces programmed cell death (apoptosis) in human skin cancer cells. The present study sought to detect the influence of TQ on dividing cells of three plant systems and on expression of Bcl2-associated athanogene-like (BAG-like) genes that might be involved during the process of cell death. BAG genes are known for the regulation of diverse physiological processes in animals, including apoptosis, tumorigenesis, stress responses, and cell division. Synthetic TQ at 0.1mg/mL greatly reduced wheat seed germination rate, whereas 0.2mg/mL completely inhibited germination. An Evans blue assay revealed moderate cell death in the meristematic zone of Glycine max roots after 1h of TQ treatment (0.2mg/mL), with severe cell death occurring in this zone after 2h of treatment. Light microscopy of TQ-treated (0.2mg/mL) onion hairy root tips for 1h revealed anti-mitotic activity and also cell death-associated changes, including nuclear membrane disruption and nuclear fragmentation. Transmission electron microscopy of TQ-treated cells (0.2mg/mL) for 1h revealed shrinkage of the plasma membrane, leakage of cell lysate, degradation of cell walls, enlargement of vacuoles and condensation of nuclei. Expression of one BAG-like gene, previously associated with cell death, was induced 20 min after TQ treatment in Glycine max root tip cells. Thus, TQ has multiple effects, including cell death, on dividing plant cells and plants may serve as a useful system to further investigate the mechanisms underlying the response of eukaryotic cells to TQ. PMID:24296078

  9. Curcumin induces apoptosis-independent death in oesophageal cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan-Coyne, G

    2009-10-06

    Background:Oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing and survival rates remain extremely poor. Natural agents with potential for chemoprevention include the phytochemical curcumin (diferuloylmethane). We have examined the effects of curcumin on a panel of oesophageal cancer cell lines.Methods:MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assays and propidium iodide staining were used to assess viability and DNA content, respectively. Mitotic catastrophe (MC), apoptosis and autophagy were defined by both morphological criteria and markers such as MPM-2, caspase 3 cleavage and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Cyclin B and poly-ubiquitinated proteins were assessed by western blotting.Results:Curcumin treatment reduces viability of all cell lines within 24 h of treatment in a 5-50 muM range. Cytotoxicity is associated with accumulation in G2\\/M cell-cycle phases and distinct chromatin morphology, consistent with MC. Caspase-3 activation was detected in two out of four cell lines, but was a minor event. The addition of a caspase inhibitor zVAD had a marginal or no effect on cell viability, indicating predominance of a non-apoptotic form of cell death. In two cell lines, features of both MC and autophagy were apparent. Curcumin-responsive cells were found to accumulate poly-ubiquitinated proteins and cyclin B, consistent with a disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This effect on a key cell-cycle checkpoint regulator may be responsible for the mitotic disturbances and consequent cytotoxicity of this drug.Conclusion:Curcumin can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not reliant on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of oesophageal cancer.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 6 October 2009; doi:10.1038\\/sj.bjc.6605308 www.bjcancer.com.

  10. Curcumin induces apoptosis-independent death in oesophageal cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan-Coyne, G

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing and survival rates remain extremely poor. Natural agents with potential for chemoprevention include the phytochemical curcumin (diferuloylmethane). We have examined the effects of curcumin on a panel of oesophageal cancer cell lines. METHODS: MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assays and propidium iodide staining were used to assess viability and DNA content, respectively. Mitotic catastrophe (MC), apoptosis and autophagy were defined by both morphological criteria and markers such as MPM-2, caspase 3 cleavage and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Cyclin B and poly-ubiquitinated proteins were assessed by western blotting. RESULTS: Curcumin treatment reduces viability of all cell lines within 24 h of treatment in a 5-50 muM range. Cytotoxicity is associated with accumulation in G2\\/M cell-cycle phases and distinct chromatin morphology, consistent with MC. Caspase-3 activation was detected in two out of four cell lines, but was a minor event. The addition of a caspase inhibitor zVAD had a marginal or no effect on cell viability, indicating predominance of a non-apoptotic form of cell death. In two cell lines, features of both MC and autophagy were apparent. Curcumin-responsive cells were found to accumulate poly-ubiquitinated proteins and cyclin B, consistent with a disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This effect on a key cell-cycle checkpoint regulator may be responsible for the mitotic disturbances and consequent cytotoxicity of this drug. CONCLUSION: Curcumin can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not reliant on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of oesophageal cancer.

  11. Low zinc environment induces stress signaling, senescence and mixed cell death modalities in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Emil; Rudolf, Kamil

    2015-12-01

    Currently it is not clear what type of the final cellular response (i.e. cell death modality or senescence) is induced upon chronic intracellular zinc depletion in colon cancer cells. To address this question, isogenic colon cancer lines SW480 and SW620 exposed to low zinc environment were studied over the period of 6 weeks. Low zinc environment reduced total as well as free intracellular zinc content in both cell lines. Decreased intracellular zinc content resulted in changes in cellular proliferation, cell cycle distribution and activation of stress signaling. In addition, colonocytes with low zinc content displayed increased levels of oxidative stress, changes in mitochondrial activity but in the absence of significant DNA damage. Towards the end of treatment (4th-6th week), exposed cells started to change morphologically, and typical markers of senescence as well as cell death appeared. Of two examined colon cancer cell lines, SW480 cells proved to activate predominantly senescent phenotype, with frequent form of demise being necrosis and mixed cell death modality but not apoptosis. Conversely, SW620 cells activated mostly cell death, with relatively equal distribution of apoptosis and mixed types, while senescent phenotypes and necrosis were present only in a small fraction of cell populations. Addition of zinc at the beginning of 4th week of treatment significantly suppressed cell death phenotypes in both cell lines but had no significant effect on senescence. In conclusion, presented results demonstrate variability of responses to chronic zinc depletion in colon cancer as modeled in vitro.

  12. Sudden death of a patient with pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhla, Hassan; Jumbelic, Mary I

    2005-06-01

    We report a case of sudden death due to bilateral pneumothorax in a previously healthy 16-year-old adolescent white girl. She presented with sudden onset of shortness of breath followed by loss of consciousness. Postmortem chest radiograph showed bilateral pneumothoraces. Autopsy confirmed the bilateral pneumothorax and additionally showed emphysematous changes and bullae throughout the lung tissue. Microscopic sections of the lungs showed Langerhans cell histiocytosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of fatal presentation of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PMID:15913433

  13. CSR1 induces cell death through inactivation of CPSF3

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Z-H; Yu, YP; Shi, Y-K; Nelson, JB; Luo, J-H

    2008-01-01

    CSR1 (cellular stress response 1), a newly characterized tumor-suppressor gene, undergoes hypermethylation in over 30% of prostate cancers. Re-expression of CSR1 inhibits cell growth and induces cell death, but the mechanism by which CSR1 suppresses tumor growth is not clear. In this study, we screened a prostate cDNA library using a yeast two-hybrid system and found that the cleavage and polyadenylation-specific factor 3 (CPSF3), an essential component for converting heteronuclear RNA to mRN...

  14. Heat shock genes – integrating cell survival and death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richa Arya; Moushami Mallik; Subhash C Lakhotia

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock induced gene expression and other cellular responses help limit the damage caused by stress and thus facilitate cellular recovery. Cellular damage also triggers apoptotic cell death through several pathways. This paper briefly reviews interactions of the major heat shock proteins with components of the apoptotic pathways. Hsp90, which acts as a chaperone for unstable signal transducers to keep them poised for activation, interacts with RIP and Akt and promotes NF-B mediated inhibition of apoptosis; in addition it also blocks some steps in the apoptotic pathways. Hsp70 is mostly anti-apoptotic and acts at several levels like inhibition of translocation of Bax into mitochondria, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, formation of apoptosome and inhibition of activation of initiator caspases. Hsp70 also modulates JNK, NF-B and Akt signaling pathways in the apoptotic cascade. In contrast, Hsp60 has both anti- and pro-apoptotic roles. Cytosolic Hsp60 prevents translocation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax into mitochondria and thus promotes cell survival but it also promotes maturation of procaspase-3, essential for caspase mediated cell death. Our recent in vivo studies show that RNAi for the Hsp60D in Drosophila melanogaster prevents induced apoptosis. Hsp27 exerts its anti-apoptotic influence by inhibiting cytochrome c and TNF-mediated cell death. crystallin suppresses caspase-8 and cytochrome c mediated activation of caspase-3. Studies in our laboratory also reveal that absence or reduced levels of the developmentally active as well as stress induced non-coding hsr transcripts, which are known to sequester diverse hnRNPs and related nuclear RNA-binding proteins, block induced apoptosis in Drosophila. Modulation of the apoptotic pathways by Hsps reflects their roles as ``weak links” between various ``hubs” in cellular networks. On the other hand, non-coding RNAs, by virtue of their potential to bind with multiple proteins, can act as ``hubs” in

  15. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimova, E T; Kapchina-Toteva, V M; Laarhoven, L-J; Harren, F M; Woltering, E J

    2006-10-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO(4). Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2-3 days which indicates the existence of an adaptation mechanism. Cadmium-induced cell death was alleviated by the addition of sub muM concentrations of peptide inhibitors specific to human caspases indicating that cell death proceeds through a mechanism with similarities to animal programmed cell death (PCD, apoptosis). Cadmium-induced cell death was accompanied by an increased production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and simultaneous addition of antioxidants greatly reduced cell death. Inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD) signalling pathway intermediates reduced cadmium-induced cell death. Treatment with the G-protein activator mastoparan and a cell permeable analogue of the lipid signal second messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) induced cell death. Ethylene, while not inducing cell death when applied alone, stimulated cadmium-induced cell death. Application of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG) reduced cadmium-induced cell death, and this effect was alleviated by simultaneous treatment with ethylene. Together the results show that cadmium induces PCD exhibiting apoptotic-like features. The cell death process requires increased H(2)O(2) production and activation of PLC, PLD and ethylene signalling pathways.

  16. EzrA: a spectrin-like scaffold in the bacterial cell division machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Cleverley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Much progress has been made in identifying the components of the divisome, the assembly of proteins that undertakes the vital process of cell division in bacteria. However, how the highly interdependent processes on either side of the membrane are coordinated during division is a major unresolved question. How is the degradation and synthesis of the cell wall on the outside of the cell coordinated with cytokinesis and membrane fission, which are driven from the inside of the cell by the tubulin homologue FtsZ? A possible key mediator of such coordination is the membrane protein EzrA, as it interacts both with FtsZ and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs that synthesize peptidoglycan. Cleverley et al. [Nature Communications (2014 5, 5421] have recently solved the crystal structure of the cytoplasmic domain of B. subtilis EzrA, which points to an important scaffolding role for EzrA in the divisome. The structure resembles the eukaryotic, cytoskeletal spectrin proteins, which link actin filaments in the cytoskeleton and also connect the actin cytoskeleton to membrane-bound integrin proteins.

  17. Human embryonic stem cells in culture possess primary cilia with hedgehog signaling machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiprilov, Enko N; Awan, Aashir; Desprat, Romain;

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are potential therapeutic tools and models of human development. With a growing interest in primary cilia in signal transduction pathways that are crucial for embryological development and tissue differentiation and interest in mechanisms regulating human h...

  18. EFFECTS OF ETHANOL AND HYDROGEN PEROXIDE ON MOUSE LIMB BUD MESENCHYME DIFFERENTIATION AND CELL DEATH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many of the morphological defects associated with embryonic alcohol exposure are a result of cell death. During limb development, ethanol administration produces cell death in the limb and digital defects, including postaxial ectrodactyly. Because an accumulation of reactive oxyg...

  19. Role of mitochondrial function in cell death and body metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the key players in apoptosis and necrosis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted r0 cells were resistant to diverse apoptosis inducers such as TNF-alpha, TNFSF10, staurosporine and p53. Apoptosis resistance was accompanied by the absence of mitochondrial potential loss or cytochrome c translocation. r0 cells were also resistant to necrosis induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) donors due to upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as manganese superoxide dismutase. Mitochondria also has a close relationship with autophagy that plays a critical role in the turnover of senescent organelles or dysfunctional proteins and may be included in 'cell death' category. It was demonstrated that autophagy deficiency in insulin target tissues such as skeletal muscle induces mitochondrial stress response, which leads to the induction of FGF21 as a 'mitokine' and affects the whole body metabolism. These results show that mitochondria are not simply the power plants of cells generating ATP, but are closely related to several types of cell death and autophagy. Mitochondria affect various pathophysiological events related to diverse disorders such as cancer, metabolic disorders and aging. PMID:27100503

  20. Fusion Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Milosevic, Ira

    2015-01-01

    the vesicular SNARE VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2 and the target (plasma membrane) SNAREs SNAP25 and syntaxin-1 results in fusion and release of neurotransmitter, synchronized to the electrical activity of the cell by calcium influx and binding to synaptotagmin. Formation of the SNARE complex is tightly regulated...... and appears to start with syntaxin-1 bound to an SM (Sec1/Munc18-like) protein. Proteins of the Munc13-family are responsible for opening up syntaxin and allowing sequential binding of SNAP-25 and VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2. N- to C-terminal “zippering” of the SNARE domains leads to membrane fusion...

  1. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Lee, Yong J.; Park, Daeho

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol ...

  2. Single-molecule investigations of the stringent response machinery in living bacterial cells

    OpenAIRE

    English, Brian P.; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Sanamrad, Arash; Tankov, Stoyan; Dekker, Nynke H.; Elf, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The RelA-mediated stringent response is at the heart of bacterial adaptation to starvation and stress, playing a major role in the bacterial cell cycle and virulence. RelA integrates several environmental cues and synthesizes the alarmone ppGpp, which globally reprograms transcription, translation, and replication. We have developed and implemented novel single-molecule tracking methodology to characterize the intracellular catalytic cycle of RelA. Our single-molecule experiments show that Re...

  3. Cell-to-Cell stochastic fluctuations in apoptotic signaling can decide between life and death

    CERN Document Server

    Raychaudhuri, S; Nguyen, T; Khan, E M; Goldkorn, T

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis, or genetically programmed cell death, is a crucial cellular process that maintains the balance between life and death in cells. The precise molecular mechanism of apoptosis signaling and how these two pathways are differentially activated under distinct apoptotic stimuli is poorly understood. We developed a Monte Carlo-based stochastic simulation model that can characterize distinct signaling behaviors in the two major pathways of apoptotic signaling using a novel probability distribution-based approach. Specifically, we show that for a weak death signal, such as low levels of death ligand Fas (CD95) binding or under stress conditions, the type 2 mitochondrial pathway dominates apoptotic signaling. Our results also show signaling in the type 2 pathway is stochastic, where the population average over many cells does not capture the cell-to-cell fluctuations in the time course (~1 - 10 hours) of downstream caspase-3 activation. On the contrary, the probability distribution of caspase-3 activation for...

  4. Bifurcate effects of glucose on caspase-independent cell death during hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the effect of glucose on hypoxic death of rat cardiomyocyte-derived H9c2 cells and found that there is an optimal glucose concentration for protection against hypoxic cell death. Hypoxic cell death in the absence of glucose is accompanied by rapid ATP depletion, release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria, and nuclear chromatin condensation, all of which are inhibited by glucose in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, excessive glucose also induces hypoxic cell death that is not accompanied by these events, suggesting a change in the mode of cell death between hypoxic cells with and without glucose supplementation.

  5. Bifurcate effects of glucose on caspase-independent cell death during hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aki, Toshihiko, E-mail: aki.legm@tmd.ac.jp [Section of Forensic Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Nara, Akina; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Uemura, Koichi [Section of Forensic Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2010-06-04

    We investigated the effect of glucose on hypoxic death of rat cardiomyocyte-derived H9c2 cells and found that there is an optimal glucose concentration for protection against hypoxic cell death. Hypoxic cell death in the absence of glucose is accompanied by rapid ATP depletion, release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria, and nuclear chromatin condensation, all of which are inhibited by glucose in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, excessive glucose also induces hypoxic cell death that is not accompanied by these events, suggesting a change in the mode of cell death between hypoxic cells with and without glucose supplementation.

  6. Breakpoint sites disclose the role of the V(D)J recombination machinery in the formation of T-cell receptor (TCR) and non-TCR associated aberrations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmonie, Nicole S D; Dik, Willem A; Meijerink, Jules P P; Homminga, Irene; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Langerak, Anton W

    2013-08-01

    Aberrant recombination between T-cell receptor genes and oncogenes gives rise to chromosomal translocations that are genetic hallmarks in several subsets of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias. The V(D)J recombination machinery has been shown to play a role in the formation of these T-cell receptor translocations. Other, non-T-cell receptor chromosomal aberrations, such as SIL-TAL1 deletions, have likewise been recognized as V(D)J recombination associated aberrations. Despite the postulated role of V(D)J recombination, the extent of the V(D)J recombination machinery involvement in the formation of T-cell receptor and non-T-cell receptor aberrations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is still poorly understood. We performed a comprehensive in silico and ex vivo evaluation of 117 breakpoint sites from 22 different T-cell receptor translocation partners as well as 118 breakpoint sites from non-T-cell receptor chromosomal aberrations. Based on this extensive set of breakpoint data, we provide a comprehensive overview of T-cell receptor and oncogene involvement in T-ALL. Moreover, we assessed the role of the V(D)J recombination machinery in the formation of chromosomal aberrations, and propose an up-dated mechanistic classification on how the V(D)J recombination machinery contributes to the formation of T-cell receptor and non-T-cell receptor aberrations in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection induces non-apoptotic cell death of human dendritic cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Ruth CM

    2011-10-24

    Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs) connect innate and adaptive immunity, and are necessary for an efficient CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We previously described the macrophage cell death response to Mtb infection. To investigate the effect of Mtb infection on human DC viability, we infected these phagocytes with different strains of Mtb and assessed viability, as well as DNA fragmentation and caspase activity. In parallel studies, we assessed the impact of infection on DC maturation, cytokine production and bacillary survival. Results Infection of DCs with live Mtb (H37Ra or H37Rv) led to cell death. This cell death proceeded in a caspase-independent manner, and without nuclear fragmentation. In fact, substrate assays demonstrated that Mtb H37Ra-induced cell death progressed without the activation of the executioner caspases, 3\\/7. Although the death pathway was triggered after infection, the DCs successfully underwent maturation and produced a host-protective cytokine profile. Finally, dying infected DCs were permissive for Mtb H37Ra growth. Conclusions Human DCs undergo cell death after infection with live Mtb, in a manner that does not involve executioner caspases, and results in no mycobactericidal effect. Nonetheless, the DC maturation and cytokine profile observed suggests that the infected cells can still contribute to TB immunity.

  8. p-Cresol mediates autophagic cell death in renal proximal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Hung; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Lin, Tze-Yi; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2015-04-01

    Higher serum level of p-cresol (PC) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has been linked with CKD progression. The toxic effect of PC on diverse cells has been reported by prior studies, except for renal tubular cells. Both autophagy and apoptosis contribute to renal tubular cell death, yet evidence of its response to PC is limited and their crosstalk is still unclear. Autophagy is an important cellular process involved in toxin-induced cell death. Renal tubular cell death in tubular injury is thought to be one of the key events causing the progression of CKD. Thus, we treated rat (NRK-52E) and human (HRPTEC) renal proximal tubular cells (RPTC) with PC and found the cell proliferation was significantly decreased. Cell apoptosis was significantly increased and accompanied with the activation of autophagy as evidenced by increases in LC3-II, beclin 1 and Atg 4. We also found an increase of p62 by c-Jun activation. p62 accumulation could mediate the activation of caspase 8-dependent cell apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of p62 by siRNA of p62 had the opposite effect by arresting LC3-II accumulation and promoting increasing cell viability. We conclude that PC triggered autophagic RPTC death via JNK-mediated p62 accumulation and then activated caspase 8-dependent cell death pathway. PC can be considered as one of the key events causing progression of CKD, which might affect drug disposition in CKD cases. PMID:25668154

  9. Peruvoside, a Cardiac Glycoside, Induces Primitive Myeloid Leukemia Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qian; Leong, Wa Seng; Liu, Liang; Chan, Wai-In

    2016-01-01

    Despite the available chemotherapy and treatment, leukemia remains a difficult disease to cure due to frequent relapses after treatment. Among the heterogeneous leukemic cells, a rare population referred as the leukemic stem cell (LSC), is thought to be responsible for relapses and drug resistance. Cardiac glycosides (CGs) have been used in treating heart failure despite its toxicity. Recently, increasing evidence has demonstrated its new usage as a potential anti-cancer drug. Ouabain, one of the CGs, specifically targeted CD34⁺CD38(-) leukemic stem-like cells, but not the more mature CD34⁺CD38⁺ leukemic cells, making this type of compounds a potential treatment for leukemia. In search of other potential anti-leukemia CGs, we found that Peruvoside, a less studied CG, is more effective than Ouabain and Digitoxin at inducing cell death in primitive myeloid leukemia cells without obvious cytotoxicity on normal blood cells. Similar to Ouabain and Digitoxin, Peruvoside also caused cell cycle arrest at G₂/M stage. It up-regulates CDKN1A expression and activated the cleavage of Caspase 3, 8 and PARP, resulting in apoptosis. Thus, Peruvoside showed potent anti-leukemia effect, which may serve as a new anti-leukemia agent in the future. PMID:27110755

  10. Activated microglia cause reversible apoptosis of pheochromocytoma cells, inducing their cell death by phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Tamara C; Vilalta, Anna; Brown, Guy C

    2016-01-01

    Some apoptotic processes, such as phosphatidylserine exposure, are potentially reversible and do not necessarily lead to cell death. However, phosphatidylserine exposure can induce phagocytosis of a cell, resulting in cell death by phagocytosis: phagoptosis. Phagoptosis of neurons by microglia might contribute to neuropathology, whereas phagoptosis of tumour cells by macrophages might limit cancer. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which BV-2 microglia killed co-cultured pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells that were either undifferentiated or differentiated into neuronal cells. We found that microglia activated by lipopolysaccharide rapidly phagocytosed PC12 cells. Activated microglia caused reversible phosphatidylserine exposure on and reversible caspase activation in PC12 cells, and caspase inhibition prevented phosphatidylserine exposur and decreased subsequent phagocytosis. Nitric oxide was necessary and sufficient to induce the reversible phosphatidylserine exposure and phagocytosis. The PC12 cells were not dead at the time they were phagocytised, and inhibition of their phagocytosis left viable cells. Cell loss was inhibited by blocking phagocytosis mediated by phosphatidylserine, MFG-E8, vitronectin receptors or P2Y6 receptors. Thus, activated microglia can induce reversible apoptosis of target cells, which is insufficient to cause apoptotic cell death, but sufficient to induce their phagocytosis and therefore cell death by phagoptosis.

  11. Anhydrobiosis and programmed cell death in plants: Commonalities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Singh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Anhydrobiosis is an adaptive strategy of certain organisms or specialised propagules to survive in the absence of water while programmed cell death (PCD is a finely tuned cellular process of the selective elimination of targeted cell during developmental programme and perturbed biotic and abiotic conditions. Particularly during water stress both the strategies serve single purpose i.e., survival indicating PCD may also function as an adaptive process under certain conditions. During stress conditions PCD cause targeted cells death in order to keep the homeostatic balance required for the organism survival, whereas anhydrobiosis suspends cellular metabolic functions mimicking a state similar to death until reestablishment of the favourable conditions. Anhydrobiosis is commonly observed among organisms that have ability to revive their metabolism on rehydration after removal of all or almost all cellular water without damage. This feature is widely represented in terrestrial cyanobacteria and bryophytes where it is very common in both vegetative and reproductive stages of life-cycle. In the course of evolution, with the development of advanced vascular system in higher plants, anhydrobiosis was gradually lost from the vegetative phase of life-cycle. Though it is retained in resurrection plants that primarily belong to thallophytes and a small group of vascular angiosperm, it can be mostly found restricted in orthodox seeds of higher plants. On the contrary, PCD is a common process in all eukaryotes from unicellular to multicellular organisms including higher plants and mammals. In this review we discuss physiological and biochemical commonalities and differences between anhydrobiosis and PCD.

  12. Ras and Rheb Signaling in Survival and Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most obvious hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation of cells partly due to independence of growth factor supply. A major component of mitogenic signaling is Ras, a small GTPase. It was the first identified human protooncogene and is known since more than three decades to promote cellular proliferation and growth. Ras was shown to support growth factor-independent survival during development and to protect from chemical or mechanical lesion-induced neuronal degeneration in postmitotic neurons. In contrast, for specific patho-physiological cases and cellular systems it has been shown that Ras may also promote cell death. Proteins from the Ras association family (Rassf, especially Rassf1 and Rassf5) are tumor suppressors that are activated by Ras-GTP, triggering apoptosis via e.g., activation of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST1) kinase. In contrast to Ras, their expression is suppressed in many types of tumours, which makes Rassf proteins an exciting model for understanding the divergent effects of Ras activity. It seems likely that the outcome of Ras signaling depends on the balance between the activation of its various downstream effectors, thus determining cellular fate towards either proliferation or apoptosis. Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) is a protein from the Ras superfamily that is also known to promote proliferation, growth, and regeneration through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. However, recent evidences indicate that the Rheb-mTor pathway may switch its function from a pro-growth into a cell death pathway, depending on the cellular situation. In contrast to Ras signaling, for Rheb, the cellular context is likely to modulate the whole Rheb-mTor pathway towards cellular death or survival, respectively

  13. Sulbutiamine counteracts trophic factor deprivation induced apoptotic cell death in transformed retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kui Dong; Majid, Aman Shah Abdul; Kim, Kyung-A; Kang, Kyungsu; Ahn, Hong Ryul; Nho, Chu Won; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2010-11-01

    Sulbutiamine is a highly lipid soluble synthetic analogue of vitamin B(1) and is used clinically for the treatment of asthenia. The aim of our study was to demonstrate whether sulbutiamine is able to attenuate trophic factor deprivation induced cell death to transformed retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5). Cells were subjected to serum deprivation for defined periods and sulbutiamine at different concentrations was added to the cultures. Various procedures (e.g. cell viability assays, apoptosis assay, reactive oxygen species analysis, Western blot analysis, flow cytometric analysis, glutathione (GSH) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) measurement) were used to demonstrate the effect of sulbutiamine. Sulbutiamine dose-dependently attenuated apoptotic cell death induced by serum deprivation and stimulated GSH and GST activity. Moreover, sulbutiamine decreased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and AIF. This study demonstrates for the first time that sulbutiamine is able to attenuate trophic factor deprivation induced apoptotic cell death in neuronal cells in culture. PMID:20809085

  14. Multiple Modes of Cell Death Discovered in a Prokaryotic (Cyanobacterial) Endosymbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weiwen; Rasmussen, Ulla; Zheng, Siping; Bao, Xiaodong; Chen, Bin; Gao, Yuan; Guan, Xiong; Larsson, John; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically-based cell death mechanism with vital roles in eukaryotes. Although there is limited consensus on similar death mode programs in prokaryotes, emerging evidence suggest that PCD events are operative. Here we present cell death events in a cyanobacterium living endophytically in the fern Azolla microphylla, suggestive of PCD. This symbiosis is characterized by some unique traits such as a synchronized development, a vertical transfer of the cyanobacterium between plant generations, and a highly eroding cyanobacterial genome. A combination of methods was used to identify cell death modes in the cyanobacterium. Light- and electron microscopy analyses showed that the proportion of cells undergoing cell death peaked at 53.6% (average 20%) of the total cell population, depending on the cell type and host developmental stage. Biochemical markers used for early and late programmed cell death events related to apoptosis (Annexin V-EGFP and TUNEL staining assays), together with visualization of cytoskeleton alterations (FITC-phalloidin staining), showed that all cyanobacterial cell categories were affected by cell death. Transmission electron microscopy revealed four modes of cell death: apoptotic-like, autophagic-like, necrotic-like and autolytic-like. Abiotic stresses further enhanced cell death in a dose and time dependent manner. The data also suggest that dynamic changes in the peptidoglycan cell wall layer and in the cytoskeleton distribution patterns may act as markers for the various cell death modes. The presence of a metacaspase homolog (domain p20) further suggests that the death modes are genetically programmed. It is therefore concluded that multiple, likely genetically programmed, cell death modes exist in cyanobacteria, a finding that may be connected with the evolution of cell death in the plant kingdom. PMID:23822984

  15. Multiple Modes of Cell Death Discovered in a Prokaryotic (Cyanobacterial Endosymbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwen Zheng

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD is a genetically-based cell death mechanism with vital roles in eukaryotes. Although there is limited consensus on similar death mode programs in prokaryotes, emerging evidence suggest that PCD events are operative. Here we present cell death events in a cyanobacterium living endophytically in the fern Azolla microphylla, suggestive of PCD. This symbiosis is characterized by some unique traits such as a synchronized development, a vertical transfer of the cyanobacterium between plant generations, and a highly eroding cyanobacterial genome. A combination of methods was used to identify cell death modes in the cyanobacterium. Light- and electron microscopy analyses showed that the proportion of cells undergoing cell death peaked at 53.6% (average 20% of the total cell population, depending on the cell type and host developmental stage. Biochemical markers used for early and late programmed cell death events related to apoptosis (Annexin V-EGFP and TUNEL staining assays, together with visualization of cytoskeleton alterations (FITC-phalloidin staining, showed that all cyanobacterial cell categories were affected by cell death. Transmission electron microscopy revealed four modes of cell death: apoptotic-like, autophagic-like, necrotic-like and autolytic-like. Abiotic stresses further enhanced cell death in a dose and time dependent manner. The data also suggest that dynamic changes in the peptidoglycan cell wall layer and in the cytoskeleton distribution patterns may act as markers for the various cell death modes. The presence of a metacaspase homolog (domain p20 further suggests that the death modes are genetically programmed. It is therefore concluded that multiple, likely genetically programmed, cell death modes exist in cyanobacteria, a finding that may be connected with the evolution of cell death in the plant kingdom.

  16. Cell death in the injured brain: roles of metallothioneins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mie Ø; Larsen, Agnete; Stoltenberg, Meredin;

    2009-01-01

    oxygen species (ROS). ROS promote oxidative stress, which leads to neurodegeneration and ultimately results in programmed cell death (secondary injury). Since this delayed, secondary tissue loss occurs days to months following the primary injury it provides a therapeutic window where potential......, and caspase inhibitors. However, most of the scientific efforts have failed in translating the experimental results into clinical trials. Despite intensive research, effective neuroprotective therapies are lacking in the clinic, and TBI continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. This paper...

  17. Calcium and cell death signaling in neurodegeneration and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Smaili

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient increase in cytosolic (Cac2+ and mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca m2+ are essential elements in the control of many physiological processes. However, sustained increases in Ca c2+ and Ca m2+ may contribute to oxidative stress and cell death. Several events are related to the increase in Ca m2+, including regulation and activation of a number of Ca2+ dependent enzymes, such as phospholipases, proteases and nucleases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER play pivotal roles in the maintenance of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and regulation of cell death. Several lines of evidence have shown that, in the presence of some apoptotic stimuli, the activation of mitochondrial processes maylead to the release of cytochrome c followed by the activation of caspases, nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. The aim of this review was to show how changes in calcium signaling can be related to the apoptotic cell death induction. Calcium homeostasis was also shown to be an important mechanism involved in neurodegenerative and aging processes.Aumentos transientes no cálcio citosólico (Ca c2+ e mitocondrial (Ca m2+ são elementos essenciais no controle de muitos processos fisiológicos. No entanto, aumentos sustentados do Ca c2+ e do Ca m2+ podem contribuir para o estresse oxidativo ea morte celular. Muitos eventos estão relacionados ao aumentono Ca c2+, incluindo a regulação e ativação de várias enzimas dependentes de Ca2+ como as fosfolipases, proteases e nucleases. A mitocôndria e o retículo endoplasmático têm um papel central na manutenção da homeostase intracellular de Ca c2+ e na regulação da morte celular. Várias evidências mostraram que, na presença de certos estímulos apoptóticos, a ativação dos processos mitocondriais pode promover a liberação de citocromo c, seguida da ativação de caspases, fragmentação nuclear e morte celular por apoptose. O objetivo desta revisão é mostrar como aumentos na sinalização de

  18. Modulating cell-to-cell variability and sensitivity to death ligands by co-drugging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flusberg, Deborah A.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2013-06-01

    TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) holds promise as an anti-cancer therapeutic but efficiently induces apoptosis in only a subset of tumor cell lines. Moreover, even in clonal populations of responsive lines, only a fraction of cells dies in response to TRAIL and individual cells exhibit cell-to-cell variability in the timing of cell death. Fractional killing in these cell populations appears to arise not from genetic differences among cells but rather from differences in gene expression states, fluctuations in protein levels and the extent to which TRAIL-induced death or survival pathways become activated. In this study, we ask how cell-to-cell variability manifests in cell types with different sensitivities to TRAIL, as well as how it changes when cells are exposed to combinations of drugs. We show that individual cells that survive treatment with TRAIL can regenerate the sensitivity and death-time distribution of the parental population, demonstrating that fractional killing is a stable property of cell populations. We also show that cell-to-cell variability in the timing and probability of apoptosis in response to treatment can be tuned using combinations of drugs that together increase apoptotic sensitivity compared to treatment with one drug alone. In the case of TRAIL, modulation of cell-to-cell variability by co-drugging appears to involve a reduction in the threshold for mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization.

  19. DIETARY PHYTOCHEMICALS INDUCE p53- AND CASPASE-INDEPENDENT CELL DEATH IN HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Sukumari-Ramesh, Sangeetha; Bentley, J Nicole; Laird, Melissa D.; Singh, Nagendra; Vender, John R.; Dhandapani, Krishnan M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most prevalent pediatric solid tumor and a leading cause of cancer-related death in children. In the present study, a novel cytotoxic role for the dietary compounds, curcumin, andrographolide, wedelolactone, dibenzoylmethane, and tanshinone IIA was identified in human S-type NB cells, SK-N-AS and SK-N-BE(2). Mechanistically, cell death appeared apoptotic by flow cytometry; however, these effects proceeded independently from both caspase-3 and p53 activation, as asses...

  20. Isogambogenic acid induces apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhong; Zhou, Yongzhao; Cheng, Xia; Fan, Yi; He, Shichao; Li, Shucai; Ye, Haoyu; Xie, Caifeng; Wu, Wenshuang; Li, Chunyan; Pei, Heying; Li, Luyuan; Wei, Zhe; Peng, Aihua; Wei, Yuquan; Li, Weimin; Chen, Lijuan

    2015-01-09

    To overcome drug resistance caused by apoptosis deficiency in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), there is a need to identify other means of triggering apoptosis-independent cancer cell death. We are the first to report that isogambogenic acid (iso-GNA) can induce apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human NSCLC cells. Several features of the iso-GNA-treated NSCLC cells indicated that iso-GNA induced autophagic cell death. First, there was no evidence of apoptosis or cleaved caspase 3 accumulation and activation. Second, iso-GNA treatment induced the formation of autophagic vacuoles, increased LC3 conversion, caused the appearance of autophagosomes and increased the expression of autophagy-related proteins. These findings provide evidence that iso-GNA induces autophagy in NSCLC cells. Third, iso-GNA-induced cell death was inhibited by autophagic inhibitors or by selective ablation of Atg7 and Beclin 1 genes. Furthermore, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin increased iso-GNA-induced cell death by enhancing autophagy. Finally, a xenograft model provided additional evidence that iso-GNA exhibited anticancer effect through inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that iso-GNA exhibited an anticancer effect by inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells, which may be an effective chemotherapeutic agent that can be used against NSCLC in a clinical setting.

  1. Membrane manipulations by the ESCRT machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odorizzi, Greg

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) collectively comprise a machinery that was first known for its function in the degradation of transmembrane proteins in the endocytic pathway of eukaryotic cells. Since their discovery, however, ESCRTs have been recognized as playing important roles at the plasma membrane, which appears to be the original site of function for the ESCRT machinery. This article reviews some of the major research findings that have shaped our current understanding of how the ESCRT machinery controls membrane dynamics and considers new roles for the ESCRT machinery that might be driven by these mechanisms.

  2. Attenuation of oxidative neuronal cell death by coffee phenolic phytochemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) are strongly associated with oxidative stress, which is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Recent studies suggest that moderate coffee consumption may reduce the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of chlorogenic acid (5-O-caffeoylquinic acid; CGA), a major phenolic phytochemical found in instant decaffeinated coffee (IDC), and IDC against oxidative PC12 neuronal cell death. IDC (1 and 5 μg/ml) or CGA (1 and 5 μM) attenuated H2O2-induced PC12 cell death. H2O2-induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation were strongly inhibited by pretreatment with IDC or CGA. Pretreatment with IDC or CGA also inhibited the H2O2-induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and downregulation of Bcl-XL and caspase-3. The accumulation of intracellular ROS in H2O2-treated PC12 cells was dose-dependently diminished by IDC or CGA. The activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by H2O2 in PC12 cells was also inhibited by IDC or CGA. Collectively, these results indicate that IDC and CGA protect PC12 cells from H2O2-induced apoptosis by blocking the accumulation of intracellular ROS and the activation of MAPKs

  3. Attenuation of oxidative neuronal cell death by coffee phenolic phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eun Sun; Jang, Young Jin [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Mun Kyung; Kang, Nam Joo [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Won [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kiwon@konkuk.ac.kr; Lee, Hyong Joo [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: leehyjo@snu.ac.kr

    2009-02-10

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) are strongly associated with oxidative stress, which is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Recent studies suggest that moderate coffee consumption may reduce the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of chlorogenic acid (5-O-caffeoylquinic acid; CGA), a major phenolic phytochemical found in instant decaffeinated coffee (IDC), and IDC against oxidative PC12 neuronal cell death. IDC (1 and 5 {mu}g/ml) or CGA (1 and 5 {mu}M) attenuated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced PC12 cell death. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation were strongly inhibited by pretreatment with IDC or CGA. Pretreatment with IDC or CGA also inhibited the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and downregulation of Bcl-X{sub L} and caspase-3. The accumulation of intracellular ROS in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated PC12 cells was dose-dependently diminished by IDC or CGA. The activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in PC12 cells was also inhibited by IDC or CGA. Collectively, these results indicate that IDC and CGA protect PC12 cells from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis by blocking the accumulation of intracellular ROS and the activation of MAPKs.

  4. Cell-to-cell variability in cell death: can systems biology help us make sense of it all?

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, X; Owen, M. S.; Lee, R E C; Gaudet, S

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common observations in cell death assays is that not all cells die at the same time, or at the same treatment dose. Here, using the perspective of the systems biology of apoptosis and the context of cancer treatment, we discuss possible sources of this cell-to-cell variability as well as its implications for quantitative measurements and computational models of cell death. Many different factors, both within and outside of the apoptosis signaling networks, have been correlated...

  5. Cell Death Pathways and Phthalocyanine as an Efficient Agent for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Mfouo-Tynga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of cell death can be predetermined (programmed or not and categorized into apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic pathways. The process of Hayflick limits completes the execution of death-related mechanisms. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are associated with oxidative stress and subsequent cytodamage by oxidizing and degrading cell components. ROS are also involved in immune responses, where they stabilize and activate both hypoxia-inducible factors and phagocytic effectors. ROS production and presence enhance cytodamage and photodynamic-induced cell death. Photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT uses non-toxic chemotherapeutic agents, photosensitizer (PS, to initiate a light-dependent and ROS-related cell death. Phthalocyanines (PCs are third generation and stable PSs with improved photochemical abilities. They are effective inducers of cell death in various neoplastic models. The metallated PCs localize in critical cellular organelles and are better inducers of cell death than other previous generation PSs as they favor mainly apoptotic cell death events.

  6. ROS-induced autophagy in cancer cells assists in evasion from determinants of immunogenic cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garg, A.D.; Dudek, A.M.D.; Ferreira, G.B.; Verfaillie, T.; Vandenabeele, P.; Krysko, D.V.; Mathieu, C.; Agostinis, P.

    2013-01-01

    Calreticulin surface exposure (ecto-CALR), ATP secretion, maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) and stimulation of T cells are prerequisites for anticancer therapy-induced immunogenic cell death (ICD). Recent evidence suggests that chemotherapy-induced autophagy may positively regulate ICD by favoring

  7. Mitophagy switches cell death from apoptosis to necrosis in NSCLC cells treated with oncolytic measles virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mao; Meng, Gang; Jiang, Aiqin; Chen, Aiping; Dahlhaus, Meike; Gonzalez, Patrick; Beltinger, Christian; Wei, Jiwu

    2014-06-15

    Although apoptotic phenomena have been observed in malignant cells infected by measles virus vaccine strain Edmonston B (MV-Edm), the precise oncolytic mechanisms are poorly defined. In this study we found that MV-Edm induced autophagy and sequestosome 1-mediated mitophagy leading to decreased cytochrome c release, which blocked the pro-apoptotic cascade in non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCs). The decrease of apoptosis by mitophagy favored viral replication. Persistent viral replication sustained by autophagy ultimately resulted in necrotic cell death due to ATP depletion. Importantly, when autophagy was impaired in NSCLCs MV-Edm-induced cell death was significantly abrogated despite of increased apoptosis. Taken together, our results define a novel oncolytic mechanism by which mitophagy switches cell death from apoptosis to more efficient necrosis in NSCLCs following MV-Edm infection. This provides a foundation for future improvement of oncolytic virotherapy or antiviral therapy. PMID:25004098

  8. Regulation of cell survival and death during Flavivirus infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sounak; Ghosh; Roy; Beata; Sadigh; Emmanuel; Datan; Richard; A; Lockshin; Zahra; Zakeri

    2014-01-01

    Flaviviruses, ss(+) RNA viruses, include many of mankind’s most important pathogens. Their pathogenicity derives from their ability to infect many types of cells including neurons, to replicate, and eventually to kill the cells. Flaviviruses can activate tumor necrosis factor α and both intrinsic(Bax-mediated) and extrinsic pathways to apoptosis. Thus they can use many approaches for activating these pathways. Infection can lead to necrosis if viral load is extremely high or to other types of cell death if routes to apoptosis are blocked. Dengue and Japanese Encephalitis Virus can also activate autophagy. In this case the autophagy temporarily spares the infected cell, allowing a longer period of reproduction for the virus, and the autophagy further protects the cell against other stresses such as those caused by reactive oxygen species. Several of the viral proteins have been shown to induce apoptosis or autophagy on their own, independent of the presence of other viral proteins. Given the versatility of these viruses to adapt to and manipulate the metabolism, and thus to control the survival of, the infected cells, we need to understand much better how the specific viral proteins affect the pathways to apoptosis and autophagy. Only in this manner will we be able to minimize the pathology that they cause.

  9. Cell death mechanisms vary with photodynamic therapy dose and photosensitizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    1995-03-01

    Mouse lymphoma L5178Y-R cells respond to photodynamic therapy (PDT) by undergoing rapid apoptosis, which is induced by PDT-activated signal transduction initiating in the damaged cellular membranes. To relate the level of PDT damage and photosensitizer to the mechanism of cell death, apoptosis has been detected by agarose gel electrophoresis of fragmented DNA and quantified by flow cytometry of cells after staining with Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide, a technique which can distinguish between live, apoptotic, and necrotic cells. When the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 or Pc 12 served as photosensitizer, lethal doses (as defined by clonogenic assay) of PDT induced apoptosis in essentially all cells, whereas supralethal doses prevented the characteristic degradation of DNA into oligonucleosomal fragments. In contrast with aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPc) cells died by apoptosis after all doses studied. It appears that high PDT doses with Pc 4 or Pc 12 damage enzymes needed to carry out the program of apoptosis; the absence of this effect with AlPc suggests either a different intracellular location or different photocytotoxic mechanism for the two photosensitizers.

  10. Primary observations of the existence of Fas-like cytoplasmic death factor in plant cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The main activity of Fas is to trigger cytoplasm death program in animal cells. In G2 pea, vacuole plays a pivotal role in inducing cell death in the cytoplasm of longday (LD) grown apical meristem cells. Expression patterns of the Fas in G2 pea cells revealed that the Fas is mainly localized in the vacuole of cells undergoing programmed cell death (PCD). The Fas expression is corresponding to the initiation of menadione-induced PCD in tobacco protoplasts.The results suggest the existence of the Fas-like mediated cytoplasmic death pathway in plant cells.``

  11. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Tony J; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei; Andrews, David W

    2015-11-01

    A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose-response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds.

  12. PDK2-mediated alternative splicing switches Bnip3 from cell death to cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Hongying; Dhingra, Rimpy; Lin, Junjun; Hai, Yan; Aviv, Yaron; Margulets, Victoria; Hamedani, Mohammad; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Leygue, Etienne; Klonisch, Thomas; Davie, James R; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A

    2015-09-28

    Herein we describe a novel survival pathway that operationally links alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the hypoxia-inducible death protein Bcl-2 19-kD interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) to the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells. While a full-length Bnip3 protein (Bnip3FL) encoded by exons 1-6 was expressed as an isoform in normal cells and promoted cell death, a truncated spliced variant of Bnip3 mRNA deleted for exon 3 (Bnip3Δex3) was preferentially expressed in several human adenocarcinomas and promoted survival. Reciprocal inhibition of the Bnip3Δex3/Bnip3FL isoform ratio by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 2 (PDK2) in Panc-1 cells rapidly induced mitochondrial perturbations and cell death. The findings of the present study reveal a novel survival pathway that functionally couples the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells to hypoxia resistance via a PDK2-dependent mechanism that switches Bnip3 from cell death to survival. Discovery of the survival Bnip3Δex3 isoform may fundamentally explain how certain cells resist Bnip3 and avert death during hypoxia.

  13. PDK2-mediated alternative splicing switches Bnip3 from cell death to cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Hongying; Dhingra, Rimpy; Lin, Junjun; Hai, Yan; Aviv, Yaron; Margulets, Victoria; Hamedani, Mohammad; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Leygue, Etienne; Klonisch, Thomas; Davie, James R; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A

    2015-09-28

    Herein we describe a novel survival pathway that operationally links alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the hypoxia-inducible death protein Bcl-2 19-kD interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) to the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells. While a full-length Bnip3 protein (Bnip3FL) encoded by exons 1-6 was expressed as an isoform in normal cells and promoted cell death, a truncated spliced variant of Bnip3 mRNA deleted for exon 3 (Bnip3Δex3) was preferentially expressed in several human adenocarcinomas and promoted survival. Reciprocal inhibition of the Bnip3Δex3/Bnip3FL isoform ratio by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 2 (PDK2) in Panc-1 cells rapidly induced mitochondrial perturbations and cell death. The findings of the present study reveal a novel survival pathway that functionally couples the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells to hypoxia resistance via a PDK2-dependent mechanism that switches Bnip3 from cell death to survival. Discovery of the survival Bnip3Δex3 isoform may fundamentally explain how certain cells resist Bnip3 and avert death during hypoxia. PMID:26416963

  14. The Molecular Ecophysiology of Programmed Cell Death in Marine Phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidle, Kay D.

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) share a diverse and ancient evolutionary history, during which time they have played key roles in regulating marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Because phytoplankton represent the basis of marine ecosystems, the manner in which they die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining upper-ocean biogeochemistry. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of nutrient stressors and are employed by parasitic viruses, play an integral role in determining the cell fate of diverse photoautotrophs in the modern ocean. Indeed, these multifaceted death pathways continue to shape the success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages at sea. Research over the past two decades has employed physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques to provide a novel, comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of the factors controlling this key process. Here, I discuss the current understanding of the genetics, activation, and regulation of PCD pathways in marine model systems; how PCD evolved in unicellular photoautotrophs; how it mechanistically interfaces with viral infection pathways; how stress signals are sensed and transduced into cellular responses; and how novel molecular and biochemical tools are revealing the impact of PCD genes on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages.

  15. Bcl-2 Knockdown Accelerates T Cell Receptor-Triggered Activation-Induced Cell Death in Jurkat T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yun-Jung; Won, Tae Joon; Hyung, Kyeong Eun; Lee, Mi Ji; Moon, Young-hye; Lee, Ik Hee; Go, Byung Sung; Hwang, Kwang Woo

    2014-01-01

    Cell death and survival are tightly controlled through the highly coordinated activation/inhibition of diverse signal transduction pathways to insure normal development and physiology. Imbalance between cell death and survival often leads to autoimmune diseases and cancer. Death receptors sense extracellular signals to induce caspase-mediated apoptosis. Acting upstream of CED-3 family proteases, such as caspase-3, Bcl-2 prevents apoptosis. Using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), we suppressed Bcl-...

  16. Smac mimetic and oleanolic acid synergize to induce cell death in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Juliane; Abhari, Behnaz Ahangarian; Fulda, Simone

    2015-08-28

    Chemotherapy resistance of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still a major unsolved problem highlighting the need to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Here, we identify a novel synergistic induction of cell death by the combination of the Smac mimetic BV6, which antagonizes Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins, and the triterpenoid oleanolic acid (OA) in human HCC cells. Importantly, BV6 and OA also cooperate to suppress long-term clonogenic survival as well as tumor growth in a preclinical in vivo model of HCC underscoring the clinical relevance of our findings. In contrast, BV6/OA cotreatment does not exert cytotoxic effects against normal primary hepatocytes, pointing to some tumor selectivity. Mechanistic studies show that BV6/OA cotreatment leads to DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 cleavage, while supply of the pan-caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD.fmk) revealed a cell type-dependent requirement of caspases for BV6/OA-induced cell death. The receptor interacting protein (RIP)1 kinase Inhibitor Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) or genetic knockdown of RIP1 fails to rescue BV6/OA-mediated cell death, indicating that BV6/OA cotreatment does not primarily engage necroptotic cell death. Notably, the addition of several reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers significantly decreases BV6/OA-triggered cell death, indicating that ROS production contributes to BV6/OA-induced cell death. In conclusion, cotreatment of Smac mimetic and OA represents a novel approach for the induction of cell death in HCC and implicates further studies.

  17. Downregulation of Pink1 influences mitochondrial fusion–fission machinery and sensitizes to neurotoxins in dopaminergic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Charry, Liliana; Cookson, Mark R.; Niño, Andrea; Arboleda, Humberto; Arboleda, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that mitochondria are organelles that, far from being static, are subject to a constant process of change. This process, which has been called mitochondrial dynamics, includes processes of both fusion and fission. Loss of Pink1 (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1) function is associated with early onset recessive Parkinson’s disease and it has been proposed that mitochondrial dynamics might be affected by loss of the mitochondrial kinase. Here, we report the effects of silencing Pink1 on mitochondrial fusion and fission events in dopaminergic neuron cell lines. Cells lacking Pink1 were more sensitive to cell death induced by C2-Ceramide, which inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis. In the same cell lines, mitochondrial morphology was fragmented and this was enhanced by application of forskolin, which stimulates the cAMP pathway that phosphorylates Drp1 and thereby inactivates it. Cells lacking Pink1 had lower Drp1 and Mfn2 expression. Based on these data, we propose that Pink1 may exert a neuroprotective role in part by limiting mitochondrial fission. PMID:24792327

  18. Programmed cell death of Ulmus pumila L. seeds during aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yulan ZHANG; Ming ZHANG; Fang LI; Xiaofeng WANG

    2008-01-01

    The programmed cell death (PCD) character-istics of Ulmus pumila L. seeds were investigated. The seeds were treated at a high temperature of 37℃ and 100% relative humidity for six days. DAPI (4'6-diami-dino-2-phenylindole) staining revealed that the aging treatment induced condensation and margination of chro-matin, as well as the formation of apoptotic bodies. DNA electrophoresis results of U. pumila seeds on an agarose gel showed a characteristic "ladder" pattern. Levels of electrolyte leakage of seed cells showed that membranes retained their integral form during almost the entire aging time. There was an immediate increase in the production rate of superoxide anion (O2-) and in the amount of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which remained at a μmol level. All of these common characteristics indicate that seed aging can be classified as PCD.

  19. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Epigenetically Manipulate Host Cell Death Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengguo; Wang, Ming; Eisel, Florian; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Chakraborty, Trinad; Meinhardt, Andreas; Bhushan, Sudhanshu

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) pathovars belong to the most frequent infections in human. It is well established that UPEC can subvert innate immune responses, but the role of UPEC in interfering with host cell death pathways is not known. Here, we show that UPEC abrogates activation of the host cell prosurvival protein kinase B signaling pathway, which results in the activation of mammalian forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors. Although FOXOs were localized in the nucleus and showed increased DNA-binding activity, no change in the expression levels of FOXO target genes were observed. UPEC can suppress BIM expression induced by LY249002, which results in attenuation of caspase 3 activation and blockage of apoptosis. Mechanistically, BIM expression appears to be epigenetically silenced by a decrease in histone 4 acetylation at the BIM promoter site. Taken together, these results suggest that UPEC can epigenetically silence BIM expression, a molecular switch that prevents apoptosis.

  20. GSK-3: A Bifunctional Role in Cell Death Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M. Jacobs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β was originally named for its ability to phosphorylate glycogen synthase and regulate glucose metabolism, this multifunctional kinase is presently known to be a key regulator of a wide range of cellular functions. GSK-3β is involved in modulating a variety of functions including cell signaling, growth metabolism, and various transcription factors that determine the survival or death of the organism. Secondary to the role of GSK-3β in various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, inflammation, diabetes, and cancer, small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3β are gaining significant attention. This paper is primarily focused on addressing the bifunctional or conflicting roles of GSK-3β in both the promotion of cell survival and of apoptosis. GSK-3β has emerged as an important molecular target for drug development.

  1. GSK-3β: A Bifunctional Role in Cell Death Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Keith M.; Bhave, Sandeep R.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Thotala, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    Although glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) was originally named for its ability to phosphorylate glycogen synthase and regulate glucose metabolism, this multifunctional kinase is presently known to be a key regulator of a wide range of cellular functions. GSK-3β is involved in modulating a variety of functions including cell signaling, growth metabolism, and various transcription factors that determine the survival or death of the organism. Secondary to the role of GSK-3β in various diseases including Alzheimer's disease, inflammation, diabetes, and cancer, small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3β are gaining significant attention. This paper is primarily focused on addressing the bifunctional or conflicting roles of GSK-3β in both the promotion of cell survival and of apoptosis. GSK-3β has emerged as an important molecular target for drug development. PMID:22675363

  2. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto;

    This project focuses on applying microfluidic tissue culture for electrochemical or optical measurements during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic tissue culture enables in vitro experiments......, we are optimising an intracellular whole-cell redox activity assay3 that detects changes in redox activity in barley aleurone layer during PCD. The assay uses a double mediator-system to electrochemically measure redox activity via changes in the NADP:NADPH ratio. Initial experiments assay show...... that the redox activity changes depending on phytohormone activation or inactivation of aleurone layer metabolism and subsequent PCD. This is similar to H2O2 concentration changes observed recently by Ishibashi et al4. We have also successfully detected PCD induced by phytohormones in barley aleurone layer using...

  3. Clozapine Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Yin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previous studies have shown that patients with schizophrenia have a lower incidence of cancer than the general population, and several antipsychotics have been demonstrated to have cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying these results remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of clozapine, which is often used to treat patients with refractory schizophrenia, on the growth of non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines and to examine whether autophagy contributes to its effects. Methods: A549 and H1299 cells were treated with clozapine, and cell cytotoxicity, cell cycle and autophagy were then assessed. The autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and siRNA-targeted Atg7 were used to determine the role of autophagy in the effect of clozapine. Results: Clozapine inhibited A549 and H1299 proliferation and increased p21 and p27 expression levels, leading to cell cycle arrest. Clozapine also induced a high level of autophagy, but not apoptosis, in both cell lines, and the growth inhibitory effect of clozapine was blunted by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or with an siRNA targeting atg7. Conclusions: Clozapine inhibits cell proliferation by inducing autophagic cell death in two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines. These findings may provide insights into the relationship between clozapine use and the lower incidence of lung cancer among patients with schizophrenia.

  4. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilibeth Lanceta

    Full Text Available Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by "loose" (probably intralysosomal iron because cytotoxic effects of heme are lessened by pre-incubation of HO-1 deficient cells with desferrioxamine (which localizes preferentially in the lysosomal compartment. Desferrioxamine also decreases lysosomal rupture promoted by intracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide. Supporting the importance of endogenous oxidant production, both chemical and siRNA inhibition of catalase activity predisposes HO-1 deficient cells to heme-mediated killing. Importantly, it appears that HO-1 deficiency somehow blocks the induction of ferritin; control cells exposed to heme show ~10-fold increases in ferritin heavy chain expression whereas in heme-exposed HO-1 deficient cells ferritin expression is unchanged. Finally, overexpression of ferritin H chain in HO-1 deficient cells completely prevents heme-induced cytotoxicity. Although two other products of HO-1 activity--CO and bilirubin--have been invoked to explain HO-1-mediated cytoprotection, we conclude that, at least in this experimental system, HO-1 activity triggers the induction of ferritin and the latter is actually responsible for the cytoprotective effects of HO-1 activity.

  5. Tumor-derived death receptor 6 modulates dendritic cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosa, David C; Ryan, Paul J; Okragly, Angela; Witcher, Derrick R; Benschop, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    Studies in murine models of cancer as well as in cancer patients have demonstrated that the immune response to cancer is often compromised. This paradigm is viewed as one of the major mechanisms of tumor escape. Many therapies focus on employing the professional antigen presenting dendritic cells (DC) as a strategy to overcome immune inhibition in cancer patients. Death receptor 6 (DR6) is an orphan member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF21). It is overexpressed on many tumor cells and DR6(-/-) mice display altered immunity. We investigated whether DR6 plays a role in tumorigenesis by negatively affecting the generation of anti-tumor activity. We show that DR6 is uniquely cleaved from the cell surface of tumor cell lines by the membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14, which is often overexpressed on tumor cells and is associated with malignancy. We also demonstrate that >50% of monocytes differentiating into DC die when the extracellular domain of DR6 is present. In addition, DR6 affects the cell surface phenotype of the resulting immature DC and changes their cytokine production upon stimulation with LPS/IFN-gamma. The effects of DR6 are mostly amended when these immature DC are matured with IL-1beta/TNF-alpha, as measured by cell surface phenotype and their ability to present antigen. These results implicate MMP-14 and DR6 as a mechanism tumor cells can employ to actively escape detection by the immune system by affecting the generation of antigen presenting cells.

  6. Cell Death Atlas of the Postnatal Mouse Ventral Forebrain and Hypothalamus: Effects of Age and Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Todd H.; Krug, Stefanie; Carr, Audrey V.; Murray, Elaine K.; Fitzpatrick, Emmett; Bengston, Lynn; McCutcheon, Jill; De Vries, Geert J.; Forger, Nancy G.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring cell death is essential to the development of the mammalian nervous system. Although the importance of developmental cell death has been appreciated for decades, there is no comprehensive account of cell death across brain areas in the mouse. Moreover, several regional sex differences in cell death have been described for the ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, but it is not known how widespread the phenomenon is. We used immunohistochemical detection of activated caspase-3 to identify dying cells in the brains of male and female mice from postnatal day (P) 1 to P11. Cell death density, total number of dying cells, and regional volume were determined in 16 regions of the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain (the anterior hypothalamus, arcuate nucleus, anteroventral periventricular nucleus, medial preoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus; the basolateral, central, and medial amygdala; the lateral and principal nuclei of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis; the caudate-putamen; the globus pallidus; the lateral septum; and the islands of Calleja). All regions showed a significant effect of age on cell death. The timing of peak cell death varied between P1 to P7, and the average rate of cell death varied tenfold among regions. Several significant sex differences in cell death and/or regional volume were detected. These data address large gaps in the developmental literature and suggest interesting region-specific differences in the prevalence and timing of cell death in the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain. PMID:23296992

  7. Prune melanoidins protect against oxidative stress and endothelial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadino, Anna Maria; Cossu, Annalisa; Piga, Antonio; Madrau, Monica Assunta; Del Caro, Alessandra; Colombino, Maria; Paglietti, Bianca; Rubino, Salvatore; Iaccarino, Ciro; Crosio, Claudia; Sanna, Bastiano; Pintus, Gianfranco

    2011-06-01

    The health-promoting effects of fruit and vegetable consumption are thought to be due to phytochemicals contained in fresh plant material. Whether processed plant foods provide the same benefits as unprocessed ones is an open question. Melanoidins from heat-processed plums (prunes) were isolated and their presence confirmed by hydroxymethylfurfural content and browning index. Oxidative-induced endothelial cell (EC) damage is the trigger for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD); therefore the potential protective effect of prune melanoidins on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cell damage was investigated on human endothelial ECV304 cells. Cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox status was assessed by using the novel, redox-sensitive, ratiometric fluorescent protein sensor (roGFP), while mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was investigated with the fluorescent dye, JC-1. Treatment of ECV304 cells with hydrogen peroxide dose-dependently induced both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic oxidation, in addition to MMP dissipation, with ensuing cell death. Pretreatment of ECV304 with prune melanoidins, significantly counteracted and ultimately abolished hydrogen peroxide elicited phenomena, clearly indicating that these polymers protect human EC against oxidative stress.

  8. Regulatory mechanism of radiation-induced cancer cell death by the change of cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Soo Jin; Jeong, Min Ho; Jang, Ji Yeon [College of Medicine, Donga Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    In our previous study, we have shown the main cell death pattern induced by irradiation or protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors in K562 human myelogenous leukemic cell line. Death of the cells treated with irradiation alone was characterized by mitotic catastrophe and typical radiation-induced apoptosis was accelerated by herbimycin A (HMA). Both types of cell death were inhibited by genistein. In this study, we investigated the effects of HMA and genistein on cell cycle regulation and its correlation with the alterations of radiation-induced cell death. K562 cells in exponential growth phase were used for this study. The cells were irradiated with 10 Gy using 6 MeV Linac (200-300 cGy/min). Immediately after irradiation, cells were treated with 250 nM of HMA or 25{mu}M of genistein. The distributions of cell cycle, the expressions of cell cycle-related protein, the activities of cyclin-dependent kinase, and the yield of senescence and differentiation were analyzed. X-irradiated cells were arrested in the G2 phase of the cell cycle but unlike the p53-positive cells, they were not able to sustain the cell cycle arrest. An accumulation of cells in G2 phase of first cell-cycle post-treatment and an increase of cyclin B1 were correlated with spontaneous, premature, chromosome condensation and mitotic catastrophe. HMA induced rapid G2 checkpoint abrogation and concomitant p53-independent G1 accumulation HMA-induced cell cycle modifications correlated with the increase of cdc2 kinase activity, the decrease of the expressions of cyclins E and A and of CDK2 kinase activity, and the enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis. Genistein maintained cells that were arrested in the G2-phase, decreased the expressions of cyclin B1 and cdc25C and cdc2 kinase activity, increased the expression of p16, and sustained senescence and megakaryocytic differentiation. The effects of HMA and genistein on the radiation-induced cell death of K562 cells were closely related to the cell

  9. Cyclosporin A inhibits programmed cell death and cytochrome c release induced by fusicoccin in sycamore cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contran, N; Cerana, R; Crosti, P; Malerba, M

    2007-01-01

    Programmed cell death plays a vital role in normal plant development, response to environmental stresses, and defense against pathogen attack. Different types of programmed cell death occur in plants and the involvement of mitochondria is still under investigation. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, the phytotoxin fusicoccin induces cell death that shows apoptotic features, including chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. In this work, we show that cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the permeability transition pore of animal mitochondria, inhibits the cell death, DNA fragmentation, and cytochrome c release induced by fusicoccin. In addition, we show that fusicoccin induces a change in the shape of mitochondria which is not prevented by cyclosporin A. These results suggest that the release of cytochrome c induced by fusicoccin occurs through a cyclosporin A-sensitive system that is similar to the permeability transition pore of animal mitochondria and they make it tempting to speculate that this release may be involved in the phytotoxin-induced programmed cell death of sycamore cells.

  10. Photodynamic therapy-induced programmed cell death in carcinoma cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Yan; Sikes, Robert A.; Thomsen, Sharon L.; Chung, L.; Jacques, Steven L.

    1993-06-01

    The mode of cell death following photodynamic therapy (PDT) was investigated from the perspective of programmed cell death (apoptosis). Human prostate carcinoma cells (PC3), human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H322a), and rat mammary carcinoma (MTF7) were treated by PDT following sensitization with dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE). The response of these carcinoma cell lines to PDT was variable. An examination of extracted cellular DNA by gel electrophoresis showed the characteristic DNA ladder pattern indicative of internucleosomal cleavage of DNA during apoptosis. MTF7 and PC3 responded to PDT by inducing apoptosis while H322a had no apoptotic response. The magnitude of the response and the PDT dosage required to induce the effect were different in PC3 and MTF7. MTF7 cells responded with rapid apoptosis at the dose of light and drug that yielded 50% cell death (LD50). In contrast, PC3 showed only marginal apoptosis at the LD50 but had a marked response at the LD85. Furthermore, the onset of apoptosis followed slower kinetics in PC3 (2 hr - 4 hr) than in MTF7 (cells were killed by PDT but failed to exhibit any apoptotic response. This study indicates that apoptosis may occur during PDT induced cell death, but this pathway is not universal for all cancer cell lines.

  11. Statins, Bcl-2 and Apoptosis: Cell Death or Cell Protection?

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, W. Gibson; Igbavboa, Urule; Muller, Walter E.; Gunter P. Eckert

    2013-01-01

    Statins have proven their effectiveness in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. This class of drugs has also attracted attention as a potential treatment for dissimilar diseases such as certain types of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. What appears to be a contradiction is that in the case of cancer, it has been suggested that statins increase apoptosis and alter levels of Bcl-2 family members (e.g., reduce Bcl-2 and increase Bax) whereas, studies mainly using non-cancerous cells r...

  12. Increasing RpoS expression causes cell death in Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxu Chen

    Full Text Available RpoS, one of the two alternative σ factors in Borrelia burgdorferi, is tightly controlled by multiple regulators and, in turn, determines expression of many critical virulence factors. Here we show that increasing RpoS expression causes cell death. The immediate effect of increasing RpoS expression was to promote bacterial division and as a consequence result in a rapid increase in cell number before causing bacterial death. No DNA fragmentation or degradation was observed during this induced cell death. Cryo-electron microscopy showed induced cells first formed blebs, which were eventually released from dying cells. Apparently blebbing initiated cell disintegration leading to cell death. These findings led us to hypothesize that increasing RpoS expression triggers intracellular programs and/or pathways that cause spirochete death. The potential biological significance of induced cell death may help B. burgdorferi regulate its population to maintain its life cycle in nature.

  13. A role for programmed cell death in the microbial loop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica V Orellana

    Full Text Available The microbial loop is the conventional model by which nutrients and minerals are recycled in aquatic eco-systems. Biochemical pathways in different organisms become metabolically inter-connected such that nutrients are utilized, processed, released and re-utilized by others. The result is that unrelated individuals end up impacting each others' fitness directly through their metabolic activities. This study focused on the impact of programmed cell death (PCD on a population's growth as well as its role in the exchange of carbon between two naturally co-occurring halophilic organisms. Flow cytometric, biochemical, ¹⁴C radioisotope tracing assays, and global transcriptomic analyses show that organic algal photosynthate released by Dunalliela salina cells undergoing PCD complements the nutritional needs of other non-PCD D. salina cells. This occurs in vitro in a carbon limited environment and enhances the growth of the population. In addition, a co-occurring heterotroph Halobacterium salinarum re-mineralizes the carbon providing elemental nutrients for the mixoheterotrophic chlorophyte. The significance of this is uncertain and the archaeon can also subsist entirely on the lysate of apoptotic algae. PCD is now well established in unicellular organisms; however its ecological relevance has been difficult to decipher. In this study we found that PCD in D. salina causes the release of organic nutrients such as glycerol, which can be used by others in the population as well as a co-occurring halophilic archaeon. H. salinarum also re-mineralizes the dissolved material promoting algal growth. PCD in D. salina was the mechanism for the flow of dissolved photosynthate between unrelated organisms. Ironically, programmed death plays a central role in an organism's own population growth and in the exchange of nutrients in the microbial loop.

  14. A novel cell death gene acts to repair patterning defects in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kentaro M; Takahashi, Aya; Fuse, Naoyuki; Takano-Shimizu-Kouno, Toshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    Cell death is a mechanism utilized by organisms to eliminate excess cells during development. Here, we describe a novel regulator of caspase-independent cell death, Mabiki (Mabi), that is involved in the repair of the head patterning defects caused by extra copies of bicoid in Drosophila melanogaster. Mabiki functions together with caspase-dependent cell death mechanisms to provide robustness during development. PMID:24671768

  15. The calcimimetic R-568 induces apoptotic cell death in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Guangming

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased serum level of parathyroid hormone (PTH was found in metastatic prostate cancers. Calcimimetic R-568 was reported to reduce PTH expression, to suppress cell proliferation and to induce apoptosis in parathyroid cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of R-568 on cellular survival of prostate cancer cells. Methods Prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 were used in this study. Cellular survival was determined with MTT, trypan blue exclusion and fluorescent Live/Death assays. Western blot assay was utilized to assess apoptotic events induced by R-568 treatment. JC-1 staining was used to evaluate mitochondrial membrane potential. Results In cultured prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells, R-568 treatment significantly reduced cellular survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. R-568-induced cell death was an apoptotic event, as evidenced by caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage, as well as JC-1 color change in mitochondria. Knocking down calcium sensing receptor (CaSR significantly reduced R-568-induced cytotoxicity. Enforced expression of Bcl-xL gene abolished R-568-induced cell death, while loss of Bcl-xL expression led to increased cell death in R-568-treated LNCaP cells,. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrated that calcimimetic R-568 triggers an intrinsic mitochondria-related apoptotic pathway, which is dependent on the CaSR and is modulated by Bcl-xL anti-apoptotic pathway.

  16. Caspase-3-mediated degradation of condensin Cap-H regulates mitotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, S-K; Wong, C-H; Lee, Y-P; Li, H-Y

    2011-06-01

    Mitotic death is a major form of cell death in cancer cells that have been treated with chemotherapeutic drugs. However, the mechanisms underlying this form of cell death is poorly understood. Here, we report that the loss of chromosome integrity is an important determinant of mitotic death. During prolonged mitotic arrest, caspase-3 is activated and it cleaves Cap-H, a subunit of condensin I. The depletion of Cap-H results in the loss of condensin I complex at the chromosomes, thus affecting the integrity of the chromosomes. Consequently, DNA fragmentation by caspase-activated DNase is facilitated, thus driving the cell towards mitotic death. By expressing a caspase-resistant form of Cap-H, mitotic death is abrogated and the cells are able to reenter interphase after a long mitotic delay. Taken together, we provide new insights into the molecular events that occur during mitotic death.

  17. ESCRT III repairs nuclear envelope ruptures during cell migration to limit DNA damage and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, M; Gentili, M; de Belly, H; Thiam, H R; Vargas, P; Jimenez, A J; Lautenschlaeger, F; Voituriez, Raphaël; Lennon-Duménil, A M; Manel, N; Piel, M

    2016-04-15

    In eukaryotic cells, the nuclear envelope separates the genomic DNA from the cytoplasmic space and regulates protein trafficking between the two compartments. This barrier is only transiently dissolved during mitosis. Here, we found that it also opened at high frequency in migrating mammalian cells during interphase, which allowed nuclear proteins to leak out and cytoplasmic proteins to leak in. This transient opening was caused by nuclear deformation and was rapidly repaired in an ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport)-dependent manner. DNA double-strand breaks coincided with nuclear envelope opening events. As a consequence, survival of cells migrating through confining environments depended on efficient nuclear envelope and DNA repair machineries. Nuclear envelope opening in migrating leukocytes could have potentially important consequences for normal and pathological immune responses. PMID:27013426

  18. Cell-Centric View of Apoptosis and Apoptotic Cell Death-Inducing Antitumoral Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dolores Boyano

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death and especially apoptotic cell death, occurs under physiological conditions and is also desirable under pathological circumstances. However, the more we learn about cellular signaling cascades, the less plausible it becomes to find restricted and well-limited signaling pathways. In this context, an extensive description of pathway-connections is necessary in order to point out the main regulatory molecules as well as to select the most appropriate therapeutic targets. On the other hand, irregularities in programmed cell death pathways often lead to tumor development and cancer-related mortality is projected to continue increasing despite the effort to develop more active and selective antitumoral compounds. In fact, tumor cell plasticity represents a major challenge in chemotherapy and improvement on anticancer therapies seems to rely on appropriate drug combinations. An overview of the current status regarding apoptotic pathways as well as available chemotherapeutic compounds provides a new perspective of possible future anticancer strategies.

  19. Calcium signaling as a mediator of cell energy demand and a trigger to cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Gauri; Sharpe, Jenny A; Sundier, Stephanie Y; Duchen, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Calcium signaling is pivotal to a host of physiological pathways. A rise in calcium concentration almost invariably signals an increased cellular energy demand. Consistent with this, calcium signals mediate a number of pathways that together serve to balance energy supply and demand. In pathological states, calcium signals can precipitate mitochondrial injury and cell death, especially when coupled to energy depletion and oxidative or nitrosative stress. This review explores the mechanisms that couple cell signaling pathways to metabolic regulation or to cell death. The significance of these pathways is exemplified by pathological case studies, such as those showing loss of mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 in patients and ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  20. PDK2-mediated alternative splicing switches Bnip3 from cell death to cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    Gang, Hongying; Dhingra, Rimpy; Lin, Junjun; Hai, Yan; Aviv, Yaron; Margulets, Victoria; Hamedani, Mohammad; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Leygue, Etienne; Klonisch, Thomas; Davie, James R.; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A.

    2015-01-01

    Herein we describe a novel survival pathway that operationally links alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the hypoxia-inducible death protein Bcl-2 19-kD interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) to the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells. While a full-length Bnip3 protein (Bnip3FL) encoded by exons 1–6 was expressed as an isoform in normal cells and promoted cell death, a truncated spliced variant of Bnip3 mRNA deleted for exon 3 (Bnip3Δex3) was preferentially expressed in several human adenocarcino...

  1. Melatonina: modulador de morte celular Melatonin: cell death modulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília da Silva Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A apoptose ou morte programada é um fenômeno biológico essencial para o desenvolvimento e manutenção de uma população celular. Neste processo, as células senescentes ou indesejáveis são eliminadas após ativação de um programa de morte celular, que envolve a participação de moléculas pró-apoptóticas (Fas, FasL, Bax, Caspases 2, 3, 6, 7, 8 e 9. A ativação destas moléculas provoca típicas alterações morfológicas como a retração celular, perda de aderência à matriz extracelular e às células vizinhas, condensação da cromatina, fragmentação do DNA e formação de corpos apoptóticos. Moléculas antiapoptóticas (Bcl2, FLIP bloqueiam o surgimento e a evolução destas alterações celulares e evitam a morte celular. É o equilíbrio entre moléculas pró e antiapoptóticas que assegura a homeostase tecidual. O descontrole da apoptose pode contribuir para o aparecimento de diversas doenças neoplásicas, autoimunes e neurodegenerativas. Diversos agentes indutores e inibidores de apoptose são reconhecidos como armas potenciais no combate a doenças relacionadas a distúrbios de proliferação e morte celular, dentre eles, destacam-se os hormônios. A melatonina tem sido relatada com importante ação antiápoptótica em diversos tecidos, modulando a expressão de agentes, reduzindo a entrada de cálcio na célula, bem como atenuando a produção de espécies reativas de oxigênio e de proteínas pró-apoptóticas, tal como, diminuição da Bax. O conhecimento de novos agentes capazes de atuar nas vias da apoptose é de grande valia para o desenvolvimento de futuras terapias no tratamento de diversas doenças. Assim, o objetivo dessa revisão é elucidar os principais aspectos da morte celular pela apoptose e o papel da melatonina neste processo.Apoptosis or programmed death is a biological phenomenon, which is essential for the development and maintenance of a cell population. In this process, senescent or damaged

  2. Protein kinase D regulates cell death pathways in experimental pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingzhen eYuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and acinar cell necrosis are two major pathological responses of acute pancreatitis, a serious disorder with no current therapies directed to its molecular pathogenesis. Serine/threonine protein kinase D family, which includes PKD/PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3, has been increasingly implicated in the regulation of multiple physiological and pathophysiological effects. We recently reported that PKD/PKD1, the predominant PKD isoform expressed in rat pancreatic acinar cells, mediates early events of pancreatitis including NF-kappaB activation and inappropriate intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In current studies, we investigated the role and mechanisms of PKD/PKD1 in the regulation of necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells by using two novel small molecule PKD inhibitors CID755673 and CRT0066101 and molecular approaches in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of acute pancreatitis. Our results demonstrated that both CID755673 and CRT0066101 are PKD-specific inhibitors and that PKD/PKD1 inhibition by either the chemical inhibitors or specific PKD/PKD1 siRNAs attenuated necrosis while promoting apoptosis induced by pathological doses of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK in pancreatic acinar cells. Conversely, upregulation of PKD expression in pancreatic acinar cells increased necrosis and decreased apoptosis. We further showed that PKD/PKD1 regulated several key cell death signals including inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs, caspases, receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1 to promote necrosis. PKD/PKD1 inhibition by CID755673 significantly ameliorated necrosis and severity of pancreatitis in an in vivo experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Thus, our studies indicate that PKD/PKD1 is a key mediator of necrosis in acute pancreatitis and that PKD/PKD1 may represent a potential therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis.

  3. Fine-mapping of an Arabidopsis cell death mutation locus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An Arabidopsis cell death mutation locus was mapped to chromosome 2 between IGS1 and mi421. The YAC clone ends, CIC9A3R, CIC11C7L, CIC2G5R and RFLP marker CDs3 within this interval, were used to probe TAMU BAC library and 31 BAC clones were obtained. A BAC contig encompassing the mutation locus, which consists of T6P5, T7M23, T12A21, T8L6 and T18A18, was identified by Southern hybridization with the BAC ends as probes. 11 CAPS and 12 STS markers were developed in this region. These results will facilitate map-based cloning of the genes and sequencing of the genomic DNA in this region.

  4. Fine-mapping of an Arabidopsis cell death mutation locus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟中林; 戴亚; 李家洋

    2000-01-01

    An Arabidopsis cell death mutation locus was mapped to chromosome 2 between lGS1 and mi421. The YAC clone ends, CIC9A3R, CIC11C7L, CIC2G5R and RFLP marker CDs3 within this interval, were used to probe TAMU BAC library and 31 BAC clones were obtained. A BAC contig encompassing the mutation locus, which consists of T6P5, T7M23, T12A21, T8L6 and T18A18, was identified by Southern hybridization with the BAC ends as probes. 11 CAPS and 12 STS markers were developed in this region. These results will facilitate map-based cloning of the genes and sequencing of the genomic DNA in this region.

  5. The Bacillus cereus spoIIS programmed cell death system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana eMelnicakova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death in bacteria is generally associated with two¬ component toxin antitoxin systems. The SpoIIS toxin-antitoxin system, consisting of a membrane bound SpoIISA toxin and a small, cytosolic antitoxin SpoIISB, was originally identified in Bacillus subtilis. In this work we describe the Bacillus cereus SpoIIS system which is a three-component system, harbouring an additional gene spoIISC. Its protein product serves as an antitoxin, and similarly as SpoIISB, is able to bind SpoIISA and abolish its toxic effect. Our results indicate that SpoIISC seems to be present not only in B. cereus but also in other Bacilli containing a SpoIIS toxin antitoxin system. In addition, we show that B. cereus SpoIISA can form higher oligomers and we discuss the possible role of this multimerization for the protein’s toxic function.

  6. Programmed cell death in developing human fetal CNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of programmed cell death (PCD) in developing central nervous system (CNS) of human fetuses ranging from 12 to 39 weeks of gestation were investigated using techniques of flow cytometry and terminal transferase-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL). The results showed that PCD did occur in every representative brain region of all fetuses examined in different stages. It was found that there were two peaks of PCD appearing at the 12th and 39th weeks respectively, which suggested that the first peak of apoptosis may be involved in the selective elimination of neurons overproduced during the early development and the second may play an important role in establishing the correct neuronal circuitry.

  7. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  8. BH3 Mimetics Reactivate Autophagic Cell Death in Anoxia-Resistant Malignant Glioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Hetschko

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we investigated the specific roles of Bcl-2 family members in anoxia tolerance of malignant glioma. Flow cytometry analysis of cell death in 17 glioma cell lines revealed drastic differences in their sensitivity to oxygen withdrawal (<0.1% O2. Cell death correlated with mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome C release, and translocation of green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged light chain 3 to autophagosomes but occurred in the absence of caspase activation or phosphatidylserine exposure. In both sensitive and tolerant glioma cell lines, anoxia caused a significant up-regulation of BH3-only genes previously implicated in mediating anoxic cell death in other cell types (BNIP3, NIX, PUMA, and Noxa. In contrast, we detected a strong correlation between anoxia resistance and high expression levels of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and Mcl-1 that function to neutralize the proapoptotic activity of BH3-only proteins. Importantly, inhibition of both Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL with the small-molecule BH3 mimetics HA14-1 and BH3I-2′ and by RNA interference reactivated anoxia-induced autophagic cell death in previously resistant glioma cells. Our data suggest that endogenous BH3-only protein induction may not be able to compensate for the high expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in anoxia-resistant astrocytomas. They also support the conjecture that BH3 mimetics may represent an exciting new approach for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  9. Furan fatty acids efficiently rescue brain cells from cell death induced by oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira, A.; Cox, R.C.; Egmond, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of rat brain C6 astroglioma cells with furan fatty acid F6 prior to exposure to hydrogen peroxide shows a strong protective effect of F6 against cell death resulting from oxidative stress. This protective effect is obtained only for F6 administered as a free fatty acid and with an intact f

  10. Gender Machineries Worldwide

    OpenAIRE

    McBride, Dorothy; Mazur, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The term gender machineries usually refers to formal government structures assigned to promote gender equality and/or improve the status and rights of women. Examining these structures in many countries around the world shows that in practice the machineries take a wide variety of forms, from formal ministries to temporary councils and committees. They may be established by formal statute, executive decree, or bureaucratic rules, or there may be machineries in political parties that have a wi...

  11. Inhibition of telomerase causes vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Toru; Nakatsu, Kanako; Shimamoto, Akira; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-08-26

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we investigated the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced cell death. ER stress-induced cell death was ameliorated in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) over-expressing MCF7 cells (MCF7-TERT cell). Telomerase specific inhibitor, BIBR1532, reversed the inhibitory effect of TERT on ER stress-induced cell death in MCF7-TERT cells. These findings suggest that BIBR1532 may specifically inhibit telomerase activity, thereby inducing cell death in ER stress-exposed cells. TERT was expressed in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. To analyze the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced neuronal cell death, we treated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with BIBR1532 and analyzed ER stress-induced cell death. We found that BIBR1532 significantly enhanced the ER stress-induced neuronal cell death. These findings suggest that inhibition of telomerase activity may enhance vulnerability to neuronal cell death caused by ER stress. PMID:27443785

  12. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji [Nippi Research Institute of Biomatrix, Toride, Ibaraki 302-0017 (Japan); Tashiro, Shin-ichi [Institute for Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Kyoto 603-8072 (Japan); Onodera, Satoshi [Department of Clinical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo 194-8543 (Japan); Ikejima, Takashi, E-mail: ikejimat@vip.sina.com [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  13. Catching up with solid tumor oncology: what is the evidence for a prognostic role of programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 expression in B-cell lymphomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, Fabienne; Sharp, Thomas G.; Gribben, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies targeting the programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 pathway have shown significant responses and good tolerability in solid malignancies. Although preclinical studies suggest that inhibiting programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 interactions might also be highly effective in hematological malignancies, remarkably few clinical trials have been published. Determining patients who will benefit most from programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1-directed immunotherapy and whether programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 are adequate prognostic markers becomes an increasingly important clinical question, especially as aberrant programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 expression are key mediators of impaired anti-tumor immune responses in a range of B-cell lymphomas. Herein, we systematically review the published literature on the expression and prognostic value of programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 in these patients and identify considerable differences in expression patterns, distribution and numbers of programmed cell death-ligand 1+/programmed cell death-1+cells, both between and within lymphoma subtypes, which is reflected in conflicting findings regarding the prognostic value of programmed cell death-ligand 1+/programmed cell death-1+ cells. This can be partly explained by differences in methodologies (techniques, protocols, cutoff values) and definitions of positivity. Moreover, lymphomagenesis, disease progression, and prognosis appear to be determined not only by the presence, numbers and distribution of specific subtypes of T cells, but also by other cells and additional immune checkpoints. Collectively, our findings indicate that programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 interactions play an essential role in B-cell lymphoma biology and are of clinical importance, but that the overall outcome is determined by additional components

  14. Temporal rhythm of petal programmed cell death in Ipomoea purpurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, M-Y; Ni, X-L; Wang, H-B; Liu, W-Z

    2016-09-01

    Flowers are the main sexual reproductive organs in plants. The shapes, colours and scents of corolla of plant flowers are involved in attracting insect pollinators and increasing reproductive success. The process of corolla senescence was investigated in Ipomoea purpurea (Convolvulaceae) in this study. In the research methods of plant anatomy, cytology, cell chemistry and molecular biology were used. The results showed that at the flowering stage cells already began to show distortion, chromatin condensation, mitochondrial membrane degradation and tonoplast dissolution and rupture. At this stage genomic DNA underwent massive but gradual random degradation. However, judging from the shape and structure, aging characteristics did not appear until the early flower senescence stage. The senescence process was slow, and it was completed at the late stage of flower senescence with a withering corolla. We may safely arrive at the conclusion that corolla senescence of I. purpurea was mediated by programmed cell death (PCD) that occurred at the flowering stage. The corolla senescence exhibited an obvious temporal rhythm, which demonstrated a high degree of coordination with pollination and fertilization. PMID:27259176

  15. Alterations in the antigen processing-presenting machinery of transformed plasma cells are associated with reduced recognition by CD8+ T cells and characterize the progression of MGUS to multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Racanelli, Vito; Leone, Patrizia; Frassanito, Maria Antonia; Brunetti, Claudia; Perosa, Federico; Ferrone, Soldano; Dammacco, Franco

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that progression of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) to multiple myeloma (MM) reflects the escape of transformed plasma cells from T-cell recognition because of impaired antigen processing-presenting machinery (APM). We studied plasma cells and CD8+ T cells from bone marrow of 20 MGUS patients, 20 MM patients, and 10 control patients. Immunofluorescence and flow cytometry revealed significantly different patterns of APM component expression in plasma c...

  16. alpha-Toxin is a mediator of Staphylococcus aureus-induced cell death and activates caspases via the intrinsic death pathway independently of death receptor signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bantel, H; Sinha, B; Domschke, W; Peters, G; Schulze-Osthoff, K; Jänicke, R U

    2001-01-01

    Infections with Staphylococcus aureus, a common inducer of septic and toxic shock, often result in tissue damage and death of various cell types. Although S. aureus was suggested to induce apoptosis, the underlying signal transduction pathways remained elusive. We show that caspase activation and DN

  17. Contact-independent cell death of human microglial cells due to pathogenic Naegleria fowleri trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Daesik; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2008-12-01

    Free-living Naegleria fowleri leads to a fatal infection known as primary amebic meningoencephalitis in humans. Previously, the target cell death could be induced by phagocytic activity of N. fowleri as a contact-dependent mechanism. However, in this study we investigated the target cell death under a non-contact system using a tissue-culture insert. The human microglial cells, U87MG cells, co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites for 30 min in a non-contact system showed morphological changes such as the cell membrane destruction and a reduction in the number. By fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis, U87MG cells co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites in a non-contact system showed a significant increase of apoptotic cells (16%) in comparison with that of the control or N. fowleri lysate. When U87MG cells were co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites in a non-contact system for 30 min, 2 hr, and 4 hr, the cytotoxicity of amebae against target cells was 40.5, 44.2, and 45.6%, respectively. By contrast, the cytotoxicity of non-pathogenic N. gruberi trophozoites was 10.2, 12.4, and 13.2%, respectively. These results suggest that the molecules released from N. fowleri in a contact-independent manner as well as phagocytosis in a contact-dependent manner may induce the host cell death.

  18. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai A

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke.

  19. Induction of cell death by graphene in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia ecotype) T87 cell suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, Parvin, E-mail: parvinchy@ees.hokudai.ac.jp; Fugetsu, Bunshi

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • This study was set up to explore potential influence of graphene on T87 cells. • Fragmented nuclei, membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction were observed. • ROS increased, ROS are key mediators in the cell death signaling pathway. • Translocation of graphene into cells and an endocytosis-like structure was observed. • Graphene entering into the cells by endocytosis. -- Abstract: The toxicity of graphene on suspensions of Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia ecotype) T87 cells was investigated by examining the morphology, mitochondrial dysfunction, reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), and translocation of graphene as the toxicological endpoints. The cells were grown in Jouanneau and Péaud-Lenoel (JPL) media and exposed to graphene at concentrations 0–80 mg/L. Morphological changes were observed by scanning electron microscope and the adverse effects such as fragmented nuclei, membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction was observed with fluorescence microscopy by staining with Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide and succinate dehydrogenase (mitochondrial bioenergetic enzyme). Analysis of intracellular ROS by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate demonstrated that graphene induced a 3.3-fold increase in ROS, suggesting that ROS are key mediators in the cell death signaling pathway. Transmission electron microscopy verified the translocation of graphene into cells and an endocytosis-like structure was observed which suggested graphene entering into the cells by endocytosis. In conclusion, our results show that graphene induced cell death in T87 cells through mitochondrial damage mediated by ROS.

  20. Neuroprotection by GH against excitotoxic-induced cell death in retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Ávila-Mendoza, José; Wu, Yilun; Arellanes-Licea, Elvira Del Carmen; Louie, Marcela; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos; Harvey, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Retinal growth hormone (GH) has been shown to promote cell survival in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during developmental waves of apoptosis during chicken embryonic development. The possibility that it might also against excitotoxicity-induced cell death was therefore examined in the present study, which utilized quail-derived QNR/D cells as an in vitro RGC model. QNR/D cell death was induced by glutamate in the presence of BSO (buthionine sulfoxamide) (an enhancer of oxidative stress), but this was significantly reduced (PGH (rcGH). Similarly, QNR/D cells that had been prior transfected with a GH plasmid to overexpress secreted and non-secreted GH. This treatment reduced the number of TUNEL-labeled cells and blocked their release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). In a further experiment with dissected neuroretinal explants from ED (embryonic day) 10 embryos, rcGH treatment of the explants also reduced (PGH-overexpressing QNR/D cells. As rcGH treatment and GH-overexpression cells also increased the content of IGF-1 and IGF-1 mRNA this neuroprotective action of GH is likely to be mediated, at least partially, through an IGF-1 mechanism. This possibility is supported by the fact that the siRNA knockdown of GH or IGF-1 significantly reduced QNR/D cell viability, as did the immunoneutralization of IGF-1. GH is therefore neuroprotective against excitotoxicity-induced RGC cell death by anti-apoptotic actions involving IGF-1 stimulation. PMID:27129619

  1. Global survey of cell death mechanisms reveals metabolic regulation of ferroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kenichi; Skouta, Rachid; Kaplan, Anna; Yang, Wan Seok; Hayano, Miki; Dixon, Scott J; Brown, Lewis M; Valenzuela, Carlos A; Wolpaw, Adam J; Stockwell, Brent R

    2016-07-01

    Apoptosis is one type of programmed cell death. Increasingly, non-apoptotic cell death is recognized as being genetically controlled, or 'regulated'. However, the full extent and diversity of alternative cell death mechanisms remain uncharted. Here we surveyed the landscape of pharmacologically accessible cell death mechanisms. In an examination of 56 caspase-independent lethal compounds, modulatory profiling showed that 10 compounds induced three different types of regulated non-apoptotic cell death. Optimization of one of those ten resulted in the discovery of FIN56, a specific inducer of ferroptosis. Ferroptosis has been found to occur when the lipid-repair enzyme GPX4 is inhibited. FIN56 promoted degradation of GPX4. FIN56 also bound to and activated squalene synthase, an enzyme involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis, independent of GPX4 degradation. These discoveries show that dysregulation of lipid metabolism is associated with ferroptosis. This systematic approach is a means to discover and characterize novel cell death phenotypes. PMID:27159577

  2. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dae-Hee, E-mail: leedneo@gmail.com [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Dong-Wook [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of VA (United States); Jung, Chang-Hwa [Division of Metabolism and Functionality Research, Korea Food Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong J. [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Park, Daeho, E-mail: daehopark@gist.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway.

  3. Cell death by pyroptosis drives CD4 T-cell depletion in HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doitsh, Gilad; Galloway, Nicole L. K.; Geng, Xin; Yang, Zhiyuan; Monroe, Kathryn M.; Zepeda, Orlando; Hunt, Peter W.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Sowinski, Stefanie; Muñoz-Arias, Isa; Greene, Warner C.

    2014-01-01

    The pathway causing CD4 T-cell death in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood although apoptosis has been proposed as a key mechanism. We now show that caspase-3-mediated apoptosis accounts for the death of only a small fraction of CD4 T cells corresponding to those that are both activated and productively infected. The remaining over 95% of quiescent lymphoid CD4 T cells die by caspase-1-mediated pyroptosis triggered by abortive viral infection. Pyroptosis corresponds to an intensely inflammatory form of programmed cell death in which cytoplasmic contents and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, are released. This death pathway thus links the two signature events in HIV infection--CD4 T-cell depletion and chronic inflammation--and creates a pathogenic vicious cycle in which dying CD4 T cells release inflammatory signals that attract more cells to die. This cycle can be broken by caspase 1 inhibitors shown to be safe in humans, raising the possibility of a new class of `anti-AIDS' therapeutics targeting the host rather than the virus.

  4. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway

  5. Cell death triggered by alpha-emitting {sup 213}Bi-immunoconjugates in HSC45-M2 gastric cancer cells is different from apoptotic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, Christof; Schroeck, Hedwig; Seidenschwang, Sabine; Beck, Roswitha; Schwaiger, Markus; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Schmid, Ernst [National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Biology, GSF, Neuherberg (Germany); Abend, Michael [German Armed Forces, Institute of Radiobiology, Munich (Germany); Becker, Karl-Friedrich [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, GSF, Neuherberg (Germany); National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Molecular Immunology, GSF, Munich (Germany); Apostolidis, Christos; Nikula, Tuomo K. [European Commission, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kremmer, Elisabeth [National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Molecular Immunology, GSF, Munich (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Radioimmunotherapy with {alpha}-particle-emitting nuclides, such as{sup 213}Bi, is a promising concept for the elimination of small tumour nodules or single disseminated tumour cells. The aim of this study was to investigate cellular damage and the mode of cell death triggered by {sup 213}Bi-immunoconjugates. Human gastric cancer cells (HSC45-M2) expressing d9-E-cadherin were incubated with different levels of activity of {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb targeting d9-E-cadherin and {sup 213}Bi-d8MAb, which does not bind to d9-E-cadherin. Micronucleated (M) cells, abnormal (A) cells and apoptotic (A) [(MAA)] cells were scored microscopically in the MAA assay following fluorescent staining of nuclei and cytoplasm. Chromosomal aberrations were analysed microscopically following Giemsa staining. The effect of z-VAD-fmk, known to inhibit apoptosis, on the prevention of cell death was investigated following treatment of HSC45-M2 cells with sorbitol as well as {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb. Activation of caspase 3 after incubation of HSC45-M2 cells with both sorbitol and {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb was analysed via Western blotting. Following incubation of HSC45-M2 human gastric cancer cells expressing d9-E-cadherin with {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb the number of cells killed increased proportional to the applied activity concentration. Microscopically visible effects of {alpha}-irradiation of HSC45-M2 cells were formation of micronuclei and severe chromosomal aberrations. Preferential induction of these lesions with specific {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb compared with unspecific {sup 213}Bi-d8MAb (not targeting d9-E-cadherin) was not observed if the number of floating, i.e. unbound {sup 213}Bi-immunoconjugates per cell exceeded 2 x 10{sup 4}, most likely due to intense crossfire. In contrast to sorbitol-induced cell death, cell death triggered by {sup 213}Bi-immunoconjugates was independent of caspase 3 activation and could not be inhibited by z-VAD-fmk, known to suppress the apoptotic pathway. {sup 213}Bi-immunoconjugates seem

  6. Cell death triggered by alpha-emitting 213Bi-immunoconjugates in HSC45-M2 gastric cancer cells is different from apoptotic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioimmunotherapy with α-particle-emitting nuclides, such as213Bi, is a promising concept for the elimination of small tumour nodules or single disseminated tumour cells. The aim of this study was to investigate cellular damage and the mode of cell death triggered by 213Bi-immunoconjugates. Human gastric cancer cells (HSC45-M2) expressing d9-E-cadherin were incubated with different levels of activity of 213Bi-d9MAb targeting d9-E-cadherin and 213Bi-d8MAb, which does not bind to d9-E-cadherin. Micronucleated (M) cells, abnormal (A) cells and apoptotic (A) [(MAA)] cells were scored microscopically in the MAA assay following fluorescent staining of nuclei and cytoplasm. Chromosomal aberrations were analysed microscopically following Giemsa staining. The effect of z-VAD-fmk, known to inhibit apoptosis, on the prevention of cell death was investigated following treatment of HSC45-M2 cells with sorbitol as well as 213Bi-d9MAb. Activation of caspase 3 after incubation of HSC45-M2 cells with both sorbitol and 213Bi-d9MAb was analysed via Western blotting. Following incubation of HSC45-M2 human gastric cancer cells expressing d9-E-cadherin with 213Bi-d9MAb the number of cells killed increased proportional to the applied activity concentration. Microscopically visible effects of α-irradiation of HSC45-M2 cells were formation of micronuclei and severe chromosomal aberrations. Preferential induction of these lesions with specific 213Bi-d9MAb compared with unspecific 213Bi-d8MAb (not targeting d9-E-cadherin) was not observed if the number of floating, i.e. unbound 213Bi-immunoconjugates per cell exceeded 2 x 104, most likely due to intense crossfire. In contrast to sorbitol-induced cell death, cell death triggered by 213Bi-immunoconjugates was independent of caspase 3 activation and could not be inhibited by z-VAD-fmk, known to suppress the apoptotic pathway. 213Bi-immunoconjugates seem to induce a mode of cell death different from apoptosis in HSC45-M2 cells. (orig.)

  7. Molecular modeling in structural nano-toxicology: Interactions of nano-particles with nano-machinery of cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yanamala, Naveena; Kagan, Valerian E.; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, nanotechnology has emerged as a key player in various disciplines of science and technology. Some of the most exciting applications are in the field of biomedicine – for theranostics (for combined diagnostic and therapeutic purposes) as well as for exploration of biological systems. A detailed understanding of the molecular details of interactions between nanoparticles and biological nano-machinery – macromolecules, membranes, and intracellular organelles - is cruci...

  8. Genetic Variation in Cell Death Genes and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Johanna M. Schuetz; Denise Daley; Jinko Graham; Berry, Brian R.; Gallagher, Richard P.; Connors, Joseph M; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Spinelli, John J.; Angela R Brooks-Wilson

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-Hodgkin lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of solid tumours that constitute the 5(th) highest cause of cancer mortality in the United States and Canada. Poor control of cell death in lymphocytes can lead to autoimmune disease or cancer, making genes involved in programmed cell death of lymphocytes logical candidate genes for lymphoma susceptibility. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We tested for genetic association with NHL and NHL subtypes, of SNPs in lymphocyte cell death genes using...

  9. Cell Death-Associated Molecular-Pattern Molecules: Inflammatory Signaling and Control

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz Sangiuliano; Nancy Marcela Pérez; Moreira, Dayson F; Belizário, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis, necroptosis, and pyroptosis are different cellular death programs characterized in organs and tissues as consequence of microbes infection, cell stress, injury, and chemotherapeutics exposure. Dying and death cells release a variety of self-proteins and bioactive chemicals originated from cytosol, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. These endogenous factors are named cell death-associated molecular-pattern (CDAMP), damage-associated molecular-pattern (DAMP) molecules,...

  10. Capsaicin-induced cell death in a human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ching Lo; Yuan-Chen Yang; I-Chieh Wu; Fu-Chen Kuo; Chi-Ming Liu; Hao-Wei Wang; Chao-Hung Kuo; Jeng-Yi Wu; Deng-Chyang Wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Capsaicin, a pungent ingredient found in red pepper,has long been used in spices, food additives, and drugs.Cell death induced by the binding of capsaicin was examined in a human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS cells).METHODS: By using XTT-based cytotoxicityassay, flow cytometry using the TUNEL method, and quantitation of DNA fragmentation, both cell death and DNA fragmentation were detected in AGS cells treated with capsaicin. By using Western blotting methods, capsaicin reduced the expression of Bcl-2, the antiapoptotic protein, in AGS cells in a concentration-dependent manner.RESULTS: After incubation of AGS cells with capsaicin for 24 h, cell viability decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. After incubation of AGS cells with capsaicin for 24 h, apoptotic bodies also significantly increased, and were again correlated with the dose of capsaicin. When the concentration of capsaicin was 1 mmol/L, the amount of DNA fragments also increased. Similar results werealso in the lower traces.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that capsaicininduced cell death might be via a Bcl-2 sensitive apoptotic pathway. Therefore, capsaicin might induce protection from gastric cancer.

  11. Inhibition of apoptic cell death induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tabaci and mycotoxin fumonisin B1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Batchvorova, R.; Kapchina, V.; Popov, T.; Atanassov, A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of programmed cell death (PCD) inhibitors on lesion formation and biochemical events in transgenic (ttr line) and non-transgenic (Nevrokop 1164) tobacco infected with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci was tested. Programmed cell death in tomato cell culture was induced by Fumonisin B1 (FUM)

  12. Non-canonical kinase signaling by the death ligand TRAIL in cancer cells : discord in the death receptor family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azijli, K.; Weyhenmeyer, B.; Peters, G. J.; de Jong, S.; Kruyt, F. A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-based therapy is currently evaluated in clinical studies as a tumor cell selective pro-apoptotic approach. However, besides activating canonical caspase-dependent apoptosis by binding to TRAIL-specific death receptors, the TRAIL ligand

  13. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.J.; Harren, F.J.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 23 days which indicates the existence

  14. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.; Harren, F.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2¿3 days which indicates the existence

  15. New insight into translation during yeast programmed cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Maria Alexandra Oliveira da

    2012-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Ciências da Saúde Global mRNA translation impairment has been described during the course of apoptosis in both mammalian and yeast. Nevertheless, the molecular pathways modulating translation during different scenarios of yeast apoptosis are still largely unexplored. Here we show by polysome profile analysis an impairment in capdependent translation initiation, correlated with alterations in translation machinery, such as the decrease in eIF4A levels ...

  16. Pathways to ischemic neuronal cell death: are sex differences relevant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCullough Louise D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have known for some time that the epidemiology of human stroke is sexually dimorphic until late in life, well beyond the years of reproductive senescence and menopause. Now, a new concept is emerging: the mechanisms and outcome of cerebral ischemic injury are influenced strongly by biological sex as well as the availability of sex steroids to the brain. The principal mammalian estrogen (17 β estradiol or E2 is neuroprotective in many types of brain injury and has been the major focus of investigation over the past several decades. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that although hormones are a major contributor to sex-specific outcomes, they do not fully account for sex-specific responses to cerebral ischemia. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent studies in cell culture and animal models that suggest that genetic sex determines experimental stroke outcome and that divergent cell death pathways are activated after an ischemic insult. These sex differences need to be identified if we are to develop efficacious neuroprotective agents for use in stroke patients.

  17. Improving machinery reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Bloch, Heinz P

    1998-01-01

    This totally revised, updated and expanded edition provides proven techniques and procedures that extend machinery life, reduce maintenance costs, and achieve optimum machinery reliability. This essential text clearly describes the reliability improvement and failure avoidance steps practiced by best-of-class process plants in the U.S. and Europe.

  18. Activation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Is a Consequence of Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixia Ye

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is similar to other Cdks but is activated during cell differentiation and cell death rather than cell division. Since activation of Cdk5 has been reported in many situations leading to cell death, we attempted to determine if it was required for any form of cell death. We found that Cdk5 is activated during apoptotic deaths and that the activation can be detected even when the cells continue to secondary necrosis. This activation can occur in the absence of Bim, calpain, or neutral cathepsins. The kinase is typically activated by p25, derived from p35 by calpain-mediated cleavage, but inhibition of calpain does not affect cell death or the activation of Cdk5. Likewise, RNAi-forced suppression of the synthesis of Cdk5 does not affect the incidence or kinetics of cell death. We conclude that Cdk5 is activated as a consequence of metabolic changes that are common to many forms of cell death. Thus its activation suggests processes during cell death that will be interesting or important to understand, but activation of Cdk5 is not necessary for cells to die.

  19. Bioactive compounds from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cells induced apoptotic cell death in hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patathananone, Supawadee; Thammasirirak, Sompong; Daduang, Jureerut; Chung, Jing Gung; Temsiripong, Yosapong; Daduang, Sakda

    2016-08-01

    Crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cell extracts (WBCex) were examined for anticancer activity in HeLa cell lines using the MTT assay. The percentage viability of HeLa cells significantly deceased after treatment with WBCex in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50 dose was suggested to be approximately 225 μg/mL protein. Apoptotic cell death occurred in a time-dependent manner based on investigation by flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC and PI staining. DAPI nucleic acid staining indicated increased chromatin condensation. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities also increased, suggesting the induction of the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm ) of HeLa cells was lost as a result of increasing levels of Bax and reduced levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bcl-Xs, and XIAP. The decreased ΔΨm led to the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Apoptosis-inducing factor translocated into the nuclei, and endonuclease G (Endo G) was released from the mitochondria. These results suggest that anticancer agents in WBCex can induce apoptosis in HeLa cells via both caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 986-997, 2016. PMID:25691005

  20. M1 muscarinic receptor activation mediates cell death in M1-HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, E Scott; Woo, Kerhan K; Aalderink, Miranda; Fry, Sandie; Greenwood, Jeffrey M; Glass, Michelle; Dragunow, Mike

    2013-01-01

    HEK293 cells have been used extensively to generate stable cell lines to study G protein-coupled receptors, such as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). The activation of M1 mAChRs in various cell types in vitro has been shown to be protective. To further investigate M1 mAChR-mediated cell survival, we generated stable HEK293 cell-lines expressing the human M1 mAChR. M1 mAChRs were efficiently expressed at the cell surface and efficiently internalised within 1 h by carbachol. Carbachol also induced early signalling cascades similar to previous reports. Thus, ectopically expressed M1 receptors behaved in a similar fashion to the native receptor over short time periods of analysis. However, substantial cell death was observed in HEK293-M1 cells within 24 h after carbachol application. Death was only observed in HEK cells expressing M1 receptors and fully blocked by M1 antagonists. M1 mAChR-stimulation mediated prolonged activation of the MEK-ERK pathway and resulted in prolonged induction of the transcription factor EGR-1 (>24 h). Blockade of ERK signalling with U0126 did not reduce M1 mAChR-mediated cell-death significantly but inhibited the acute induction of EGR-1. We investigated the time-course of cell death using time-lapse microscopy and xCELLigence technology. Both revealed the M1 mAChR cytotoxicity occurs within several hours of M1 activation. The xCELLigence assay also confirmed that the ERK pathway was not involved in cell-death. Interestingly, the MEK blocker did reduce carbachol-mediated cleaved caspase 3 expression in HEK293-M1 cells. The HEK293 cell line is a widely used pharmacological tool for studying G-protein coupled receptors, including mAChRs. Our results highlight the importance of investigating the longer term fate of these cells in short term signalling studies. Identifying how and why activation of the M1 mAChR signals apoptosis in these cells may lead to a better understanding of how mAChRs regulate cell-fate decisions.

  1. Import of textile machinery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In 2007,the total importation of our textile machinery amounts to US$4.948 billion,increased by 20.62%over the same period of the previous year,which turns out to be a new high in the year of textile machinery.Among the imported produc ts in 2007,different impor ted produc ts witness growths of various degrees. The large-scale impor t increase of tex tile machiner y indicates the acceleration of textile technology and upgrading of textile industry,and demonstrates that our textile machinery industry still keeps distance from the international advanced technology in terms of product level,product stability as well as the product reliability although the rapid improvement was made in manufacturing in Chinese textile machinery industry in the last few years.In addition,the possibility of RMB appreciation still exists.Import increase of textile machinery brings a new historical high in 2007.

  2. Creation and characterization of a cell-death reporter cell line for hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhilei; Simeon, Rudo; Chockalingam, Karuppiah; Rice, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes the creation and characterization of a hepatoma cell line, n4mBid, that supports all stages of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle and strongly reports HCV infection by a cell-death phenotype. The n4mBid cell line is derived from the highly HCV-permissive Huh-7.5 hepatoma cell line and contains a modified Bid protein (mBid) that is cleaved and activated by the HCV serine protease NS3-4A. N4mBid exhibited a 10–20 fold difference in cell viability between the HCV-infected and mock-infected states, while the parental Huh-7.5 cells showed <2 fold difference under the same conditions. The pronounced difference in n4mBid cell viability between the HCV- and mock-infected states in a 96-well plate format points to its usefulness in cell survival-based high-throughput screens for anti-HCV molecules. The degree of cell death was found to be proportional to the intracellular load of HCV. HCV-low n4mBid cells, expressing an anti-HCV short hairpin RNA, showed a significant growth advantage over naïve cells and could be rapidly enriched after HCV infection, suggesting the possibility of using n4mBid cells for the cell survival-based selection of genetic anti-HCV factors. PMID:20188762

  3. Effect of advanced glycation end-products on cell proliferation and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterszegi, G; Molinari, J; Ravelojaona, V; Robert, L

    2006-09-01

    The effect of advanced glycation end products (AGE-s) was studied on the proliferation and cell death of human skin fibroblasts in culture. Several AGE-products were prepared from proteins, a peptide and amino acids, using Glucose or Fructose, with or without Fe2+. The AGE preparations increased cell death at the 7th day, after only 72 hours of incubation. Some of these glycation products modified also proliferation. This effect of AGE-s was even maintained without these products in fresh medium for a second period of incubation up to 10 days from the start of the experiment. In order to explore the role of AGE-receptors, especially of AGE-receptor and of growth factor receptors (fibroblast and epidermal growth factors receptors), antibodies to these receptors were added to cell cultures and their effect on both cell death and proliferation were determined as for the AGE-s. These anti-receptor antibodies imitated to some extent the results obtained with AGE-s, producing increase of cell death and proliferation, followed above a certain concentration of antibodies by a decrease and a new increase or plateau. This might correspond to the internalization of the receptors followed by a re-expression on the cell membrane. The role of receptor-mediated Reactive Oxygen Species-production was also explored using scavengers: N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), L-Carnosine, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Catalase. Several of these scavengers decreased cell death, suggesting that Reactive Oxygen Species-production is partially involved in the observed phenomena. PMID:16919894

  4. Coniferyl aldehyde attenuates radiation enteropathy by inhibiting cell death and promoting endothelial cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Ji Jeong

    Full Text Available Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA, an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function.

  5. Cell proliferation and cell death are disturbed during prenatal and postnatal brain development after uranium exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, M; Elie, C; Stefani, J; N Florès; Culeux, C; Delissen, O; Ibanez, C; Lestaevel, P; Eriksson, P; Dinocourt, C

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain is more susceptible to neurotoxic compounds than adult brain. It is also well known that disturbances during brain development cause neurological disorders in adulthood. The brain is known to be a target organ of uranium (U) exposure and previous studies have noted that internal U contamination of adult rats induces behavioral disorders as well as affects neurochemistry and neurophysiological properties. In this study, we investigated whether depleted uranium (DU) exposure affects neurogenesis during prenatal and postnatal brain development. We examined the structural morphology of the brain, cell death and finally cell proliferation in animals exposed to DU during gestation and lactation compared to control animals. Our results showed that DU decreases cell death in the cortical neuroepithelium of gestational day (GD) 13 embryos exposed at 40mg/L and 120mg/L and of GD18 fetuses exposed at 120mg/L without modification of the number of apoptotic cells. Cell proliferation analysis showed an increase of BrdU labeling in the dentate neuroepithelium of fetuses from GD18 at 120mg/L. Postnatally, cell death is increased in the dentate gyrus of postnatal day (PND) 0 and PND5 exposed pups at 120mg/L and is associated with an increase of apoptotic cell number only at PND5. Finally, a decrease in dividing cells is observed in the dentate gyrus of PND21 rats developmentally exposed to 120mg/L DU, but not at PND0 and PND5. These results show that DU exposure during brain development causes opposite effects on cell proliferation and cell death processes between prenatal and postnatal development mainly at the highest dose. Although these modifications do not have a major impact in brain morphology, they could affect the next steps of neurogenesis and thus might disrupt the fine organization of the neuronal network. PMID:26506049

  6. Novel self-micellizing anticancer lipid nanoparticles induce cell death of colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Baskaran, Rengarajan; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kyu Yoo, Bong; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we developed a novel drug-like self-micellizing anticancer lipid (SMAL), and investigated its anticancer activity and effects on cell death pathways in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. Three self-assembled nanoparticles were prepared, namely, SMAL102 (lauramide derivative), SMAL104 (palmitamide derivative), and SMAL108 (stearamide derivative) by a thin-film hydration technique, and were characterized for physicochemical and biological parameters. SMAL102 were nanosized (160.23 ± 8.11 nm) with uniform spherical shape, while SMAL104 and SMAL108 did not form spherical shape but formed large size nanoparticles and irregular in shape. Importantly, SMAL102 showed a cytotoxic effect towards CRC cell lines (HCT116 and HT-29), and less toxicity to a normal colon fibroblast cell line (CCD-18Co). Conversely, SMAL104 and SMAL108 did not have an anti-proliferative effect on CRC cell lines. SMAL102 nanoparticles were actively taken up by CRC cell lines, localized in the cell membrane, and exhibited remarkable cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. The normal colon cell line showed significantly less cellular uptake and non-cytotoxicity as compared with the CRC cell lines. SMAL102 nanoparticles induced caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells, indicating the induction of apoptosis; whereas LC3B was activated in HCT116 cells, indicating autophagy-induced cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SMAL102 induced cell death via activation of apoptosis and autophagy in CRC cell lines. The present study could be a pioneer for further preclinical and clinical development of such compounds. PMID:26342325

  7. Triptolide induces apoptotic cell death of human cholangiocarcinoma cells through inhibition of myeloid cell leukemia-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a devastating neoplasm, is highly resistant to current chemotherapies. CCA cells frequently overexpress the antiapoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia-1(Mcl-1), which is responsible for its extraordinary ability to evade cell death. Triptolide, a bioactive ingredient extracted from Chinese medicinal plant, has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in several cancers. CCK-8 assay was performed to detect cell survival rate in vitro. DAPI staining and Flow cytometry were used to analyze apoptosis. Western blot was performed to determine the expression levels of caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9, PARP, and Mcl-1. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence were used to detect the expression levels of Mcl-1. The nude mice xenograft model was used to evaluate the antitumor effect of triptolide in vivo. Triptolide reduced cell viability in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 12.6 ± 0.6 nM, 20.5 ± 4.2 nM, and 18.5 ± 0.7 nM at 48 h for HuCCT1, QBC939, and FRH0201 respectively. Triptolide induced apoptosis in CCA cell lines in part through mitochondrial pathway. Using quantitative real-time PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence, we have shown that triptolide downregulates Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, triptolide inhibited the CCA growth in vivo. Triptolide has profound antitumor effect on CCA, probably by inducing apoptosis through inhibition of Mcl-1. Triptolide would be a promising therapeutic agent for CCA

  8. Crocin suppresses tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced cell death of neuronally differentiated PC-12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeda, S; Ochiai, T; Paopong, L; Tanaka, H; Shoyama, Y; Shimeno, H

    2001-11-01

    Crocus sativus L. is used in Chinese traditional medicine to treat some disorders of the central nervous system. Crocin is an ethanol-extractable component of Crocus sativus L.; it is reported to prevent ethanol-induced impairment of learning and memory in mice. In this study, we demonstrate that crocin suppresses the effect of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on neuronally differentiated PC-12 cells. PC-12 cells dead from exposure to TNF-alpha show apoptotic morphological changes and DNA fragmentation. These hallmark features of cell death did not appear in cells treated in the co-presence of 10 microM crocin. Moreover, crocin suppressed the TNF-alpha-induced expression of Bcl-Xs and LICE mRNAs and simultaneously restored the cytokine-induced reduction of Bcl-X(L) mRNA expression. The modulating effects of crocin on the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins led to a marked reduction of a TNF-alpha-induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Crocin also blocked the cytochrome c-induced activation of caspase-3. To learn how crocin exhibits these anti-apoptotic actions in PC-12 cells, we tested the effect of crocin on PC-12 cell death induced by daunorubicin. We found that crocin inhibited the effect of daunorubicin as well. Our findings suggest that crocin inhibits neuronal cell death induced by both internal and external apoptotic stimuli.

  9. Autophagy in response to photodynamic therapy: cell survival vs. cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Nancy L.; Xue, Liang-yan; Chiu, Song-mao; Joseph, Sheeba

    2009-02-01

    Autophagy (or more properly, macroautophagy) is a pathway whereby damaged organelles or other cell components are encased in a double membrane, the autophagosome, which fuses with lysosomes for digestion by lysosomal hydrolases. This process can promote cell survival by removing damaged organelles, but when damage is extensive, it can also be a mechanism of cell death. Similar to the Kessel and Agostinis laboratories, we have reported the vigorous induction of autophagy by PDT; this was found in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells whether or not they were able to efficiently induce apoptosis. One way to evaluate the role of autophagy in PDT-treated cells is to silence one of the essential genes in the pathway. Kessel and Reiners silenced the Atg7 gene of murine leukemia L1210 cells using inhibitory RNA and found sensitization to PDT-induced cell death at a low dose of PDT, implying that autophagy is protective when PDT damage is modest. We have examined the role of autophagy in an epithelium-derived cancer cell by comparing parental and Atg7-silenced MCF-7 cells to varying doses of PDT with the phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4. In contrast to L1210 cells, autophagy-deficient MCF-7 cells were more resistant to the lethal effects of PDT, as judged by clonogenic assays. A possible explanation for the difference in outcome for L1210 vs. MCF-7 cells is the greatly reduced ability of the latter to undergo apoptosis, a deficiency that may convert autophagy into a cell-death process even at low PDT doses. Experiments to investigate the mechanism(s) responsible are in process.

  10. Apocynin attenuates cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death by suppressing NF-κB-mediated cell death process in differentiated PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da Hee; Nam, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Chung Soo

    2015-10-01

    Cholesterol oxidation products are suggested to be involved in neuronal degeneration. Apocynin has demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. We assessed the effect of apocynin on the cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death in neuronal cells using differentiated PC12 cells in relation to NF-κB-mediated cell death process. 7-Ketocholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased the levels of Bid and Bcl-2, increased the levels of Bax and p53, and induced loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, release of cytochrome c and activation of caspases (-8, -9 and -3). 7-Ketocholesterol caused an increase in the levels of cytosolic and nuclear NF-κB p65, cytosolic NF-κB p50 and cytosolic phospho-IκB-α, which was inhibited by the addition of 0.5 μM Bay11-7085 (an inhibitor of NF-κB activation). Apocynin attenuated the cholesterol oxidation product-induced changes in the programmed cell death-related protein levels, NF-κB activation, production of reactive oxygen species, and depletion of GSH. The results show that apocynin appears to attenuate the cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death in PC12 cells by suppressing the activation of the mitochondrial pathway and the caspase-8- and Bid-dependent pathways that are mediated by NF-κB activation. The preventive effect appears to be associated with the inhibitory effect on the production of reactive oxygen species and depletion of GSH.

  11. Modulation of Programmed Cell Death in a Model System of Xylogenic Zinnia (Zinnia Elegans) Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakimova, E.T.; Woltering, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Programmed cell death is an integral part of the latest stage of differentiation of the tracheary elements of plant xylem vascular system. In this study, by applying a pharmacological approach with specific peptide inhibitors, we have elucidated the involvement of plant caspase-like proteases in cel

  12. Inhibition of autophagy induced by proteasome inhibition increases cell death in human SHG-44 glioma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-fei GE; Ji-zhou ZHANG; Xiao-fei WANG; Fan-kai MENG; Wen-chen LI; Yong-xin LUAN; Feng LING; Yi-nan LUO

    2009-01-01

    Aim:The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and lysosome-dependent macroautophagy (autophagy) are two major intracellular pathways for protein degradation.Recent studies suggest that proteasome inhibitors may reduce tumor growth and activate autophagy.Due to the dual roles of autophagy in tumor cell survival and death,the effect of autophagy on the destiny of glioma cells remains unclear.In this study,we sought to investigate whether inhibition of the proteasome can induce autophagy and the effects of autophagy on the fate of human SHG-44 glioma cells.Methods:The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 was used to induce autophagy in SHG-44 glioma cells,and the effect of autophagy on the survival of SHG-44 glioma cells was investigated using an autophagy inhibitor 3-MA.Cell viability was measured by MTT assay.Apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry.The expression of autophagy related proteins was determined by Western blot.Results:MG-132 inhibited cell proliferation,induced cell death and cell cycle arrest at G~JM phase,and activated autophagy in SHG-44 glioma cells.The expression of autophagy-related Beclin-1 and LC3-1 was significantly up-regulated and part of LC3-1 was converted into LC3-11.However,when SHG-44 glioma cells were co-treated with MG-132 and 3-MA,the cells became less viable,but cell death and cell numbers at G2/M phase increased.Moreover,the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles was decreased,the expression of Beclin-1 and LC3 was significantly down-regulated and the conversion of LC3-11 from LC3-1 was also inhibited.Conclusion:Inhibition of the proteasome can induce autophagy in human SHG-44 glioma cells,and inhibition of autophagy increases cell death.This discovery may shed new light on the effect of autophagy on modulating the fate of SHG-44 glioma cells.

  13. Cell Death Pathways in Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Hamblin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is an emerging cancer therapy that uses the combination of non-toxic dyes or photosensitizers (PS and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species and destroy tumors. The PS can be localized in various organelles such as mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes and this sub-cellular location governs much of the signaling that occurs after PDT. There is an acute stress response that leads to changes in calcium and lipid metabolism and causes the production of cytokines and stress response mediators. Enzymes (particularly protein kinases are activated and transcription factors are expressed. Many of the cellular responses center on mitochondria and frequently lead to induction of apoptosis by the mitochondrial pathway involving caspase activation and release of cytochrome c. Certain specific proteins (such as Bcl-2 are damaged by PDT-induced oxidation thereby increasing apoptosis, and a build-up of oxidized proteins leads to an ER-stress response that may be increased by proteasome inhibition. Autophagy plays a role in either inhibiting or enhancing cell death after PDT.

  14. Cell Death Pathways in Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mroz, Pawel, E-mail: pmroz@partners.org [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Yaroslavsky, Anastasia [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Boston University College of Engineering, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Kharkwal, Gitika B [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Hamblin, Michael R. [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging cancer therapy that uses the combination of non-toxic dyes or photosensitizers (PS) and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species and destroy tumors. The PS can be localized in various organelles such as mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes and this sub-cellular location governs much of the signaling that occurs after PDT. There is an acute stress response that leads to changes in calcium and lipid metabolism and causes the production of cytokines and stress response mediators. Enzymes (particularly protein kinases) are activated and transcription factors are expressed. Many of the cellular responses center on mitochondria and frequently lead to induction of apoptosis by the mitochondrial pathway involving caspase activation and release of cytochrome c. Certain specific proteins (such as Bcl-2) are damaged by PDT-induced oxidation thereby increasing apoptosis, and a build-up of oxidized proteins leads to an ER-stress response that may be increased by proteasome inhibition. Autophagy plays a role in either inhibiting or enhancing cell death after PDT.

  15. Cell Death Pathways in Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging cancer therapy that uses the combination of non-toxic dyes or photosensitizers (PS) and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species and destroy tumors. The PS can be localized in various organelles such as mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes and this sub-cellular location governs much of the signaling that occurs after PDT. There is an acute stress response that leads to changes in calcium and lipid metabolism and causes the production of cytokines and stress response mediators. Enzymes (particularly protein kinases) are activated and transcription factors are expressed. Many of the cellular responses center on mitochondria and frequently lead to induction of apoptosis by the mitochondrial pathway involving caspase activation and release of cytochrome c. Certain specific proteins (such as Bcl-2) are damaged by PDT-induced oxidation thereby increasing apoptosis, and a build-up of oxidized proteins leads to an ER-stress response that may be increased by proteasome inhibition. Autophagy plays a role in either inhibiting or enhancing cell death after PDT

  16. Mitochondria and Mitophagy: The Yin and Yang of Cell Death Control

    OpenAIRE

    Kubli, Dieter A.; Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are primarily responsible for providing the contracting cardiac myocyte with a continuous supply of ATP. However, mitochondria can rapidly change into death-promoting organelles. In response to changes in the intracellular environment, mitochondria become producers of excessive reactive oxygen species and release pro-death proteins, resulting in disrupted ATP synthesis and activation of cell death pathways. Interestingly, cells have developed a defense mechanism against aberrant ...

  17. Prodigiosin activates endoplasmic reticulum stress cell death pathway in human breast carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Mu-Yun [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shen, Yuh-Chiang [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lu, Chien-Hsing [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Shu-Yi [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Ho, Tsing-Fen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Peng, Yu-Ta [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chia-Che, E-mail: chia_che@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent cytotoxicity against diverse human cancer cell lines. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is initiated by accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen and may induce cell death when irremediable. In this study, the role of ER stress in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity was elucidated for the first time. Comparable to the ER stress inducer thapsigargin, prodigiosin up-regulated signature ER stress markers GRP78 and CHOP in addition to activating the IRE1, PERK and ATF6 branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in multiple human breast carcinoma cell lines, confirming prodigiosin as an ER stress inducer. Prodigiosin transcriptionally up-regulated CHOP, as evidenced by its promoting effect on the CHOP promoter activity. Of note, knockdown of CHOP effectively lowered prodigiosin's capacity to evoke PARP cleavage, reduce cell viability and suppress colony formation, highlighting an essential role of CHOP in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxic ER stress response. In addition, prodigiosin down-regulated BCL2 in a CHOP-dependent manner. Importantly, restoration of BCL2 expression blocked prodigiosin-induced PARP cleavage and greatly enhanced the survival of prodigiosin-treated cells, suggesting that CHOP-dependent BCL2 suppression mediates prodigiosin-elicited cell death. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of JNK by SP600125 or dominant-negative blockade of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation impaired prodigiosin-induced CHOP up-regulation and PARP cleavage. Collectively, these results identified ER stress-mediated cell death as a mode-of-action of prodigiosin's tumoricidal effect. Mechanistically, prodigiosin engages the IRE1–JNK and PERK–eIF2α branches of the UPR signaling to up-regulate CHOP, which in turn mediates BCL2 suppression to induce cell death. Highlights: ► Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent anticancer effect. ► Prodigiosin is herein identified

  18. c-di-GMP induction of Dictyostelium cell death requires the polyketide DIF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; Luciani, Marie-Françoise; Giusti, Corinne; Golstein, Pierre

    2015-02-15

    Cell death in the model organism Dictyostelium, as studied in monolayers in vitro, can be induced by the polyketide DIF-1 or by the cyclical dinucleotide c-di-GMP. c-di-GMP, a universal bacterial second messenger, can trigger innate immunity in bacterially infected animal cells and is involved in developmental cell death in Dictyostelium. We show here that c-di-GMP was not sufficient to induce cell death in Dictyostelium cell monolayers. Unexpectedly, it also required the DIF-1 polyketide. The latter could be exogenous, as revealed by a telling synergy between c-di-GMP and DIF-1. The required DIF-1 polyketide could also be endogenous, as shown by the inability of c-di-GMP to induce cell death in Dictyostelium HMX44A cells and DH1 cells upon pharmacological or genetic inhibition of DIF-1 biosynthesis. In these cases, c-di-GMP-induced cell death was rescued by complementation with exogenous DIF-1. Taken together, these results demonstrated that c-di-GMP could trigger cell death in Dictyostelium only in the presence of the DIF-1 polyketide or its metabolites. This identified another element of control to this cell death and perhaps also to c-di-GMP effects in other situations and organisms.

  19. Hypermutator Salmonella Heidelberg induces an early cell death in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall-David, Sandrine; Zenbaa, Neila; Bouchard, Damien; Lavault, Marie-Thérèse; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Bousarghin, Latifa

    2015-10-22

    We have previously described that a strain of Salmonella Heidelberg with a hypermutator phenotype, B182, adhered strongly to HeLa cells. In this work, we showed that this hypermutator Salmonella strain invaded HeLa epithelial cells and induced cytoskeleton alteration. Those changes lead to HeLa cell death which was characteristic of apoptosis. For the first time, we showed that this hypermutator strain induced apoptosis associated with the activation of caspases 2, 9 and 3. Complementation of B182 strain showed a decrease in cells death induction. In the presence of other Salmonella Heidelberg with a normomutator phenotype, such as WT and SL486, cell death and caspase 3 were undetectable. These results suggested that early apoptosis and caspase 3 activation were specific to B182. Besides, B182 induced LDH release and caspase 3 activation in CaCo-2 and HCT116 cells. Heat-treated B182 and diffusible products failed to induce this phenotype. Epithelial cells treatment with cytochalasin D caused the inhibition of B182 internalisation and caspase 3 activation. These results showed that this cell death required active S. Heidelberg B182 protein synthesis and bacterial internalisation. However sipB and sopB, usually involved in apoptosis induced by Salmonella were not overexpressed in B182, contrary to fimA and fliC. Comparative genome analysis showed numerous mutations as in rpoS which would be more investigated. The role of the hypermutator phenotype might be suspected to be implicated in these specific features. This result expands our knowledge about strong mutators frequently found in bacterial organisms isolated from clinical specimens.

  20. Reversal of an immunity associated plant cell death program by the growth regulator auxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalan Suresh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One form of plant immunity against pathogens involves a rapid host programmed cell death at the site of infection accompanied by the activation of local and systemic resistance to pathogens, termed the hypersensitive response (HR. In this work it was tested (i if the plant growth regulator auxin can inhibit the cell death elicited by a purified proteinaceous HR elicitor, (ii how far down the process this inhibition can be achieved, and (iii if the inhibition affects reporters of immune response. The effect of constitutive modulation of endogenous auxin levels in transgenic plants on this cell death program was also evaluated. Results The HR programmed cell death initiated by a bacterial type III secretion system dependent proteinaceous elicitor harpin (from Erwinia amylovora can be reversed till very late in the process by the plant growth regulator auxin. Early inhibition or late reversal of this cell death program does not affect marker genes correlated with local and systemic resistance. Transgenic plants constitutively modulated in endogenous levels of auxin are not affected in ability or timing of cell death initiated by harpin. Conclusion These data indicate that the cell death program initiated by harpin can be reversed till late in the process without effect on markers strongly correlated with local and systemic immunity. The constitutive modulation of endogenous auxin does not affect equivalent signaling processes affecting cell death or buffers these signals. The concept and its further study has utility in choosing better strategies for treating mammalian and agricultural diseases.

  1. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik; Bazan, Nicolas G;

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H]A...

  2. Depletion of the AP-1 repressor JDP2 induces cell death similar to apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerdrup, Mads; Holmberg, Christian Henrik; Dietrich, Nikolaj;

    2005-01-01

    depletion of JDP2 resulted in p53-independent cell death that resembles apoptosis and was evident at 72 h. The death mechanism was caspase dependent as the cells could be rescued by treatment with caspase inhibitor zVAD. Our studies suggest that JDP2 functions as a general survival protein, not only...

  3. Cloning and analysis of a defender against apoptotic cell death (DAD1) homologue from tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeberichts, F.A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    A cDNA clone homologous to the human defender against apoptotic cell death (DAD1) gene, which is believed to be a conserved inhibitor of programmed cell death, was isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Prisca). The 351 basepairs open reading frame predicted a 116 amino acid protein seque

  4. Programmed cell death features in apple suspension cells under low oxygen culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chang-jie(徐昌杰); CHEN Kun-song(陈昆松); FERGUSON Ian B.

    2004-01-01

    Suspension-cultured apple fruit cells (Malus pumila Mill. cv. Braeburn) were exposed to a low oxygen atmosphere to test whether programmed cell death (PCD) has a role in cell dysfunction and death under hypoxic conditions. Protoplasts were prepared at various times after low oxygen conditions were established, and viability tested by triple staining with fluorescein diacetate (FDA), propidium iodide (PI) and Hoechst33342 (HO342). DNA breakdown and phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane were observed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), and annexin V binding. About 30% of protoplasts from cells after 48 h under low oxygen showed an increased accumulation of HO342, indicating increased membrane permeability. Positive TUNEL and annexin V results were also only obtained with protoplasts from cells under low oxygen. The results suggest that apple cell death under low oxygen is at least partially PCD mediated, and may explain tissue breakdown under controlled atmosphere (low oxygen) conditions in apple fruit.

  5. Crotamine and crotoxin interact with tumor cells and trigger cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Marcella Araugio; Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli; Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN-MG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: maso@cdtn.br; santosr@cdtn.br; Dias, Consuelo Latorre Fortes [Fundacao Ezequiel Dias FUNED, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Chavez Olortegui, Carlos Delfin [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas; Santos, Wagner Gouvea dos [Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States). Neurosurgery Dept.

    2007-07-01

    Crotoxin (Crtx) and Crotamine (Crota) are polypeptides isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom (CV). Previous reports have been shown therapeutic effects of Crotalus durissus terrificus venom and Crtx on skin, breast and lung tumours, although, the mechanisms of this antitumoral effect are still unknown. The aim of this work was to investigate the antitumoral effect of Crtx and Crota on brain tumours cells (GH3 and RT2) in vitro and their capacity of interaction with these tumour cells membranes. Cell survival after Crtx and Crota treatment was evaluated by MTT assay in different times post-treatment and apoptosis was evaluated by DAPI staining. In order to evaluate the specific interaction of Crtx and Crota, these polypeptides were radiolabelled, using {sup 125}I as radiotracer and binding assays were performed. The results were compared with the binding in nontumoral brain tissue. Crtx and Crota induced apoptosis on both tumour cells lineages but, Crota was more powerful than Crtx 90% and 20% cell death for RT2 cells; 80% and 20% cell death for GH3 cells, respectively). Both {sup 125}I-Crtx and {sup 125}I-Crota bound specifically in glioblastoma membranes. Nonetheless, CV polypeptides recognised glioblastoma cells with higher specificity than normal brain tissue. These results suggest that the Crtx and Crota interactions with the plasmatic membrane of tumour cells may be the first step of the cascade of signalling that trigger their antitumoral effect. (author)

  6. Breast cancer cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance are sensitized to cisplatin-induced cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Christina Westmose; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E;

    2007-01-01

    with parental MCF-7 cells. Our data show that Bcl-2 can protect antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells from cisplatin-induced cell death, indicating that the reduced expression of Bcl-2 in the antiestrogen-resistant cells plays a role in sensitizing the cells to cisplatin treatment.......Antiestrogens are currently used for treating breast cancer patients who have estrogen receptor-positive tumors. However, patients with advanced disease will eventually develop resistance to the drugs. Therefore, compounds effective on antiestrogen-resistant tumors will be of great importance...... for future breast cancer treatment. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the chemotherapeutic compound cisplatin using a panel of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cell lines established from the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. We show that the antiestrogen-resistant cells...

  7. Delayed cell death associated with mitotic catastrophe in γ-irradiated stem-like glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stem-like tumor cells are regarded as highly resistant to ionizing radiation (IR). Previous studies have focused on apoptosis early after irradiation, and the apoptosis resistance observed has been attributed to reduced DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair compared to non-stem tumor cells. Here, early and late radioresponse of patient-derived stem-like glioma cells (SLGCs) and differentiated cells directly derived from them were examined for cell death mode and the influence of stem cell-specific growth factors. Primary SLGCs were propagated in serum-free medium with the stem-cell mitogens epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). Differentiation was induced by serum-containing medium without EGF and FGF. Radiation sensitivity was evaluated by assessing proliferation, clonogenic survival, apoptosis, and mitotic catastrophe. DNA damage-associated γH2AX as well as p53 and p21 expression were determined by Western blots. SLGCs failed to apoptose in the first 4 days after irradiation even at high single doses up to 10 Gy, but we observed substantial cell death later than 4 days postirradiation in 3 of 6 SLGC lines treated with 5 or 10 Gy. This delayed cell death was observed in 3 of the 4 SLGC lines with nonfunctional p53, was associated with mitotic catastrophe and occurred via apoptosis. The early apoptosis resistance of the SLGCs was associated with lower γH2AX compared to differentiated cells, but we found that the stem-cell culture cytokines EGF plus FGF-2 strongly reduce γH2AX levels. Nonetheless, in two p53-deficient SLGC lines examined γIR-induced apoptosis even correlated with EGF/FGF-induced proliferation and mitotic catastrophe. In a line containing CD133-positive and -negative stem-like cells, the CD133-positive cells proliferated faster and underwent more γIR-induced mitotic catastrophe. Our results suggest the importance of delayed apoptosis, associated mitotic catastrophe, and cellular proliferation for γIR-induced death of

  8. Delayed cell death associated with mitotic catastrophe in γ-irradiated stem-like glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esser Norbert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose Stem-like tumor cells are regarded as highly resistant to ionizing radiation (IR. Previous studies have focused on apoptosis early after irradiation, and the apoptosis resistance observed has been attributed to reduced DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair compared to non-stem tumor cells. Here, early and late radioresponse of patient-derived stem-like glioma cells (SLGCs and differentiated cells directly derived from them were examined for cell death mode and the influence of stem cell-specific growth factors. Materials and methods Primary SLGCs were propagated in serum-free medium with the stem-cell mitogens epidermal growth factor (EGF and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2. Differentiation was induced by serum-containing medium without EGF and FGF. Radiation sensitivity was evaluated by assessing proliferation, clonogenic survival, apoptosis, and mitotic catastrophe. DNA damage-associated γH2AX as well as p53 and p21 expression were determined by Western blots. Results SLGCs failed to apoptose in the first 4 days after irradiation even at high single doses up to 10 Gy, but we observed substantial cell death later than 4 days postirradiation in 3 of 6 SLGC lines treated with 5 or 10 Gy. This delayed cell death was observed in 3 of the 4 SLGC lines with nonfunctional p53, was associated with mitotic catastrophe and occurred via apoptosis. The early apoptosis resistance of the SLGCs was associated with lower γH2AX compared to differentiated cells, but we found that the stem-cell culture cytokines EGF plus FGF-2 strongly reduce γH2AX levels. Nonetheless, in two p53-deficient SLGC lines examined γIR-induced apoptosis even correlated with EGF/FGF-induced proliferation and mitotic catastrophe. In a line containing CD133-positive and -negative stem-like cells, the CD133-positive cells proliferated faster and underwent more γIR-induced mitotic catastrophe. Conclusions Our results suggest the importance of delayed

  9. Role of mitochondria-associated hexokinase II in cancer cell death induced by 3-Bromopyruvate

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhao; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Weiqin; Huang, Peng

    2009-01-01

    It has long been observed that cancer cells rely more on glycolysis to generate ATP and actively use certain glycolytic metabolic intermediates for biosynthesis. Hexokinase II (HKII) is a key glycolytic enzyme that plays a role in the regulation of the mitochondria-initiated apoptotic cell death. As a potent inhibitor of hexokinase, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) is known to inhibit cancer cell energy metabolism and trigger cell death, supposedly through depletion of cellular ATP. The current study...

  10. Spontaneous and radiation induced cell death in HeLa S3 human carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation biologists have classified radiation-induced cell death based on cell proliferative capacity to either mitotic or interphase death. Cytologists have revealed two morphologically and biochemically diverse forms of cell death, apoptosis and necrosis. While the knowledge of the former is already well exploited by radiologists, cell susceptibility to apoptosis and necrosis is still under investigation. We studied characteristics of spontaneous cell death, and dose dependence and time course of radiation-induced cell death of human uterine cervix epitheloid carcinoma HeLaS3 in culture. Cells were irradiated with 2-40 Gy of γ-rays. The effect on growth, viability, morphology and genomic DNA structure were followed 24-72 h after irradiation. Cell viability was evaluated by trypan-blue exclusion assay and cell morphology by in situ DNA staining with propidium iodide. Cell genomic DNA fragmentation pattern was determined by electrophoresis on 2% agarose gels. At all cell densities 25-35% cells were PI positive and their DNA was fragmented to a high molecular size (≥20 kbp), but the internucleosomal ladder was not observed. A significant decrease in viability to 33% was observed 72 h post 40 Gy irradiation. It corresponded to 55% of PI positive cells. A smear of smaller DNA fragments (0.1-1 kbp), 24 h after 10-20 Gy irradiation was considered as proof that the dominant form of radiation-induced cell death was necrosis. It was concluded that the dominant form of radiation-induced cell death in HeLaS3 population was necrosis and the radiation dose which caused 50% of cell death after 72 h (termed ND50) was between 30-40 Gy. (author)

  11. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine

    OpenAIRE

    Randhawa, H; Kibble, K; Zeng, H.; Moyer, MP; Reindl, KM

    2013-01-01

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objective was to identify the intracellular signaling mechanisms by which PPLGM leads to enhanced colon cancer cell death. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in time- and concen...

  12. Machinery Market Heats Up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JADEFU

    2004-01-01

    In late June, the buzz amongst Chinese machinery manufacturers was that the country's top construction equipment producer, Xuzhou Construction Machinerv Group (XCMG), was to be sold. XCMG's holding company, the Shenzhen-listed Xugong

  13. The phytoalexin resveratrol regulates the initiation of hypersensitive cell death in Vitis cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chang

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a major phytoalexin produced by plants in response to various stresses and promotes disease resistance. The resistance of North American grapevine Vitis rupestris is correlated with a hypersensitive reaction (HR, while susceptible European Vitis vinifera cv. 'Pinot Noir' does not exhibit HR, but expresses basal defence. We have shown previously that in cell lines derived from the two Vitis species, the bacterial effector Harpin induced a rapid and sensitive accumulation of stilbene synthase (StSy transcripts, followed by massive cell death in V. rupestris. In the present work, we analysed the function of the phytoalexin resveratrol, the product of StSy. We found that cv. 'Pinot Noir' accumulated low resveratrol and its glycoside trans-piceid, whereas V. rupestris produced massive trans-resveratrol and the toxic oxidative δ-viniferin, indicating that the preferred metabolitism of resveratrol plays role in Vitis resistance. Cellular responses to resveratrol included rapid alkalinisation, accumulation of pathogenesis-related protein 5 (PR5 transcripts, oxidative burst, actin bundling, and cell death. Microtubule disruption and induction of StSy were triggered by Harpin, but not by resveratrol. Whereas most responses proceeded with different amplitude for the two cell lines, the accumulation of resveratrol, and the competence for resveratrol-induced oxidative burst differed in quality. The data lead to a model, where resveratrol, in addition to its classical role as antimicrobial phytoalexin, represents an important regulator for initiation of HR-related cell death.

  14. Ezrin dephosphorylation/downregulation contributes to ursolic acid-mediated cell death in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezrin links the actin filaments with the cell membrane and has a functional role in the apoptotic process. It appears clear that ezrin is directly associated with Fas, leading to activation of caspase cascade and cell death. However, the exact role of ezrin in ursolic acid (UA)-induced apoptosis remains unclear. In this study, we show for the first time that UA induces apoptosis in both transformed and primary leukemia cells through dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin, association and polarized colocalization of Fas and ezrin, as well as formation of death-inducing signaling complex. These events are dependent on Rho-ROCK1 signaling pathway. Knockdown of ezrin enhanced cell death mediated by UA, whereas overexpression of ezrin attenuated UA-induced apoptosis. Our in vivo study also showed that UA-mediated inhibition of tumor growth of mouse leukemia xenograft model is in association with the dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin. Such findings suggest that the cytoskeletal protein ezrin may represent an attractive target for UA-mediated lethality in human leukemia cells

  15. Programmed cell death features in apple suspension cells under low oxygen culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐昌杰; 陈昆松; FERGUSONIanB

    2004-01-01

    Suspension-cultured apple fruit cells (Malus pumila Mill. cv. Braeburn) were exposed to a low oxygen atmosphere to test whether programmed cell death (PCD) has a role in cell dysfunction and death under hypoxic conditions. Protoplasts were prepared at various times after low oxygen conditions were established, and viability tested by triple staining with fluorescein diacetate (FDA), propidium iodide (PI) and Hoechst33342 (HO342). DNA breakdown and phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane were observed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), and annexin V binding. About 30% of protoplasts from cells after 48 h under low oxygen showed an increased accumulation of HO342, indicating increased membrane permeability. Positive TUNEL and annexin V results were also only obtained with protoplasts from cells under low oxygen. The results suggest that apple celi death under low oxygen is at least partially PCD mediated, and may explain tissue breakdown under controlled atmosphere (low oxygen) conditions in apple fruit.

  16. HAMLET triggers apoptosis but tumor cell death is independent of caspases, Bcl-2 and p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, O; Gustafsson, L; Irjala, H; Selivanova, G; Orrenius, S; Svanborg, C

    2006-02-01

    HAMLET (Human alpha-lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumor cells) triggers selective tumor cell death in vitro and limits tumor progression in vivo. Dying cells show features of apoptosis but it is not clear if the apoptotic response explains tumor cell death. This study examined the contribution of apoptosis to cell death in response to HAMLET. Apoptotic changes like caspase activation, phosphatidyl serine externalization, chromatin condensation were detected in HAMLET-treated tumor cells, but caspase inhibition or Bcl-2 over-expression did not prolong cell survival and the caspase response was Bcl-2 independent. HAMLET translocates to the nuclei and binds directly to chromatin, but the death response was unrelated to the p53 status of the tumor cells. p53 deletions or gain of function mutations did not influence the HAMLET sensitivity of tumor cells. Chromatin condensation was partly caspase dependent, but apoptosis-like marginalization of chromatin was also observed. The results show that tumor cell death in response to HAMLET is independent of caspases, p53 and Bcl-2 even though HAMLET activates an apoptotic response. The use of other cell death pathways allows HAMLET to successfully circumvent fundamental anti-apoptotic strategies that are present in many tumor cells.

  17. Non-cell autonomous influence of the astrocyte system xc− on hypoglycaemic neuronal cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Hewett

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite longstanding evidence that hypoglycaemic neuronal injury is mediated by glutamate excitotoxicity, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved remain incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that the excitotoxic neuronal death that follows GD (glucose deprivation is initiated by glutamate extruded from astrocytes via system xc− – an amino acid transporter that imports l-cystine and exports l-glutamate. Specifically, we find that depriving mixed cortical cell cultures of glucose for up to 8 h injures neurons, but not astrocytes. Neuronal death is prevented by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonism and is partially sensitive to tetanus toxin. Removal of amino acids during the deprivation period prevents – whereas addition of l-cystine restores – GD-induced neuronal death, implicating the cystine/glutamate antiporter, system xc−. Indeed, drugs known to inhibit system xc− ameliorate GD-induced neuronal death. Further, a dramatic reduction in neuronal death is observed in chimaeric cultures consisting of neurons derived from WT (wild-type mice plated on top of astrocytes derived from sut mice, which harbour a naturally occurring null mutation in the gene (Slc7a11 that encodes the substrate-specific light chain of system xc− (xCT. Finally, enhancement of astrocytic system xc− expression and function via IL-1β (interleukin-1β exposure potentiates hypoglycaemic neuronal death, the process of which is prevented by removal of l-cystine and/or addition of system xc− inhibitors. Thus, under the conditions of GD, our studies demonstrate that astrocytes, via system xc−, have a direct, non-cell autonomous effect on cortical neuron survival.

  18. Non-cell autonomous influence of the astrocyte system xc- on hypoglycaemic neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Nicole A; Melchior, Shannon E; Hewett, James A; Hewett, Sandra J

    2012-02-08

    Despite longstanding evidence that hypoglycaemic neuronal injury is mediated by glutamate excitotoxicity, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved remain incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that the excitotoxic neuronal death that follows GD (glucose deprivation) is initiated by glutamate extruded from astrocytes via system xc---an amino acid transporter that imports L-cystine and exports L-glutamate. Specifically, we find that depriving mixed cortical cell cultures of glucose for up to 8 h injures neurons, but not astrocytes. Neuronal death is prevented by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonism and is partially sensitive to tetanus toxin. Removal of amino acids during the deprivation period prevents--whereas addition of L-cystine restores--GD-induced neuronal death, implicating the cystine/glutamate antiporter, system xc-. Indeed, drugs known to inhibit system xc- ameliorate GD-induced neuronal death. Further, a dramatic reduction in neuronal death is observed in chimaeric cultures consisting of neurons derived from WT (wild-type) mice plated on top of astrocytes derived from sut mice, which harbour a naturally occurring null mutation in the gene (Slc7a11) that encodes the substrate-specific light chain of system xc- (xCT). Finally, enhancement of astrocytic system xc- expression and function via IL-1β (interleukin-1β) exposure potentiates hypoglycaemic neuronal death, the process of which is prevented by removal of l-cystine and/or addition of system xc- inhibitors. Thus, under the conditions of GD, our studies demonstrate that astrocytes, via system xc-, have a direct, non-cell autonomous effect on cortical neuron survival.

  19. RBE of neutrons for induction of cell reproductive death and chromosome aberrations in three cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have compared the RBE values for induction of dicentrics and centric rings with those for cell inactivation and with the mean or effective quality factors (Q) recommended for radiation protection. The induction of cell reproductive death and chromosome aberrations has been investigated in plateau phase cultures of established lines of a rat rhabdomyosarcoma, a rat ureter carcinoma and Chinese hamster cells for single doses of 300 kV X-rays and 0.5, 4.2 and 15 MeV neutrons. The different cell lines show considerable variations in sensitivity and the RBE values obtained are presented in tabular form. The mean RBE values for the rat rhabdomyosarcoma cells are lower than those for the other two relatively resistant cell lines. Those for the Chinese hamster cells extrapolated to levels according to low doses of X-rays are in good agreement with the quoted Q values. (Auth./C.F.)

  20. Determination of Cell Death Induced by Lovastatin on Human Colon Cell Line HT29 Using the Comet Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Jafari, Marzieh; Rezaei, Mohsen; Kalantari, Heibatullah; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Background Apoptosis or programmed cell death is an essential process for elimination of damaged cells. Also, induction of apoptosis is fundamental for treating cancer. Screening for agents that induce apoptosis in tumor cells help in the development of novel agents for cancer treatment. Numerous studies suggest that the exposure of tumor cells to statins can lead to cell death via two separate processes: apoptosis or necrosis. Severe fragmentation of DNA during apoptosis can be readily measu...

  1. Autophagic Cell Death and Apoptosis Jointly Mediate Cisatracurium Besylate-Induced Cell Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixia Zhuang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cisatracurium besylate is an ideal non-depolarizing muscle relaxant which is widely used in clinical application. However, some studies have suggested that cisatracurium besylate can affect cell proliferation. Moreover, its specific mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we found that the number of GFP-LC3 (green fluoresent protein-light chain 3 positive autophagosomes and the rate of mitochondria fracture both increased significantly in drug-treated GFP-LC3 and MitoDsRed stable HeLa cells. Moreover, cisatracurium promoted the co-localization of LC3 and mitochondria and induced formation of autolysosomes. Levels of mitochondrial proteins decreased, which were reversed by the lysosome inhibitor Bafinomycin A1. Similar results with evidence of dose-dependent effects were found in both HeLa and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs. Cisatracurium lowered HUVEC viability to 0.16 (OD490 at 100 µM and to 0.05 (OD490 after 48 h in vitro; it increased the cell death rate to 56% at 100 µM and to 60% after 24 h in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (p < 0.01. Cell proliferation decreased significantly by four fold in Atg5 WT (wildtype MEF (mouse embryonic fibroblast (p < 0.01 but was unaffected in Atg5 KO (Knockout MEF, even upon treatment with a high dose of cisatracurium. Cisatracurium induced significant increase in cell death of wild-type MEFs even in the presence of the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD. Thus, we conclude that activation of both the autophagic cell death and cell apoptosis pathways contributes to cisatracurium-mediated cell injury.

  2. Evaluation of the effects of Streptococcus mutans chaperones and protein secretion machinery components on cell surface protein biogenesis, competence, and mutacin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, P J; Brady, L J

    2016-02-01

    The respective contributions of components of the protein translocation/maturation machinery to cell surface biogenesis in Streptococcus mutans are not fully understood. Here we used a genetic approach to characterize the effects of deletion of genes encoding the ribosome-associated chaperone RopA (Trigger Factor), the surface-localized foldase PrsA, and the membrane-localized chaperone insertases YidC1 and YidC2, both singly and in combination, on bacterial growth, chain length, self-aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity, autolysis, and antigenicity of surface proteins P1 (AgI/II, PAc), WapA, GbpC, and GtfD. The single and double deletion mutants, as well as additional mutant strains lacking components of the signal recognition particle pathway, were also evaluated for their effects on mutacin production and genetic competence. PMID:26386361

  3. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, H; Kibble, K; Zeng, H; Moyer, M P; Reindl, K M

    2013-09-01

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objective was to identify the intracellular signaling mechanisms by which PPLGM leads to enhanced colon cancer cell death. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in time- and concentration-dependent manners, but was not toxic toward normal colon mucosal cells at concentrations below 10 μM. Acute (0-60 min) and prolonged (24h) exposure of HT-29 cells to PPLGM resulted in phosphorylation of ERK. To investigate whether ERK signaling was involved in PPLGM-mediated cell death, we treated HT-29 cells with the MEK inhibitor U0126, prior to treating with PPLGM. We found that U0126 attenuated PPLGM-induced activation of ERK and partially protected against PPLGM-induced cell death. These results suggest that PPLGM works, at least in part, through the MEK/ERK pathway to result in colon cancer cell death. A more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which PPLGM induces colon cancer cell death will be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to treat colon cancer. PMID:23603476

  4. Developmental cell death programs license cytotoxic cells to eliminate histocompatible partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Daniel M; Rosental, Benyamin; Kowarsky, Mark; Sinha, Rahul; Ishizuka, Katherine J; Palmeri, Karla J; Quake, Stephen R; Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Weissman, Irving L

    2016-06-01

    In a primitive chordate model of natural chimerism, one chimeric partner is often eliminated in a process of allogeneic resorption. Here, we identify the cellular framework underlying loss of tolerance to one partner within a natural Botryllus schlosseri chimera. We show that the principal cell type mediating chimeric partner elimination is a cytotoxic morula cell (MC). Proinflammatory, developmental cell death programs render MCs cytotoxic and, in collaboration with activated phagocytes, eliminate chimeric partners during the "takeover" phase of blastogenic development. Among these genes, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 enhances cytotoxicity in allorecognition assays. Cellular transfer of FACS-purified MCs from allogeneic donors into recipients shows that the resorption response can be adoptively acquired. Transfer of 1 × 10(5) allogeneic MCs eliminated 33 of 78 (42%) recipient primary buds and 20 of 76 (20.5%) adult parental adult organisms (zooids) by 14 d whereas transfer of allogeneic cell populations lacking MCs had only minimal effects on recipient colonies. Furthermore, reactivity of transferred cells coincided with the onset of developmental-regulated cell death programs and disproportionately affected developing tissues within a chimera. Among chimeric partner "losers," severe developmental defects were observed in asexually propagating tissues, reflecting a pathologic switch in gene expression in developmental programs. These studies provide evidence that elimination of one partner in a chimera is an immune cell-based rejection that operates within histocompatible pairs and that maximal allogeneic responses involve the coordination of both phagocytic programs and the "arming" of cytotoxic cells. PMID:27217570

  5. Protein Kinase G facilitates EGFR-mediated cell death in MDA-MB-468 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Nicole M; Ceresa, Brian P

    2016-08-15

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase with critical implications in cell proliferation, migration, wound healing and the regulation of apoptosis. However, the EGFR has been shown to be hyper-expressed in a number of human malignancies. The MDA-MB-468 metastatic breast cell line is one example of this. This particular cell line hyper-expresses the EGFR and undergoes EGFR-mediated apoptosis in response to EGF ligand. The goal of this study was to identify the kinases that could be potential intermediates for the EGFR-mediated induction of apoptosis intracellularly. After identifying Cyclic GMP-dependent Protein Kinase G (PKG) as a plausible intermediate, we wanted to determine the temporal relationship of these two proteins in the induction of apoptosis. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in MDA-MB-468 cell viability, which was co-incident with increased PKG activity as measured by VASPSer239 phosphorylation. In addition, we observed a dose dependent decrease in cell viability, as well as an increase in apoptosis, in response to two different PKG agonists, 8-Bromo-cGMP and 8-pCPT-cGMP. MDA-MB-468 cells with reduced PKG activity had attenuated EGFR-mediated apoptosis. These findings indicate that PKG does not induce cell death via transphosphorylation of the EGFR. Instead, PKG activity occurs following EGFR activation. Together, these data indicate PKG as an intermediary in EGFR-mediated cell death, likely via apoptotic pathway. PMID:27381222

  6. A novel approach for studying programmed cell death in living plant tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina

    insight by determining both the intra- and extracellular reducing capacity in living cells rather than using cell extracts. The reducing capacity of aleurone cells was shown to increase over time in parallel with the increase in cell death. Use of the flavoenzyme inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride......, and enabled a higher throughput. The system wasused for parallel time course studies of cell viability, intracellular reducing capacity and transient expression profiles in immobilised tissue under multiple incubation conditions. Immobilisation resulted in decreased rates of cell death due to the lower......Programmed cell death (PCD) is a highly regulated process in which cells are killed as part of developmental programmes or as defence mechanisms against pathogens, but the process is less well understood in plant cells compared to animal cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in PCD...

  7. Death signals by environmental pollutants; Todessignale durch Umweltchemikalien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, H.F. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie und Genetik

    2002-07-01

    Life and death are directly involved in the normal development of all multicellular organisms. Defects in the regulation of the mechanism of programmed cell death (apoptosis) contribute to many diseases as well as in the toxic effects of xenobiotics. Here it is described which elements of the apoptotic machinery are possible targets of hydrocarbons and metal compounds, prominent environmental pollutants. Moreover, it is shown that cytotoxic rather than cytostatic therapies might be most effective in treatment of cancer. (orig.)

  8. Different cell death modes of pancreatic acinar cells on macrophage activation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Tao; LIU Tie-fu; XUE Dong-bo; SUN Bei; SHI Li-jun

    2008-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis is complex and largely unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between modes of cell death in pancreatic acinar cells, the release of cell contents and the inflammatory response of macrophagas.Methods Our experiment included four groups: group A (the control group), group B (AR42J cells overstimulated by caerulein), group C (AR42J cells treated with lipopolysaccharide and caerulein), and group D (AR42J cells treated with octreotide and caerulein). Apoptosis and oncosis, and the release of amylase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from AR42J cells were detected. Rat macrophages were stimulated by 1 ml supematant of culture medium of AR42J cells.Finally, NF-кB activation and TNF-α and IL-1β secretion by macrophages were detected.Results Oncotlc cells in group C increased while apoptctic cells decreased (P <0.05); cells in group D had the inverse reaction. The release of amylase and LDH changed directly with the occurrence of oncosis. The transcription factor NF-кB was activated and secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly higher in group C than in group B (P <0.05); in group D, these actions were significantly lower than in group B (P<0.05). This trend was in line with changes in amylase and LDH production.Conclusion There is a close relationship between modes of pancreatic acinar cell death, the release of cell contents and the inflammatory reaction of macrophages.

  9. Fermented Brown Rice Extract Causes Apoptotic Death of Human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells via Death Receptor Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Yukiko; Nemoto, Hideyuki; Itoh, Mari; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Morita, Kyoji

    2016-04-01

    Mixture of brown rice and rice bran fermented with Aspergillus oryzae, designated as FBRA, has been reported to reveal anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects in rodents. Then, to test its potential anti-cancer activity, the aqueous extract was prepared from FBRA powder, and the effect of this extract on human acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells was directly examined. The exposure to FBRA extract reduced the cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The reduction of the cell viability was accompanied by the DNA fragmentation, and partially restored by treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor. Further studies showed that FBRA extract induced the cleavage of caspase-8, -9, and -3, and decreased Bcl-2 protein expression. Moreover, the expression of tBid, DR5, and Fas proteins was enhanced by FBRA extract, and the pretreatment with caspase-8 inhibitor, but not caspase-9 inhibitor, restored the reduction of the cell viability induced by FBRA extract. These findings suggested that FBRA extract could induce the apoptotic death of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells probably through mainly the death receptor-mediated pathway and supplementarily through the tBid-mediated mitochondrial pathway, proposing the possibility that FBRA was a potential functional food beneficial to patients with hematological cancer. PMID:26769704

  10. Signal transduction pathway of nitric oxide inducing PC12 cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study signal transduction pathway of nitric oxideinducing death of PC12 cells.Methods: Cell survival rate was measured with MTT assay, and caspase-3 activity with caspase-3 assay kits after PC12 cells were incubated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), caspase-3 inhibitor Ⅱ plus SNP or p38 inhibitor-SB203580 plus SNP.Results: SNP induced death of PC12 cells in dose- and time-dependent manner and enhanced caspase-3 activity gradually. Both caspase-3 inhibitor Ⅱ and SB203580 reduced cell death, but SB203580 reduced caspase-3 activity significantly.Conclusions: NO may induce death of PC12 cells through activation of p38 and caspase-3.

  11. Thapsigargin increases apoptotic cell death in human hepatoma BEL—7404 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUJUN; HELIU

    1995-01-01

    Effects of thapsigargin,an inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase in surface of endoplasmic reticulum,on apoptotic cell death were studied in human hepatoma cells of BEL-7404 cell line by using both flow cytometry and electron microscopy.Propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry revealed that in the serum-free condition,thapsigargin increased the rate of apoptosis of BEL-7404 cells in a dose-dependent manner.Prolongation of the period of serum-free condition enhanced the apoptosis induced by thapsigargin treatment.Morphological observation with electron microscope further demonstrated that chromatin condensation and fragmentation,apoptotic bodies existed in TG-treated cells,supporting that thapsigargin is a potent activator of apoptosis in the cells.

  12. PKC activation induces inflammatory response and cell death in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunhee Kim

    Full Text Available A variety of airborne pathogens can induce inflammatory responses in airway epithelial cells, which is a crucial component of host defence. However, excessive inflammatory responses and chronic inflammation also contribute to different diseases of the respiratory system. We hypothesized that the activation of protein kinase C (PKC is one of the essential mechanisms of inflammatory response in airway epithelial cells. In the present study, we stimulated human bronchial lung epithelial (BEAS-2B cells with the phorbol ester Phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu, and examined gene expression profile using microarrays. Microarray analysis suggests that PKC activation induced dramatic changes in gene expression related to multiple cellular functions. The top two interaction networks generated from these changes were centered on NFκB and TNF-α, which are two commonly known pathways for cell death and inflammation. Subsequent tests confirmed the decrease in cell viability and an increase in the production of various cytokines. Interestingly, each of the increased cytokines was differentially regulated at mRNA and/or protein levels by different sub-classes of PKC isozymes. We conclude that pathological cell death and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells in various situations may be mediated through PKC related signaling pathways. These findings suggest that PKCs can be new targets for treatment of lung diseases.

  13. Disrupting the oncogenic synergism between nucleolin and Ras results in cell growth inhibition and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Schokoroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ErbB receptors, Ras proteins and nucleolin are major contributors to malignant transformation. The pleiotropic protein nucleolin can bind to both Ras protein and ErbB receptors. Previously, we have demonstrated a crosstalk between Ras, nucleolin and the ErbB1 receptor. Activated Ras facilitates nucleolin interaction with ErbB1 and stabilizes ErbB1 levels. The three oncogenes synergistically facilitate anchorage independent growth and tumor growth in nude mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we used several cancer cell lines. The effect of Ras and nucleolin inhibition was determined using cell growth, cell death and cell motility assays. Protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. We found that inhibition of Ras and nucleolin reduces tumor cell growth, enhances cell death and inhibits anchorage independent growth. Our results reveal that the combined treatment affects Ras and nucleolin levels and localization. Our study also indicates that Salirasib (FTS, Ras inhibitor reduces cell motility, which is not affected by the nucleolin inhibitor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that targeting both nucleolin and Ras may represent an additional avenue for inhibiting cancers driven by these oncogenes.

  14. NOPO modulates Egr-induced JNK-independent cell death in Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianjue Ma; Jiuhong Huang; Lixia Yang; Yang Yang; Wenzhe Li; Lei Xue

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family ligands play essential roles in regulating a variety of cellular processes including proliferation,differentiation and survival.Expression of Drosophila TNF ortholog Eiger (Egr) induces JNK-dependent cell death,while the roles of caspases in this process remain elusive.To further delineate the Egr-triggered cell death pathway,we performed a genetic screen to identify dominant modifiers of the Egr-induced cell death phenotype.Here we report that Egr elicits a caspase-mediated cell death pathway independent of JNK signaling.Furthermore,we show NOPO,the Drosophila ortholog of TRIP (TRAF interacting protein) encoding an E3 ubiquitin ligase,modulates Egr-induced Caspase-mediated cell death through transcriptional activation of pro-apoptotic genes reaper and hid.Finally,we found Bendless and dUEV1a,an ubiquitin-conjugating E2 enzyme complex,regulates NOPO-triggered cell death.Our results indicate that the Ben-dUEV1a complex constitutes a molecular switch that bifurcates the Egr-induced cell death signaling into two pathways mediated by JNK and caspases respectively.

  15. Iron Prochelator BSIH Protects Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells against Cell Death Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Charkoudian, Louise K.; Dentchev, Tzvete; Lukinova, Nina; Wolkow, Natalie; Dunaief, Joshua L.; Franz, Katherine J.

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulation of localized iron homeostasis is implicated in several degenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and age-related macular degeneration, wherein iron-mediated oxidative stress is hypothesized to contribute to cell death. Inhibiting toxic iron without altering normal metal-dependent processes presents significant challenges for standard small molecule chelating agents. We previously introduced BSIH (isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl...

  16. Hop/STI1 modulates retinal proliferation and cell death independent of PrPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hop/STI1 is a co-chaperone adaptor protein for Hsp70/Hsp90 complexes. Hop/STI1 is found extracellularly and modulates cell death and differentiation through interaction with the prion protein (PrPC). Here, we investigated the expression of hop/STI1 and its role upon cell proliferation and cell death in the developing retina. Hop/STI1 is more expressed in developing rat retina than in the mature tissue. Hop/STI1 blocks retinal cell death in the neuroblastic layer (NBL) in a PrPC dependent manner, but failed to protect ganglion cells against axotomy-induced cell death. An antibody raised against hop/STI1 (α-STI1) blocked both ganglion cell and NBL cell death independent of PrPC. cAMP/PKA, ERK, PI3K and PKC signaling pathways were not involved in these effects. Hop/STI1 treatment reduced proliferation, while α-STI1 increased proliferation in the developing retina, both independent of PrPC. We conclude that hop/STI1 can modulate both proliferation and cell death in the developing retina independent of PrPC

  17. Interplay between autophagy and programmed cell death in mammalian neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min Chung

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs are of particular interestbecause of their role in brain development and function. Recentfindings suggest the intimate involvement of programmed celldeath (PCD in the turnover of NSCs. However, the underlyingmechanisms of PCD are largely unknown. Although apoptosis isthe best-defined form of PCD, accumulating evidence hasrevealed a wide spectrum of PCD encompassing apoptosis,autophagic cell death (ACD and necrosis. This mini-reviewaims to illustrate a unique regulation of PCD in NSCs. Theresults of our recent studies on autophagic death of adulthippocampal neural stem (HCN cells are also discussed. HCNcell death following insulin withdrawal clearly provides areliable model that can be used to analyze the molecularmechanisms of ACD in the larger context of PCD. Moreresearch efforts are needed to increase our understanding of themolecular basis of NSC turnover under degenerating conditions,such as aging, stress and neurological diseases. Efforts aimed atprotecting and harnessing endogenous NSCs will offer novelopportunities for the development of new therapeutic strategiesfor neuropathologies. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(8: 383-390

  18. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway

  19. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Qing [School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Key Lab in Healthy Science and Technology, Division of Life Science, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Tou, Fangfang [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China); Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong [First Affiliated Hospital, Guiyang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guiyang, 550002 (China); Chen, Xinyi [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029 (China); Zheng, Zhi, E-mail: zheng_sheva@hotmail.com [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China)

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway.

  20. HIV-1 Vpr-induced cell death in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is reminiscent of apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sylvain Huard; Mingzhong Chen; Kristen E Burdette; Csaba Fenyvuesvolgyi; Min Yu; Robert T Elder; Richard Y Zhao

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr induces cell death in mammalian and fission yeast cells,suggesting that Vpr may affect a conserved cellular process. It is unclear,however,whether Vpr-induced yeast cell death mimics Vpr-mediated apoptosis in mammalian cells. We have recently identified a number of Vpr suppressors that not only suppress Vpr-induced cell death in fission yeast,but also block Vpr-induced apoptosis in mammalian cells. These findings suggest that Vpr-induced cell death in yeast may resemble some of the apoptotic processes of mammalian cells.The goal of this study was to develop and validate a fission yeast model system for future studies of apoptosis. Similar to Vpr-induced apoptosis in mammalian cells,we show here that Vpr in fission yeast promotes phosphatidylserine externalization and induces hyperpolarization of mitochondria,leading to changes of mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover,Vpr triggers production of reactive oxygen species (ROS),indicating that the apoptotic-like cell death might be mediated by ROS. Interestingly,Vpr induces unique morphologic changes in mitochondria that may provide a simple marker for measuring the apoptotic-like process in fission yeast. To verify this possibility,we tested two Vpr suppressors (EF2 and Hspl6) that suppress Vpr-induced apoptosis in mammalian cells in addition to a newly identified Vpr suppressor (Skp1). All three proteins abolished cell death mediated by Vpr and restored normal mitochondrialmorphology in the yeast cells. In conclusion,Vpr-induced cell death in fission yeast resembles the mammalian apoptotic process. Fission yeast may thus potentially be used as a simple model organism for the future study of the apoptotic-like process induced by Vpr and other proapoptotic agents.

  1. Melatonin attenuates 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced PC12 cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-feng BAO; Ren-gang WU; Xiao-ping ZHANG; Yan SONG; Chang-ling LI

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effect of melatonin on PC12 cell death induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). Methods: MTT assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)efflux assay, and immunohistochemistry methods were used to measure neurotoxicity of PC 12 cells treated acutely with MPP+ in low glucose and high glucose conditions, and to assess the neuroprotective effect of melatonin on PC 12 cell death induced by MPP+. Results: In a low glucose condition, MPP+ significantly induced PC 12 cell death, which showed time and concentration dependence. In a serum-free low glucose condition, the percentages of viability of cells treated with MPP+ for 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h were 85.1%, 75.4%, 64.9%, 28.15%, and 9%, respectively. The level of LDH in the culture medium increased and tyrosine hydroxylase positive (TH+) cell count decreased. However, in a serum-free high glucose condition, MPP+ did not significantly induce PC12 cell death compared with control at various concentrations and time regimens. When the cells were preincubated with melatonin 250 μmol/L for 48, 72, and 96 h in a serum-free low glucose condition, cell survival rate significantly increased to 78.1%, 58.8%, and 31.6%, respectively. Melatonin abolished the LDH leakage of cells treated with MPP+ and increased TH+ cells count. Conclusion: MPP+ caused concentrationdependent PC12 cell death. The level of glucose was an important factor to MPP+induced dopaminergic PC12 cell death. Low glucose level could potentiate MPP+toxicity, while high glucose level could reduce the toxicity. In addition, melatonin attenuated PC12 cell death induced by MPP+.

  2. Cellular Mechanism of Newly Synthesized Indoledione Derivative-induced Immunological Death of Tumor Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Su-Jin; Ryu, Chung-Kyu; Baek, So-Young; Lee, Hyunah

    2011-01-01

    Background EY-6 is one of the newly synthesized indoledione derivatives to induce tumor cell-specific cell death. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of immunological death induced by EY-6 at mouse colon cancer cell as well as at the normal immune cell represented by dendritic cell. Methods C57BL/6 mouse syngeneic colon cancer cell MC38 was treated with EY-6, and analyzed by MTT for viability test, flow cytometry for confirming surface expressing molecules and ELISA for detection of ...

  3. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, Merril C.; Peters, Amelia A. [School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Kenny, Paraic A. [Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J. [School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Monteith, Gregory R., E-mail: gregm@uq.edu.au [School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Some clinical breast cancers are associated with MCU overexpression. •MCU silencing did not alter cell death initiated with the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263. •MCU silencing potentiated caspase-independent cell death initiated by ionomycin. •MCU silencing promoted ionomycin-mediated cell death without changes in bulk Ca{sup 2+}. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  4. Overexpression of Ref-1 Inhibits Lead-induced Endothelial Cell Death via the Upregulation of Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwon Ho; Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Hyo Shin; Cho, Eun Jung; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Soo; Chang, Seok Jong; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2009-12-01

    The role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (Ref-1) on the lead (Pb)-induced cellular response was investigated in the cultured endothelial cells. Pb caused progressive cellular death in endothelial cells, which occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, Ref-1 overexpression with AdRef-1 significantly inhibited Pb-induced cell death in the endothelial cells. Also the overexpression of Ref-1 significantly suppressed Pb-induced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide elevation in the endothelial cells. Pb exposure induced the downregulation of catalase, it was inhibited by the Ref-1 overexpression in the endothelial cells. Taken together, our data suggests that the overexpression of Ref-1 inhibited Pb-induced cell death via the upregulation of catalase in the cultured endothelial cells.

  5. Cavitation in Hydraulic Machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjeldsen, M.

    1996-11-01

    The main purpose of this doctoral thesis on cavitation in hydraulic machinery is to change focus towards the coupling of non-stationary flow phenomena and cavitation. It is argued that, in addition to turbulence, superimposed sound pressure fluctuations can have a major impact on cavitation and lead to particularly severe erosion. For the design of hydraulic devices this finding may indicate how to further limit the cavitation problems. Chapter 1 reviews cavitation in general in the context of hydraulic machinery, emphasizing the initial cavitation event and the role of the water quality. Chapter 2 discusses the existence of pressure fluctuations for situations common in such machinery. Chapter 3 on cavitation dynamics presents an algorithm for calculating the nucleation of a cavity cluster. Chapter 4 describes the equipment used in this work. 53 refs., 55 figs.,10 tabs.

  6. Involvement of ethylene and nitric oxide in cell death in mastoparan-treated unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yordanova, Z.P.; Iakimova, E.T.; Cristescu, S.M.; Harren, F.J.M.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    This work demonstrates a contribution of ethylene and NO in mastoparan (MP)-induced cell death in the green algae C. reinhardtii. Following MP treatment, C. reinhardtii showed massive cell death, expressing morphological features of programmed cell death (PCD). A pharmacological approach involving c

  7. Rhinacanthus nasutus protects cultured neuronal cells against hypoxia induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimson, James M; Tencomnao, Tewin

    2011-07-26

    Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz (Acanthaceae) is an herb native to Thailand and Southeast Asia, known for its antioxidant properties. Hypoxia leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species in cells and is a leading cause of neuronal damage. Cell death caused by hypoxia has been linked with a number of neurodegenerative diseases including some forms of dementia and stroke, as well as the build up of reactive oxygen species which can lead to diseases such as Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and Alzeheimer's disease. In this study we used an airtight culture container and the Mitsubishi Gas Company anaeropack along with the MTT assay, LDH assay and the trypan blue exlusion assay to show that 1 and 10 µg mL⁻¹ root extract of R. nasutus is able to significantly prevent the death of HT-22 cells subjected to hypoxic conditions, and 0.1 to 10 µg mL⁻¹ had no toxic effect on HT-22 under normal conditions, whereas 100 µg mL⁻¹ reduced HT-22 cell proliferation. We also used H₂DCFDA staining to show R. nasutus can reduce reactive oxygen species production in HT-22 cells.

  8. Rhinacanthus nasutus Protects Cultured Neuronal Cells against Hypoxia Induced Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Brimson

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Rhinacanthus nasutus (L. Kurz (Acanthaceae is an herb native to Thailand and Southeast Asia, known for its antioxidant properties. Hypoxia leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species in cells and is a leading cause of neuronal damage. Cell death caused by hypoxia has been linked with a number of neurodegenerative diseases including some forms of dementia and stroke, as well as the build up of reactive oxygen species which can lead to diseases such as Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Alzeheimer’s disease. In this study we used an airtight culture container and the Mitsubishi Gas Company anaeropack along with the MTT assay, LDH assay and the trypan blue exlusion assay to show that 1 and 10 µg mL−1 root extract of R. nasutus is able to significantly prevent the death of HT-22 cells subjected to hypoxic conditions, and 0.1 to 10 µg mL−1 had no toxic effect on HT-22 under normal conditions, whereas 100 µg mL−1 reduced HT-22 cell proliferation. We also used H2DCFDA staining to show R. nasutus can reduce reactive oxygen species production in HT-22 cells.

  9. Programmed Cell Death Progresses Differentially in Epidermal and Mesophyll Cells of Lily Petals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Mochizuki-Kawai

    Full Text Available In the petals of some species of flowers, programmed cell death (PCD begins earlier in mesophyll cells than in epidermal cells. However, PCD progression in each cell type has not been characterized in detail. We separately constructed a time course of biochemical signs and expression patterns of PCD-associated genes in epidermal and mesophyll cells in Lilium cv. Yelloween petals. Before visible signs of senescence could be observed, we found signs of PCD, including DNA degradation and decreased protein content in mesophyll cells only. In these cells, the total proteinase activity increased on the day after anthesis. Within 3 days after anthesis, the protein content decreased by 61.8%, and 22.8% of mesophyll cells was lost. A second peak of proteinase activity was observed on day 6, and the number of mesophyll cells decreased again from days 4 to 7. These biochemical and morphological results suggest that PCD progressed in steps during flower life in the mesophyll cells. PCD began in epidermal cells on day 5, in temporal synchrony with the time course of visible senescence. In the mesophyll cells, the KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase (LoCYP and S1/P1 nuclease (LoNUC genes were upregulated before petal wilting, earlier than in epidermal cells. In contrast, relative to that in the mesophyll cells, the expression of the SAG12 cysteine proteinase homolog (LoSAG12 drastically increased in epidermal cells in the final stage of senescence. These results suggest that multiple PCD-associated genes differentially contribute to the time lag of PCD progression between epidermal and mesophyll cells of lily petals.

  10. Improving Accuracy in Arrhenius Models of Cell Death: Adding a Temperature-Dependent Time Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, John A

    2015-12-01

    The Arrhenius formulation for single-step irreversible unimolecular reactions has been used for many decades to describe the thermal damage and cell death processes. Arrhenius predictions are acceptably accurate for structural proteins, for some cell death assays, and for cell death at higher temperatures in most cell lines, above about 55 °C. However, in many cases--and particularly at hyperthermic temperatures, between about 43 and 55 °C--the particular intrinsic cell death or damage process under study exhibits a significant "shoulder" region that constant-rate Arrhenius models are unable to represent with acceptable accuracy. The primary limitation is that Arrhenius calculations always overestimate the cell death fraction, which leads to severely overoptimistic predictions of heating effectiveness in tumor treatment. Several more sophisticated mathematical model approaches have been suggested and show much-improved performance. But simpler models that have adequate accuracy would provide useful and practical alternatives to intricate biochemical analyses. Typical transient intrinsic cell death processes at hyperthermic temperatures consist of a slowly developing shoulder region followed by an essentially constant-rate region. The shoulder regions have been demonstrated to arise chiefly from complex functional protein signaling cascades that generate delays in the onset of the constant-rate region, but may involve heat shock protein activity as well. This paper shows that acceptably accurate and much-improved predictions in the simpler Arrhenius models can be obtained by adding a temperature-dependent time delay. Kinetic coefficients and the appropriate time delay are obtained from the constant-rate regions of the measured survival curves. The resulting predictions are seen to provide acceptably accurate results while not overestimating cell death. The method can be relatively easily incorporated into numerical models. Additionally, evidence is presented

  11. Thymoquinone inhibits autophagy and induces cathepsin-mediated, caspase-independent cell death in glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira O Racoma

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most aggressive and common type of malignant brain tumor in humans, with a median survival of 15 months. There is a great need for more therapies for the treatment of glioblastoma. Naturally occurring phytochemicals have received much scientific attention because many exhibit potent tumor killing action. Thymoquinone (TQ is the bioactive compound of the Nigella sativa seed oil. TQ has anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic actions with selective cytotoxicity for human cancer cells compared to normal cells. Here, we show that TQ selectively inhibits the clonogenicity of glioblastoma cells as compared to normal human astrocytes. Also, glioblastoma cell proliferation could be impaired by chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, suggesting that glioblastoma cells may be dependent on the autophagic pathway for survival. Exposure to TQ caused an increase in the recruitment and accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II. TQ also caused an accumulation of the LC3-associated protein p62, confirming the inhibition of autophagy. Furthermore, the levels of Beclin-1 protein expression were unchanged, indicating that TQ interferes with a later stage of autophagy. Finally, treatment with TQ induces lysosome membrane permeabilization, as determined by a specific loss of red acridine orange staining. Lysosome membrane permeabilization resulted in a leakage of cathepsin B into the cytosol, which mediates caspase-independent cell death that can be prevented by pre-treatment with a cathepsin B inhibitor. TQ induced apoptosis, as determined by an increase in PI and Annexin V positive cells. However, apoptosis appears to be caspase-independent due to failure of the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK to prevent cell death and absence of the typical apoptosis related signature DNA fragmentation. Inhibition of autophagy is an exciting and emerging strategy in cancer therapy. In this vein, our results describe a

  12. The mechanism of pneumolysin-induced cochlear hair cell death in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurg, Maryline; Hafidi, Aziz; Skinner, Liam; Cowan, Graeme; Hondarrague, Yannick; Mitchell, Tim J; Dulon, Didier

    2005-10-01

    Streptoccocus pneumoniae infection can result in local and systemic diseases such as otitis media, pneumonia and meningitis. Sensorineural hearing loss associated with this infection is mediated by the release of an exotoxin, pneumolysin. The goal of the present study was to characterize the mechanisms of pneumolysin toxicity in cochlear hair cells in vitro. Pneumolysin induced severe damage in cochlear hair cells, ranging from stereocilia disorganization to total cell loss. Surprisingly, pneumolysin-induced cell death preferentially targeted inner hair cells. Pneumolysin triggered in vitro cell death by an influx of calcium. Extracellular calcium appeared to enter the cell through a pore formed by the toxin. Buffering intracellular calcium with BAPTA improved hair cell survival. The mitochondrial apoptotic pathway involved in pneumolysin-induced cell death was demonstrated by the use of bongkrekic acid. Binding of pneumolysin to the hair cell plasma membrane was required to induce cell death. Increasing external calcium reduced cell toxicity by preventing the binding of pneumolysin to hair cell membranes. These results showed the significant role of calcium both in triggering pneumolysin-induced hair cell apoptosis and in preventing the toxin from binding to its cellular target. PMID:16051626

  13. Cocaine-induced oxidative stress precedes cell death in human neuronal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, H Fai; Abdullah, Laila; Mullan, Myles A; Mullan, Michael J; Crawford, Fiona C

    2007-01-01

    By 2003, an estimated 34 million Americans had used cocaine according to the National Survey on Drug Use & Health. About 5.9 million of those had used in the past 12 months. Chronic cocaine users often develop addiction, dependency and tolerance to the drug. The psychological and physical effects of cocaine are due to the disruption of the limbic system in the central nervous system (CNS). Increased oxidative stress reported in the frontal cortex and the striatum of rats exposed to cocaine suggests that oxidative damage plays a significant role in cocaine-induced disruption of the CNS. Although it is evident that cocaine induces oxidative stress in the CNS, little has been learned about whether such increased oxidative stress is also relevant to apoptosis in cocaine-exposed models. To gain insight into the role of cocaine-induced oxidative stress in apoptosis, we hypothesized that oxidative stress precedes cell death when cocaine is administrated. To test this hypothesis, we have monitored the oxidative stress and apoptotic effects of acute cocaine exposure in human neuronal progenitor cells (HNPC). We found that oxidative stress was significantly increased at 48h after a 30min cocaine exposure compared to control cells, and that this was followed by cell death at 72h. Using the same experimental paradigm we have previously shown that pro-inflammatory genes are up-regulated in cocaine-exposed HNPC at 24h. Therefore, we suggest that the increased oxidative stress (possibly mediated by inflammatory responses) precedes cell death in cocaine-exposed HNPC. This may have implications for the consequences of cocaine abuse in situations where antioxidant capacity is compromised, as in the aging brain. PMID:16956698

  14. Mechanisms underlying 3-bromopyruvate-induced cell death in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yiming; Liu, Zhe; Zou, Xue; Lan, Yadong; Sun, Xiaojin; Wang, Xiu; Zhao, Surong; Jiang, Chenchen; Liu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) is an energy-depleting drug that inhibits Hexokinase II activity by alkylation during glycolysis, thereby suppressing the production of ATP and inducing cell death. As such, 3BP can potentially serve as an anti-tumorigenic agent. Our previous research showed that 3BP can induce apoptosis via AKT /protein Kinase B signaling in breast cancer cells. Here we found that 3BP can also induce colon cancer cell death by necroptosis and apoptosis at the same time and concentration in the SW480 and HT29 cell lines; in the latter, autophagy was also found to be a mechanism of cell death. In HT29 cells, combined treatment with 3BP and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) exacerbated cell death, while viability in 3BP-treated cells was enhanced by concomitant treatment with the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-fmk) and the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin (Nec)-1. Moreover, 3BP inhibited tumor growth in a SW480 xenograft mouse model. These results indicate that 3BP can suppress tumor growth and induce cell death by multiple mechanisms at the same time and concentration in different types of colon cancer cell by depleting cellular energy stores. PMID:26054380

  15. (-)-Oleocanthal rapidly and selectively induces cancer cell death via lysosomal membrane permeabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGendre, Onica; Breslin, Paul AS; Foster, David A

    2015-01-01

    (-)-Oleocanthal (OC), a phenolic compound present in extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), has been implicated in the health benefits associated with diets rich in EVOO. We investigated the effect of OC on human cancer cell lines in culture and found that OC induced cell death in all cancer cells examined as rapidly as 30 minutes after treatment in the absence of serum. OC treatment of non-transformed cells suppressed their proliferation but did not cause cell death. OC induced both primary necrotic and apoptotic cell death via induction of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). We provide evidence that OC promotes LMP by inhibiting acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) activity, which destabilizes the interaction between proteins required for lysosomal membrane stability. The data presented here indicate that cancer cells, which tend to have fragile lysosomal membranes compared to non-cancerous cells, are susceptible to cell death induced by lysosomotropic agents. Therefore, targeting lysosomal membrane stability represents a novel approach for the induction of cancer-specific cell death. PMID:26380379

  16. Magnaporthe oryzae-Secreted Protein MSP1 Induces Cell Death and Elicits Defense Responses in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiming; Wu, Jingni; Kim, Sang Gon; Tsuda, Kenichi; Gupta, Ravi; Park, Sook-Young; Kim, Sun Tae; Kang, Kyu Young

    2016-04-01

    The Magnaporthe oryzae snodprot1 homolog (MSP1), secreted by M. oryzae, is a cerato-platanin family protein. msp1-knockout mutants have reduced virulence on barley leaves, indicating that MSP1 is required for the pathogenicity of rice blast fungus. To investigate the functional roles of MSP1 and its downstream signaling in rice, recombinant MSP1 was produced in Escherichia coli and was assayed for its functionality. Application of MSP1 triggered cell death and elicited defense responses in rice. MSP1 also induced H2O2 production and autophagic cell death in both suspension-cultured cells and rice leaves. One or more protein kinases triggered cell death, jasmonic acid and abscisic acid enhanced cell death, while salicylic acid suppressed it. We demonstrated that the secretion of MSP1 into the apoplast is a prerequisite for triggering cell death and activating defense-related gene expression. Furthermore, pretreatment of rice with a sublethal MSP1 concentration potentiated resistance to the pathogen. Taken together, our results showed that MSP1 induces a high degree of cell death in plants, which might be essential for its virulence. Moreover, rice can recognize MSP1, resulting in the induction of pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity. PMID:26780420

  17. Chinese Medicines Induce Cell Death: The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanbin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and Methods. Chinese medicines (including Chinese medicinal herbs, animal parts, and minerals were used in the study. The key words including “cancer”, “cell death”, “apoptosis”, “autophagy,” “necrosis,” and “Chinese medicine” were used in retrieval of related information from PubMed and other databases. Results. The cell death induced by Chinese medicines is described as apoptotic, autophagic, or necrotic cell death and other types with an emphasis on their mechanisms of anticancer action. The relationship among different types of cell death induced by Chinese medicines is critically reviewed and discussed. Conclusions. This review summarizes that CMs treatment could induce multiple pathways leading to cancer cell death, in which apoptosis is the dominant type. To apply these preclinical researches to clinic application will be a key issue in the future.

  18. Aluminum toxicity and Ca depletion may enhance cell death of tobacco cells via similar syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, Refat Abdel; Matsumoto, Hideaki

    2008-05-01

    The main objective of this work is to find out whether aluminum (Al) toxicity and Ca depletion cause cell death of tobacco cells via similar sequence of events. Tobacco cell suspension culture exhibited maximum fresh weight in the presence of a wide range of Ca concentrations between 0.1-1.0 mM whereas higher concentrations (>1.0-5.0 mM) gradually lowered cell fresh weight. However, this decrease in fresh weight does not imply a negative impact on cell viability since cell growth recommenced in fresh MS medium with rates mostly higher than those of low Ca. In addition, high Ca seems to be crucial for survival of Al-treated cells. On the other side, tobacco cells exhibited extreme sensitivity to complete deprivation of Ca. Without Ca, cells could not survive for 18 h and substantially lost their growth capability. Evans blue uptake proved membrane damage of Ca-depleted same as Al-treated cells; relative to maintained membrane intactness of calcium-supplemented (control) ones. Percentage of membrane damage and the growth capability (survival) of tobacco cells exhibited a clear negative correlation.Alterations in growth (fresh weight per aliquot) could not be ascribed neither to cell number nor to decreased dry matter allocation (dry weight/fresh weight percentage) but was mainly due to decreased cellular water content. In this context, Ca-depleted cells lost about half their original water content while 100 microM Al-treated ones retained most of it (ca 87%). This represented the single difference between the two treatments (discussed in the text). Nevertheless, such high water content of the Al-treated cells seems physiologically useless since it did not result in improved viability. Similarities, however, included negligible levels of growth capability, maximum levels of membrane damage, and comparable amounts of NO(3) (-) efflux. As well, both types of treatments led to a sharp decline in osmotic potential that is, in turn, needed for water influx. The above

  19. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  20. Apoptotic Cell Death Induced by Resveratrol Is Partially Mediated by the Autophagy Pathway in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Lang

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (trans-3,4,5'-trihydroxystilbene is an active compound in food, such as red grapes, peanuts, and berries. Resveratrol exhibits an anticancer effect on various human cancer cells. However, the mechanism of resveratrol-induced anti-cancer effect at the molecular level remains to be elucidated. In this study, the mechanism underlying the anti-cancer effect of resveratrol in human ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3 and Caov-3 was investigated using various molecular biology techniques, such as flow cytometry, western blotting, and RNA interference, with a major focus on the potential role of autophagy in resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. We demonstrated that resveratrol induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, which triggers autophagy and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Resveratrol induced ATG5 expression and promoted LC3 cleavage. The apoptotic cell death induced by resveratrol was attenuated by both pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine, which functions at the late stage of autophagy, significantly reduced resveratrol-induced cell death and caspase 3 activity in human ovarian cancer cells. We also demonstrated that targeting ATG5 by siRNA also suppressed resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. Thus, we concluded that a common pathway between autophagy and apoptosis exists in resveratrol-induced cell death in OVCAR-3 human ovarian cancer cells.

  1. Mediation of autophagic cell death by type 3 ryanodine receptor (RyR3 in adult hippocampal neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min eChung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic Ca2+ actively engages in diverse intracellular processes from protein synthesis, folding and trafficking to cell survival and death. Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels is observed in various neuropathological states including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs and IP3 receptors (IP3Rs, the main Ca2+ release channels located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes, are known to direct various cellular events such as autophagy and apoptosis. Here we investigated the intracellular Ca2+-mediated regulation of survival and death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN cells utilizing an insulin withdrawal model of autophagic cell death. Despite comparable expression levels of RyR and IP3R transcripts in HCN cells at normal state, the expression levels of RyRs — especially RyR3 — were markedly upregulated upon insulin withdrawal. While treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine significantly promoted the autophagic death of insulin-deficient HCN cells, treatment with its inhibitor dantrolene prevented the induction of autophagy following insulin withdrawal. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of the RyR3 gene abolished autophagic cell death of HCN cells. This study delineates a distinct, RyR3-mediated ER Ca2+ regulation of autophagy and programmed cell death in neural stem cells. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical, yet understudied mechanisms underlying the regulatory function of ER Ca2+ in neural stem cell biology.

  2. (-)-Oleocanthal rapidly and selectively induces cancer cell death via lysosomal membrane permeabilization

    OpenAIRE

    LeGendre, Onica; Breslin, Paul AS; Foster, David A.

    2015-01-01

    (-)-Oleocanthal (OC), a phenolic compound present in extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), has been implicated in the health benefits associated with diets rich in EVOO. We investigated the effect of OC on human cancer cell lines in culture and found that OC induced cell death in all cancer cells examined as rapidly as 30 minutes after treatment in the absence of serum. OC treatment of non-transformed cells suppressed their proliferation but did not cause cell death. OC induced both primary necrotic...

  3. Antisense bcl-2 treatment increases programmed cell death in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koty, P P; Zhang, H; Levitt, M L

    1999-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically regulated pathway that is altered in many cancers. This process is, in part, regulated by the ratio of PCD inducers (Bax) or inhibitors (Bcl-2). An abnormally high ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax prevents PCD, thus contributing to resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, many of which are capable of inducing PCD. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells demonstrate resistance to these PCD-inducing agents. If Bcl-2 prevents NSCLC cells from entering the PCD pathway, then reducing the amount of endogenous Bcl-2 product may allow these cells to spontaneously enter the PCD pathway. Our purpose was to determine the effects of bcl-2 antisense treatment on the levels of programmed cell death in NSCLC cells. First, we determined whether bcl-2 and bax mRNA were expressed in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines: NCI-H226 (squamous), NCI-H358 (adenocarcinoma), and NCI-H596 (adenosquamous). Cells were then exposed to synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment, after which programmed cell death was determined, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation. Bcl-2 protein expression was detected immunohistochemically. All three NSCLC cell lines expressed both bcl-2 and bax mRNA and had functional PCD pathways. Synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment resulted in decreased Bcl-2 levels, reduced cell proliferation, decreased cell viability, and increased levels of spontaneous PCD. This represents the first evidence that decreasing Bcl-2 in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines allows the cells to spontaneously enter a PCD pathway. It also indicates the potential therapeutic use of antisense bcl-2 in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:10217615

  4. A Proteolytic Cascade Controls Lysosome Rupture and Necrotic Cell Death Mediated by Lysosome-Destabilizing Adjuvants

    OpenAIRE

    Jürgen Brojatsch; Heriberto Lima; Alak K Kar; Jacobson, Lee S.; Stefan M Muehlbauer; Kartik Chandran; Felipe Diaz-Griffero

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have linked necrotic cell death and proteolysis of inflammatory proteins to the adaptive immune response mediated by the lysosome-destabilizing adjuvants, alum and Leu-Leu-OMe (LLOMe). However, the mechanism by which lysosome-destabilizing agents trigger necrosis and proteolysis of inflammatory proteins is poorly understood. The proteasome is a cellular complex that has been shown to regulate both necrotic cell death and proteolysis of inflammatory proteins. We found that the p...

  5. Chinese Medicines Induce Cell Death: The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Xuanbin Wang; Yibin Feng; Ning Wang; Fan Cheung; Hor Yue Tan; Sen Zhong; Charlie Li; Seiichi Kobayashi

    2014-01-01

    Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and...

  6. Regulation of programmed cell death by plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lademann, Ulrik Axel; Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed

    2008-01-01

    PA) observed in tumours; however, several lines of evidence suggest that PAI-1 may contribute directly to the pathology of the disease. PAI-1 has been reported to have an effect on most of the basic cellular processes including cell adhesion, cell migration, cell invasion, and cell proliferation and increasing...... numbers of reports suggest that PAI-1 also can regulate programmed cell death (PCD) in cancer cells and normal cells. A number of reports suggest that PAI-1 can inhibit PCD through its pro-adhesive/anti-proteolytic property whereas other reports suggest that PAI-1 induces PCD through its anti......-adhesive property.Furthermore,it has been suggested that PAI-1 can either induce or inhibit PCD though activation of cell signalling pathways.This review will focus on the regulation of programmed cell death by PAI-1 in both normal cells and cancer cells....

  7. The modulatory effects of connexin 43 on cell death/survival beyond cell coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sinovas, Antonio; Cabestrero, Alberto; López, Diego; Torre, Iratxe; Morente, Miriam; Abellán, Arancha; Miró, Elisabet; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; García-Dorado, David

    2007-01-01

    Connexins form a diverse and ubiquitous family of integral membrane proteins. Characteristically, connexins are assembled into intercellular channels that aggregate into discrete cell-cell contact areas termed gap junctions (GJ), allowing intercellular chemical communication, and are essential for propagation of electrical impulses in excitable tissues, including, prominently, myocardium, where connexin 43 (Cx43) is the most important isoform. Previous studies have shown that GJ-mediated communication has an important role in the cellular response to stress or ischemia. However, recent evidence suggests that connexins, and in particular Cx43, may have additional effects that may be important in cell death and survival by mechanisms independent of cell to cell communication. Connexin hemichannels, located at the plasma membrane, may be important in paracrine signaling that could influence intracellular calcium and cell survival by releasing intracellular mediators as ATP, NAD(+), or glutamate. In addition, recent studies have shown the presence of connexins in cell structures other than the plasma membrane, including the cell nucleus, where it has been suggested that Cx43 influences cell growth and differentiation. In addition, translocation of Cx43 to mitochondria appears to be important for certain forms of cardioprotection. These findings open a new field of research of previously unsuspected roles of Cx43 intracellular signaling.

  8. A shift to organismal stress resistance in programmed cell death mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith E Judy

    Full Text Available Animals have many ways of protecting themselves against stress; for example, they can induce animal-wide, stress-protective pathways and they can kill damaged cells via apoptosis. We have discovered an unexpected regulatory relationship between these two types of stress responses. We find that C. elegans mutations blocking the normal course of programmed cell death and clearance confer animal-wide resistance to a specific set of environmental stressors; namely, ER, heat and osmotic stress. Remarkably, this pattern of stress resistance is induced by mutations that affect cell death in different ways, including ced-3 (cell death defective mutations, which block programmed cell death, ced-1 and ced-2 mutations, which prevent the engulfment of dying cells, and progranulin (pgrn-1 mutations, which accelerate the clearance of apoptotic cells. Stress resistance conferred by ced and pgrn-1 mutations is not additive and these mutants share altered patterns of gene expression, suggesting that they may act within the same pathway to achieve stress resistance. Together, our findings demonstrate that programmed cell death effectors influence the degree to which C. elegans tolerates environmental stress. While the mechanism is not entirely clear, it is intriguing that animals lacking the ability to efficiently and correctly remove dying cells should switch to a more global animal-wide system of stress resistance.

  9. Serum Amyloid A Induces Inflammation, Proliferation and Cell Death in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Sören V; Schlosser, Monika; Schildberg, Frank A; Seki, Ekihiro; De Minicis, Samuele; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Kuntzen, Christian; Knolle, Percy A; Strassburg, Christian P; Schwabe, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an evolutionary highly conserved acute phase protein that is predominantly secreted by hepatocytes. However, its role in liver injury and fibrogenesis has not been elucidated so far. In this study, we determined the effects of SAA on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the main fibrogenic cell type of the liver. Serum amyloid A potently activated IκB kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Erk and Akt and enhanced NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity in primary human and rat HSCs. Serum amyloid A induced the transcription of MCP-1, RANTES and MMP9 in an NF-κB- and JNK-dependent manner. Blockade of NF-κB revealed cytotoxic effects of SAA in primary HSCs with signs of apoptosis such as caspase 3 and PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining. Serum amyloid A induced HSC proliferation, which depended on JNK, Erk and Akt activity. In primary hepatocytes, SAA also activated MAP kinases, but did not induce relevant cell death after NF-κB inhibition. In two models of hepatic fibrogenesis, CCl4 treatment and bile duct ligation, hepatic mRNA levels of SAA1 and SAA3 were strongly increased. In conclusion, SAA may modulate fibrogenic responses in the liver in a positive and negative fashion by inducing inflammation, proliferation and cell death in HSCs. PMID:26937641

  10. Cell Wall Invertase Promotes Fruit Set under Heat Stress by Suppressing ROS-Independent Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Hua; Offler, Christina E; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Reduced cell wall invertase (CWIN) activity has been shown to be associated with poor seed and fruit set under abiotic stress. Here, we examined whether genetically increasing native CWIN activity would sustain fruit set under long-term moderate heat stress (LMHS), an important factor limiting crop production, by using transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) with its CWIN inhibitor gene silenced and focusing on ovaries and fruits at 2 d before and after pollination, respectively. We found that the increase of CWIN activity suppressed LMHS-induced programmed cell death in fruits. Surprisingly, measurement of the contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde and the activities of a cohort of antioxidant enzymes revealed that the CWIN-mediated inhibition on programmed cell death is exerted in a reactive oxygen species-independent manner. Elevation of CWIN activity sustained Suc import into fruits and increased activities of hexokinase and fructokinase in the ovaries in response to LMHS Compared to the wild type, the CWIN-elevated transgenic plants exhibited higher transcript levels of heat shock protein genes Hsp90 and Hsp100 in ovaries and HspII17.6 in fruits under LMHS, which corresponded to a lower transcript level of a negative auxin responsive factor IAA9 but a higher expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene ToFZY6 in fruits at 2 d after pollination. Collectively, the data indicate that CWIN enhances fruit set under LMHS through suppression of programmed cell death in a reactive oxygen species-independent manner that could involve enhanced Suc import and catabolism, HSP expression, and auxin response and biosynthesis. PMID:27462084

  11. Knockout of Arabidopsis accelerated-cell-death11 encoding a sphingosine transfer protein causes activation of programmed cell death and defense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Peter; Petersen, Morten; Pike, Helen M;

    2002-01-01

    by avirulent pathogens. Global transcriptional changes during programmed cell death (PCD) and defense activation in acd11 were monitored by cDNA microarray hybridization. The PCD and defense pathways activated in acd11 are salicylic acid (SA) dependent, but do not require intact jasmonic acid or ethylene...

  12. Interaction of CSR1 with XIAP reverses inhibition of caspases and accelerates cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhong-Liang; Tan, Lang-Zhu; Yu, Yan P; Michalopoulos, George; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2012-08-01

    Cellular Stress Response 1 (CSR1) is a tumor suppressor gene that is located at 8p21, a region that is frequently deleted in prostate cancer as well as a variety of human malignancies. Previous studies have indicated that the expression of CSR1 induces cell death. In this study, we found that CSR1 interacts with X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP), using yeast two-hybrid screening analyses. XIAP overexpression has been found in many human cancers, and forced expression of XIAP blocks apoptosis. Both in vitro and in vivo analyses indicated that the C-terminus of CSR1 binds XIAP with high affinity. Through a series of in vitro recombinant protein-binding analyses, the XIAP-binding motif in CSR1 was determined to include amino acids 513 to 572. Targeted knock-down of XIAP enhanced CSR1-induced cell death, while overexpression of XIAP antagonized CSR1 activity. The binding of CSR1 with XIAP enhanced caspase-9 and caspase-3 protease activities, and CSR1-induced cell death was dramatically reduced on expression of a mutant CSR1 that does not bind XIAP. However, a XIAP mutant that does not interact with caspase-9 had no impact on CSR1-induced cell death. These results suggest that cell death is induced when CSR1 binds XIAP, preventing the interaction of XIAP with caspases. Thus, this study may have elucidated a novel mechanism by which tumor suppressors induce cell death. PMID:22683311

  13. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M. [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sontag, Ryan L. [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Weber, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Weber@pnl.gov [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  14. Induction of Cell Death Mechanisms and Apoptosis by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields (nsPEFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nova M. Sain

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulse power technology using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs offers a new stimulus to modulate cell functions or induce cell death for cancer cell ablation. New data and a literature review demonstrate fundamental and basic cellular mechanisms when nsPEFs interact with cellular targets. NsPEFs supra-electroporate cells creating large numbers of nanopores in all cell membranes. While nsPEFs have multiple cellular targets, these studies show that nsPEF-induced dissipation of ΔΨm closely parallels deterioration in cell viability. Increases in intracellular Ca2+ alone were not sufficient for cell death; however, cell death depended of the presence of Ca2+. When both events occur, cell death ensues. Further, direct evidence supports the hypothesis that pulse rise-fall times or high frequency components of nsPEFs are important for decreasing ΔΨm and cell viability. Evidence indicates in Jurkat cells that cytochrome c release from mitochondria is caspase-independent indicating an absence of extrinsic apoptosis and that cell death can be caspase-dependent and –independent. The Ca2+ dependence of nsPEF-induced dissipation of ΔΨm suggests that nanoporation of inner mitochondria membranes is less likely and effects on a Ca2+-dependent protein(s or the membrane in which it is embedded are more likely a target for nsPEF-induced cell death. The mitochondria permeability transition pore (mPTP complex is a likely candidate. Data demonstrate that nsPEFs can bypass cancer mutations that evade apoptosis through mechanisms at either the DISC or the apoptosome.

  15. The exocyst subunit Exo70B1 is involved in the immune response of Arabidopsis thaliana to different pathogens and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmann, Martin; Anderson, Ryan G; Westphal, Lore; Rosahl, Sabine; McDowell, John M; Trujillo, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Components of the vesicle trafficking machinery are central to the immune response in plants. The role of vesicle trafficking during pre-invasive penetration resistance has been well documented. However, emerging evidence also implicates vesicle trafficking in early immune signaling. Here we report that Exo70B1, a subunit of the exocyst complex which mediates early tethering during exocytosis is involved in resistance. We show that exo70B1 mutants display pathogen-specific immuno-compromised phenotypes. We also show that exo70B1 mutants display lesion-mimic cell death, which in combination with the reduced responsiveness to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) results in complex immunity-related phenotypes. PMID:24389869

  16. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Merril C; Peters, Amelia A; Kenny, Paraic A; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-05-10

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca(2+) into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  17. Acanthamoeba castellanii Induces Host Cell Death via a Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissons, James; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Jayasekera, Samantha; Alsam, Selwa; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis due to Acanthamoeba castellanii is a serious human infection with fatal consequences, but it is not clear how the circulating amoebae interact with the blood-brain barrier and transmigrate into the central nervous system. We studied the effects of an Acanthamoeba encephalitis isolate belonging to the T1 genotype on human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which constitute the blood-brain barrier. Using an apoptosis-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we showed that Acanthamoeba induces programmed cell death in brain microvascular endothelial cells. Next, we observed that Acanthamoeba specifically activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Acanthamoeba-mediated brain endothelial cell death was abolished using LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor. These results were further confirmed using brain microvascular endothelial cells expressing dominant negative forms of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. This is the first demonstration that Acanthamoeba-mediated brain microvascular endothelial cell death is dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. PMID:15845472

  18. An Arabidopsis aspartic protease functions as an anti-cell-death component in reproduction and embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaochun; Dietrich, Charles; Matsuno, Michiyo; Li, Guojing; Berg, Howard; Xia, Yiji

    2005-03-01

    The components and pathways that regulate and execute developmental cell death programmes in plants remain largely unknown. We have found that the PROMOTION OF CELL SURVIVAL 1 (PCS1) gene in Arabidopsis, which encodes an aspartic protease, has an important role in determining the fate of cells in embryonic development and in reproduction processes. The loss-of-function mutation of PCS1 causes degeneration of both male and female gametophytes and excessive cell death of developing embryos. Conversely, ectopic expression of PCS1 causes the septum and stomium cells that normally die in the anther wall to survive instead, leading to a failure in anther dehiscence and male sterility. PCS1 provides a new avenue for understanding the mechanisms of the programmed cell death processes that are associated with developmental pathways in plants and makes available a useful tool for engineering the male sterility trait for hybrid seed production.

  19. Cell death mechanisms of plant-derived anticancer drugs: beyond apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali-Muhtasib, Hala; Hmadi, Raed; Kareh, Mike; Tohme, Rita; Darwiche, Nadine

    2015-12-01

    Despite remarkable progress in the discovery and development of novel cancer therapeutics, cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the world. For many years, compounds derived from plants have been at the forefront as an important source of anticancer therapies and have played a vital role in the prevention and treatment of cancer because of their availability, and relatively low toxicity when compared with chemotherapy. More than 3000 plant species have been reported to treat cancer and about thirty plant-derived compounds have been isolated so far and have been tested in cancer clinical trials. The mechanisms of action of plant-derived anticancer drugs are numerous and most of them induce apoptotic cell death that may be intrinsic or extrinsic, and caspase and/or p53-dependent or independent mechanisms. Alternative modes of cell death by plant-derived anticancer drugs are emerging and include mainly autophagy, necrosis-like programmed cell death, mitotic catastrophe, and senescence leading to cell death. Considering that the non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms of plant-derived anticancer drugs are less reviewed than the apoptotic ones, this paper attempts to focus on such alternative cell death pathways for some representative anticancer plant natural compounds in clinical development. In particular, emphasis will be on some promising polyphenolics such as resveratrol, curcumin, and genistein; alkaloids namely berberine, noscapine, and colchicine; terpenoids such as parthenolide, triptolide, and betulinic acid; and the organosulfur compound sulforaphane. The understanding of non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms induced by these drugs would provide insights into the possibility of exploiting novel molecular pathways and targets of plant-derived compounds for future cancer therapeutics. PMID:26362468

  20. Maitotoxin-induced membrane blebbing and cell death in bovine aortic endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schilling William P

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maitotoxin, a potent cytolytic agent, causes an increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i via activation of Ca2+-permeable, non-selective cation channels (CaNSC. Channel activation is followed by formation of large endogenous pores that allow ethidium and propidium-based vital dyes to enter the cell. Although activation of these cytolytic/oncotic pores, or COP, precedes release of lactate dehydrogenase, an indication of oncotic cell death, the relationship between CaNSC, COP, membrane lysis, and the associated changes in cell morphology has not been clearly defined. In the present study, the effect maitotoxin on [Ca2+]i, vital dye uptake, lactate dehydrogenase release, and membrane blebbing was examined in bovine aortic endothelial cells. Results Maitotoxin produced a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i followed by a biphasic uptake of ethidium. Comparison of ethidium (Mw 314 Da, YO-PRO-1 (Mw 375 Da, and POPO-3 (Mw 715 Da showed that the rate of dye uptake during the first phase was inversely proportional to molecular weight, whereas the second phase appeared to be all-or-nothing. The second phase of dye uptake correlated in time with the release of lactate dehydrogenase. Uptake of vital dyes at the single cell level, determined by time-lapse videomicroscopy, was also biphasic. The first phase was associated with formation of small membrane blebs, whereas the second phase was associated with dramatic bleb dilation. Conclusions These results suggest that maitotoxin-induced Ca2+ influx in bovine aortic endothelial cells is followed by activation of COP. COP formation is associated with controlled membrane blebbing which ultimately gives rise to uncontrolled bleb dilation, lactate dehydrogenase release, and oncotic cell death.

  1. Bar represses dPax2 and decapentaplegic to regulate cell fate and morphogenetic cell death in Drosophila eye.

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    Jongkyun Kang

    Full Text Available The coordinated regulation of cell fate and cell survival is crucial for normal pattern formation in developing organisms. In Drosophila compound eye development, crystalline arrays of hexagonal ommatidia are established by precise assembly of diverse cell types, including the photoreceptor cells, cone cells and interommatidial (IOM pigment cells. The molecular basis for controlling the number of cone and IOM pigment cells during ommatidial pattern formation is not well understood. Here we present evidence that BarH1 and BarH2 homeobox genes are essential for eye patterning by inhibiting excess cone cell differentiation and promoting programmed death of IOM cells. Specifically, we show that loss of Bar from the undifferentiated retinal precursor cells leads to ectopic expression of Prospero and dPax2, two transcription factors essential for cone cell specification, resulting in excess cone cell differentiation. We also show that loss of Bar causes ectopic expression of the TGFβ homolog Decapentaplegic (Dpp posterior to the morphogenetic furrow in the larval eye imaginal disc. The ectopic Dpp expression is not responsible for the formation of excess cone cells in Bar loss-of-function mutant eyes. Instead, it causes reduction in IOM cell death in the pupal stage by antagonizing the function of pro-apoptotic gene reaper. Taken together, this study suggests a novel regulatory mechanism in the control of developmental cell death in which the repression of Dpp by Bar in larval eye disc is essential for IOM cell death in pupal retina.

  2. Patterns of cell proliferation and cell death in the developing retina and optic tectum of the brown trout.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Candal, E.; Anadon, R.; Grip, W.J. de; Rodriguez-Moldes, I.

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed the patterns of cell proliferation and cell death in the retina and optic tectum of the brown trout (Salmo trutta fario) throughout embryonic and postembryonic stages. Cell proliferation was detected by immunohistochemistry with an antibody against the proliferating cell nuclear ant

  3. Withaferin A Induces Cell Death Selectively in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cells but Not in Normal Fibroblast Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Nishikawa

    Full Text Available Withaferin A (WA, a major bioactive component of the Indian herb Withania somnifera, induces cell death (apoptosis/necrosis in multiple types of tumor cells, but the molecular mechanism underlying this cytotoxicity remains elusive. We report here that 2 μM WA induced cell death selectively in androgen-insensitive PC-3 and DU-145 prostate adenocarcinoma cells, whereas its toxicity was less severe in androgen-sensitive LNCaP prostate adenocarcinoma cells and normal human fibroblasts (TIG-1 and KD. WA also killed PC-3 cells in spheroid-forming medium. DNA microarray analysis revealed that WA significantly increased mRNA levels of c-Fos and 11 heat-shock proteins (HSPs in PC-3 and DU-145, but not in LNCaP and TIG-1. Western analysis revealed increased expression of c-Fos and reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIP(L. Expression of HSPs such as HSPA6 and Hsp70 was conspicuously elevated; however, because siRNA-mediated depletion of HSF-1, an HSP-inducing transcription factor, reduced PC-3 cell viability, it is likely that these heat-shock genes were involved in protecting against cell death. Moreover, WA induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in PC-3 and DU-145, but not in normal fibroblasts. Immunocytochemistry and immuno-electron microscopy revealed that WA disrupted the vimentin cytoskeleton, possibly inducing the ROS generation, c-Fos expression and c-FLIP(L suppression. These observations suggest that multiple events followed by disruption of the vimentin cytoskeleton play pivotal roles in WA-mediated cell death.

  4. 3-Bromopyruvate induces necrotic cell death in sensitive melanoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, J.-Z.; Xin, H. [Oncology Institute, Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola University of Chicago Medical Center (United States); Nickoloff, B.J., E-mail: bnickol@lumc.edu [Oncology Institute, Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola University of Chicago Medical Center (United States)

    2010-05-28

    Clinicians successfully utilize high uptake of radiolabeled glucose via PET scanning to localize metastases in melanoma patients. To take advantage of this altered metabolome, 3-bromopyruvate (BrPA) was used to overcome the notorious resistance of melanoma to cell death. Using four melanoma cell lines, BrPA triggered caspase independent necrosis in two lines, whilst the other two lines were resistant to killing. Mechanistically, sensitive cells differed from resistant cells by; constitutively lower levels of glutathione, reduction of glutathione by BrPA only in sensitive cells; increased superoxide anion reactive oxygen species, loss of outer mitochondrial membrane permeability, and rapid ATP depletion. Sensitive cell killing was blocked by N-acetylcysteine or glutathione. When glutathione levels were reduced in resistant cell lines, they became sensitive to killing by BrPA. Taken together, these results identify a metabolic-based Achilles' heel in melanoma cells to be exploited by use of BrPA. Future pre-clinical and clinical trials are warranted to translate these results into improved patient care for individuals suffering from metastatic melanoma.

  5. 5-ALA mediated photodynamic therapy induces autophagic cell death via AMP-activated protein kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yu-Hsin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Photodynamic therapy (PDT has been developed as an anticancer treatment, which is based on the tumor-specific accumulation of a photosensitizer that induces cell death after irradiation of light with a specific wavelength. Depending on the subcellular localization of the photosensitizer, PDT could trigger various signal transduction cascades and induce cell death such as apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis. In this study, we report that both AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling cascades are activated following 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-mediated PDT in both PC12 and CL1-0 cells. Although the activities of caspase-9 and -3 are elevated, the caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk did not protect cells against ALA-PDT-induced cell death. Instead, autophagic cell death was found in PC12 and CL1-0 cells treated with ALA-PDT. Most importantly, we report here for the first time that it is the activation of AMPK, but not MAPKs that plays a crucial role in mediating autophagic cell death induced by ALA-PDT. This novel observation indicates that the AMPK pathway play an important role in ALA-PDT-induced autophagy.

  6. p53 dependent apoptotic cell death induces embryonic malformation in Carassius auratus under chronic hypoxia.

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    Paramita Banerjee Sawant

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a global phenomenon affecting recruitment as well as the embryonic development of aquatic fauna. The present study depicts hypoxia induced disruption of the intrinsic pathway of programmed cell death (PCD, leading to embryonic malformation in the goldfish, Carrasius auratus. Constant hypoxia induced the early expression of pro-apoptotic/tumor suppressor p53 and concomitant expression of the cell death molecule, caspase-3, leading to high level of DNA damage and cell death in hypoxic embryos, as compared to normoxic ones. As a result, the former showed delayed 4 and 64 celled stages and a delay in appearance of epiboly stage. Expression of p53 efficiently switched off expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 during the initial 12 hours post fertilization (hpf and caused embryonic cell death. However, after 12 hours, simultaneous downregulation of p53 and Caspase-3 and exponential increase of Bcl-2, caused uncontrolled cell proliferation and prevented essential programmed cell death (PCD, ultimately resulting in significant (p<0.05 embryonic malformation up to 144 hpf. Evidences suggest that uncontrolled cell proliferation after 12 hpf may have been due to downregulation of p53 abundance, which in turn has an influence on upregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Therefore, we have been able to show for the first time and propose that hypoxia induced downregulation of p53 beyond 12 hpf, disrupts PCD and leads to failure in normal differentiation, causing malformation in gold fish embryos.

  7. Tales of cannibalism, suicide, and murder: Programmed cell death in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchen, Jason M; Hengartner, Michael O

    2005-01-01

    "Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It's the transition that's troublesome," said Isaac Asimov. Indeed, much scientific work over the last hundred years centered around attempts either to stave off or to induce the onset of death, at both the organismal and the cellular levels. In this quest, the nematode C. elegans has proven an invaluable tool, first, in the articulation of the genetic pathway by which programmed cell death proceeds, and also as a continuing source of inspiration. It is our purpose in this Chapter to familiarize the reader with the topic of programmed cell death in C. elegans and its relevance to current research in the fields of apoptosis and cell corpse clearance.

  8. Fluorescence imaging analysis of taxol-induced ASTC-a-1 cell death with cell swelling and cytoplasmic vacuolization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong-sheng; Sun, Lei; Wang, Longxiang; Wang, Huiying

    2008-02-01

    Taxol (Paclitaxel), an isolated component from the bark of the Pacific yew Taxus brevifolia, exhibits a broad spectrum of clinical activity against human cancers. Taxol can promote microtubule (MT) assembly, inhibit depolymerization, and change MT dynamics, resulting in disruption of the normal reorganization of the microtubule network required for mitosis and cell proliferation. However, the molecular mechanism of taxol-induced cell death is still unclear. In this report, CCK-8 was used to assay the inhibition of taxol on the human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells viability, confocal fluorescence microscope was used to monitor the morphology changes of cells with taxol treatment. We for the first time describe the characteristics of taxol-induced cells swelling, cytoplasmic vacuolization and cell death. Taxol induced swelling, cytoplasmatic vacuolization and cell death without cell shrinkage and membrane rupture. These features differ from those of apoptosis and resemble the paraptosis, a novel nonapoptotic PCD.

  9. Cell death in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum of senescence accelerated mouse (SAMP(8)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yonghong; Lee, Cleo C L; Lam, W P; Wai, Maria S M; Rudd, John A; Yew, David T

    2007-10-01

    The cerebella of SAMP(8) (accelerated aging mouse) and SAMR(1) controls were analyzed by Western Blotting of tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase, as well as by TUNEL and histological silver staining. Both tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase levels were higher in SAMR(1) than in SAMP(8). There was also an age-related decrease in enzyme levels in SAMP(8), with the reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase being more apparent. Concomitantly, there was an age-related increase of apoptosis in the medial neocerebellum and the vermis as revealed by TUNEL, with changes being significant in the SAMP(8) strain. Histologically, some Purkinje cells appeared to disappear during aging. Taken together, the data suggests that the aging SAMP(8) strain displays differential Purkinje cell death in the medial cerebellum and that some of the dying cells are likely to be catecholaminergic. PMID:17415677

  10. Assessment of cell death studies by monitoring hydrogen peroxide in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Irina; Prell, Erik; Weiwad, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been widely used to study the oxidative stress response. However, H2O2 is unstable and easily decomposes into H2O and O2. Consequently, a wide range of exposure times and treatment concentrations has been described in the literature. In the present study, we established a ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay, which was originally described for food and body liquids, as a method for the precise quantification of H2O2 concentrations in cell culture media. We observed that the presence of FCS and high cell densities significantly accelerate the decomposition of H2O2, therefore acting as a protection against cell death by accidental necrosis. PMID:24747006

  11. Kinetic modeling reveals a common death niche for newly formed and mature B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitit Shahaf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: B lymphocytes are subject to elimination following strong BCR ligation in the absence of appropriate second signals, and this mechanism mediates substantial cell losses during late differentiation steps in the bone marrow and periphery. Mature B cells may also be eliminated through this mechanism as well as through normal turnover, but the population containing mature cells destined for elimination has not been identified. Herein, we asked whether the transitional 3 (T3 subset, which contains most newly formed cells undergoing anergic death, could also include mature B cells destined for elimination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To interrogate this hypothesis and its implications, we applied mathematical models to previously generated in vivo labeling data. Our analyses reveal that the death rate of T3 B cells is far higher than the death rates of all other splenic B cell subpopulations. Further, the model, in which the T3 pool includes both newly formed and mature primary B cells destined for apoptotic death, shows that this cell loss may account for nearly all mature B cell turnover. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This finding has implications for the mechanism of normal mature B cell turnover.

  12. Cell-death-mode switch from necrosis to apoptosis in hydrogen peroxide treated macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Cell death is typically defined either as apoptosis or necrosis. Because the consequences of apoptosis and necrosis are quite different for an entire organism, the investigation of the cell-death-mode switch has considerable clinical significance. The existence of a necrosis-to-apoptosis switch induced by hydrogen peroxide in macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 cells was confirmed by using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. With the help of computational simulations, this study predicted that negative feedbacks between NF-κB and MAPKs are implicated in converting necrosis into apoptosis in macrophages exposed to hydrogen peroxide, which has significant implications.

  13. The cell's dilemma, or the story of cell death: an entertainment in three acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Douglas R

    2016-07-01

    Cells. They assemble, thrive, and cooperate to compose an organism, simple or complex. And like any living thing, they die. They die by catastrophe, they become sabotaged by condition, or they remove themselves on command from within or without. Each small life is followed by a death, to the benefit or the harm of the whole. Our story, here, is not of how each quietus occurs, but instead, of our ongoing effort to understand these tiny demises, to manipulate them, and to some day control them.

  14. Export of textile machinery products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the export of textile machinery products continued to keep a rapidly increasing trend. In accordance with the statistics from the custom, as of December this year, the value of exported textile machinery products was USD1.528 billion, increased by 23.54% over the previous year. Except that the export of nonwoven cloth machinery products reduced to a certain degree compared with that in 2006, the export of other varieties of products increased greatly. The export of textile machinery products had been remaining relatively rapid growth since 2000. During this period, the structure of exported products has changed continuously, so do export enterprises. There are still many problems in export of textile machinery products, and manufacturers of textile machinery products should improve and advance continuously. However, on the whole, the integrated and international competitiveness of textile machinery products is enhanced, so is the internationalization level of manufacturers of textile machinery products.

  15. Vibrio cholerae GbpA elicits necrotic cell death in intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sudipto; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar

    2016-08-01

    Vibrio choleraeN-acetylglucosamine-binding protein GbpA is a secretory protein that facilitates the initial adherence of bacteria in the human intestine. Until now, considerable progress in the characterization of GbpA has been done, yet little is known about its role in host response. Our present studies demonstrated that GbpA at the amount secreted in the intestine resulted in decreased cell viability, altered cell morphology, disruption of cell membrane integrity and damage of cellular DNA indicating necrotic cell death. We observed that GbpA exposure leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, characterized by accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and depletion of ATP pool in host cells. Additionally, the intra-cellular ROS, accumulated in response to GbpA, were found to induce the migration of NF-κB from cytoplasm into nucleus in host cells. Taken together, these results prompted us to conclude that GbpA orchestrates a necrotic response in host cells which may have implications in immune response. PMID:27324251

  16. Neuroprotective effects of pramipexole against tunicamycin-induced cell death in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hitoshi; Zhao, Jing; Ei-Fakhrany, Amany; Isosaki, Minoru; Satoh, Hiroyasu; Kyotani, Yoji; Yoshizumi, Masanori

    2009-12-01

    1. Pramipexole (PPX), a dopamine D2 and D3 receptor agonist, exerts neuroprotective effects via both dopamine receptor-mediated and non-dopaminergic mechanisms. In the present study, we demonstrate that PPX reduces the toxicity of tunicamycin, a typical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stressor, in PC12h cells, a subline of PC12 cells. 2. The PC12h cells were treated with 300 micromol / L PPX in the presence of 0.5 micromol / L tunicamycin for 24 h. The neuroprotective effects of PPX against tunicamycin-induced cell death were evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays, Hoechst 33258 staining and western blot analysis. 3. Tunicamycin (0.2, 0.3 and 0.5 microg / mL) dose-dependently decreased MTT activity and increased LDH release from PC12h cells. Treatment with 300 micromol / L PPX rescued the tunicamycin-induced decrease in cell viability. 4. Spiperone (10 micromol / L), a dopamine D2 and D4 receptor antagonist, had no effect on PPX neuroprotection against tunicamycin in these cells. Marker proteins of ER stress and apoptosis are known to be upregulated by tunicamycin, but we detected no significant effects of PPX on these factors. 5. In conclusion, we speculate that a combination of several mechanisms may be involved in PPX-induced neuroprotection. PMID:19515063

  17. Apoptosis Cell Death Effect of Scrophularia Variegata on Breast Cancer Cells via Mitochondrial Intrinsic Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadmehr, Abbas; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Baradaran, Behzad; Haghdoost-Yazdi, Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Scrophularia variegata M. Beib. (Scrophulariaceae) is an Iranian medicinal plant which is used for various inflammatory disorders in traditional medicine. In this study we evaluated the anti-cancer and cytotoxic effects of the Scrophularia variegata (S. variegata) ethanolic extract on the human breast cancer cell line. Methods: The cytotoxicity effect of the extract on MCF-7 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. In addition, Caspase activity, DNA ladder and Cell death were evaluated by ELISA, gel electrophoresis and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, respectively. Results: The S. variegata extract showed significant effect cytotoxicity on MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. Treatment with the extract induced apoptosis on the breast cancer cells by cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. The results indicated that cytotoxicity activity was associated with an increase of apoptosis as demonstrated by DNA fragmentation as well as an increase of the amount of caspase 3 and caspase 9. In addition, the phytochemical assay showed that the extract had antioxidant capacity and also flavonoids, phenolic compounds and phenyl propanoids were presented in the extract. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that S. variegata extract induced apoptosis via mitochondrial intrinsic pathway on breast cancer by cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and an increase of caspase 3 and caspase 9. However future studies are needed. PMID:26504768

  18. Studies on the Programmed Cell Death in Rice During Starchy Endosperm Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rui; LAN Sheng-yin; XU Zhen-xiu

    2004-01-01

    Morphological variations of the nucleus in starchy endosperm cell were observed by the electron-transmisson microscope during endosperm development in rice. Along with the development of the starchy endosperm,the nuclei of the cells showed chromatin condensation,the typical feature of programmed cell death(PCD). The nuclei also showed nucleus deformation,disruption of nuclear envelope,nucleoplasm leaking into the cytoplasm and nucleus disintegration resulting in nuclear residue formation. From the nucleus deformation to the nucleus disintegration,the morphological changes of the nucleus were orderly progressive. This indicated that the cell death of starchy endosperm in rice was programmed cell death. Evans Blue staining observation showed that the cell death was initially detected in the central part of starchy endosperm in rice,then expanded outward. The activities of superoxide dismutase(SOD)and catalase(CAT)in rice starchy endosperm both descended continuously as development progressed. The analysis of DNA of rice starchy endosperm did not show the presence of DNA laddering. The above results showed that the cell death of starchy endosperm in rice was a special form of PCD.

  19. Cell death and the immune responses of the sipunculan worm Themiste petricola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GA Blanco

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We have recently studied the role of cell death in the immune system of the sipunculan worm Themiste petricola. Typical biochemical and morphological changes of apoptosis were induced in celomocytes of these marine worms after in vitro exposure of cells to hydrogen peroxide. Apoptosis was time and dose dependent, and required several hours to become apparent. Surprisingly, in unexposed samples a subtype of granulocyte was observed to undergo homotypic aggregation, extensive cytoskeletal changes, and degranulation followed by cell death. This spontaneous response ending in cell death occurred in a divalent cation-dependent manner, served to entrap foreign particles, and was blocked by EDTA-containing saline solutions. Even though the mode of granulocyte cell death shares some features with apoptosis, it appears to be a different form of programmed cell death since it occurs within minutes and does not produce single cell-derived apoptotic bodies but transforms itself into one or several syncytial masses with haemostatic and immune purposes. Since numerous granulocyte types and multicellular masses involved in cellular immunity have been described in sipunculan worms, the review also discusses the potential influence of activation of granulocytes by sea water in expanding the variety of morphological types and multicellular structures identified through morphological studies among sipunculan species.

  20. Morphological Analysis of Cell Death by Cytospinning Followed by Rapid Staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Lisa C; Marfell, Brooke J; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Identifying and characterizing different forms of cell death can be facilitated by staining internal cellular structures with dyes such as hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). These dyes stain the nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively, and optimized reagents (e.g., Rapi-Diff, Rapid Stain, or Quick Dip) are commonly used in pathology laboratories. Fixing and staining adherent cells with these optimized reagents is a straightforward procedure, but apoptotic cells may detach from the culture plate and be washed away during the fixing and staining procedure. To prevent the loss of apoptotic cells, cells can be gently centrifuged onto glass slides by cytospinning before fixing and staining. In addition to apoptotic cells, this procedure can be used on cells in suspension, or adherent cells that have been trypsinized and removed from the culture dish. This protocol describes cytospinning followed by Rapi-Diff staining for morphological analysis of cell death. PMID:27587773

  1. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eGiannattasio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications.

  2. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter protein MCU is involved in oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yajin; Hao, Yumin; Chen, Hong; He, Qing; Yuan, Zengqiang; Cheng, Jinbo

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is a conserved Ca(2+) transporter at mitochondrial in eukaryotic cells. However, the role of MCU protein in oxidative stress-induced cell death remains unclear. Here, we showed that ectopically expressed MCU is mitochondrial localized in both HeLa and primary cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Knockdown of endogenous MCU decreases mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake following histamine stimulation and attenuates cell death induced by oxidative stress in both HeLa cells and CGNs. We also found MCU interacts with VDAC1 and mediates VDAC1 overexpression-induced cell death in CGNs. This finding demonstrates that MCU-VDAC1 complex regulates mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, which might represent therapeutic targets for oxidative stress related diseases.

  3. The effect of proteolysis on the induction of cell death by monomeric alpha-lactalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, Wolfram M; Gibson, Glenn R; Brück, Thomas B

    2014-02-01

    α-Lactalbumin (α-la) is a major whey protein found in milk. Previous data suggested that α-la has antiproliferative effects in human adenocarcinoma cell lines such as Caco-2 and HT-29. However, the cell death inducing α-la was not a naturally occurring monomer but either a multimeric variant or an α-la:oleic acid complex (HAMLET/BAMLET). Proteolysis showed that both human and bovine α-la are susceptible to digestion. ELISA assays assessing cell death with the native undigested α-la fractions showed that undigested protein fractions did have a significant cell death effect on CaCo-2 cells. Bovine α-la was also more effective than human α-la. A reduction in activity corresponded with lower concentrations of the protein and partial digestion and fragmentation of the protein using trypsin and pepsin. This suggests that the tertiary structure is vital for the apoptotic effect.

  4. VMP1 related autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells: VMP1 regulates cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Qinyi [Department of Ultrasonograph, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); Zhou, Hao; Chen, Yan [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Shen, Chenglong [Department of General Surgery, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); He, Songbing; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Liang [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Wan, Daiwei, E-mail: 372710369@qq.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Gu, Wen, E-mail: 505339704@qq.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •This research confirmed VMP1 as a regulator of autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We proved the pro-survival role of VMP1-mediated autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We found the interaction between VMP1 and BECLIN1 also existing in colorectal cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1) is an autophagy-related protein and identified as a key regulator of autophagy in recent years. In pancreatic cell lines, VMP1-dependent autophagy has been linked to positive regulation of apoptosis. However, there are no published reports on the role of VMP1 in autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancers. Therefore, to address this gap of knowledge, we decided to interrogate regulation of autophagy and apoptosis by VMP1. We have studied the induction of autophagy by starvation and rapamycin treatment in colorectal cell lines using electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. We found that starvation-induced autophagy correlated with an increase in VMP1 expression, that VMP1 interacted with BECLIN1, and that siRNA mediated down-regulation of VMP1-reduced autophagy. Next, we examined the relationship between VMP1-dependent autophagy and apoptosis and found that VMP1 down-regulation sensitizes cells to apoptosis and that agents that induce apoptosis down-regulate VMP1. In conclusion, similar to its reported role in other cell types, VMP1 is an important regulator of autophagy in colorectal cell lines. However, in contrast to its role in pancreatic cell lines, in colorectal cancer cells, VMP1-dependent autophagy appears to be pro-survival rather than pro-cell death.

  5. Myt3 suppression sensitizes islet cells to high glucose-induced cell death via Bim induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, B R; Vanderkruk, B; Dhillon, J; Dai, D; Verchere, C B; Hoffman, B G

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that results from the body's inability to properly control circulating blood glucose levels. The loss of glucose homoeostasis can arise from a loss of β-cell mass because of immune-cell-mediated attack, as in type 1 diabetes, and/or from dysfunction of individual β-cells (in conjunction with target organ insulin resistance), as in type 2 diabetes. A better understanding of the transcriptional pathways regulating islet-cell survival is of great importance for the development of therapeutic strategies that target β-cells for diabetes. To this end, we previously identified the transcription factor Myt3 as a pro-survival factor in islets following acute suppression of Myt3 in vitro. To determine the effects of Myt3 suppression on islet-cell survival in vivo, we used an adenovirus to express an shRNA targeting Myt3 in syngeneic optimal and marginal mass islet transplants, and demonstrate that suppression of Myt3 impairs the function of marginal mass grafts. Analysis of grafts 5 weeks post-transplant revealed that grafts transduced with the shMyt3 adenovirus contained ~20% the number of transduced cells as grafts transduced with a control adenovirus. In fact, increased apoptosis and significant cell loss in the shMyt3-transduced grafts was evident after only 5 days, suggesting that Myt3 suppression sensitizes islet cells to stresses present in the early post-transplant period. Specifically, we find that Myt3 suppression sensitizes islet cells to high glucose-induced cell death via upregulation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family member Bim. Taken together these data suggest that Myt3 may be an important link between glucotoxic and immune signalling pathways. PMID:27195679

  6. Safe design and construction of machinery regulation, practice and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Bluff, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The origin of this book is the compelling evidence that a high proportion of machinery-related deaths and injuries are attributable to genuine and serious risks originating within machine design and construction. This trend continues despite significant legal obligations, notably the European regulatory regime giving effect to the Machinery Directive (among others), and a substantial body of specialist knowledge originating in the disciplines of human factors and safety engineering. Grounded in empirical research with machinery manufacturers, this book aims to elucidate the factors and process

  7. Vibrio cholerae Porin OmpU Induces Caspase-independent Programmed Cell Death upon Translocation to the Host Cell Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shelly; Prasad, G V R Krishna; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-12-25

    Porins, a major class of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, primarily act as transport channels. OmpU is one of the major porins of human pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. In the present study, we show that V. cholerae OmpU has the ability to induce target cell death. Although OmpU-mediated cell death shows some characteristics of apoptosis, such as flipping of phosphatidylserine in the membrane as well as cell size shrinkage and increased cell granularity, it does not show the caspase-3 activation and DNA laddering pattern typical of apoptotic cells. Increased release of lactate dehydrogenase in OmpU-treated cells indicates that the OmpU-mediated cell death also has characteristics of necrosis. Further, we show that the mechanism of OmpU-mediated cell death involves major mitochondrial changes in the target cells. We observe that OmpU treatment leads to the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). AIF translocates to the host cell nucleus, implying that it has a crucial role in OmpU-mediated cell death. Finally, we observe that OmpU translocates to the target cell mitochondria, where it directly initiates mitochondrial changes leading to mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and AIF release. Partial blocking of AIF release by cyclosporine A in OmpU-treated cells further suggests that OmpU may be inducing the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. All of these results lead us to the conclusion that OmpU induces cell death in target cells in a programmed manner in which mitochondria play a central role.

  8. A statistical model for multidimensional irreversible electroporation cell death in tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubinsky Boris

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irreversible electroporation (IRE is a minimally invasive tissue ablation technique which utilizes electric pulses delivered by electrodes to a targeted area of tissue to produce high amplitude electric fields, thus inducing irreversible damage to the cell membrane lipid bilayer. An important application of this technique is for cancer tissue ablation. Mathematical modelling is considered important in IRE treatment planning. In the past, IRE mathematical modelling used a deterministic single value for the amplitude of the electric field required for causing cell death. However, tissue, particularly cancerous tissue, is comprised of a population of different cells of different sizes and orientations, which in conventional IRE are exposed to complex electric fields; therefore, using a deterministic single value is overly simplistic. Methods We introduce and describe a new methodology for evaluating IRE induced cell death in tissue. Our approach employs a statistical Peleg-Fermi model to correlate probability of cell death in heterogeneous tissue to the parameters of electroporation pulses such as the number of pulses, electric field amplitude and pulse length. For treatment planning, the Peleg-Fermi model is combined with a numerical solution of the multidimensional electric field equation cast in a dimensionless form. This is the first time in which this concept is used for evaluating IRE cell death in multidimensional situations. Results We illustrate the methodology using data reported in literature for prostate cancer cell death by IRE. We show how to fit this data to a Fermi function in order to calculate the critical statistic parameters. To illustrate the use of the methodology, we simulated 2-D irreversible electroporation protocols and produced 2-D maps of the statistical distribution of cell death in the treated region. These plots were compared to plots produced using a deterministic model of cell death by IRE and

  9. Model of mammalian cell reproductive death. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general equation for mammalian cell survival has been derived in the previous paper. This paper presents the results of comparison of theoretical evaluations with survival data available from the literature, including different cell lines, variations. In linear energy transfer, dose rate and dose fractionation and the effects of ultrasoft X-rays and superheavy ions. Merits and demerits of the model are considered in comparison with other models of radiation-induced killing of mammalian cells published in the literature. (orig.)

  10. Heterotrimeric G-protein is involved in phytochrome A-mediated cell death of Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Wei; Wenbin Zhou; Guangzhen Hu; Jiamian Wei; Hongquan Yang; Jirong Huang

    2008-01-01

    The heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein) has been demonstrated to mediate various signaling pathways in plants. However,its role in phytochrome A (phyA) signaling remains elusive. In this study,we discover a new phyA-mediated phenotype designated far-red irradiation (FR) preconditioned cell death,which occurs only in the hypocotyls of FR-grown seedlings following exposure to white light (WL). The cell death is mitigated in the Ga mutant gpal but aggravated in the Gβ mutant agbl in comparison with the wild type (WT),indicative of antagonistic roles of GPAI and AGB1 in the phyA-mediated cell-death pathway. Further investigation indicates that FR-induced accumulation of nonphotoconvertible protochlorophyllide (Pchlide633),which generates reactive oxygen species (ROS)on exposure to WL,is required for FR-preconditioned cell death. Moreover,ROS is mainly detected in chloroplasts using the fluorescent probe. Interestingly,the application of H2O2 to dark-grown seedlings results in a phenotype similar to FR-preconditioned cell death. This reveals that ROS is a critical mediator for the cell death. In addition,we observe that agbl is more sensitive to H2O2 than WT seedlings,indicating that the G-protein may also modify the sensitivity of the seedlings to ROS stress. Taking these results together,we infer that the G-protein may be involved in the phyA signaling pathway to regulate FR-preconditioned cell death of Arabidopsis hypocotyls.Apossible mechanism underlying the involvement of the G-protein in phyA signaling is discussed in this study.

  11. Effect of ionizing radiation on cell death in frog spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was studied the number of dead cells in frog spleen by means of coloration with trypan blue which allowed to estimate last stage of apoptosis dead of cells.The investigated frogs (Rana arvalis) were caught in september 1997 at radionuclide contamination territory (the Gomel Region, the Khojniki District). Control animals were caught in village Ratamka of the Minsk District. The percent of dead cells was less in control group in 1,5 times. Under additional irradiation (2 Gy) the number of dead cells in spleen also differs significantly in the investigated and control groups

  12. PCM1 Depletion Inhibits Glioblastoma Cell Ciliogenesis and Increases Cell Death and Sensitivity to Temozolomide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan B. Hoang-Minh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the molecules implicated in the growth and survival of glioblastoma (GBM cells and their response to temozolomide (TMZ, the standard-of-care chemotherapeutic agent, is necessary for the development of new therapies that would improve the outcome of current GBM treatments. In this study, we characterize the role of pericentriolar material 1 (PCM1, a component of centriolar satellites surrounding centrosomes, in GBM cell proliferation and sensitivity to genotoxic agents such as TMZ. We show that PCM1 is expressed around centrioles and ciliary basal bodies in patient GBM biopsies and derived cell lines and that its localization is dynamic throughout the cell cycle. To test whether PCM1 mediates GBM cell proliferation and/or response to TMZ, we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to generate primary GBM cell lines depleted of PCM1. These PCM1-depleted cells displayed reduced AZI1 satellite protein localization and significantly decreased proliferation, which was attributable to increased apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, PCM1-depleted lines were more sensitive to TMZ toxicity than control lines. The increase in TMZ sensitivity may be partly due to the reduced ability of PCM1-depleted cells to form primary cilia, as depletion of KIF3A also ablated GBM cells' ciliogenesis and increased their sensitivity to TMZ while preserving PCM1 localization. In addition, the co-depletion of KIF3A and PCM1 did not have any additive effect on TMZ sensitivity. Together, our data suggest that PCM1 plays multiple roles in GBM pathogenesis and that associated pathways could be targeted to augment current or future anti-GBM therapies.

  13. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Guijarro, José Manuel; García, Carolina; Macías, Álvaro; García-Fernández, Luis Francisco; Moreno, Cristina; Reyes, Fernando; Martínez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Fernández, Rogelio; Martínez, Valentín; Valenzuela, Carmen; Lillo, M. Pilar; Galmarini, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734) inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv) presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:26474061

  14. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Molina-Guijarro

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734 inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy.

  15. Maitotoxin-induced cell death cascade in bovine aortic endothelial cells: divalent cation specificity and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnoskey, Brian J; Estacion, Mark; Schilling, William P

    2004-08-01

    The maitotoxin (MTX)-induced cell death cascade in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs), a model for Ca(2+) overload-induced toxicity, reflects three sequential changes in plasmalemmal permeability. MTX initially activates Ca(2+)-permeable, nonselective cation channels (CaNSC) and causes a massive increase in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). This is followed by the opening of large endogenous cytolytic/oncotic pores (COP) that allow molecules ionomycin and were significantly delayed in BAPTA-loaded cells. Experiments at the single-cell level revealed that Ba(2+) not only delayed the time to cell lysis but also caused desynchronization of the lytic phase. Last, membrane blebs, which were numerous and spherical in Ca(2+)-containing solutions, were poorly defined and greatly reduced in number in the presence of Ba(2+). Taken together, these results suggest that intracellular high-affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins are involved in the MTX-induced changes in plasmalemmal permeability that are responsible for cell demise. PMID:15044153

  16. Seasonal variations of group-specific phytoplankton cell death in Xiamen Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaozhou; Liu, Xin; Chen, Jixin; Xiao, Wupeng; Cao, Zhen; Huang, Bangqin

    2016-05-01

    The importance of phytoplankton cell death is being increasingly recognized, however, there are still no published reports on this in Xiamen Bay. In this study, the proportion of dead phytoplankton cells associated with environmental factors was assessed at a station in Xiamen Bay from December 2012 to December 2013, using a cell digestion assay, which is an eff ective method to analyze dead/ living cells in complex natural phytoplankton communities. The percentages of dead cells (% DC) in the total phytoplankton in summer (16%±6%) were lower than those in winter (27%±16%). Six groups of phytoplankton (G1-G6) were categorized by flow cytometry. These phytoplankton communities with diverse seasonal variations in % DC had different responses to environmental constraints. The main factors aff ecting mortality were temperature and salinity, while nutrient concentration showed little influence on phytoplankton death. Additionally, our results provide evidence that chlorophyll a concentrations had an inverse relationship with total phytoplankton % DC and viable cell abundance was more meaningful than total cells to explain variations in environmental parameters (such as Chl a ). Moreover, the lowest mean % DC in total phytoplankton was 16%±6% at our sample site, which is in a subtropical area with high water temperatures, full solar radiation, and rich nutrients. This indicates that phytoplankton cell death is a process that cannot be ignored. In summary, phytoplankton cell death is important in understanding the dynamics of phytoplankton communities and the functioning of subtropical ecosystems.

  17. Vibration of hydraulic machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yulin; Liu, Shuhong; Dou, Hua-Shu; Qian, Zhongdong

    2013-01-01

    Vibration of Hydraulic Machinery deals with the vibration problem which has significant influence on the safety and reliable operation of hydraulic machinery. It provides new achievements and the latest developments in these areas, even in the basic areas of this subject. The present book covers the fundamentals of mechanical vibration and rotordynamics as well as their main numerical models and analysis methods for the vibration prediction. The mechanical and hydraulic excitations to the vibration are analyzed, and the pressure fluctuations induced by the unsteady turbulent flow is predicted in order to obtain the unsteady loads. This book also discusses the loads, constraint conditions and the elastic and damping characters of the mechanical system, the structure dynamic analysis, the rotor dynamic analysis and the system instability of hydraulic machines, including the illustration of monitoring system for the instability and the vibration in hydraulic units. All the problems are necessary for vibration pr...

  18. Suitability of Machinery Logging in Slovenian Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Jakše

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available RQ: The purpose of the research was to examine how much Slovenian forest land is suitable for machine logging and harvesting of timber.Purpose: To determine the actual potential of machinery logging in Slovenian forests.Method: On the basis of Slovenian forest service cadastral maps from 2011, we assumed potential areas for machinery logging and harvesting of timber.Results: In 2011, Slovenia cut about 3.9 million m³ of wood. Given the potential of Slovenian forests that amounts to 5.5 million m³ / year, it was determined that the percentage of machinery logging can significantly increase.Organization: The research will have a significant impact on themanagement of organizations that are considering buying equipment for machinery logging.Society: Society will be richer in knowing that there are opportunities in increasing contemporary technologies in Slovenian forests. With the realization that this type of technology is currently the safest form of work in forests, not only benefits favorable economic results, but also save many victims of accidents at work (in 2011 there were 21 deathsOriginality: The study included the latest findings of modern technology for forest work.Limitations: The greatest limitation is primarily in assessing the suitability of terrains.

  19. Increased anion channel activity is an unavoidable event in ozone-induced programmed cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kadono

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ozone is a major secondary air pollutant often reaching high concentrations in urban areas under strong daylight, high temperature and stagnant high-pressure systems. Ozone in the troposphere is a pollutant that is harmful to the plant. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By exposing cells to a strong pulse of ozonized air, an acute cell death was observed in suspension cells of Arabidopsis thaliana used as a model. We demonstrated that O(3 treatment induced the activation of a plasma membrane anion channel that is an early prerequisite of O(3-induced cell death in A. thaliana. Our data further suggest interplay of anion channel activation with well known plant responses to O(3, Ca(2+ influx and NADPH-oxidase generated reactive oxygen species (ROS in mediating the oxidative cell death. This interplay might be fuelled by several mechanisms in addition to the direct ROS generation by O(3; namely, H(2O(2 generation by salicylic and abscisic acids. Anion channel activation was also shown to promote the accumulation of transcripts encoding vacuolar processing enzymes, a family of proteases previously reported to contribute to the disruption of vacuole integrity observed during programmed cell death. SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, our data indicate that anion efflux is an early key component of morphological and biochemical events leading to O(3-induced programmed cell death. Because ion channels and more specifically anion channels assume a crucial position in cells, an understanding about the underlying role(s for ion channels in the signalling pathway leading to programmed cell death is a subject that warrants future investigation.

  20. Growth and death of animal cells in bioreactors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Animal-cell cultivation is becoming increasingly important especially for the area of hunian- health products. The products range from vaccines to therapeutic proteins and the cells themselves. The therapeutic application of proteins puts high demands upon their quality with respect to purity and st

  1. Analyzing Cell Death by Nuclear Staining with Hoechst 33342.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Lisa C; Marfell, Brooke J; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    The nuclei of healthy cells are generally spherical, and the DNA is evenly distributed. During apoptosis the DNA becomes condensed, but this process does not occur during necrosis. Nuclear condensation can therefore be used to distinguish apoptotic cells from healthy cells or necrotic cells. Dyes that bind to DNA, such as Hoechst 33342 or 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), can be used to observe nuclear condensation. These dyes fluoresce at 461 nm when excited by ultraviolet light and can therefore be visualized using conventional fluorescent microscopes equipped with light sources that emit light at ∼350 nm and filter sets that permit the transmission of light at ∼460 nm. This protocol describes staining and visualization of cells stained with Hoechst 33342, but it can be adapted for staining with DAPI or other dyes. PMID:27587774

  2. Necroptotic Cell Death Signaling and Execution Pathway: Lessons from Knockout Mice

    OpenAIRE

    José Belizário; Luiz Vieira-Cordeiro; Sylvia Enns

    2015-01-01

    Under stress conditions, cells in living tissue die by apoptosis or necrosis depending on the activation of the key molecules within a dying cell that either transduce cell survival or death signals that actively destroy the sentenced cell. Multiple extracellular (pH, heat, oxidants, and detergents) or intracellular (DNA damage and Ca2+ overload) stress conditions trigger various types of the nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cytoplasmatic, and mitochondrion-centered signaling events that...

  3. Role of autophagy in disease resistance and hypersensitive response-associated cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Munch, David; Bressendorff, Simon;

    2011-01-01

    Ancient autophagy pathways are emerging as key defense modules in host eukaryotic cells against microbial pathogens. Apart from actively eliminating intracellular intruders, autophagy is also responsible for cell survival, for example by reducing the deleterious effects of endoplasmic reticulum...... stress. At the same time, autophagy can contribute to cellular suicide. The concurrent engagement of autophagy in these processes during infection may sometimes mask its contribution to differing pro-survival and pro-death decisions. The importance of autophagy in innate immunity in mammals is well...... documented, but how autophagy contributes to plant innate immunity and cell death is not that clear. A few research reports have appeared recently to shed light on the roles of autophagy in plant-pathogen interactions and in disease-associated host cell death. We present a first attempt to reconcile...

  4. Hepatic Leukemia Factor Promotes Resistance To Cell Death: Implications For Therapeutics and Chronotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation.

  5. Activation of cell death pathways in the inner ear of the aging CBA/J mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Sha, Su-Hua; CHEN, FU-QUAN; Schacht, Jochen

    2009-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that oxidative stress increases in the inner ear of aging CBA/J mice and might contribute to the loss of function of the sensory system. We now investigate the activation of cell death pathways in the cochlea of these animals. Middle-aged (12 months) and old (18-26 months) mice with hearing deficits displayed outer hair cell nuclei with apoptotic and, to a lesser extent, necrotic features. Both intrinsic and extrinsic cell death pathways were activated by trans...

  6. Mechanisms underlying 3-bromopyruvate-induced cell death in colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yiming; Zhe LIU; Zou, Xue; Lan, Yadong; Sun, Xiaojin; Wang, Xiu; Zhao, Surong; Jiang, Chenchen; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) is an energy-depleting drug that inhibits Hexokinase II activity by alkylation during glycolysis, thereby suppressing the production of ATP and inducing cell death. As such, 3BP can potentially serve as an anti-tumorigenic agent. Our previous research showed that 3BP can induce apoptosis via AKT /protein Kinase B signaling in breast cancer cells. Here we found that 3BP can also induce colon cancer cell death by necroptosis and apoptosis at the same time and concentration...

  7. Cationic polystyrene nanospheres induce autophagic cell death through the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hui-Wen; Xia, Tian; Lee, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Chun-Wan; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2014-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used to produce a wide range of products that have applications in imaging and drug delivery in medicine. Due to their chemical stability, well-controlled sizes and surface charges, polystyrene (PS) NPs have been developed as biosensors and drug delivery carriers. However, the possible adverse biological effects and underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recently, autophagy has been implicated in the regulation of cell death. In this study, we evaluated a library of PS NPs with different surface charges. We found that NH2-labeled polystyrene (NH2-PS) nanospheres were highly toxic with enhanced uptake in macrophage (RAW 264.7) and lung epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. Furthermore, NH2-PS could induce autophagic cell death. NH2-PS increased autophagic flux due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress caused by misfolded protein aggregation. The inhibition of ER stress decreased cytotoxicity and autophagy in the NH2-PS-treated cells. In addition, the Akt/mTOR and AMPK signaling pathways were involved in the regulation of NH2-PS-triggered autophagic cell death. These results suggest an important role of autophagy in cationic NP-induced cell death and provide mechanistic insights into the inhibition of the toxicity and safe material design.Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used to produce a wide range of products that have applications in imaging and drug delivery in medicine. Due to their chemical stability, well-controlled sizes and surface charges, polystyrene (PS) NPs have been developed as biosensors and drug delivery carriers. However, the possible adverse biological effects and underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recently, autophagy has been implicated in the regulation of cell death. In this study, we evaluated a library of PS NPs with different surface charges. We found that NH2-labeled polystyrene (NH2-PS) nanospheres were highly toxic with enhanced uptake in macrophage (RAW 264.7) and lung

  8. A critical role for ethylene in hydrogen peroxide release during programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.J.; Yakimova, E.T.; Kapchina, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    Camptothecin, a topo isomerase-I inhibitor used in cancer therapy, induces apoptosis in animal cells. In tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells, camptothecin induces cell death that is accompanied by the characteristic nuclear morphological changes such as chromatin condensation and

  9. Transformation-associated changes in sphingolipid metabolism sensitize cells to lysosomal cell death induced by inhibitors of acid sphingomyelinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Olsen, Ole D; Groth-Pedersen, Line;

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and subsequent cell death may prove useful in cancer treatment, provided that cancer cell lysosomes can be specifically targeted. Here, we identify acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) inhibition as a selective means to destabilize cancer cell lysosomes. Lysosome-destab...

  10. Evaluation of cell death after treatment with extracorporeal photopheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Nicola; Del Proposto, Gianpaolo; Cerrone, Paola; Sinopoli, Silvia; Sansone, Lucia; Gadaleta, Deborah Ilaria; Lanti, Alessandro; Ferraro, Angelo Salvatore; Spurio, Stefano; Scerpa, Maria Cristina; Zinno, Francesco; Adorno, Gaspare; Isacchi, Giancarlo

    2012-02-01

    The aim of our study is to assess the mortality of leukocytes during extracorporeal photopheresis. Sixty-three photopheresis performed on 13 patients affected by chronic GvHD were evaluated. Samples were analyzed using a FACSCalibur flow cytometer. Apoptosis and necrosis of limphomononuclear cells dramatically increased after the apheretic procedure. We found a further increase of apoptotic and necrotic limphomononuclear cells after treatment with 8-MOP and UVA (p≤0.05). Our data suggested that the immunomodulatory effects of extracorporeal photopheresis, triggered by circulating apoptotic or necrotic cells, could play an important role in the treatment of GvHD with this procedure.

  11. CRFR1 activation protects against cytokine-induced beta cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Lykke; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Matsumoto, Masahito;

    2014-01-01

    During diabetes development beta cells are exposed to elevated concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β which in vitro, induce beta cell death. The class B G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): Corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) and CRFR2 are expressed in pancreat...

  12. Necroptotic Cell Death Signaling and Execution Pathway: Lessons from Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Belizário

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Under stress conditions, cells in living tissue die by apoptosis or necrosis depending on the activation of the key molecules within a dying cell that either transduce cell survival or death signals that actively destroy the sentenced cell. Multiple extracellular (pH, heat, oxidants, and detergents or intracellular (DNA damage and Ca2+ overload stress conditions trigger various types of the nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum (ER, cytoplasmatic, and mitochondrion-centered signaling events that allow cells to preserve the DNA integrity, protein folding, energetic, ionic and redox homeostasis, thus escaping from injury. Along the transition from reversible to irreversible injury, death signaling is highly heterogeneous and damaged cells may engage autophagy, apoptotic, or necrotic cell death programs. Studies on multiple double- and triple- knockout mice identified caspase-8, flip, and fadd genes as key regulators of embryonic lethality and inflammation. Caspase-8 has a critical role in pro- and antinecrotic signaling pathways leading to the activation of receptor interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1, RIPK3, and the mixed kinase domain-like (MLKL for a convergent execution pathway of necroptosis or regulated necrosis. Here we outline the recent discoveries into how the necrotic cell death execution pathway is engaged in many physiological and pathological outcome based on genetic analysis of knockout mice.

  13. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H2O2 treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells

  14. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jung Ar [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Sil [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang-Ho [Department of Pathology, Pochon CHA University, College of Medicine, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Jung, E-mail: khj57@yuhs.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young Do, E-mail: ydy1130@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells.

  15. Nuclear DAMP complex-mediated RAGE-dependent macrophage cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ruochan [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Fu, Sha; Fan, Xue-Gong [Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Tang, Daolin, E-mail: tangd2@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Kang, Rui, E-mail: kangr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2015-03-13

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), histone, and DNA are essential nuclear components involved in the regulation of chromosome structure and function. In addition to their nuclear function, these molecules act as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) alone or together when released extracellularly. The synergistic effect of these nuclear DNA-HMGB1-histone complexes as DAMP complexes (nDCs) on immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that nDCs limit survival of macrophages (e.g., RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages) but not cancer cells (e.g., HCT116, HepG2 and Hepa1-6). nDCs promote production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release, triggering reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-2, was required for Akt-dependent TNFα release and subsequent cell death following treatment with nDCs. Genetic depletion of RAGE by RNAi, antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, and TNFα neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated nDC-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence supporting novel signaling mechanisms linking nDCs and inflammation in macrophage cell death. - Highlights: • Nuclear DAMP complexes (nDCs) selectively induce cell death in macrophages, but not cancer cells. • TNFα-mediated oxidative stress is required for nDC-induced death. • RAGE-mediated Akt activation is required for nDC-induced TNFα release. • Blocking RAGE and TNFα inhibits nDC-induced macrophage cell death.

  16. Influence on cell death of high frequency motion of magnetic nanoparticles during magnetic hyperthermia experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallali, N.; Clerc, P.; Fourmy, D.; Gigoux, V.; Carrey, J.

    2016-07-01

    Studies with transplanted tumors in animals and clinical trials have provided the proof-of-concept of magnetic hyperthermia (MH) therapy of cancers using iron oxide nanoparticles. Interestingly, in several studies, the application of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to tumor cells having internalized and accumulated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into their lysosomes can induce cell death without detectable temperature increase. To explain these results, among other hypotheses, it was proposed that cell death could be due to the high-frequency translational motion of MNPs under the influence of the AMF gradient generated involuntarily by most inductors. Such mechanical actions of MNPs might cause cellular damages and participate in the induction of cell death under MH conditions. To test this hypothesis, we developed a setup maximizing this effect. It is composed of an anti-Helmholtz coil and two permanent magnets, which produce an AMF gradient and a superimposed static MF. We have measured the MNP heating power and treated tumor cells by a standard AMF and by an AMF gradient, on which was added or not a static magnetic field. We showed that the presence of a static magnetic field prevents MNP heating and cell death in standard MH conditions. The heating power of MNPs in an AMF gradient is weak, position-dependent, and related to the presence of a non-zero AMF. Under an AMF gradient and a static field, no MNP heating and cell death were measured. Consequently, the hypothesis that translational motions could be involved in cell death during MH experiments is ruled out by our experiments.

  17. Combined cisplatin and aurora inhibitor treatment increase neuroblastoma cell death but surviving cells overproduce BDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polacchini, Alessio; Albani, Clara; Baj, Gabriele; Colliva, Andrea; Carpinelli, Patrizia; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2016-07-15

    Drug-resistance to chemotherapics in aggressive neuroblastoma (NB) is characterized by enhanced cell survival mediated by TrkB and its ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); thus reduction in BDNF levels represent a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance, but how chemotherapics regulate BDNF is unknown. Here, cisplatin treatment in SK-N-BE neuroblastoma upregulated multiple BDNF transcripts, except exons 5 and 8 variants. Cisplatin increased BDNF mRNA and protein, and enhanced translation of a firefly reporter gene flanked by BDNF 5'UTR exons 1, 2c, 4 or 6 and 3'UTR-long. To block BDNF translation we focused on aurora kinases inhibitors which are proposed as new chemotherapeutics. NB cell survival after 24 h treatment was 43% with cisplatin, and 22% by cisplatin+aurora kinase inhibitor PHA-680632, while the aurora kinases inhibitor alone was less effective; however the combined treatment induced a paradoxical increase of BDNF in surviving cells with strong translational activation of exon6-3'UTR-long transcript, while translation of BDNF transcripts 1, 2C and 4 was suppressed. In conclusion, combined cisplatin and aurora kinase inhibitor treatment increases cell death, but induces BDNF overproduction in surviving cells through an aurora kinase-independent mechanism.

  18. Evodiamine induces tumor cell death through different pathways: apoptosis and necrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YingZHANG; Li-junWU; Shin-ichiTASHIRO; SatoshiONODERA; TakashiIKEJIMA

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the different death pathways in human cervical cancer HeLa and melanoma A375-S2 cells initiated by evodiamine. METHODS: Viability of evodiamine-induced HeLa and A375-S2 cells was measured by MTT assay. Apoptotic cells with condensed or fragmented nuclei were visualized by Hoechst 33258 staining. Nucleosomal DNA fragmentation was assayed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Proportion of cell death through apoptotic and necrotic pathways was determined by LDH activity-based cytotoxicity assays. Cell cycle distribution was observed by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Evodiamine induced HeLa and A375-S2 cell death dose- and time-dependently.Caspase-3 and -8 were activated in apoptosis induced by evodiamine 15 μmol/L. However, over 24- h incubation of A375-S2 cells, evodiamine 15 μmol/L initiated necrosis related to p38 and ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinases)activities. Evodiamine-induced HeLa cell death was preceded by an accumulation of cells at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, but there was no significant effect of evodiamine on A375-S2 cell cycle. CONCLUSION: Evodiamineinduces caspase-3,8-dependent apoptosis in HeLa cells which is related to G2/M arrest of the cell cycle. On the other hand, in A375-S2 cells, evodiamine initiates caspase-3,8-mediated apoptosis at early stages and the induction of MAPK-mediated necrosis at later stages of cell culture.

  19. Regulation of Neuronal Cell Death by c-Abl-Hippo/MST2 Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lei; Bai, Yujie; Qu, Aiqin; Zheng, Zheng; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammalian Ste20-like kinases (MSTs) are the mammalian homologue of Drosophila hippo and play critical roles in regulation of cell death, organ size control, proliferation and tumorigenesis. MSTs exert pro-apoptotic function through cleavage, autophosphorylation and in turn phosphorylation of downstream targets, such as Histone H2B and FOXO (Forkhead box O). Previously we reported that protein kinase c-Abl mediates oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death through phosphorylating MST1 at Y433, which is not conserved among mammalian MST2, Drosophila Hippo and C.elegans cst-1/2. Methodology/Principal Findings Using immunoblotting, in vitro kinase and cell death assay, we demonstrate that c-Abl kinase phosphorylates MST2 at an evolutionarily conserved site, Y81, within the kinase domain. We further show that the phosphorylation of MST2 by c-Abl leads to the disruption of the interaction with Raf-1 proteins and the enhancement of homodimerization of MST2 proteins. It thereby enhances the MST2 activation and induces neuronal cell death. Conclusions/Significance The identification of the c-Abl tyrosine kinase as a novel upstream activator of MST2 suggests that the conserved c-Abl-MST signaling cascade plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. PMID:22590567

  20. Mechanism of neem limonoids-induced cell death in cancer: Role of oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Neelu; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Rahul; Srivastava, Pragya; Sun, Leimin; Rapali, Peter; Marlowe, Timothy; Schneider, Andrea; Inigo, Joseph R; O'Malley, Jordan; Londonkar, Ramesh; Gogada, Raghu; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Yadava, Nagendra; Chandra, Dhyan

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that neem limonoids (neem) induce multiple cancer cell death pathways. Here we dissect the underlying mechanisms of neem-induced apoptotic cell death in cancer. We observed that neem-induced caspase activation does not require Bax/Bak channel-mediated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, permeability transition pore, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Neem enhanced mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial biomass. While oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) Complex-I activity was decreased, the activities of other OXPHOS complexes including Complex-II and -IV were unaltered. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were associated with an increase in mitochondrial biomass and apoptosis upon neem exposure. Complex-I deficiency due to the loss of Ndufa1-encoded MWFE protein inhibited neem-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, but cell death induction was enhanced. Complex II-deficiency due to the loss of succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit C (SDHC) robustly decreased caspase activation, apoptosis, and cell death. Additionally, the ablation of Complexes-I, -III, -IV, and -V together did not inhibit caspase activation. Together, we demonstrate that neem limonoids target OXPHOS system to induce cancer cell death, which does not require upregulation or activation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

  1. Decisive role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/Ref-1 in initiation of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyoung Joo; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Park, Soo Chul; Kim, Hyun Woo; Kim, Gyung Whan

    2010-11-01

    The apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox effector factor-1 (APE/Ref-1) is involved in the base excision repair of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites induced by oxidative DNA damage. APE/Ref-1 was decreased by kainic acid (KA) injury in a time-dependent manner at the level of proteins, not transcripts. We investigated whether alteration of APE/Ref-1 amounts would influence hippocampal cell fate, survival or death, after KA injury. Overexpression of APE/Ref-1 using adenovirus and restoration of APE small peptides significantly reduced KA-induced hippocampal cell death. Both silencing of APE/Ref-1 by siRNA and inhibition of endonuclease by an antibody significantly increased caspase-3 activity and apoptotic cell death triggered from the early time after exposure to KA. These findings suggest that cell death is initiated by reducing APE/Ref-1 protein and inhibiting its repair function in spite of enough protein amounts. In conclusion, APE/Ref-1 may be a regulator of cell death initiation, and APE small peptides could provide molecular mechanism-based therapies for neuroprotection in progressive excitotoxic neuronal damage.

  2. Mitochondrion-mediated cell death: Dissecting yeast apoptosis for a better understanding of neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf J Braun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial damage and dysfunction are common hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer, Parkinson, Huntington diseases, and the motor neuron disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Damaged mitochondria pivotally contribute to neurotoxicity and neuronal cell death in these disorders, e.g., due to their inability to provide the high energy requirements for neurons, their generation of reactive oxygen species, and their induction of mitochondrion-mediated cell death pathways. Therefore, in-depth analyses of the underlying molecular pathways, including cellular mechanisms controlling the maintenance of mitochondrial function, is a prerequisite for a better understanding of neurodegenerative disorders. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an established model for deciphering mitochondrial quality control mechanisms and the distinct mitochondrial roles during apoptosis and programmed cell death. Cell death upon expression of various human neurotoxic proteins has been characterized in yeast, revealing neurotoxic protein-specific differences. This review summarizes how mitochondria are affected in these neurotoxic yeast models, and how they are involved in the execution and prevention of cell death. I will discuss to which extent this mimics the situation in other neurotoxic model systems, and how this may contribute to a better understanding of the mitochondrial roles in the human disorders.

  3. Tissue resident stem cells: till death do us part

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Aging is accompanied by reduced regenerative capacity of all tissues and organs and dysfunction of adult stem cells. Notably, these age-related alterations contribute to distinct pathophysiological characteristics depending on the tissue of origin and function and thus require special attention in a type by type manner. In this paper, we review the current understanding of the mechanisms leading to tissue-specific adult stem cell dysfunction and reduced regenerative capacity with age. A compr...

  4. Cell cycle regulation and apoptotic cell death in experimental colon carcinogenesis: intervening with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2015-01-01

    Relative imbalance in the pathways regulating cell cycle, cell proliferation, or cell death marks a prerequisite for neoplasm. C-phycocyanin, a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis and a selective COX-2 inhibitor along with piroxicam, a traditional nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug was used to investigate the role of cell cycle regulatory proteins and proinflammatory transcription factor NFκB in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Cell cycle regulators [cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), CDK4, and p53], NFκB (p65) pathway, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were evaluated by gene and protein expression, whereas apoptosis was studied by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and apoptotic bleb assay. Molecular docking of ligand protein interaction was done to validate the in vivo results. Cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, and CDK4 were overexpressed in DMH, whereas piroxicam and c-phycocyanin promoted the cell cycle arrest by downregulating them. Both drugs mediated apoptosis through p53 activation. Piroxicam and c-phycocyanin also stimulated antiproliferation by restraining PCNA expression and reduced cell survival via inhibiting NFκB (p65) pathway. Molecular docking revealed that phycocyanobilin (a chromophore of c-phycocyanin) interact with DNA binding site of NFκB. Inhibition of cyclin/CDK complex by piroxicam and c-phycocyanin affects the expression of p53 in colon cancer followed by downregulation of NFκB and PCNA levels, thus substantiating the antineoplastic role of these agents. PMID:25825916

  5. Microscopic analysis of cell death by metabolic stress-induced autophagy in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changou, Chun; Cheng, R. Holland; Bold, Richard; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y. S.

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular recycling mechanism that helps cells to survive against environmental stress and nutritional starvation. We have recently shown that prostate cancers undergo metabolic stress and caspase-independent cell death following exposure to arginine deiminase (ADI, an enzyme that degrades arginine in tissue). The aims of our current investigation into the application of ADI as a novel cancer therapy are to identify the components mediating tumor cell death, and to determine the role of autophagy (stimulated by ADI and/or rapamycin) on cell death. Using advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques including 3D deconvolution and superresolution structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), we show that prostate tumor cells that are killed after exposure to ADI for extended periods, exhibit a morphology that is distinct from caspase-dependent apoptosis; and that autophagosomes forming as a result of ADI stimulation contain DAPI-stained nuclear material. Fluorescence imaging (as well as cryo-electron microscopy) show a breakdown of both the inner and outer nuclear membranes at the interface between the cell nucleus and aggregated autophagolysosomes. Finally, the addition of N-acetyl cysteine (or NAC, a scavenger for reactive oxygen species) effectively abolishes the appearance of autophagolysosomes containing nuclear material. We hope to continue this research to understand the processes that govern the survival or death of these tumor cells, in order to develop methods to improve the efficacy of cancer pharmacotherapy.

  6. Apoptosis, necrosis and necroptosis: cell death regulation in the intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Claudia; Neumann, Helmut; Neurath, Markus F; Becker, Christoph

    2013-07-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) are organised as a single cell layer which covers the intestine. Their primary task is to absorb nutrients present in the intestinal lumen. However, IEC also play an important role in the immune defence of our body by building a barrier that separates the bowel wall from potentially hazardous bacteria present in the gut lumen. The life cycle of IEC is determined by the time span in which cells migrate from their place of origin at the crypt base to the villus tip, from where they are shed into the lumen. Cell death in the intestinal epithelium has to be tightly regulated and irregularities might cause pathologies. Excessive cell death has been associated with chronic inflammation as seen in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. While until recently apoptosis was discussed as being essential for epithelial turnover and tissue homeostasis in the intestinal epithelium, recent data using gene deficient mice have challenged this concept. Moreover, an apoptosis-independent mode of programmed cell death, termed necroptosis, has been identified and described in the intestinal epithelium. The following article reviews previous studies on cell death regulation in IEC and a potential role of necroptosis for gut homeostasis. PMID:22689519

  7. DCD – a novel plant specific domain in proteins involved in development and programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerks Tobias

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of microbial pathogens by plants triggers the hypersensitive reaction, a common form of programmed cell death in plants. These dying cells generate signals that activate the plant immune system and alarm the neighboring cells as well as the whole plant to activate defense responses to limit the spread of the pathogen. The molecular mechanisms behind the hypersensitive reaction are largely unknown except for the recognition process of pathogens. We delineate the NRP-gene in soybean, which is specifically induced during this programmed cell death and contains a novel protein domain, which is commonly found in different plant proteins. Results The sequence analysis of the protein, encoded by the NRP-gene from soybean, led to the identification of a novel domain, which we named DCD, because it is found in plant proteins involved in development and cell death. The domain is shared by several proteins in the Arabidopsis and the rice genomes, which otherwise show a different protein architecture. Biological studies indicate a role of these proteins in phytohormone response, embryo development and programmed cell by pathogens or ozone. Conclusion It is tempting to speculate, that the DCD domain mediates signaling in plant development and programmed cell death and could thus be used to identify interacting proteins to gain further molecular insights into these processes.

  8. Attenuation of cisplatin-induced acute renal failure is associated with less apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H; Miyaji, T; Kato, A; Fujigaki, Y; Sano, K; Hishida, A

    1999-12-01

    To clarify the pathophysiologic role of apoptosis in acute renal failure (ARF), we examined whether the attenuation of cisplatin-induced ARF is associated with the change in the degree of apoptotic cell death. The administration of cisplatin (CDDP) (6 mg/kg body weight) in rats induced ARF at day 5, as manifested by a significant increase in serum creatinine (Scr) and tubular damage. CDDP-induced apoptotic cell death was confirmed by electron microscopic examination, agarose gel electrophoresis, and increased cells positive for TaT-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) in the outer medulla of the kidney. Treatment with dimethylthiourea (DMTU)--a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals--or glycine abrogated CDDP-induced increases in Scr, the tubular damage score, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells. Pretreatment with uranyl acetate (UA) induced a significant expression of Bcl-2 in the kidney and ameliorated CDDP-induced increases in Scr, the tubular damage score, and TUNEL-positive cells in the outer stripe of the outer medulla. Our findings indicate (1) that the attenuation of CDDP-induced ARF was associated with less apoptotic cell death and (2) that the induction of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 attenuated apoptosis and tubular damage. Our results suggest that apoptotic cell death may play an important role in the development of cisplatin-induced ARF. PMID:10595794

  9. Melatonin enhances arsenic trioxide-induced cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sun-Mi; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Oh, Sang Taek; Hong, Sung-Eun; Choe, Tae-Boo; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Seong, Min Ki; Kim, Hyun-A; Noh, Woo Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2016-02-15

    Melatonin is implicated in various physiological functions, including anticancer activity. However, the mechanism(s) of its anticancer activity is not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the combined effects of melatonin and arsenic trioxide (ATO) on cell death in human breast cancer cells. Melatonin enhanced the ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via changes in the protein levels of Survivin, Bcl-2, and Bax, thus affecting cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol. Interestingly, we found that the cell death induced by co-treatment with melatonin and ATO was mediated by sustained upregulation of Redd1, which was associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combined treatment with melatonin and ATO induced the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase downstream from Redd1 expression. Rapamycin and S6K1 siRNA enhanced, while activation of mTORC1 by transfection with TSC2 siRNA suppressed the cell death induced by melatonin and ATO treatment. Taken together, our findings suggest that melatonin enhances ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression and inhibition of mTORC1 upstream of the activation of the p38/JNK pathways in human breast cancer cells. PMID:26607805

  10. Ubiquitin at the crossroad of cell death and survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Shan Chen; Xiao-Bo Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitination is crucial for cellular processes, such as protein degradation, apoptosis, autophagy, and cell cycle progression. Dysregulation of the ubiquitination network accounts for the development of numerous diseases, including cancer. Thus, targeting ubiquitination is a promising strategy in cancer therapy. Both apoptosis and autophagy are involved in tumorigenesis and response to cancer therapy. Although both are categorized as types of celldeath, autophagy is general y considered to have protective functions, including protecting cells from apoptosis under certain cellular stress conditions. This review highlights recent advances in understanding the regulation of apoptosis and autophagy by ubiquitination.

  11. Germline cell death is inhibited by P-element insertions disrupting the dcp-1/pita nested gene pair in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundrie, Bonni; Peterson, Jeanne S; Baum, Jason S; Chang, Jeffrey C; Fileppo, Dana; Thompson, Sharona R; McCall, Kimberly

    2003-12-01

    Germline cell death in Drosophila oogenesis is controlled by distinct signals. The death of nurse cells in late oogenesis is developmentally regulated, whereas the death of egg chambers during mid-oogenesis is induced by environmental stress or developmental abnormalities. P-element insertions in the caspase gene dcp-1 disrupt both dcp-1 and the outlying gene, pita, leading to lethality and defective nurse cell death in late oogenesis. By isolating single mutations in the two genes, we have found that the loss of both genes contributes to this ovary phenotype. Mutants of pita, which encodes a C2H2 zinc-finger protein, are homozygous lethal and show dumpless egg chambers and premature nurse cell death in germline clones. Early nurse cell death is not observed in the dcp-1/pita double mutants, suggesting that dcp-1+ activity is required for the mid-oogenesis cell death seen in pita mutants. dcp-1 mutants are viable and nurse cell death in late oogenesis occurs normally. However, starvation-induced germline cell death during mid-oogenesis is blocked, leading to a reduction and inappropriate nuclear localization of the active caspase Drice. These findings suggest that the combinatorial loss of pita and dcp-1 leads to the increased survival of abnormal egg chambers in mutants bearing the P-element alleles and that dcp-1 is essential for cell death during mid-oogenesis.

  12. Carvedilol protects bone marrow stem cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death via PI3K-AKT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meihui; Chen, Shudong; Lin, Dingkun

    2016-03-01

    Carvedilol, a nonselective β-adrenergic receptor blocker, has been reported to exert potent anti-oxidative activities. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of carvedilol against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) death, which imitate the microenvironment surrounding transplanted cells in the injured spinal cord in vitro. Carvedilol significantly reduced H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species production, apoptosis and subsequent cell death. LY294002, the PI3K inhibitor, blocked the protective effects and up-regulation of Akt phosphorylation of carvedilol. Together, our results showed that carvedilol protects H2O2-induced BMSCs cell death partly through PI3K-Akt pathway, suggesting carvedilol could be used in combination with BMSCs for the treatment of spinal cord injury by improving the cell survival and oxidative stress microenvironments. PMID:26898450

  13. METACASPASE9 modulates autophagy to confine cell death to the target cells during Arabidopsis vascular xylem differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacha Escamez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We uncovered that the level of autophagy in plant cells undergoing programmed cell death determines the fate of the surrounding cells. Our approach consisted of using Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures capable of differentiating into two different cell types: vascular tracheary elements (TEs that undergo programmed cell death (PCD and protoplast autolysis, and parenchymatic non-TEs that remain alive. The TE cell type displayed higher levels of autophagy when expression of the TE-specific METACASPASE9 (MC9 was reduced using RNAi (MC9-RNAi. Misregulation of autophagy in the MC9-RNAi TEs coincided with ectopic death of the non-TEs, implying the existence of an autophagy-dependent intercellular signalling from within the TEs towards the non-TEs. Viability of the non-TEs was restored when AUTOPHAGY2 (ATG2 was downregulated specifically in MC9-RNAi TEs, demonstrating the importance of autophagy in the spatial confinement of cell death. Our results suggest that other eukaryotic cells undergoing PCD might also need to tightly regulate their level of autophagy to avoid detrimental consequences for the surrounding cells.

  14. Association of Autophagy in the Cell Death Mediated by Dihydrotestosterone in Autoreactive T Cells Independent of Antigenic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ting; Anandhan, Annandurai; Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Rajasekaran, Rajkumar A; Franco, Rodrigo; Reddy, Jay

    2015-12-01

    Gender disparity is well documented in the mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced with proteolipid protein (PLP) 139-151, in which female, but not male, SJL mice show a chronic relapsing-remitting paralysis. Furthermore, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) has been shown to ameliorate the severity of EAE, but the underlying mechanisms of its protective effects are unclear. Using major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II dextramers for PLP 139-151, we tested the hypothesis that DHT selectively modulates the expansion and functionalities of antigen-specific T cells. Unexpectedly, we noted that DHT induced cell death in antigen-specific, autoreactive T cells, but the effects were not selective, because both proliferating and non-proliferating cells were equally affected independent of antigenic stimulation. Furthermore, DHT-exposed PLP 139-151-specific T cells did not show any shift in cytokine production; rather, frequencies of cytokine-producing PLP-specific T cells were significantly reduced, irrespective of T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 subsets of cytokines. By evaluating cell death and autophagy pathways, we provide evidence for the induction of autophagy to be associated with cell death caused by DHT. Taken together, the data provide new insights into the role of DHT and indicate that cell death and autophagy contribute to the therapeutic effects of androgens in autoreactive T cells.

  15. Mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analogs inhibit breast cancer cell energy metabolism and promote cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research has revealed that targeting mitochondrial bioenergetic metabolism is a promising chemotherapeutic strategy. Key to successful implementation of this chemotherapeutic strategy is the use of new and improved mitochondria-targeted cationic agents that selectively inhibit energy metabolism in breast cancer cells, while exerting little or no long-term cytotoxic effect in normal cells. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and alterations in bioenergetic metabolism induced by mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analog (Mito-chromanol, Mito-ChM) and its acetylated ester analog (Mito-ChMAc). Assays of cell death, colony formation, mitochondrial bioenergetic function, intracellular ATP levels, intracellular and tissue concentrations of tested compounds, and in vivo tumor growth were performed. Both Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc selectively depleted intracellular ATP and caused prolonged inhibition of ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate in breast cancer cells, but not in non-cancerous cells. These effects were significantly augmented by inhibition of glycolysis. Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc exhibited anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in several breast cancer cells with different genetic background. Furthermore, Mito-ChM selectively accumulated in tumor tissue and inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft model of human breast cancer. We conclude that mitochondria-targeted small molecular weight chromanols exhibit selective anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in multiple breast cancer cells, and that esterification of the hydroxyl group in mito-chromanols is not a critical requirement for its anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effect

  16. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death.

  17. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto;

    to approach in vivo conditions. Microfluidics also allow implementation of a wide range of electrochemical or optical assays for online, real-time, parallel analysis of important parameters such as redox activity, O2 and H2O2 concentration, extracellular pH, cell viability and enzyme activity1,2. Currently...

  18. The red cell revisited--matters of life and death.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werre, J.M.; Willekens, F.L.A.; Bosch, F.H.; Haans, L.D. de; Vegt, S.G. van der; Bos, A.G. van den; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    An erythrocyte-fractionating method combining volume and subsequent density separation is described. Iron isotope (59Fe)-validation proved this combination of methods to be complementary. By deploying HbA1c as cell age marker, obtained fractions demonstrated that circulating erythrocytes lose 20% of

  19. Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3, 2016 WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New research challenges the long-held belief that people with sickle cell trait, who are born with ... span and causes sudden episodes of severe pain. People with the disease carry ... on active duty in the U.S. Army over a four-year period. All had undergone ...

  20. Protein translation machinery holds a key for transition of planktonic cells to biofilm state in Enterococcus faecalis: A proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Shariq; Sharma, Divakar; Bisht, Deepa; Khan, Asad U

    2016-06-10

    Enterococcus faecalis is a member of human gut microflora causing nosocomial infection involving biofilm formation. Ethyl methyl sulfonate induced mutants were analysed using crystal violet assay, SEM and CLSM microscopy which confirmed AK-E12 as biofilm efficient and AK-F6 as biofilm deficient mutants. Growth curve pattern revealed AK-E12 was fast growing whereas, AK-F6 was found slow growing mutant. 2D-Electrophorosis and MALDI-TOF analysis revealed over and underexpression of many translation-elongation associated proteins in mutants compared to wild type. Protein translation elongation factor G, translation elongation factor Tu and ribosomal subunit interface proteins were underexpressed and UTP-glucose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase and cell division protein divIVA were overexpressed in AK-E12 as compared to wild type. In AK-F6, except 10 kDa chaperonin which was over-expressed other selected proteins were found to be suppressed. RT-PCR confirmed proteomic data except for the translation elongation factor G which showed contradictory data of proteome expression in AK-E12. Protein-protein interaction networks were constructed using STRING 10.0 which demonstrated strong connection of translation-elongation proteins with other proteins. Hence, it concludes from the data that translation elongation factors are important in transition of planktonic cells to biofilm cells in Enterococcus faecalis. PMID:27144316

  1. Silencer of Death Domains Controls Cell Death through Tumour Necrosis Factor-Receptor 1 and Caspase-10 in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naveed I.; Welschinger, Robert; Basnett, Jordan; Fung, Carina; Rizos, Helen; Bradstock, Kenneth F.; Bendall, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to apoptosis remains a significant problem in drug resistance and treatment failure in malignant disease. NO-aspirin is a novel drug that has efficacy against a number of solid tumours, and can inhibit Wnt signaling, and although we have shown Wnt signaling to be important for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell proliferation and survival inhibition of Wnt signaling does not appear to be involved in the induction of ALL cell death. Treatment of B lineage ALL cell lines and patient ALL cells with NO-aspirin induced rapid apoptotic cell death mediated via the extrinsic death pathway. Apoptosis was dependent on caspase-10 in association with the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) incorporating pro-caspase-10 and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF-R1). There was no measurable increase in TNF-R1 or TNF-α in response to NO-aspirin, suggesting that the process was ligand-independent. Consistent with this, expression of silencer of death domain (SODD) was reduced following NO-aspirin exposure and lentiviral mediated shRNA knockdown of SODD suppressed expansion of transduced cells confirming the importance of SODD for ALL cell survival. Considering that SODD and caspase-10 are frequently over-expressed in ALL, interfering with these proteins may provide a new strategy for the treatment of this and potentially other cancers. PMID:25061812

  2. Silencer of death domains controls cell death through tumour necrosis factor-receptor 1 and caspase-10 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Cisterne

    Full Text Available Resistance to apoptosis remains a significant problem in drug resistance and treatment failure in malignant disease. NO-aspirin is a novel drug that has efficacy against a number of solid tumours, and can inhibit Wnt signaling, and although we have shown Wnt signaling to be important for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cell proliferation and survival inhibition of Wnt signaling does not appear to be involved in the induction of ALL cell death. Treatment of B lineage ALL cell lines and patient ALL cells with NO-aspirin induced rapid apoptotic cell death mediated via the extrinsic death pathway. Apoptosis was dependent on caspase-10 in association with the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC incorporating pro-caspase-10 and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF-R1. There was no measurable increase in TNF-R1 or TNF-α in response to NO-aspirin, suggesting that the process was ligand-independent. Consistent with this, expression of silencer of death domain (SODD was reduced following NO-aspirin exposure and lentiviral mediated shRNA knockdown of SODD suppressed expansion of transduced cells confirming the importance of SODD for ALL cell survival. Considering that SODD and caspase-10 are frequently over-expressed in ALL, interfering with these proteins may provide a new strategy for the treatment of this and potentially other cancers.

  3. Characterisation in vivo of ways of induced deaths by p53, in the male germinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The male germinal cells constitute a heterogeneous cell population including pre-meiotic proliferating cells (spermatogonia) and meiotic cells and post meiotic cells in differentiation (spermatocytes and spermatids). We study the involvement in vivo of the p53 protein in the death of these cells with the help of two models, (1) a transgenic model of infertility, MTp53, in which the p53 is over expressed in the differentiated cells and induced their death, (2) the response of these cells to gamma irradiation, where only the spermatogonia die by apoptosis dependent of p53. We showed that the caspases (cysteine-aspartic proteases) are involved in the terminal differentiation of normal germinal cells. But in the MTp53 model, the p53 induces the death of differentiated cells via the activation of calpains and not of caspases. We studied the response of spermatogonia, to gamma irradiation by a transcriptomic approach, by DNA chips and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. we showed that the puma and dr5 genes are induced by the p53 after irradiation. more, the study of mice invalidated for trail ( the dr5 ligand) or for puma, allowed to demonstrate that the two effectors are essential to the activation of intrinsic and extrinsic ways of apoptosis. (N.C.)

  4. A homologue of the defender against the apoptotic death gene (dad1) in UV-exposed Chlamydomonas cells is downregulated with the onset of programmed cell death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swati Moharikar; Jacinta S D’souza; Basuthkar J Rao

    2007-03-01

    We report here the isolation of a homologue of the potential anti-apoptotic gene, defender against apoptotic death (dad1) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we investigated its expression in the execution process of programmed cell death (PCD) in UV-C exposed dying C. reinhardtii cells. Reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR showed that C. reinhardtii dad1 amplification was drastically reduced in UV-C exposed dying C. reinhardtii cells. We connect the downregulation of dad1 with the upregulation of apoptosis protease activating factor-1 (APAF-1) and the physiological changes that occur in C. reinhardtii cells upon exposure to 12 J/m2 UV-C in order to show a reciprocal relationship between proapoptotic and inhibitor of apoptosis factors. The temporal changes indicate a correlation between the onset of cell death and dad1 downregulation. The sequence of the PCR product of the cDNA encoding the dad1 homologue was aligned with the annotated dad1 (C_20215) from the Chlamydomonas database (http://genome.jgi-psf.org:8080/annotator/servlet/jgi.annotation.Annotation?pDb=chlre2); Annotation?pDb=chlre2); this sequence was found to show 100% identity, both at the nucleotide and amino acid level. The 327 bp transcript showed an open reading frame of 87 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the putative C. reinhardtii DAD1 homologue showed 54% identity with Oryza sativa, 56% identity with Drosophila melanogaster, 66% identity with Xenopus laevis, and 64% identity with Homo sapiens, Sus scrofa, Gallus gallus, Rattus norvegicus and Mus musculus.

  5. Cloning of murine BRI3 gene and study on its function for inducing cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism of TNFα effects, the cDNA of murine BRI3 gene was cloned from the total RNA of murine brain endothelial cells (bEnd.3)treated with hTNFα by using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and the RT-PCR method. The fusion expression vector harbouring BRI3 gene and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) thus obtained were designated as pEGFP/I3. Then pEGFP/I3 was transiently transfected into L929 cells and the fusion protein EGFP/I3 was localized in cytoplasm. It is found that the expression of EGFP/I3 could induce cell death in L929 cells detected by TUNEL method and flow cytometry. And the overexpression of Bci-2 in L929 cells can block cell death induced by EGFP/I3, indicating that murine BRI3 gene might related to the TNFα mediated cytotoxicity.

  6. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Emeli M., E-mail: Emeli.Nilsson@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden); Brokken, Leon J.S., E-mail: Leon.Brokken@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden); Haerkoenen, Pirkko L., E-mail: Pirkko.Harkonen@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden)

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  7. Human lactoferrin triggers a mitochondrial- and caspase-dependent regulated cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Zaldívar, M; Andrés, M T; Rego, A; Pereira, C S; Fierro, J F; Côrte-Real, M

    2016-02-01

    We have previously shown that the antifungal activity of human lactoferrin (hLf) against Candida albicans relies on its ability to induce cell death associated with apoptotic markers. To gain a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying hLf-induced apoptosis, we characterized this cell death process in the well-established Saccharomyces cerevisiae model. Our results indicate that hLf induces cell death in S. cerevisiae in a manner that requires energy and de novo protein synthesis. Cell death is associated with nuclear chromatin condensation, preservation of plasma membrane integrity, and is Yca1p metacaspase-dependent. Lactoferrin also caused mitochondrial dysfunction associated with ROS accumulation and release of cytochrome c. Pre-incubation with oligomycin, an oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor, increased resistance to hLf and, accordingly, mutants deficient in the F1F0-ATP synthase complex were more resistant to death induced by hLf. This indicates that mitochondrial energetic metabolism plays a key role in the killing effect of hLf, though a direct role of F1F0-ATP synthase cannot be precluded. Overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL or pre-incubation with N-acetyl cysteine reduced the intracellular level of ROS and increased resistance to hLf, confirming a ROS-mediated mitochondrial cell death process. Mitochondrial involvement was further reinforced by the higher resistance of cells lacking mitochondrial DNA, or other known yeast mitochondrial apoptosis regulators, such as, Aif1p, Cyc3p and Aac1/2/3p. This study provides new insights into a detailed understanding at the molecular level of hLf-induced apoptosis, which may allow the design of new strategies to overcome the emergence of resistance of clinically relevant fungi to conventional antifungals.

  8. Low-frequency quantitative ultrasound imaging of cell death in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Czarnota, Gregory J. [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Papanicolau, Naum; Tadayyon, Hadi [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Lee, Justin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Zubovits, Judit [Department of Pathology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Sadeghian, Alireza [Department of Computer Science, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Karshafian, Raffi [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Giles, Anoja [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Kolios, Michael C. [Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Currently, no clinical imaging modality is used routinely to assess tumor response to cancer therapies within hours to days of the delivery of treatment. Here, the authors demonstrate the efficacy of ultrasound at a clinically relevant frequency to quantitatively detect changes in tumors in response to cancer therapies using preclinical mouse models.Methods: Conventional low-frequency and corresponding high-frequency ultrasound (ranging from 4 to 28 MHz) were used along with quantitative spectroscopic and signal envelope statistical analyses on data obtained from xenograft tumors treated with chemotherapy, x-ray radiation, as well as a novel vascular targeting microbubble therapy.Results: Ultrasound-based spectroscopic biomarkers indicated significant changes in cell-death associated parameters in responsive tumors. Specifically changes in the midband fit, spectral slope, and 0-MHz intercept biomarkers were investigated for different types of treatment and demonstrated cell-death related changes. The midband fit and 0-MHz intercept biomarker derived from low-frequency data demonstrated increases ranging approximately from 0 to 6 dBr and 0 to 8 dBr, respectively, depending on treatments administrated. These data paralleled results observed for high-frequency ultrasound data. Statistical analysis of ultrasound signal envelope was performed as an alternative method to obtain histogram-based biomarkers and provided confirmatory results. Histological analysis of tumor specimens indicated up to 61% cell death present in the tumors depending on treatments administered, consistent with quantitative ultrasound findings indicating cell death. Ultrasound-based spectroscopic biomarkers demonstrated a good correlation with histological morphological findings indicative of cell death (r{sup 2}= 0.71, 0.82; p < 0.001).Conclusions: In summary, the results provide preclinical evidence, for the first time, that quantitative ultrasound used at a clinically relevant frequency

  9. Role of apoptosis and necrosis in cell death induced by nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattani, Varun P., E-mail: varun.pattani@utexas.edu; Shah, Jay; Atalis, Alexandra; Sharma, Anirudh; Tunnell, James W. [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Current cancer therapies can cause significant collateral damage due to a lack of specificity and sensitivity. Therefore, we explored the cell death pathway response to gold nanorod (GNR)-mediated photothermal therapy as a highly specific cancer therapeutic to understand the role of apoptosis and necrosis during intense localized heating. By developing this, we can optimize photothermal therapy to induce a maximum of ‘clean’ cell death pathways, namely apoptosis, thereby reducing external damage. GNRs were targeted to several subcellular localizations within colorectal tumor cells in vitro, and the cell death pathways were quantitatively analyzed after photothermal therapy using flow cytometry. In this study, we found that the cell death response to photothermal therapy was dependent on the GNR localization. Furthermore, we demonstrated that nanorods targeted to the perinuclear region irradiated at 37.5 W/cm{sup 2} laser fluence rate led to maximum cell destruction with the ‘cleaner’ method of apoptosis, at similar percentages as other anti-cancer targeted therapies. We believe that this indicates the therapeutic potential for GNR-mediated photothermal therapy to treat cancer effectively without causing damage to surrounding tissue.

  10. A unifying mechanism for cancer cell death through ion channel activation by HAMLET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Petter; Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Trulsson, Maria; Ho C S, James; Dosnon, Marion; Westergren, Tomas; Chao, Yinxia; Rydström, Anna; Yang, Henry; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Svanborg, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels and ion fluxes control many aspects of tissue homeostasis. During oncogenic transformation, critical ion channel functions may be perturbed but conserved tumor specific ion fluxes remain to be defined. Here we used the tumoricidal protein-lipid complex HAMLET as a probe to identify ion fluxes involved in tumor cell death. We show that HAMLET activates a non-selective cation current, which reached a magnitude of 2.74±0.88 nA within 1.43±0.13 min from HAMLET application. Rapid ion fluxes were essential for HAMLET-induced carcinoma cell death as inhibitors (amiloride, BaCl2), preventing the changes in free cellular Na(+) and K(+) concentrations also prevented essential steps accompanying carcinoma cell death, including changes in morphology, uptake, global transcription, and MAP kinase activation. Through global transcriptional analysis and phosphorylation arrays, a strong ion flux dependent p38 MAPK response was detected and inhibition of p38 signaling delayed HAMLET-induced death. Healthy, differentiated cells were resistant to HAMLET challenge, which was accompanied by innate immunity rather than p38-activation. The results suggest, for the first time, a unifying mechanism for the initiation of HAMLET's broad and rapid lethal effect on tumor cells. These findings are particularly significant in view of HAMLET's documented therapeutic efficacy in human studies and animal models. The results also suggest that HAMLET offers a two-tiered therapeutic approach, killing cancer cells while stimulating an innate immune response in surrounding healthy tissues.

  11. Disruptive environmental chemicals and cellular mechanisms that confer resistance to cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Ali, Manaf; Barclay, Barry J; Cheng, Qiang Shawn; D'Abronzo, Leandro; Dornetshuber-Fleiss, Rita; Ghosh, Paramita M; Gonzalez Guzman, Michael J; Lee, Tae-Jin; Leung, Po Sing; Li, Lin; Luanpitpong, Suidjit; Ratovitski, Edward; Rojanasakul, Yon; Romano, Maria Fiammetta; Romano, Simona; Sinha, Ranjeet K; Yedjou, Clement; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Brown, Dustin G; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Colacci, Annamaria; Hamid, Roslida A; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Salem, Hosni K; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Kim, Seo Yun; Bisson, William H; Lowe, Leroy; Park, Hyun Ho

    2015-06-01

    Cell death is a process of dying within biological cells that are ceasing to function. This process is essential in regulating organism development, tissue homeostasis, and to eliminate cells in the body that are irreparably damaged. In general, dysfunction in normal cellular death is tightly linked to cancer progression. Specifically, the up-regulation of pro-survival factors, including oncogenic factors and antiapoptotic signaling pathways, and the down-regulation of pro-apoptotic factors, including tumor suppressive factors, confers resistance to cell death in tumor cells, which supports the emergence of a fully immortalized cellular phenotype. This review considers the potential relevance of ubiquitous environmental chemical exposures that have been shown to disrupt key pathways and mechanisms associated with this sort of dysfunction. Specifically, bisphenol A, chlorothalonil, dibutyl phthalate, dichlorvos, lindane, linuron, methoxychlor and oxyfluorfen are discussed as prototypical chemical disruptors; as their effects relate to resistance to cell death, as constituents within environmental mixtures and as potential contributors to environmental carcinogenesis. PMID:26106145

  12. Control of adult neurogenesis by programmed cell death in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jae Ryun; Hong, Caroline Jeeyeon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Sun, Woong; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-04-21

    The presence of neural stem cells (NSCs) and the production of new neurons in the adult brain have received great attention from scientists and the public because of implications to brain plasticity and their potential use for treating currently incurable brain diseases. Adult neurogenesis is controlled at multiple levels, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and programmed cell death (PCD). Among these, PCD is the last and most prominent process for regulating the final number of mature neurons integrated into neural circuits. PCD can be classified into apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell death and emerging evidence suggests that all three may be important modes of cell death in neural stem/progenitor cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate PCD and thereby impact the intricate balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation during adult neurogenesis are not well understood. In this comprehensive review, we focus on the extent, mechanism, and biological significance of PCD for the control of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. The role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the regulation of PCD at the molecular and systems levels is also discussed. Adult neurogenesis is a dynamic process, and the signals for differentiation, proliferation, and death of neural progenitor/stem cells are closely interrelated. A better understanding of how adult neurogenesis is influenced by PCD will help lead to important insights relevant to brain health and diseases.

  13. p31comet-Induced Cell Death Is Mediated by Binding and Inactivation of Mad2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jin Shin

    Full Text Available Mad2, a key component of the spindle checkpoint, is closely associated with chromosomal instability and poor prognosis in cancer. p31comet is a Mad2-interacting protein that serves as a spindle checkpoint silencer at mitosis. In this study, we showed that p31comet-induced apoptosis and senescence occur via counteraction of Mad2 activity. Upon retroviral transduction of p31comet, the majority of human cancer cell lines tested lost the ability to form colonies in a low-density seeding assay. Cancer cells with p31comet overexpression underwent distinct apoptosis and/or senescence, irrespective of p53 status, confirming the cytotoxicity of p31comet. Interestingly, both cytotoxic and Mad2 binding activities were eliminated upon deletion of the C-terminal 30 amino acids of p31comet. Point mutation or deletion of the region affecting Mad2 binding additionally abolished cytotoxic activity. Consistently, wild-type Mad2 interacting with p31comet, but not its non-binding mutant, inhibited cell death, indicating that the mechanism of p31comet-induced cell death involves Mad2 inactivation. Our results clearly suggest that the regions of p31comet affecting interactions with Mad2, including the C-terminus, are essential for induction of cell death. The finding that p31comet-induced cell death is mediated by interactions with Mad2 that lead to its inactivation is potentially applicable in anticancer therapy.

  14. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of β-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, cytochrome c release and cell death. These events were fully prevented by Imeglimin treatment. This protective effect on cell death occurred without any effect on oxygen consumption rate, on lactate production and on cytosolic redox or phosphate potentials. Imeglimin also dramatically decreased reactive oxygen species production, inhibiting specifically reverse electron transfer through complex I. We conclude that Imeglimin prevents hyperglycemia-induced cell death in HMEC-1 through inhibition of PTP opening without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration nor affecting cellular energy status. Considering the high prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic subjects, these results together suggest a potential benefit of Imeglimin in diabetic angiopathy. PMID:27551496

  15. Helicobacter pylori Infection Induces Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death in Human Gastric Epithelial Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Song-Ze; Minohara, Yutaka; Fan, Xue Jun; Wang, Jide; Reyes, Victor E; Patel, Janak; Dirden-Kramer, Bernadette; Boldogh, Istvan; Ernst, Peter B.; Crowe, Sheila E.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with altered gastric epithelial cell turnover. To evaluate the role of oxidative stress in cell death, gastric epithelial cells were exposed to various strains of H. pylori, inflammatory cytokines, and hydrogen peroxide in the absence or presence of antioxidant agents. Increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected using a redox-sensitive fluorescent dye, a cytochrome c reduction assay, and measurements of glutathione. Apoptosis...

  16. Rho family GTPase Chp/RhoV induces PC12 apoptotic cell death via JNK activation

    OpenAIRE

    Shepelev, Mikhail V; Chernoff, Jonathan; Korobko, Igor V

    2011-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate numerous cellular processes including apoptosis. Chp/RhoV is an atypical Rho GTPase which functions are poorly understood. Here we investigated the role of Chp in regulation of cell viability using PC12 cells with inducible expression of Chp as a model. We found that expression of Chp results in apoptosis in PC12 cells. Chp-induced apoptosis was accompanied by activation of JNK signaling and both death receptor-mediated and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways as justified by...

  17. Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) Exacerbates Cisplatin-induced Sensory Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    OpenAIRE

    Uribe, Phillip M.; Mueller, Melissa A.; Gleichman, Julia S.; Kramer, Matthew D.; Qi Wang; Martha Sibrian-Vazquez; Strongin, Robert M.; Peter S Steyger; Douglas A Cotanche; Matsui, Jonathan I.

    2013-01-01

    Inner ear sensory hair cells die following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics or chemotherapeutics like cisplatin, leading to permanent auditory and/or balance deficits in humans. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are used to study drug-induced sensory hair cell death since their hair cells are similar in structure and function to those found in humans. We developed a cisplatin dose-response curve using a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein under ...

  18. Rodent CNS neuron development: Timing of cell birth and death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Data obtained from a staged series of single paired injections of tritiated thymidine to pregnant Wistar rats or C57B16/j mice on selected embryonic days and several postnatal times are reported. All injected specimens were allowed to come to term, each litter culled to six pups and specimens were sacrificed on PN28, with fixation and embedding for paraffin and plastic embedding. The results are derived from serial paraffin sections of PN28 animals exposed to autoradiographic processing and plotted with respect to heavily labelled cell nuclei present in the selected brain stem nuclei and sensory ganglia. Counts from each time sample/structure are totalled and the percentage of cells in the total labelled population/structure represented by each injection time interval plotted.

  19. Regulation of Hypoxia-Induced Cell Death in Human Tenocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Min Liang; Cornell, Hannah R.; Nasim Zargar Baboldashti; Thompson, Mark S.; Carr, Andrew J.; Hulley, Philippa A

    2012-01-01

    Degenerate shoulder tendons display evidence of hypoxia. However tendons are relatively avascular and not considered to have high oxygen requirements and the vulnerability of tendon cells to hypoxia is unclear. Cultured human tenocytes were exposed to hypoxia and the cellular response detected using QPCR, Western blotting, viability, and ELISA assays. We find that tenocytes respond to hypoxia in vitro by activating classical HIF-1 α -driven pathways. Total hypoxia caused significant tenocyte ...

  20. Targeting Protective Autophagy Exacerbates UV-Triggered Apoptotic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hwa Chiou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is activated by various stresses, including DNA damage, and previous studies of DNA damage-induced autophagy have focused on the response to chemotherapeutic drugs, ionizing radiation, and reactive oxygen species. In this study, we investigated the biological significance of autophagic response to ultraviolet (UV irradiation in A549 and H1299 cells. Our results indicated that UV induces on-rate autophagic flux in these cells. Autophagy inhibition resulting from the knockdown of beclin-1 and Atg5 reduced cell viability and enhanced apoptosis. Moreover, we found that ATR phosphorylation was accompanied by microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B II (LC3B-II expression during the early phases following UV irradiation, which is a well-established inducer of ATR. Knocking down ATR further attenuated the reduction in LC3B-II at early stages in response to UV treatment. Despite the potential role of ATR in autophagic response, reduced ATR expression does not affect autophagy induction during late phases (24 and 48 h after UV treatment. The result is consistent with the reduced ATR phosphorylation at the same time points and suggests that autophagic response at this stage is activated via a distinct pathway. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that autophagy acts as a cytoprotective mechanism against UV-induced apoptosis and that autophagy induction accompanied with apoptosis at late stages is independent of ATR activation.

  1. Systematization of the Mechanism by Which Plasma Irradiation Causes Cell Growth and Tumor Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    New methods and technologies have improved minimally invasive surgical treatment and saved numerous patients. Recently, plasma irradiation has been demonstrated that might be useful in medical field and the plasma irradiation device is expected to become practically applicable. Mild plasma coagulator showed some advantages such as hemostasis and adhesion reduction in experimental animal model, but the mechanism of plasma irradiation remains unclear. Our study group aim to clarify the mechanism of plasma irradiation effects, mainly focusing on oxidative stress using cultured cell lines and small animal model. First, a study using cultured cell lines showed that the culture medium that was activated by plasma irradiation (we called this kind of medium as ``PAM'' -plasma activated medium-) induced tumor cell death. Although this effect was mainly found to be due to hydrogen peroxide, the remaining portion was considered as the specific effect of the plasma irradiation and we are now studying focusing on this effect. Second, we established a mouse intra-peritoneal adhesion model and checked biological reaction that occurred in the adhesion part. Histopathological study showed inflammatory cells infiltration into adhesion part and the expression of PTX3 that might involve tissue repair around adhesion part. We also confirmed that cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 might be useful as a marker of adhesion formation in this model. Applying ``PAM'' or mild plasma irradiation in this model, we examine the effects of plasma on inflamed cells. The samples in these experiments would be applied to targeted proteomics analysis, and we aim to demonstrate the systematization of the cell's reaction by plasma irradiation.

  2. Hibiscus anthocyanins rich extract-induced apoptotic cell death in human promyelocytic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibiscus sabdariffa Linne (Malvaceae), an attractive plant believed to be native to Africa, is cultivated in the Sudan and Eastern Taiwan. Anthocyanins exist widely in many vegetables and fruits. Some reports demonstrated that anthocyanins extracted from H. sabdariffa L., Hibiscus anthocyanins (HAs) (which are a group of natural pigments existing in the dried calyx of H. sabdariffa L.) exhibited antioxidant activity and liver protection. Therefore, in this study, we explored the effect of HAs on human cancer cells. The result showed that HAs could cause cancer cell apoptosis, especially in HL-60 cells. Using flow cytometry, we found that HAs treatment (0-4 mg/ml) markedly induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The result also revealed increased phosphorylation in p38 and c-Jun, cytochrome c release, and expression of tBid, Fas, and FasL in the HAs-treated HL-60 cells. We further used SB203580 (p38 inhibitor), PD98059 (MEK inhibitor), SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), and wortmannin (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase; PI-3K inhibitor) to evaluate their effect on the HAs-induced HL-60 death. The data showed that only SB203580 had strong potential in inhibiting HL-60 cell apoptosis and related protein expression and phosphorylation. Therefore, we suggested that HAs mediated HL-60 apoptosis via the p38-FasL and Bid pathway. According to these results, HAs could be developed as chemopreventive agents. However, further investigations into the specificity and mechanism(s) of HAs are needed

  3. Expression of the Arabidopsis high-affinity hexose transporter STP13 correlates with programmed cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Morten Helge Hauberg; Nour-Eldin, Hussam H; Brodersen, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    GFP expression only in the vascular tissue in emerging petals under non-stressed conditions. Quantitative PCR and the pSTP13-GFP plants show induction of STP13 in programmed cell death (PCD) obtained by treatments with the fungal toxin fumonisin B1 and the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. A role for STP......13 in PCD is supported by microarray data from e.g. plants undergoing senescence and a strong correlation between STP13 transcripts and the PCD phenotype in different accelerated cell death (acd11) mutants....

  4. Programmed Cell Death in Relation to Petal Senescence in Ornamental Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan ZHOU; Cai-Yun WANG; Hong GE; Frank A. HOEBERICHTS; Peter B. VISSER

    2005-01-01

    Cell death is a common event in all types of plant organisms. Understanding the phenomenon of programmed cell death (PCD) is an important area of research for plant scientists because of its role in senescence and the post-harvest quality of ornamentals, fruits, and vegetables. In the present paper, PCD in relation to petal senescence in ornamental plants is reviewed. Morphological, anatomical, physiological,and biochemical changes that are related to PCD in petals, such as water content, sink-source relationships,hormones, genes, and signal transduction pathways, are discussed. Several approaches to improving the quality of post-harvest ornamentals are reviewed and some prospects for future research are given.

  5. Connexin 43 Channels Protect Osteocytes against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Rekha; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Werner, Sherry; Jiang, Jean X.

    2013-01-01

    The increased osteocyte death by oxidative stress (OS) during aging is a major cause contributing to the impairment of bone quality and bone loss. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we showed that H2O2 induced cell death of primary osteocytes and osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells, and also caused dose-dependent decrease expression of gap junction and hemichannel-forming connexin 43 (Cx43). The decrease of Cx43 expression was also demonstrated with the treatment of oth...

  6. Unlocking Pandora's box: personalising cancer cell death in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fennell Dean A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Evasion of apoptosis is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and a recognised cause of multidrug resistance. Over the last decade, insights into how apoptosis might be exploited in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and how cancer therapeutics might be used to engage apoptotic signalling in a personalised manner have changed markedly. We are now in the wake of a paradigm shift in stratified therapeutic approaches related to NSCLC. At the heart of this shift in thinking is the emerging knowledge that even the most drug-resistant cancers exhibit a functional death pathway and, critically, that this pathway can be efficiently engaged, leading to clinical benefit. This review will summarise current knowledge of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway dysfunction in NSCLC and how the next generation of targeted therapeutics might be used to exploit deficiencies in apoptotic signalling in a personalised manner to improve clinical outcome and predict therapeutic benefit.

  7. Docosahexaenoic acid counteracts attenuation of CD95-induced cell death by inorganic mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States the principal environmental exposure to mercury is through dietary consumption of sea food. Although the mechanism by which low levels of mercury affect the nervous system is not well established, epidemiological studies suggest that low level exposure of pregnant women to dietary mercury can adversely impact cognitive development in their children, but that Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the most prominent n-polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-PUFA) present in fish may counteract negative effects of mercury on the nervous system. Aside from effects on the nervous system, epidemiological and animal studies have also suggested that low level mercury exposure may be a risk factor for autoimmune disease. However unlike the nervous system where a mechanism linking mercury to impaired cognitive development remains elusive, we have previously suggested a potential mechanism linking low level mercury exposures to immune system dysfunction and autoimmunity. In the immune system it is well established that disruption of CD95 mediated apoptosis leads to autoimmune disease. We have previously shown in vitro as well as in vivo that in lymphocytes burdened with low levels of mercury, CD95 mediated cell death is impaired. In this report we now show that DHA c