WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell cycle-dependent localization

  1. Cdc6 localizes to S- and G2-phase centrosomes in a cell cycle-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwang Su; Kang, Jeeheon; Bang, Sung Woong; Hwang, Deog Su, E-mail: dshwang@snu.ac.kr

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • Cdc6 protein is a component of the pre-replicative complex required for chromosomal replication initiation. • Cdc6 localized to centrosomes of S and G2 phases in a cell cycle-dependent manner. • The centrosomal localization was governed by centrosomal localization signal sequences of Cdc6. • Deletions or substitution mutations on the centrosomal localization signal interfered with centrosomal localization of the Cdc6 proteins. - Abstract: The Cdc6 protein has been primarily investigated as a component of the pre-replicative complex for the initiation of chromosome replication, which contributes to maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Here, we show that Cdc6 localized to the centrosomes during S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. The centrosomal localization was mediated by Cdc6 amino acid residues 311–366, which are conserved within other Cdc6 homologues and contains a putative nuclear export signal. Deletions or substitutions of the amino acid residues did not allow the proteins to localize to centrosomes. In contrast, DsRed tag fused to the amino acid residues localized to centrosomes. These results indicated that a centrosome localization signal is contained within amino acid residues 311–366. The cell cycle-dependent centrosomal localization of Cdc6 in S and G2 phases suggest a novel function of Cdc6 in centrosomes.

  2. Cell-cycle dependent localization of MELK and its new partner RACK1 in epithelial versus mesenchyme-like cells in Xenopus embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Chartrain

    2013-08-01

    Maternal Embryonic Leucine zipper Kinase (MELK was recently shown to be involved in cell division of Xenopus embryo epithelial cells. The cytokinetic furrow of these cells ingresses asymmetrically and is developmentally regulated. Two subpopulations of xMELK, the mMELK (for “mitotic” xMELK and iMELK (“interphase” xMELK, which differ in their spatial and temporal regulation, are detected in Xenopus embryo. How cells regulate these two xMELK populations is unknown. In this study we show that, in epithelial cells, xMELK is present at a higher concentration at the apical junctional complex, in contrast to mesenchyme-like cells, which have uniform distribution of cortical MELK. Interestingly, mMELK and iMELK also differ by their requirements towards cell–cell contacts to establish their proper cortical localization both in epithelial and mesenchyme-like cells. Receptor for Activated protein Kinase C (RACK1, which we identified as an xMELK partner, co-localizes with xMELK at the tight junction. Moreover, a truncated RACK1 construct interferes with iMELK localization at cell–cell contacts. Collectively, our results suggest that iMELK and RACK1 are present in the same complex and that RACK1 is involved in the specific recruitment of iMELK at the apical junctional complex in epithelial cells of Xenopus embryos.

  3. Cell cycle-dependent microtubule-based dynamic transport of cytoplasmic dynein in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytoplasmic dynein complex is a large multi-subunit microtubule (MT-associated molecular motor involved in various cellular functions including organelle positioning, vesicle transport and cell division. However, regulatory mechanism of the cell-cycle dependent distribution of dynein has not fully been understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report live-cell imaging of cytoplasmic dynein in HeLa cells, by expressing multifunctional green fluorescent protein (mfGFP-tagged 74-kDa intermediate chain (IC74. IC74-mfGFP was successfully incorporated into functional dynein complex. In interphase, dynein moved bi-directionally along with MTs, which might carry cargos such as transport vesicles. A substantial fraction of dynein moved toward cell periphery together with EB1, a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs, suggesting +TIPs-mediated transport of dynein. In late-interphase and prophase, dynein was localized at the centrosomes and the radial MT array. In prometaphase and metaphase, dynein was localized at spindle MTs where it frequently moved from spindle poles toward chromosomes or cell cortex. +TIPs may be involved in the transport of spindle dyneins. Possible kinetochore and cortical dyneins were also observed. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that cytoplasmic dynein is transported to the site of action in preparation for the following cellular events, primarily by the MT-based transport. The MT-based transport may have greater advantage than simple diffusion of soluble dynein in rapid and efficient transport of the limited concentration of the protein.

  4. Cell cycle-dependent SUMO-1 conjugation to nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jae Sung; Kim, Ha Na; Kim, Sun-Jick; Bang, Jiyoung; Kim, Eun-A; Sung, Ki Sa [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hyun-Joo [TissueGene Inc. 9605 Medical Center Dr., Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Yoo, Hae Yong [Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Cheol Yong, E-mail: choicy@skku.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •NuMA is modified by SUMO-1 in a cell cycle-dependent manner. •NuMA lysine 1766 is the primary target site for SUMOylation. •SUMOylation-deficient NuMA induces multiple spindle poles during mitosis. •SUMOylated NuMA induces microtubule bundling. -- Abstract: Covalent conjugation of proteins with small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1) plays a critical role in a variety of cellular functions including cell cycle control, replication, and transcriptional regulation. Nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) localizes to spindle poles during mitosis, and is an essential component in the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles. Here we show that NuMA is a target for covalent conjugation to SUMO-1. We find that the lysine 1766 residue is the primary NuMA acceptor site for SUMO-1 conjugation. Interestingly, SUMO modification of endogenous NuMA occurs at the entry into mitosis and this modification is reversed after exiting from mitosis. Knockdown of Ubc9 or forced expression of SENP1 results in impairment of the localization of NuMA to mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. The SUMOylation-deficient NuMA mutant is defective in microtubule bundling, and multiple spindles are induced during mitosis. The mitosis-dependent dynamic SUMO-1 modification of NuMA might contribute to NuMA-mediated formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis.

  5. Cell cycle-dependent SUMO-1 conjugation to nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •NuMA is modified by SUMO-1 in a cell cycle-dependent manner. •NuMA lysine 1766 is the primary target site for SUMOylation. •SUMOylation-deficient NuMA induces multiple spindle poles during mitosis. •SUMOylated NuMA induces microtubule bundling. -- Abstract: Covalent conjugation of proteins with small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1) plays a critical role in a variety of cellular functions including cell cycle control, replication, and transcriptional regulation. Nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) localizes to spindle poles during mitosis, and is an essential component in the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles. Here we show that NuMA is a target for covalent conjugation to SUMO-1. We find that the lysine 1766 residue is the primary NuMA acceptor site for SUMO-1 conjugation. Interestingly, SUMO modification of endogenous NuMA occurs at the entry into mitosis and this modification is reversed after exiting from mitosis. Knockdown of Ubc9 or forced expression of SENP1 results in impairment of the localization of NuMA to mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. The SUMOylation-deficient NuMA mutant is defective in microtubule bundling, and multiple spindles are induced during mitosis. The mitosis-dependent dynamic SUMO-1 modification of NuMA might contribute to NuMA-mediated formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis

  6. Cell cycle-dependent alteration in NAC1 nuclear body dynamics and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Hung, Shen-Hsiu; Ren, Tina; Shih, Ie-Ming; Tseng, Yiider

    2011-02-01

    NAC1, a BTB/POZ family member, has been suggested to participate in maintaining the stemness of embryonic stem cells and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. In ovarian cancer, NAC1 upregulation is associated with disease aggressiveness and with the development of chemoresistance. Like other BTB/POZ proteins, NAC1 forms discrete nuclear bodies in non-dividing cells. To investigate the biological role of NAC1 nuclear bodies, we characterized the expression dynamics of NAC1 nuclear bodies during different phases of the cell cycle. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays revealed that NAC1 was rapidly exchanged between the nucleoplasm and NAC1 nuclear bodies in interphase cells. The number of NAC1 bodies significantly increased and their size decreased in the S phase as compared to the G0/G1 and G2 phases. NAC1 nuclear bodies disappeared and NAC1 became diffuse during mitosis. NAC1 nuclear bodies reappeared immediately after completion of mitosis. These results indicate that a cell cycle-dependent regulatory mechanism controls NAC1 body formation in the nucleus and suggest that NAC1 body dynamics are associated with mitosis or cytokinesis.

  7. Cell cycle-dependent alteration in NAC1 nuclear body dynamics and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NAC1, a BTB/POZ family member, has been suggested to participate in maintaining the stemness of embryonic stem cells and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. In ovarian cancer, NAC1 upregulation is associated with disease aggressiveness and with the development of chemoresistance. Like other BTB/POZ proteins, NAC1 forms discrete nuclear bodies in non-dividing cells. To investigate the biological role of NAC1 nuclear bodies, we characterized the expression dynamics of NAC1 nuclear bodies during different phases of the cell cycle. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays revealed that NAC1 was rapidly exchanged between the nucleoplasm and NAC1 nuclear bodies in interphase cells. The number of NAC1 bodies significantly increased and their size decreased in the S phase as compared to the G0/G1 and G2 phases. NAC1 nuclear bodies disappeared and NAC1 became diffuse during mitosis. NAC1 nuclear bodies reappeared immediately after completion of mitosis. These results indicate that a cell cycle-dependent regulatory mechanism controls NAC1 body formation in the nucleus and suggest that NAC1 body dynamics are associated with mitosis or cytokinesis

  8. RNF4 regulates DNA double-strand break repair in a cell cycle-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Li, Xu; Stark, Jeremy M; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Ann, David K

    2016-03-18

    Both RNF4 and KAP1 play critical roles in the response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but the functional interplay of RNF4 and KAP1 in regulating DNA damage response remains unclear. We have previously demonstrated the recruitment and degradation of KAP1 by RNF4 require the phosphorylation of Ser824 (pS824) and SUMOylation of KAP1. In this report, we show the retention of DSB-induced pS824-KAP1 foci and RNF4 abundance are inversely correlated as cell cycle progresses. Following irradiation, pS824-KAP1 foci predominantly appear in the cyclin A (-) cells, whereas RNF4 level is suppressed in the G0-/G1-phases and then accumulates during S-/G2-phases. Notably, 53BP1 foci, but not BRCA1 foci, co-exist with pS824-KAP1 foci. Depletion of KAP1 yields opposite effect on the dynamics of 53BP1 and BRCA1 loading, favoring homologous recombination repair. In addition, we identify p97 is present in the RNF4-KAP1 interacting complex and the inhibition of p97 renders MCF7 breast cancer cells relatively more sensitive to DNA damage. Collectively, these findings suggest that combined effect of dynamic recruitment of RNF4 to KAP1 regulates the relative occupancy of 53BP1 and BRCA1 at DSB sites to direct DSB repair in a cell cycle-dependent manner. PMID:26766492

  9. The CHR Promoter Element Controls Cell Cycle-Dependent Gene Transcription and Binds the DREAM and MMB Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Gerd A.; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Fischer, Martin; Engeland, Kurt; Padi, Megha; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like \\(cyclin B, CDC2\\) and \\(CDC25C\\) are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in \\(G_0/G_1\\). It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and...

  10. The one-cell mouse embryo: cell cycle-dependent radiosensitivity and development of chromosomal anomalies in postradiation cell cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One-cell mouse embryos were irradiated with X-rays at different cell cycle stages. Examination of structural chromosomal anomalies and micronucleus formation in postradiation mitoses and interphases demonstrated cell cycle-dependent radiosensitivities in the order: late G2 phase > G1 phase > S phase > early G2 phase > stage of decondensing nuclei. Comparison of the quality and quantity of chromosomal aberrations from the first to third mitosis led to the conclusion that new chromosomal anomalies were formed in the course of postirradiation cell cycles. This hypothesis was supported by an increasing number of micronuclei from 24 to 48 h post-conception. In addition to structural chromosomal aberrations, radiation-induced chromosome loss was observed with a frequency that was obviously independent of the exposed cell cycle phase. Loss of acentric chromosome fragments and of single chromosomes contributed to the micronucleus formation. (author)

  11. The CHR promoter element controls cell cycle-dependent gene transcription and binds the DREAM and MMB complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gerd A; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Padi, Megha; Fischer, Martin; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A; Engeland, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like cyclin B, CDC2 and CDC25C are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in G(0)/G(1). It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and human cyclin B2 promoters in G(0). Association of DREAM and cell cycle-dependent regulation is abrogated when the CHR is mutated. Although E2f4 is part of the complex, a CDE is not essential but can enhance binding of DREAM. We show that the CHR element is not only necessary for repression of gene transcription in G(0)/G(1), but also for activation in S, G(2) and M phases. In proliferating cells, the B-myb-containing MMB complex binds the CHR of both promoters independently of the CDE. Bioinformatic analyses identify many genes which contain conserved CHR elements in promoters binding the DREAM complex. With Ube2c as an example from that screen, we show that inverse CHR sites are functional promoter elements that can bind DREAM and MMB. Our findings indicate that the CHR is central to DREAM/MMB-dependent transcriptional control during the cell cycle. PMID:22064854

  12. The CHR promoter element controls cell cycle-dependent gene transcription and binds the DREAM and MMB complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gerd A.; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Padi, Megha; Fischer, Martin; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.; Engeland, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like cyclin B, CDC2 and CDC25C are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in G0/G1. It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and human cyclin B2 promoters in G0. Association of DREAM and cell cycle-dependent regulation is abrogated when the CHR is mutated. Although E2f4 is part of the complex, a CDE is not essential but can enhance binding of DREAM. We show that the CHR element is not only necessary for repression of gene transcription in G0/G1, but also for activation in S, G2 and M phases. In proliferating cells, the B-myb-containing MMB complex binds the CHR of both promoters independently of the CDE. Bioinformatic analyses identify many genes which contain conserved CHR elements in promoters binding the DREAM complex. With Ube2c as an example from that screen, we show that inverse CHR sites are functional promoter elements that can bind DREAM and MMB. Our findings indicate that the CHR is central to DREAM/MMB-dependent transcriptional control during the cell cycle. PMID:22064854

  13. Cell-cycle dependent micronucleus formation and mitotic disturbances induced by 5-azacytidine in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stopper, Helga; Körber, C.; Schiffmann, D; Caspary, W J

    2012-01-01

    5-Azacytidine was originally developed to treat human myelogenous leukemia. However, interest in this compound has expanded because of reports of its ability to affect cell differentiation and to alter eukaryotic gene expression. In an ongoing attempt to understand the biochemical effects of this compound, we examined the effects of 5-azacytidine on mitosis and on micronucleus formation in mammalian cells. In L5178Y mouse cells, 5-azacytidine induced micronuclei at concentrations at which we ...

  14. Backup pathways of NHEJ in cells of higher eukaryotes: Cell cycle dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in cells of higher eukaryotes are predominantly repaired by a pathway of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) utilizing Ku, DNA-PKcs, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4 and XLF/Cernunnos (D-NHEJ) as central components. Work carried out in our laboratory and elsewhere shows that when this pathway is chemically or genetically compromised, cells do not shunt DSBs to homologous recombination repair (HRR) but instead use another form of NHEJ operating as a backup (B-NHEJ). Here I review our efforts to characterize this repair pathway and discuss its dependence on the cell cycle as well as on the growth conditions. I present evidence that B-NHEJ utilizes ligase III, PARP-1 and histone H1. When B-NHEJ is examined throughout the cell cycle, significantly higher activity is observed in G2 phase that cannot be attributed to HRR. Furthermore, the activity of B-NHEJ is compromised when cells enter the plateau phase of growth. Together, these observations uncover a repair pathway with unexpected biochemical constitution and interesting cell cycle and growth factor regulation. They generate a framework for investigating the mechanistic basis of HRR contribution to DSB repair.

  15. Backup pathways of NHEJ in cells of higher eukaryotes: cell cycle dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliakis, George

    2009-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in cells of higher eukaryotes are predominantly repaired by a pathway of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) utilizing Ku, DNA-PKcs, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4 and XLF/Cernunnos (D-NHEJ) as central components. Work carried out in our laboratory and elsewhere shows that when this pathway is chemically or genetically compromised, cells do not shunt DSBs to homologous recombination repair (HRR) but instead use another form of NHEJ operating as a backup (B-NHEJ). Here I review our efforts to characterize this repair pathway and discuss its dependence on the cell cycle as well as on the growth conditions. I present evidence that B-NHEJ utilizes ligase III, PARP-1 and histone H1. When B-NHEJ is examined throughout the cell cycle, significantly higher activity is observed in G2 phase that cannot be attributed to HRR. Furthermore, the activity of B-NHEJ is compromised when cells enter the plateau phase of growth. Together, these observations uncover a repair pathway with unexpected biochemical constitution and interesting cell cycle and growth factor regulation. They generate a framework for investigating the mechanistic basis of HRR contribution to DSB repair. PMID:19604590

  16. Cell-Cycle-Dependent Reconfiguration of the DNA Methylome during Terminal Differentiation of Human B Cells into Plasma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gersende Caron

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms underlying terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells are major determinants of adaptive immunity but remain only partially understood. Here we present the transcriptional and epigenomic landscapes of cell subsets arising from activation of human naive B cells and differentiation into plasmablasts. Cell proliferation of activated B cells was linked to a slight decrease in DNA methylation levels, but followed by a committal step in which an S phase-synchronized differentiation switch was associated with an extensive DNA demethylation and local acquisition of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at enhancers and genes related to plasma cell identity. Downregulation of both TGF-β1/SMAD3 signaling and p53 pathway supported this final step, allowing the emergence of a CD23-negative subpopulation in transition from B cells to plasma cells. Remarkably, hydroxymethylation of PRDM1, a gene essential for plasma cell fate, was coupled to progression in S phase, revealing an intricate connection among cell cycle, DNA (hydroxymethylation, and cell fate determination.

  17. Differential regulation of survivin by p53 contributes to cell cycle dependent apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan JIN; Yong WEI; Lei XIONG; Ying YANG; Jia Rui WU

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that cell-cycle checkpoints are tightly correlated with the regulation of apoptosis, in which p53 plays an important role. Our present works show that the expression of E6/E7 oncogenes of human papillomavirus in HeLa cells is inhibited in the presence of anti-tumor reagent tripchlorolide (TC), which results in the up-regulation of p53 in HeLa cells. Interestingly, under the same TC-treatment, the cells at the early S-phase are more susceptible to apoptosis than those at the middle S-phase although p53 protein is stabilized to the same level in both situations.Significant difference is exhibited between the two specified expression profiles. Further analysis demonstrates that anti-apoptotic gene survivin is up-regulated by p53 in the TC-treated middle-S cells, whereas it is down-regulated by p53 in the TC-treated early-S cells. Taken together, the present study indicates that the differential p53-regulated expression of survivin at different stages of the cell cycle results in different cellular outputs under the same apoptosis-inducer.

  18. Cell cycle dependence of mitotic delay in X-irradiated normal and ataxia-telangiectasia fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation has been made of the relationship between suppression in the mitotic index and inhibition of DNA synthesis in normal (N) and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) skin fibroblasts, using tritiated thymidine as a marker of the cell cycle. The delay in progression of X-irradiated cells through the cell cycle, which is more pronounced in normal than in A-T fibroblasts, was greatest for cells in G2 at the time of irradiation. The greater effect of radiation on the initiation of DNA synthesis in N than in A-T cells was reflected in the shape of the percent labelled mitosis curves after 3H-thymidine treatment. The duration of the S phase in unirradiated A-T cells was greater than in N cells. It is pointed out that any explanation of the underlying defect in A-T must account not only for the reduced radiosensitivity of DNA synthesis but for the lesser delay in G2. The authors claim that their data support the hypothesis that DNA is the principal target for radiation-induced G2 delay. (U.K.)

  19. Phosphorylation of TPP1 regulates cell cycle-dependent telomerase recruitment

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Liuh-Yow; Han, Xin; XIE, Wei; Kim, Hyeung; Yang, Dong; Liu, Dan; Songyang, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Telomere maintenance is essential for organisms with linear chromosomes and is carried out by telomerase during cell cycle. The precise mechanism by which cell cycle controls telomeric access of telomerase and telomere elongation in mammals remains largely unknown. Previous work has established oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) fold-containing telomeric protein TPP1, formerly known as TINT1, PTOP, and PIP1, as a key factor that regulates telomerase recruitment and activity. However...

  20. Cell cycle-dependent differentiation dynamics balances growth and endocrine differentiation in the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yung Hae; Larsen, Hjalte List; Rué, Paul;

    2015-01-01

    Organogenesis relies on the spatiotemporal balancing of differentiation and proliferation driven by an expanding pool of progenitor cells. In the mouse pancreas, lineage tracing at the population level has shown that the expanding pancreas progenitors can initially give rise to all endocrine...

  1. Identification of Cell Cycle Dependent Interaction Partners of the Septins by Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renz, Christian; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Grinhagens, Sören; Warscheid, Bettina; Johnsson, Nils; Gronemeyer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The septins are a conserved family of GTP-binding proteins that, in the baker's yeast, assemble into a highly ordered array of filaments at the mother bud neck. These filaments undergo significant structural rearrangements during the cell cycle. We aimed at identifying key components that are involved in or regulate the transitions of the septins. By combining cell synchronization and quantitative affinity-purification mass-spectrometry, we performed a screen for specific interaction partners of the septins at three distinct stages of the cell cycle. A total of 83 interaction partners of the septins were assigned. Surprisingly, we detected DNA-interacting/nuclear proteins and proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis predominantly present in alpha-factor arrested that do not display an assembled septin structure. Furthermore, two distinct sets of regulatory proteins that are specific for cells at S-phase with a stable septin collar or at mitosis with split septin rings were identified. Complementary methods like SPLIFF and immunoprecipitation allowed us to more exactly define the spatial and temporal characteristics of selected hits of the AP-MS screen. PMID:26871441

  2. Cell cycle-dependent mobility of Cdc45 determined in vivo by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Broderick

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic DNA replication is a dynamic process requiring the co-operation of specific replication proteins. We measured the mobility of eGFP-Cdc45 by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS in vivo in asynchronous cells and in cells synchronized at the G1/S transition and during S phase. Our data show that eGFP-Cdc45 mobility is faster in G1/S transition compared to S phase suggesting that Cdc45 is part of larger protein complex formed in S phase. Furthermore, the size of complexes containing Cdc45 was estimated in asynchronous, G1/S and S phase-synchronized cells using gel filtration chromatography; these findings complemented the in vivo FCS data. Analysis of the mobility of eGFP-Cdc45 and the size of complexes containing Cdc45 and eGFP-Cdc45 after UVC-mediated DNA damage revealed no significant changes in diffusion rates and complex sizes using FCS and gel filtration chromatography analyses. This suggests that after UV-damage, Cdc45 is still present in a large multi-protein complex and that its mobility within living cells is consistently similar following UVC-mediated DNA damage.

  3. Cell Cycle Dependent Expression of Plk1 in Synchronized Porcine Fetal Fibroblasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anger, Martin; Kues, W. A.; Klíma, Jiří; Mielenz, M.; Kubelka, Michal; Motlík, Jan; Ešner, M.; Dvořák, P.; Carnwath, J. W.; Niemann, H.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 3 (2003), s. 245-253. ISSN 1040-452X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Grant ostatní: FIRCA(XX) R03-TW-05530-01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : Plk1 * serum deprivation * cell cycle Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.543, year: 2003

  4. The DREAM complex: master coordinator of cell cycle-dependent gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivam, Subhashini; DeCaprio, James A

    2013-08-01

    The dimerization partner, RB-like, E2F and multi-vulval class B (DREAM) complex provides a previously unsuspected unifying role in the cell cycle by directly linking p130, p107, E2F, BMYB and forkhead box protein M1. DREAM mediates gene repression during the G0 phase and coordinates periodic gene expression with peaks during the G1/S and G2/M phases. Perturbations in DREAM complex regulation shift the balance from quiescence towards proliferation and contribute to the increased mitotic gene expression levels that are frequently observed in cancers with a poor prognosis. PMID:23842645

  5. The DREAM complex: Master coordinator of cell cycle dependent gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivam, Subhashini; DeCaprio, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Preface The dimerization partner (DP), retinoblastoma (RB)-like, E2F and MuvB (DREAM) complex provides a previously unsuspected unifying role in the cell cycle by directly linking p130, p107, E2F, BMYB and FOXM1. DREAM mediates gene repression during G0 and coordinates periodic gene expression with peaks during G1/S and G2/M. Perturbations in DREAM regulation shift the balance from quiescence towards proliferation and contribute to increased mitotic gene expression levels frequently observed in cancers with poor prognosis. PMID:23842645

  6. The DREAM complex: Master coordinator of cell cycle dependent gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Sadasivam, Subhashini; DeCaprio, James A.

    2013-01-01

    The dimerization partner (DP), retinoblastoma (RB)-like, E2F and MuvB (DREAM) complex provides a previously unsuspected unifying role in the cell cycle by directly linking p130, p107, E2F, BMYB and FOXM1. DREAM mediates gene repression during G0 and coordinates periodic gene expression with peaks during G1/S and G2/M. Perturbations in DREAM regulation shift the balance from quiescence towards proliferation and contribute to increased mitotic gene expression levels frequently observed in cance...

  7. Cell cycle-dependent DNA damage signaling induced by ICRF-193 involves ATM, ATR, CHK2, and BRCA1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topoisomerase II is essential for cell proliferation and survival and has been a target of various anticancer drugs. ICRF-193 has long been used as a catalytic inhibitor to study the function of topoisomerase II. Here, we show that ICRF-193 treatment induces DNA damage signaling. Treatment with ICRF-193 induced G2 arrest and DNA damage signaling involving γ-H2AX foci formation and CHK2 phosphorylation. DNA damage by ICRF-193 was further demonstrated by formation of the nuclear foci of 53BP1, NBS1, BRCA1, MDC1, and FANCD2 and increased comet tail moment. The DNA damage signaling induced by ICRF-193 was mediated by ATM and ATR and was restricted to cells in specific cell cycle stages such as S, G2, and mitosis including late and early G1 phases. Downstream signaling of ATM and ATR involved the phosphorylation of CHK2 and BRCA1. Altogether, our results demonstrate that ICRF-193 induces DNA damage signaling in a cell cycle-dependent manner and suggest that topoisomerase II might be essential for the progression of the cell cycle at several stages including DNA decondensation

  8. HIV-1 Vpr-induced apoptosis is cell cycle dependent and requires Bax but not ANT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua L Andersen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 accessory protein viral protein R (Vpr causes G2 arrest and apoptosis in infected cells. We previously identified the DNA damage-signaling protein ATR as the cellular factor that mediates Vpr-induced G2 arrest and apoptosis. Here, we examine the mechanism of induction of apoptosis by Vpr and how it relates to induction of G2 arrest. We find that entry into G2 is a requirement for Vpr to induce apoptosis. We investigated the role of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore by knockdown of its essential component, the adenine nucleotide translocator. We found that Vpr-induced apoptosis was unaffected by knockdown of ANT. Instead, apoptosis is triggered through a different mitochondrial pore protein, Bax. In support of the idea that checkpoint activation and apoptosis induction are functionally linked, we show that Bax activation by Vpr was ablated when ATR or GADD45alpha was knocked down. Certain mutants of Vpr, such as R77Q and I74A, identified in long-term nonprogressors, have been proposed to inefficiently induce apoptosis while activating the G2 checkpoint in a normal manner. We tested the in vitro phenotypes of these mutants and found that their abilities to induce apoptosis and G2 arrest are indistinguishable from those of HIV-1NL4-3 vpr, providing additional support to the idea that G2 arrest and apoptosis induction are mechanistically linked.

  9. Neutron-induced cell cycle-dependent oncogenic transformation of C3H 10T1/2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of synchronized populations of mouse C3H 10T1/2 cells to a single dose (0.6 Gy) of 5.9 MeV neutrons at intervals after mitotic shake-off results in a distinctive variation in the oncogenic transformation frequency through the cell cycle. Previous findings show a sensitive window for X-ray-induced oncogenic transformants at late times after mitotic shake-off (14-16 h). Optimal sensitivity to neutrons was observed for cell populations irradiated soon after mitotic shake-off (4-6 h), where the majority of cells would be in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Additionally, enhanced sensitivity was also found for that period after shake-off (14-16 h) which was maximally sensitive to X rays corresponding to cell populations with a high proportion of G2-phase cells. That is, low-LET radiation (250 kVp X rays) largely appears to produce oncogenic transformants in G2-phase cells, while intermediate-LET radiation (5.9 MeV neutrons) is effective principally on G1- and, to a somewhat lesser extent, G2-phase cells. Cells irradiated with neutrons showed less variation for lethality through the cell cycle than those irradiated with X rays, in agreement with previous findings. The mechanistic basis for the differences in the response of cells in the different phases of the cell cycle to radiations of different quality is unknown but is suggestive of distinct (open-quotes signatureclose quotes) molecular changes leading to the observed oncogenic transformation response. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  10. Cell-Cycle-Dependent Variations in the FTIR Spectroscopy of HeLa Cells Treated with Trichostatin A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Feng-qiu; QI Jian; YANG Zhan-guo

    2011-01-01

    It is quite complex to evaluate the mechanism of action for antitumor drugs on cancer cells.Studies have pointed out that there is an unique advantage of Fourier transform infrared spectrum to obtain a fingerprint of all molecules present in the cells when cancer cells were exposed to anti-cancer drugs.Trichostatin A (TSA) is a most potent reversible inhibitor of mammalian histone deacetylases.It can inhibit cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.In the present study,HeLa cells were exposed to 0,50,100,200,300 and 400 nmol · L-1 TSA,and FTIR spectra were applied to evaluate the effect of TSA on cancer cells.Results show that there is some significant relationship between the changes in FTIR absorption and cell cycle arresting.On the other hand,this investigation shows that the concentration of TSA had to be more than 200 nmol · L-1 in order to ensure A1080 cm-1/A1540cm-1 ≥1 for inhibiting cell proliferation.

  11. Cell cycle-dependent expression of Ki-67 antigen in human melanoma cells subjected to irradiation and/or hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proliferation of human melanoma cells in vitro during the first 3 days after irradiation and/or hyperthermia was followed by two-parameter flow cytometry combining cell cycle analysis on the basis of DNA content with Ki-67 antibody labeling. It was found that cells arrested or delayed in the S and G2 phases of the cell cycle were Ki-67-positive in spite of the antigen's very short half-life. Thus Ki-67 staining failed to reflect those changes in cell proliferation which typically occur in the course of a fractionated radiotherapy as well as those expected in the case of hyperthermia or a combined treatment. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. Using a GFP-gene fusion technique to study the cell cycle-dependent distribution of calmodulin in living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李朝军; 吕品; 张东才

    1999-01-01

    In this study, a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-calmodulin (CaM) fusion gene method was used to examine the distribution of calmodulin during various stages of cell cycle. First, it was found that the distribution of CaM in living cells changes with the cell cycle. CaM was found mainly in the cytoplasm during G1 phase. It began to move into the nucleus when the cell entered S phase. At G2 phase, CaM became more concentrated in the nucleus than in cytoplasm. Second, the accumulation of CaM in the nucleus during G2 phase appeared to be related to the onset of mitosis, since inhibiting the activation of CaM at this stage resulted in blocking the nuclear membrane breakdown and chromatin condensation. Finally, after the cell entered mitosis, a high concentration of CaM was found at the polar regions of the mitotic spindle. At this time, inhibiting the activity of CaM would cause a disruption of the spindle structure. The relationship between the stage-specific distribution of CaM and its function in regulat

  13. βTrCP-mediated ubiquitylation regulates protein stability of Mis18β in a cell cycle-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ik Soo; Lee, Minkyoung; Park, Joo Hyeon; Jeon, Raok; Baek, Sung Hee; Kim, Keun Il

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin E3 ligases including SCF complex are key regulators of cell cycle. Here, we show that Mis18β, a component of Mis18 complex governing CENP-A localization, is a new substrate of βTrCP-containing SCF complex. βTrCP interacted with Mis18β exclusively during interphase but not during mitosis and mediated proteasomal degradation of Mis18β leading to the inactivation of Mis18 complex during interphase. In addition, uncontrolled stabilization of Mis18β caused cell death. Together, we propose that βTrCP-mediated regulation of Mis18β stability is a mechanism to restrict centromere function of Mis18 complex from late mitosis to early G1 phase. PMID:24269809

  14. Cell-cycle dependent radiation-induced transformations of C3H 10T1/2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of the temporal distribution of dose have shown that low doses and low dose-rates of certain radiations of intermediate LET result in a higher incidence of oncogenic transformation than the same dose delivered in an acute exposure. To account for this anomalous effect, a biophysical model was proposed by Rossi and Kellerer, which postulated the existence of a narrow 'window' of sensitivity. Subsequently, in fitting all available transformation data to this model, Brenner and Hall estimated that the window of sensitivity may have a duration of about 1 hour and went on to postulate that it may correspond to cells near mitosis. A series of experiments was designed to test this hypothesis. (author). 6 refs., 2 figs

  15. The Human Papillomavirus Type 18 E2 Protein Is a Cell Cycle-Dependent Target of the SCFSkp2 Ubiquitin Ligase▿

    OpenAIRE

    Bellanger, Sophie; Tan, Chye Ling; Nei, Wenlong; He, Ping Ping; Thierry, Françoise

    2009-01-01

    The human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) E2 gene is inactivated in cervical carcinoma after integration of the viral DNA into the host cellular genome. Since E2 represses the transcription of the two viral oncogenes E6 and E7, integration which allows their strong expression is considered a major step in transformation by HPV. We show here that E2 is specifically degraded at the end of the G1 phase in a Brd4-independent manner, implying that its regulatory functions are cell cycle dependent....

  16. Cell cycle-dependent deposition of CENP-A requires the Dos1/2-Cdc20 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Marlyn; He, Haijin; Sun, Siyu; Li, Chen; Li, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Centromeric histone CENP-A, a variant of canonical histone H3, plays a central role in proper chromosome segregation. Loading of CENP-A at centromeres is cell cycle-regulated: parental CENP-A is deposited at centromeres during S phase, whereas newly synthesized CENP-A is deposited during later stages of the cell cycle. The mechanisms involved in deposition of CENP-A at centromeres during S phase remain poorly understood. In fission yeast, loading of CENP-A during S phase is regulated by the GATA-type factor, Ams2. Here we show that the Dos1/2-Cdc20 complex, previously characterized as a silencing complex essential for inheritance of H3K9 methylation during S phase, is also required for localization of CENP-A(cnp1) at centromeres at this stage. Disruption of Dos1 (also known as Raf1/Clr8/Cmc1), Dos2 (also known as Raf2/Clr7/Cmc2), or Cdc20, a DNA polymerase epsilon subunit, results in dissociation of CENP-A from centromeres and mislocalization of the protein to noncentromeric sites. All three mutants display spindle disorganization and mitotic defects. Inactivation of Dos1 or Cdc20 also results in accumulation of noncoding RNA transcripts from centromeric cores, a feature common to mutants affecting kinetochore integrity. We further find that Dos1 physically associates with Ams2 and is required for the association of Ams2 with centromeric cores during S phase. Finally, we show that Dos2 associates with centromeric cores during S phase and that its recruitment to centromeric cores depends on Cdc20. This study identifies a physical link between DNA replication and CENP-A assembly machinery and provides mechanistic insight into how CENP-A is faithfully inherited during S phase. PMID:23267073

  17. FasL and FADD delivery by a glioma-specific and cell cycle-dependent HSV-1 amplicon virus enhanced apoptosis in primary human brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Paula Y

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme is the most malignant cancer of the brain and is notoriously difficult to treat due to the highly proliferative and infiltrative nature of the cells. Herein, we explored the combination treatment of pre-established human glioma xenograft using multiple therapeutic genes whereby the gene expression is regulated by both cell-type and cell cycle-dependent transcriptional regulatory mechanism conferred by recombinant HSV-1 amplicon vectors. Results We demonstrated for the first time that Ki67-positive proliferating primary human glioma cells cultured from biopsy samples were effectively induced into cell death by the dual-specific function of the pG8-FasL amplicon vectors. These vectors were relatively stable and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity in vivo. Intracranial implantation of pre-transduced glioma cells resulted in better survival outcome when compared with viral vectors inoculated one week post-implantation of tumor cells, indicating that therapeutic efficacy is dependent on the viral spread and mode of viral vectors administration. We further showed that pG8-FasL amplicon vectors are functional in the presence of commonly used treatment regimens for human brain cancer. In fact, the combined therapies of pG8-FasL and pG8-FADD in the presence of temozolomide significantly improved the survival of mice bearing intracranial high-grade gliomas. Conclusion Taken together, our results showed that the glioma-specific and cell cycle-dependent HSV-1 amplicon vector is potentially useful as an adjuvant therapy to complement the current gene therapy strategy for gliomas.

  18. Cell Cycle-dependent Expression of Thyroid Hormone Receptor-β Is a Mechanism for Variable Hormone SensitivityD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Maruvada, Padma; Dmitrieva, Natalia I.; East-Palmer, Joyce; Yen, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are ligand-regulatable transcription factors. Currently, little is known about the expression of TRs or other nuclear hormone receptors during the cell cycle. We thus developed a stable expression system to express green fluorescent protein-TRβ in HeLa cells under tetracycline regulation, and studied TR expression during the cell cycle by laser scanning cytometry. Only ∼9-15% of the nonsynchronized cell population expressed TR because the majority of cells were...

  19. Cell Cycle-dependent Regulation of the Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXK2 by CDK·Cyclin Complexes*

    OpenAIRE

    Marais, Anett; Ji, Zongling; Child, Emma S.; Krause, Eberhard; Mann, David J.; Sharrocks, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Several mammalian forkhead transcription factors have been shown to impact on cell cycle regulation and are themselves linked to cell cycle control systems. Here we have investigated the little studied mammalian forkhead transcription factor FOXK2 and demonstrate that it is subject to control by cell cycle-regulated protein kinases. FOXK2 exhibits a periodic rise in its phosphorylation levels during the cell cycle, with hyperphosphorylation occurring in mitotic cells. Hyperphosphorylation occ...

  20. Genes adopt non-optimal codon usage to generate cell cycle-dependent oscillations in protein levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Danon, Tamar; Christian, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    The cell cycle is a temporal program that regulates DNA synthesis and cell division. When we compared the codon usage of cell cycle-regulated genes with that of other genes, we discovered that there is a significant preference for non-optimal codons. Moreover, genes encoding proteins that cycle at...... the protein level exhibit non-optimal codon preferences. Remarkably, cell cycle-regulated genes expressed in different phases display different codon preferences. Here, we show empirically that transfer RNA (tRNA) expression is indeed highest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, consistent with the non......-optimal codon usage of genes expressed at this time, and lowest toward the end of G1, reflecting the optimal codon usage of G1 genes. Accordingly, protein levels of human glycyl-, threonyl-, and glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetases were found to oscillate, peaking in G2/M phase. In light of our findings, we propose...

  1. Cell-cycle dependent expression of a translocation-mediated fusion oncogene mediates checkpoint adaptation in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Ken; Hettmer, Simone; Aslam, M Imran; Michalek, Joel E; Laub, Wolfram; Wilky, Breelyn A; Loeb, David M; Rubin, Brian P; Wagers, Amy J; Keller, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most commonly occurring soft-tissue sarcoma in childhood. Most rhabdomyosarcoma falls into one of two biologically distinct subgroups represented by alveolar or embryonal histology. The alveolar subtype harbors a translocation-mediated PAX3:FOXO1A fusion gene and has an extremely poor prognosis. However, tumor cells have heterogeneous expression for the fusion gene. Using a conditional genetic mouse model as well as human tumor cell lines, we show that that Pax3:Foxo1a expression is enriched in G2 and triggers a transcriptional program conducive to checkpoint adaptation under stress conditions such as irradiation in vitro and in vivo. Pax3:Foxo1a also tolerizes tumor cells to clinically-established chemotherapy agents and emerging molecularly-targeted agents. Thus, the surprisingly dynamic regulation of the Pax3:Foxo1a locus is a paradigm that has important implications for the way in which oncogenes are modeled in cancer cells. PMID:24453992

  2. Cell-cycle dependent expression of a translocation-mediated fusion oncogene mediates checkpoint adaptation in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kikuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most commonly occurring soft-tissue sarcoma in childhood. Most rhabdomyosarcoma falls into one of two biologically distinct subgroups represented by alveolar or embryonal histology. The alveolar subtype harbors a translocation-mediated PAX3:FOXO1A fusion gene and has an extremely poor prognosis. However, tumor cells have heterogeneous expression for the fusion gene. Using a conditional genetic mouse model as well as human tumor cell lines, we show that that Pax3:Foxo1a expression is enriched in G2 and triggers a transcriptional program conducive to checkpoint adaptation under stress conditions such as irradiation in vitro and in vivo. Pax3:Foxo1a also tolerizes tumor cells to clinically-established chemotherapy agents and emerging molecularly-targeted agents. Thus, the surprisingly dynamic regulation of the Pax3:Foxo1a locus is a paradigm that has important implications for the way in which oncogenes are modeled in cancer cells.

  3. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol exert cell cycle-dependent radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects as elucidated by the PCC and G2-assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastià, N., E-mail: natividad.sebastia@uv.es [Radiation Protection Service, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Montoro, A. [Radiation Protection Service, Universitary and Politechnic Hospital La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Grupo de Investigación Biomédica en Imagen GIBI230, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Unidad Mixta de Investigación en Endocrinología, Nutrición y Dietética Clínica, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Hervás, D. [Biostatistics Unit, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Pantelias, G.; Hatzi, V.I. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Soriano, J.M. [Grupo de Investigación Biomédica en Imagen GIBI230, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Unidad Mixta de Investigación en Endocrinología, Nutrición y Dietética Clínica, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Villaescusa, J.I. [Radiation Protection Service, Universitary and Politechnic Hospital La Fe, Valencia (Spain); and others

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Curcumin and trans-resveratrol can exert radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects. • The mechanisms underlying such dual action were elucidated using the PCC and G2-assay. • Radioprotection occurs in non-cycling cells exposed to curcumin and resveratrol. • Radiosensitization occurs in cycling cells exposed to the chemicals. • G2-checkpoint abrogation by the chemicals underlies the radiosensitizing mechanism. - Abstract: Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are well-known antioxidant polyphenols with radiomodulatory properties, radioprotecting non-cancerous cells while radiosensitizing tumor cells. This dual action may be the result of their radical scavenging properties and their effects on cell-cycle checkpoints that are activated in response to radiation-induced chromosomal damage. It could be also caused by their effect on regulatory pathways with impact on detoxification enzymes, the up-regulation of endogenous protective systems, and cell-cycle-dependent processes of DNA damage. This work aims to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the dual action of these polyphenols and investigates under which conditions they exhibit radioprotecting or radiosensitizing properties. The peripheral blood lymphocyte test system was used, applying concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 140 μM curcumin and 2.2 to 220 μM trans-resveratrol. The experimental design focuses first on their radioprotective effects in non-cycling lymphocytes, as uniquely visualized using cell fusion-mediated premature chromosome condensation, excluding, thus, cell-cycle interference to repair processes and activation of checkpoints. Second, the radiosensitizing potential of these chemicals on the induction of chromatid breaks in cultured lymphocytes following G2-phase irradiation was evaluated by a standardized G2-chromosomal radiosensitivity predictive assay. This assay uses caffeine for G2-checkpoint abrogation and it was applied to obtain an internal control for radiosensitivity

  4. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol exert cell cycle-dependent radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects as elucidated by the PCC and G2-assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Curcumin and trans-resveratrol can exert radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects. • The mechanisms underlying such dual action were elucidated using the PCC and G2-assay. • Radioprotection occurs in non-cycling cells exposed to curcumin and resveratrol. • Radiosensitization occurs in cycling cells exposed to the chemicals. • G2-checkpoint abrogation by the chemicals underlies the radiosensitizing mechanism. - Abstract: Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are well-known antioxidant polyphenols with radiomodulatory properties, radioprotecting non-cancerous cells while radiosensitizing tumor cells. This dual action may be the result of their radical scavenging properties and their effects on cell-cycle checkpoints that are activated in response to radiation-induced chromosomal damage. It could be also caused by their effect on regulatory pathways with impact on detoxification enzymes, the up-regulation of endogenous protective systems, and cell-cycle-dependent processes of DNA damage. This work aims to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the dual action of these polyphenols and investigates under which conditions they exhibit radioprotecting or radiosensitizing properties. The peripheral blood lymphocyte test system was used, applying concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 140 μM curcumin and 2.2 to 220 μM trans-resveratrol. The experimental design focuses first on their radioprotective effects in non-cycling lymphocytes, as uniquely visualized using cell fusion-mediated premature chromosome condensation, excluding, thus, cell-cycle interference to repair processes and activation of checkpoints. Second, the radiosensitizing potential of these chemicals on the induction of chromatid breaks in cultured lymphocytes following G2-phase irradiation was evaluated by a standardized G2-chromosomal radiosensitivity predictive assay. This assay uses caffeine for G2-checkpoint abrogation and it was applied to obtain an internal control for radiosensitivity

  5. The steady-state level and stability of TLS polymerase eta are cell cycle dependent in the yeast S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, Michal; Halas, Agnieszka; McIntyre, Justyna; Sledziewska-Gojska, Ewa

    2015-05-01

    Polymerase eta (Pol eta) is a ubiquitous translesion DNA polymerase that is capable of bypassing UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in an error-free manner. However, this specialized polymerase is error prone when synthesizing through an undamaged DNA template. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, both depletion and overproduction of Pol eta result in mutator phenotypes. Therefore, regulation of the cellular abundance of this enzyme is of particular interest. However, based on the investigation of variously tagged forms of Pol eta, mutually contradictory conclusions have been reached regarding the stability of this polymerase in yeast. Here, we optimized a protocol for the detection of untagged yeast Pol eta and established that the half-life of the native enzyme is 80 ± 14 min in asynchronously growing cultures. Experiments with synchronized cells indicated that the cellular abundance of this translesion polymerase changes throughout the cell cycle. Accordingly, we show that the stability of Pol eta, but not its mRNA level, is cell cycle stage dependent. The half-life of the polymerase is more than fourfold shorter in G1-arrested cells than in those at G2/M. Our results, in concert with previous data for Rev1, indicate that cell cycle regulation is a general property of Y family TLS polymerases in S. cerevisiae. PMID:25766643

  6. Evolutionarily conserved multisubunit RBL2/p130 and E2F4 protein complex represses human cell cycle-dependent genes in quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litovchick, Larisa; Sadasivam, Subhashini; Florens, Laurence; Zhu, Xiaopeng; Swanson, Selene K; Velmurugan, Soundarapandian; Chen, Runsheng; Washburn, Michael P; Liu, X Shirley; DeCaprio, James A

    2007-05-25

    The mammalian Retinoblastoma (RB) family including pRB, p107, and p130 represses E2F target genes through mechanisms that are not fully understood. In D. melanogaster, RB-dependent repression is mediated in part by the multisubunit protein complex Drosophila RBF, E2F, and Myb (dREAM) that contains homologs of the C. elegans synthetic multivulva class B (synMuvB) gene products. Using an integrated approach combining proteomics, genomics, and bioinformatic analyses, we identified a p130 complex termed DP, RB-like, E2F, and MuvB (DREAM) that contains mammalian homologs of synMuvB proteins LIN-9, LIN-37, LIN-52, LIN-54, and LIN-53/RBBP4. DREAM bound to more than 800 human promoters in G0 and was required for repression of E2F target genes. In S phase, MuvB proteins dissociated from p130 and formed a distinct submodule that bound MYB. This work reveals an evolutionarily conserved multisubunit protein complex that contains p130 and E2F4, but not pRB, and mediates the repression of cell cycle-dependent genes in quiescence. PMID:17531812

  7. Regulation of store-operated Ca2+ entry activity by cell cycle dependent up-regulation of Orai2 in brain capillary endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) via Orai1 and STIM1 complex is supposed to have obligatory roles in the regulation of cellular functions of vascular endothelial cells, while little is known about the contribution of Orai2. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses indicated the expression of Orai2 and STIM2, in addition to Orai1 and STIM1 in bovine brain capillary endothelial cell line, t-BBEC117. During the exponential growth of t-BBEC117, the knockdown of Orai1 and STIM1 significantly reduced the SOCE activity, whereas Orai2 and STIM2 siRNAs had no effect. To examine whether endogenous SOCE activity contributes to the regulation of cell cycle progression, t-BBEC117 were synchronized using double thymidine blockage. At the G2/M phase, Ca2+ influx via SOCE was decreased and Orai2 expression was increased compared to the G0/G1 phase. When Orai2 was knocked down at the G2/M phase, the decrease in SOCE was removed, and cell proliferation was partly attenuated. Taken together, Orai1 significantly contributes to cell proliferation via the functional expression, which is presumably independent of the cell cycle phases. In construct, Orai2 is specifically up-regulated during the G2/M phase, negatively modulates the SOCE activity, and may contribute to the regulation of cell cycle progression in brain capillary endothelial cells. - Highlights: • Orai1 is essential for SOCE activity in brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs). • Cell cycle independent expression of Orai1 regulated SOCE and cell proliferation. • Orai2 was up-regulated only at G2/M phase and this consequently reduced SOCE. • Orai2 as well as Orai1 is a key player controlling SOCE and proliferation in BCECs

  8. Regulation of store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry activity by cell cycle dependent up-regulation of Orai2 in brain capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kito, Hiroaki [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Pharmacology, Division of Pathological Sciences, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Yamamura, Hisao; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hideto [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ohya, Susumu [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Pharmacology, Division of Pathological Sciences, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-04-10

    Store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) via Orai1 and STIM1 complex is supposed to have obligatory roles in the regulation of cellular functions of vascular endothelial cells, while little is known about the contribution of Orai2. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses indicated the expression of Orai2 and STIM2, in addition to Orai1 and STIM1 in bovine brain capillary endothelial cell line, t-BBEC117. During the exponential growth of t-BBEC117, the knockdown of Orai1 and STIM1 significantly reduced the SOCE activity, whereas Orai2 and STIM2 siRNAs had no effect. To examine whether endogenous SOCE activity contributes to the regulation of cell cycle progression, t-BBEC117 were synchronized using double thymidine blockage. At the G2/M phase, Ca{sup 2+} influx via SOCE was decreased and Orai2 expression was increased compared to the G0/G1 phase. When Orai2 was knocked down at the G2/M phase, the decrease in SOCE was removed, and cell proliferation was partly attenuated. Taken together, Orai1 significantly contributes to cell proliferation via the functional expression, which is presumably independent of the cell cycle phases. In construct, Orai2 is specifically up-regulated during the G2/M phase, negatively modulates the SOCE activity, and may contribute to the regulation of cell cycle progression in brain capillary endothelial cells. - Highlights: • Orai1 is essential for SOCE activity in brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs). • Cell cycle independent expression of Orai1 regulated SOCE and cell proliferation. • Orai2 was up-regulated only at G2/M phase and this consequently reduced SOCE. • Orai2 as well as Orai1 is a key player controlling SOCE and proliferation in BCECs.

  9. Decreased radioiodine uptake of FRTL-5 cells after 131I incubation in vitro: molecular biological investigations indicate a cell cycle-dependent pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radioiodine therapy the ''stunning phenomenon'' is defined as a reduction of radioiodine uptake after diagnostic application of 131I. In the current study, we established an in vitro model based on the ''Fisher rat thyrocyte cell line no. 5'' (FRTL-5) to investigate the stunning. TSH-stimulated FRTL-5 cells were incubated with 131I. Time-dependent 131I uptake and the viability of FRTL-5 cells were evaluated at 4-144 h after radioiodine application. All data was corrected for number of viable cells, half life and 131I concentration. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and the housekeeping gene (β-actin, GAPDH) levels were quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Additionally, immunohistochemical staining (IHC) of NIS on the cell membrane was carried out. FRTL-5 monolayer cell cultures showed a specific maximum uptake of 131I 24-48 h after application. Significantly decreased 131I uptake values were observed after 72-144 h. The decrease in radioiodine uptake was correlated with decreasing mRNA levels of NIS and housekeeping genes. In parallel, unlike in controls, IHC staining of NIS on FRTL-5 cells declined significantly after 131I long-term incubation. It could be demonstrated that during 131I incubation of FRTL-5 cells, radioiodine uptake decreased significantly. Simultaneously decreasing levels of NIS mRNA and protein expression suggest a NIS-associated mechanism. Since mRNA levels of housekeeping genes decreased, too, the reduced NIS expression might be provoked by a cell cycle arrest. Our investigations recommend the FRTL-5 model as a valuable tool for further molecular biological investigations of the stunning phenomenon. (orig.)

  10. The mammalian Cut homeodomain protein functions as a cell-cycle-dependent transcriptional repressor which downmodulates p21WAF1/CIP1/SDI1 in S phase.

    OpenAIRE

    Coqueret, O; Bérubé, G; Nepveu, A

    1998-01-01

    Cut is a homeodomain transcription factor which has the unusual property of containing several DNA-binding domains: three regions called Cut repeats and the Cut homeodomain. Genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster indicate that cut plays important roles in the determination and maintenance of cell-type specificity. In the present study, we show that mammalian Cut proteins may yet play another biological role, specifically in proliferating cells. We found that the binding of Cut to a consen...

  11. Distinct kinetics of DNA repair protein accumulation at DNA lesions and cell cycle-dependent formation of gammaH2AX- and NBS1-positive repair foci

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchánková, Jana; Kozubek, Stanislav; Legartová, Soňa; Sehnalová, Petra; Kuntzinger, T.; Bártová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 12 (2015), s. 440-454. ISSN 0248-4900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G157; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-07822S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Cell cycle * DNA repair * Interphase Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.506, year: 2014

  12. Proximal and distal regulatory elements that influence in vivo expression of a cell cycle-dependent human H4 histone gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have examined the sequences required in vivo to promote transcription of a cell cycle-regulated human H4 histone gene. Deletion mutants of the 5' flanking region were assayed in mouse cells or fused with the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene for assay in HeLa cells. The functional limits of the regulatory sequences were shown to extend at least 6.5 kilobases (kb) upstream. Sequences sufficient for correctly initiated transcription were found in the 70 base pairs (bp) immediately 5' to the cap site. A proximal element located 200-400 bp upstream increased the level of transcription several times above the basal level, although not to maximal levels. Maximal levels of expression were achieved with 6.5 kb of 5' flanking sequence adjacent to the proximal promoter sequences or when a distal enhancer element with both position- and orientation-independent function was moved proximal to the promoter. The results indicate that a series of 5' cis-acting sequences are functionally related to the fidelity and level of expression of this human H4 histone gene

  13. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of RNA polymerase I transcription: The nucleolar transcription factor UBF is inactive in mitosis and early G1

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Joachim; Grummt, Ingrid

    1999-01-01

    Transcription of ribosomal RNA genes by RNA polymerase (pol) I oscillates during the cell cycle, being maximal in S and G2 phase, repressed during mitosis, and gradually recovering during G1 progression. We have shown that transcription initiation factor (TIF)-IB/SL1 is inactivated during mitosis by cdc2/cyclin B-directed phosphorylation of TAFI110. In this study, we have monitored reactivation of transcription after exit from mitosis. We demonstrate that the pol I factor UBF is also inactiva...

  14. Activity of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 cell cycle-dependent internal ribosomal entry site is modulated by IRES trans-acting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejos, Maricarmen; Deforges, Jules; Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Letelier, Alejandro; Ramdohr, Pablo; Abraham, Christopher G; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Sargueil, Bruno; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2011-08-01

    The 5' leader of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genomic RNA harbors an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is functional during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Here we show that translation initiation mediated by the HIV-1 IRES requires the participation of trans-acting cellular factors other than the canonical translational machinery. We used 'standard' chemical and enzymatic probes and an 'RNA SHAPE' analysis to model the structure of the HIV-1 5' leader and we show, by means of a footprinting assay, that G2/M extracts provide protections to regions previously identified as crucial for HIV-1 IRES activity. We also assessed the impact of mutations on IRES function. Strikingly, mutations did not significantly affect IRES activity suggesting that the requirement for pre-formed stable secondary or tertiary structure within the HIV-1 IRES may not be as strict as has been described for other viral IRESes. Finally, we used a proteomic approach to identify cellular proteins within the G2/M extracts that interact with the HIV-1 5' leader. Together, data show that HIV-1 IRES-mediated translation initiation is modulated by cellular proteins. PMID:21482538

  15. Cell cycle-dependent changes in localization of a 210-kDa microtubule-interacting protein in .I.Leishmania./I..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Libusová, Lenka; Dráberová, Eduarda; Juliano, C.; Viklický, Vladimír; Fiori, P. L.; Cappuccinelli, P.; Dráber, Petr

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 266, č. 2 (2001), s. 270-278. ISSN 0014-4827 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/00/0553; GA AV ČR IAA5052004 Keywords : microtubule-associated proteins * Leishmania-antibody Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.096, year: 2001

  16. Uptake of host cell transforming growth factor-ß by Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes in cardiomyocytes: potential role in parasite cycle completion. : Cycle-dependent uptake of TGF-ß by T. cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Waghabi, Mariana,; Keramidas, Michelle; Bailly, Sabine; Degrave, Wim,; Mendonça-Lima, Leila; Soeiro, Maria De Nazaré,; Meirelles, Maria De Nazareth,; Paciornik, Sidnei; Araújo-Jorge, Tania,; Feige, Jean-Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a cytokine that plays various functions in the control of Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity and in the progression of Chagas disease. When we immunostained Trypanosoma cruzi-infected cardiomyocytes (following either in vivo or in vitro infections) for TGF-β, we observed stronger immunoreactivity in parasites than in host cells. TGF-β immunoreactivity evolved during parasite cycle progression: intense staining in amastigotes versus very faint staining in try...

  17. A new analysis of radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in human lymphocytes using the PCC technique, and its implications for biological dosimetry and the understanding of cell-cycle-dependent radiosensitivity fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the project are: to develop a sensitive biological dosemeter, based on the analysis of C-banded peripheral blood lymphocyte prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCCs), for the early assessment of radiation injury and the establishment of absorbed dose estimates in accidental overexposures; and to elucidate the mechanisms of radiation action at the molecular, chromosomal and cellular levels by the study of the effects of DNA repair inhibitors on the repair of radiation damage, effects of BrdUrd incorporation on radiation damage, effects of hyperthermia on the induction and repair of radiation-induced damage, and induction and repair of radiation damage in an X-ray sensitive CHO mutant cell line. (authors) 16 refs., 1 fig

  18. Pulmonary dendritic cells: thinking globally, acting locally

    OpenAIRE

    Randall, Troy D.

    2010-01-01

    The phrase “think globally, act locally” was coined in the early 1970s and directed individuals to clean up their local environment with the ultimate goal of improving the health of the entire planet. Several recent studies indicate that similar considerations apply to the immune system, in which small numbers of leukocytes, such as pulmonary dendritic cells, can modify the local immune environment in the lung and promote a positive outcome for the organism.

  19. Local thermal ablation of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: With evolving local thermal ablation technology, the clinical application of thermal ablation has been actively investigated in the treatment for renal cell carcinoma. We review the evolution and current status of radiofrequency ablation and microwave ablation for renal cell carcinoma. Materials and methods: All articles published in English on radiofrequency ablation or microwave ablation as a treatment for renal cell carcinoma were identified with a MEDLINE® and PubMed® search from 1990 to 2010. Results: Local thermal ablation has several advantages, including keeping more normal renal units, relatively simple operation, easy tolerance, fewer complications, a shorter hospitalization and convalescence period. Long-term data has determined radiofrequency ablation is responsible for poor surgical candidates with renal cell carcinoma, however, tumor size, location and shape might affect the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation. Microwave ablation can induce large ablation volumes and yield good local tumor control. Associated complications appear to be low. Conclusions: Local ablative approaches seem to represent an attractive alternative to extirpative surgery for the treatment of small renal neoplasms in select patients. Potential developments include concepts to improve the accuracy and effectiveness of thermal ablation by improving the guiding, monitoring capabilities and detection capacity of multi-center lesions to provide at least equivalent cancer control to conventional surgery.

  20. Characterization and localization of side population cells in the lens

    OpenAIRE

    Oka, Mikako; Toyoda, Chizuko; Kaneko, Yuka; Nakazawa, Yosuke; Aizu-Yokota, Eriko; Takehana, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Side population (SP) cells were isolated and the possibility whether lens epithelial cells contain stem cells was investigated. Methods Mouse lens epithelial cells were stained by Hoechst 33342 and then sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The expression of stem cell markers in sorted SP cells and the main population of epithelial cells were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Localization of SP cells in the mouse lens was studied by fluorescence microscopy. Resul...

  1. Immunoelectron microscopic localization of calmodulin in corn root cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIJIAXU; JIEWENLIU; DAYESUN

    1993-01-01

    Methods for the localization of plant calmodulin by immuno-gold and immuno-peroxidase electron microscopy have been developed. In both corn root-cap cells and meristematic cells, calmodulin was found to be localized in the nucleus, cytoplasm, mitochondria as well as in the cell wall, In the meristematic cells, calmodulin was distinctly localized on the plasma membrane, cytoplasmic face of rough endoplasmic rcticulum and polyribosomes. Characteristically, calmodulin was present in the amyloplasts of root-cap cells. The widespread distribution of calmodulin may reflect its plciotropic functions in plant cellular activities.

  2. Business Cycle Dependent Unemployment Benefits with Wealth Heterogeneity and Precautionary Savings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Mark Strøm

    In the wake of the financial and economic crisis the discussion about social insurance and optimal stabilization policies has re-blossomed. This paper adds to the literature by studying the effects of a business cycle dependent level of unemployment benefits in a model with labor market matching...... of the distortionary effect (on job creation) from providing unemployment insurance, whereas countercyclical benefits facilitate consumption smoothing....

  3. Asymmetric protein localization in planar cell polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The polarization of epithelial cells along an axis orthogonal to their apical-basal axis is increasingly recognized for roles in a variety of developmental events and physiological functions. While now studied in many model organisms, mechanistic understanding is rooted in intensive investigations of Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) in Drosophila. Consensus has emerged that two molecular modules, referred to here as the global and core modules, operate upstream of effector proteins to produce morphological PCP. Proteins of the core module develop subcellular asymmetry, accumulating in two groups on opposite sides of cells, consistent with proposed functions in producing cell polarity and in communicating that polarity between neighboring cells. Less clear are the molecular and cell biological mechanisms underlying core module function in the generation and communication of subcellular asymmetry, and the relationship between the global and core modules. In this review, we discuss these two unresolved questions, highlighting important studies and potentially enlightening avenues for further investigation. It is likely that results from Drosophila will continue to inform our views of the growing list of examples of PCP in vertebrate systems. PMID:23140624

  4. Respiratory Cycle-Dependent Atrial Trachycardia; its Unique Characteristics and Relation with Autonomic Nerve System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppei Yamamoto, MD

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Respiration influences the sinus heart rate, however, little is still known about the tachyarrhythmias related to respiration. Atrial tachycardia (AT rarely emerges during inspiration and it also ceases during expiration. This type of AT is thus called respiratory cycle-dependent atrial tachycardia (RCAT, and it demonstrates a centrifugal activation pattern. Based on these peculiar P wave morphologies, the foci converged either around the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV or inside the superior vena cava where the anterior right ganglionated plexi (ARGP is considered to be located. The mechanism of such AT is therefore thought to be related to the activity of the autonomic system.

  5. MUSIC for localization of thunderstorm cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.C.; Lewis, P.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rynne, T.M. [Scientific Applications and Research Associates, Inc., Huntington Beach, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Lightning represents an event detectable optically, electrically, and acoustically, and several systems are already in place to monitor such activity. Unfortunately, such detection of lightning can occur too late, since operations need to be protected in advance of the first lightning strike. Additionally, the bolt itself can traverse several kilometers before striking the ground, leaving a large region of uncertainty as to the center of the storm and its possible strike regions. NASA Kennedy Space Center has in place an array of electric field mills that monitor the (effectively) DC electric field. Prior to the first lightning strike, the surface electric fields rise as the storm generator within a thundercloud begins charging. Extending methods we developed for an analogous source localization problem in mangnetoencephalography, we present Cramer-Rao lower bounds and MUSIC scans for fitting a point-charge source model to the electric field mill data. Such techniques can allow for the identification and localization of charge centers in cloud structures.

  6. Localization of ANP-synthesizing cells in rat stomach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hui Li; Li-Hui Pan; Chun-Yu Li; Chang-Lin Zhu; Wen-Xie Xu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the morphological positive expression of antrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-synthesizing cells and ultrastructural localization and the relationship between ANP-synthesizing cells and microvessel density in the stomach of rats and to analyze the distribution of the three histologically distinct regions of ANP-synthesizing cells.METHODS: Using immunohistochemical techniques, we studied positive expression of ANP-synthesizing cells in rat stomach. A postembedding immunogold microscopy technique was used for ultrastructural localization of ANP-synthesizing cells. Microvessel density in the rat stomach was estimated using tannic acid-ferric chloride (TAFC) method staining. Distribution of ANP-synthesizing cells were studied in different regions of rat stomach histochemically.RESULTS: Positive expression of ANP-synthesizing cells were localized in the gastric mucosa of rats. Localization of ANP-synthesizing cells identified them to be enterochrochromaffin cells (EC) by using a postembedding immunogold electron microscopy technique. EC cells were in the basal third of the cardiac mucosa region.ANP-synthesizing cells existed in different regions of rat stomach and its density was largest in the gastric cardiac region, and the distribution order of ANP-synthesizing cells in density was cardiac region, pyloric region and fundic region in mucosa layer. We have also found a close relationship between ANP-synthesizing cells and microvessel density in gastric mucosa of rats using TAFC staining.CONCLUSION: ANP-synthesizing cells are expressed in the gastric mucosa. EC synthesize ANP. There is a close relationship between ANP-synthesizing cells and microvessel density in gastric mucosa of rats.The distribution density of ANP-synthesizing cells is largest in the gastric cardiac region.

  7. Local cell metrics: a novel method for analysis of cell-cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chien-Chiang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of many cell functions is inherently linked to cell-cell contact interactions. However, effects of contact interactions among adherent cells can be difficult to detect with global summary statistics due to the localized nature and noise inherent to cell-cell interactions. The lack of informatics approaches specific for detecting cell-cell interactions is a limitation in the analysis of large sets of cell image data, including traditional and combinatorial or high-throughput studies. Here we introduce a novel histogram-based data analysis strategy, termed local cell metrics (LCMs, which addresses this shortcoming. Results The new LCM method is demonstrated via a study of contact inhibition of proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. We describe how LCMs can be used to quantify the local environment of cells and how LCMs are decomposed mathematically into metrics specific to each cell type in a culture, e.g., differently-labelled cells in fluorescence imaging. Using this approach, a quantitative, probabilistic description of the contact inhibition effects in MC3T3-E1 cultures has been achieved. We also show how LCMs are related to the naïve Bayes model. Namely, LCMs are Bayes class-conditional probability functions, suggesting their use for data mining and classification. Conclusion LCMs are successful in robust detection of cell contact inhibition in situations where conventional global statistics fail to do so. The noise due to the random features of cell behavior was suppressed significantly as a result of the focus on local distances, providing sensitive detection of cell-cell contact effects. The methodology can be extended to any quantifiable feature that can be obtained from imaging of cell cultures or tissue samples, including optical, fluorescent, and confocal microscopy. This approach may prove useful in interpreting culture and histological data in fields where cell-cell interactions play a critical

  8. Ratchetaxis: Long-Range Directed Cell Migration by Local Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, David; Comelles, Jordi; Piel, Matthieu; Voituriez, Raphaël; Riveline, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Directed cell migration is usually thought to depend on the presence of long-range gradients of either chemoattractants or physical properties such as stiffness or adhesion. However, in vivo, chemical or mechanical gradients have not systematically been observed. Here we review recent in vitro experiments, which show that other types of spatial guidance cues can bias cell motility. Introducing local geometrical or mechanical anisotropy in the cell environment, such as adhesive/topographical microratchets or tilted micropillars, show that local and periodic external cues can direct cell motion. Together with modeling, these experiments suggest that cell motility can be viewed as a stochastic phenomenon, which can be biased by various types of local cues, leading to directional migration. PMID:26615123

  9. Time-resolved local strain tracking microscopy for cell mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, O.; Aksoy, B.; Akalin, O. B.; Bayraktar, H.; Alaca, B. E.

    2016-02-01

    A uniaxial cell stretching technique to measure time-resolved local substrate strain while simultaneously imaging adherent cells is presented. The experimental setup comprises a uniaxial stretcher platform compatible with inverted microscopy and transparent elastomer samples with embedded fluorescent beads. This integration enables the acquisition of real-time spatiotemporal data, which is then processed using a single-particle tracking algorithm to track the positions of fluorescent beads for the subsequent computation of local strain. The present local strain tracking method is demonstrated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of rectangular and dogbone geometries. The comparison of experimental results and finite element simulations for the two sample geometries illustrates the capability of the present system to accurately quantify local deformation even when the strain distribution is non-uniform over the sample. For a regular dogbone sample, the experimentally obtained value of local strain at the center of the sample is 77%, while the average strain calculated using the applied cross-head displacement is 48%. This observation indicates that considerable errors may arise when cross-head measurement is utilized to estimate strain in the case of non-uniform sample geometry. Finally, the compatibility of the proposed platform with biological samples is tested using a unibody PDMS sample with a well to contain cells and culture media. HeLa S3 cells are plated on collagen-coated samples and cell adhesion and proliferation are observed. Samples with adherent cells are then stretched to demonstrate simultaneous cell imaging and tracking of embedded fluorescent beads.

  10. WHAT CONTROLS STEM CELL DEVELOPMENT-- CELL POTENTIAL OR LOCAL ENVIRONMENT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In H. virescens, as in M. sexta and other lepidoptera, midgut development proceeds through the sequential proliferation and differentiation of the midgut stem cells. In larvae,the stem cells repeatedly differentiatiate to goblet, columnar, and to a lesser extent endocrine cells of the midgut; a res...

  11. Cell cycle dependent expression of Plk 1 in synchronized porcine fetal fibroblasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anger, M.; Kues, W. A.; Klíma, J.; Mielenz, M.; Kubelka, M.; Motlík, J.; Ešner, M.; Dvořák, Petr; Carnwath, J. W.; Niemann, H.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 65, - (2003), s. 245-253. ISSN 1040-452X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : serum deprivation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.543, year: 2003

  12. Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.

  13. Localization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in plant guard cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), as an important neurotransmitter in animals, also plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. But relatively little is known about its receptors in plants. A green fluorescence BODIPY FL-labeled ABT, which is a high affinity ligand of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), was used to localize mAChR in plant guard cells. In Vicia faba L. and Pisum sativum L., mAChR was found both on the plasma membrane of guard cells. mAChR may also be distributed on guard cell chloroplast membrane of Vicia faba L. The evidence that mAChR localizes in the guard cells provides a new possible signal transduction pathway in ACh mediated stomata movement.

  14. Spatial distributions of red blood cells significantly alter local haemodynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Sherwood

    Full Text Available Although bulk changes in red blood cell concentration between vessels have been well characterised, local distributions are generally overlooked. Red blood cells aggregate, deform and migrate within vessels, forming heterogeneous distributions which have considerable effect on local haemodynamics. The present study reports data on the local distribution of human red blood cells in a sequentially bifurcating microchannel, representing the branching geometry of the microvasculature. Imaging methodologies with simple extrapolations are used to infer three dimensional, time-averaged velocity and haematocrit distributions under a range of flow conditions. Strong correlation between the bluntness of the velocity and haematocrit profiles in the parent branch of the geometry is observed and red blood cell aggregation has a notable effect on the observed trends. The two branches of the first bifurcation show similar characteristics in terms of the shapes of the profiles and the extent of plasma skimming, despite the difference in geometric configuration. In the second bifurcation, considerable asymmetry between the branches in the plasma skimming relationship is observed, and elucidated by considering individual haematocrit profiles. The results of the study highlight the importance of considering local haematocrit distributions in the analysis of blood flow and could lead to more accurate computational models of blood flow in microvascular networks. The experimental approaches developed in this work provide a foundation for further examining the characteristics of microhaemodynamics.

  15. Octreotide scintigraphy localizes somatostatin receptor-positive islet cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyr-3-octreotide is a synthetic derivative of somatostatin and a somatostatin-receptor analogue. The iodine-123-labelled compound localizes somatostatin-receptor-positive tumours. In this paper two patients are reported in whom somatostatin receptors were demonstrated in vitro. In a 60-year-old female with an islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas, multiple liver metastases and previously uncrecognized bone metastases in the right acetabulum could be diagnosed as the reason for a persistent hypoglycaemia. In a 60-year-old male an islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas was localized with 123I-Tyr-3-octreotide. The somatostatin receptors were demonstrated in vitro and the tumour was successfully treated with somatostatin. These studies demonstrate that 123I-Tyr-3-octreotide offers the possibility of localizing somatostatin-receptor-positive tumours and their metastases. Moreover the method makes it possible to determine the receptor status of a tumour in vivo. (orig.)

  16. Localization of Ga-67 in rat liver cell, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intracellular behaviour of Ga-67 was studied after intravenous injection of Ga-67 citrate to the rat. The mechanisms of cellular uptake was investigated by observing the time course of the radionuclide in subcellular liver cell fractions. For this purpose, we have developed a continuous isopycnic rate-zonal ultracentrifugation system capable of successively fractionating the homogenate according to isopycnic and rate-zonal principles. To collect the cell nuclei, a special technique, which consisted of supplementing the outer sucrose layer with cesium chloride to increase density, was applied to trap nuclei with isopycnic equilibrium. We isolated cell nuclei, mitochondria, lysosomes and peroxysomes, micro-somes and the cell supernatant in sufficiently purified state. With this technique, the intracellular localization of Ga-67 was studied. At 30 minutes after intravenous injection, radioactivity was found mainly in the cell supernatant, the radioactivity peak corresponded to sedimentation coefficient of 5S. However, after 24 hours, the radioactivity was localized in the heavier fraction containing lysosomes and heavy endoplasmic reticulum, and it was found that further moving of Ga-67 did not take place thereafter. No intranuclear localization was observed. Furthermore, we found no radioactivity of Ga-67 associated with ferritin in the course of migration of Ga-67 in the cytosol. Therefore, it is concluded that gallium is stored entirely in the above mentioned organella, and ferritin is not participating in gallium transport and storage. (author)

  17. Spectroscopic investigation of local mechanical impedance of living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luca; Benseny-Cases, Núria; Mayeaux, Véronique; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of PC12 living cells have been studied at the nanoscale with a Force Feedback Microscope using two experimental approaches. Firstly, the local mechanical impedance of the cell membrane has been mapped simultaneously to the cell morphology at constant force. As the force of the interaction is gradually increased, we observed the appearance of the sub-membrane cytoskeleton. We shall compare the results obtained with this method with the measurement of other existing techniques. Secondly, a spectroscopic investigation has been performed varying the indentation of the tip in the cell membrane and consequently the force applied on it. In contrast with conventional dynamic atomic force microscopy techniques, here the small oscillation amplitude of the tip is not necessarily imposed at the cantilever first eigenmode. This allows the user to arbitrarily choose the excitation frequency in developing spectroscopic AFM techniques. The mechanical response of the PC12 cell membrane is found to be...

  18. Schelling model of cell segregation based only on local information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Alexander Valentin; Gade, Annika Lund; Juul, Jeppe; Strandkvist, Charlotte

    2015-11-01

    While biological studies suggest that motility of cells is involved in cell segregation, few computational models have investigated this mechanism. We apply a simple Schelling model, modified to reflect biological conditions, demonstrating how differences in cell motility arising exclusively from differences in the composition of the local environment can be sufficient to drive segregation. The work presented here demonstrates that the segregation behavior observed in the original Schelling model is robust to a relaxation of the requirement for global information and that the Schelling model may yield insight in the context of biological systems. In the model, the time course of cell segregation follows a power law in accord with experimental observations and previous work.

  19. Local cell-mediated immune reactions in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of 178 cases of stage I-II breast cancer showed morphological features of local cell-mediated immune reactions to be of limited prognostic value. A comparative evaluation of some characteristics of cell surface receptors, such as ability to spontaneous rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes and sensitivty to theophylline, was carried out in lymphocyte samples obtained from tumor tissue and peripheral blood of 76 cancer patients subjected to preoperative radiotherapy. The said parameters were studied in breast cancer patients of rosette-forming cell reaction to theophylline were identified, the incidence of some of them being determined by the presence or absence of regional metastases. The level and functional activity of surface receptors of tumor mononuclear cells proved to influence prognosis

  20. Micromechanical stimulator for localized cell loading: fabrication and strain analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical stimuli regulate cell structure and function during physiological processes. To understand the role of mechanical stimuli, engineered devices are developed to deliver controllable mechanical signals to cells cultured in vitro. Localized mechanical loading on selected cells are preferred when investigating intercellular communication. In this work, we fabricated and characterized a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-device for applying controlled compressive/tensile loads to selected live cells. The device consists of nine circular PDMS membranes serving as the loading sites; the loading parameters at each site are individually controllable. The in-plane strain upon PDMS membrane deflection was experimentally characterized. The result showed that for a circular membrane with 500 µm in diameter and 60 µm thick, the radial strain from −6% (compressive) to 25% (tensile) can be achieved at the membrane center. This device allows localized cell loading with minimal fabrication/operation complexity and ease of scaling-up. It is expected to foster the development of high throughput mechanical loading systems for a broad array of cellular mechanobiological studies. (paper)

  1. Salvage surgery for local failure of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local failure rates following treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity have been reported to be in the range of 25%-48%. This study investigated the pattern of failure for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and evaluated salvage surgery for local recurrent disease. The tumor files of 549 patients undergoing treatment for SCC of the oral cavity between 1980 and 2000 at Chiba Cancer Center Hospital were reviewed. Of 549 patients, 289 were initially treated with radiation therapy for their primary tumor, and 260 with surgery, either with or without radiation therapy. One hundred and sixty-one patients developed failures, yielding a failure rate of 29.3%. The site of recurrent tumor was local in 72 (13.1%) patients, regional in 89 (16.2%) patients, and distant in 5 (0.9%) patients. Local failure developed in 49 (17.0%) patients with radiation therapy and in 23 (8.8%) patients with surgery. Out of these 72 patients with local failure, 41 (56.9%) patients had salvage surgery for their disease. Twenty-five (73.5%) of the 34 patients initially treated with radiation therapy were salvaged with surgery, and 4 (57.1%) of the 7 patients initially treated with surgery were cured with further surgery. For the treatment of patients with local failure, the disease should be diagnosed more carefully than untreated disease. The disease that has recurred after radiation therapy may be more likely to be salvaged by surgery, however, the disease that has developed after surgery may have a limited indication for re-surgery. (author)

  2. Tracking and localization of calmodulin in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carey K; Harms, Gregory S

    2016-08-01

    The calcium signaling protein calmodulin (CaM) interacts with many target proteins inside the cell to regulate a wide range of biological signals. CaM's availability to propagate signals depends on its mobility, which may be regulated by interactions with multiple target proteins. We detected single molecules of CaM labeled with a fluorescent dye and injected into living HEK 293 cells, and we used high-speed, wide-field, single-molecule imaging to track single CaM molecules. Single-molecule trajectories were analyzed to characterize the motions of individual CaM molecules. Single-molecule localization resolved CaM positions with a position accuracy of tracking demonstrated the presence of a wide range of mobilities of individual calmodulin molecules in a cell, with diffusion coefficients ranging from 10μm(2)s(-1). For molecules confined to small regions of the cell, super-resolved images of presumed signaling complexes were recovered. Individual trajectories were classified as normal diffusion, confined diffusion, or directed motion, and could suggest how the individual CaM molecules were bound in the cell. The results show that interactions of CaM with target proteins result in decreased translational mobilities of a significant fraction of CaM molecules inside cells. The work presented here illustrates methods that can characterize location, mobilities, and the availability of signaling molecules in live cells. PMID:27113857

  3. The local origin of decidual cells in pregnant mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the participation of extrauterine cells in the formation of mouse antimesometrial decidua, [3H]-thymidine was administered ip on days 1, 5 and 6 of pregnancy and the animals were killed 1 h afterwards. A second group of mice received four ip injections of [3H]-thymidine at 6-h intervals on the 1st day of pregnancy and were killed on the 2nd, 5th or 6th day of pregnancy. A third group of virgin mice in estrus received [3H]-thymidine ip four times at 6-h intervals and was killed 96 h after the first injection. Radioautographs of the uteri showed that few endometrial stomal cells were labelled on the 1st and 2nd day of pregnancy. Although many decidual cells incorporated thymidine on the 5th and 6th day of pregnancy in pulse-labelled animals, only few labelled decidual cells were found on the 5th and 6th day of pregnancy in animals that received several injections of thymidine on the 1st and 2nd day of pregnancy. These results indicate that the antimesometrial decidual cells that develop at the beginning of pregnancy are mostly of local origin. The short-term migration of extraneous cells into the uterus to participate in decidualization is not supported by these data. (author)

  4. Cellular localization of BARF1 oncoprotein and its cell stimulating activity in human epithelial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Emna; Zur Hausen, Axel; Houali, Karim; Liu, Haying; Fiorini, Sylvie; Ooka, Tadamasa

    2013-06-01

    BARF1 gene encoded by Epstein-Barr virus is capable of immortalizing the primary monkey epithelial cells and of inducing malignant transformation in human EBV-negative B cell lines as well as rodent fibroblast. This oncoprotein is a secreted protein capable of acting as a powerful mitogen. We have studied the effect of BARF1 protein in transfected or BARF1 protein treated human HaCaT epithelial cells. In BARF1-transfected cells, cell growth was activated and its protein was found both in culture medium and cellular compartment (membrane, cytoplasm and nuclei). When purified BARF1 protein was exogenously added in the cell culture medium of HaCaT cells in absence of fetal calf serum led to its entrance into cells and its intracellular localization in cytoplasm, nuclear periphery and nuclei at 14h treatment, determined by confocal and immunoelectron microscopy. Cell fractionation confirmed its nuclear localization. Nuclear localization was observed in both systems. More interestingly, purified BARF1 protein p29 exogenously added in the cell culture medium activated cell passage of G1 to S phase. S phase activation by its autocrine activity and its tumorigenic activity would be associated with the development of EBV-associated carcinomas. PMID:23458996

  5. Radio(chemotherapy in locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Glatzer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Definitive radiochemotherapy is the standard treatment for many patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Treatment outcomes have improved over the last decades. Several treatment regimens have been shown effective and safe. This review summarises the results of significant studies between 1996 and 2015 on concomitant and sequential radiochemotherapy regimens and radiation dose per fraction. Beside therapy regimens, optimised radiotherapy planning is indispensable to improve outcome and minimise radiation-induced toxicity. An insight into the rationale of radiotherapy planning for stage III NSCLC is also provided.

  6. Differential Localization of Rho Gtpases in Live Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Michaelson, David; Silletti, Joseph; Murphy, Gretchen; D'Eustachio, Peter; Rush, Mark; Philips, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    Determinants of membrane targeting of Rho proteins were investigated in live cells with green fluorescent fusion proteins expressed with or without Rho-guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI)α. The hypervariable region determined to which membrane compartment each protein was targeted. Targeting was regulated by binding to RhoGDIα in the case of RhoA, Rac1, Rac2, and Cdc42hs but not RhoB or TC10. Although RhoB localized to the plasma membrane (PM), Golgi, and motile peri-Golgi vesicle...

  7. Local therapy for small cell carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is a rare and aggressive tumor. This tumor is similar to small cell carcinoma of the lung with a tendency to metastasize early. While there has been an increasing interest in the use of chemotherapy regimens similar to those used for small cell carcinoma of the lung, the optimum local therapy for small cell carcinoma of the cervix remains unknown. We reviewed the treatment outcome of patients with small cell carcinoma of the cervix diagnosed in our cancer center with an emphasis on the local/regional disease control. Material and Methods: Between 1983 and 1993, medical records of patients diagnosed with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were reviewed. There were 281 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix referred to our department for radiation treatment. Seven patients had pathologic diagnosis of either small cell or neuroendocrine histology. Details of the treatments and follow-up information of these patients were reviewed with a medium follow-up period of three years (range - 1 to 4 years). Results: Five patients had pure small cell histology. Two patients had mixed histology: one with mixed small cell anaplastic neuroendocrine cells and a small foci of adenocarcinoma, the other had mixed small cell and squamous cell histology. Four patients had clinical stage IB disease. The others had IIA, IIB, and IIIB disease, respectively. All patients received either irradiation (XRT) alone or as part of the local therapy. Three patients received XRT alone, one received surgery followed by XRT, one received XRT followed by surgery, and the remaining two had triple modality treatment (chemotherapy, surgery, and XRT). Three patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence at the last follow-up. Two of these received adjuvant chemotherapy in addition to local therapy. The third patient, whose tumor was smaller than one cm at the time of diagnosis, received XRT alone. Four patients died with disease

  8. Evidence for local dendritic cell activation in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berge Bregje

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease characterized by a seemingly exaggerated immune response against a difficult to discern antigen. Dendritic cells (DCs are pivotal antigen presenting cells thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis. Paradoxically, decreased DC immune reactivity was reported in blood samples from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients. However, functional data on lung DCs in sarcoidosis are lacking. We hypothesized that at the site of disease DCs are mature, immunocompetent and involved in granuloma formation. Methods We analyzed myeloid DCs (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL and blood from newly diagnosed, untreated pulmonary sarcoidosis patients and healthy controls using 9-color flowcytometry. DCs, isolated from BAL using flowcytometric sorting (mDCs or cultured from monocytes (mo-DCs, were functionally assessed in a mixed leukocyte reaction with naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells. Using Immunohistochemistry, location and activation status of CD11c+DCs was assessed in mucosal airway biopsies. Results mDCs in BAL, but not in blood, from sarcoidosis patients were increased in number when compared with mDCs from healthy controls. mDCs purified from BAL of sarcoidosis patients induced T cell proliferation and differentiation and did not show diminished immune reactivity. Mo-DCs from patients induced increased TNFα release in co-cultures with naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells. Finally, immunohistochemical analyses revealed increased numbers of mature CD86+ DCs in granuloma-containing airway mucosal biopsies from sarcoidosis patients. Conclusion Taken together, these finding implicate increased local DC activation in granuloma formation or maintenance in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  9. Locally contacted rear surface passivated solar cells by inkjet printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiwpha, N.; Fangsuwannarak, T.; Sopitpan, S.

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet printing of photoresist material may provide a new route for low-cost fabrication of patterned oxide passivation layer of solar cells that require fine patterning and simple process. However, printing by liquid-based, environmentally friendly ink and printing device required development efforts aimed at achieving a fine patterning and long used inkjet nozzles under corrosive influence. This work was demonstrated a concept for grooved silicon oxide patterning for rear localized contact of p-n junction solar cells by chemical etching after photoresist patterning obtained. This article reviews the silicon dioxide fabrication on p-Si substrate from sol-gel technique for oxide passivation layer of solar cells. The aluminium was deposited on the patterned oxide layer and then heated at its Al-Si eutectic temperature. Finally, an aluminium-induced solid-phase epitaxial growth of p+ forming into the openings of the oxide passivation layer was presented. The sheet resistance of n-emitter layer, carrier life-time and surface recombination velocity values are investigated. Photoconductive measurements were performed on the prepared samples after each thermal process to measure the effective lifetime of the minority carriers. Carrier lifetime up to 60 microseconds has been measured on c-Si wafer passivated by the opened SiO2 layer. It was shown that the patterned SiO2 passivation has obtained high passivation quality making by the proposed inkjet printing method.

  10. Nucleolar localization of influenza A NS1: striking differences between mammalian and avian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazel-Sanchez Beryl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In mammalian cells, nucleolar localization of influenza A NS1 requires the presence of a C-terminal nucleolar localization signal. This nucleolar localization signal is present only in certain strains of influenza A viruses. Therefore, only certain NS1 accumulate in the nucleolus of mammalian cells. In contrast, we show that all NS1 tested in this study accumulated in the nucleolus of avian cells even in the absence of the above described C-terminal nucleolar localization signal. Thus, nucleolar localization of NS1 in avian cells appears to rely on a different nucleolar localization signal that is more conserved among influenza virus strains.

  11. Cancer cell uptake behavior of Au nanoring and its localized surface plasmon resonance induced cell inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au nanorings (NRIs), which have the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength around 1058 nm, either with or without linked antibodies, are applied to SAS oral cancer cells for cell inactivation through the LSPR-induced photothermal effect when they are illuminated by a laser of 1065 nm in wavelength. Different incubation times of cells with Au NRIs are considered for observing the variations of cell uptake efficiency of Au NRI and the threshold laser intensity for cell inactivation. In each case of incubation time, the cell sample is washed for evaluating the total Au NRI number per cell adsorbed and internalized by the cells based on inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement. Also, the Au NRIs remaining on cell membrane are etched with KI/I2 solution to evaluate the internalized Au NRI number per cell. The threshold laser intensities for cell inactivation before washout, after washout, and after KI/I2 etching are calibrated from the circular area sizes of inactivated cells around the illuminated laser spot center with various laser power levels. By using Au NRIs with antibodies, the internalized Au NRI number per cell increases monotonically with incubation time up to 24 h. However, the number of Au NRI remaining on cell membrane reaches a maximum at 12 h in incubation time. The cell uptake behavior of an Au NRI without antibodies is similar to that with antibodies except that the uptake NRI number is significantly smaller and the incubation time for the maximum NRI number remaining on cell membrane is delayed to 20 h. By comparing the threshold laser intensities before and after KI/I2 etching, it is found that the Au NRIs remaining on cell membrane cause more effective cancer cell inactivation, when compared with the internalized Au NRIs. (paper)

  12. Local pH tracking in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Chieh-Jui; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chu, Jia-Yin; Hung, Yann; Chen, Yi-Ping; Chien, Fan-Ching; Chou, Keng C; Chen, Peilin; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-03-01

    Continuous and simultaneous 3D single-particle movement and local pH detection in HeLa cells were demonstrated for the first time by combining fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) and a single-particle tracking (SPT) technique with a precision of ∼10 nm. FMSNs, synthesized by the co-condensation of both pH-sensitive and reference dyes with a silica/surfactant source, allow long-term reliable ratiometric pH measurements with a precision better than 0.3 pH unit because of their excellent brightness and stability. pH variation in the surrounding area of FMSNs during endocytosis was monitored in real-time. Acidification and low mobility of FMSNs were observed at the early endocytic stage, whereas basification and high mobility of FMSNs were observed at the late stage. Our results indicate that it is possible to monitor local pH changes in the environments surrounding nanoparticles during the cellular uptake process of FMSNs, which provides much needed information for designing an efficient drug delivery nanosystem. PMID:25672786

  13. Sensitivity of locally recurrent rat mammary tumour cell lines to syngeneic polymorphonuclear cell, macrophage and natural killer cell cytolysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Aeed, P. A.; Welch, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    Using a recently developed model for studying the biology of locally recurrent (LR) mammary tumours in the 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma system, we examined the sensitivity to polymorphonuclear cell, macrophage and natural killer cell cytolysis. The parental MTF7(T20) cell line; the 'primary' tumours which arose following subcutaneous inoculation into the mammary fat pad, sc1 and sc3; and the local recurrences (following surgical excision) LR1 and LR1a from sc1, and LR3 from sc3 were all...

  14. IL-1 & IL-6 in Bone: Local Translators in Cell-to-Cell Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Angky Soekanto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-1 (IL-1 and interleukin-6 (IL-6 which are produced in bone marrow cells and bone cells play an important roles as local mediators between cells in the bone microenvironment. These interleukin of osteotropic cytokines have important regulatory roles in many organ processes, such as embryogenesis, angiogenesis, tumorigenesis, wound healing, and immune responses. The major targets of these cytokines in the bone is progenitor cells, and in particular, hematopoietic precursors of osteoclasts, are strongly influenced by these cytokines. Proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts are modulated by IL-1 and IL-6 through autocrine and/or paracrine mechanisms. IL-1 and IL-6 both have the action on bone formation and resorption in normal and pathologic bone turnover. However, it seems almost impossible to clearly elucidate their roles. Further investigation are needed to give more information on the role of osteotropic cytokines in bone cell function that will advance bone research.

  15. Life cycle-dependent cytoskeletal modifications in Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Shi

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum infection of human erythrocytes is known to result in the modification of the host cell cytoskeleton by parasite-coded proteins. However, such modifications and corresponding implications in malaria pathogenesis have not been fully explored. Here, we probed the gradual modification of infected erythrocyte cytoskeleton with advancing stages of infection using atomic force microscopy (AFM. We reported a novel strategy to derive accurate and quantitative information on the knob structures and their connections with the spectrin network by performing AFM-based imaging analysis of the cytoplasmic surface of infected erythrocytes. Significant changes on the red cell cytoskeleton were observed from the expansion of spectrin network mesh size, extension of spectrin tetramers and the decrease of spectrin abundance with advancing stages of infection. The spectrin network appeared to aggregate around knobs but also appeared sparser at non-knob areas as the parasite matured. This dramatic modification of the erythrocyte skeleton during the advancing stage of malaria infection could contribute to the loss of deformability of the infected erythrocyte.

  16. The Response of Thermospheric Winds to Geomagnetic Storms and Its Solar Cycle Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Burns, A. G.; Qian, L.

    2014-12-01

    Thermospheric neutral wind circulation is set up as a result of a number of competing forcing processes. These include the pressure gradient, ion drag, Coriolis, momentum advection and viscosity forces. All of these forces change with varying solar radiation and geomagnetic activity. In this study we employ the thermosphere ionosphere electrodynamics global circulation model (TIEGCM) to elucidate the changes of thermospheric neutral winds with geomagnetic storms when a large amount of energy and momentum is deposited into the thermosphere at high latitudes. We will focus on the low and middle latitudes, where enhanced equatorward and westward winds are seen during the storms. The storm-time westward winds occur at all local times and are sustained well into the storm recovery phase. Diagnostic analysis on TIEGCM simulations suggests that momentum advection, ion drag and pressure gradient are the main drivers of these storm-time wind changes. The TIEGCM has also been run for different solar cycle conditions. Wind changes are smaller during solar maximum at low and middle latitudes. This is the result of higher neutral temperature and pressure gradient at low and middle latitudes in solar maximum, which limits the penetration of wind changes at high latitudes into low and middle latitudes.

  17. Crypt region localization of intestinal stem cells in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial lining plays a central role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients, but exists in a harsh luminal environment that necessitates continual renewal. This renewal process involves epithelial cell proliferation in the crypt base and later cell migration from the crypt base to the luminal surface. This process is dependent on multi-potent progenitor cells, or stem cells, located in each crypt. There are about 4 to 6 stem cells per crypt, and these stem cells are believed to generate distinct end-differentiated epithelial cell types, including absorptive cells, goblet cells, enteroendocrine cells and Paneth cells, while also maintaining their own progenitor cell state. Earlier studies suggested that intestinal stem cells were located either in the crypt base interspersed between the Paneth cells [i.e. Crypt base columnar (CBC) cell model] or at an average position of 4 cells from the crypt base [I.e. Label-retaining cells (LRC +4) model]. Recent studies have employed biomarkers in the in vivo mammalian state to more precisely evaluate the location of these progenitor cells in the intestinal crypt. Most notable of these novel markers are Lgr5, a gene that encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor with expression restricted to CBC cells, and Bmi 1, which encodes a chromatin remodeling protein expressed by LRC. These studies raise the possibility that there may be separate stem cell lines or different states of stem cell activation involved in the renewal of normal mammalian intestinal tract.

  18. PKCθ regulates T cell motility via ezrin-radixin-moesin localization to the uropod.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy L Cannon

    Full Text Available Cell motility is a fundamental process crucial for function in many cell types, including T cells. T cell motility is critical for T cell-mediated immune responses, including initiation, activation, and effector function. While many extracellular receptors and cytoskeletal regulators have been shown to control T cell migration, relatively few signaling mediators have been identified that can modulate T cell motility. In this study, we find a previously unknown role for PKCθ in regulating T cell migration to lymph nodes. PKCθ localizes to the migrating T cell uropod and regulates localization of the MTOC, CD43 and ERM proteins to the uropod. Furthermore, PKCθ-deficient T cells are less responsive to chemokine induced migration and are defective in migration to lymph nodes. Our results reveal a novel role for PKCθ in regulating T cell migration and demonstrate that PKCθ signals downstream of CCR7 to regulate protein localization and uropod formation.

  19. Local Pheromone Release from Dynamic Polarity Sites Underlies Cell-Cell Pairing during Yeast Mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Laura; Khalili, Bita; Bendezú, Felipe O; Hurwitz, Daniel; Vincenzetti, Vincent; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Martin, Sophie G

    2016-04-25

    Cell pairing is central for many processes, including immune defense, neuronal connection, hyphal fusion, and sexual reproduction. How does a cell orient toward a partner, especially when faced with multiple choices? Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe P and M cells, which respectively express P and M factor pheromones [1, 2], pair during the mating process induced by nitrogen starvation. Engagement of pheromone receptors Map3 and Mam2 [3, 4] with their cognate pheromone ligands leads to activation of the Gα protein Gpa1 to signal sexual differentiation [3, 5, 6]. Prior to cell pairing, the Cdc42 GTPase, a central regulator of cell polarization, forms dynamic zones of activity at the cell periphery at distinct locations over time [7]. Here we show that Cdc42-GTP polarization sites contain the M factor transporter Mam1, the general secretion machinery, which underlies P factor secretion, and Gpa1, suggesting that these are sub-cellular zones of pheromone secretion and signaling. Zone lifetimes scale with pheromone concentration. Computational simulations of pair formation through a fluctuating zone show that the combination of local pheromone release and sensing, short pheromone decay length, and pheromone-dependent zone stabilization leads to efficient pair formation. Consistently, pairing efficiency is reduced in the absence of the P factor protease. Similarly, zone stabilization at reduced pheromone levels, which occurs in the absence of the predicted GTPase-activating protein for Ras, leads to reduction in pairing efficiency. We propose that efficient cell pairing relies on fluctuating local signal emission and perception, which become locked into place through stimulation. PMID:27020743

  20. Integrin VLA-3: ultrastructural localization at cell-cell contact sites of human cell cultures

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    The integrin VLA-3 is a cell surface receptor, which binds to fibronectin, laminin, collagen type I and VI (Takada, Y., E. A. Wayner, W. G. Carter, and M. E. Hemler. 1988. J. Cell. Biochem. 37:385-393) and is highly expressed in substrate adherent cultures of almost all human cell types. The ligand specificity of VLA-3 and the inhibition of cell adhesion by anti-VLA-3 monoclonal antibodies suggest its involvement in cell-substrate interaction. In normal tissues, VLA-3 is restricted to few cel...

  1. Presence of intratumoral neutrophils is an independent prognostic factor in localized renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Krogh; Donskov, Frede; Marcussen, Niels; Nordsmark, Marianne; Lundbeck, Finn; von der Maase, Hans

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have previously demonstrated a significant negative impact of intratumoral neutrophils in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. This study assessed intratumoral neutrophils in localized clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study comprised 121 consecutive patients....... CONCLUSION: The presence of intratumoral neutrophils is a new, strong, independent prognostic factor for short recurrence-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival in localized clear cell RCC....... who had a nephrectomy for localized RCC. Biomarkers (intratumoral CD8+, CD57+ immune cells, CD66b+ neutrophils, and carbonic anhydrase IX [CA IX]) were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and the relationship with clinical and histopathologic features and patient outcome was evaluated. RESULTS: The...

  2. Retinoic acid, local cell-cell interactions, and pattern formation in vertebrate limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, S V; Gardiner, D M

    1992-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a derivative of vitamin A, has remarkable effects on developing and regenerating limbs. These effects include teratogenesis, arising from RA's ability to inhibit growth and pattern formation. They also include pattern duplication, arising as a result of the stimulation of additional growth and pattern formation. In this review we present evidence that the diverse effects of RA are consistent with a singular, underlying explanation. We propose that in all cases exogenously applied RA causes the positional information of pattern formation-competent cells to be reset to a value that is posterior-ventral-proximal with respect to the limb. The diversity of outcomes can be seen as a product of the mode of application of exogenous RA (global versus local) coupled with the unifying concept that growth and pattern formation in both limb development and limb regeneration are controlled by local cell-cell interactions, as formulated in the polar coordinate model. We explore the possibility that the major role of endogenous RA in limb development is in the establishment of the limb field rather than as a diffusible morphogen that specifies graded positional information across the limb as previously proposed. Finally, we interpret the results of the recent finding that RA can turn tail regenerates into limbs, as evidence that intercalary interactions may also be involved in the formation of the primary body axis. PMID:1628749

  3. Localization of thymosin ß10 in breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mælan, A.ase Elisabeth; Rasmussen, Trine Kring; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2007-01-01

    cell motility and spreading. We have studied the distribution of endogenously expressed thymosin ß10 in cultured human breast cancer cell lines. Both unperturbed monolayer cultures and wound-healing models were examined using double-staining for thymosin ß10 and polymerized (F-) actin. Our findings...... show that thymosin ß10 is expressed in all three-cancer cell lines (SK-BR-3, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) studied. No or little staining was detected in confluent cells, whereas strong staining occurred in semiconfluent cells and in cells populating monolayer wounds. Importantly, the distribution of staining...... for thymosin ß10 was inverse of staining for F-actin. These data support a physiological role for thymosin ß10 in sequestration of G-actin as well as in cancer cell motility....

  4. Sex and estrous cycle-dependent rapid protein kinase signaling actions of estrogen in distal colonic cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Mahony, Fiona

    2008-10-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated that 17beta-estradiol (E2) rapidly inhibits Cl(-) secretion in rat and human distal colonic epithelium. The inhibition has been shown to occur via targeting of a basolateral K(+) channel identified as the KCNQ1 (KvLQT1) channel. E2 indirectly modulates the channel activity via a cascade of second messengers which are rapidly phosphorylated in response to E2. The anti-secretory mechanism may be the manner by which E2 induces fluid retention in the intestine during periods of high circulating plasma E2. Here we review the sex-dependent and estrous cycle regulation of this novel rapid response to E2. The inhibition of KCNQ1 channel activity and Cl(-) secretion will be of interest in the future in the investigation of the retentive effects of estrogen in female tissue and also in the study of secretory disorders and drugable targets of the intestine.

  5. A new epigenetic marker: The replication-coupled, cell cycle-dependent, dual modification of the histone H4 tail

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fidlerová, Helena; Kalinová, Jana; Blechová, Miroslava; Velek, Jiří; Raška, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 167, č. 1 (2009), s. 76-82. ISSN 1047-8477 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/06/1691 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : epigenetics * H4K16 * H4K20 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.673, year: 2009

  6. From Global Stresses to Local Cell Packing During Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubensky, David

    2011-03-01

    To perform their functions, cells in epithelial tissues must often adopt highly regular packings. It is still not fully understood how these ordered arrangements of cells arise from disordered, proliferative epithelia during development. I will use experimental and theoretical studies on an attractive model system, the cone cell mosaic in fish retina, to illustrate some ways that mechanical forces and cell signaling can interact to produce this transformation. Experiments examining the response to surgical lesions suggest that the correct mechanical environment at the tissue scale is essential to induce cone cells to rearrange into a rectangular lattice. Starting from this observation, I will argue that large-scale mechanical stresses naturally couple to and orient cell polarization and that this coupling can lead cells to line up in regular rows, as observed in the fish retina. This model predicts that cells in the rows will adopt characteristic trapezoidal shapes and that fragments of rows will persist even in tissue where the mosaic pattern is disrupted by lesions; these predictions are borne out by an analysis of cell packings at the level of the zonula occludens in wildtype and lesioned retinas. Supported by NSF grant IOS-0952873.

  7. LOCAL IN-SITU ANALYSIS OF PEM FUEL CELLS BY IMPEDANCE SPECTROSCOPY AND RAMAN MEASUREMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Gülzow, Erich; Schulze, Mathias; Friedrich, Andreas; Fischer, Peter; Bettermann, Hans

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of the processes inside of low temperature fuel cells on a local scale is required for an effective improvement strategy. For this purpose in situ Raman spectroscopy and local impedance spectroscopy is being developed. The contribution describes the modifications to the cell, and installations of additional devices and the experimental detection systems for integrating both methods into a single cell set up. First results to verify the combined results were carried out and ar...

  8. A genetic screen for asymmetrically localized RNAs in Drosophila tracheal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Jayan Nandanan

    2008-01-01

    Asymmetrical localization of mRNAs and localized protein synthesis have an important role in establishing and maintaining polarity in cells such as neurons or the Drosophila oocyte and in the regulation of developmental plasticity. In Drosophila a subset of highly branched cells of the respiratory system exhibits both a high degree of polarity and developmental plasticity. These tracheal cells respond to the need for oxygen in the surrounding tissue by outgrowth of branches, often at sites ve...

  9. Giant germ cell tumor with mediastinal localization: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Meteroğlu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Germ celled tumors frequently localize in anterior mediastinum.In this study we presented two germ cell tumors with different localization and huge size. We discussed two cases with germ cell tumors operated in our clinic togetherwith literature findings. Chest x-ray, computerized tomography (CT and transthorasic tru-cut biopsy were used for diagnosis. The huge intratorasic teratomas are rarely seen and surgical full resection is the most importantfactor in survival.

  10. Local calcium elevation and cell elongation initiate guided motility in electrically stimulated osteoblast-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdan Ozkucur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Investigation of the mechanisms of guided cell migration can contribute to our understanding of many crucial biological processes, such as development and regeneration. Endogenous and exogenous direct current electric fields (dcEF are known to induce directional cell migration, however the initial cellular responses to electrical stimulation are poorly understood. Ion fluxes, besides regulating intracellular homeostasis, have been implicated in many biological events, including regeneration. Therefore understanding intracellular ion kinetics during EF-directed cell migration can provide useful information for development and regeneration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed the initial events during migration of two osteogenic cell types, rat calvarial and human SaOS-2 cells, exposed to strong (10-15 V/cm and weak (< or = 5 V/cm dcEFs. Cell elongation and perpendicular orientation to the EF vector occurred in a time- and voltage-dependent manner. Calvarial osteoblasts migrated to the cathode as they formed new filopodia or lamellipodia and reorganized their cytoskeleton on the cathodal side. SaOS-2 cells showed similar responses except towards the anode. Strong dcEFs triggered a rapid increase in intracellular calcium levels, whereas a steady state level of intracellular calcium was observed in weaker fields. Interestingly, we found that dcEF-induced intracellular calcium elevation was initiated with a local rise on opposite sides in calvarial and SaOS-2 cells, which may explain their preferred directionality. In calcium-free conditions, dcEFs induced neither intracellular calcium elevation nor directed migration, indicating an important role for calcium ions. Blocking studies using cadmium chloride revealed that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs are involved in dcEF-induced intracellular calcium elevation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these data form a time scale of the morphological and physiological

  11. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  12. Cell-specific localization of alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus stem tissue measured with Imaging MS and Single-cell MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kotaro; Takahashi, Katsutoshi; Mizuno, Hajime; Anegawa, Aya; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Ohnishi, Miwa; Yamazaki, Mami; Masujima, Tsutomu; Mimura, Tetsuro

    2016-04-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don is a medicinal plant well known for producing antitumor drugs such as vinblastine and vincristine, which are classified as terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs). The TIA metabolic pathway in C. roseus has been extensively studied. However, the localization of TIA intermediates at the cellular level has not been demonstrated directly. In the present study, the metabolic pathway of TIA in C. roseus was studied with two forefront metabolomic techniques, that is, Imaging mass spectrometry (MS) and live Single-cell MS, to elucidate cell-specific TIA localization in the stem tissue. Imaging MS indicated that most TIAs localize in the idioblast and laticifer cells, which emit blue fluorescence under UV excitation. Single-cell MS was applied to four different kinds of cells [idioblast (specialized parenchyma cell), laticifer, parenchyma, and epidermal cells] in the stem longitudinal section. Principal component analysis of Imaging MS and Single-cell MS spectra of these cells showed that similar alkaloids accumulate in both idioblast cell and laticifer cell. From MS/MS analysis of Single-cell MS spectra, catharanthine, ajmalicine, and strictosidine were found in both cell types in C. roseus stem tissue, where serpentine was also accumulated. Based on these data, we discuss the significance of TIA synthesis and accumulation in the idioblast and laticifer cells of C. roseus stem tissue. PMID:27001858

  13. Localization of adenovirus DNA replication in KB cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlak, J.M.; Rozijn, Th.H.; Spies, F.

    1975-01-01

    The localization of adenovirus type 5 DNA replication has been investigated by both fractionation of isolated nuclei and electron-microscope autoradiography. Nuclear fractionation by means of the M-band-technique of Tremblay et al. (Tremblay, G. Y., Daniels, M. J., and Schaechter, M. (1969). J. Mol.

  14. Coupling of protein localization and cell movements by a dynamically localized response regulator in Myxococcus xanthus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonardy, Simone; Freymark, Gerald; Hebener, Sabrina;

    2007-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus cells harbor two motility machineries, type IV pili (Tfp) and the A-engine. During reversals, the two machineries switch polarity synchronously. We present a mechanism that synchronizes this polarity switching. We identify the required for motility response regulator (RomR) as ...

  15. Surface localization of the nuclear receptor CAR in influenza A virus-infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constitutive active/androstane receptor CAR is a member of the nuclear receptors which regulate transcription of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. CAR is usually localized in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that CAR was localized at the cell surface of influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that expression of a viral envelope glycoprotein, either hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA), but not viral nucleoprotein (NP), was responsible for this localization. This report is the first demonstration of CAR at the surface of tissue culture cells, and suggests that CAR may exert the IAV infection mechanism

  16. Immunohistochemical localization of glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide on rat endocrine pancreas: coexistence in rat islet cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YH Huang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We used immunofluorescence double staining method to investigate the cellular localization of glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide (PP in rat pancreatic islets. The results showed that both A-cells (glucagon-secreting cells and PP-cells (PPsecreting cells were located in the periphery of the islets. However, A-cells and PP-cells had a different regional distribution. Most of A-cells were located in the splenic lobe but a few of them were in the duodenal lobe of the pancreas. In contrast, the majority of PP-cells were found in the duodenal lobe and a few of them were in the splenic lobe of the pancreas. Furthermore, we found that 67.74% A-cells had PP immunoreactivity, 70.92% PP-cells contained glucagon immunoreactivity with immunofluorescence double staining. Our data support the concept of a common precursor stem cell for pancreatic hormone-producing cells.

  17. Local viscoelasticity of living cells measured by rotational magnetic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berret, J.-F.

    2016-01-01

    When submitted to a magnetic field, micron-size wires with superparamagnetic properties behave as embedded rheometers and represent interesting sensors for microrheology. Here we use rotational magnetic spectroscopy to measure the shear viscosity of the cytoplasm of living cells. We address the question of whether the cytoplasm is a viscoelastic liquid or an elastic gel. The main result of the study is the observation of a rotational instability between a synchronous and an asynchronous regime of rotation, found for murine fibroblasts and human cancer cells. For wires of susceptibility 3.6, the transition occurs in the range 0.01-1 rad s-1. The determination of the shear viscosity (10-100 Pa s) and elastic modulus (5-20 Pa) confirms the viscoelastic character of the cytoplasm. In contrast to earlier studies, it is concluded that the interior of living cells can be described as a viscoelastic liquid, and not as an elastic gel.

  18. ANF and exocrine pancreas: ultrastructural autoradiographic localization in acinar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) binding sites have been recently demonstrated to be present in exocrine pancreas by an in vitro autoradiographic approach. An autoradiographic study was carried out to identify the exocrine cells containing ANF binding sites and to monitor the fate of 125I-labeled ANF in acinar cells after removal of pancreas at specific time intervals (1-30 min) after intravenous administration. At the light microscopic level, silver grains were found over acinar and centroacinar cells. Concomitant injection of an excess of unlabeled ANF inhibited the binding of labeled peptide by approximately 60%. At the electron microscopic level, the time-course study in acinar cells has revealed that of the cell compartments examined, plasma membrane, Golgi apparatus, mitochondria, and zymogen granules, the nucleus had distinct labeling patterns. Plasma membrane was maximally labeled 1 and 2 min after injection with 125I-ANF. Golgi apparatus was significantly labeled from 2 to 30 min after injection, mitochondria from 1 to 30 min after injection, zymogen granules at 1 and 15 min, and the nucleus only at 30 min. The lysosomal compartment was not labeled during the 30-min observation period. These results suggest that after binding to the plasma membrane, ANF is rapidly internalized and distributed to the intracellular organelles as a function of time. Labeling of the zymogen granules suggests that they may bind ANF and that the atrial peptide may be secreted by acinar cells. The significance of association of radioactivity with mitochondria and nuclei remains to be elucidated but may represent intracellular sites of action of ANF complementary to those on plasma membranes

  19. Alterations in Kainate Receptor and TRPM1 Localization in Bipolar Cells after Retinal Photoreceptor Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Gayet-Primo, Jacqueline; Puthussery, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptor degeneration differentially impacts glutamatergic signaling in downstream On and Off bipolar cells. In rodent models, photoreceptor degeneration leads to loss of glutamatergic signaling in On bipolar cells, whereas Off bipolar cells appear to retain glutamate sensitivity, even after extensive photoreceptor loss. The localization and identity of the receptors that mediate these residual glutamate responses in Off bipolar cells have not been determined. Recent studies show that ma...

  20. Alterations in kainate receptor and TRPM1 localization in bipolar cells after retinal photoreceptor degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqueline eGayet-Primo; Theresa ePuthussery

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptor degeneration differentially impacts glutamatergic signaling in downstream On and Off bipolar cells. In rodent models, photoreceptor degeneration leads to loss of glutamatergic signaling in On bipolar cells, whereas Off bipolar cells appear to retain glutamate sensitivity, even after extensive photoreceptor loss. The localization and identity of the receptors that mediate these residual glutamate responses in Off bipolar cells have not been determined. Recent studies show that ma...

  1. Treatment Advances in Locally Advanced and Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Surmont, Veerle

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and Europe. Approximately 85% of the patients with lung cancer have non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which can be classified into squamous, adeno, large cell and not otherwise specified (NOS) histologies. The most common histologies are: adenocarcinoma ( 50%), squamous cell ( 20%), and large cell ( 10%). More than two third of the patients have locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of diagnos...

  2. Localized giant cell tumors in the spinal column radiologic presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given the uncommonness of the location of giant cell tumors (GCT) in the spinal column and the limited number of studies published, we present a case of GCT located in the spinal column, which involved both vertebral bodies and partially destroyed the adjacent rib. (Author)

  3. Cystic local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy in a hemodialysis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kazuyo; Takagi, Toshio; Kondo, Tsunenori; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Iizuka, Junpei; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Tomita, Eri; Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2014-03-01

    Although local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy is sometimes reported, cystic local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 59-year-old man with hemodialysis who developed cystic local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma accompanied by acquired cystic disease of the kidney in the retroperitoneal space after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy. A cystic tumor of 5.1 cm in diameter occurred in the left retroperitoneal space 15 months after left laparoscopic radical nephrectomy, and enlarged to 7.2 cm in diameter with enhanced mass along the wall of the cyst 36 months after surgery. The cystic tumor was removed and showed local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma on pathological examination. PMID:23909823

  4. Identification, localization and morphology of APUD cells in gastroenteropancreatic system of stomach-containing teleosts

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Qian Sheng; Fang, Zhi Ping; Huang, Feng Jie

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To identify the type localization and morphology of APUD endocrine cells in the gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) system of stomach-containing teleosts, and study APUD endocrine system in the stomach, intestine and pancreas of fish species.

  5. Is the surface area of the red cell membrane skeleton locally conserved?

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, T M

    1992-01-01

    The incompressibility of the lipid bilayer keeps the total surface area of the red cell membrane constant. Local conservation of membrane surface area requires that each surface element of the membrane skeleton keeps its area when its aspect ratio is changed. A change in area would require a flow of lipids past the intrinsic proteins to which the skeleton is anchored. in fast red cell deformations, there is no time for such a flow. Consequently, the bilayer provides for local area conservatio...

  6. Surgical Management of Local Recurrences of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Ömer; Şanlı, Öner

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection either in the form of radical nephrectomy or in the form of partial nephrectomy represents the mainstay options in the treatment of kidney cancer. In most instances, resecting the tumor bearing kidney or the tumor itself provides durable cancer specific survival rates. However, recurrences may rarely develop in the renal fossa or remnant kidney. Despite its rarity, locally recurrent RCC is a challenging condition in terms of the possible management options and relatively poor prognosis. If technically feasible, wide surgical excision and ensuring negative surgical margins are the most effective treatment options. Repeat surgeries (completion nephrectomy, excision of locally recurrent tumor, or repeat partial nephrectomy) may often be complicated, and perioperative morbidity is a major concern. Open approach has been extensively applied in this context and 5-year cancer specific survival rates have been reported to be around 50%. The roles of minimally invasive surgical options (laparoscopic and robotic approach) and nonsurgical alternatives (cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation) have yet to be described. In selected patients, surgical resection may have to be complemented with (neo)adjuvant radiotherapy or medical treatment. PMID:26925458

  7. Surgical Management of Local Recurrences of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Acar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical resection either in the form of radical nephrectomy or in the form of partial nephrectomy represents the mainstay options in the treatment of kidney cancer. In most instances, resecting the tumor bearing kidney or the tumor itself provides durable cancer specific survival rates. However, recurrences may rarely develop in the renal fossa or remnant kidney. Despite its rarity, locally recurrent RCC is a challenging condition in terms of the possible management options and relatively poor prognosis. If technically feasible, wide surgical excision and ensuring negative surgical margins are the most effective treatment options. Repeat surgeries (completion nephrectomy, excision of locally recurrent tumor, or repeat partial nephrectomy may often be complicated, and perioperative morbidity is a major concern. Open approach has been extensively applied in this context and 5-year cancer specific survival rates have been reported to be around 50%. The roles of minimally invasive surgical options (laparoscopic and robotic approach and nonsurgical alternatives (cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation have yet to be described. In selected patients, surgical resection may have to be complemented with (neoadjuvant radiotherapy or medical treatment.

  8. Probabilistic mapping and image clustering for quantitative assessment of fluorescent protein localizations in Arabidopsis guard cells

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Takumi Higaki, Natsumaro Kutsuna & Seiichiro Hasezawa ### Abstract The protocol reported here describes a method to quantitatively evaluate fluorescently-tagged protein localizations from fluorescent microscopic images with a combination of probabilistic mapping and image clustering. We demonstrate the use of this protocol using kidney-shaped guard cells of plants. ### Introduction Microscopic assessment of protein localizations with fluorescent protein taggin...

  9. Spatial localization of ryanodine receptors in human cardiac cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallmitjana, A; Nolla, C; Herraiz-Martínez, A; Hove-Madsen, L; Benítez, R

    2015-08-01

    We present a novel image processing method to determine the location of ryanodine receptors in cardiac cells. A semi-automatic manual validation by an expert has been used in order to establish the performance of the segmentation method. The approach provides high accuracy under different experimental conditions and it is robust to common sources of noise including experimental, molecular and biological fluctuations. PMID:26737732

  10. Self-assembled mannan nanogel : cytocompatibility and cell localization

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Sílvia A.; Carvalho, Vera; Vilanova, Manuel; Costa, Carla Isabel; Teixeira, João P.; Gama, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Amphiphilic mannan, produced by the Michael addition of hydrophobic 1-hexadecanethiol to vinyl methacrylated mannan, self-assembles in aqueous medium through hydrophobic interactions among alkyl chains. Resultant nanogel is stable, spherical, polydisperse, with 50–140 nm mean hydrodynamic diameter depending on the polymer degree of substitution, and nearly neutral negative surface charge. No cytotoxicity of mannan nanogel is detected up to about 0.4 mg/mL in mouse embryo fibroblast cell line ...

  11. "Cell therapy for stroke: use of local astrocytes"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek eChouchane

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Stroke refers to a variety of conditions caused by the occlusion or hemorrhage of blood vessels supplying the brain, which is one of the main causes of death and the leading cause of disability worldwide. In the last years, cell-based therapies have been proposed as a new approach to ameliorate post stroke deficits. However, the most appropriate type of cell to be used in such therapies, as well as their sources, remains a matter of intense research. A good candidate cell should, in principle, display high plasticity to generate diverse types of neurons and, at the same type, low risk to cause undesired outcomes, such as malignant transformation. Recently, a new approach grounded on the reprogramming of endogenous astrocytes towards neuronal fates emerged as an alternative to restore neurological functions in several central nervous system diseases. In this perspective, we review data about the potential of astrocytes to become functional neurons following expression of neurogenic genes and discuss the potential benefits and risks of reprogramming astrocytes in the glial scar to replace neurons lost after stroke.

  12. Combined local current distribution measurements and high resolution neutron radiography of operating direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Alexander; Wippermann, Klaus [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Energy Research, IEF-3: Fuel Cells; Sanders, Tilman [RWTH Aachen (DE). Inst. for Power Electronics and Electrical Drives (ISEA); Arlt, Tobias [Helmholtz Centre Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials

    2010-07-01

    Neutron radiography allows the investigation of the local fluid distribution in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) under operating conditions. Spatial resolutions in the order of some tens of micrometers at the full test cell area are achieved. This offers the possibility to study practice-oriented, large stack cells with an active area of several hundred cm{sup 2} as well as specially designed, small test cells with an area of some cm{sup 2}. Combined studies of high resolution neutron radiography and segmented cell measurements are especially valuable, because they enable a correlation of local fluid distribution and local performance [1, 2]. The knowledge of this interdependency is essential to optimise the water management and performance respecting a homogeneous fluid, current and temperature distribution and to achieve high performance and durability of DMFCs. (orig.)

  13. Regulation of CD8+ T cell responses to retinal antigen by local FoxP3+ regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W McPherson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available While pathogenic CD4 T cells are well known mediators of autoimmune uveoretinitis, CD8 T cells can also be uveitogenic. Since preliminary studies indicated that C57BL/6 mice were minimally susceptible to autoimmune uveoretinitis induction by CD8 T cells, the basis of the retinal disease resistance was sought. Mice that express β-galactosidase (βgal on a retina-specific promoter (arrβgal mice were backcrossed to mice expressing green fluorescent protein and diphtheria toxin receptor under control of the Foxp3 promoter (Foxp3-DTR/GFP mice, and to T cell receptor transgenic mice that produce βgal specific CD8 T cells (BG1 mice. These mice were used to explore the role of regulatory T cells in the resistance to retinal autoimmune disease. Experiments with T cells from double transgenic BG1 x Foxp3-DTR/GFP mice transferred into Foxp3-DTR/GFP x arrβgal mice confirmed that the retina was well protected from attempts to induce disease by adoptive transfer of activated BG1 T cells. The successful induction of retinal disease following unilateral intraocular administration of diphtheria toxin to deplete regulatory T cells showed that the protective activity was dependent on local, toxin-sensitive regulatory T cells; the opposite, untreated eye remained disease-free. Although there were very few Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the parenchyma of quiescent retina, and they did not accumulate in retina, their depletion by local toxin administration led to disease susceptibility. We propose that these regulatory T cells modulate the pathogenic activity of βgal-specific CD8 T cells in the retinas of arrβgal mice on a local basis, allowing immunoregulation to be responsive to local conditions.

  14. Protein subcellular localization in human and hamster cell lines: employing local ternary patterns of fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Muhammad; Khan, Asifullah; Kaya, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    Discriminative feature extraction technique is always required for the development of accurate and efficient prediction systems for protein subcellular localization so that effective drugs can be developed. In this work, we showed that Local Ternary Patterns (LTPs) effectively exploit small variations in pixel intensities; present in fluorescence microscopy based protein images of human and hamster cell lines. Further, Synthetic Minority Oversampling Technique is applied to balance the feature space for the classification stage. We observed that LTPs coupled with data balancing technique could enable a classifier, in this case support vector machine, to yield good performance. The proposed ensemble based prediction system, using 10-fold cross-validation, has yielded better performance compared to existing techniques in predicting various subcellular compartments for both 2D HeLa and CHO datasets. The proposed predictor is available online at: http://111.68.99.218/Protein_SubLoc/, which is freely accessible to the public. PMID:23988793

  15. The subcellular localization of IGFBP5 affects its cell growth and migration functions in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahin Aysegul

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 (IGFBP5 has been shown to be associated with breast cancer metastasis in clinical marker studies. However, a major difficulty in understanding how IGFBP5 functions in this capacity is the paradoxical observation that ectopic overexpression of IGFBP5 in breast cancer cell lines results in suppressed cellular proliferation. In cancer tissues, IGFBP5 resides mainly in the cytoplasm; however, in transfected cells, IGFBP5 is mainly located in the nucleus. We hypothesized that subcellular localization of IGFBP5 affects its functions in host cells. Methods To test this hypothesis, we generated wild-type and mutant IGFBP5 expression constructs. The mutation occurs within the nuclear localization sequence (NLS of the protein and is generated by site-directed mutagenesis using the wild-type IGFBP5 expression construct as a template. Next, we transfected each expression construct into MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells to establish stable clones overexpressing either wild-type or mutant IGFBP5. Results Functional analysis revealed that cells overexpressing wild-type IGFBP5 had significantly lower cell growth rate and motility than the vector-transfected cells, whereas cells overexpressing mutant IGFBP5 demonstrated a significantly higher ability to proliferate and migrate. To illustrate the subcellular localization of the proteins, we generated wild-type and mutant IGFBP5-pDsRed fluorescence fusion constructs. Fluorescence microscopy imaging revealed that mutation of the NLS in IGFBP5 switched the accumulation of IGFBP5 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of the protein. Conclusion Together, these findings imply that the mutant form of IGFBP5 increases proliferation and motility of breast cancer cells and that mutation of the NLS in IGFBP5 results in localization of IGFBP5 in the cytoplasm, suggesting that subcellular localization of IGFBP5 affects its cell growth and migration functions in the

  16. Persistence of disseminated tumor cells after neoadjuvant treatment for locally advanced breast cancer predicts poor survival

    OpenAIRE

    Mathiesen, Randi R.; Borgen, Elin; Renolen, Anne; Løkkevik, Erik; Nesland, Jahn M; Anker, Gun; Østenstad, Bjørn; Lundgren, Steinar; Risberg, Terje; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Lønning, Per E.; Naume, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Presence of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow (BM) and circulating tumor cells (CTC) in peripheral blood (PB) predicts reduced survival in early breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of and alterations in DTC- and CTC-status in locally advanced breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and to evaluate their prognostic impact. Methods ...

  17. Localized Pleural Metastases of Renal Cell Carcinoma After Nephrectomy: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Yuichiro; Tobino, Kazunori; Ko, Yuki; Asaji, Mina; Yamaji, Yoshikazu; Tsuruno, Kosuke; Mukasa, Yosuke; Ebi, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 61-year-old Japanese male with localized pleural metastases of renal cell carcinoma. The patient was admitted to our hospital because of dyspnea on exertion and left-sided pleural effusion. He had undergone right radical nephrectomy 10 years previously. Contrast-enhanced whole-body computed tomography revealed scattered nodular thickening of the left pleura with contrast enhancement and left-sided pleural effusion. Thoracoscopy performed under local anesthesia was applied to obtain a biopsy of the pleural nodules, and the specimen was consequently diagnosed as exhibiting pleural metastasis of renal cell carcinoma, clear cell type. PMID:26705014

  18. Mitochondrial localization of the low level p53 protein in proliferative cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    p53 protein plays a central role in suppressing tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Emerging publications suggest that following stress, a fraction of p53 translocates to mitochondria to induce cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the localization of p53 under unstressed conditions remains largely unexplored. Here we show that p53 is localized at mitochondria in absence of apoptotic stimuli, when cells are proliferating, localization observed in various cell types (rodent and human). This is also supported by acellular assays in which p53 bind strongly to mitochondria isolated from rat liver. Furthermore, the mitochondria subfractionation study and the alkaline treatment of the mitochondrial p53 revealed that the majority of mitochondrial p53 is present in the membranous compartments. Finally, we identified VDAC, a protein of the mitochondrial outer-membrane, as a putative partner of p53 in unstressed/proliferative cells.

  19. Localization of vitamin A-storing cell in mouse uterus. A radioautographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Localization of vitamin A in mouse uterus was studied with both light and electron microscopic radioautography after oral administration of tritiated vitamin A. Radioactivity was detected in the lipid droplets of particular cells in the connective tissue space of the uterus. The cells showed morphological features common to the vitamin A-storing cells in other organs, and in addition, the intimate relationship with collagenous fibrils was noticed. The distribution of the cells was most numerous in the subserosal space and decreased towards luminal side. The functional significance of these cells in uterus was still uncertain

  20. Tuning nano electric field to affect restrictive membrane area on localized single cell nano-electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Tuhin Subhra; Wang, Pen-Cheng; Chang, Hwan-You; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2013-12-01

    Interaction of electric field with biological cells is an important phenomenon for field induced drug delivery system. We demonstrate a selective and localized single cell nano-electroporation (LSCNEP) by applying an intense electric field on a submicron region of the single cell membrane, which can effectively allow high efficient molecular delivery but low cell damage. The delivery rate is controlled by adjusting transmembrane potential and manipulating membrane status. Thermal and ionic influences are deteriorated from the cell membrane by dielectric passivation. Either reversible or irreversible by LSCNEP can fully controlled with potential applications in medical diagnostics and biological studies.

  1. Localization of Cell Division Protein FtsQ by Immunofluorescence Microscopy in Dividing and Nondividing Cells of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddelmeijer, Nienke; Aarsman, Mirjam E. G.; Kolk, Arend H. J.; Vicente, Miguel; Nanninga, Nanne

    1998-01-01

    The localization of cell division protein FtsQ in Escherichia coli wild-type cells was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy with specific monoclonal antibodies. FtsQ could be localized to the division site in constricting cells. FtsQ could also localize to the division site in ftsQ1(Ts) cells grown at the permissive temperature. A hybrid protein in which the cytoplasmic domain and the transmembrane domain were derived from the γ form of penicillin-binding protein 1B and the periplasmic domain was derived from FtsQ was also able to localize to the division site. This result indicates that the periplasmic domain of FtsQ determines the localization of FtsQ, as has also been concluded by others for the periplasmic domain of FtsN. Noncentral FtsQ foci were found in the area of the cell where the nucleoid resides and were therefore assumed to represent sites where the FtsQ protein is synthesized and simultaneously inserted into the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:9829918

  2. Cell-intrinsic adaptation of lipid composition to local crowding drives social behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frechin, Mathieu; Stoeger, Thomas; Daetwyler, Stephan; Gehin, Charlotte; Battich, Nico; Damm, Eva-Maria; Stergiou, Lilli; Riezman, Howard; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2015-07-01

    Cells sense the context in which they grow to adapt their phenotype and allow multicellular patterning by mechanisms of autocrine and paracrine signalling. However, patterns also form in cell populations exposed to the same signalling molecules and substratum, which often correlate with specific features of the population context of single cells, such as local cell crowding. Here we reveal a cell-intrinsic molecular mechanism that allows multicellular patterning without requiring specific communication between cells. It acts by sensing the local crowding of a single cell through its ability to spread and activate focal adhesion kinase (FAK, also known as PTK2), resulting in adaptation of genes controlling membrane homeostasis. In cells experiencing low crowding, FAK suppresses transcription of the ABC transporter A1 (ABCA1) by inhibiting FOXO3 and TAL1. Agent-based computational modelling and experimental confirmation identified membrane-based signalling and feedback control as crucial for the emergence of population patterns of ABCA1 expression, which adapts membrane lipid composition to cell crowding and affects multiple signalling activities, including the suppression of ABCA1 expression itself. The simple design of this cell-intrinsic system and its broad impact on the signalling state of mammalian single cells suggests a fundamental role for a tunable membrane lipid composition in collective cell behaviour. PMID:26009010

  3. Mechanical Coupling of Smooth Muscle Cells Using Microengineered Substrates and Local Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Craig; Hunter, David; Tung, Leslie; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Mechanical stresses directly affect many cellular processes, including signal transduction, growth, differentiation, and survival. Cells can themselves generate such stresses by activating myosin to contract the actin cytoskeleton, which in turn can regulate both cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions. We are studying mechanical forces at cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions using arrays of selectively patterned flexible PDMS microposts combined with the ability to apply local chemical stimulation. Micropipette ``spritzing'', a laminar flow technique, uses glass micropipettes mounted on a microscope stage to deliver drugs to controlled regions within a cellular construct while cell traction forces are recorded via the micropost array. The pipettes are controlled by micromanipulators allowing for rapid and precise movement across the array and the ability to treat multiple constructs within a sample. This technique allows for observing the propagation of a chemically induced mechanical stimulus through cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. We have used this system to administer the acto-myosin inhibitors Blebbistatin and Y-27632 to single cells and observed the subsequent decrease in cell traction forces. Experiments using trypsin-EDTA have shown this system to be capable of single cell manipulation through removal of one cell within a pair configuration while leaving the other cell unaffected. This project is supported in part by NIH grant HL090747

  4. Determinates of tumor response to radiation: Tumor cells, tumor stroma and permanent local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The causes of tumor response variation to radiation remain obscure, thus hampering the development of predictive assays and strategies to decrease resistance. The present study evaluates the impact of host tumor stromal elements and the in vivo environment on tumor cell kill, and relationship between tumor cell radiosensitivity and the tumor control dose. Material and methods: Five endpoints were evaluated and compared in a radiosensitive DNA double-strand break repair-defective (DNA-PKcs−/−) tumor line, and its DNA-PKcs repair competent transfected counterpart. In vitro colony formation assays were performed on in vitro cultured cells, on cells obtained directly from tumors, and on cells irradiated in situ. Permanent local control was assessed by the TCD50 assay. Vascular effects were evaluated by functional vascular density assays. Results: The fraction of repair competent and repair deficient tumor cells surviving radiation did not substantially differ whether irradiated in vitro, i.e., in the absence of host stromal elements and factors, from the fraction of cells killed following in vivo irradiation. Additionally, the altered tumor cell sensitivity resulted in a proportional change in the dose required to achieve permanent local control. The estimated number of tumor cells per tumor, their cloning efficiency and radiosensitivity, all assessed by in vitro assays, were used to predict successfully, the measured tumor control doses. Conclusion: The number of clonogens per tumor and their radiosensitivity govern the permanent local control dose

  5. Transcription factor co-localization patterns affect human cell type-specific gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dennis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular development requires the precise control of gene expression states. Transcription factors are involved in this regulatory process through their combinatorial binding with DNA. Information about transcription factor binding sites can help determine which combinations of factors work together to regulate a gene, but it is unclear how far the binding data from one cell type can inform about regulation in other cell types. Results By integrating data on co-localized transcription factor binding sites in the K562 cell line with expression data across 38 distinct hematopoietic cell types, we developed regression models to describe the relationship between the expression of target genes and the transcription factors that co-localize nearby. With K562 binding sites identifying the predictors, the proportion of expression explained by the models is statistically significant only for monocytic cells (p-valueFOS, TAF1 and YY1 to a sparsely studied gene LRIG2. We also find that the activity of a transcription factor may be different depending on the cell type and the identity of other co-localized factors. Conclusion Our approach shows that gene expression can be explained by a modest number of co-localized transcription factors, however, information on cell-type specific binding is crucial for understanding combinatorial gene regulation.

  6. A Putative NES Mediates Cytoplasmic Localization of Apoptin in Normal Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Ming WANG; Guo-Cai FAN; Ji-Zhong CHEN; Hui-Peng CHEN; Fu-Chu HE

    2004-01-01

    Apoptin, a protein expressed by chicken anemia virus, is found predominantly in the cytoplasm in normal cells, whereas it localizes in the nucleus in transformed and malignant cells. However, the mechanisms that regulate the different subcellular localization of Apoptin in normal and tumor cells have not been fully clarified. In this work, a putative nuclear export signal (NES) in Apoptin was predicted. It was testified that the putative NES (pNES) of Apoptin was not a functional NES, but actually acted as a cytoplasmic retention signal. Deletion of the pNES led to the nuclear accumulation of Apoptin in normal cells. In addition,when a strong nuclear localization signal was introduced into Apoptin, it exclusively translocated to the nucleus in normal cells. These observations indicated that the cytoplasmic localization of Apoptin in normal cells results from the balance between cytoplasmic retention and nuclear import. On the other hand, the pNES was also proved to be necessary for Apoptin multimerization. Mutants lacking the pNES did not form obviously visible globular aggregates in normal or tumor cells.

  7. Using Fluorescent Protein Fusions to Study Protein Subcellular Localization and Dynamics in Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Gao, Caiji; Zhao, Qiong; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Studies of protein subcellular localization and dynamics are helpful in understanding the cellular functions of proteins in an organism. In the past decade, the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a fusion tag has dramatically extended our knowledge in this field. Transient expression and stable transformation of GFP-tagged proteins have been wildly used to study protein localization in vivo in different systems. Although GFP-based tags provide a fast and convenient way to characterize protein properties in living cells, several reports have demonstrated that GFP fusions might not accurately reflect the localization of the native protein as GFP tags may alter the protein properties. To facilitate proper usage of GFP tags in plant cell biology study, we describe detailed protocols to identify possible inhibitory effects of fluorescent tags on protein subcellular localization and to determine if a fluorescently tagged protein is localized to the correct subcellular compartment. Using Arabidopsis Endomembrane protein 12 (EMP12) as an example, we first show the possible inhibitory effect of GFP tags on proper protein localization and then describe the immunofluorescence labeling method to verify the correct localization of GFP fusion proteins. Next, a method is presented using the ImageJ program with the Pearson-Spearman correlation (PSC) colocalization plug-in for statistical quantification of colocalization ratios of two fluorophores. Finally we provide a detailed method for protein dynamics studies using spinning disk confocal microscopy in Arabidopsis cells. PMID:27515077

  8. Revealing the cellular localization of STAT1 during the cell cycle by super-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yanhou; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Wang, Hongda

    2015-03-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) can transduce cytokine signals and regulate gene expression. The cellular localization and nuclear trafficking of STAT1, a representative of the STAT family with multiple transcriptional functions, is tightly related with transcription process, which usually happens in the interphase of the cell cycle. However, these priority questions regarding STAT1 distribution and localization at the different cell-cycle stages remain unclear. By using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), we found that the nuclear expression level of STAT1 increased gradually as the cell cycle carried out, especially after EGF stimulation. Furthermore, STAT1 formed clusters in the whole cell during the cell cycle, with the size and the number of clusters also increasing significantly from G1 to G2 phase, suggesting that transcription and other cell-cycle related activities can promote STAT1 to form more and larger clusters for fast response to signals. Our work reveals that the cellular localization and clustering distribution of STAT1 are associated with the cell cycle, and further provides an insight into the mechanism of cell-cycle regulated STAT1 signal transduction.

  9. TREATMENT OF RAT HEPATOMA BY LOCALLY INJECTION OF MURINE IL-12 RETROVIRUS PACKAGING CELL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effects of the murine IL-12 (mIL-12) retrovirus packaging cell line on hepatoma injected locally. Methods: The retrovirus vector encoding mIL-12 gene was constructed and transfected into packaging cell line PA317. The cells were then used to treat the rats with experimental orthotopic hepatoma at different time. The therapeutic effects, immune functions of the hosts, pathological and toxicological responses were documented. Results: the results showed that the mIL-12 retrovirus packaging cell line could significantly inhibit the growth of the hepatoma cells injected locally to the hepatoma. The early treatment made the rats survive long, while the medium or late stage treatment could prolong the life time of the rats compared with the bland control group or bland vector control group, though the rats did not survive. The number of NK cells and T cells increased significantly in the treatment group. The effects of the early treatment were superior to those of the medium and late stage treatment. Moreover, the transfection of IL-12 gene locally in the hepatoma tissue could make the hepatoma disappear from other liver lobe. This phenomenon demonstrated that IL-12 could activate the immune cells of the host to kill the untransfected tumor cells. This is very important for IL-12 to be used in gene therapy clinically. Meanwhile, the hepatoma would not recur in the rats that had survived more than 2 months from the early treatment after being re-challenged with tumor cells. Conclusion: the results showed that IL-12 gene injected locally in the hepatoma tissue could enhance the anti-tumor immunity of the host.

  10. Multidisciplinary management of the locally advanced unresectable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locally advanced (Stage III) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately one third of all cases of NSCLC. Few patients with locally advanced NSCLC present with disease amenable to curative surgical resection. Historically, these patients were treated with primary thoracic radiation therapy (RT) and had poor long term survival rates, due to both progression of local disease and development of distant metastases. Over the last two decades, the use of multidisciplinary approach has improved the outcome for patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Combined chemoradiotherapy is the most favored approach for treatment of locally advanced unresectable NSCLC. There are two basic treatment protocols for administering combined chemotherapy and radiation, sequential versus concurrent. The rationale for using chemotherapy is to eliminate subclinical metastatic disease while improving local control. Sequential use of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy has improved median and long term survival compared to radiation therapy alone. This approach appears to decrease the risk of distant metastases, but local failure rates remain the same as radiation alone. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy has been studied extensively. The potential advantages of this approach may include sensitization of tumor cells to radiation by the administration of chemotherapy, and reduced overall treatment time compared to sequential therapy; which is known to be important for improving local control in radiation biology. This approach improves survival primarily as a result of improved local control. However, it doesn't seem to decrease the risk of distant metastases probably because concurrent chemoradiation requires dose reductions in chemotherapy due to increased risks of acute morbidity such as acute esophageal toxicity. Although multidisciplinary therapy has led to improved survival rates compared to radiation therapy alone and has become the new standard of care, the optimal therapy of

  11. Ontogenesis and cell specific localization of Fas ligand expression in the rat testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abrizio, Piera; Baldini, Enke; Russo, Paola F; Biordi, Leda; Graziano, Filomena M; Rucci, Nadia; Properzi, Giuliana; Francavilla, Sandro; Ulisse, Salvatore

    2004-10-01

    Over the past few years, a number of experimental evidences suggested the involvement of Fas Ligand (FasL) expressing Sertoli cells to induce apoptosis of Fas bearing germ cells. However, the FasL expression during testicular development and its cell specific localization within the testis is still a matter of debate. In the present study, we have monitored FasL expression during rat testis development by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and evaluated cell specific localization of FasL expression, by in situ RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, on adult rat testis. RT-PCR analysis, performed on total RNA from rat testes obtained from 1 day up to 1-year-old animals, demonstrated the presence of FasL transcripts at all developmental stages examined. In situ RT-PCR analysis clearly indicated the presence of FasL mRNA in Sertoli cells of adult testis, while we could never detect FasL transcripts in germ cells. Immunohistochemistry experiments showed a strong immunostaining for FasL in Sertoli cells of adult testis and again, no immunopositivity was observed in germ cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that FasL expression in rat testis is present from the early postnatal days up to the adult, and the Sertoli cells is the main FasL expressing cell within the seminiferous tubule. PMID:15379972

  12. A Hidden Markov Model for Localization Using Low-End GSM Cell Phones

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Research in location determination for GSM phones has gained interest recently as it enables a wide set of location based services. RSSI-based techniques have been the preferred method for GSM localization on the handset as RSSI information is available in all cell phones. Although the GSM standard allows for a cell phone to receive signal strength information from up to seven cell towers, many of today's cell phones are low-end phones, with limited API support, that gives only information about the associated cell tower. In addition, in many places in the world, the density of cell towers is very small and therefore, the available cell tower information for localization is very limited. This raises the challenge of accurately determining the cell phone location with very limited information, mainly the RSSI of the associated cell tower. In this paper we propose a Hidden Markov Model based solution that leverages the signal strength history from only the associated cell tower to achieve accurate GSM localizat...

  13. Reversible and irreversible electroporation of cell suspensions flowing through a localized DC electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korohoda, Włodzimierz; Grys, Maciej; Madeja, Zbigniew

    2013-03-01

    Experiments on reversible and irreversible cell electroporation were carried out with an experimental setup based on a standard apparatus for horizontal electrophoresis, a syringe pump with regulated cell suspension flow velocity and a dcEF power supply. Cells in suspension flowing through an orifice in a barrier inserted into the electrophoresis apparatus were exposed to defined localized dcEFs in the range of 0-1000 V/cm for a selected duration in the range 10-1000 ms. This method permitted the determination of the viability of irreversibly electroperforated cells. It also showed that the uptake by reversibly electroperforated cells of fluorescent dyes (calcein, carboxyfluorescein, Alexa Fluor 488 Phalloidin), which otherwise do not penetrate cell membranes, was dependent upon the dcEF strength and duration in any given single electrical field exposure. The method yields reproducible results, makes it easy to load large volumes of cell suspensions with membrane non-penetrating substances, and permits the elimination of irreversibly electroporated cells of diameter greater than desired. The results concur with and elaborate on those in earlier reports on cell electroporation in commercially available electroporators. They proved once more that the observed cell perforation does not depend upon the thermal effects of the electric current upon cells. In addition, the method eliminates many of the limitations of commercial electroporators and disposable electroporation chambers. It permits the optimization of conditions in which reversible and irreversible electroporation are separated. Over 90% of reversibly electroporated cells remain viable after one short (less than 400 ms) exposure to the localized dcEF. Experiments were conducted with the AT-2 cancer prostate cell line, human skin fibroblasts and human red blood cells, but they could be run with suspensions of any cell type. It is postulated that the described method could be useful for many purposes in

  14. Challenges in optimizing chemoradiation in locally advanced non small-cell lung cancers in India

    OpenAIRE

    Sushma Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Data supporting use of concurrent chemoradiation in locally advanced lung cancers comes from clinical trials from developed countries. Applicability and outcomes of such schedules in developing countries is not widely reported. There are various challenges in delivering chemoradiation in locally advanced non small cell lung cancer in developing countries which is highlighted by an audit of patients treated with chemoradiation in our center. This article deals with the challenges in the contex...

  15. Subcellular localization of YKL-40 in normal and malignant epithelial cells of the breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roslind, A.; Balslev, E.; Kruse, H.;

    2008-01-01

    . YKL-40 protein expression was redistributed in carcinoma versus normal glandular tissue of the breast. A reduced expression of YKL-40 in relation to intermediate filaments and desmosomes was found in tumor cells. Changes in YKL-40 expression suggest that the function of YKL-40 in cells of epithelial......YKL-40 is a new prognostic biomarker in cancer. The biological function is only poorly understood. This study aimed at determining the subcellular localization of YKL-40, using immunogold labeling, in normal epithelial cells and in malignant tumor cells of the breast by immunoelectron microscopy...

  16. A Hidden Markov Model for Localization Using Low-End GSM Cell Phones

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Mohamed; Youssef, Moustafa

    2010-01-01

    Research in location determination for GSM phones has gained interest recently as it enables a wide set of location based services. RSSI-based techniques have been the preferred method for GSM localization on the handset as RSSI information is available in all cell phones. Although the GSM standard allows for a cell phone to receive signal strength information from up to seven cell towers, many of today's cell phones are low-end phones, with limited API support, that gives only information ab...

  17. Effect of catalyst layer defects on local membrane degradation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, Arash; Lim, Chan; Kolodziej, Joanna; Lauritzen, Michael; Knights, Shanna; Wang, G. Gary; Kjeang, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Aiming at durability issues of fuel cells, this research is dedicated to a novel experimental approach in the analysis of local membrane degradation phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, shedding light on the potential effects of manufacturing imperfections on this process. With a comprehensive review on historical failure analysis data from field operated fuel cells, local sources of iron oxide contaminants, catalyst layer cracks, and catalyst layer delamination are considered as potential candidates for initiating or accelerating the local membrane degradation phenomena. Customized membrane electrode assemblies with artificial defects are designed, fabricated, and subjected to membrane accelerated stress tests followed by extensive post-mortem analysis. The results reveal a significant accelerating effect of iron oxide contamination on the global chemical degradation of the membrane, but dismiss local traces of iron oxide as a potential stressor for local membrane degradation. Anode and cathode catalyst layer cracks are observed to have negligible impact on the membrane degradation phenomena. Notably however, distinct evidence is found that anode catalyst layer delamination can accelerate local membrane thinning, while cathode delamination has no apparent effect. Moreover, a substantial mitigating effect for platinum residuals on the site of delamination is observed.

  18. Planar Cell Polarity Protein Localization in the Secretory Ameloblasts of Rat Incisors

    OpenAIRE

    Nishikawa, Sumio; Kawamoto, Tadafumi

    2012-01-01

    The localization of the planar cell polarity proteins Vang12, frizzled-3, Vang11, and Celsr1 in the rat incisors was examined using immunocytochemistry. The results showed that Vang12 was localized at two regions of the Tomes’ processes of inner enamel–secretory ameloblasts in rat incisors: a proximal and a distal region. In contrast, frizzled-3 was localized at adherens junctions of the proximal and distal areas of inner enamel– and outer enamel–secretory ameloblasts, where N-cadherin and β-...

  19. DISTINCTIVE LOCALIZATION OF GROUP 3 LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT SYNTHESIZING CELLS DURING BRINE SHRIMP DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Yong; Song, Hwa Young; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, Bong Hee; Kim, Kyung Joo; Jo, Kyung Jin; Kim, Suhng Wook; Lee, Seung Gwan; Lee, Boo Hyung

    2015-07-01

    Despite numerous studies on late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, their functions, roles, and localizations during developmental stages in arthropods remain unknown. LEA proteins protect crucial proteins against osmotic stress during the development and growth of various organisms. Thus, in this study, fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to determine the crucial regions protected against osmotic stress as well as the distinctive localization of group 3 (G3) LEA(+) cells during brine shrimp development. Several cell types were found to synthesize G3 LEA RNA, including neurons, muscular cells, APH-1(+) cells, and renal cells. The G3 LEA(+) neuronal cell bodies outside of the mushroom body projected their axonal bundles to the central body, but those inside the mushroom body projected their axonal bundles toward the deutocerebrum without innervating the central body. The cell bodies inside the mushroom body received axons of the G3 LEA(+) sensory cells at the medial ventral cup of the nauplius eye. Several glands were found to synthesize G3 LEA RNA during the nauplius stages of brine shrimp, including the sinus, antennal I and II, salt, and three ectodermal glands. This study provides the first demonstration of the formation of G3 LEA(+) sinus glands at the emergence stages of brine shrimp. These results suggest that G3 LEA protein is synthesized in several cell types. In particular, specific glands play crucial roles during the emergence and nauplius stages of brine shrimp. PMID:25781424

  20. Localized extramedullary relapse after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas are rare manifestation of plasma cell malignancies. After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation HSCT, presentation of localized plasmacytoma with extramedullary growth is very unusual. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with Dune-Salmon stage IIIA immunoglobulin A-kappa multiple myeloma, which presented 120 days after autologous HSCT with extramedullary plasmacytoma arising from a lymph node in supraclavicular region. The patient had no pretransplant-history related with extramedullary disease. There was no increase of plasma cells in bone marrow or monoclonal protein in urine or serum. Aspiration smears of lymph node revealed a population of plasmacytoid cells at various stages of maturation. The patient was successfully treated with local radiotherapy and has remained progression-free for more than 20 months. (author)

  1. Silencing of LASP-1 influences zyxin localization, inhibits proliferation and reduces migration in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LIM and SH3 protein (LASP-1), initially identified from human breast cancer, is a specific focal adhesion protein involved in cell migration. LASP-1 is an actin binding protein, which also interacts with the proline-rich domains of zyxin, a scaffolding protein required for cell movement and gene transcription. In the present work, we analyzed the effect of LASP-1 on different human breast cancer cell lines. Transfection with LASP-1-specific siRNA resulted in a reduced protein level of LASP-1 in BT-20 and MCF-7 cell lines. The siRNA-treated cells were arrested in G2/M phase of cell cycle, and proliferation of the tumor cells was suppressed by 30-50% corresponding to around 50% of the cells being transfected successfully as seen by immunofluorescence. In addition, tumor cells showed a 50% reduced migration after siRNA treatment, while overexpression of LASP-1 in non-tumor PTK-2 cells, which do not express endogenous LASP-1, resulted in a significant increase in cell motility. LASP-1 silencing is accompanied with a reduced binding of the of LASP-1 binding partner zyxin to focal contacts without changes in actin stress fiber organization as observed in immunofluorescence experiments. The data provide evidence for an essential role of LASP-1 in tumor cell growth and migration, possibly by influencing the localization of zyxin

  2. Mechanical coupling of smooth muscle cells using local and global stimulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Craig; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical stresses can directly alter many cellular processes, including signal transduction, growth, differentiation, and survival. These stresses, generated primarily by myosin activity within the cytoskeleton, regulate both cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions. We report studies of mechanical cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions using patterned arrays of flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microposts combined with application of global stretch or local chemical stimulation. Bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells are patterned onto micropost arrays to create multicellular structures to probe intercellular coupling. Global stimulation is applied by building the micropost arrays on a flexible membrane that can be stretched while allowing simultaneous observation of cell traction forces. Results for triangle wave stretches of single cells show increasing traction forces with increasing strain, and immediate weakening of traction forces as strain is decreased. ``Spritzing,'' a laminar flow technique, is used to expose a single cell within a construct to a drug treatment while cell traction forces are recorded via the microposts. Results will be described showing the response of cells to external stimulation both directly and through intercellular coupling.

  3. In vivo hyperspectral confocal fluorescence imaging to determine pigment localization and distribution in cyanobacterial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vermaas, Wim F. J.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Nieman, Linda T.; Hamad, Sawsan W.; Melgaard, David K.; Haaland, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral confocal fluorescence imaging provides the opportunity to obtain individual fluorescence emission spectra in small (≈0.03-μm3) volumes. Using multivariate curve resolution, individual fluorescence components can be resolved, and their intensities can be calculated. Here we localize, in vivo, photosynthesis-related pigments (chlorophylls, phycobilins, and carotenoids) in wild-type and mutant cells of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Cells were excited at 488 nm, exc...

  4. Chemical Stimulation of Adherent Cells by Localized Application of Acetylcholine from a Microfluidic System

    OpenAIRE

    Susanne Zibek

    2010-01-01

    Chemical stimulation of cells is inherently cell type selective in contrast to electro-stimulation. The availability of a system for localized application of minute amounts of chemical stimulants could be useful for dose related response studies to test new compounds. It could also bring forward the development of a novel type of neuroprostheses. In an experimental setup micro-droplets of an acetylcholine solution were ejected from a fluidic microsystem and applied to the bottom of a nanop...

  5. Epidermal Th22 and Tc17 Cells Form a Localized Disease Memory in Clinically Healed Psoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Cheuk, Stanley; Wikén, Maria; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nylén, Susanne; Talme, Toomas; Ståhle, Mona; Eidsmo, Liv

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common and chronic inflammatory skin disease in which T cells play a key role. Effective treatment heals the skin without scarring, but typically psoriasis recurs in previously affected areas. A pathogenic memory within the skin has been proposed, but the nature of such site-specific disease memory is unknown. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been ascribed a role in immunity after resolved viral skin infections. Because of their localization in the epidermal compartmen...

  6. Golgi-localized UDP-glucose transporter is required for cell wall integrity in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Xueqin; Zhang, Baocai; Zhou, Yihua

    2011-01-01

    Cell wall-related nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs) theoretically supply the cytosolic nucleotide sugars for glycosyltransferases (GTs) to carry out ploysaccharide synthesis and modification in the Golgi apparatus. However, the regulation of cell wall synthesis by NSTs remains undescribed. Recently, we have reported the functional characterization of Oryza sativa nucleotide sugar transport (Osnst1) mutant and its corresponding gene. OsNST1/BC14 is localized in the Golgi apparatus and trans...

  7. Interspecific variation of intracellular localization and postirradiation movement of Ku70-protein in fibroblastic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku (Ku70 and Ku80) Proteins are known as components of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and play an important role for DNA repair. We previously reported that more than 70% of Ku proteins were located in cytoplasm of rat cells, the Ku proteins moved into nuclei of normal rat cells after X-irradiation, Ku proteins also moved into nuclei after X-irradiation but were not retained in nucleus of radiosensitive LEC rat cells. While reports have been shown about mechanisms on nuclear localization of Ku proteins, how Ku proteins export from nucleus is poorly understood. Here we show that C-terminal region of Ku70 protein is important for its cytoplasmic localization. When transfected into LEC rat cells, exogenous intact Ku70 (1-609) tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-Ku70) localized mainly in the cytoplasm, whereas C-terminal-deletion mutant of Ku70 (1-593) tagged with EGFP (EGFP-Ku70D) was mainly localized in the nucleus. After X-irradiation, the endogenous intact EGFP-Ku70 once moved into nucleus, but returned into the cytoplasm. On the other hand, EGFP-Ku70D was retained in nucleus for two hours after X-irradiation. These results suggest that C-terminal region of Ku70 is included in the postirradiation nuclear export. Next, we investigated the intracellular localization of Ku70 proteins and the movement after X-irradiation of fibroblastic cells prepared from some mammalian species. Ku70 proteins were localized in nucleus and the postirradiation-extranuclear transport was not observed in human and African green monkey cells. On the other hand, Ku70 proteins were mainly localized in cytoplasm and moved into nucleus in mouse, Chinese hamster, Golden hamster, cotton rat, squirrel, cat and dog cells. These results may show that alternatively Ku70 protein is localized in the cytoplasm or nucleus depends on species and translocation of cytoplasmic Ku70 into nucleus is a response against low dose irradiation in fibroblasts of rodents, cats and dogs

  8. Interspecific variation of intracellular localization and postirradiation movement of Ku70-protein in fibroblastic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endoh, Daiji; Hayashi, Masanobu [Rakuno Gakuen Univ., School of Veterinary Midicine, Ebetsu, Hokkaido (Japan); Okui, Toyo; Kawase, Shiro [Hokkaido Institute of Public Health, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Kon, Yasushiro [Hokkaido Univ., Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Ku (Ku70 and Ku80) Proteins are known as components of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and play an important role for DNA repair. We previously reported that more than 70% of Ku proteins were located in cytoplasm of rat cells, the Ku proteins moved into nuclei of normal rat cells after X-irradiation, Ku proteins also moved into nuclei after X-irradiation but were not retained in nucleus of radiosensitive LEC rat cells. While reports have been shown about mechanisms on nuclear localization of Ku proteins, how Ku proteins export from nucleus is poorly understood. Here we show that C-terminal region of Ku70 protein is important for its cytoplasmic localization. When transfected into LEC rat cells, exogenous intact Ku70 (1-609) tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-Ku70) localized mainly in the cytoplasm, whereas C-terminal-deletion mutant of Ku70 (1-593) tagged with EGFP (EGFP-Ku70D) was mainly localized in the nucleus. After X-irradiation, the endogenous intact EGFP-Ku70 once moved into nucleus, but returned into the cytoplasm. On the other hand, EGFP-Ku70D was retained in nucleus for two hours after X-irradiation. These results suggest that C-terminal region of Ku70 is included in the postirradiation nuclear export. Next, we investigated the intracellular localization of Ku70 proteins and the movement after X-irradiation of fibroblastic cells prepared from some mammalian species. Ku70 proteins were localized in nucleus and the postirradiation-extranuclear transport was not observed in human and African green monkey cells. On the other hand, Ku70 proteins were mainly localized in cytoplasm and moved into nucleus in mouse, Chinese hamster, Golden hamster, cotton rat, squirrel, cat and dog cells. These results may show that alternatively Ku70 protein is localized in the cytoplasm or nucleus depends on species and translocation of cytoplasmic Ku70 into nucleus is a response against low dose irradiation in fibroblasts of rodents, cats and dogs

  9. Local device parameter extraction of a concentrator photovoltaic cell under solar spot illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munji, M.K.; Okullo, W.; van Dyk, E.E.; Vorster, F.J. [Physics Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P O Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2010-12-15

    Focused sunlight can act as a localized source of excess minority carriers in a solar cell. Current signal generated by these carriers gives considerable information about the electrical properties of the cell's material. Point by point current-voltage data were measured for a back point-contact concentrator photovoltaic cell when illuminated by focused sunlight. Two numerical curve fitting procedures: a non-linear two-point interval division and particle swarm optimization algorithm were then applied to extract local parameters (i.e. as function of position) from the current-voltage data at each measurement point. Extracted parameters plotted yields relative spatial information about the electrical properties of a solar cell in a two or three dimensional mapping. The curve fitting routines applied to current-voltage data reveal that performance parameters: short circuit current, open circuit voltage, maximum power and fill factor show distinct variations in the vicinity of the observed current reducing feature. The relative values of the diode ideality factors, series resistance, shunt resistance and reverse saturation currents from both methods showed no significant measurable features that could be distinguished. This shows that the observed reduction in photo-induced current was due to severe recombination in the bulk or around the highly diffused point contacts and not the quality of the multiple p-n junctions of the cell. These approaches allow one to obtain a set of parameters at each local point on the cell which are reasonable and representative of the physical system. (author)

  10. Climatologies of nighttime upper thermospheric winds measured by ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometers during geomagnetically quiet conditions: 1. Local time, latitudinal, seasonal, and solar cycle dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, J. T.; Faivre, M. L.; Hernandez, G.; Jarvis, M. J.; Meriwether, J. W.; Niciejewski, R. J.; Sipler, D. P.; Tepley, C. A.

    2006-12-01

    We analyze ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer observations of upper thermospheric (˜250 km) horizontal neutral winds derived from Doppler shifts in the 630.0 nm (red line) nightglow. The winds were measured over the following locations: South Pole (90°S), Halley (76°S, 27°W), Arequipa (17°S, 72°W), Arecibo (18°N, 67°W), Millstone Hill (43°N, 72°W), Søndre Strømfjord (67°N, 51°W), and Thule (77°N, 68°W). We derive climatological quiet time (Kp irradiance. Over Millstone Hill and Arecibo, solar EUV has a negative effect on wind magnitudes. As represented by the 10.7 cm radio flux proxy, the solar EUV dependence of the winds at all latitudes is characterized by a saturation or weakening of the effect above moderate values (F10.7 > 150). The seasonal dependence of the winds is generally annual, but there are isolated cases in which a semiannual variation is observed. Within the austral winter, winds measured from the South Pole show a substantial intraseasonal variation only along longitudes directed toward the magnetic pole. IMF effects are described in a companion paper.

  11. Glyoxylate Reductase Isoform 1 is Localized in the Cytosol and Not Peroxisomes in Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steven L. K. Ching; Satinder K. Gidda; Amanda Rochon; Owen R. van Cauwenberghe; Barry J. Shelp; Robert T. Mullen

    2012-01-01

    Glyoxylate reductase (GLYR) is a key enzyme in plant metabolism which catalyzes the detoxification of both photorespiratory glyoxylate and succinic semialdehdye,an intermediate of the γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) pathway.Two isoforms of GLYR exist in plants,GLYR1 and GLYR2,and while GLYR2 is known to be localized in plastids,GLYR1 has been reported to be localized in either peroxisomes or the cytosol.Here,we reappraised the intracellular localization of GLYR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana L.Heynh (ecotype Lansberg erecta) using both transiently-transformed suspension cells and stably-transformed plants,in combination with fluorescence microscopy.The results indicate that GLYR1 is localized exclusively to the cytosol regardless of the species,tissue and/or cell type,or exposure of plants to environmental stresses that would increase flux through the GABA pathway.Moreover,the C-terminal tripeptide sequence of GLYR1,-SRE,despite its resemblance to a type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal,is not sufficient for targeting to peroxisomes.Collectively,these results define the cytosol as the intracellular location of GLYR1 and provide not only important insight to the metabolic roles of GLYR1 and the compartmentation of the GABA and photorespiratory pathways in plant cells,but also serve as a useful reference for future studies of proteins proposed to be localized to peroxisomes and/or the cytosol.

  12. Non-linear elasticity of extracellular matrices enables contractile cells to communicate local position and orientation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessamine P Winer

    Full Text Available Most tissue cells grown in sparse cultures on linearly elastic substrates typically display a small, round phenotype on soft substrates and become increasingly spread as the modulus of the substrate increases until their spread area reaches a maximum value. As cell density increases, individual cells retain the same stiffness-dependent differences unless they are very close or in molecular contact. On nonlinear strain-stiffening fibrin gels, the same cell types become maximally spread even when the low strain elastic modulus would predict a round morphology, and cells are influenced by the presence of neighbors hundreds of microns away. Time lapse microscopy reveals that fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells on fibrin deform the substrate by several microns up to five cell lengths away from their plasma membrane through a force limited mechanism. Atomic force microscopy and rheology confirm that these strains locally and globally stiffen the gel, depending on cell density, and this effect leads to long distance cell-cell communication and alignment. Thus cells are acutely responsive to the nonlinear elasticity of their substrates and can manipulate this rheological property to induce patterning.

  13. NKT cell activation by local α-galactosylceramide administration decreases susceptibility to HSV-2 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie Beck; Jensen, Simon Kok; Hansen, Anne Louise;

    2015-01-01

    that received local pre-treatment with αGalCer prior to intra-vaginal HSV-2 infection had a lower mean disease score, mortality and viral load in the vagina following infection, compared to mice that did not receive αGalCer pre-treatment. Further, we found increased numbers of CD45 and NK1.1 positive cells...

  14. Local Authorities and the Education of Young People with Sickle Cell Disorders in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, S. M.; Abuateya, H.; Atkin, K.; Culley, L. A.; Dyson, S. E.; Rowley, D. T.

    2008-01-01

    The successful inclusion of minority ethnic pupils with sickle cell disorders (SCD) raises a number of challenges for educational systems. In England, local education authorities were important drivers for innovative responses to complex needs and the former Inner London Education Authority produced guidance in 1989 on SCD in schools. Local…

  15. LOCALIZATION OF BRANCHING ENZYME IN POTATO-TUBER CELLS WITH THE USE OF IMMUNOELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KRAM, AM; OOSTERGETEL, GT; VANBRUGGEN, EFJ

    1993-01-01

    Potato branching enzyme, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of starch, was localized in amyloplasts in starch-storage cells of potato (Solanum tuberosum L) with the use of immunogold electron microscopy. Branching enzyme was found in the amyloplast stroma, concentrated at the interface of the stroma a

  16. Localization of type I interferon receptor limits interferon-induced TLR-3 in epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study aimed to expand on the role of type I IFNs in the influenza-induced upregulation of TLR3 and determine whether and how the localization of the IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR) in respiratory epithelial cells could modify IFN-induced responses. Using differentiated prima...

  17. Localization study of Co-phthalocyanines in cells by Raman micro(spectro)scopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arzhantsev, S Y; Chikishev, A Y; Koroteev, N I; Greve, J; Otto, C; Sijtsema, N M

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of intracellular localization of Co-phthalocyanines is reported. The Raman images of K562 cells stained with phthalocyanine were acquired. To understand the peculiarities of the Raman images, measurements were performed at different z-axis positions. The intracellular concentration

  18. Localization study of co-phthalocyanines in cells by Raman micro(spectro)scopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arzhantsev, S.Y.; Chikishev, A.Y.; Koroteev, N.I.; Greve, J.; Otto, C.; Sijtsema, N.M.

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of intracellular localization of Co-phthalocyanines is reported. The Raman images of K562 cells stained with phthalocyanine were acquired. To understand the peculiarities of the Raman images, measurements were performed at different z-axis positions. The intracellular concentration

  19. Progression of Intravesical Condyloma Acuminata to Locally Advanced Poorly Differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khambati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Condyloma acuminata (CA is a common sexually transmitted disease caused by Human Papilloma Virus (HPV infection. CA of the bladder, however, is an exceedingly rare lesion. We present a rare case of poorly differentiated locally invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC arising from recurrent CA of the bladder in an immunocompetent patient and discuss pathophysiology and management of this unusual condition.

  20. Localized Modeling of Biochemical and Flow Interactions during Cancer Cell Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Behr

    Full Text Available This work focuses on one component of a larger research effort to develop a simulation tool to model populations of flowing cells. Specifically, in this study a local model of the biochemical interactions between circulating melanoma tumor cells (TC and substrate adherent polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN is developed. This model provides realistic three-dimensional distributions of bond formation and attendant attraction and repulsion forces that are consistent with the time dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD framework of the full system model which accounts local pressure, shear and repulsion forces. The resulting full dynamics model enables exploration of TC adhesion to adherent PMNs, which is a known participating mechanism in melanoma cell metastasis. The model defines the adhesion molecules present on the TC and PMN cell surfaces, and calculates their interactions as the melanoma cell flows past the PMN. Biochemical rates of reactions between individual molecules are determined based on their local properties. The melanoma cell in the model expresses ICAM-1 molecules on its surface, and the PMN expresses the β-2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. In this work the PMN is fixed to the substrate and is assumed fully rigid and of a prescribed shear-rate dependent shape obtained from micro-PIV experiments. The melanoma cell is transported with full six-degrees-of-freedom dynamics. Adhesion models, which represent the ability of molecules to bond and adhere the cells to each other, and repulsion models, which represent the various physical mechanisms of cellular repulsion, are incorporated with the CFD solver. All models are general enough to allow for future extensions, including arbitrary adhesion molecule types, and the ability to redefine the values of parameters to represent various cell types. The model presented in this study will be part of a clinical tool for development of personalized medical treatment programs.

  1. Subcellular Localization of Thiol-Capped CdTe Quantum Dots in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ji-Yao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Internalization and dynamic subcellular distribution of thiol-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs in living cells were studied by means of laser scanning confocal microscopy. These unfunctionalized QDs were well internalized into human hepatocellular carcinoma and rat basophilic leukemia cells in vitro. Co-localizations of QDs with lysosomes and Golgi complexes were observed, indicating that in addition to the well-known endosome-lysosome endocytosis pathway, the Golgi complex is also a main destination of the endocytosed QDs. The movement of the endocytosed QDs toward the Golgi complex in the perinuclear region of the cell was demonstrated.

  2. Button sequestrum in a case of localized Langerhans' cell histiocytosis of the ilium: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) is characterized by a proliferation of cells exhibiting the same immunohistochemical and ultra-structural characteristics as Langerhans' cells of the epidermis. Eosinophilic granuloma, chronic polyostotic disease (Hand-Schuller-Christian disease) and multisystemic disease (Letterer-Siwe disease) all belong to the spectrum LCH. Osseous lesions are the most common findings. the radiological appearance of skeletal LCH depends on the site and on disease activity. Button sequestrum has been described as uncommon in LCH of the skull and exceedingly rare in LCH at other sites. We report a case of localized LCH of the ilium with a button sequestrum. (author)

  3. Subcellular Localization of Thiol-Capped CdTe Quantum Dots in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Mi, Lan; Xiong, Rongling; Wang, Pei-Nan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Yang, Wuli; Wang, Changchun; Peng, Qian

    2009-07-01

    Internalization and dynamic subcellular distribution of thiol-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) in living cells were studied by means of laser scanning confocal microscopy. These unfunctionalized QDs were well internalized into human hepatocellular carcinoma and rat basophilic leukemia cells in vitro. Co-localizations of QDs with lysosomes and Golgi complexes were observed, indicating that in addition to the well-known endosome-lysosome endocytosis pathway, the Golgi complex is also a main destination of the endocytosed QDs. The movement of the endocytosed QDs toward the Golgi complex in the perinuclear region of the cell was demonstrated.

  4. Intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze our experience with intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) followed by moderate doses of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in patients with locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma. From 1992 to 2010, 17 patients with histologically proven, locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma (median tumor size 7 cm) were treated by surgery and IOERT with a median dose of 15 Gy. All patients met the premise of curative intent including 7 patients with oligometastases at the time of recurrent surgery, which were resected and/or irradiated. The median time interval from primary surgery to local recurrence was 26 months. Eleven patients received additional 3D-conformal EBRT with a median dose of 40 Gy. Surgery resulted in free but close margins in 6 patients (R0), while 9 patients suffered from microscopic (R1) and 2 patients from macroscopic (R2) residual disease. After a median follow-up of 18 months, two local recurrences were observed, resulting in an actuarial 2-year local control rate of 91%. Eight patients developed distant failures, predominantly to liver and bone, resulting in an actuarial 2-year progression free survival of 32%. An improved PFS rate was found in patients with a larger time interval between initial surgery and recurrence (> 26 months). The actuarial 2-year overall survival rate was 73%. Lower histological grading (G1/2) was the only factor associated with improved overall survival. Perioperative complications were found in 4 patients. No IOERT specific late toxicities were observed. Combination of surgery, IOERT and EBRT resulted in high local control rates with low toxicity in patients with locally recurrent renal cell cancer despite an unfavorable surgical outcome in the majority of patients. However, progression-free and overall survival were still limited due to a high distant failure rate, indicating the need for intensified systemic treatment especially in patients with high tumor grading and short interval to recurrence

  5. Characterization of a beta-catenin nuclear localization defect in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Cara; Mills, Kate M; Lui, Christina; Semaan, Crystal; Molloy, Mark P; Sharma, Manisha; Forwood, Jade K; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-02-15

    Beta-catenin plays a key role in transducing Wnt signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Here we characterize an unusual subcellular distribution of beta-catenin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, wherein beta-catenin localizes to the cytoplasm and membrane but atypically did not relocate to the nucleus after Wnt treatment. The inability of Wnt or the Wnt agonist LiCl to induce nuclear localization of beta-catenin was not due to defective nuclear transport, as the transport machinery was intact and ectopic GFP-beta-catenin displayed rapid nuclear entry in living cells. The mislocalization is explained by a shift in the retention of beta-catenin from nucleus to cytoplasm. The reduced nuclear retention is caused by unusually low expression of lymphoid enhancer factor/T-cell factor (LEF/TCF) transcription factors. The reconstitution of LEF-1 or TCF4 expression rescued nuclear localization of beta-catenin in Wnt treated cells. In the cytoplasm, beta-catenin accumulated in recycling endosomes, golgi and beta-COP-positive coatomer complexes. The peripheral association with endosomes diminished after Wnt treatment, potentially releasing β-catenin into the cytoplasm for nuclear entry. We propose that in MCF-7 and perhaps other breast cancer cells, beta-catenin may contribute to cytoplasmic functions such as ER-golgi transport, in addition to its transactivation role in the nucleus. PMID:26844628

  6. Local Augmented Angiotensinogen Secreted from Apoptotic Vascular Endothelial Cells Is a Vital Mediator of Vascular Remodelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Jong Wu

    Full Text Available Vascular remodelling is a critical vasculopathy found in atheromatous diseases and allograft failures. The local renin angiotensin system (RAS has been implicated in vascular remodelling. However, the mechanisms by which the augmented local RAS is associated with the initial event of endothelial cell apoptosis in injured vasculature remain undefined. We induced the apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs through serum starvation (SS. After the cells were subjected to SS, we found that the mRNA expression of angiotensinogen (AGT was increased by >3-fold in HUVECs and by approximately 2.5-fold in VSMCs. In addition, the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE mRNA was increased in VSMCs but decreased to 50% in HUVECs during the same apoptotic process. Increases in the expression of AGT protein and angiotensin II (Ang II were found in a serum-free medium conditioned by HUVECs (SSC. The increased Ang II was suppressed using lisinopril (an ACE inhibitor treatment. Moreover, the activation of ERK1/2 induced by the SSC in VSMCs was also suppressed by losartan. In conclusion, we first demonstrated that the augmented AGT released from apoptotic endothelial cells acts as a vital progenitor of Ang II to accelerate vascular remodelling, and we suggest that blocking local augmented Ang II might be an effective strategy for restraining intimal hyperplasia.

  7. Distinct effects of nuclear membrane localization on gene transcription silencing in Drosophila S2 cells and germ cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Sui; Yanhong Yang

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelope proteins have important roles in chromatin organization and signal-dependent transcriptional regulation. A previous study reported that the inner nuclear membrane protein, Otefin (Ote), was essential for germline stem cell (GSC) maintenance via interaction with Smad complex. The interaction of Otc with the Smad complex recruits the bam locus to the nuclear periphery and subsequently results in bam transcriptional silencing, revealing that nuclear peripheral localization is essential for bam gene regulation. However, it remains unknown whether the nuclear peripheral localization is sufficient for bam silencing. To address this issue, we have established a tethering system, in which the Gal4 DNA binding domain (DBD) of the Flag:Gal4 DBD:Ote △ LEM fusion protein physically interacts with the Gal4 binding sites upstream of bamP-gfp to artificially recruit the reporter gene gfp to the nuclear membrane. Our data demonstrated that the nuclear peripheral localization seemed to affect the expression of the target naked gene in S2 cells. By contrast, in Drosophila germ cells, the nuclear membrane localization was not sufficient for gene silencing.

  8. Localized decrease of β-catenin contributes to the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are pluripotent, and can be directed to differentiate into different cell types for therapeutic applications. To expand hESCs, it is desirable to maintain hESC growth without differentiation. As hESC colonies grow, differentiated cells are often found at the periphery of the colonies, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we utilized micropatterning techniques to pattern circular islands or strips of matrix proteins, and examined the spatial pattern of hESC renewal and differentiation. We found that micropatterned matrix restricted hESC differentiation at colony periphery but allowed hESC growth into multiple layers in the central region, which decreased hESC proliferation and induced hESC differentiation. In undifferentiated hESCs, β-catenin primarily localized at cell-cell junctions but not in the nucleus. The amount of β-catenin in differentiating hESCs at the periphery of colonies or in multiple layers decreased significantly at cell-cell junctions. Consistently, knocking down β-catenin decreased Oct-4 expression in hESCs. These results indicate that localized decrease of β-catenin contributes to the spatial pattern of differentiation in hESC colonies

  9. A rare chest wall localized soft tissue sarcoma: Clear cell sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulaş Alabalık

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The clear cell sarcomas of soft tissue are rare tumorsoriginating from neural crest cells and presenting withpoor prognosis. By the reason of the resemblance ofhistological properties to malign melanoma (eg. the immunoreactivityto S100 and HMB45, the presence of melanosomesultrastructurally, these tumors are also definedas malign melanomas of soft tissue. But distinctivelyfrom cutaneous melanoma, clear cell sarcoma is almostalways deeply localized and the biological behaviour ofthe last one is also different. The differential diagnosisbetween clear cell sarcoma and desmoplastic or spindlecell malign melanoma may be more difficult because ofthe dermal localization of the last ones. In our case, itwas observed an infiltrative tumor composed of uniformseeming cells with vesicular nuclei, distinct nucleoli, paleeosinophilic and sometimes clear, scant cytoplasms, inaddition to necrotic areas. On immunohistochemical examination,the tumoral cells showed a positive immunoreactivityto vimentin, S100, HMB45, and SMA, while showingnegative immunoreactivity with CD34, PanCK, EMA,LCA, CD99 and desmin. Ki-67 proliferation index was determinedas approximately 50%. Because of deep localizationand different morphological-immunohistochemicalfindings of the tumor, the case was diagnosed as “clearcell sarcoma”. It was observed a tumor with similar morphologyin the biopsy sample taken from vertebra of thepatient one month later than the first material and this wascommented as the metastasis of the tumor to vertebra.Key words: Clear cell sarcoma, chest wall, metastasis,vertebral, HMB-45, S-100

  10. Dickkopf-3, a Tissue-Derived Modulator of Local T-Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Michael; Papatriantafyllou, Maria; Nordström, Viola; Kumar, Varun; Ludwig, Julia; Lui, Kathy O.; Boyd, Ashleigh S.; Popovic, Zoran V.; Fleming, Thomas Henry; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Nawroth, Peter P.; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Waldmann, Herman; Oelert, Thilo; Arnold, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune system protects organisms from harmful environmental insults. In parallel, regulatory mechanisms control immune responses in order to assure preservation of organ integrity. Yet, molecules involved in the control of T-cell responses in peripheral tissues are poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the function of Dickkopf-3 in the modulation of local T-cell reactivity. Dkk3 is a secreted, mainly tissue-derived protein with highest expression in organs considered as immune-privileged such as the eye, embryo, placenta, and brain. While T-cell development and activation status in naïve Dkk3-deficient mice was comparable to littermate controls, we found that Dkk3 contributes to the immunosuppressive microenvironment that protects transplanted, class-I mismatched embryoid bodies from T-cell-mediated rejection. Moreover, genetic deletion or antibody-mediated neutralization of Dkk3 led to an exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This phenotype was accompanied by a change of T-cell polarization displayed by an increase of IFNγ-producing T cells within the central nervous system. In the wild-type situation, Dkk3 expression in the brain was up-regulated during the course of EAE in an IFNγ-dependent manner. In turn, Dkk3 decreased IFNγ activity and served as part of a negative feedback mechanism. Thus, our findings suggest that Dkk3 functions as a tissue-derived modulator of local CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses. PMID:25759692

  11. CyDiv, a conserved and novel filamentous Cyanobacteria cell division protein involved in septum localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinka eMandakovic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division, encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  12. CyDiv, a Conserved and Novel Filamentous Cyanobacterial Cell Division Protein Involved in Septum Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Trigo, Carla; Andrade, Derly; Riquelme, Brenda; Gómez-Lillo, Gabriela; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Díez, Beatriz; Vásquez, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division), encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. PMID:26903973

  13. Dickkopf-3, a tissue-derived modulator of local T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eMeister

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive immune system protects organisms from harmful environmental insults. In parallel, regulatory mechanisms control immune responses in order to assure preservation of organ integrity. Yet, molecules involved in the control of T cell responses in peripheral tissues are poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the function of Dickkopf-3 in the modulation of local T cell reactivity. Dkk3 is a secreted, mainly tissue derived protein with highest expression in organs considered as immune privileged such as the eye, embryo, placenta and brain. While T cell development and activation status in naïve Dkk3 deficient mice was comparable to littermate controls, we found that Dkk3 contributes to the immunosuppressive microenvironment that protects transplanted, class-I mismatched embryoid bodies from T cell mediated rejection. Moreover, genetic deletion or antibody mediated neutralization of Dkk3 led to an exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. This phenotype was accompanied by a change of T cell polarization displayed by an increase of IFNγ producing T cells within in the CNS. In the wild type situation, Dkk3 expression in the brain was up-regulated during the course of EAE in an IFNγ dependent manner. In turn, Dkk3 decreased IFNγ activity and served as part of a negative feedback mechanism. Thus, our findings suggest that Dkk3 functions as a tissue-derived modulator of local CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses.

  14. Mutant K-ras Regulates Cathepsin B Localization on the Surface of Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Cavallo-Medved

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin B protein and activity are known to localize to the basal plasma membrane of colon carcinoma cells following the appearance of K-ras mutations. Using immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation techniques and two human colon carcinoma cell lines—one with a mutated K-ras allele (HCT 116 and a daughter line in which the mutated allele has been disrupted (HKh-2—we demonstrate that the localization of cathepsin B to caveolae on the surface of these carcinoma cells is regulated by mutant K-ras. In HCT 116 cells, a greater percentage of cathepsin B was distributed to the caveolae, and the secretion of cathepsin B and pericellular (membrane-associated and secreted cathepsin B activity were greater than observed in HKh-2 cells. Previous studies established the light chain of annexin II tetramer, p11, as a binding site for cathepsin B on the surface of tumor cells. The deletion of active K-ras in HKh-2 cells reduced the steady-state levels of p11 and caveolin-1 and the distribution of pl1 to caveolae. Based upon these results, we speculate that cathepsin B, a protease implicated in tumor progression, plays a functional role in initiating proteolytic cascades in caveolae as downstream components of this cascade (e.g., urokinase plasminogen activator and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor are also present in HCT 116 caveolae.

  15. Localization of the Naturally Occurring Plasmid ColE1 at the Cell Pole▿

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Shiyin; Helinski, Donald R.; Toukdarian, Aresa

    2006-01-01

    The naturally occurring plasmid ColE1 was found to localize as a cluster in one or both of the cell poles of Escherichia coli. In addition to the polar localization of ColE1 in most cells, movement of the plasmid to the midcell position was observed in time-lapse studies. ColE1 could be displaced from its polar location by the p15A replicon, pBAD33, but not by plasmid RK2. The displacement of ColE1 by pBAD33 resulted in an almost random positioning of ColE1 foci in the cell and also in a loss...

  16. Local proliferation and extrahepatic recruitment of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in partial-body irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative significance of local proliferation and extrahepatic recruitment of Kupffer cells was investigated by partial-body irradiation before the induction of macrophage hyperplasia by zymosan. There was no difference in growth of the Kupffer cells population between nonirradiated rats and rats irradiated with the liver shielded, whereas irradiation of the liver with the rest of the body (bone marrow) shielded resulted in strong inhibition of growth (-61%). Splenectomy combined with bone marrow irradiation inhibited growth to a lesser extent as compared to liver irradiation (-38%). Monocyte and other leukocyte numbers were strongly reduced in peripheral blood and their accumulation in the liver was completely prevented by bone marrow irradiation. Our results demonstrate that local proliferation of resident Kupffer cells represents the predominant source for their increased number during hyperplasia

  17. Alterations in kainate receptor and TRPM1 localization in bipolar cells after retinal photoreceptor degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline eGayet-Primo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Photoreceptor degeneration differentially impacts glutamatergic signaling in downstream On and Off bipolar cells. In rodent models, photoreceptor degeneration leads to loss of glutamatergic signaling in On bipolar cells, whereas Off bipolar cells appear to retain glutamate sensitivity, even after extensive photoreceptor loss. The localization and identity of the receptors that mediate these residual glutamate responses in Off bipolar cells have not been determined. Recent studies show that macaque and mouse Off bipolar cells receive glutamatergic input primarily through kainate-type glutamate receptors. Here, we studied the impact of photoreceptor degeneration on glutamate receptor associated proteins in Off and On bipolar cells. We show that the kainate receptor subunit, GluK1, persists in remodeled Off bipolar cell dendrites of the rd10 mouse retina. However, the pattern of expression is altered and the intensity of staining is reduced compared to wild-type retina. The kainate receptor auxiliary subunit, Neto1, also remains in Off bipolar cell dendrites after complete photoreceptor degeneration. Similar preservation of kainate receptor subunits was evident in human retina in which photoreceptors had degenerated due to serous retinal detachment. In contrast, photoreceptor degeneration leads to loss of synaptic expression of TRPM1 in mouse and human On bipolar cells, but strong somatic expression remains. These findings demonstrate that Off bipolar cells retain dendritic glutamate receptors during retinal degeneration and could thus serve as a conduit for signal transmission from transplanted or optogenetically-restored photoreceptors.

  18. Physiological and pathological role of local and immigrating colonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferenc Sipos; Gábor Valcz; Béla Molnár

    2012-01-01

    The latest avenue of research is revealing the existence of and role for the colonic stem cells in the physiological renewal of the mucosa and in pathological circumstances where they have both positive and negative effects. In the case of human colon, different levels of stem cell compartments exist. First, the crypt epithelial stem cells, which have a role in the normal crypt epithelial cell dynamics and in colorectal carcinogenesis. Close to the crypts, the second layer of stem cells can be found; the local subepithelial stem cell niche, including the pericryptic subepithelial myofibroblasts that regulate the epithelial cell differentiation and have a crucial role in cancer progression and chronic inflammation-related fibrosis. The third level of stem cell compartment is the immigrating bone-marrow-derived stem cells, which have an important role in wound healing after severe mucosal inflammation, but are also involved in cancer invasion. This paper focuses on stem cell biology in the context of physiological and pathological processes in the human colon.

  19. In vivo distribution and tissue localization of highly purified rat lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly purified population of effector lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells was generated by culturing nylon-wool column nonadherent rat splenocytes in the presence of interleukin 2 (IL-2), and the cells which became adherent to the plastic flasks were separated and maintained in culture for a total of 5 days. More than 95% of these cells had the morphology of large granular lymphocytes (LGL), expressed surface phenotypes characteristic of rat natural killer (NK) cells, and were able to kill NK-sensitive and NK-resistant tumor target cells. 51Cr-labeled purified A-LAK cells injected intravenously into syngeneic F344 rats localized primarily in the lungs 2 hr after injection but then redistributed to the liver and the spleen by 24 hr after injection. The effects of various immunological manipulations on the distribution pattern of the isolated LAK cells were evaluated. Treatment of the host with 500 rad total body X-irradiation 24 hr before cell injection resulted in an early uptake of LAK cells into the liver and the spleen, whereas treatment with cyclophosphamide 1 day before cell injection, resulted in an early uptake of LAK cells into the liver but not into the spleen. Treatment of the recipient rats with up to 120,000 units recombinant interleukin-2 intraperitoneally did not result in the accumulation of LAK cells at the site of IL-2 injection, nor did it result in a modulation of the overall distribution pattern or total recovery of radiolabeled LAK cells. Rather, the administration of IL-2 was necessary to maintain the cytotoxic activity of the injected LAK cells isolated from the liver and spleen

  20. Localization and relative quantification of carbon nanotubes in cells with multispectral imaging flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, Iris; Boggetto, Nicole; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Luciani, Nathalie; Wilhelm, Claire; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials, like carbon nanotubes (CNTs), belong to this type of nanoparticles which are very difficult to discriminate from carbon-rich cell structures and de facto there is still no quantitative method to assess their distribution at cell and tissue levels. What we propose here is an innovative method allowing the detection and quantification of CNTs in cells using a multispectral imaging flow cytometer (ImageStream, Amnis). This newly developed device integrates both a high-throughput of cells and high resolution imaging, providing thus images for each cell directly in flow and therefore statistically relevant image analysis. Each cell image is acquired on bright-field (BF), dark-field (DF), and fluorescent channels, giving access respectively to the level and the distribution of light absorption, light scattered and fluorescence for each cell. The analysis consists then in a pixel-by-pixel comparison of each image, of the 7,000-10,000 cells acquired for each condition of the experiment. Localization and quantification of CNTs is made possible thanks to some particular intrinsic properties of CNTs: strong light absorbance and scattering; indeed CNTs appear as strongly absorbed dark spots on BF and bright spots on DF with a precise colocalization. This methodology could have a considerable impact on studies about interactions between nanomaterials and cells given that this protocol is applicable for a large range of nanomaterials, insofar as they are capable of absorbing (and/or scattering) strongly enough the light. PMID:24378540

  1. Localization of androgen receptors and estrogen receptors in the same cells of the songbird brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahr, M. (Univ. of Kaiserslautern (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-12-01

    Estrogens and androgens each have unique effects but act together for the neural differentiation and control of sexual behaviors in male vertebrates, such as the canary. The neuronal basis for these synergistic effects is elusive because the spatial relation between estrogen target cells and androgen target cells is unknown. This study localized estrogen receptor (ER)-containing cells by using immunocytochemistry and androgen receptor (AR)-containing cells by using autoradiography in the same sections of the male canary brain. Three cell types, those containing only ER, those containing only AR, and those containing both ER and AR, were found in tissue-specific frequencies. The midbrain nucleus intercollicularis exhibited the highest number of cells expressing both ER and AR, whereas ER and AR are expressed only in disjunctive cell populations in the forebrain nucleus hyperstriatalis ventrale, pars caudale. Synergistic effects of androgens and estrogens for the neural behavorial control could result from cells containing both ER and AR (intracellular) and from neural circuits containing ER and AR in different cells (intercellular).

  2. Multiphoton-generated localized electron plasma for membrane permeability modification in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, T.; Leblanc, M.; McMillan, J.; Westwood, J.; Khodaparast, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    Successful incorporation of a specific macromolecule into a single cell would be ideal for characterizing trafficking dynamics through plasmodesmata or for studying intracellular localizations. Here, we demonstrate NIR femtosecond laser-mediated infiltration of a membrane impermeable dextran-conjugated dye into living cells of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling stems. Based on the reactions of fluorescing vacuoles of transgenic cells and artificial cell walls comprised of nanocellulose, laser intensity and exposure time were adjusted to avoid deleterious effects. Using these plant-tailored laser parameters, cells were injected with the fluorophores and long-term dye retention was observed, all while preserving vital cell functions. This method is ideal for studies concerning cell-to-cell interactions and potentially paves the way for introducing transgenes to specific cells. This work was supported by NSF award IOS-0843372 to JHW, with additional support from and U.S. Department of Agriculture Hatch Project no. 135997, and by the Institute of Critical Technology and Applied Sciences (ICTAS) at Virginia Tech.

  3. The Arabidopsis stem cell factor POLTERGEIST is membrane localized and phospholipid stimulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Jennifer M; Clark, Steven E

    2010-03-01

    Stem cell maintenance and differentiation are tightly regulated in multicellular organisms. In plants, proper control of the stem cell populations is critical for extensive postembryonic organogenesis. The Arabidopsis thaliana protein phosphatase type 2C proteins POLTERGEIST (POL) and PLL1 are essential for maintenance of both the root and shoot stem cells. Specifically, POL and PLL1 are required for proper specification of key asymmetric cell divisions during stem cell initiation and maintenance. POL and PLL1 are known to be integral components of the CLE/WOX signaling pathways, but the location and mechanisms by which POL and PLL1 are regulated within these pathways are unclear. Here, we show that POL and PLL1 are dual-acylated plasma membrane proteins whose membrane localization is required for proper function. Furthermore, this localization places POL and PLL1 in proximity of the upstream plasma membrane receptors that regulate their activity. Additionally, we find that POL and PLL1 directly bind to multiple lipids and that POL is catalytically activated by phosphatidylinositol (4) phosphate [PI(4)P] in vitro. Based on these results, we propose that the upstream receptors in the CLE/WOX signaling pathways may function to either limit PI(4)P availability or antagonize PI(4)P stimulation of POL/PLL1. Significantly, the findings presented here suggest that phospholipids play an important role in promoting stem cell specification. PMID:20348433

  4. FOXP3 subcellular localization predicts recurrence in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald T Weed

    Full Text Available Forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3 expression in tumor infiltrating CD4(+T cells is generally associated with an intrinsic capacity to suppress tumor immunity. Based on this notion, different studies have evaluated the prognostic value of this maker in cancer but contradictory results have been found. Indeed, even within the same cancer population, the presence of CD4(+FOXP3(+T cells has been associated,with either a poor or a good prognosis, or no correlation has beenfound. Here, we demonstrate,in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, that what really represents a prognostic parameter is not the overall expression of FOXP3 but its intracellular localization.While overallFOXP3 expression in tumor infiltrating CD4(+T cells does not correlate with tumor recurrence, its intracellular localization within the CD4 cells does: nuclear FOXP3 (nFOXP3 is associated with tumor recurrence within 3 years, while cytoplasmicFOXP3 (cFOXP3 is associated with a lower likelihood of recurrence. Thus, we propose elevated levels of the cFOXP3/nFOXP3 ratio within tumor infiltrating CD4(+ T cells as a predictor of OSCC recurrence.

  5. Laparoscopic resection of tumor recurrence after radical nephrectomy for localized renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lessandro Curcio; Antonio Claudio Cunha; Juan Renteria; Daniel Presto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Local recurrence of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) after radical nephrectomy is a rare event. Some known risk factors are: clinical/pathological stage, locorregional disease and lyimph node positivity. Since up to 30-40% of patients can achieve a disease-free status, we show a case (video) in which we performed a laparoscopic excision of a local RCC, taking advantage of all the well-known benefits of laparoscopy.Case report A 56 years old female with a history of open radical nephrec...

  6. [Stereotactic radiotherapy is established treatment in localized non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailas, Liisa; Virsunen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Surgery has been the standard treatment in localized non-small cell lung cancer. Some of the early stage lung cancer patients are not suitable for surgery owing to associated diseases or refusing surgery. Ninety percent of untreated patients die within five years. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy is a technique in which highly focused radiation treatment is given at a couple of high single doses to the tumor region. The treatment results in an average of 90% local control of the cancer, and the adverse effects are minor. Treatment outcome is equivalent to those of surgical therapy and is better than obtained with conventional external radiation therapy. PMID:27132296

  7. Immunohistochemical localization of hepatopancreatic phospholipase in gastropods mollusc, Littorina littorea and Buccinum undatum digestive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarai Zied

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the digestive enzymes, phospholipase A2 (PLA2 hydrolyzes the essential dietary phospholipids in marine fish and shellfish. However, we know little about the organs that produce PLA2, and the ontogeny of the PLA2-cells. Accordingly, accurate localization of PLA2 in marine snails might afford a better understanding permitting the control of the quality and composition of diets and the mode of digestion of lipid food. Results We have previously producted an antiserum reacting specifically with mSDPLA2. It labeled zymogen granules of the hepatopancreatic acinar cells and the secretory materials of certain epithelial cells in the depths of epithelial crypts in the hepatopancreas of snail. To confirm this localization a laser capture microdissection was performed targeting stained cells of hepatopancreas tissue sections. A Western blot analysis revealed a strong signal at the expected size (30 kDa, probably corresponding to the PLA2. Conclusions The present results support the presence of two hepatopancreatic intracellular and extracellular PLA2 in the prosobranchs gastropods molluscs, Littorina littorea and Buccinum undatum and bring insights on their localizations.

  8. Co-localization of GSTP1 and JNK in transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Pljesa-Ercegovac

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of urinary bladder belongs to glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1 overexpressing tumors. Upregulated GSTP1 in TCC is related to apoptosis inhibition. This antiapoptotic effects of GSTP1 might be mediated through protein:protein interaction with c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK. Herein, we analyzed whether a direct link between GSTP1 and JNK exists in TCC. The presence of GSTP1/JNK complexes was analyzed by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting in 20 TCC specimens, obtained after surgery. Co-localization of GSTP1 and JNK was also investigated in the 5637 TCC cell line by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. By means of immunoprecipitation we show for the first time the presence of GSTP1/JNK complexes in all TCC samples studied. A co-localization of GSTP1 and JNK was also demonstrated in the 5637 TCC cell line by means of confocal microscopy. Protein-protein interactions, together with co-localization between GSTP1 and JNK provide evidence that GSTP1 most probably inhibits apoptosis in TCC cells by non-covalent binding to JNK.

  9. Plasticity in variation of xylem and phloem cell characteristics of Norway spruce under different local conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozica eGricar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is limited information on intra-annual plasticity of secondary tissues of tree species growing under different environmental conditions. To increase the knowledge about the plasticity of secondary growth, which allows trees to adapt to specific local climatic regimes, we examined climate–radial growth relationships of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. H. Karst. from three contrasting locations in the temperate climatic zone by analyzing tree-ring widths for the period 1932–2010, and cell characteristics in xylem and phloem increments formed in the years 2009–2011. Variation in the structure of xylem and phloem increments clearly shows that plasticity in seasonal dynamics of cambial cell production and cell differentiation exists on xylem and phloem sides. Anatomical characteristics of xylem and phloem cells are predominantly site-specific characteristics, because they varied among sites but were fairly uniform among years in trees from the same site. Xylem and phloem tissues formed in the first part of the growing season seemed to be more stable in structure, indicating their priority over latewood and late phloem for tree performance. Long-term climate and radial growth analyses revealed that growth was in general less dependent on precipitation than on temperature; however, growth sensitivity to local conditions differed among the sites. Only partial dependence of radial growth of spruce on climatic factors on the selected sites confirms its strategy to adapt the structure of wood and phloem increments to function optimally in local conditions.

  10. AltMV TGB1 nucleolar localization requires homologous interaction and correlates with cell wall localization associated with cell-to-cell movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Potexvirus Alternanthera mosaic virus has multifunctional triple gene block (TGB) proteins, among which our studies have focused on the properties of the TGB1 protein. The TGB1 of AltMV has functions including RNA binding, RNA silencing suppression, and cell-to-cell movement, and is known to for...

  11. Effect of resection on local failure in irradiated non-oat cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From January 1969 through December 1979, 171 patients completed a course of high dose definitive radiotherapy alone for non-oat cell carcinoma of the lung. During the same period, 53 patients completed a course of definitive postoperative radiotherapy after undergoing resection of the primary tumor. The two groups were otherwise very similar with regard to patient related and tumor related variables. A detailed analysis of the incidence of clinically documented local (in-field) failure on the basis of clinical T and N stages was performed. A comparison of the incidence of local failure as the first site of failure for patients with T/sub 1-2/ tumors demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in local failure in patients whose primary tumors were resected. Histology (epidermoid vs. non-epidermoid) had no apparent effect on the frequency of local failure, either with or without resection. A review of past experience indicates that local failure is common after definitive irradiation alone, and is due to a low rate of sterilization of the primary tumor, even with tolerance doses of irradiation. Data are presented to support a reappraisal of the role of combined resection and irradiation in future clinical trials, to reduce the present unacceptably high rate of local failure in potentially curable patients treated by irradiation alone

  12. Beta cell count instead of beta cell mass to assess and localize growth in beta cell population following pancreatic duct ligation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Chintinne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic-tail duct ligation (PDL in adult rodents has been reported to induce beta cell generation and increase beta cell mass but increases in beta cell number have not been demonstrated. This study examines whether PDL increases beta cell number and whether this is caused by neogenesis of small clusters and/or their growth to larger aggregates. METHODOLOGY: Total beta cell number and its distribution over small (100 µm clusters was determined in pancreatic tails of 10-week-old mice, 2 weeks after PDL or sham. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PDL increased total beta cell mass but not total beta cell number. It induced neogenesis of small beta cell clusters (2.2-fold higher number which contained a higher percent proliferating beta cells (1.9% Ki67+cells than sham tails (<0.2%; their higher beta cell number represented <5% of total beta cell number and was associated with a similar increase in alpha cell number. It is unknown whether the regenerative process is causally related to the inflammatory infiltration in PDL-tails. Human pancreases with inflammatory infiltration also exhibited activation of proliferation in small beta cell clusters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The PDL model illustrates the advantage of direct beta cell counts over beta cell mass measurements when assessing and localizing beta cell regeneration in the pancreas. It demonstrates the ability of the adult mouse pancreas for neogenesis of small beta cell clusters with activated beta cell proliferation. Further studies should investigate conditions under which neoformed small beta cell clusters grow to larger aggregates and hence to higher total beta cell numbers.

  13. Cell type-dependent uptake, localization, and cytotoxicity of 1.9 nm gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coulter JA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan A Coulter,1 Suneil Jain,2 Karl T Butterworth,2 Laura Taggart,2 Glenn Dickson,2 Stephen J McMahon,3 Wendy Hyland,1 Mark F Muir,3 Coleman Trainor,2 Alan Hounsell,2,4 Joe M O'Sullivan,2,4 Giuseppe Schettino,2 Fred Currell,3 David G Hirst,1 Kevin M Prise21School of Pharmacy, McClay Research Centre, 2Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, 3School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, 4Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, IrelandBackground: This follow-up study aims to determine the physical parameters which govern the differential radiosensitization capacity of two tumor cell lines and one immortalized normal cell line to 1.9 nm gold nanoparticles. In addition to comparing the uptake potential, localization, and cytotoxicity of 1.9 nm gold nanoparticles, the current study also draws on comparisons between nanoparticle size and total nanoparticle uptake based on previously published data.Methods: We quantified gold nanoparticle uptake using atomic emission spectroscopy and imaged intracellular localization by transmission electron microscopy. Cell growth delay and clonogenic assays were used to determine cytotoxicity and radiosensitization potential, respectively. Mechanistic data were obtained by Western blot, flow cytometry, and assays for reactive oxygen species.Results: Gold nanoparticle uptake was preferentially observed in tumor cells, resulting in an increased expression of cleaved caspase proteins and an accumulation of cells in sub G1 phase. Despite this, gold nanoparticle cytotoxicity remained low, with immortalized normal cells exhibiting an LD50 concentration approximately 14 times higher than tumor cells. The surviving fraction for gold nanoparticle-treated cells at 3 Gy compared with that of untreated control cells indicated a strong dependence on cell type in respect to radiosensitization potential.Conclusion: Gold nanoparticles were most avidly endocytosed and localized within cytoplasmic

  14. Effect of Hypergravity on Localization Calcium Ions in Plant Cells Grown in Vivo and in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedukha, Olena

    Using plant callus tissues and Arabidopsis thaliana plants as model systems we have been investigated the effect of hypergravity on the localization and relative content of calcium ions in photosynthesizing cells. The tobacco callus cells in log stage of growth and mesophyll cells from developed A. thaliana leaves were used in the experiments. Plant samples were exposed to hypergravity at 6.5 g, 10g and 14 g for 15-60 min. After centrifugation, dye Fluo-4 was loaded in the control leaves and the centrifuged samples by the standard cytochemical method. Observation of calcium fluorescence was carried out with a laser confocal microscope LSM 5 Pascal at the excitation wave 488 nm (by the argon laser), at emission wavelength 516 nm. The data of the calcium ion distribution and quantification in cells were obtained using software "Pascal" (Carl Zeiss). The effect of hypergravity on redistribution of calcium ions in plant cells has been established. This effect is depended from exposure time and from the value of hypergravity. The cells cultivated in vitro is showed fast response to hypergravity influence. Plasmolysis cells and calcium domains formation have been observed in most of callus cells. This influence was like to that, which was wrote in Funaria hygrometrica protonema cells after 8.5 g influence (Sytnik et al., 1984). Leaf cells of A. thaliana were of less responsively to hypergravity than callus cells. Sytnik K, Kordyum E, Nedukha O. et al. 1984. Plant Cell Under Change of Geophysical Factors. Kiev: Naukova Dumka, 1-134 p.

  15. Parallel local search for solving Constraint Problems on the Cell Broadband Engine (Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvator Abreu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We explore the use of the Cell Broadband Engine (Cell/BE for short for combinatorial optimization applications: we present a parallel version of a constraint-based local search algorithm that has been implemented on a multiprocessor BladeCenter machine with twin Cell/BE processors (total of 16 SPUs per blade. This algorithm was chosen because it fits very well the Cell/BE architecture and requires neither shared memory nor communication between processors, while retaining a compact memory footprint. We study the performance on several large optimization benchmarks and show that this achieves mostly linear time speedups, even sometimes super-linear. This is possible because the parallel implementation might explore simultaneously different parts of the search space and therefore converge faster towards the best sub-space and thus towards a solution. Besides getting speedups, the resulting times exhibit a much smaller variance, which benefits applications where a timely reply is critical.

  16. Cytochemical localization of calcium in cap cells of primary roots of Zea mays L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of calcium (Ca) in caps of vertically- and horizontally-oriented roots of Zea mays was monitored to determine its possible role in root graviresponsiveness. A modification of the antimonate precipitation procedure was used to localize Ca in situ. In vertically-oriented roots, the presumed graviperceptive (i.e., columella) cells were characterized by minimal and symmetric staining of the plasmalemma and mitochondria. No precipitate was present in plasmodesmata or cell walls. Within 5 min after horizontal reorientation, staining was associated with the portion of the cell wall adjacent to the distal end of the cell. This asymmetric staining persisted throughout the onset of gravicurvature. No staining of lateral cell walls of columella cells was observed at any stage of gravicurvature, suggesting that a lateral flow of Ca through the columella tissue of horizontally-oriented roots does not occur. The outermost peripheral cells of roots oriented horizontally and vertically secrete Ca through plasmodesmata-like structures in their cell walls. These results are discussed relative to proposed roles of root-cap Ca in root gravicurvature.

  17. Actin and Arp2/3 localize at the centrosome of interphase cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan, E-mail: jan.gettemans@vib-ugent.be

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Actin was detected at the centrosome with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. {yields} Centrosomal actin was found in interphase but not mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. {yields} Neither the anti-actin antibody C4 that binds to globular, monomer actin, nor the anti-actin antibody 2G2 that recognizes the nuclear conformation of actin detect actin at the centrosome. {yields} The Arp2/3 complex transiently localizes at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. -- Abstract: Although many actin binding proteins such as cortactin and the Arp2/3 activator WASH localize at the centrosome, the presence and conformation of actin at the centrosome has remained elusive. Here, we report the localization of actin at the centrosome in interphase but not in mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. Centrosomal actin was detected with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. In addition, we report the transient presence of the Arp2/3 complex at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. Overexpression of an Arp2/3 component resulted in expansion of the pericentriolar matrix and selective accumulation of the Arp2/3 component in the pericentriolar matrix. Altogether, we hypothesize that the centrosome transiently recruits Arp2/3 to perform processes such as centrosome separation prior to mitotic entry, whereas the observed constitutive centrosomal actin staining in interphase cells reinforces the current model of actin-based centrosome reorientation toward the leading edge in migrating cells.

  18. Immunoreactivity of glucose transporter 8 is localized in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and in ependymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Ryuta; Chiba, Yoichi; Tsuboi, Kazuhito; Matsumoto, Koichi; Kawauchi, Machi; Fujihara, Ryuji; Mashima, Masato; Kanenishi, Kenji; Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Ueno, Masaki

    2016-08-01

    High fructose intake is known to be associated with increased plasma triglyceride concentration, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, and high blood pressure. In addition, excess fructose intake is also thought to be a risk factor for dementia. Previous immunohistochemical studies have shown the presence of glucose transporter 5 (GLUT5), a major transporter of fructose, in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and ependymal cells in the brains of humans, rats, and mice, while GLUT2, a minor transporter of fructose, was localized in the ependymal cells of rat brain. In this study, immunoreactivity for the fructose transporter GLUT8 was observed in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells in the choroid plexus and in the ependymal cells of the brains of humans and mice. These structures were not immunoreactive for GLUT7, GLUT11, and GLUT12. Our findings support the hypothesis of the transport of intravascular fructose through the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and the ependymal cells. PMID:27160096

  19. Local area water removal analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell under gas purge conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Yu-Ming; Lee, Shuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, local area water content distribution under various gas purging conditions are experimentally analyzed for the first time. The local high frequency resistance (HFR) is measured using novel micro sensors. The results reveal that the liquid water removal rate in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is non-uniform. In the under-the-channel area, the removal of liquid water is governed by both convective and diffusive flux of the through-plane drying. Thus, almost all of the liquid water is removed within 30 s of purging with gas. However, liquid water that is stored in the under-the-rib area is not easy to remove during 1 min of gas purging. Therefore, the re-hydration of the membrane by internal diffusive flux is faster than that in the under-the-channel area. Consequently, local fuel starvation and membrane degradation can degrade the performance of a fuel cell that is started from cold. PMID:22368495

  20. Characteristics of the Localization of Connexin 43 in Satellite Cells during Skeletal Muscle Regeneration In Vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For myogenesis, new myotubes are formed by the fusion of differentiated myoblasts. In the sequence of events for myotube formation, intercellular communication through gap junctions composed of connexin 43 (Cx43) plays critical roles in regulating the alignment and fusion of myoblasts in advances of myotube formation in vitro. On the other hand, the relationship between the expression patterns of Cx43 and the process of myotube formation in satellite cells during muscle regeneration in vivo remains poorly understood. The present study investigated the relationship between Cx43 and satellite cells in muscle regeneration in vivo. The expression of Cx43 was detected in skeletal muscles on day 1 post-muscle injury, but not in control muscles. Interestingly, the expression of Cx43 was not localized on the inside of the basement membrane of myofibers in the regenerating muscles. Moreover, although the clusters of differentiated satellite cells, which represent a more advanced stage of myotube formation, were observed on the inside of the basement membrane of myofibers in regenerating muscles, the expression of Cx43 was not localized in the clusters of these satellite cells. Therefore, in the present study, it was suggested that Cx43 may not directly contribute to muscle regeneration via satellite cells

  1. Local Field Potentials Encode Place Cell Ensemble Activation during Hippocampal Sharp Wave Ripples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taxidis, Jiannis; Anastassiou, Costas A; Diba, Kamran; Koch, Christof

    2015-08-01

    Whether the activation of spiking cell ensembles can be encoded in the local field potential (LFP) remains unclear. We address this question by combining in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the rat hippocampus with realistic biophysical modeling, and explore the LFP of place cell sequence spiking ("replays") during sharp wave ripples. We show that multi-site perisomatic LFP amplitudes, in the ∼150-200 Hz frequency band, reliably reflect spatial constellations of spiking cells, embedded within non-spiking populations, and encode activation of local place cell ensembles during in vivo replays. We find spatiotemporal patterns in the LFP, which remain consistent between sequence replays, in conjunction with the ordered activation of place cell ensembles. Clustering such patterns provides an efficient segregation of replay events from non-replay-associated ripples. This work demonstrates how spatiotemporal ensemble spiking is encoded extracellularly, providing a window for efficient, LFP-based detection and monitoring of structured population activity in vivo. PMID:26247865

  2. Columnar deformation of human red blood cell by highly localized fiber optic Bessel beam stretcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungrae; Joo, Boram; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Im, Seongil; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2015-11-01

    A single human red blood cell was optically stretched along two counter-propagating fiber-optic Bessel-like beams in an integrated lab-on-a-chip structure. The beam enabled highly localized stretching of RBC, and it induced a nonlinear mechanical deformation to finally reach an irreversible columnar shape that has not been reported. We characterized and systematically quantified this optically induced mechanical deformation by the geometrical aspect ratio of stretched RBC and the irreversible stretching time. The proposed RBC mechanism can realize a versatile and compact opto-mechanical platform for optical diagnosis of biological substances in the single cell level. PMID:26601005

  3. Single Molecule Localization Microscopy of Mammalian Cell Nuclei on the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander; Xing, Jun; Birk, Udo J; Cremer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear texture analysis is a well-established method of cellular pathology. It is hampered, however, by the limits of conventional light microscopy (ca. 200 nm). These limits have been overcome by a variety of super-resolution approaches. An especially promising approach to chromatin texture analysis is single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) as it provides the highest resolution using fluorescent based methods. At the present state of the art, using fixed whole cell samples and standard DNA dyes, a structural resolution of chromatin in the 50-100 nm range is obtained using SMLM. We highlight how the combination of localization microscopy with standard fluorophores opens the avenue to a plethora of studies including the spatial distribution of DNA and associated proteins in eukaryotic cell nuclei with the potential to elucidate the functional organization of chromatin. These views are based on our experience as well as on recently published research in this field. PMID:27446198

  4. Local electromechanical properties of different phenotype models of vascular smooth muscle cells using force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gary; Reukov, Vladimir; Nikiforov, Maxim; Guo, Senli; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei; Vertegel, Alexey

    2010-03-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) exist as a spectrum of diverse phenotypes raning between contractile and synthetic, the latter being associated with disease states. Different VSMC phenotypes, modeled using serum-starvation, exhibit characteristic electromechanical responses that can be distinguished using band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy (BEPFM), which maps information at the same rate as the atomic force microscope (AFM) scan performed simultaneously. BEPFM image formation mechanism in the culture medium is determined using excitation steps from 1 mV to 100 V. High voltage improves contrast between cells and collagen-coated substrates. Viscoelasticity from AFM stress relaxation experiments and local elasticity from force maps correlate to BEPFM data providing a map of local mechanical properties on different VSMCs.

  5. Combined local current distribution measurements and high resolution neutron radiography of operating Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Alexander; Wippermann, Klaus; Mergel, Juergen; Lehnert, Werner; Stolten, Detlef [Institute of Energy Research, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Sanders, Tilman; Baumhoefer, Thorsten; Sauer, Dirk U. [Institute for Power Electronics and Electrical Drives (ISEA), RWTH Aachen University, Jaegerstrasse 17-19, 52066 Aachen (Germany); Manke, Ingo; Banhart, John [Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Berlin Institute of Technology, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Centre Berlin (Hahn-Meitner-Institute), SF3, Glienicker Strasse 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, Andre; Schloesser, Jana [Helmholtz Centre Berlin (Hahn-Meitner-Institute), SF3, Glienicker Strasse 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Hartnig, Christoph [Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research (ZSW), Helmholtzstrasse 8, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The current and fluid distribution in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs) was investigated in situ by means of combined high resolution neutron radiography and locally resolved current distribution measurements. The used neutron radiography set-up allows high spatial resolutions down to 70 {mu}m at the full test cell area. A local formation of water droplets in the cathode flow field channels could be observed. Strongly inhomogeneous current distributions during cathodic flooding processes result in a performance loss of up to 30% of the initial value. Single CO{sub 2} bubbles can be observed at low current densities. The water and current distribution during bi-functional operation of a DMFC was measured for the first time. (author)

  6. Protein-specific localization of a rhodamine-based calcium-sensor in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Marcel; Porth, Isabel; Hauke, Sebastian; Braun, Felix; Herten, Dirk-Peter; Wombacher, Richard

    2016-06-28

    A small synthetic calcium sensor that can be site-specifically coupled to proteins in living cells by utilizing the bio-orthogonal HaloTag labeling strategy is presented. We synthesized an iodo-derivatized BAPTA chelator with a tetramethyl rhodamine fluorophore that allows further modification by Sonogashira cross-coupling. The presented calcium sensitive dye shows a 200-fold increase in fluorescence upon calcium binding. The derivatization with an aliphatic linker bearing a terminal haloalkane-function by Sonogashira cross-coupling allows the localization of the calcium sensor to Halo fusion proteins which we successfully demonstrate in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The herein reported highly sensitive tetramethyl rhodamine based calcium indicator, which can be selectively localized to proteins, is a powerful tool to determine changes in calcium levels inside living cells with spatiotemporal resolution. PMID:27072883

  7. Investigation into local cell mechanics by atomic force microscopy mapping and optical tweezer vertical indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceano, G; Yousafzai, M S; Ma, W; Ndoye, F; Venturelli, L; Hussain, I; Bonin, S; Niemela, J; Scoles, G; Cojoc, D; Ferrari, E

    2016-02-12

    Investigating the mechanical properties of cells could reveal a potential source of label-free markers of cancer progression, based on measurable viscoelastic parameters. The Young's modulus has proved to be the most thoroughly studied so far, however, even for the same cell type, the elastic modulus reported in different studies spans a wide range of values, mainly due to the application of different experimental conditions. This complicates the reliable use of elasticity for the mechanical phenotyping of cells. Here we combine two complementary techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical tweezer microscopy (OTM), providing a comprehensive mechanical comparison of three human breast cell lines: normal myoepithelial (HBL-100), luminal breast cancer (MCF-7) and basal breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells. The elastic modulus was measured locally by AFM and OTM on single cells, using similar indentation approaches but different measurement parameters. Peak force tapping AFM was employed at nanonewton forces and high loading rates to draw a viscoelastic map of each cell and the results indicated that the region on top of the nucleus provided the most meaningful results. OTM was employed at those locations at piconewton forces and low loading rates, to measure the elastic modulus in a real elastic regime and rule out the contribution of viscous forces typical of AFM. When measured by either AFM or OTM, the cell lines' elasticity trend was similar for the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, which were found to be significantly softer than the other two cell types in both measurements. However, when comparing HBL-100 and MCF-7 cells, we found significant differences only when using OTM. PMID:26683826

  8. Investigation into local cell mechanics by atomic force microscopy mapping and optical tweezer vertical indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceano, G.; Yousafzai, M. S.; Ma, W.; Ndoye, F.; Venturelli, L.; Hussain, I.; Bonin, S.; Niemela, J.; Scoles, G.; Cojoc, D.; Ferrari, E.

    2016-02-01

    Investigating the mechanical properties of cells could reveal a potential source of label-free markers of cancer progression, based on measurable viscoelastic parameters. The Young’s modulus has proved to be the most thoroughly studied so far, however, even for the same cell type, the elastic modulus reported in different studies spans a wide range of values, mainly due to the application of different experimental conditions. This complicates the reliable use of elasticity for the mechanical phenotyping of cells. Here we combine two complementary techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical tweezer microscopy (OTM), providing a comprehensive mechanical comparison of three human breast cell lines: normal myoepithelial (HBL-100), luminal breast cancer (MCF-7) and basal breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells. The elastic modulus was measured locally by AFM and OTM on single cells, using similar indentation approaches but different measurement parameters. Peak force tapping AFM was employed at nanonewton forces and high loading rates to draw a viscoelastic map of each cell and the results indicated that the region on top of the nucleus provided the most meaningful results. OTM was employed at those locations at piconewton forces and low loading rates, to measure the elastic modulus in a real elastic regime and rule out the contribution of viscous forces typical of AFM. When measured by either AFM or OTM, the cell lines’ elasticity trend was similar for the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, which were found to be significantly softer than the other two cell types in both measurements. However, when comparing HBL-100 and MCF-7 cells, we found significant differences only when using OTM.

  9. Epidermal Th22 and Tc17 cells form a localized disease memory in clinically healed psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk, Stanley; Wikén, Maria; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nylén, Susanne; Talme, Toomas; Ståhle, Mona; Eidsmo, Liv

    2014-04-01

    Psoriasis is a common and chronic inflammatory skin disease in which T cells play a key role. Effective treatment heals the skin without scarring, but typically psoriasis recurs in previously affected areas. A pathogenic memory within the skin has been proposed, but the nature of such site-specific disease memory is unknown. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been ascribed a role in immunity after resolved viral skin infections. Because of their localization in the epidermal compartment of the skin, TRM may contribute to tissue pathology during psoriasis. In this study, we investigated whether resolved psoriasis lesions contain TRM cells with the ability to maintain and potentially drive recurrent disease. Three common and effective therapies, narrowband-UVB treatment and long-term biologic treatment systemically inhibiting TNF-α or IL-12/23 signaling were studied. Epidermal T cells were highly activated in psoriasis and a high proportion of CD8 T cells expressed TRM markers. In resolved psoriasis, a population of cutaneous lymphocyte-associated Ag, CCR6, CD103, and IL-23R expressing epidermal CD8 T cells was highly enriched. Epidermal CD8 T cells expressing the TRM marker CD103 responded to ex vivo stimulation with IL-17A production and epidermal CD4 T cells responded with IL-22 production after as long as 6 y of TNF-α inhibition. Our data suggest that epidermal TRM cells are retained in resolved psoriasis and that these cells are capable of producing cytokines with a critical role in psoriasis pathogenesis. We provide a potential mechanism for a site-specific T cell-driven disease memory in psoriasis. PMID:24610014

  10. Estimation of localized current anomalies in polymer electrolyte fuel cells from magnetic flux density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, Takaaki; Koike, Masanori; Ando, Shigeru; Gotoh, Yuji; Izumi, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose novel inversion methods to estimate defects or localized current anomalies in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). One method is an imaging approach with L1-norm regularization that is suitable for estimation of focal anomalies compared to Tikhonov regularization. The second is a complex analysis based method in which multiple pointwise current anomalies can be identified directly and algebraically from the measured magnetic flux density.

  11. Localizing Proteins in Fixed Giardia lamblia and Live Cultured Mammalian Cells by Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyindodo-Ogari, Lilian; Schwartzbach, Steven D; Skalli, Omar; Estraño, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) are complementary methods for studying the intracellular localization of proteins. Confocal fluorescence microscopy provides a rapid and technically simple method to identify the organelle in which a protein localizes but only EM can identify the suborganellular compartment in which that protein is present. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, however, can provide information not obtainable by EM but required to understand the dynamics and interactions of specific proteins. In addition, confocal fluorescence microscopy of cells transfected with a construct encoding a protein of interest fused to a fluorescent protein tag allows live cell studies of the subcellular localization of that protein and the monitoring in real time of its trafficking. Immunostaining methods for confocal fluorescence microscopy are also faster and less involved than those for EM allowing rapid optimization of the antibody dilution needed and a determination of whether protein antigenicity is maintained under fixation conditions used for EM immunogold labeling. This chapter details a method to determine by confocal fluorescence microscopy the intracellular localization of a protein by transfecting the organism of interest, in this case Giardia lamblia, with the cDNA encoding the protein of interest and then processing these organisms for double label immunofluorescence staining after chemical fixation. Also presented is a method to identify the organelle targeting information in the presequence of a precursor protein, in this case the presequence of the precursor to the Euglena light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein of photosystem II precursor (pLHCPII), using live cell imaging of mammalian COS7 cells transiently transfected with a plasmid encoding a pLHCPII presequence fluorescent protein fusion and stained with organelle-specific fluorescent dyes. PMID:27515076

  12. Radio(chemo)therapy in locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Glatzer; Olgun Elicin; Sara Ramella; Ursula Nestle; Paul Martin Putora

    2016-01-01

    Definitive radiochemotherapy is the standard treatment for many patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Treatment outcomes have improved over the last decades. Several treatment regimens have been shown effective and safe. This review summarises the results of significant studies between 1996 and 2015 on concomitant and sequential radiochemotherapy regimens and radiation dose per fraction. Beside therapy regimens, optimised radiotherapy planning is indispensable to i...

  13. Columnar deformation of human red blood cell by highly localized fiber optic Bessel beam stretcher

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sungrae; Joo, Boram; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Im, Seongil; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2015-01-01

    A single human red blood cell was optically stretched along two counter-propagating fiber-optic Bessel-like beams in an integrated lab-on-a-chip structure. The beam enabled highly localized stretching of RBC, and it induced a nonlinear mechanical deformation to finally reach an irreversible columnar shape that has not been reported. We characterized and systematically quantified this optically induced mechanical deformation by the geometrical aspect ratio of stretched RBC and the irreversible...

  14. Immunohistochemical localization of hepatopancreatic phospholipase A2 in Hexaplex Trunculus digestive cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rebai Tarek; Bezzine Sofiane; Misery Laurent; Karray Aida; Boulais Nicholas; Zarai Zied; Gargouri Youssef; Mejdoub Hafedh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Mammalian sPLA2-IB localization cell are well characterized. In contrast, much less is known about aquatic primitive ones. The aquatic world contains a wide variety of living species and, hence represents a great potential for discovering new lipolytic enzymes and the mode of digestion of lipid food. Results The marine snail digestive phospholipase A2 (mSDPLA2) has been previously purified from snail hepatopancreas. The specific polyclonal antibodies were prepared and used...

  15. Effect of trypsin on the migration of stem hemopoietic cells in local irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The administration of trypsin to mice induced short-term stimulation of the migration process of the stem hemopoietic cells accompanied by an increase of the pool of the migrating spleen colony forming units (CFUs) in healthy animals as well as in those exposed to local and subtotal irradiation. A conclusion was made on a definite radioresistance of the biological reactions controlling the process of CFUs migration

  16. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  17. Immunohistochemical localization of renin-containing cells in two elasmobranch species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, E R; Reale, E; Luciano, L

    2016-06-01

    Renin immunoreactivity was localized at the light and electron microscopic level in two elasmobranch fish species, the Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina, and river ray, Potamotrygon humerosa. At the light microscopic level, the peroxidase-anti-peroxidase method showed a positive immunoreactivity in modified smooth muscle cells in kidney afferent arterioles as well as in arterioles of several organs: rectal gland, inter-renal gland, conus arteriosus, and gill. Electron microscopic renin-positive immunogold localization was confined to the contents of membrane bound granules in the modified smooth muscle cells of these arterioles. The presence of renin-containing granules in the modified smooth muscle, "granular cells," of the renal glomerular afferent arteriole of these two stingray species adds support to earlier studies which showed the structural components of a complete juxtaglomerular apparatus and some of the biochemical and molecular components of a renin-angiotensin system (RAS) as found in teleost fish, reptiles, birds, and mammals. A notable result, however, was the renin-positive immunoreaction in the arteriolar wall of all other organs studied here. The presence of this "diffuse renin system" in the connective tissue of various organs suggests that in these two stingray species in addition to local organ-specific functions, the RAS may act as a systemic mechanism to regulate blood pressure and blood flow in the body. PMID:26746846

  18. SEU-hardened silicon bipolar and GaAs MESFET SRAM cells using local redundancy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon bipolar and GaAs FET SRAM's have proven to be more difficult to harden with respect to single-event upset mechanisms than have silicon CMOS SRAM's. This is a fundamental property of bipolar and JFET or MESFET device technologies which do not have a high-impedance, nonactive isolation between the control electrode and the current or voltage being controlled. All SEU circuit level hardening techniques applied at the local level must use some type of information storage redundancy so that information loss on one node due to an SEU event can be recovered from information stored elsewhere in the cell. In CMOS technologies, this can be achieved by the use of simple cross-coupling resistors, whereas in bipolar and FET technologies, no such simple approach is possible. Several approaches to the use of local redundancy in bipolar and FET technologies are discussed in this paper. At the expense of increased cell complexity and increased power consumption and write time, several approaches are capable of providing complete SEU hardness at the local cell level

  19. Computational local stiffness analysis of biological cell: High aspect ratio single wall carbon nanotube tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TermehYousefi, Amin; Bagheri, Samira; Shahnazar, Sheida; Rahman, Md Habibur; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib

    2016-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potentially ideal tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) due to the robust mechanical properties, nanoscale diameter and also their ability to be functionalized by chemical and biological components at the tip ends. This contribution develops the idea of using CNTs as an AFM tip in computational analysis of the biological cells. The proposed software was ABAQUS 6.13 CAE/CEL provided by Dassault Systems, which is a powerful finite element (FE) tool to perform the numerical analysis and visualize the interactions between proposed tip and membrane of the cell. Finite element analysis employed for each section and displacement of the nodes located in the contact area was monitored by using an output database (ODB). Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic model of the cell allows the simulation to obtain a new method for estimating the stiffness and spring constant of the cell. Stress and strain curve indicates the yield stress point which defines as a vertical stress and plan stress. Spring constant of the cell and the local stiffness was measured as well as the applied force of CNT-AFM tip on the contact area of the cell. This reliable integration of CNT-AFM tip process provides a new class of high performance nanoprobes for single biological cell analysis. PMID:26652417

  20. Local Production of Interferon Gamma by Invariant Natural Killer T cells Modulates Acute Lyme Carditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Chris M.; Bates, Tonya C.; Izadi, Hooman; Radolf, Justin D.; Huber, Sally A.; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Anguita, Juan

    2009-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is the only known human pathogen that directly activates invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. The number and activation kinetics of iNKT cells vary greatly among different strains of mice. We now report the role of the iNKT cell response in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease using C57Bl/6 mice, a strain with optimal iNKT cell activation that is resistant to the development of spirochetal-induced inflammation. During experimental infection of B6 mice with B. burgdorferi, iNKT cells localize to the inflamed heart where they are activated by CD1d-expressing macrophages. Activation of iNKT cells in vivo results in the production of IFNγ, which we demonstrate ameliorates the severity of murine Lyme carditis by at least two mechanisms. First, IFNγ enhances the recognition of B. burgdorferi by macrophages, leading to increased phagocytosis of the spirochete. Secondly, IFNγ activation of macrophages increases the surface expression of CD1d, thereby facilitating further iNKT activation. Collectively, our data demonstrate that in the resistant background, B6, iNKT cells modulate the severity of murine Lyme carditis through the action of IFNγ, which appears to self-renew through a positive feedback loop during infection. PMID:19265151

  1. Localization of bleomycin in a single living cell using three-photon excitation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Anil T.; Brautigan, David L.; Hecht, Sidney M.; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2001-04-01

    Bleomycin has been used in the clinic as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of several neoplasms, including non-Hodgkins lymphomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and testicular tumors. The effectiveness of bleomycin is believed to be derived from its ability to bind and oxidatively cleave DNA in the presence of a iron cofactor in vivo. A substantial amount of data on BLM has been collected, there is little information concerning the effects of bleomycin in living cells. In order to obtain data pertinent to the effects of BLM in intact cells, we have exploited the intrinsic fluorescence property of bleomycin to monitor the uptake of the drug in mammalian cells. We employed two light microscopy techniques, a wide-field and three-photon excitation (760 nm) fluorescence microscopy. Treatment of HeLa cells with bleomycin resulted in rapid to localization within the cells. In addition data collected from the wide field experiments, three-photon excitation of BLM which considerably reduced the phototoxic effect compared with UV light excitation in the wide-field microscopy indicated co-localization of the drug to regions of the cytoplasm occupied by the endoplasmic reticulum probe, DiOC5. The data clearly indicates that the cellular uptake of bleomycin after one minute includes the nucleus as well as in cytoplasm. Contrary to previous studies, which indicate chromosomal DNA as the target of bleomycin, the current findings suggest that the drug is distributed to many areas within the cell, including the endoplasmic reticulum, an organelle that is known to contain ribonucleic acids.

  2. Local failure in patients treated with radiotherapy and multidrug chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-three patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, 40 Gy in the chest tumor. Intrathoracic failure occurred in 89% of the cases with extensive disease and in 60% of those with limited disease. Since 86% of all failures were localized within the target volume, one can conclude that in most cases the radiation dose was too low for eradication of the tumour. The treatment technique resulted in dose inhomogeneities of more than ±5% in 45% of the cases. The high local failure rate might indicate the need of improved radiotherapy, in the first place higher radiation dose. However, 82% of the patients with limited disease and local failure and 50% of those without local failure also developed distant metastases. This might indicate that the curative potential of improved thoracic radiotherapy probably is limited. Besides, lethal treatment toxicity affected particularly patients in whom local cure had been achieved, indicating the difficulty of increasing the treatment intensity without increasing the lethal toxicity in potentially curable cases. (orig.)

  3. The immunodominant myeloperoxidase T-cell epitope induces local cell-mediated injury in antimyeloperoxidase glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Joshua D; Chang, Janet; Hickey, Michael J; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Fugger, Lars; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2012-09-25

    Microscopic polyangiitis is an autoimmune small-vessel vasculitis that often manifests as focal and necrotizing glomerulonephritis and renal failure. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic Abs (ANCAs) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) play a role in this disease, but the role of autoreactive MPO-specific CD4(+) T cells is uncertain. By screening overlapping peptides of 20 amino acids spanning the MPO molecule, we identified an immunodominant MPO CD4(+) T-cell epitope (MPO(409-428)). Immunizing C57BL/6 mice with MPO(409-428) induced focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis similar to that seen after whole MPO immunization, when MPO was deposited in glomeruli. Transfer of an MPO(409-428)-specific CD4(+) T-cell clone to Rag1(-/-) mice induced focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis when glomerular MPO deposition was induced either by passive transfer of MPO-ANCA and LPS or by planting MPO(409-428) conjugated to a murine antiglomerular basement membrane mAb. MPO(409-428) also induced biologically active anti-MPO Abs in mice. The MPO(409-428) epitope has a minimum immunogenic core region of 11 amino acids, MPO(415-426), with several critical residues. ANCA-activated neutrophils not only induce injury but lodged the autoantigen MPO in glomeruli, allowing autoreactive anti-MPO CD4(+) cells to induce delayed type hypersensitivity-like necrotizing glomerular lesions. These studies identify an immunodominant MPO T-cell epitope and redefine how effector responses can induce injury in MPO-ANCA-associated microscopic polyangiitis. PMID:22955884

  4. Local Anesthetics Induce Apoptosis in Human Thyroid Cancer Cells through the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan-Ching Chang; Yi-Chiung Hsu; Chien-Liang Liu; Shih-Yuan Huang; Meng-Chun Hu; Shih-Ping Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Local anesthetics are frequently used in fine-needle aspiration of thyroid lesions and locoregional control of persistent or recurrent thyroid cancer. Recent evidence suggests that local anesthetics have a broad spectrum of effects including inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in neuronal and other types of cells. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment with lidocaine and bupivacaine resulted in decreased cell viability and colony formation of both 8505C and K1 c...

  5. Localization of the v-rel protein in reticuloendotheliosis virus strain T-transformed lymphoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protein (p59/sup rel/) encoded by the transforming gene of reticuloendotheliosis virus strain T (REV-T) has been identified in REV-T-transformed avian lymphoid cells by using antisera raised against synthetic peptides whose sequences were derived from three nonoverlapping regions of v-rel. To obtain polyclonal antibodies directed against a larger number of p59/sup rel/ epitopes, a 262-amino acid segment was expressed in bacteria. Antisera raised against this fusion protein (v-Δ-rel) precipitated p59/sup rel/ from lysates of [35S]methionine-labeled REV-T-transformed cells, thus confirming previous results obtained with peptide antisera. The authors used this new antiserum to localize p59/sup rel/ in REV-T-transformed cells by subcellular fractionation using differential centrifugation and by indirect immune fluorescent staining. After fractionation and immune precipitation, the majority of p59/sup rel/ was found in the cytoplasmic fraction. Indirect immunofluorescence experiments also gave results consistent with the cytoplasmic localization of the v-rel protein in transformed lymphoid cells. In previous studies, it was shown that immune precipitates formed with one of the three p59/sup rel/ peptide antisera possessed in vitro protein kinase activity. Immune precipitates formed with the fusion protein antiserum also showed kinase activity in the in vitro assay. Most of this activity was found in the soluble cytoplasmic fraction, indicating that the kinase may be p59/sup rel/ or a protein closely associated with it

  6. Atypical nuclear localization of VIP receptors in glioma cell lines and patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The VIP receptor VPAC1 contains a putative NLS signal. • VPAC1 is predominantly nuclear in GBM cell lines but not VPAC2. • Non-nuclear VPAC1/2 protein expression is correlated with glioma grade. • Nuclear VPAC1 is observed in 50% of stage IV glioma (GBM). - Abstract: An increasing number of G protein-coupled receptors, like receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), are found in cell nucleus. As VIP receptors are involved in the regulation of glioma cell proliferation and migration, we investigated the expression and the nuclear localization of the VIP receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 in this cancer. First, by applying Western blot and immunofluorescence detection in three human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, we observed a strong nuclear staining for the VPAC1 receptor and a weak nuclear VPAC2 receptor staining. Second, immunohistochemical staining of VPAC1 and VPAC2 on tissue microarrays (TMA) showed that the two receptors were expressed in normal brain and glioma tissues. Expression in the non-nuclear compartment of the two receptors significantly increased with the grade of the tumors. Analysis of nuclear staining revealed a significant increase of VPAC1 staining with glioma grade, with up to 50% of GBM displaying strong VPAC1 nuclear staining, whereas nuclear VPAC2 staining remained marginal. The increase in VPAC receptor expression with glioma grades and the enhanced nuclear localization of the VPAC1 receptors in GBM might be of importance for glioma progression

  7. Atypical nuclear localization of VIP receptors in glioma cell lines and patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbarin, Alice; Séité, Paule [Equipe Récepteurs, Régulations et Cellules Tumorales, Université de Poitiers, PBS bât 36, 1 rue Georges Bonnet, TSA 51106, 86073 Poitiers Cedex 9 (France); Godet, Julie [Laboratoire d’anatomie et de cytologie pathologiques, CHU de Poitiers, 2 rue de la Milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Bensalma, Souheyla; Muller, Jean-Marc [Equipe Récepteurs, Régulations et Cellules Tumorales, Université de Poitiers, PBS bât 36, 1 rue Georges Bonnet, TSA 51106, 86073 Poitiers Cedex 9 (France); Chadéneau, Corinne, E-mail: corinne.chadeneau@univ-poitiers.fr [Equipe Récepteurs, Régulations et Cellules Tumorales, Université de Poitiers, PBS bât 36, 1 rue Georges Bonnet, TSA 51106, 86073 Poitiers Cedex 9 (France)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • The VIP receptor VPAC1 contains a putative NLS signal. • VPAC1 is predominantly nuclear in GBM cell lines but not VPAC2. • Non-nuclear VPAC1/2 protein expression is correlated with glioma grade. • Nuclear VPAC1 is observed in 50% of stage IV glioma (GBM). - Abstract: An increasing number of G protein-coupled receptors, like receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), are found in cell nucleus. As VIP receptors are involved in the regulation of glioma cell proliferation and migration, we investigated the expression and the nuclear localization of the VIP receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 in this cancer. First, by applying Western blot and immunofluorescence detection in three human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, we observed a strong nuclear staining for the VPAC1 receptor and a weak nuclear VPAC2 receptor staining. Second, immunohistochemical staining of VPAC1 and VPAC2 on tissue microarrays (TMA) showed that the two receptors were expressed in normal brain and glioma tissues. Expression in the non-nuclear compartment of the two receptors significantly increased with the grade of the tumors. Analysis of nuclear staining revealed a significant increase of VPAC1 staining with glioma grade, with up to 50% of GBM displaying strong VPAC1 nuclear staining, whereas nuclear VPAC2 staining remained marginal. The increase in VPAC receptor expression with glioma grades and the enhanced nuclear localization of the VPAC1 receptors in GBM might be of importance for glioma progression.

  8. Experimental Approaches to Study Mitochondrial Localization and Function of a Nuclear Cell Cycle Kinase, Cdk1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candas, Demet; Qin, Lili; Fan, Ming; Li, Jian-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Although mitochondria possess their own transcriptional machinery, merely 1% of mitochondrial proteins are synthesized inside the organelle. The nuclear-encoded proteins are transported into mitochondria guided by their mitochondria targeting sequences (MTS); however, a majority of mitochondrial localized proteins lack an identifiable MTS. Nevertheless, the fact that MTS can instruct proteins to go into the mitochondria provides a valuable tool for studying mitochondrial functions of normally nuclear and/or cytoplasmic proteins. We have recently identified the cell cycle kinase CyclinB1/Cdk1 complex in the mitochondria. To specifically study the mitochondrial functions of this complex, mitochondrial overexpression and knock-down of this complex without interfering with its nuclear or cytoplasmic functions were essential. By tagging CyclinB1/Cdk1 with MTS, we were able to achieve mitochondrial overexpression of this complex to study its mitochondrial targets as well as functions. Via tagging dominant-negative Cdk1 with MTS, inhibition of Cdk1 activity was accomplished particularly in the mitochondria. Potential mitochondrial targets of CyclinB1/Cdk1 complex were identified using a gel-based proteomics approach. Unlike traditional 2D gel analysis, we employed 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) technology followed by phosphoprotein staining to fluorescently label differentially phosphorylated proteins in mitochondrial Cdk1 expressing cells. Identification of phosphoprotein spots that were altered in wild type versus dominant negative Cdk1 bearing mitochondria revealed the identity of mitochondrial targets of Cdk1. Finally, to determine the effect of CyclinB1/Cdk1 mitochondrial localization in cell cycle progression, a cell proliferation assay using a synthetic thymidine analogue EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) was used to monitor the cells as they go through the cell cycle and replicate their DNA. Altogether, we demonstrated a variety of approaches

  9. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Shin Nishitani; Adriano Mesquita Alencar; Yingxiao Wang

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium i...

  10. Monodisperse magnetite nanoparticles coupled with nuclear localization signal peptide for cell-nucleus targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G; Chin, Y Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2008-03-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. These NLS-coated nanoparticles were introduced into the HeLa cell cytoplasm and nucleus, where the particles were monodispersed and non-aggregated. The success of labeling was examined and identified by fluorescence microscopy and MRI. The work demonstrates that monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles can be readily functionalized and stabilized for potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:18080259

  11. Subcellular localization of Cd in the root cells of Allium sativum by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Donghua Liu; Ingrid Kottke

    2003-06-01

    The ultrastructural investigation of the root cells of Allium sativum L. exposed to three different concentrations of Cd (100 M, 1 mM and 10 mM) for 9 days was carried out. The results showed that Cd induced several significant ultrastructural changes – high vacuolization in cytoplasm, deposition of electron-dense material in vacuoles and nucleoli and increment of disintegrated organelles. Data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed that Cd was localized in the electron-dense precipitates in the root cells treated with 10 mM Cd. High amounts of Cd were mainly accumulated in the vacuoles and nucleoli of cortical cells in differentiating and mature root tissues. The mechanisms of detoxification and tolerance of Cd are briefly explained.

  12. Fatal Metastatic Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Evolving from a Localized Verrucous Epidermal Nevus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Riad

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A malignant transformation is known to occur in many nevi such as a sebaceous nevus or a basal cell nevus, but a verrucous epidermal nevus has only rarely been associated with neoplastic changes. Keratoacanthoma, multifocal papillary apocrine adenoma, multiple malignant eccrine poroma, basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC have all been reported to develop from a verrucous epidermal nevus. CSCC has also been reported to arise from other nevoid lesions like a nevus comedonicus, porokeratosis, a sebaceous nevus, an oral sponge nevus and an ichthyosiform nevus with CHILD syndrome. Here we report a case of progressive poorly differentiated CSCC arising from a localized verrucous epidermal nevus, which caused both spinal cord and brain metastasis.

  13. TOR signaling regulates planarian stem cells and controls localized and organismal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, T Harshani; Weckerle, Frank; Ozamoto, Elyse; Ramirez, Daniel; Davidian, Devon; García-Ojeda, Marcos E; Oviedo, Néstor J

    2012-04-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) controls an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway that modulates cellular growth and division by sensing levels of nutrients, energy and stress. As such, TOR signaling is a crucial component of tissues and organs that translates systemic signals into cellular behavior. The ubiquitous nature of TOR signaling, together with the difficulty of analyzing tissue during cellular turnover and repair, have limited our understanding of how this kinase operates throughout the body. Here, we use the planarian model system to address TOR regulation at the organismal level. The planarian TOR homolog (Smed-TOR) is ubiquitously expressed, including stem cells (neoblasts) and differentiated tissues. Inhibition of TOR with RNA interference severely restricts cell proliferation, allowing the study of neoblasts with restricted proliferative capacity during regeneration and systemic cell turnover. Strikingly, TOR signaling is required for neoblast response to amputation and localized growth (blastema). However, in the absence of TOR signaling, regeneration takes place only within differentiated tissues. In addition, TOR is essential for maintaining the balance between cell division and cell death, and its dysfunction leads to tissue degeneration and lack of organismal growth in the presence of nutrients. Finally, TOR function is likely to be mediated through TOR Complex 1 as its disruption recapitulates signs of the TOR phenotype. Our data reveal novel roles for TOR signaling in controlling adult stem cells at a systemic level and suggest a new paradigm for studying TOR function during physiological turnover and regeneration. PMID:22427692

  14. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC AUTORADIOGRAPHIC STUDY ON SUBCELLULAR LOCALIZATION OF FISSION PRODUCT 147Pm IN TISSUE CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱寿彭; 汪源长

    1994-01-01

    The early risk of internal contaminated accumualtion of 147Pm is in blood cells and endothelial cells,especially in red blood cells.Then 147Pm is selectively deposited in ultrastructure of liver cells,such as in nucleus,nucleolus,rough endoplasmic reticulum,mitochondria and microbodies,Dense tracks also appear in mitochondria and lysosome of pedal cells within renal corpuscle,and so dose in nucleus as well as in mitochondria and microbodies of epicyte of kidney near-convoluted tubule.With the prolongation of observing time,147Pm is selectively and steadily depostied in subcellular level of organic ocmponent for bone.Substantial amount of 147Pm is taken up into the nuclear fraction of osteoclasts and osteoblasts.Particularly,in organelles 147Pm is mainly accumulated in rough endoplasmic reticulum and in mitochondria.Autoradiographic tracks especially localize in combined point between Golgi complex and transitive vesicle of rough endoplasmic reticulum.In addition,numerous 147Pm deposited in collagenous fibre within interstitial of bone cells is hardly excreted.

  15. Localization of sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis in cells of capitate glandular trichomes of Helianthus annuus (Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrehn, Evelyn; Aschenbrenner, Anna-Katharina; Heller, Annerose; Spring, Otmar

    2016-03-01

    Capitate glandular trichomes (CGT) of sunflower, Helianthus annuus, synthesize bioactive sesquiterpene lactones (STLs) within a short period of only a few days during trichome development. In the current project, the subcellular localization of H. annuus germacrene A monooxygenase (HaGAO), a key enzyme of the STL biosynthesis in sunflower CGT, was investigated. A polyclonal antibody raised against this enzyme was used for immunolabelling. HaGAO was found in secretory and stalk cells of CGT. This correlated with the appearance of smooth endoplasmic reticulum in both cell types. Stalk cells and secretory cells differed in form, size and types of plastids, but both had structures necessary for secretion. No HaGAO-specific immunoreaction was found in sunflower leaf tissue outside of CGT or in developing CGT before the secretory phase had started. Our results indicated that not only secretory cells but also nearly all cells of the CGT were involved in the biosynthesis of STL and that this process was not linked to the presence or absence of a specific type of plastid. PMID:25956500

  16. On modifying the condition for the local current density decoupling in fuel cell stacks for moderate perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two adjacent cells in a fuel cell stack are said to be decoupled when they do not affect each other's local current density distribution. This paper proposes a condition for local current density decoupling between two adjacent cells with arbitrary degree of perturbations. The proposed condition in the form of a bound comprising some measure of the perturbation on a dimensionless number comprising the design, operating conditions, and material properties of the bipolar plate is correlated with the current redistribution between cells and verified with a non-isothermal proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack model

  17. Local control rate and prognosis after sequential chemoradiation for small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study were to assess the long-term outcome and the risk for local recurrence of patients with small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB) treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by external beam radiotherapy (sequential chemoradiation). All consecutive patients with primary small cell carcinoma of the bladder (n=66), treated in our institution between 1993 and 2011 were retrospectively evaluated from an institutional database. Only patients with limited disease (Tx-4N0-1M0) small cell carcinoma of the bladder treated with sequential chemoradiation (n=27) were included in this study. Recurrence rates, overall survival and cancer-specific survival were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median time to recurrence was 20 months, median overall survival 26 months, 5-year overall survival 22.2%, median cancer-specific survival 47 months and 5-year cancer-specific survival 39.6%. For complete responders after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (n=19), median cancer-specific survival was 52 months with a 5-year cancer-specific survival 45.9% versus a median cancer-specific survival of 22 months and 5-year cancer-specific survival 0.0% for incomplete responders (n=8; P=0.034). Eight patients (29.6%) underwent transurethral resections (TUR-BT) for local recurrences in the bladder. At the end of follow up, four patients had undergone cystectomy for recurrence of disease resulting in a bladder-preservation rate of 85.2%. Median time to local recurrence was 29 months and median time to distant recurrence was 10 months. Sequential chemoradiation for limited disease small cell carcinoma of the bladder results in a reasonable outcome with a high bladder preservation rate. Response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy represents a significant prognostic factor in this patient population. (author)

  18. B-cell infiltration and frequency of cytokine producing cells differ between localized and disseminated human cutaneous leishmaniases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MGS Vieira

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Biopsies from human localized cutaneous lesions (LCL n = 7 or disseminated lesions (DL n = 8 cases were characterized according to cellular infiltration,frequency of cytokine (IFN-g, TNF-alpha or iNOS enzyme producing cells. LCL, the most usual form of the disease with usually one or two lesions, exhibits extensive tissue damage. DL is a rare form with widespread lesions throughout the body; exhibiting poor parasite containment but less tissue damage. We demonstrated that LCL lesions exhibit higher frequency of B lymphocytes and a higher intensity of IFN-gamma expression. In both forms of the disease CD8+ were found in higher frequency than CD4+ T cells. Frequency of TNF-alpha and iNOS producing cells, as well as the frequency of CD68+ macrophages, did not differ between LCL and DL. Our findings reinforce the link between an efficient control of parasite and tissue damage, implicating higher frequency of IFN-gamma producing cells, as well as its possible counteraction by infiltrated B cells and hence possible humoral immune response in situ.

  19. The localization of key Bacillus subtilis penicillin binding proteins during cell growth is determined by substrate availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lages, Marta Carolina Afonso; Beilharz, Katrin; Angeles, Danae Morales; Veening, Jan-Willem; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    The shape of bacteria is maintained by the cell wall. The main component of the cell wall is peptidoglycan (PG) that is synthesized by penicillin binding proteins (PBPs). The correct positioning of PBPs is essential for the maintenance of cell shape. In the literature, two different models for local

  20. Netrin-1 induces local translation of down syndrome cell adhesion molecule in axonal growth cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shruti; Welshhans, Kristy

    2016-07-01

    Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM) plays an important role in many neurodevelopmental processes such as axon guidance, dendrite arborization, and synapse formation. DSCAM is located in the Down syndrome trisomic region of human chromosome 21 and may contribute to the Down syndrome brain phenotype, which includes a reduction in the formation of long-distance connectivity. The local translation of a select group of mRNA transcripts within growth cones is necessary for the formation of appropriate neuronal connectivity. Interestingly, we have found that Dscam mRNA is localized to growth cones of mouse hippocampal neurons, and is dynamically regulated in response to the axon guidance molecule, netrin-1. Furthermore, netrin-1 stimulation results in an increase in locally translated DSCAM protein in growth cones. Deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), a netrin-1 receptor, is required for the netrin-1-induced increase in Dscam mRNA local translation. We also find that two RNA-binding proteins-fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) and cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein (CPEB)-colocalize with Dscam mRNA in growth cones, suggesting their regulation of Dscam mRNA localization and translation. Finally, overexpression of DSCAM in mouse cortical neurons results in a severe stunting of axon outgrowth and branching, suggesting that an increase in DSCAM protein results in a structural change having functional consequences. Taken together, these results suggest that netrin-1-induced local translation of Dscam mRNA during embryonic development may be an important mechanism to regulate axon growth and guidance in the developing nervous system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 799-816, 2016. PMID:26518186

  1. Radiotherapy is associated with significant improvement in local and regional control in Merkel cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Susan H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a rare tumour of skin. This study is a retrospective audit of patients with MCC from St Vincent’s and Mater Hospital, Sydney, Australia. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of radiotherapy (RT on the local and regional control of MCC lesions and survival of patients with MCC. Method The data bases in anatomical pathology, RT and surgery. We searched for patients having a diagnosis of MCC between 1996 and 2007. Patient, tumour and treatment characteristics were collected and analysed. Univariate survival analysis of categorical variables was conducted with the Kaplan-Meier method together with the Log-Rank test for statistical significance. Continuous variables were assessed using the Cox regression method. Multivariate analysis was performed for significant univariate results. Results Sixty seven patients were found. Sixty two who were stage I-III and were treated with radical intent were analysed. 68% were male. The median age was 74 years. Forty-two cases (68% were stage I or II, and 20 cases (32% were stage III. For the subset of 42 stage I and II patients, those that had RT to their primary site had a 2-year local recurrence free survival of 89% compared with 36% for patients not receiving RT (p Conclusions RT is associated with significant improvement in local and regional control in Merkel cell carcinoma. Immunosuppression is an important factor in overall survival.

  2. TRX-1 Regulates SKN-1 Nuclear Localization Cell Non-autonomously in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Katie C; Liu, Bin; Fierro-González, Juan Carlos; Swoboda, Peter; Arur, Swathi; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio; Garsin, Danielle A

    2016-05-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans oxidative stress response transcription factor, SKN-1, is essential for the maintenance of redox homeostasis and is a functional ortholog of the Nrf family of transcription factors. The numerous levels of regulation that govern these transcription factors underscore their importance. Here, we add a thioredoxin, encoded by trx-1, to the expansive list of SKN-1 regulators. We report that loss of trx-1 promotes nuclear localization of intestinal SKN-1 in a redox-independent, cell non-autonomous fashion from the ASJ neurons. Furthermore, this regulation is not general to the thioredoxin family, as two other C. elegans thioredoxins, TRX-2 and TRX-3, do not play a role in this process. Moreover, TRX-1-dependent regulation requires signaling from the p38 MAPK-signaling pathway. However, while TRX-1 regulates SKN-1 nuclear localization, classical SKN-1 transcriptional activity associated with stress response remains largely unaffected. Interestingly, RNA-Seq analysis revealed that loss of trx-1 elicits a general, organism-wide down-regulation of several classes of genes; those encoding for collagens and lipid transport being most prevalent. Together, these results uncover a novel role for a thioredoxin in regulating intestinal SKN-1 nuclear localization in a cell non-autonomous manner, thereby contributing to the understanding of the processes involved in maintaining redox homeostasis throughout an organism. PMID:26920757

  3. Combined modality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-modality treatment consisting of cisplatin, VP-16, and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy given concomitantly with external beam radiation was used to treat 64 patients with locally advanced Stage III non-small cell lung carcinoma. This regimen was used in a preoperative fashion for four cycles in patients considered surgically resectable and with curative intent for six cycles in the remainder of patients. The clinical response rate for the entire group was 84% and the overall local control rate was 74%. The median survival was 13 months with a median follow-up for live patients of 19 months. The actuarial 3-year survival and disease-free survival rates were 30% and 23%, respectively. Histologic complete response was 39% and appeared to predict for survival. The 3-year actuarial survival and disease-free survival rates for 23 resected patients were 69% and 45%, respectively, with the complete histologic responders having a disease-free survival of 78%. The pattern of first recurrence did not appear to differ by histology or presence of lymph nodes in this subset of patients. The actuarial 3-year survival and disease-free survival rates for inoperable patients receiving six cycles of treatment were 18% and 23%, respectively. The local control was 67% with the majority of these patients having Stage IIIB disease. The Mountain International staging system appeared to predict for operability, local recurrence, and survival. This concomitant treatment regimen is feasible, with the major toxicities being leukopenia, nausea, and vomiting

  4. Localization of neuropeptide-Y immunoreactivity in estradiol-concentrating cells in the hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable evidence shows that gonadal steroids exert a facilitatory influence on levels and release of neuropeptide-Y (NPY) from the hypothalamus. However, it is not known whether gonadal steroids act directly on NPY-producing cells in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus to produce these facilitatory effects on NPY or whether they act on other cells that have a modulatory influence via synapses on ARC NPY cells. We applied the combined method of steroid autoradiography and immunocytochemistry to assess the localization of [3H]estradiol in relation to NPY-producing cells in the hypothalamus. Rats (n = 6) were bilaterally ovariectomized and injected intracerebroventricularly with colchicine. Twenty-four hours later each rat received an iv injection of 17 beta-[2,4,6,7,16,17(-3)H]estradiol (SA, 166 Ci/mmol) at a dose of 5.0 micrograms/kg BW. One hour after the injection of [3H]estradiol, the rats were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde; brains were removed, frozen in isopentane precooled in liquid nitrogen (-190 C), sectioned, and processed for autoradiography. The autoradiograms were then incubated with specific antibodies for NPY immunostaining by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method. The results revealed NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and cerebral cortex and a few cells in the median eminence. NPY-immunoreactive fibers were also detected in the internal layer of the median eminence. The largest number of neurons showing NPY immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm was detected in the ARC, and only in this nucleus did we observed colocalization of [3H]estradiol and NPY immunoreactivity in neurons. A population of NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC (10-20%) exhibited nuclear [3H]estradiol; the majority of these cells were located in the lateral and ventral portions of the ARC

  5. Chemotherapy related toxicity in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahl Amit

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: For inoperable non-small cell lung cancer combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy plays an important role as a therapeutic modality. The aim of the present study was to analyze neoadjuvant chemotherapy related acute toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer (stage IIIA and IIIB in Indian patients using Cisplatin and Etoposide combination chemotherapy. Material and methods: Forty patients of locally advanced Non small cell lung cancer received three cycles neoadjuvant chemotherapy using Injection Cisplatin and Etoposide. The patients were taken for Radical radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray over 30 fractions in conventional fractionation after completing chemotherapy. Chemotherapy associated toxicity was assessed using common toxicity criteria (CTC v2.0 Results: Forty patients were available for final evaluation. Median age of presentation of patients was fifty-six years. Thirteen patients had Non small cell lung cancer stage IIIA while twenty-seven patients had Stage IIIB disease. Anemia was the most common hematological toxicity observed (seen in 81% of patients. Nausea and vomiting were the most common non -hematological toxicity seen. Sensory neuropathy was seen in 38%of patients. 88% patients developed alopecia. Seven patients developed febrile neutropenias. Conclusion: Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy using Cisplatin and Etoposide continues to be a basic regimen in the Indian set up despite availability of higher molecules, since it is cost effective, well tolerated and therapeutically effective. Blood transfusions, growth factors and supportive care can be used effectively to over come toxicity associated with this regimen.

  6. Expression of recombinant dystrophin and its localization to the cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C C; Pearlman, J A; Chamberlain, J S; Caskey, C T

    1991-01-24

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked progressive myopathy caused by a defect in the DMD gene locus. The gene corresponding to the DMD locus produces a 14-kilobase (kb) messenger RNA that codes for a large cytoskeletal membrane protein, dystrophin. DMD and Becker's muscular dystrophy are the consequences of dystrophin mutations. The exact biological function of dystrophin remains unknown but it has been demonstrated that it is localized to the cytoplasmic face of the cell membrane and has direct interaction with several other membrane proteins. We report here the synthesis of a 14-kb full-length complementary DNA for the mouse muscle dystrophin mRNA and the expression of this cDNA in COS cells. The recombinant dystrophin is indistinguishable from mouse muscle dystrophin by western blot analysis with anti-dystrophin antibodies and was shown by an immunofluorescent technique to be localized in the cell membrane. Our successful construction of a functional full-length cDNA opens opportunities for the study of structure and function of dystrophin and provides an opportunity to initiate gene therapy studies. PMID:1824797

  7. Effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on healing of wound combined with local radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on healing of wounds combined with local skin irradiation injury. Methods: MSC were injected into the wound combined with local skin irradiation injury. Light and electron microscopy, fibroblast and capillary vessel counts, detection of hydroxyproline content in the wound and demonstration of MSC distribution by fluorescence examination were carried out. Results: MSC could accelerate the speed of wound healing. The number of fibroblasts and capillary vessels increased obviously during 5 to 20 days after wounding. Granular tissues were abundant in the wound, and the content of hydroxyproline increased in the MSC-treated groups. The fluorescence labelling showed that MSC could be found during 1 to 20 days after injection. Conclusion: MSC can remain alive in the wound for a long time and surely promote wound healing

  8. Tomographic sensing and localization of fluorescently labeled circulating cells in mice in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettergren, Eric; Swamy, Tushar; Runnels, Judith; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark

    2012-07-01

    Sensing and enumeration of specific types of circulating cells in small animals is an important problem in many areas of biomedical research. Microscopy-based fluorescence in vivo flow cytometry methods have been developed previously, but these are typically limited to sampling of very small blood volumes, so that very rare circulating cells may escape detection. Recently, we described the development of a ‘diffuse fluorescence flow cytometer’ (DFFC) that allows sampling of much larger blood vessels and therefore circulating blood volumes in the hindlimb, forelimb or tail of a mouse. In this work, we extend this concept by developing and validating a method to tomographically localize circulating fluorescently labeled cells in the cross section of a tissue simulating optical flow phantom and mouse limb. This was achieved using two modulated light sources and an array of six fiber-coupled detectors that allowed rapid, high-sensitivity acquisition of full tomographic data sets at 10 Hz. These were reconstructed into two-dimensional cross-sectional images using Monte Carlo models of light propagation and the randomized algebraic reconstruction technique. We were able to obtain continuous images of moving cells in the sample cross section with 0.5 mm accuracy or better. We first demonstrated this concept in limb-mimicking optical flow photons with up to four flow channels, and then in the tails of mice with fluorescently labeled multiple myeloma cells. This approach increases the overall diagnostic utility of our DFFC instrument.

  9. Tomographic sensing and localization of fluorescently labeled circulating cells in mice in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensing and enumeration of specific types of circulating cells in small animals is an important problem in many areas of biomedical research. Microscopy-based fluorescence in vivo flow cytometry methods have been developed previously, but these are typically limited to sampling of very small blood volumes, so that very rare circulating cells may escape detection. Recently, we described the development of a ‘diffuse fluorescence flow cytometer’ (DFFC) that allows sampling of much larger blood vessels and therefore circulating blood volumes in the hindlimb, forelimb or tail of a mouse. In this work, we extend this concept by developing and validating a method to tomographically localize circulating fluorescently labeled cells in the cross section of a tissue simulating optical flow phantom and mouse limb. This was achieved using two modulated light sources and an array of six fiber-coupled detectors that allowed rapid, high-sensitivity acquisition of full tomographic data sets at 10 Hz. These were reconstructed into two-dimensional cross-sectional images using Monte Carlo models of light propagation and the randomized algebraic reconstruction technique. We were able to obtain continuous images of moving cells in the sample cross section with 0.5 mm accuracy or better. We first demonstrated this concept in limb-mimicking optical flow photons with up to four flow channels, and then in the tails of mice with fluorescently labeled multiple myeloma cells. This approach increases the overall diagnostic utility of our DFFC instrument. (paper)

  10. Immunohistochemical localization of hepatopancreatic phospholipase A2 in Hexaplex Trunculus digestive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebai Tarek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian sPLA2-IB localization cell are well characterized. In contrast, much less is known about aquatic primitive ones. The aquatic world contains a wide variety of living species and, hence represents a great potential for discovering new lipolytic enzymes and the mode of digestion of lipid food. Results The marine snail digestive phospholipase A2 (mSDPLA2 has been previously purified from snail hepatopancreas. The specific polyclonal antibodies were prepared and used for immunohistochimical and immunofluorescence analysis in order to determine the cellular location of mSDPLA2. Our results showed essentially that mSDPLA2 was detected inside in specific vesicles tentatively named (mSDPLA2+ granules of the digestive cells. No immunolabelling was observed in secretory zymogene-like cells. This immunocytolocalization indicates that lipid digestion in the snail might occur in specific granules inside the digestive cells. Conclusion The cellular location of mSDPLA2 suggests that intracellular phospholipids digestion, like other food components digestion of snail diet, occurs in these digestive cells. The hepatopancreas of H. trunculus has been pointed out as the main region for digestion, absorption and storage of lipids.

  11. Exogenous cardiolipin localizes to mitochondria and prevents TAZ knockdown-induced apoptosis in myeloid progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikon, Nikita; Su, Betty; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-21

    The concentration and composition of cardiolipin (CL) in mitochondria are altered in age-related heart disease, Barth Syndrome, and other rare genetic disorders, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. To explore whether exogenous CL can be delivered to cells, CL was combined with apolipoprotein A-I to generate water-soluble, nanoscale complexes termed nanodisks (ND). Mass spectrometry of HL60 myeloid progenitor cell extracts revealed a 30-fold increase in cellular CL content following incubation with CL-ND. When CL-ND containing a fluorescent CL analogue was employed, confocal microscopy revealed CL localization to mitochondria. The ability of CL-ND to elicit a physiological response was examined in an HL60 cell culture model of Barth Syndrome neutropenia. siRNA knockdown of the phospholipid transacylase, tafazzin (TAZ), induced apoptosis in these cells. When TAZ knockdown cells were incubated with CL-ND, the apoptotic response was attenuated. Thus, CL-ND represent a potential intervention strategy for replenishment of CL in Barth Syndrome, age-related heart disease, and other disorders characterized by depletion of this key mitochondrial phospholipid. PMID:26164234

  12. GPR30 decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II by inhibiting local mast cell number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhuo [Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27159-1009 (United States); Department of Cardiology, Jinan Central Hospital, Affiliated with Shandong University, 105 Jiefang Road, Jinan, 250013 (China); Wang, Hao; Lin, Marina [Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27159-1009 (United States); Groban, Leanne, E-mail: lgroban@wakehealth.edu [Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27159-1009 (United States); Hypertension and Vascular Disease Center, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Office of Women in Medicine and Science, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2015-03-27

    Chronic activation of the novel estrogen receptor GPR30 by its agonist G1 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen (E2) loss on cardiac structure and function. Using the ovariectomized (OVX) mRen2.Lewis rat, an E2-sensitive model of diastolic dysfunction, we found that E2 status is inversely correlated with local cardiac angiotensin II (Ang II) levels, likely via Ang I/chymase-mediated production. Since chymase is released from cardiac mast cells during stress (e.g., volume/pressure overload, inflammation), we hypothesized that GPR30-related cardioprotection after E2 loss might occur through its opposing actions on cardiac mast cell proliferation and chymase production. Using real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analysis, we found mast cell number, chymase expression, and cardiac Ang II levels were significantly increased in the hearts of OVX-compared to ovary-intact mRen2.Lewis rats and the GPR30 agonist G1 (50 mg/kg/day, s.c.) administered for 2 weeks limited the adverse effects of estrogen loss. In vitro studies revealed that GPR30 receptors are expressed in the RBL-2H3 mast cell line and G1 inhibits serum-induced cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by cell counting, BrdU incorporation assay, and Ki-67 staining. Using specific antagonists to estrogen receptors, blockage of GPR30, but not ERα or ERβ, attenuated the inhibitory effects of estrogen on BrdU incorporation in RBL-2H3 cells. Further study of the mechanism underlying the effect on cell proliferation showed that G1 inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression in RBL-2H3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. - Highlights: • GPR30 activation limits mast cell number in hearts from OVX mRen2.Lewis rats. • GPR30 activation decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II after estrogen loss. • GPR30 activation inhibits RBL-2H3 mast cell proliferation and CDK1 expression.

  13. GPR30 decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II by inhibiting local mast cell number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic activation of the novel estrogen receptor GPR30 by its agonist G1 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen (E2) loss on cardiac structure and function. Using the ovariectomized (OVX) mRen2.Lewis rat, an E2-sensitive model of diastolic dysfunction, we found that E2 status is inversely correlated with local cardiac angiotensin II (Ang II) levels, likely via Ang I/chymase-mediated production. Since chymase is released from cardiac mast cells during stress (e.g., volume/pressure overload, inflammation), we hypothesized that GPR30-related cardioprotection after E2 loss might occur through its opposing actions on cardiac mast cell proliferation and chymase production. Using real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analysis, we found mast cell number, chymase expression, and cardiac Ang II levels were significantly increased in the hearts of OVX-compared to ovary-intact mRen2.Lewis rats and the GPR30 agonist G1 (50 mg/kg/day, s.c.) administered for 2 weeks limited the adverse effects of estrogen loss. In vitro studies revealed that GPR30 receptors are expressed in the RBL-2H3 mast cell line and G1 inhibits serum-induced cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by cell counting, BrdU incorporation assay, and Ki-67 staining. Using specific antagonists to estrogen receptors, blockage of GPR30, but not ERα or ERβ, attenuated the inhibitory effects of estrogen on BrdU incorporation in RBL-2H3 cells. Further study of the mechanism underlying the effect on cell proliferation showed that G1 inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression in RBL-2H3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. - Highlights: • GPR30 activation limits mast cell number in hearts from OVX mRen2.Lewis rats. • GPR30 activation decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II after estrogen loss. • GPR30 activation inhibits RBL-2H3 mast cell proliferation and CDK1 expression

  14. Radio(chemo)therapy in locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatzer, Markus; Elicin, Olgun; Ramella, Sara; Nestle, Ursula; Putora, Paul Martin

    2016-03-01

    Definitive radiochemotherapy is the standard treatment for many patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Treatment outcomes have improved over the last decades. Several treatment regimens have been shown effective and safe. This review summarises the results of significant studies between 1996 and 2015 on concomitant and sequential radiochemotherapy regimens and radiation dose per fraction. Beside therapy regimens, optimised radiotherapy planning is indispensable to improve outcome and minimise radiation-induced toxicity. An insight into the rationale of radiotherapy planning for stage III NSCLC is also provided. PMID:26929423

  15. Functional Effect of Pim1 Depends upon Intracellular Localization in Human Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samse, Kaitlen; Emathinger, Jacqueline; Hariharan, Nirmala; Quijada, Pearl; Ilves, Kelli; Völkers, Mirko; Ormachea, Lucia; De La Torre, Andrea; Orogo, Amabel M.; Alvarez, Roberto; Din, Shabana; Mohsin, Sadia; Monsanto, Megan; Fischer, Kimberlee M.; Dembitsky, Walter P.; Gustafsson, Åsa B.; Sussman, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPC) improve heart function after autologous transfer in heart failure patients. Regenerative potential of hCPCs is severely limited with age, requiring genetic modification to enhance therapeutic potential. A legacy of work from our laboratory with Pim1 kinase reveals effects on proliferation, survival, metabolism, and rejuvenation of hCPCs in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that subcellular targeting of Pim1 bolsters the distinct cardioprotective effects of this kinase in hCPCs to increase proliferation and survival, and antagonize cellular senescence. Adult hCPCs isolated from patients undergoing left ventricular assist device implantation were engineered to overexpress Pim1 throughout the cell (PimWT) or targeted to either mitochondrial (Mito-Pim1) or nuclear (Nuc-Pim1) compartments. Nuc-Pim1 enhances stem cell youthfulness associated with decreased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, preserved telomere length, reduced expression of p16 and p53, and up-regulation of nucleostemin relative to PimWT hCPCs. Alternately, Mito-Pim1 enhances survival by increasing expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL and decreasing cell death after H2O2 treatment, thereby preserving mitochondrial integrity superior to PimWT. Mito-Pim1 increases the proliferation rate by up-regulation of cell cycle modulators Cyclin D, CDK4, and phospho-Rb. Optimal stem cell traits such as proliferation, survival, and increased youthful properties of aged hCPCs are enhanced after targeted Pim1 localization to mitochondrial or nuclear compartments. Targeted Pim1 overexpression in hCPCs allows for selection of the desired phenotypic properties to overcome patient variability and improve specific stem cell characteristics. PMID:25882843

  16. The impact of locally multiply damaged sites (LMDS) induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D.; Boucher, D. [Institut Curie-Section de Recherche, UMR2027 CNRS, LCR-V28 du CEA, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have shown that ionising radiations produce a specific type of clustered cell damage called locally multiply damaged sites or LMDS. These lesions consist of closely positioned single-strand breaks, (oxidative) base damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in between one helical turn of DNA. As specific markers of radiation-induced damage these lesions are likely to condition biological responses and are thus of great interest for radiation protection. Calculations indicate that there should be more LMDS induced by high than by low LET radiation, and they should be absent in un-irradiated cells. Processes like K-shell activation and local Auger electron emission can be expected to add complex DSB or LMDS, producing significant chromosomal damage. In the discussion of the specificity of ionising radiation in comparison to other genotoxic agents, many arguments have been put forward that these lesions should be particularly deleterious for living cells. Complex lesions of that type should represent big obstacles for DNA repair and give rise to high lethality. Moreover, cellular attempts to repair them could accentuate harm, leading to mutations, genetic instability and cancer. In vitro experiments with oligonucleotides containing an artificially introduced set of base damage and SSB in different combinations have shown that depending on the close positioning of the damage on DNA, repair enzymes, and even whole cell extracts, are unable to repair properly and may stimulate mis-repair. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in conjunction with enzymatic treatments has been used to detect LMDS in mammalian cells after high and low LET radiation. In order to further define the importance of LMDS for radiation induced cellular responses, we studied the induction of LMDS as a function of radiation dose and dose rate in mammalian cells (CHO and MRC5) using {sup 137}Cs gamma-radiation. Using PFGE and specific glycosylases to convert oxidative damage

  17. The impact of locally multiply damaged sites (LMDS) induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo calculations have shown that ionising radiations produce a specific type of clustered cell damage called locally multiply damaged sites or LMDS. These lesions consist of closely positioned single-strand breaks, (oxidative) base damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in between one helical turn of DNA. As specific markers of radiation-induced damage these lesions are likely to condition biological responses and are thus of great interest for radiation protection. Calculations indicate that there should be more LMDS induced by high than by low LET radiation, and they should be absent in un-irradiated cells. Processes like K-shell activation and local Auger electron emission can be expected to add complex DSB or LMDS, producing significant chromosomal damage. In the discussion of the specificity of ionising radiation in comparison to other genotoxic agents, many arguments have been put forward that these lesions should be particularly deleterious for living cells. Complex lesions of that type should represent big obstacles for DNA repair and give rise to high lethality. Moreover, cellular attempts to repair them could accentuate harm, leading to mutations, genetic instability and cancer. In vitro experiments with oligonucleotides containing an artificially introduced set of base damage and SSB in different combinations have shown that depending on the close positioning of the damage on DNA, repair enzymes, and even whole cell extracts, are unable to repair properly and may stimulate mis-repair. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in conjunction with enzymatic treatments has been used to detect LMDS in mammalian cells after high and low LET radiation. In order to further define the importance of LMDS for radiation induced cellular responses, we studied the induction of LMDS as a function of radiation dose and dose rate in mammalian cells (CHO and MRC5) using 137Cs gamma-radiation. Using PFGE and specific glycosylases to convert oxidative damage into

  18. GD3 nuclear localization after apoptosis induction in HUT-78 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glycosphingolipids are essential components of plasma membrane and act as antigens, mediators of cell adhesion, and modulators of signal transduction. Following activation of the Fas receptor, gangliosides are recuited in various intracellular compartments. We have evaluated whether the pro-apoptotic anti-CD95 antibody induces a nuclear localization of GD3 in HUT-78 cells. Our data shows that GD3 translocation from cytosol to nuclei is strongly correlated to concomitant rapid phosphorylation of histone H1 shortly after induction of apoptosis. This work advances the hypothesis that GD3 induces a post-translational modification of histone H1 thus influencing the apoptosis process through transcriptional activation/repression of specific genes

  19. Chemotherapy and cyclic radiation therapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (4 squamous, 4 adenocarcinoma, 1 large cell) were treated with a combination of radiation therapy and cyclic chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate and platinum. Four previously untreated patients had stage III, 2 having distant metastases, 5 previously treated patients were restaged as stage III with distant metastasis in one. Moderate hematologic toxicity was noted. Objective responses occurred in 67 per cent, regardless of previous treatment or performance status. Responders survived for a median of 11 months with one complete response patient surviving at 14 months while 5 partial response patients survived for a median of 10 months. This regimen is feasible and its utility as the initial treatment of locally advanced disease should be further investigated. (Auth.)

  20. Asymmetric Localization of Cdx2 mRNA during the First Cell-Fate Decision in Early Mouse Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Skamagki

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A longstanding question in mammalian development is whether the divisions that segregate pluripotent progenitor cells for the future embryo from cells that differentiate into extraembryonic structures are asymmetric in cell-fate instructions. The transcription factor Cdx2 plays a key role in the first cell-fate decision. Here, using live-embryo imaging, we show that localization of Cdx2 transcripts becomes asymmetric during development, preceding cell lineage segregation. Cdx2 transcripts preferentially localize apically at the late eight-cell stage and become inherited asymmetrically during divisions that set apart pluripotent and differentiating cells. Asymmetric localization depends on a cis element within the coding region of Cdx2 and requires cell polarization as well as intact microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Failure to enrich Cdx2 transcripts apically results in a significant decrease in the number of pluripotent cells. We discuss how the asymmetric localization and segregation of Cdx2 transcripts could contribute to multiple mechanisms that establish different cell fates in the mouse embryo.

  1. Construction of eukaryotic expression vector NONO expression product and its intracellular localization in cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui-ling WU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct an eukaryotic expression vector NONO(containing nucleotide octamer-binding protein without POU domain of mouse,and detect its expression and intracellular localization in NIH3T3 cells,so as to obtain a tool to assist the study of intracellular biological functions of NONO.Methods The total RNA was extracted from the liver of BALB/c mice,the corresponding coding sequences of mouse NONO(GenBank accession No.53237024 were amplified by RT-PCR and then cloned into hemagglutinin(HA-tagged vector of pcDNA3-HA to form a new recombinant plasmid named pcDNA3-NONO-HA.The recombinant plasmid was verified by polymerase chain reaction(PCR and double digestion by restricted endonuclease,followed by sequencing.The recombinant plasmid was then transfected into NIH3T3 cells with the liposome transfection reagent Polyfect as a medium.Twenty-four hours later,immunofluorescence was performed.After detection of fusion protein NONO-HA by specific antibody of HA tag and the Alexa Fluor 488 coupled secondary antibody,the expression and localization of the fusion protein were observed by fluorescence microscopy.Results The results of identification by PCR,digestion with restriction endonuclease and sequencing indicated that the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3-NONO-HA was correctly constructed.After transfection of the recombinant plasmid,the fusion protein was found to highly express in NIH3T3 cells and distribute mainly in the cytoplasm.Conclusion The eukaryotic expression vector for HA-NONO fusion protein is successfully constructed and effectively expressed in mammalian cells.The constructed vector may serve as an assistant tool in the study of intracellular biological functions of NONO.

  2. Business Cycle Dependent Unemployment Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben M.; Svarer, Michael

    The consequences of business cycle contingencies in unemployment insurance systems are considered in a search-matching model allowing for shifts between "good" and "bad" states of nature. We show that not only is there an insurance argument for such contingencies, but there may also be an incentive...

  3. Business cycle dependent unemployment insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Torben M.; Svarer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The consequences of business cycle contingencies in unemployment insurance systems are considered in a search-matching model allowing for shifts between "good" and "bad" states of nature. We show that not only is there an insurance argument for such contingencies, but there may also be an incentive argument. Since benefits may be less distortionary in a recession than a boom, it follows that counter-cyclical benefits reduce average distortions compared to state independent benefits. We show t...

  4. Dynamic mitochondrial localization of nuclear transcription factor HMGA1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been well established that high mobility group A1 (HMGA1) proteins act within the nucleus of mammalian cells as architectural transcription factors that regulate the expression of numerous genes. Here, however, we report on the unexpected cytoplasmic/mitochondrial localization of the HMGA1 proteins within multiple cell types. Indirect immunofluorescence, electron microscopic immunolocalization, and Western blot studies revealed that, in addition to the nucleus, HMGA1 proteins could also be found in both the cytoplasm and mitochondria of randomly dividing populations of wild-type murine NIH3T3 cells and transgenic human MCF-7 breast cancer epithelial cells expressing a hemagglutinin tagged-HMGA1a fusion protein. While the molecular mechanisms underlying these novel subcellular localization patterns have not yet been determined, initial synchronization studies revealed a dynamic, cell cycle-dependent translocation of HMGA1 proteins from the nucleus into the cytoplasm and mitochondria of NIH3T3 cells. Furthermore, preliminary functionality studies utilizing a modified 'chromatin' immunoprecipitation protocol revealed that HMGA1 retains its DNA binding capabilities within the mitochondria and associates with the regulatory D-loop region in vivo. We discuss potential new biological roles for the classically nuclear HMGA1 proteins with regard to the observed nucleocytoplasmic translocation, mitochondrial internalization, and regulatory D-loop DNA binding

  5. Intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin in locally advanced or recurrent penile squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ye Liu; Yong-Hong Li; Zhuo-Wei Liu; Zhi-Ling Zhang; Yun-Lin Ye; Kai Yao; Hui Han; Zi-Ke Qin; Fang-Jian Zhou

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of locally advanced or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis after conventional treatment is dismal. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin on local y advanced or recurrent SCC of the penis. Between April 1999 and May 2011, we treated 5 patients with locally advanced penile SCC and 7 patients with recurrent disease with intraarterial chemotherapy. The response rate and toxicity data were analyzed, and survival rates were calculated. After 2 to 6 cycles of intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin, 1 patients with locoregional y advanced disease achieved a complete response, and 4 achieved partial response. Of the 7 patients with recurrent disease, 2 achieved complete response, 3 achieved partial response, 3 had stable disease, and 1 developed progressive disease. An objective tumor response was therefore achieved in 10 of the 12 patients. The median overal survival for the patients was 24 months (range, 10-50 months). Three out of 10 patients who responded were long-term survivors after intraarterial chemotherapy. Intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin may be effective and potential y curative in locoregional y advanced or recurrent penile SCC. The contribution of this therapy in the primary management of advanced or recurrent penile SCC should be prospectively investigated.

  6. Alterations in expression, proteolysis and intracellular localizations of clusterin in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Zhi He; Xiao-Hang Zhao; Zhen-Mei Song; Kun Wang; Liang-Hong Teng; Fang Liu; You-Sheng Mao; Ning Lu; Shang-Zhong Zhang; Min Wu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate biogenesis and intracellular localizations of clusterin to elucidate the potential molecular mechanisms implicated in tumorigenesis of esophageal mucosa.METHODS: Semi-quantitative RT-PCR for multi-region alteration analysis, Western blot for different transcriptional forms and immunohistochemical staining for intracellular localizations of clusterin were carried out in both tissues and cell lines of ESCC.RESULTS: The N-terminal deletions of the clusterin gene and the appearance of a 50-53 ku nuclear clusterin, an uncleaved, nonglycosylated, and disulfide-linked isoform,were the major alterations in cancer cells of esophagus.Naturally the 40 ku clusterin was located in the connective tissue of the lamina propria of epithelial mucosa and right under the basal membrane of epithelia, but it was disappeared in stromal mucosa of esophagus and the pre-matured clusterin was found positive in cancerous epithelia.CONCLUSION: The N-terminal deletion of clusterin may be essential for its alterations of biogenesis in ESCC.

  7. NKp46+ Innate Lymphoid Cells Dampen Vaginal CD8 T Cell Responses following Local Immunization with a Cholera Toxin-Based Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Luci

    Full Text Available Innate and adaptive immune cells work in concert to generate efficient protection at mucosal surface. Vaginal mucosa is an epithelial tissue that contains innate and adaptive immune effector cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that vaginal administration of Cholera toxin -based vaccines generate antigen-specific CD8 T cells through the stimulation of local dendritic cells (DC. Innate lymphoid cells (ILC are a group of lymphocytes localized in epithelial tissues that have important immune functions against pathogens and in tissue homeostasis. Their contribution to vaccine-induced mucosal T cell responses is an important issue for the design of protective vaccines. We report here that the vaginal mucosa contains a heterogeneous population of NKp46+ ILC that includes conventional NK cells and ILC1-like cells. We show that vaginal NKp46+ ILC dampen vaccine-induced CD8 T cell responses generated after local immunization. Indeed, in vivo depletion of NKp46+ ILC with anti-NK1.1 antibody or NKG2D blockade increases the magnitude of vaginal OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, such treatments also increase the number of DC in the vagina. NKG2D ligands being expressed by vaginal DC but not by CD8 T cells, these results support that NKp46+ ILC limit mucosal CD8 T cell responses indirectly through the NKG2D-dependent elimination of vaginal DC. Our data reveal an unappreciated role of NKp46+ ILC in the regulation of mucosal CD8 T cell responses.

  8. Local membrane deformations activate Ca2+-dependent K+ and anionic currents in intact human red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrda, Agnieszka; Cytlak, Urszula; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna;

    2010-01-01

    flow, as well as the local membrane deformations generated in certain pathological conditions, such as sickle cell anemia, have been shown to increase membrane permeability, based largely on experimentation with red cell suspensions. We attempted here the first measurements of membrane currents......-activated transient PCa observed here under local membrane deformation is a likely contributor to the Ca(2+)-mediated effects observed during the normal aging process of red blood cells, and to the increased Ca(2+) content of red cells in certain hereditary anemias such as thalassemia and sickle cell anemia.......BACKGROUND: The mechanical, rheological and shape properties of red blood cells are determined by their cortical cytoskeleton, evolutionarily optimized to provide the dynamic deformability required for flow through capillaries much narrower than the cell's diameter. The shear stress induced by such...

  9. Radiotherapy is associated with significant improvement in local and regional control in Merkel cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare tumour of skin. This study is a retrospective audit of patients with MCC from St Vincent’s and Mater Hospital, Sydney, Australia. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of radiotherapy (RT) on the local and regional control of MCC lesions and survival of patients with MCC. The data bases in anatomical pathology, RT and surgery. We searched for patients having a diagnosis of MCC between 1996 and 2007. Patient, tumour and treatment characteristics were collected and analysed. Univariate survival analysis of categorical variables was conducted with the Kaplan-Meier method together with the Log-Rank test for statistical significance. Continuous variables were assessed using the Cox regression method. Multivariate analysis was performed for significant univariate results. Sixty seven patients were found. Sixty two who were stage I-III and were treated with radical intent were analysed. 68% were male. The median age was 74 years. Forty-two cases (68%) were stage I or II, and 20 cases (32%) were stage III. For the subset of 42 stage I and II patients, those that had RT to their primary site had a 2-year local recurrence free survival of 89% compared with 36% for patients not receiving RT (p<0.001). The cumulative 2-year regional recurrence free survival for patients having adjuvant regional RT was 84% compared with 43% for patients not receiving this treatment (p<0.001). Immune status at initial surgery was a significant predictor for OS and MCCSS. In a multivariate analysis combining macroscopic size (mm) and immune status at initial surgery, only immune status remained a significant predictor of overall survival (HR=2.096, 95% CI: 1.002-4.385, p=0.049). RT is associated with significant improvement in local and regional control in Merkel cell carcinoma. Immunosuppression is an important factor in overall survival

  10. Survival advantage of partial over radical nephrectomy in patients presenting with localized renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partial nephrectomy (PN) preserves renal function and has become the standard approach for T1a renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, there is still an ongoing debate as to which patients will actually derive greater benefit from partial than from radical nephrectomy (RN). The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the impact of the type of surgery on overall survival (OS) in patients with localized RCC. Renal surgery was performed in 4326 patients with localized RCC (pT ≤ 3a N/M0) at six German tertiary care centers from 1980 to 2010: RN in 2955 cases (68.3%), elective (ePN) in 1108 (25.6%), and imperative partial nephrectomy (iPN) in 263 (6.1%) cases. The median follow-up for all patients was 63 months. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were carried out to identify prognosticators for OS. PN was performed significantly more often than RN in patients presenting with lower tumor stages, higher RCC differentiation, and non-clear cell histology. Accordingly, the calculated 5 (10)-year OS rates were 90.0 (74.6)% for ePN, 83.9 (57.5)% for iPN, and 81.2 (64.7)% for RN (p < 0.001). However, multivariate analysis including age, sex, tumor diameter and differentiation, histological subtype, and the year of surgery showed that ePN compared to RN still qualified as an independent factor for improved OS (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66-0.94, p = 0.008). Even allowing for the weaknesses of this retrospective analysis, our multicenter study indicates that in patients with localized RCC, PN appears to be associated with better OS than RN irrespective of age or tumor size

  11. APOPTOSIS AND PROLIFERATION OF TUMOR CELLS IN LOCALLY ADVANCED CERVICAL CANCER AFTER NEOADJUVANT INTRAARTERIAL CHEMOTHERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雪琼; 岳天孚; 惠京; 张颖; 王德华

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Through observing the clinical response to neoadjuvant intraarterial chemotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer and investigating the changes of p53 protein expression, proliferation and apoptosis of tumor cells after chemotherapy, to study the relationship between biological markers and chemotherapeutic response. Methods: 20 women with locally advanced squamous cervical cancer received consecutive infusion chemotherapy of five days of cisplatin and adriamycin via the superselective uterine artery. The response to chemotherapy was evaluated by gynecologic examination and ultrasonography 3 weeks after chemotherapy. The changes of apoptotic index (AI), proliferation index (PI) and p53 expression of tumor cells were detected by immunohistochemical technique. Results: The clinical response rate of locally advanced squamous cervical cancer to uterine artery infusion chemotherapy was 70%. No change of PI was found 3 weeks after treatment, but AI significantly increased from 2.79±0.76 to 4.29±1.13 (P<0.01), and AI/PI from 5.68±1.21 to 9.00±1.95 (P<0.05). On the contrary, the expression of p53 was significantly decreased (P<0.05). Patients who responded to chemotherapy showed higher PI before chemotherapy and significantly increased AI and AI/PI after chemotherapy than non-responders (P<0.05). Conclusion: Higher PI was an indication for neoadjuvant intraarterial chemotherapy. One more cycle of chemotherapy should be given to those who have significantly increased AI or AI/PI after chemotherapy, while definite treatment such as surgery or/and radiotherapy should be immediately given to those patients without increased AI or AI/PI.

  12. External beam radiotherapy for basal cell carcinoma. Local control and cosmetic outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The basal cell carcinoma which is often occurring in the elderly can be well treated by surgery. For large and recurrent lesions and in cosmetically difficult locations external beam radiotherapy provides an equally effective treatment alternative. Patients and Methods: From 1986 to 1999, 60 females and 39 males received primary radiotherapy for a total of 127 histologically verified basal cell carcinoma lesions. Tumors were mostly localized in the face at the temple, nose and forehead. Radiotherapy was applied with orthovoltage equipment and energies of up to 100 kV. Single doses ranged from 2 to 5 Gy related to the 80%-isodose depth. Weekly doses ranged from 8 to 25 Gy and total doses from 25 to 60 Gy. The mean follow-up period was 36±21 months. The acute sequelae were scored according to CTC criteria. Radiogenic late effects as single events were related to the radiation portal. Results: 3 months after treatment all besides one patient (99%) experienced complete tumor remission (CR). In all cases, acute radiation reaction occurred within the radiation portal: CTC Grade 1 in 100%, CTC Grade 2 in 54% and CTC Grade 3 in 30% of the cases. All side effects regressed under simple local measures without further complications. Late sequelae were observed in three cases. Overall cosmetic outcome was good to excellent in almost all patients (98%). In two cases (2%) a local recurrence was observed 6 and 20 months after radiotherapy. Conclusion: External beam (orthovoltage) radiotherapy is very effective and yields high tumor control rates and good cosmetic results in long-term follow-up. Former dermatological treatment concepts should be replaced by an ICRU-based radiophysical dose prescription and should respect the newer radiobiological fractionation principles. (orig.)

  13. The role of local renin-angiotensin system on high glucose-induced cell toxicity, apoptosis and reactive oxygen species production in PC12 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Shahveisi

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion:  The results of the present study showed that RAS inhibitors reduced cell toxicity and apoptosis and ROS production was induced by high glucose. It may be suggested that local RAS has a role in high glucose toxicity.

  14. Paraventricular and supraoptic bursting oxytocin cells in rat are locally regulated by oxytocin and functionally related.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, F; Richard, P

    1989-01-01

    1. Oxytocin was pressure injected through a glass micropipette into a supraoptic (SON) or paraventricular nucleus (PVN) while recording the electrical activities of oxytocin cells in a contralateral nucleus, to see whether oxytocin acts locally in the magnocellular nuclei to control their bursting activity and whether the oxytocin cells of the four magnocellular nuclei were functionally interconnected during suckling. To test the rapidity of these relations, similar intranuclear injections were realized with acetylcholine, known to rapidly increase the background activity of oxytocin cells. The effects of intranuclear injections of oxytocin and acetylcholine were tested before and after interhemisphere sections of various dimensions. 2. Injecting oxytocin (1 ng in 100 nl) into a magnocellular nucleus (5 times into the PVN and 15 times into the SON) facilitated the occurrence and increased the amplitude of bursts of the oxytocin cells in both the contralateral PVN and SON. This facilitatory effect was similar to that induced by intraventricular injection of the same dose of oxytocin, though slightly delayed and lower. 3. Injecting acetylcholine (0.6 microgram in 100 nl) into the SON (7 times) induced a rapid and sustained increase in the background activity of oxytocin cells in both the contralateral PVN (2 times) and SON (5 times) within the same delay (less than 15 s). This excitatory effect was similar to that induced by an intraventricular injection of 5 micrograms acetylcholine. The effects on bursting activity were not considered in this study. 4. Neither the injections of oxytocin or acetylcholine outside but near the magnocellular nuclei (200-500 microns), nor the intranuclear injection of 100-200 nl of cerebrospinal fluid-like medium, modified the background activity, the frequency and amplitude of bursts of the oxytocin cells in the nucleus contralateral to the injection site. 5. After interhemisphere sections most oxytocin cells were silent, bursts

  15. EGFR Signaling Regulates Maspin/SerpinB5 Phosphorylation and Nuclear Localization in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Jeffrey; Morais Freitas, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Maspin (SerpinB5) is a non-inhibitory serpin (serine protease inhibitor) with very diverse biological activities including regulation of cell adhesion, migration, death, control of gene expression and oxidative stress response. Initially described as a tumor and metastasis suppressor, clinical data brought controversies to the field, as some studies reported no correlation between SerpinB5 expression and prognosis value. These data underscore the importance of understanding SerpinB5 function in a normal physiological context and the molecular mechanism involved. Several SerpinB5 phosphoforms have been detected in different cell lines, but the signaling pathways involved and the biological significance of this post-translational modification in vivo remains to be explored. In this study we investigated SerpinB5 expression, subcellular localization and phosphorylation in different stages of the mouse mammary gland development and the signaling pathway involved. Here we show that SerpinB5 is first detected in late pregnancy, reaches its highest levels in lactation and remains at constant levels during post-lactational regression (involution). Using high resolution isoelectric focusing followed but immunoblot, we found at least 8 different phosphoforms of SerpinB5 during lactation, which decreases steadily at the onset of involution. In order to investigate the signaling pathway involved in SerpinB5 phosphorylation, we took advantage of the non-transformed MCF-10A model system, as we have previously observed SerpinB5 phosphorylation in these cells. We detected basal levels of SerpinB5 phosphorylation in serum- and growth factor-starved cells, which is due to amphiregulin autocrine activity on MCF-10A cells. EGF and TGF alpha, two other EGFR ligands, promote important SerpinB5 phosphorylation. Interestingly, EGF treatment is followed by SerpinB5 nuclear accumulation. Altogether, these data indicate that SerpinB5 expression and phosphorylation are developmentally

  16. Targeting the tumor-draining area : local immunotherapy and its effect on the systemic T cell response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbert-Fransen, Marieke Fernande

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the role of local immune stimulation in the lymph node and tumor microenvironment and its effect on systemic CD8+ T cell responses, in particular the anti-tumor CD8+ T cell responses. In chapter 2 the use of a slow-release system is described to deliver the immune-acti

  17. Local ATP generation by brain-type creatine kinase (CK-B facilitates cell motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan W P Kuiper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Creatine Kinases (CK catalyze the reversible transfer of high-energy phosphate groups between ATP and phosphocreatine, thereby playing a storage and distribution role in cellular energetics. Brain-type CK (CK-B deficiency is coupled to loss of function in neural cell circuits, altered bone-remodeling by osteoclasts and complement-mediated phagocytotic activity of macrophages, processes sharing dependency on actomyosin dynamics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we provide evidence for direct coupling between CK-B and actomyosin activities in cortical microdomains of astrocytes and fibroblasts during spreading and migration. CK-B transiently accumulates in membrane ruffles and ablation of CK-B activity affects spreading and migration performance. Complementation experiments in CK-B-deficient fibroblasts, using new strategies to force protein relocalization from cytosol to cortical sites at membranes, confirmed the contribution of compartmentalized CK-B to cell morphogenetic dynamics. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide evidence that local cytoskeletal dynamics during cell motility is coupled to on-site availability of ATP generated by CK-B.

  18. Autoradiographic localization of epidermal growth factor receptors to all major uterine cell types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have recently studied the structure and function of the uterine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, its hormonal regulation, and its possible role in estrogen-induced uterine DNA synthesis. Since the uterus is composed of multiple cell types, we sought, in the work reported here, to localize EGF binding in this organ by autoradiography. Prior to the actual autoradiography, we performed a companion series of experiments to insure that EGF binding to uterine tissue in situ represented a true receptor interaction. Uteri from immature female rats were incubated in vitro with 125I-EGF at 25 degrees C. Tissue binding was maximal within 120 min and remained constant for at least an additional 120 min. This binding of labeled EGF was largely abolished by excess unlabeled EGF but not by other growth factors, indicating that binding was to specific receptors. The binding of 125I-EGF was saturable and reached a plateau at 4-8 nM; specific binding was half-maximal at 1-2 nM EGF. In situ cross-linking studies revealed that 125I-EGF was bound predominantly to a 170,000 MW EGF receptor similar to that seen in isolated uterine membranes. Incubation of uteri with 125I-EGF followed by autoradiography revealed binding to epithelial cells, stroma, and myometrium. These results provide evidence for the presence of specific EGF receptors in all major uterine cell types of the immature rat

  19. Chemical stimulation of adherent cells by localized application of acetylcholine from a microfluidic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibek, Susanne; Hagmeyer, Britta; Stett, Alfred; Stelzle, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Chemical stimulation of cells is inherently cell type selective in contrast to electro-stimulation. The availability of a system for localized application of minute amounts of chemical stimulants could be useful for dose related response studies to test new compounds. It could also bring forward the development of a novel type of neuroprostheses. In an experimental setup microdroplets of an acetylcholine solution were ejected from a fluidic microsystem and applied to the bottom of a nanoporous membrane. The solution traveled through the pores to the top of the membrane on which TE671 cells were cultivated. Calcium imaging was used to visualize cellular response with temporal and spatial resolution. Experimental demonstration of chemical stimulation for both threshold gated stimulation as well as accumulated dose-response was achieved by either employing acetylcholine as chemical stimulant or applying calcein uptake, respectively. Numerical modeling and simulation of transport mechanisms involved were employed to gain a theoretical understanding of the influence of pore size, concentration of stimulant and droplet volume on the spatial-temporal distribution of stimulant and on the cellular response. Diffusion, pressure driven flow and evaporation effects were taken into account. Fast stimulation kinetic is achieved with pores of 0.82 μm diameter, whereas sustained substance delivery is obtained with nanoporous membranes. In all cases threshold concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.015 μM acetylcholine independent of pore size were determined. PMID:21151808

  20. Chemical Stimulation of Adherent Cells by Localized Application of Acetylcholine from a Microfluidic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibek, Susanne; Hagmeyer, Britta; Stett, Alfred; Stelzle, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Chemical stimulation of cells is inherently cell type selective in contrast to electro-stimulation. The availability of a system for localized application of minute amounts of chemical stimulants could be useful for dose related response studies to test new compounds. It could also bring forward the development of a novel type of neuroprostheses. In an experimental setup microdroplets of an acetylcholine solution were ejected from a fluidic microsystem and applied to the bottom of a nanoporous membrane. The solution traveled through the pores to the top of the membrane on which TE671 cells were cultivated. Calcium imaging was used to visualize cellular response with temporal and spatial resolution. Experimental demonstration of chemical stimulation for both threshold gated stimulation as well as accumulated dose–response was achieved by either employing acetylcholine as chemical stimulant or applying calcein uptake, respectively. Numerical modeling and simulation of transport mechanisms involved were employed to gain a theoretical understanding of the influence of pore size, concentration of stimulant and droplet volume on the spatial-temporal distribution of stimulant and on the cellular response. Diffusion, pressure driven flow and evaporation effects were taken into account. Fast stimulation kinetic is achieved with pores of 0.82 μm diameter, whereas sustained substance delivery is obtained with nanoporous membranes. In all cases threshold concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.015 μM acetylcholine independent of pore size were determined. PMID:21151808

  1. Local regulation of haemopoietic stem cell proliferation in mice following irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the kinetic state of pluripotent haemopoietic spleen colony forming cells (CFU-S) and of the CFU-S proliferation stimulator have been studied following whole-body X-irradiation. Rapid recruitment of CFU-S into cell cycle by 30 min after irradiation was observed following low doses (0.5 Gy) but a delay of 6 h occurred after higher doses (1.5 and 4.5 Gy). These changes in proliferative state correlated with the presence of the CFU-S proliferation stimulator. CFU-S irradiated in vitro in bone marrow plugs were also recruited into cycle illustrating directly the local nature of the feedback mechanism. CFU-S removed from 1.5 Gy irradiated recipients at a time when they were not in cycle were not responsive to the CFU-S proliferation stimulator. The CFU-S proliferation stimulator was produced by Ia positive cells in the irradiated bone marrow. The regulation changes occurring shortly after irradiation cannot simply be controlled by the size of the CFU-S compartment. (author)

  2. Localized photovoltaic investigations on organic semiconductors and bulk heterojunction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newly synthesized organic electronics materials are often available in submicrogram amounts only. Photoelectrochemical scanning droplet cell microscopy is a powerful method that allows a comprehensive characterisation of such small amounts including oxidation, reduction potentials, doping, determination of charge carriers, band gap, charge capacity, over-oxidation sensitivity and many more. Localized photoelectrochemical characterization of the poly[4,8-bis-substituted-benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b0]dithiophene-2, 6-diyl-alt-4-substituted-thieno [3,4-b] thiophene-2,6-diyl] (PBDTTT-c) and PBDTTT-c:PCBM bulk heterojunction was performed using photoelectrochemical scanning droplet cell microscopy (PE-SDCM). The optical properties and the real and imaginary part of the dielectric function, of the polymer were determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The photoelectrochemical characterizations were performed in a three and two electrode configuration of PE-SDCM under laser and white light illumination. The effect of illumination was characterized using dark/illumination sequences. The stability of the photocurrent was studied using longer term (600 s) illumination. Finally the effect of cell configuration and illumination conditions on the photovoltage was studied. (paper)

  3. Cytochemical localization of calcium in soybean root cap cells in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchuk, D. O.; Brown, C. S.; Chapman, D. K.; Vorobyova, T. V.; Martyn, G. M.

    The antimonate precipitation technique was used to evaluate the effects of microgravity and ethylene on the cellular and subcellular distribution of free calcium ions in soybean root apices. Soybean (Glycine max L. [Merr.]) dry seeds were launched, activated by hydration, and germinated in the presence of KMnO4 (to remove ethylene) and in its absence onboard the space shuttle Columbia during the STS-87 mission. Primary root apices of 6-day old seedlings were fixed for electron microscopy after landing. Ultrastructural studies indicated that antimonate precipitation appeared as individual electron-dense particles which were more or less round in shape and varied in diameter from 10 nm (minimum size beginning from which the particles were well identified) to 90 nm. It was revealed that analyzed root cap cells varied in both the precipitate particle sizes and the amount particles per unit of the cellular area. In both flight and ground control treatments, antimonate precipitation level increases from apical meristem cells to peripheral (secretory) cells of root apices. In root cap statocytes, subcellular localization of precipitate particles was revealed in the cytoplasm, nucleus and small vacuoles. The quantitative analysis showed a reduction of precipitate density in the cytoplasm and the nucleus, and an increase in precipitate density in the vacuoles from statocytes of both spaceflight treatments in comparison with ground controls.

  4. Localization of human immunodeficiency virus antigens in infected cells by scanning/transmission-immunogold techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An application of high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and gold-labelling techniques for the rapid detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in infected cells has been developed. Experimental in vitro studies for detecting two HIV structural proteins, gp41 and p17, were performed following an indirect labeling procedure that uses monoclonal anti-p17 and anti-gp41 antibodies as primary antibodies and 40 nm gold-linked goat antimouse IgG as secondary antibodies. The cells were then studied by STEM in the scanning mode. Unambiguous localization of the viral antigens was possible by combining the three-dimensional image provided by the secondary electron image and the atomic number-dependent backscattered electron image for the identification of the gold marker. This technique combines both the morphological information and the rapid procedures of scanning electron microscopy with the precise and sensitive antigen detection provided by the use of STEM and immunological methods. The preliminary results of its application to the study of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from four anti-HIV-seropositive patients showing the presence of specific labeling in all of them suggest that it might prove useful for early detection of HIV infection before seroconversion, as well as for quantitative studies

  5. A new insight into cancer stem cell markers: Could local and circulating cancer stem cell markers correlate in colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Alireza; Tavoosidana, Gholamreza; Rad, Afshin Abdi; Rezaei, Farhad; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Kadijani, Azade Amini; Khalili, Ehsan; Madjd, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) markers could serve as potential prognostic procedure. This study is aimed to investigate the local expression of doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) and Lgr5 in colorectal cancer tissues (CRC) at both protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) level, followed by providing a comparison of the local and circulating expression pattern of these markers, based on our present and previous study. The mRNA expression level of DCLK1 and Lgr5 was evaluated using comparative real-time PCR method applying 58 fresh tumor tissues and their correspondent normal margins. Immunohistochemistry was applied to analyze the protein expression level of DCLK1 and Lgr5 in paraffin-embedded CRC tissues. The correlation of DCLK1 and Lgr5 expression pattern with clinicopathological characteristics was assessed. A higher mRNA expression level of DCLK1 (3.28-fold change, p < 0.001) and Lgr5 (2.29-fold change, p < 0.001) was observed in CRC fresh tissues compared to the normal adjacent margins, and the expression level was higher in patients with higher grade and stages of disease and patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The protein expression level of DCLK1 and Lgr5 was also increased significantly in tumor tissues compared to normal colon tissues which were positively correlated to tumor stage and grade and neoadjuvant CRT. Taken together, the results of protein analysis were in accordance with mRNA assessment. The local expression pattern of DCLK1 and Lgr5 was also in accordance with their expression level in circulation. However, some minor inconsistencies were observed which may be attributed to several factors including the possible effect of CRT on CSC reprogramming. PMID:26383518

  6. MR-imaging of the breast at 0.5 Tesla: menstrual-cycle dependency of parenchymal contrast enhancement in healthy volunteers with oral contraceptive use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: To evaluate changes of contrast medium enhancement of the breast parenchyma due to menstrual cycle in healthy volunteers with oral contraceptive use in MR-imaging of the breast. Material and Methods: 15 healthy volunteers (age: 22 - 36, mean 28,2) without breast disease were examined two times during one menstrual cycle (days 7 - 14 and days 21 - 2). Two volunteers were examined only in the second part of the cycle (days 21 - 2). All volunteers used oral contraceptives for more than 6 month continuously. Examinations were performed with a 0,5 T magnet (dynamic 3D-gradient echo protocol with subtraction postprocessing). We evaluated the number of enhancing foci and the parenchymal contrast medium enhancement during the different phases of the cycle by region of interest. Results: Only a total of two enhancing foci were found in 2 of 17 volunteers. Time/signal intensity diagrams in these both cases were not suspicious (< 80% initial signal increase after of contrast medium injection, no wash-out phenomenon) and sonography of the breast in these two cases was inconspicuous. Contrast medium enhancement of breast parenchyma in cycle days 7 - 14 (mean enhancement: 0.12 - 0.26, minutes 1 - 9 p.i.) was not significantly different (p = 0.2209; Wilcoxon signed rank test) from cycle days 21 - 2 (mean: 0.13 - 0.32). Conclusion: Menstrual cycle dependency of parenchymal contrast medium enhancement seems to be of minor relevance for premenopausal women with use of oral contraceptives. (orig.)

  7. Cellular Localization of the Molecular Forms of Acetylcholinesterase in rat Pheochromocytoma Pc12 Cells Treated with Nerve Growth Factor1

    OpenAIRE

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Reiness, C. Gary; Reichardt, Louis F.; Hall, Zach W

    1981-01-01

    In rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells treated with nerve growth factor (NGF), there are several molecular forms of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) which sediment on sucrose density gradients at 4 to 6, 10, and 16 S, respectively. We have investigated the cellular localization of these forms in PC12 cells. In order to determine which forms are soluble and which are membrane bound, we extracted PC12 cells in buffers of various ionic strengths and detergent compositions. To distinguish int...

  8. Local Viscoelastic Properties of Live Cells Investigated Using Dynamic and Quasi-Static Atomic Force Microscopy Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Cartagena, Alexander; Raman, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of viscoelasticity of cells in physiological environments with high spatio-temporal resolution is a key goal in cell mechanobiology. Traditionally only the elastic properties have been measured from quasi-static force-distance curves using the atomic force microscope (AFM). Recently, dynamic AFM-based methods have been proposed to map the local in vitro viscoelastic properties of living cells with nanoscale resolution. However, the differences in viscoelastic properties estima...

  9. Estudo quantitativo das células de Langerhans em carcinomas basocelulares com maior e menor potencial de agressividade local Quantitative study of Langerhans cells in basal cell carcinoma with higher or lower potential of local aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itamar Santos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS - O carcinoma basocelular localiza-se principalmente em áreas expostas ao sol, apresentando formas clínicas e histológicas diferentes, algumas com grande e outras com pequena agressividade local. Células de Langerhans participam ativamente do sistema imune da pele. OBJETIVO - Avaliar quantitativamente as células de Langerhans sobrepostas aos carcinomas basocelulares de maior e menor potencial de agressividade local, assim como nas respectivas epidermes sãs adjacentes. MÉTODOS - Dois grupos com 14 preparações histológicas cada. No primeiro, carcinoma basocelular de menor potencial de agressividade local e, no segundo, carcinoma basocelular de maior potencial. Empregou-se a imunoistoquímica com proteína S100 para identificação das células de Langerhans. Utilizando microscópio óptico em aumento de 400 vezes e a grade morfométrica de Weibel, foram contadas as células de Langerhans presentes em sete campos, obtendo-se a média em cada lâmina. Foi utilizado teste estatístico de Wilcoxon para análise estatística. RESULTADOS - No grupo de menor potencial de agressividade local, na epiderme sã adjacente houve aumento significativo no número de células de Langerhans comparado ao da epiderme sobreposta ao carcinoma basocelular (p d 0,05. No grupo de maior potencial de agressividade local, não houve diferença com significado estatístico (p > 0,05. CONCLUSÃO - O maior número de células de Langerhans na epiderme sã vizinha à lesão tumoral de menor potencial de agressividade local poderia representar uma maior resistência imunológica da epiderme, limitando a agressividade da neoplasia.BACKGROUNDS - Basal cell carcinoma affects areas of the body that have been exposed to the sun, and this disorder has different clinical and histopathologic presentations. Some of these forms have a higher potential of local aggressiveness, while others have a lower potential. Langerhans cells actively participate in the skin

  10. RETOUR AU LOCAL : Celles qui attendent et l’engagement diasporique de Fatou Diome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna‐Leena Toivanen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available La littérature africaine du XXIe siècle est marquée par des affinités transnationales au lieu d’une approche nationale et locale. La théorie postcoloniale hégémonique a consolidé le paradigme postnational en mettant l’accent sur les métaphores délocalisées. Dans son roman Celles qui attendent (2010, Fatou Diome examine la face souvent tue par les discours littéraires diaspo‐riques : les réalités difficiles de ceux qui ne profitent pas directement de la logique du transnationalisme et continuent à subir les précarités de la condition postcoloniale nationale. Le présent article se propose de prospecter les dimensions complexes de l’engagement de Diome.

  11. Sequential hemibody and local irradiation with combination chemotherapy for small cell lung carcinoma: a preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequential hemibody irradiation (SHB) was integrated with combination chemotherapy and local irradiation (LRT) in the induction and consolidation phases of a therapeutic protocol for small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Forty-one previously untreated patients were entered into this program. Among 38 evaluable patients (20 with limited disease [LD] and 18 with extensive disease [ED]), the overall response rate was 63% (90% in LD and 33% in ED patients). The estimated overall survival is 8.1 months. The major toxicity has been myelosuppression - especially thrombocytopenia. The frequency of previously described acute radiation syndromes and radiation pneumonitis associated with hemibody irradiation have been substantially decreased at the current dosage with premedication and shielding techniques

  12. The magnetic field of Betelgeuse: a local dynamo from giant convection cells?

    CERN Document Server

    Auriere, M; Konstantinova-Antova, R; Perrin, G; Petit, P; Roudier, T

    2010-01-01

    Betelgeuse is an M supergiant with a complex and extended atmosphere, which also harbors spots and giant granules at its surface. A possible magnetic field could contribute to the mass loss and to the heating of the outer atmosphere. We observed Betelgeuse, to directly study and infer the nature of its magnetic field. We used the new-generation spectropolarimeter NARVAL and the least square deconvolution (LSD) method to detect circular polarization within the photospheric absorption lines of Betelgeuse. We have unambiguously detected a weak Stokes V signal in the spectral lines of Betelgeuse, and measured the related surface-averaged longitudinal magnetic field Bl at 6 different epochs over one month. The detected longitudinal field is about one Gauss and is apparently increasing on the time scale of our observations. This work presents the first direct detection of the magnetic field of Betelgeuse. This magnetic field may be associated to the giant convection cells that could enable a "local dynamo:.

  13. Localization of LHCP II in the Golgi of synchronized Euglena cells by immuno-electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously localized LHCP II apoprotein in the Golgi ampersand thylakoids of Euglena gracilis (bacillaris ampersand Z strain) using specific antibody ampersand protein A-gold, during plastid development ampersand induction of LHCP II synthesis by increased light intensity. Using light/dark synchronized cells we now show that thylakoids are always immunoreactive. There is no reaction in the Golgi at 0 h. (beginning of light period), but immunoreaction appears in the Golgi soon thereafter, rises to a peak at 8 h. ampersand declines again to zero by 16 h. (2 h. into the dark period). The peak in immunoreaction in the Golgi immediately precedes the peak in 14C-labeling of cellular LHCP, supporting our suggestion that processing in the Golgi precedes deposition of LHCP II apoprotein in the thylakoids. Synchronized mutant Gr1 which lacks LHCP apoprotein fails to show immunoreaction in the Golgi or thylakoids at any stage

  14. Pulsating Tandem Microbubble for Localized and Directional Single Cell Membrane Poration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankin, G.N.; Yuan, F.; Zhong, P.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of laser-generated tandem microbubble (maximum diameter about 50 μm) with single (rat mammary carcinoma) cells is investigated in a 25-μm liquid layer. Anti-phase and coupled oscillation of the tandem microbubble leads to the formation of alternating, directional microjets (with max. microstreaming velocity of 10 m/s) and vortices (max. vorticity of 350,000 s−1) in opposite directions. Localized and directional membrane poration (200 nm to 2 μm in pore size) can be produced by the tandem microbubble in an orientation and proximity dependent manner, which is absence from a single oscillating microbubble of comparable size and at the same stand-off distance. PMID:20868077

  15. AWireless Local Area Network Soft Cell Phone (SCP System with Multimedia and Data Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olakanmi O.Oladayo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most organizations concurrently maintain private Automatic Branch Exchange (PABX and Local Area Network (LAN for information interchange within their organization. This is obviously a waste of resources and avoidable duplication of communication systems. The existing LAN can be used as a communication backbone for the in house telephone operations with no extra cost and resources. In view of this, a portable and a platform independent Software-Based Cell Phone (SCP was proposed for the existing LANs infrastructure in the organizations. The SPC is a telephony application with a user friendly interface which is capable of handling voice, video and text messages without compromising the Quality of Service (QoS of the existing LAN.

  16. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of thyroid gland with local recurrence: ultrasonographic and computed tomographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ja Yoon; Kwon, Kye Won; Kim, Sang Wook [Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Youn, In Young [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland (PSCCT) is a rare malignancy that presents with advanced disease and poor prognosis. It is difficult to diagnose PSCCT in its early stage because of its rarity and lack of typical imaging findings. We experienced an elderly woman with PSCCT confirmed by surgery. Although preoperative fine-needle aspiration revealed no malignancy, surgical resection was performed because the ultrasonogram showed diffuse microcalcifications, which suggested malignancy, and clinically, the mass grew rapidly to compress the trachea. Local tumor recurrence was noted at 3 months after surgery. Surgical resection or repeat biopsy should be considered if a cytologically benign thyroid mass shows imaging or clinical features of malignancy.

  17. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of thyroid gland with local recurrence: ultrasonographic and computed tomographic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja yoon Jang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland (PSCCT is a rare malignancy that presents with advanced disease and poor prognosis. It is difficult to diagnose PSCCT in its early stage because of its rarity and lack of typical imaging findings. We experienced an elderly woman with PSCCT confirmed by surgery. Although preoperative fine-needle aspiration revealed no malignancy, surgical resection was performed because the ultrasonogram showed diffuse microcalcifications, which suggested malignancy, and clinically, the mass grew rapidly to compress the trachea. Local tumor recurrence was noted at 3 months after surgery. Surgical resection or repeat biopsy should be considered if a cytologically benign thyroid mass shows imaging or clinical features of malignancy.

  18. Delayed postoperative radiation therapy in local control of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to evaluate the effect of time between surgery and postoperative radiation therapy on local recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth. Methods: a total of 154 patients treated between 1996 and 2007 were selected considering local recurrence rate and time of the adjuvant radiotherapy. Results: local recurrence was diagnosed in 54 (35%) patients. Radiation therapy reduced the rate of local recurrences, although with no statistical significance. The time between surgery and initiation of postoperative radiotherapy did not significantly influence the risk of local recurrence in patients referred to adjuvant treatment (p=0.49). Conclusion: in the presence of risk factors for local recurrence, a short delay in starting the adjuvant radiation therapy does not contraindicate its performance. (author)

  19. Delayed postoperative radiation therapy in local control of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amar, Ali; Chedid, Helma Maria; Curioni, Otavio Alberto; Rapoport, Abrao, E-mail: arapoport@uol.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Dedivitis, Rogerio Aparecido; Cernea, Claudio Roberto; Brandao, Lenine Garcia [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao aulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    Objective: to evaluate the effect of time between surgery and postoperative radiation therapy on local recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth. Methods: a total of 154 patients treated between 1996 and 2007 were selected considering local recurrence rate and time of the adjuvant radiotherapy. Results: local recurrence was diagnosed in 54 (35%) patients. Radiation therapy reduced the rate of local recurrences, although with no statistical significance. The time between surgery and initiation of postoperative radiotherapy did not significantly influence the risk of local recurrence in patients referred to adjuvant treatment (p=0.49). Conclusion: in the presence of risk factors for local recurrence, a short delay in starting the adjuvant radiation therapy does not contraindicate its performance. (author)

  20. Laparoscopic resection of tumor recurrence after radical nephrectomy for localized renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lessandro Curcio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Local recurrence of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC after radical nephrectomy is a rare event. Some known risk factors are: clinical/pathological stage, locorregional disease and lyimph node positivity. Since up to 30-40% of patients can achieve a disease-free status, we show a case (video in which we performed a laparoscopic excision of a local RCC, taking advantage of all the well-known benefits of laparoscopy.Case report A 56 years old female with a history of open radical nephrectomy two years before was diagnosed with a mass at the time of surveillance CT imaging during follow-up. The suspected local recurrence was 12cm, and vascularized predominantly by tributaries originating from the iliac vessels. There was no other site of disease (i.e. brain, lung, liver, bones and laboratory tests were normal. Laparoscopic approach was approached, by inserting 4 trocars (2 of 10 and 2 of 5mm with the patient in the lateral position.Result The procedure lasted 130 minutes, with 220mL of estimated bleeding; the larger vessels were ligated with polymer clips (Hem-o-lok and the smaller handled by ultrasonic clamp. The specimen was removed by a small incision below the umbilicus in an appropriate bag. The patient was feed in the first postoperative day and discharged on the third day. Histopathology revealed sarcoma, with a high degree of mitosis, and negative surgical margins. She was referred to medical oncology for adjuvant therapy consideration.Conclusion The laparoscopic resection of recurrent tumor should be encouraged in highly selected cases. The minimally invasive method, with its known advantages, especially for more debilitated patients, can be advantageous when applied to suitable cases.

  1. Intranuclear Localization of EGFP-mouse PPARγ1 in Bovine Fibroblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorayya Ghasemi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to clone PPARγ1 cDNA in an appropriate mammalianexpression vector, with a chimeric cDNA form, encompassing PPARγ with enhanced greenfluorescent protein (EGFP cDNA. This recombinant plasmid will be used for further analysesto investigate the molecular mechanism of PPARγ1 for neural differentiation process.Moreover, the nuclear localization of the PPARγ1 protein linked to EGFP marker was chasedby using transient transfection of a constructed plasmid into bovine fibroblast cells.Materials and Methods: Total RNA was extracted from the fatty tissue of an adult mouse.Using specific pair primers, PPARγ1 cDNA was synthesized and amplified to producethe entire length of ORF. RT-PCR products containing PPARγ1 cDNA were treated byenzymatic digestion and inserted into the pEGFP-C1 downstream from EGFP cDNA. Theconstructed vector was used for transformation into bacterial competent cells. Positivecolonies which showed inserted PPARγ1 cDNA were selected for plasmid preparationsand additional analysis was performed to ensure that PPARγ1 cDNA was inserted properly.Finally, to confirm the intracellular localization of EGFP-PPARγ1, bovine fibroblastcells were transfected with the recombinant plasmid.Results: Our results from enzymatic digestion and sequencing confirmed, as expected, thatPPARγ1 cDNA was amplified and cloned correctly. This cDNA gene encompassed 1428 bp.The related product was entered into the nucleus of bovine fibroblasts after transfection ofits cDNA.

  2. EPHA7 and EPHA10 Physically Interact and Differentially Co-localize in Normal Breast and Breast Carcinoma Cell Lines, and the Co-localization Pattern Is Altered in EPHB6-expressing MDA-MB-231 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Candace; Segovia, Briana; Kandpal, Raj P

    Erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular carcinoma cell (EPH) receptors comprise the most abundant receptor tyrosine kinase family characterized to date in mammals including humans. These proteins are involved in axon guidance, tissue organization, vascular development and the intricate process of various diseases including cancer. These diverse functions of EPH receptors are attributed, in part, to their abilities for heterodimerization. While the interacting partners of kinase-deficient EPHB6 receptor have been characterized, the interaction of the kinase-dead EPHA10 with any other receptor has not been identified. By using co-immunoprecipitation, we demonstrated physical interaction between kinase-deficient EPHA10 with kinase-sufficient EPHA7 receptor. Immunocytochemical analyses have revealed that these two receptors co-localize on the cell surface, and soluble portions of the receptors exist as a complex in the cytoplasm as well as the nuclei. While EPHA7 and EPHA10 co-localize similarly on the membrane in MCF10A and MCF7 cells, they were differentially co-localized in MDA-MB-231 cells stably transfected with empty pcDNA vector (MDA-MB-231-PC) or an expression construct of EPHB6 (MDA-MB-231-B6). The full-length isoforms of these receptors were co-localized on the cell surface, and the soluble forms were present as a complex in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus in MDA-MB-231-PC cells. MDA-MB-231-B6 cells, on the other hand, were distinguished by the absence of any signal in the nuclei. Our results represent the first demonstration of physical interaction between EPHA10 and EPHA7 and their cellular co-localization. Furthermore, these observations also suggest gene-regulatory functions of the complex of the soluble forms of these receptors in breast carcinoma cells of differential invasiveness. PMID:27566654

  3. Thermoradiotherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Non small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose : To improve the treatment results of locally advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient, we treated those patients with regional hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy. And we conducted a retrospective analysis of the results.Methods and Materials : Thirty two non small cell lung cancer patients treated at the Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's hospital. Catholic University Medical College were the base of this analysis. Fourteen patients of above them were treated with hyperthermia and radiotherapy of more than 3000 cGy in radiation dose. Radiofrequency capacitive hyperthermia was administered twice weekly, immediately after radiotherapy. Total sessions of hyperthermia ranged from 3 to 13 times (mean 7,8). Eighteen patient received an external radiation therapy alone. Median radiation dose was 5580 cGy (range, 3000-7000 cGy) in fraction of 180-300 cGy, 5 fractions per week.Results : The results of thermoradiotherapy group (HTRT group) were compared with radiation alone group (RT group). There were no complete response (CR) and 12 partial responses (PR) (CR rate 0%, response rate 85.7%) in HTRT group, whereas there were 2 CRs, 8 PRs and 8 no responses (CR rate 11.1%, response rate 55.6%) in RT group. There was significant difference in local response rate of the tumors between RT group and HTRT group (p<0.05). Overall 2 year survival rate and mean survival were 7.1% and 10.5 months for HTRT group, and 0% 8.1 months for RT group. However, by the number of hyperthermia, in cases with more than or equal to 10 sessions of hyperthermia, there were significant improvement in 2 year survival rate and mean survival (40.0% and 18.2 months) compared with those in cases with less than 10 sessions of hyperthermia (7.4% and 7.4 months) (p<0.05).Conclusion : Thermoradiotherapy in locally advanced NSCLC patients increased their response rate but not 2 year survival and mean survival, therefore thermoradiotherapy with enough number of hyperthermia is

  4. Characterization of immune cells and cytokine localization in the rat utero-placental unit mid- to late gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Daniel R; Raha, Sandeep; Holloway, Alison C; Yockell-Lelièvre, Julien; Tayade, Chandrakant; Gruslin, Andrée

    2015-08-01

    The success of pregnancy is dependent on the precise regulation of the immune response within the utero-placental environment. Rats are beginning to be widely used as a model for human immune-related pregnancy complications. However, our knowledge of immune cells and cytokine localization in the rat utero-placental tissue is limited. The current study aimed to localize the immune cell populations, including uterine natural killer (uNK) cells, neutrophils, and macrophages within the rat utero-placental unit at two crucial gestational ages, gestational days 15.5 and 18.5. In addition, we characterized the distribution of the cytokines TNFα, IFNγ, and IL-10 in the utero-placental regions at both the above-mentioned gestational ages. Our study has demonstrated co-localization TNFα and IFNγ with uNK cells in perivascular regions of the rat mesometrial triangle at both gestational ages. Neutrophils and IL-10-positive cells were localized at the maternal-fetal interface and in the spiral artery lumen of the rat mesometrial triangle at both gestational ages. TNFα and IL-10 demonstrated a temporal change in the localization from GD15.5 to GD18.5, which coincides with the leading edge of trophoblast invasion into the mesometrial triangle. The current study furthers our knowledge of the localization of uterine immune cells and relevant cytokines, and provides a base from which to research the function of these immune cells and cytokines during rat pregnancy as a model to study human immune-related pregnancy complications. PMID:25725501

  5. Studies on the turnover and subcellular localization of membrane gangliosides in cultured neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the subcellular distribution of endogenously synthesized and exogenous gangliosides, cultured murine neuroblastoma cells (N1E-115) were incubated in suspension for 22 h in the presence of D-[1-3H]galactose or [3H]GM1 ganglioside, transferred to culture medium containing no radioisotope for periods of up to 72 hr, and then subjected to subcellular fractionation and analysis of lipid-sialic acid and radiolabeled ganglioside levels. The results indicated that GM2 and GM3 were the principal gangliosides in the cells with only traces of GM1 and small amounts of disialogangliosides present. About 50% of the endogenously synthesized radiolabelled ganglioside in the four major subcellular membrane fractions studied was recovered from plasma membrane and only 10-15% from the crude mitochondrial membrane fraction. In contrast, 45% of the exogenous [3H]GM1 taken up into the same subcellular membrane fractions was recovered from the crude mitochondrial fraction; less than 15% was localized in the plasma membrane fraction. The results are similar to those obtained from previously reported studies on membrane phospholipid turnover. They suggest that exogenous GM1 ganglioside, like exogenous phosphatidylcholine, does not intermix freely with any quantitatively major pool of endogenous membrane lipid

  6. Quantitative Expression and Co-Localization of Wnt Signalling Related Proteins in Feline Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Antonio; Swift, Rebecca; Arthurs, Callum; Marote, Georgina; Abramo, Francesca; McKay, Jenny; Thomson, Calum; Beltran, Mariana; Millar, Michael; Priestnall, Simon; Dobson, Jane; Costantino-Casas, Fernando; Petrou, Terry; McGonnell, Imelda M; Davies, Anthony J; Weetman, Malcolm; Garden, Oliver A; Masters, John R; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Ahmed, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (FOSCC) is an aggressive neoplasm in cats. Little is known about the possible molecular mechanisms that may be involved in the initiation, maintenance and progression of FOSCC. Wnt signalling is critical in development and disease, including many mammalian cancers. In this study, we have investigated the expression of Wnt signalling related proteins using quantitative immunohistochemical techniques on tissue arrays. We constructed tissue arrays with 58 individual replicate tissue samples. We tested for the expression of four key Wnt/ß-catenin transcription targets, namely Cyclin D1 (CCND1 or CD1), FRA1, c-Myc and MMP7. All antibodies showed cross reactivity in feline tissue except MMP7. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of single proteins (expressed as area fraction / amount of tissue for normal vs tumor, mean ± SE) showed that the expression of CD1 (3.9 ± 0.5 vs 12.2 ± 0.9), FRA1 (5.5 ± 0.6 vs 16.8 ± 1.1) and c-Myc (5.4 ± 0.5 vs 12.5 ± 0.9) was increased in FOSCC tissue by 2.3 to 3 fold compared to normal controls (p<0.0001). By using a multilabel, quantitative fluorophore technique we further investigated if the co-localization of these proteins (all transcription factors) with each other and in the nucleus (stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, DAPI) was altered in FOSCC compared to normal tissue. The global intersection coefficients, a measure of the proximity of two fluorophore labeled entities, showed that there was a significant change (p < 0.01) in the co-localization for all permutations (e.g. CD1/FRA1 etc), except for the nuclear localization of CD1. Our results show that putative targets of Wnt signalling transcription are up-regulated in FOSCC with alterations in the co-localization of these proteins and could serve as a useful marker for the disease. PMID:27559731

  7. Unconventional Human T Cells Accumulate at the Site of Infection in Response to Microbial Ligands and Induce Local Tissue Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; Kift-Morgan, Ann; Lopez-Anton, Melisa; Friberg, Ida M.; Zhang, Jingjing; Brook, Amy C.; Roberts, Gareth W.; Donovan, Kieron L.; Colmont, Chantal S.; Toleman, Mark A.; Bowen, Timothy; Johnson, David W.; Topley, Nicholas; Moser, Bernhard; Fraser, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial responsiveness and function of unconventional human T cells are poorly understood, with only limited access to relevant specimens from sites of infection. Peritonitis is a common and serious complication in individuals with end-stage kidney disease receiving peritoneal dialysis. By analyzing local and systemic immune responses in peritoneal dialysis patients presenting with acute bacterial peritonitis and monitoring individuals before and during defined infectious episodes, our data show that Vγ9/Vδ2+ γδ T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells accumulate at the site of infection with organisms producing (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate and vitamin B2, respectively. Such unconventional human T cells are major producers of IFN-γ and TNF-α in response to these ligands that are shared by many microbial pathogens and affect the cells lining the peritoneal cavity by triggering local inflammation and inducing tissue remodeling with consequences for peritoneal membrane integrity. Our data uncover a crucial role for Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in bacterial infection and suggest that they represent a useful predictive marker for important clinical outcomes, which may inform future stratification and patient management. These findings are likely to be applicable to other acute infections where local activation of unconventional T cells contributes to the antimicrobial inflammatory response. PMID:27527598

  8. Down-regulation of β-catenin Nuclear Localization by Aspirin Correlates with Growth Inhibition of Jurkat Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of aspirin on the growth rates, subcellar distribution of β-catenin protein, the expression of β-catenin/TCF signaling pathway target gene cyclinD1 mRNA,and cell cycle of Jurkat cell line (Human T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia). Our results showed that the treatment with aspirin inhibited the growth of Jurkat cell line. Jurkat cells treated with 3 mmol/L of aspirin could significantly decrease nuclear localization of β-catenin, and at 5 mmol/L of aspirin,the nuclear localization of β-catenin was undetectable. QRT-PCR showed that the target gene cyclinD1 mRNA expression was gradually decreased with the dosage of aspirin. Aspirin induced G0/G1cell cycle arrest in Jurkat cells. We are led to conclude that aspirin acts through β-catenin-independent mechanisms. The effects of aspirin include down-regulation of β-catenin nuclear localization and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, which might serve as a means of growth inhibition in aspirin-treated human Jurkat cell line.

  9. Golgi localization and dynamics of hyaluronan binding protein 1 (HABP1/p32/C1QBP) during the cell cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aniruddha SENGUPTA; Bhaswati BANERJEE; Rakesh K. TYAGI; Kasturi DATTA

    2005-01-01

    Hyaluronan binding protein 1 (HABP1) is a negatively charged multifunctional mammalian protein with a unique structural fold. Despite the fact that HABP1 possesses mitochondrial localization signal, it has also been localized to other cellular compartments. Using indirect immunofluorescence, we examined the sub-cellular localization of HABP1 and its dynamics during mitosis. We wanted to determine whether it distributes in any distinctive manner after mitotic nuclear envelope disassembly or is dispersed randomly throughout the cell. Our results reveal the golgi localization of HABP1 and demonstrate its complete dispersion throughout the cell during mitosis. This distinctive distribution pattern of HABP1 during mitosis resembles its ligand hyaluronan, suggesting that in concert with each other the two molecules play critical roles in this dynamic process.

  10. Pre-embedding Method of Electron Microscopy for Glycan Localization in Mammalian Tissues and Cells Using Lectin Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Takata, Kuniaki; Kawakami, Hayato

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the study of glycans is progressing remarkably by the development of glycan analysis systems using mass spectrometry, glycan profiling systems using lectin microarrays, and glycoprotein analysis by the isotope-coded glycosylation site-specific tagging method. With these methodologies, glycan structures and biological functions are being elucidated. In the study of glycan function as well as disease diagnosis, it is important to examine the localization of glycans in tissues and cells. Histochemical methods using lectin probes can localize glycans in the tissues and cells. This chapter describes a pre-embedding electron microscopic method for glycan localization in which tissue sections and cells are incubated with lectin prior to embedding in resin. PMID:27515086

  11. Localization of the Gangliosides GD2 and GD3 in Adhesion Plaques and on the Surface of Human Melanoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheresh, David A.; Harper, John R.; Schulz, Gregor; Reisfeld, Ralph A.

    1984-09-01

    The predominant gangliosides produced by two cultured human melanoma cell lines are GD3 and/or GD2. These gangliosides were found to be cell associated and present in substratum-attached material after cell removal by EDTA. Monoclonal antibodies directed to GD2 and GD3 specified the cell-surface distribution of these gangliosides and localized them in focal adhesion plaques at the interface of cells and their substratum. These attachment sites did not represent indiscriminant membrane fragments remaining after removal of cells with EDTA, because neither melanoma-associated proteoglycan nor class I histocompatibility antigens were detected by their respective antibodies. Our data suggest that the disialogangliosides GD2 and GD3 may be involved in the interaction between human melanoma cells and solid substrata.

  12. Propagation of localized structures in relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas using particle-in-cell simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use a particle-in-cell simulation to study the propagation of localized structures in a magnetized electron-positron plasma with relativistic finite temperature. We use as initial condition for the simulation an envelope soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, derived from the relativistic two fluid equations in the strongly magnetized limit. This envelope soliton turns out not to be a stable solution for the simulation and splits in two localized structures propagating in opposite directions. However, these two localized structures exhibit a soliton-like behavior, as they keep their profile after they collide with each other due to the periodic boundary conditions. We also observe the formation of localized structures in the evolution of a spatially uniform circularly polarized Alfvén wave. In both cases, the localized structures propagate with an amplitude independent velocity

  13. Propagation of localized structures in relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas using particle-in-cell simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Rodrigo A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción 4070386 (Chile); Muñoz, Víctor [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Viñas, Adolfo F. [Geospace Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Valdivia, Juan A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología (CEDENNA), Santiago 9170124 (Chile)

    2015-09-15

    We use a particle-in-cell simulation to study the propagation of localized structures in a magnetized electron-positron plasma with relativistic finite temperature. We use as initial condition for the simulation an envelope soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, derived from the relativistic two fluid equations in the strongly magnetized limit. This envelope soliton turns out not to be a stable solution for the simulation and splits in two localized structures propagating in opposite directions. However, these two localized structures exhibit a soliton-like behavior, as they keep their profile after they collide with each other due to the periodic boundary conditions. We also observe the formation of localized structures in the evolution of a spatially uniform circularly polarized Alfvén wave. In both cases, the localized structures propagate with an amplitude independent velocity.

  14. Mitochondrial localization of cyclooxygenase-2 and calcium-independent phospholipase A2 in human cancer cells: Implication in apoptosis resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is inducible by myriad stimuli. The inducible COX-2 in primary cultured human cells has been reported to localize to nuclear envelope, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and caveolae. As COX-2 plays an important role in tumor growth, we were interested in its subcellular location in cancer cells. We examined COX-2 localization in several cancer cell lines by confocal microscopy. A majority of COX-2 was colocalized with heat shock protein 60, a mitochondrial protein, in colon cancer (HT-29, HCT-15 and DLD-1), breast cancer (MCF7), hepatocellular cancer (HepG2) and lung cancer cells (A549) with a similar distribution pattern. By contrast, COX-2 was not localized to mitochondria in human foreskin fibroblasts or endothelial cells. Immunoblot analysis of COX-2 in mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions confirmed localization of COX-2 to mitochondria in HT-29 and DLD-1 cells but not in fibroblasts. Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 was colocalized with heat shock protein 60 to mitochondria not only in cancer cells (HT-29 and DLD-1) but also in fibroblasts. HT-29 which expressed more abundant mitochondrial COX-2 than DLD-1 was highly resistant to arachidonic acid and H2O2-induced apoptosis whereas DLD-1 was less resistant and human fibroblasts were highly susceptible. Treatment of HT-29 cells with sulindac or SC-236, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, resulted in loss of resistance to apoptosis. These results suggest that mitochondrial COX-2 in cancer cells confer resistance to apoptosis by reducing the proapoptotic arachidonic acid

  15. Dose escalation with stereotactic body radiation therapy boost for locally advanced non small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low survival outcomes have been reported for the treatment of locally advanced non small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) with the standard of care treatment of concurrent chemoradiation (cCRT). We present our experience of dose escalation using stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) following conventional cCRT for patients with LA-NSCLC. Sixteen patients with a median age of 67.5 treated with fractionated SBRT from 2010 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Nine (56%) of the patients had stage IIIB, 6 (38%) has stage IIIA, and 1 (6%) had recurrent disease. Majority of the patients (63%) presented with N2 disease. All patients had a PET CT for treatment planning. Patients received conventional cCRT to a median dose of 50.40 Gy (range 45–60) followed by an SBRT boost with an average dose of 25 Gy (range 20–30) given over 5 fractions. With a median follow-up of 14 months (range, 1–14 months), 1-year overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), local control (LC), regional control (RC), and distant control (DC) rates were, 78%, 42%, 76%, 79%, and 71%, respectively. Median times to disease progression and regional failure were 10 months and 18 months, respectively. On univariate analysis, advanced age and nodal status were worse prognostic factors of PFS (p < 0.05). Four patients developed radiation pneumonitis and one developed hemoptysis. Treatment was interrupted in one patient who required hospitalization due to arrhythmias and pneumonia. Risk adaptive dose escalation with SBRT following external beam radiotherapy is possible and generally tolerated treatment option for patients with LA-NSCLC

  16. Changes in subcellular localization of visfatin in human colorectal HCT-116 carcinoma cell line after cytochalasin B treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.J. Bułdak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the expression and subcellular localization of visfatin in HCT-116 colorectal carcinoma cells after cytokinesis failure using Cytochalasin B (CytB and the mechanism of apoptosis of cells after CytB. We observed translocation of visfatin’s antigen in cytB treated colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells from cytosol to nucleus. Statistical and morphometric analysis revealed significantly higher area-related numerical density visfatin-bound nano-golds in the nuclei of cytB-treated HCT-116 cells compared to cytosol. Reverse relation to visfatin subcellular localization was observed in un-treated HCT-116 cells. The total amount of visfatin protein and visfatin mRNA level in HCT-116 cells was also decreased after CytB treatment. Additionally, CytB significantly decreased cell survival, increased levels of G2/M fractions, induced bi-nuclei formation as well as increased reactive oxygen species (ROS level in HCT-116 cells. CytB treatment showed cytotoxic effect that stem from oxidative stress and is connected with the changes in the cytoplasmic/nuclear amount of visfatin in HCT-116 cells.

  17. Recurrence pattern in patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma: The implications of clinicopathological variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameh, Wael M.; Hashad, Mohammed M.; Eid, Ahmed A.; Abou Yousif, Tamer A.; Atta, Mohammed A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Recurrence rates for patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (LARCC) remain high. To date the predictors of recurrence in those patients remain controversial. The aim of the present study was to assess the relapse pattern in those patients and identify predictors for recurrence. Patients and methods We evaluated retrospectively 112 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for LARCC (T3–T4N0M0) between January 2000 and December 2010. Clinical and pathological data were collected from hospital medical records and compiled into a computerized database. Studied variables were age, mode of presentation, Tumour-Node-Metastasis (TNM) stage, Fuhrman nuclear grade, histological subtype, tumour size, venous thrombus level, collecting-system invasion and sarcomatoid differentiation. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Results Patients were followed for a mean and median follow-up of 33 and 24 months, respectively, after surgery. During the follow-up, recurrences (distant and/or local) were recorded in 58 patients, representing 52% of the cohort. The mean and median times to recurrence were 25 and 13 months, respectively. Sites of recurrence were multiple in 36 patients (62%), lung only in 14 (24%), and local in eight (14%). RFS rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were 50%, 43% and 34%, respectively, while the median RFS was 23.7 months. Using univariate analysis, RFS after nephrectomy was significantly shorter in patients aged <70 years, symptomatic at presentation, with larger tumours, higher nuclear grade, collecting-system invasion, and/or sarcomatoid differentiation. After multivariate analysis, T-stage, nuclear grade and sarcomatoid differentiation retained their power as independent predictors of RFS (P = 0.032, <0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Conclusions For patients with LARCC, T-stage, grade and sarcomatoid differentiation independently dictate the

  18. Chronic low-dose UVA irradiation induces local suppression of contact hypersensitivity, Langerhans cell depletion and suppressor cell activation in C3H/HeJ mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has previously been demonstrated that chronic low-dose solar-simulated UV radiation could induce both local and systemic immunosuppression as well as tolerance to a topically applied hapten. In this study, we have used a chronic low-dose UV-irradiation protocol to investigate the effects of UVA on the skin immune system of C3H/HeJ mice. Irradiation with UVA+B significantly suppressed the local and systemic primary contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response to the hapten 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene. Furthermore, UVA+B reduced Langerhans cell (LC) and dendritic epidermal T cell (DETC) densities in chronically UV-irradiated mice. Ultraviolet A irradiation induced local, but not systemic, immunosuppression and reduced LC (32%) but not DETC from the epidermis compared to the shaved control animals. Treatment of mice with both UVA+B and UVA radiation also induced an impaired secondary CHS response, and this tolerance was transferable with spleen cells. (Author)

  19. Adjuvant therapy for locally advanced renal cell cancer: A systematic review with meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Carmen SP

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adjuvant trials have been undertaken in an attempt to reduce the risk of recurrence among patients who undergo surgical resection for locally advanced renal cancer. However, no clear benefit has been identified to date. This systematic review was conducted to examine the exact role of adjuvant therapy in renal cancer setting. Methods Randomized controlled trials were searched comparing adjuvant therapy (chemotherapy, vaccine, immunotherapy, biochemotherapy versus no active treatment after surgery among renal cell cancer patients. Outcomes were overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS, and severe toxicities. Risk ratios (RR, hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using a fixed-effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity was measured by I2. Different strategies of adjuvant treatment were evaluated separately. Results Ten studies (2,609 patients were included. Adjuvant therapy provided no benefits in terms of OS (HR 1.07; 95%CI 0.89 to 1.28; P = 0.48 I2 = 0% or DFS (HR 1.03; 95%CI 0.87 to 1.21; P = 0.77 I2 = 15% when compared to no treatment. No subgroup analysis (immunotherapy, vaccines, biochemotherapy and hormone therapy had relevant results. Toxicity evaluation depicted a significantly higher frequency of serious adverse events in the adjuvant group. Conclusions This analysis provided no support for the hypothesis that the agents studied provide any clinical benefit for renal cancer patients although they increase the risk of toxic effects. Randomized trials are underway to test targeted therapies, which might open a new therapeutic frontier. Until these trials yield results, no adjuvant therapy can be recommended for patients who undergo surgical resection for renal cell cancer.

  20. Sleep-active neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive cells of the cerebral cortex: a local regulator of sleep?

    OpenAIRE

    Wisor, Jonathan P.; Gerashchenko, Dmitry; Kilduff, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    Our recent report demonstrated that a small subset of GABAergic interneurons in the cerebral cortex of rodents expresses Fos protein, a marker for neuronal activity, during slow wave sleep (Gerashchenko et al., 2008). The population of sleep-active neurons consists of strongly immunohistochemically-stained cells for the enzyme neuronal nitric oxide synthase. By virtue of their widespread localization within the cerebral cortex and their widespread projections to other cortical cell types, cor...

  1. Estimation of local built-in potential of amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells by Kelvin force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Takashi; Ito, Takanori; Kuriyama, Hiroshi; Nonomura, Shuichi

    2016-04-01

    The local surface potential of pin-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film solar cells has been evaluated by Kelvin force microscopy (KFM). We have also estimated the local built-in potential of the solar cells by KFM. In the surface morphology image of the solar cells, large convex grains related to the textured structure of the substrate were found. The surface potential distribution related to the surface morphology was observed in the solar cells. A similar surface potential distribution was also found in an n-type hydrogenated microcrystalline Si (µc-Si:H) film. The surface potential of the solar cells was not the same as that of the n-type film. The difference in average surface potential between the n-type hydrogenated microcrystalline Si (µc-Si:H) film and the solar cells increased with increasing built-in potential. The difference in local surface potential on large convex grains was smaller than that in the region between the large convex grains.

  2. Impact of tumor local factors on radiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of tumor local factors on radiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: From Jan. 2000 to Jun. 2002, 75 stage I- IIIb NSCLC patients who received definitive radiotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Thirty-nine patients treated by conventional radiotherapy and 36 by three dimensional radiotherapy with 60-70 Gy/30-35F/6-7w. The tumor diameter and volume were measured on CT scans. The impact of related prognostic factors on survival was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. The treatment outcome was analyzed by prognostic index model. Results: The complete response (CR) was 33.3%(25/75), partial response was 52.0%(39/75) and median survival time was 13.8 months. The 1.02, 1.52 year survival rates were 54.7% and 27.5%, respectively. Smaller tumor diameter and volume, earlier T stage, shorter overall treatment time and milder acute radiation pneumonitis were favorable factors for survival when analyzed by univariate and multivariate. Prognostic index was higher sensitivity for predicting treatment outcome. Conclusions: Tumor diameter, tumor volume, T stage, overall treatment time, milder acute radiation-induced pneumonitis are likely to be independent prognostic factors. Prognostic index model may well raise the predictive value of multivariate analysis for NSCLC treated by radiotherapy. (authors)

  3. Dye-sensitized solar cells using natural dyes as sensitizers from Malaysia local fruit `Buah Mertajam'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambali, N. A. M. Ahmad; Roshidah, N.; Hashim, M. Norhafiz; Mohamad, I. S.; Saad, N. Hidayah; Norizan, M. N.

    2015-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the high conversion efficiency, low cost, green technology and easy to fabricate dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using natural anthocyanin dyes as sensitizers. The DSSCs was fabricated by using natural anthocyanin dyes which were extracted from different parts of the plants inclusive `Buah Mertajam', `Buah Keriang Dot', `Bunga Geti', Hibiscus, Red Spinach and Henna. The natural anthocyanin dyes that found in flower, leaves and fruits were extracted by the simple procedures. This anthocyanin dye is used to replace the expensive chemical synthetic dyes due to its ability to effectively attach into the surface of Titanium dioxide (TiO2). A natural anthocyanin dyes molecule adsorbs to each particle of the TiO2 and acts as the absorber of the visible light. A natural anthocyanin dye from Buah Mertajam shows the best performance with the conversion efficiency of 5.948% and fill factor of 0.708 followed by natural anthocyanin dyes from `Buah Keriang Dot', `Bunga Geti', Hibiscus, Red Spinach and Henna. Buah Mertajam or scientifically known as eriglossum rubiginosum is a local Malaysia fruit.

  4. Palliative radiotherapy in asymptomatic patients with locally advanced, unresectable, non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1983 and 1990, 332 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were referred to short-time, split-course palliative thoracic radiotherapy. The group consisted of patients with locally advanced (IIIo), unresectable cancer, not suitable for curative radiotherapy, asymptomatic or having only minimal symptoms related to intrathoracic tumor. The therapeutic plan involved two series of irradiation. Tumor dose delivered in each series was 20 Gy given in five daily fractions over five treatment days. There were four weeks interval between series. Of 332 patients initially qualified to thoracic radiotherapy only 170 patients received the treatment; the other 162 patients were not irradiated because of treatment refusal or logistic problems concerning therapy. They made the control group of the study, receiving the best possible symptomatic care. Twelve-month survivals in the radiotherapy and control groups were 32.4% and 9.3%, respectively; 24-month survivals 11.2% and 0%, respectively. Improvement of survival after palliative thoracic radiotherapy was observed only in patients with clinical stage IIIA and Karnofsky's performance status (KPS) ≥ 70. (orig.)

  5. Resolving protein interactions and organization downstream the T cell antigen receptor using single-molecule localization microscopy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Eilon

    2016-06-01

    Signal transduction is mediated by heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes. Such complexes play a critical role in diverse cell functions, with the important example of T cell activation. Biochemical studies of signalling complexes and their imaging by diffraction limited microscopy have resulted in an intricate network of interactions downstream the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). However, in spite of their crucial roles in T cell activation, much remains to be learned about these signalling complexes, including their heterogeneous contents and size distribution, their complex arrangements in the PM, and the molecular requirements for their formation. Here, we review how recent advancements in single molecule localization microscopy have helped to shed new light on the organization of signalling complexes in single molecule detail in intact T cells. From these studies emerges a picture where cells extensively employ hierarchical and dynamic patterns of nano-scale organization to control the local concentration of interacting molecular species. These patterns are suggested to play a critical role in cell decision making. The combination of SMLM with more traditional techniques is expected to continue and critically contribute to our understanding of multimolecular protein complexes and their significance to cell function.

  6. Claudin-4 undergoes age-dependent change in cellular localization on pig jejunal villous epithelial cells, independent of bacterial colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, J Alex; Kent-Dennis, Coral; Van Kessel, Andrew G; Wilson, Heather L

    2015-01-01

    Newborn piglets are immunologically naïve and must receive passive immunity via colostrum within 24 hours to survive. Mechanisms by which the newborn piglet gut facilitates uptake of colostral cells, antibodies, and proteins may include FcRn and pIgR receptor-mediated endocytosis and paracellular transport between tight junctions (TJs). In the present study, FcRn gene (FCGRT) was minimally expressed in 6-week-old gut and newborn jejunum but it was expressed at significantly higher levels in the ileum of newborn piglets. pIgR was highly expressed in the jejunum and ileum of 6-week-old animals but only minimally in neonatal gut. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Claudin-5 localized to blood vessel endothelial cells. Claudin-4 was strongly localized to the apical aspect of jejunal epithelial cells for the first 2 days of life after which it was redistributed to the lateral surface between adjacent enterocytes. Claudin-4 was localized to ileal lateral surfaces within 24 hours after birth indicating regional and temporal differences. Tissue from gnotobiotic piglets showed that commensal microbiota did not influence Claudin-4 surface localization on jejunal or ileal enterocytes. Regulation of TJs by Claudin-4 surface localization requires further investigation. Understanding the factors that regulate gut barrier maturation may yield protective strategies against infectious diseases. PMID:25948883

  7. Claudin-4 Undergoes Age-Dependent Change in Cellular Localization on Pig Jejunal Villous Epithelial Cells, Independent of Bacterial Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Alex Pasternak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Newborn piglets are immunologically naïve and must receive passive immunity via colostrum within 24 hours to survive. Mechanisms by which the newborn piglet gut facilitates uptake of colostral cells, antibodies, and proteins may include FcRn and pIgR receptor-mediated endocytosis and paracellular transport between tight junctions (TJs. In the present study, FcRn gene (FCGRT was minimally expressed in 6-week-old gut and newborn jejunum but it was expressed at significantly higher levels in the ileum of newborn piglets. pIgR was highly expressed in the jejunum and ileum of 6-week-old animals but only minimally in neonatal gut. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Claudin-5 localized to blood vessel endothelial cells. Claudin-4 was strongly localized to the apical aspect of jejunal epithelial cells for the first 2 days of life after which it was redistributed to the lateral surface between adjacent enterocytes. Claudin-4 was localized to ileal lateral surfaces within 24 hours after birth indicating regional and temporal differences. Tissue from gnotobiotic piglets showed that commensal microbiota did not influence Claudin-4 surface localization on jejunal or ileal enterocytes. Regulation of TJs by Claudin-4 surface localization requires further investigation. Understanding the factors that regulate gut barrier maturation may yield protective strategies against infectious diseases.

  8. Limited disease of extra-pulmonary small cell carcinoma. Impact of local treatment and nodal status, role of cranial irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, A.C.; Gani, C.; Weinmann, M.; Bamberg, M.; Eckert, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology; Mayer, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Sipos, B. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Pathology

    2012-03-15

    As extra-pulmonary small cell carcinoma (EPSCC) is a rare entity of tumors, the available treatment recommendations are mainly based on retrospective analyses and deduction from treatment of small cell lung cancer. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed analysis concerning prognostic factors and treatment modalities. A total of 20 patients with limited disease (LD) of EPSCC treated at our institution from 1999-2009 were retrospectively analyzed. Data were gathered from chart review. Localization, lymph node involvement, as well as local and systemic treatment were documented and their impact on pattern of failure and survival times statistically evaluated. With a median follow-up of 21 months, the estimated median overall- and disease-free survival were 59 and 25 months, respectively. Local control was excellent with 100% at 2 years. Nodal involvement was observed in 74% (n = 14/19) of evaluable patients. However, outcome was not altered by this parameter. Local treatment consisted of surgery in 10 cases, radiotherapy in 7 cases, and a combination of both in 3 cases. Only 3 patients (15%) developed hematogenous central nervous system metastases, while none of the patients received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Nodal involvement did not worsen prognosis. Local control was excellent irrespective of local treatment modality and the leading cause of failure was distant metastasis. Therefore, systemic treatment should not be omitted. Prophylactic cranial irradiation might be dispensable but discussed for head and neck malignancies.

  9. Concurrent versus Sequential Chemoradiotherapy with Cisplatin and Vinorelbine in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Randomized Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zatloukal, P.; Petruželka, L.; Zemanová, M.; Havel, L.; Janků, F.; Judas, L.; Kubík, A.; Křepela, E.; Fiala, P.; Pecen, Ladislav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 46, - (2004), s. 87-98. ISSN 0169-5002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1030915 Keywords : concurrent chemoradiotherapy * sequential chemoradiotherapy * locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer * cisplatin * vinorelbine Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 2.914, year: 2004

  10. Modulation of Olfactory Bulb Network Activity by Serotonin: Synchronous Inhibition of Mitral Cells Mediated by Spatially Localized GABAergic Microcircuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Loren J.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    Although inhibition has often been proposed as a central mechanism for coordinating activity in the olfactory system, relatively little is known about how activation of different inhibitory local circuit pathways can generate coincident inhibition of principal cells. We used serotonin (5-HT) as a pharmacological tool to induce spiking in ensembles…

  11. Limited value of technetium 99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy in localization of lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of technetium 99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy in localizing the site of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The outcome of 203 patients undergoing technetium 99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy was reviewed, and the scan result was compared with the true site of bleeding. The true site of bleeding was determined by other methods including angiography and surgical pathology. Fifty-two scans (26%) were positive and indicated a specific site of bleeding. A definitive bleeding site was identified in 22 patients by other means and correlated with the technetium scan in only 9 cases. The nuclear scan was incorrect in the remaining 13 cases, implying a localization error of 25% (13 of 52). A subgroup of 19 patients with a positive scan underwent a surgical procedure directed by the nuclear scan. Eight of these 12 patients had incorrect surgical procedures based upon findings of more definitive tests, indicating a surgical error of 42% (8 of 19). We conclude that the technetium 99m-labeled red cell scan's ability to accurately localize the site of lower gastrointestinal bleeding is limited. Furthermore, performing a surgical procedure that relies exclusively on localization by red cell scintigraphy will produce an undesirable result in at least 42% of patients

  12. Limited value of technetium 99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy in localization of lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, J.M.; Pezim, M.E. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of technetium 99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy in localizing the site of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The outcome of 203 patients undergoing technetium 99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy was reviewed, and the scan result was compared with the true site of bleeding. The true site of bleeding was determined by other methods including angiography and surgical pathology. Fifty-two scans (26%) were positive and indicated a specific site of bleeding. A definitive bleeding site was identified in 22 patients by other means and correlated with the technetium scan in only 9 cases. The nuclear scan was incorrect in the remaining 13 cases, implying a localization error of 25% (13 of 52). A subgroup of 19 patients with a positive scan underwent a surgical procedure directed by the nuclear scan. Eight of these 12 patients had incorrect surgical procedures based upon findings of more definitive tests, indicating a surgical error of 42% (8 of 19). We conclude that the technetium 99m-labeled red cell scan's ability to accurately localize the site of lower gastrointestinal bleeding is limited. Furthermore, performing a surgical procedure that relies exclusively on localization by red cell scintigraphy will produce an undesirable result in at least 42% of patients.

  13. Subcellular localization of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus proteins and DNA during permissive infection of Crandell feline kidney cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Costello, F.; Huhtanen, M.;

    1996-01-01

    Confocal microscopy allowed us to localize viral nonstructural (NS) and capsid (VP) proteins and DNA simultaneously in cells permissively infected with Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). Early after infection, NS proteins colocalized with viral DNA to form intranuclear inclusions, whereas VP...

  14. Localization of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Experience with red blood cells labeled in vitro with technetium Tc 99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventy-six patients clinically suspected of having lower gastrointestinal bleeding were studied by scintigraphy utilizing red blood cells labeled in vitro with technetium Tc 99m. Sixteen patients required emergency surgery; bleeding was accurately localized in 15 (94%). One patient (6%) had a normal scan. A 20-month mean follow-up of the 16 patients showed no recurrent bleeding. Of 60 patients not requiring emergency surgery, bleeding was localized in 11, but the bleeding ceased. Forty-nine of the 60 patients had normal scans and had no further hemorrhaging during hospitalization. A 21-month mean follow-up of 38 of the 49 patients showed no further bleeding episodes or surgical procedures in 29 patients; however, eight patients required surgical procedures, including seven for gastrointestinal malignancies. Scanning of red blood cells labeled in vitro with 99mTc is accurate and efficacious in localization of bleeding sites that require emergency surgery for lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage

  15. Button sequestrum in a case of localized Langerhans' cell histiocytosis of the ilium: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tordeur, M. [Pitie-Salpetriere Teaching Hospital, Radiology Dept., Paris (France); Wybier, M. [Lariboisiere Teaching Hospital, Paris (France); Laporte, J.L. [Pitie-Salpetriere Teaching Hospital, Pathology Dept., Paris (France); Grenier, P. [Pitie-Salpetriere Teaching Hospital, Radiology Dept., Paris (France); Laredo, J.D. [Lariboisiere Teaching Hospital, Paris (France)

    2000-04-15

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) is characterized by a proliferation of cells exhibiting the same immunohistochemical and ultra-structural characteristics as Langerhans' cells of the epidermis. Eosinophilic granuloma, chronic polyostotic disease (Hand-Schuller-Christian disease) and multisystemic disease (Letterer-Siwe disease) all belong to the spectrum LCH. Osseous lesions are the most common findings. the radiological appearance of skeletal LCH depends on the site and on disease activity. Button sequestrum has been described as uncommon in LCH of the skull and exceedingly rare in LCH at other sites. We report a case of localized LCH of the ilium with a button sequestrum. (author)

  16. Combined Chemoradiotherapy vs Radiotherapy Alone for Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyeon Ju; Suh, Hyun Suk; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Re Hwe; Kim, Sung Rok [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-15

    Purpose : The traditional approach with surgery and/or radiotherapy(RT) for advanced head and neck cancer provides anticipated cure rates of 10-65% depending on stages and sites. Recently, combined modality with chemotherapy have been extensively investigated in attempts to improve survival and local control. We retrospectively analysed our experience of 31 patients with advanced head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials : From November 1983 to October 1994, 31 patients with Stage II and IV squamous cell head and neck cancer were treated with RT. Sixteen patients were treated with RT alone. and 15 patients were treated with combined RT plus chemotherapy. All patients were treated with 4-MV LINAC and radiation dose ranged from 5000 cGy to 7760 cGy(median 7010 cGy). In combined group. 7 patients were treated with cis-platin plus 5-FU, 2 patients were treated with methotrexate plus leucovorin plus 5-FU plus cisplatin or carboplatin, and 6 patients were treated with cisplatin as a radiosensitizer. Results : Median follow up period was 16 months (range 4-134 months). The major responses (CR+PR) were noted in 10 patient (66.6%) of the RT alone group and 14 patient (93.3%) of the chemoradiation group. There was no statistical difference in CR rate between the two groups. The overall survival rates at 5 years were 23.4% in the radiation alone group. 23.5% in the chemoradiation group. Disease-free survival rates at 3 year were 44.5% in the radiation alone group. 40% in the chemoradiation group. There was no statistical differences in overall survival rates and disease free survival rates between the two groups. Local recurrences occurred in 71.5% of the radiation alone group. 72.7% of the chemoradiation group and distant metastasis occurred in 14.4% of radiation alone group. 9.1% of the chemoradiation group. The frequencies of complications were comparable in both groups except hematologic toxicity. Conclusion : Total response rates in the combined chemotherapy and

  17. Fission yeast Sec3 and Exo70 are transported on actin cables and localize the exocyst complex to cell poles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe O Bendezú

    Full Text Available The exocyst complex is essential for many exocytic events, by tethering vesicles at the plasma membrane for fusion. In fission yeast, polarized exocytosis for growth relies on the combined action of the exocyst at cell poles and myosin-driven transport along actin cables. We report here the identification of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Sec3 protein, which we identified through sequence homology of its PH-like domain. Like other exocyst subunits, sec3 is required for secretion and cell division. Cells deleted for sec3 are only conditionally lethal and can proliferate when osmotically stabilized. Sec3 is redundant with Exo70 for viability and for the localization of other exocyst subunits, suggesting these components act as exocyst tethers at the plasma membrane. Consistently, Sec3 localizes to zones of growth independently of other exocyst subunits but depends on PIP(2 and functional Cdc42. FRAP analysis shows that Sec3, like all other exocyst subunits, localizes to cell poles largely independently of the actin cytoskeleton. However, we show that Sec3, Exo70 and Sec5 are transported by the myosin V Myo52 along actin cables. These data suggest that the exocyst holocomplex, including Sec3 and Exo70, is present on exocytic vesicles, which can reach cell poles by either myosin-driven transport or random walk.

  18. Localization of Core Planar Cell Polarity Proteins, PRICKLEs, in Ameloblasts of Rat Incisors: Possible Regulation of Enamel Rod Decussation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To confirm the possible involvement of planar cell polarity proteins in odontogenesis, one group of core proteins, PRICKLE1, PRICKLE2, PRICKLE3, and PRICKLE4, was examined in enamel epithelial cells and ameloblasts by immunofluorescence microscopy. PRICKLE1 and PRICKLE2 showed similar localization in the proliferation and secretory zones of the incisor. Immunoreactive dots and short rods in ameloblasts and stratum intermedium cells were evident in the proliferation to differentiation zone, but in the secretion zone, cytoplasmic dots decreased and the distal terminal web was positive for PRICKLE1 and PRICKLE2. PRICKLE3 and PRICKLE4 showed cytoplasmic labeling in ameloblasts and other enamel epithelial cells. Double labeling of PRICKLE2 with VANGL1, which is another planar cell polarity protein, showed partial co-localization. To examine the transport route of PRICKLE proteins, PRICKLE1 localization was examined after injection of a microtubule-disrupting reagent, colchicine, and was compared with CX43, which is a membrane protein transported as vesicles via microtubules. The results confirmed the retention of immunoreactive dots for PRICKLE1 in the cytoplasm of secretory ameloblasts of colchicine-injected animals, but fewer dots were observed in control animals. These results suggest that PRICKLE1 and PRICKLE2 are transported as vesicles to the junctional area, and are involved in pattern formation of distal junctional complexes and terminal webs of ameloblasts, further implying a role in the formed enamel rod arrangement

  19. Actin Cytoskeleton and Golgi Involvement in Barley stripe mosaic virus Movement and Cell Wall Localization of Triple Gene Block Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoun-Sub Lim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV induces massive actin filament thickening at the infection front of infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. To determine the mechanisms leading to actin remodeling, fluorescent protein fusions of the BSMV triple gene block (TGB proteins were coexpressed in cells with the actin marker DsRed: Talin. TGB ectopic expression experiments revealed that TGB3 is a major elicitor of filament thickening, that TGB2 resulted in formation of intermediate DsRed:Talin filaments, and that TGB1 alone had no obvious effects on actin filament structure. Latrunculin B (LatB treatments retarded BSMV cell-to-cell movement, disrupted actin filament organization, and dramatically decreased the proportion of paired TGB3 foci appearing at the cell wall (CW. BSMV infection of transgenic plants tagged with GFP-KDEL exhibited membrane proliferation and vesicle formation that were especially evident around the nucleus. Similar membrane proliferation occurred in plants expressing TGB2 and/or TGB3, and DsRed: Talin fluorescence in these plants colocalized with the ER vesicles. TGB3 also associated with the Golgi apparatus and overlapped with cortical vesicles appearing at the cell periphery. Brefeldin A treatments disrupted Golgi and also altered vesicles at the CW, but failed to interfere with TGB CW localization. Our results indicate that actin cytoskeleton interactions are important in BSMV cell-to-cell movement and for CW localization of TGB3.

  20. Local hyperthermia treatment of tumors induces CD8+ T cell-mediated resistance against distal and secondary tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peisheng; Chen, Lei; Baird, Jason R.; Demidenko, Eugene; Turk, Mary Jo; Hoopes, P. Jack; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Fiering, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and an alternating magnetic filed (AMF) can induce local hyperthermia in tumors in a controlled and uniform manner. Heating B16 primary tumors at 43°C for 30 minutes activated dendritic cells (DCs) and subsequently CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node (dLN) and conferred resistance against rechallenge with B16 (but not unrelated Lewis Lung carcinoma) given 7 days post hyperthermia on both the primary tumor side and the contralateral side in a CD8+ T cell-dependent manner. Mice with heated primary tumors also resisted rechallenge given 30 days post hyperthermia. Mice with larger heated primary tumors had greater resistance to secondary tumors. No rechallenge resistance occurred when tumors were heated at 45°C. Our results demonstrate the promising potential of local hyperthermia treatment applied to identified tumors in inducing anti-tumor immune responses that reduce the risk of recurrence and metastasis. PMID:24566274

  1. Localized Langerhans cell histiocytosis masquerading as Brodie's abscess in a 2-year-old child: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Fang; Hsu, Yi-Chih; Wu, Yi-Der; Kuo, Chun-Lang; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), formerly known as histiocytosis X, refers to a spectrum of diseases characterized by idiopathic proliferation of histiocytes that produce either focal (localized LCH) or systemic manifestations (Hand-Schüller-Christian disease and Letterer-Siwe disease). Localized LCH accounts for approximately 60-70 % of all LCH cases. Osseous involvement is the most common manifestation and typically involves the flat bones, along with lesions of the skull, pelvis, and ribs. Localized LCH in bone shows a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and radiologic features that may mimic those of infections as well as benign and malignant tumors. The diagnostic imaging findings of localized LCH are also diverse and challenging. The penumbra sign is a common and characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) feature of Brodie's abscess, but is rarely seen in localized LCH. In this report, we describe a case of localized LCH misdiagnosed as Brodie's abscess in a 2-year-old child based on clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, and pre-diagnostic MRI findings (penumbra sign). Therefore, the penumbra sign is not sufficient to clearly establish the diagnosis of Brodie's abscess, and the differential diagnosis of localized LCH should be considered when a child with an osteolytic lesion presents with a penumbra sign. PMID:27065773

  2. Long clinostation influence on the localization of free and weakly bound calcium in cell walls of Funaria hygrometrica moss protonema cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedukha, E. M.

    The pyroantimonate method was used to study the localization of free and weakly bound calcium in cells of moss protonema of Funaria hygrometrica Hedw. cultivated on a clinostat (2 rev/min). Electroncytochemical study of control cells cultivated at 1 g revealed that granular precipitate marked chloroplasts, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, lipid drops, nucleoplasma, nucleolus, nucleus membranes, cell walls and endoplasmic reticulum. In mitochondria the precipitate was revealed in stroma, in chloroplast it was found on thylakoids and envelope membranes. The cultivation of protonema on clinostat led to the intensification in cytochemical reaction product deposit. A considerable intensification of the reaction was noted in endomembranes, vacuoles, periplasmic space and cell walls. At the same time analysis of pectinase localization was made using the electroncytochemical method. A high reaction intensity in walls in comparison to that in control was found out to be a distinctive pecularity of the cells cultivated on clinostat. It testifies to the fact that increasing of freee calcium concentrations under conditions of clinostation is connected with pectinic substances hydrolysis and breaking of methoxy groups of pectins. Data obtained are discussed in relation to problems of possible mechanisms of disturbance in calcium balance of plant cells and the role of cell walls in gomeostasis of cell grown under conditions of simulated weighlessness.

  3. Thorax irradiation triggers a local and systemic accumulation of immunosuppressive CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymphocyte infiltration is a common feature of radiation-induced pneumonitis and fibrosis, but their contribution to the pathogenic processes is still unclear. Here, we addressed the impact of thorax irradiation on the T cell compartment with a focus on immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Treg). C57BL/6 wild type mice (WT) received anesthesia only (sham controls, 0 Gy) or were exposed to a single dose of whole thorax irradiation (15 Gy). Immune cells from lung tissue, spleen, and cervical lymph nodes were collected 10 to 84 days post-irradiation and phenotypically characterized by flow cytometry. Whole thorax irradiation provoked an increased influx of CD3+ T cells at 42 and 84 days post-irradiation. In contrast, local irradiation caused a sustained reduction in CD3+ T cells in peripheral lymphoid tissues. Interestingly, we observed a significant local and systemic increase in the fraction of CD4+ T cells expressing the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), the phenotypic marker for murine Treg, at day 21 post-irradiation. The accumulation of Treg was associated with increased levels of T cells expressing surface proteins characteristic for recruitment and immunosuppressive activity, e.g. CD103, CTLA-4 and CD73. Importantly, Treg isolated at this time point were able to suppress CD4+ effector T cells to a similar extent as Treg isolated from control mice. The response of the adaptive immune system to whole thorax irradiation is characterized by local immunoactivation and systemic immunosuppression. The transient accumulation of immunosuppressive CD4+ FoxP3+ Treg may be required to protect the lung against excessive inflammation-induced tissue damage. Further investigations shall define the mechanisms underlying the accumulation of Treg and their role for the pathogenesis of radiation-induced lung disease

  4. Local membrane deformations activate Ca2+-dependent K+ and anionic currents in intact human red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Dyrda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanical, rheological and shape properties of red blood cells are determined by their cortical cytoskeleton, evolutionarily optimized to provide the dynamic deformability required for flow through capillaries much narrower than the cell's diameter. The shear stress induced by such flow, as well as the local membrane deformations generated in certain pathological conditions, such as sickle cell anemia, have been shown to increase membrane permeability, based largely on experimentation with red cell suspensions. We attempted here the first measurements of membrane currents activated by a local and controlled membrane deformation in single red blood cells under on-cell patch clamp to define the nature of the stretch-activated currents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique was used to allow recordings of single channel activity in intact red blood cells. Gigaohm seal formation was obtained with and without membrane deformation. Deformation was induced by the application of a negative pressure pulse of 10 mmHg for less than 5 s. Currents were only detected when the membrane was seen domed under negative pressure within the patch-pipette. K(+ and Cl(- currents were strictly dependent on the presence of Ca(2+. The Ca(2+-dependent currents were transient, with typical decay half-times of about 5-10 min, suggesting the spontaneous inactivation of a stretch-activated Ca(2+ permeability (PCa. These results indicate that local membrane deformations can transiently activate a Ca(2+ permeability pathway leading to increased [Ca(2+](i, secondary activation of Ca(2+-sensitive K(+ channels (Gardos channel, IK1, KCa3.1, and hyperpolarization-induced anion currents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The stretch-activated transient PCa observed here under local membrane deformation is a likely contributor to the Ca(2+-mediated effects observed during the normal aging process of red blood cells, and

  5. Retrospective analysis of multidisciplinary therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Seo, Yuji; Nakajima, Kaori; Miyano, Takashi [Asahikawa Medical Univ., Hokkaido (Japan); Kikuchi, Yuzou [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the efficacy of multidisciplinary therapy (concomitant radiotherapy and intra-arterial infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) followed by maxillectomy) in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. We reviewed 71 patient records with locally advanced but respectable carcinoma of the maxillary sinus treated by means of multidisciplinary therapy between 1978 through 1997. The clinical T factor for these patients, according to the UICC definitions (1997), was 12 for T2, 46 for T3, and 13 for T4. Twelve patients were diagnosed as node-positive at initial presentation. Intra-arterial 5-FU was delivered via a superficial temporal artery in accordance with radiotherapy, and the cumulative 5-FU dose ranged from 2,900 mg to 5,250 mg (median 5,000 mg). The total radiotherapy dose ranged from 29 Gy to 48 Gy (median 48 Gy) with conventional fractionation. Patients underwent radical maxillectomy thereafter. The 5-year overall survival rate and disease-specific survival rate of all the patients were 58% and 68%, respectively. There was no significant correlation of clinical T factor or N factor with disease-specific survival on univariate and multivariate analysis. The overall treatment-related mortality rate was 3.7%. Radiation cataract later developed in all evaluable patients whose lenses were within the treatment volume. About a half of the operable T4 patients survived over 5 years by means of the above-mentioned multidisciplinary therapy. This multidisciplinary therapy should be compared to treatment with a combination of surgery and postoperative chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  6. Retrospective analysis of multidisciplinary therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the efficacy of multidisciplinary therapy (concomitant radiotherapy and intra-arterial infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) followed by maxillectomy) in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. We reviewed 71 patient records with locally advanced but respectable carcinoma of the maxillary sinus treated by means of multidisciplinary therapy between 1978 through 1997. The clinical T factor for these patients, according to the UICC definitions (1997), was 12 for T2, 46 for T3, and 13 for T4. Twelve patients were diagnosed as node-positive at initial presentation. Intra-arterial 5-FU was delivered via a superficial temporal artery in accordance with radiotherapy, and the cumulative 5-FU dose ranged from 2,900 mg to 5,250 mg (median 5,000 mg). The total radiotherapy dose ranged from 29 Gy to 48 Gy (median 48 Gy) with conventional fractionation. Patients underwent radical maxillectomy thereafter. The 5-year overall survival rate and disease-specific survival rate of all the patients were 58% and 68%, respectively. There was no significant correlation of clinical T factor or N factor with disease-specific survival on univariate and multivariate analysis. The overall treatment-related mortality rate was 3.7%. Radiation cataract later developed in all evaluable patients whose lenses were within the treatment volume. About a half of the operable T4 patients survived over 5 years by means of the above-mentioned multidisciplinary therapy. This multidisciplinary therapy should be compared to treatment with a combination of surgery and postoperative chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  7. The localization of naive and memory CD8+ T cells following infection

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Different subsets of memory CD8⁺ T cells populate the T cell compartment. Antigen-experienced memory (true-memory) cells are formed in a classic immune response against an invading pathogen, but memory-like (HP-memory) cells can also be generated through antigen-independent homeostatic proliferation resulting from lymphopenia. HP-memory cells subsequently acquire the same effector functions and surface marker expression as true-memory cells. When HP- and true-memory CD8⁺ cells of the same spe...

  8. Altered Localization of Retinoid X Receptor α Coincides with Loss of Retinoid Responsiveness in Human Breast Cancer MDA-MB-231 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, T; Dancheck, B. L.; Trifiletti, L. C.; Birnkrant, R. E.; Taylor, B J; Garfield, S. H.; Thorgeirsson, U; De Luca, L M

    2004-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of retinoid resistance, we studied the subcellular localization and function of retinoid receptors in human breast cancer cell lines. Retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) localized throughout the nucleoplasm in retinoid-sensitive normal human mammary epithelial cells and in retinoid-responsive breast cancer cell line (MCF-7), whereas it was found in the splicing factor compartment (SFC) of the retinoid-resistant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line and in human breast carcin...

  9. Correlation of Local FOXP3-Expressing T Cells and Th1-Th2 Balance in Perennial Allergic Nasal Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Shirasaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Treg play some important roles in allergic rhinitis. The most specific marker for Treg is FOXP3, a recently identified transcription factor that is essential for Treg development. In order to clarify the levels of Treg in allergic nasal mucosa, we studied the relationship between FOXP3-expressing cells and Th1-Th2 balance in nasal mucosa by means of immunohistochemistry. Human turbinates were obtained after turbinectomy from 26 patients (14 patients with perennial allergic rhinitis and 12 patients with nonallergic rhinitis. To identify the cells expressing the FOXP3 protein, double immunostaining was performed by using anti-FOXP3 antibody and anti-CD3 antibody. There was no significant difference in the percentage of FOXP3+CD3+ cells among CD3+ cells in the nasal mucosa of two groups. The proportion of FOXP3+CD3+ cells tend to be correlated positively with GATA3+CD3+ cells/T-bet+CD3+ cells ratio (=0.56, =0.04. A positive correlation with GATA3+CD3+/T-bet+CD3+ ratio and FOXP3+CD3+/CD3+ ratio suggests the role of local regulatory T cells as a minimal control of the chronic allergen exposure in nasal mucosa.

  10. Light and electron microscopic localization of GABAA-receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes using immunohistochemical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, G H; Hösli, E; Belhage, B;

    1991-01-01

    GABAA-receptors were localized in explant cultures of rat cerebellum and in dissociated primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells and rat cerebellar astrocytes using the monoclonal antibody bd-17 directed against the beta-subunit of the GABAA/benzodiazepine/chloride channel complex. At the...... light microscope level specific staining of GABAA-receptors was localized in various types of neurones in explant cultures of rat cerebellum using the indirect peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) technique, whereas no specific staining was found in astrocytes. At the electron microscope level labeling of...... in dissociated primary cultures of cerebellar astrocytes....

  11. Estrous cycle-dependent changes of Fas expression in the bovine corpus luteum: influence of keratin 8/18 intermediate filaments and cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Alice

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fas expression and Fas-induced apoptosis are mechanisms attributed to the selective destruction of cells of the corpus luteum (CL during luteal regression. In certain cell-types, sensitivity to these death-inducing mechanisms is due to the loss or cleavage of keratin-containing intermediate filaments. Specifically, keratin 8/18 (K8/K18 filaments are hypothesized to influence cell death in part by regulating Fas expression at the cell surface. Methods Here, Fas expression on bovine luteal cells was quantified by flow cytometry during the early (Day 5, postovulation and late stages (Days 16–18, postovulation of CL function, and the relationship between Fas expression, K8/K18 filament expression and cytokine-induced cell death in vitro was evaluated. Results Both total and cell surface expression of Fas on luteal cells was greater for early versus late stage bovine CL (89% vs. 44% of cells for total Fas; 65% vs.18% of cells for cell surface Fas; respectively, P0.05, n=4 CL/stage, despite evidence these conditions increased Fas expression on HepG2 cells (P0.05 or stage of CL (P>0.05, n= 4 CL/stage on this outcome. Conclusion In conclusion, we rejected our null hypothesis that the cell surface expression of Fas does not differ between luteal cells of early and late stage CL. The results also did not support the idea that K8/K18 filaments influence the expression of Fas on the surface of bovine luteal cells. Potential downstream effects of these filaments on death signaling, however, remain a possibility. Importantly, the elevated expression of Fas observed on cells of early stage bovine CL compared to late stage bovine CL raises a provocative question concerning the physiological role(s of Fas in the corpus luteum, particularly during early luteal development.

  12. Production of low cost single crystal silicon solar cells using local material and recycled Si saw-dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon material due to its abundance in nature and maximum conversion efficiency, has a vide range of application in opto-electronic and photovoltaic devices, such as ICs, thin film transistors and solar cells. The cost of the solar cells is the main hindrance in competing solar energy with other form of energy resources. The production of Si material using locally available indigenous silicon ores will reduce the cost silicon solar cells and will help to promote solar energy applications in the country. Silicon ores, Quartz and Sand, were collected from various parts of the country and analyzed. The purification processes of Silicon to produce high purity silicon are discussed. The cost comparison of locally produced and imported silicon material shows that 15% to 20% cheaper material can be produced locally. In order to reduce the cost further, the silicon saw dust wasted during wafering process are analyzed. The undesirable impurities from silicon saw dust can be removed. The reusing of sawdust will produce 10% cheaper silicon solar cells. (author)

  13. Development of confocal immunofluorescence FRET microscopy to Investigate eNOS and GSNOR localization and interaction in pulmonary endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Shagufta; Brown-Steinke, Kathleen; Palmer, Lisa; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2015-03-01

    Confocal FRET microscopy is a widely used technique for studying protein-protein interactions in live or fixed cells. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) are enzymes involved in regulating the bioavailability of S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) in the pulmonary endothelium and have roles in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Labeling of endogenous proteins to better understand a disease process can be challenging. We have used immunofluorescence to detect endogenous eNOS and GSNOR in primary pulmonary endothelial cells to co-localize these proteins as well as to study their interaction by FRET. The challenge has been in selecting the right immunofluorescence labeling condition, right antibody, the right blocking reagent, the right FRET pair and eliminating cross-reactivity of secondary antibodies. We have used Alexa488 and Alexa568 as a FRET pair. After a series of optimizations, the data from Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) demonstrate co-localization of eNOS and GSNOR in the perinuclear region of the pulmonary endothelial cell primarily within the cis-Golgi with lower levels of co-localization seen within the trans-Golgi. FRET studies demonstrate, for the first time, interaction between eNOS and GSNOR in both murine and bovine pulmonary endothelial cells. Further characterization of eNOSGSNOR interaction and the subcellular location of this interaction will provide mechanistic insight into the importance of S-nitrosothiol signaling in pulmonary biology, physiology and pathology.

  14. Construction of a fusion protein expression vector MK-EGFP and its subcellular localization in different carcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Cheng Dai; Di-Yong Xu; Xing Yao; Li-Shan Min; Ning Zhao; Bo-Ying Xu; Zheng-Ping Xu; Yong-Liang Lu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To construct an expression plasmid encoding human wild-type midkine (MK) and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) fusion protein (MK-EGFP), and to analyze the subcellular localization of MK in different carcinoma cell lines.METHODS: Two kinds of MK coding sequences with or without signal peptide were cloned into plasmid pEGFP-N2, and the recombinant plasmids constructed were introduced into HepG2, MCF7 and DU145 cells,respectively, by transfection. With the help of laser scanning confocal microscopy, the expression and subcellular localization of MK-GFP fusion protein could be detected.RESULTS: Compared with the GFP control, in which fluorescence was detected diffusely over the entire cell body except in the nucleolus, both kinds of fusion protein MK-GFP were localized exclusively to the nucleus and accumulated in the nucleolus in the three kinds of cancer cell lines.CONCLUSION: This study reveals the specific nucleolar translocation independent of signal peptide, which may be involved in the mechanism that MK works. It provides valuable evidence for further study on the functions of MK in nucleus and its possible mechanisms, in which ribosomal RNA transcription and ribosome assembly are involved.

  15. Live attenuated measles virus vaccine therapy for locally established malignant glioblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shammari AM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed M Al-Shammari,1 Farah E Ismaeel,2 Shahlaa M Salih,2 Nahi Y Yaseen11Experimental Therapy Department, Iraqi Center for Cancer and Medical Genetic Researches, Mustansiriya University, 2Departments of Biotechnology, College of Science, Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad, IraqAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans, with poor prognosis. A new glioblastoma cell line (ANGM5 was established from a cerebral glioblastoma multiforme in a 72-year-old Iraqi man who underwent surgery for an intracranial tumor. This study was carried out to evaluate the antitumor effect of live attenuated measles virus (MV Schwarz vaccine strain on glioblastoma multiforme tumor cell lines in vitro. Live attenuated MV Schwarz strain was propagated on Vero, human rhabdomyosarcoma, and human glioblastoma-multiform (ANGM5 cell lines. The infected confluent monolayer appeared to be covered with syncytia with granulation and vacuolation, as well as cell rounding, shrinkage, and large empty space with cell debris as a result of cell lysis and death. Cell lines infected with virus have the ability for hemadsorption to human red blood cells after 72 hours of infection, whereas no hemadsorption of uninfected cells is seen. Detection of MV hemagglutinin protein by monoclonal antibodies in infected cells of all cell lines by immunocytochemistry assay gave positive results (brown color in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Cell viability was measured after 72 hours of infection by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Results showed a significant cytotoxic effect for MV (P≤0.05 on growth of ANGM5 and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines after 72 hours of infection. Induction of apoptosis by MV was assessed by measuring mitochondrial membrane potentials in tumor cells after 48, 72, and 120 hours of infection. Apoptotic cells were counted, and the mean percentage of dead cells was significantly higher after 48, 72

  16. Placental localization in abdominal pregnancy using technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a patient with third trimester abdominal pregnancy with fetal demise, technetium-99m-labeled erythrocytes (99mTc-RBCs) localized the placenta preoperatively, after nonvisualization by ultrasonography and arteriography. Extrauterine placental localization by blood-pool imaging may be useful when ultrasound fails

  17. Local anesthetics induce apoptosis in human thyroid cancer cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Ching Chang

    Full Text Available Local anesthetics are frequently used in fine-needle aspiration of thyroid lesions and locoregional control of persistent or recurrent thyroid cancer. Recent evidence suggests that local anesthetics have a broad spectrum of effects including inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in neuronal and other types of cells. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment with lidocaine and bupivacaine resulted in decreased cell viability and colony formation of both 8505C and K1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Lidocaine and bupivacaine induced apoptosis, and necrosis in high concentrations, as determined by flow cytometry. Lidocaine and bupivacaine caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, accompanied by activation of caspase 3 and 7, PARP cleavage, and induction of a higher ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. Based on microarray and pathway analysis, apoptosis is the prominent transcriptional change common to lidocaine and bupivacaine treatment. Furthermore, lidocaine and bupivacaine attenuated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 activity and induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and c-jun N-terminal kinase. Pharmacological inhibitors of MAPK/ERK kinase and p38 MAPK suppressed caspase 3 activation and PARP cleavage. Taken together, our results for the first time demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of local anesthetics on thyroid cancer cells and implicate the MAPK pathways as an important mechanism. Our findings have potential clinical relevance in that the use of local anesthetics may confer previously unrecognized benefits in the management of patients with thyroid cancer.

  18. Local anesthetics induce apoptosis in human thyroid cancer cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-Ching; Hsu, Yi-Chiung; Liu, Chien-Liang; Huang, Shih-Yuan; Hu, Meng-Chun; Cheng, Shih-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Local anesthetics are frequently used in fine-needle aspiration of thyroid lesions and locoregional control of persistent or recurrent thyroid cancer. Recent evidence suggests that local anesthetics have a broad spectrum of effects including inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in neuronal and other types of cells. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment with lidocaine and bupivacaine resulted in decreased cell viability and colony formation of both 8505C and K1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Lidocaine and bupivacaine induced apoptosis, and necrosis in high concentrations, as determined by flow cytometry. Lidocaine and bupivacaine caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, accompanied by activation of caspase 3 and 7, PARP cleavage, and induction of a higher ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. Based on microarray and pathway analysis, apoptosis is the prominent transcriptional change common to lidocaine and bupivacaine treatment. Furthermore, lidocaine and bupivacaine attenuated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity and induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-jun N-terminal kinase. Pharmacological inhibitors of MAPK/ERK kinase and p38 MAPK suppressed caspase 3 activation and PARP cleavage. Taken together, our results for the first time demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of local anesthetics on thyroid cancer cells and implicate the MAPK pathways as an important mechanism. Our findings have potential clinical relevance in that the use of local anesthetics may confer previously unrecognized benefits in the management of patients with thyroid cancer. PMID:24586874

  19. Local induction of immunosuppressive CD8+ T cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Fleissner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In contrast to intestinal CD4(+ regulatory T cells (T(regs, the generation and function of immunomodulatory intestinal CD8(+ T cells is less well defined. To dissect the immunologic mechanisms of CD8(+ T cell function in the mucosa, reactivity against hemagglutinin (HA expressed in intestinal epithelial cells of mice bearing a MHC class-I-restricted T-cell-receptor specific for HA was studied. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HA-specific CD8(+ T cells were isolated from gut-associated tissues and phenotypically and functionally characterized for the expression of Foxp3(+ and their suppressive capacity. We demonstrate that intestinal HA expression led to peripheral induction of HA-specific CD8(+Foxp3(+ T cells. Antigen-experienced CD8(+ T cells in this transgenic mouse model suppressed the proliferation of CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells in vitro. Gene expression analysis of suppressive HA-specific CD8(+ T cells revealed a specific up-regulation of CD103, Nrp1, Tnfrsf9 and Pdcd1, molecules also expressed on CD4(+ T(reg subsets. Finally, gut-associated dendritic cells were able to induce HA-specific CD8(+Foxp3(+ T cells. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that gut specific antigen presentation is sufficient to induce CD8(+ T(regsin vivo which may maintain intestinal homeostasis by down-modulating effector functions of T cells.

  20. Development and experimental basis of local subretinal technique of xenogenic’s injection stem cells labelled by magnetic perticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Belyy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: is to develop a technique for local subretinal injection of xenogeneic stem cells labeled with magnetic particles and to prove experimentally its effectiveness.Material and methods: We used a line of stem cells HEK-293 GFP,labeled with magnetic particles. The study was made on 84 eyes of 42 chinchilla rabbits 6 months of age, the weight were from 2.5 to 3.5 kg. All right eyes were experimental (42 eyes and all left eyes (42 eyes were the control group. In the experimental group we used original complex of polymer elastic magnetic implant (PEMI with laser probe and fixed it to the sclera, then we made a median vitrectomy and injected HEK-293 GFP under the retina using a specially designed dispenser. In the control group PEMI was not fixed. We examined animals using biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, ultrasound scanning, optical coherence tomography  OCT, computer tomography (CT, morphological study (cryohistological sections in 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 day and 1 month after surgery.Results: According the results of biomicroscopy in observation periods up to 3 days the vascular injection was visualized in the area operation. According the results of ophthalmoscopy and ultrasound scanning in 1 day the local retinal detachment was visualized in the area of local injection of the stem cells, which was not visualized in terms of further observations. CT helped us to confirm the local place of PEMI fixation. The morphological study results showed that cells were located in the subretinal space up to 14 days in the experimental group, and only up 3 days in the control group.Conclusion: The suggested surgical technique enables to control the injection of cells into the subretinal space, reduces the risk of tissue damage and exit cells in the vitreous space. The suggested methodology allows the fixing of the cellular material in the local place of the injection and enables to predict cells`s movement.

  1. A novel population of local pericyte precursor cells in tumor stroma that require Notch signaling for differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patenaude, Alexandre; Woerher, Stefan; Umlandt, Patricia; Wong, Fred; Ibrahim, Rawa; Kyle, Alastair; Unger, Sandy; Fuller, Megan; Parker, Jeremy; Minchinton, Andrew; Eaves, Connie J; Karsan, Aly

    2015-09-01

    Pericytes are perivascular support cells, the origin of which in tumor tissue is not clear. Recently, we identified a Tie1(+) precursor cell that differentiates into vascular smooth muscle, in a Notch-dependent manner. To understand the involvement of Notch in the ontogeny of tumor pericytes we used a novel flow immunophenotyping strategy to define CD146(+)/CD45(-)/CD31(-/lo) pericytes in the tumor stroma. This strategy combined with ex vivo co-culture experiments identified a novel pericyte progenitor cell population defined as Sca1(hi)/CD146(-)/CD45(-)/CD31(-). The differentiation of these progenitor cells was stimulated by co-culture with endothelial cells. Overexpression of the Notch ligand Jagged1 in endothelial cells further stimulated the differentiation of Sca1(hi)/CD146(-)/CD45(-)/CD31(-) cells into pericytes, while inhibition of Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor reduced this differentiation. However, Notch inhibition specifically in Tie1-expressing cells did not change the abundance of pericytes in tumors, suggesting that the pericyte precursor is distinct from the vascular smooth muscle cell precursor. Transplant experiments showed that the bone marrow contributes minimally to tumor pericytes. Immunophenotyping revealed that Sca1(hi)/CD146(-)/CD45(-)/CD31(-) cells have greater potential to differentiate into pericytes and have increased expression of classic mesenchymal stem cell markers (CD13, CD44, Nt5e and Thy-1) compared to Sca1(-/lo)/CD146(-)/CD45(-)/CD31(-) cells. Our results suggest that a local Sca1(hi)/CD146(-)/CD45(-)/CD31(-) pericyte progenitor resides in the tumor microenvironment and requires Notch signaling for differentiation into mature pericytes. PMID:26092680

  2. Effect of mesenchymal stem cells transplantation on glycaemic profile & their localization in streptozotocin induced diabetic Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobhit Bhansali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Bone marrow is a rich source of adult stem cells that can differentiate into various cell types. Administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in irradiated diabetic rat model has transiently shown to decrease blood glucose level. This study examines the effect of high dose and multiple injections of MSCs on glycemic profile, their localization and regeneration of islet in diabetic Wistar rat. Methods: The study was carried out in male Wistar rats categorized into three groups (n=6, in each group: Group 1 as control, group 2 streptozotocin (STZ (50 mg/kg induced diabetic group and group 3 experimental group; 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU labelled allogenic MSCs were injected in the non-irradiated diabetic rat of the experimental group through tail vein. The blood glucose profile was subsequently monitored at regular intervals. Rats were sacrificed on day 45 and pancreas was examined for localization of BrdU labelled stem cells by immunofluorescence and islet-neogenesis by immunohistochemistry . Results: There was a significant reduction in blood glucose level after administration of MSCs in the experimental group (P<0.001. The presence of BrdU labelled MSCs in islet suggested their localization in the pancreas. Co-expression of anti-BrdU and anti-insulin antibody indicated trans-differentiation / fusion into insulin producing cells evidenced by significant increase in total number of islet (P=0.004 and insulin positive cells ( P<0.0001 in experimental group. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the MSCs administration in non-irradiated diabetic Wistar rat reduced hyperglycaemia and was accompanied by increased islet-neogengesis, possibly through trans- differentiation/fusion.

  3. Locally-regionally advanced tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective review of stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil managed by definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in order to analyze the patients’ outcome and to evaluate the acute and late toxic effects of this treatment modality. Material and methods: Between January 2005 and December 2010, 36 patients with locally and/or regionally advanced tonsillar cancer underwent three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The dose prescription of the planning target volume for gross tumor and low-risk subclinical disease was 70 Gy and 50 Gy, respectively. Conventional fractionation with a daily dose of 2.0 Gy, 5 times per week was used. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 30 mg/m2 given on a weekly basis. Acute and late radiotherapy-related toxicities were recorded using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (EORTC/RTOG) grading system. The 3-year locoregional relapse-free survival (LRRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 20.5 months (range, 5 to 90 months). The median followup of living patients was 59 months (range, 30 to 90 months). Complete response rates of the primary tumor and of the nodal disease were 72.2% and 64.0%, respectively. A complete composite response was present in 25 patients (69.4%). Treatment failure occurred in 15 out of 25 patients who achieved complete composite response following CCRT. The 3-year LRRFS, DFS, and OS rate was 38.8%, 27.8%, and 27.3%, respectively. Grade 3 mucositis occurred in 58.3% of patients. Xerostomia grade 2 was revealed in 72.2% of patients. Conclusion: Taking into account the low 3-year survival rates observed in our study and the high percentage of grade 2 xerostomia, it can be concluded that in the future, instead of 3DCRT with concurrent

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Patterns of Failure and Predictors of Local Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Few studies have evaluated the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity (OC). We report clinical outcomes and failure patterns for these patients. Methods and Materials: Between October 2002 and June 2009, 37 patients with newly diagnosed SCC of the OC underwent postoperative (30) or definitive (7) IMRT. Twenty-five patients (66%) received systemic therapy. The median follow-up was 38 months (range, 10-87 months). The median interval from surgery to RT was 5.9 weeks (range, 2.1-10.7 weeks). Results: Thirteen patients experienced local-regional failure at a median of 8.1 months (range, 2.4-31.9 months), and 2 additional patients experienced local recurrence between surgery and RT. Seven local failures occurred in-field (one with simultaneous nodal and distant disease) and two at the margin. Four regional failures occurred, two in-field and two out-of-field, one with synchronous metastases. Six patients experienced distant failure. The 3-year actuarial estimates of local control, local-regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival were 67%, 53%, 81%, and 60% among postoperative patients, respectively, and 60%, 60%, 71%, and 57% among definitive patients. Four patients developed Grade ≥2 chronic toxicity. Increased surgery to RT interval predicted for decreased LRC (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Local-regional control for SCC of the OC treated with IMRT with or without surgery remains unsatisfactory. Definitive and postoperative IMRT have favorable toxicity profiles. A surgery-to-RT interval of <6 weeks improves local-regional control. The predominant failure pattern was local, suggesting that both improvements in target delineation and radiosensitization and/or dose escalation are needed.

  5. The use of fluorescamine as a permeant probe to localize phosphatidylethanolamine in intact friend erythroleukaemic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, J.A.F. op den; Rawyler, A.; Roelofsen, B.

    1984-01-01

    Intact Friend erythroleukaemic cells (Friend cells) were incubated at 0–4°C with increasing amounts of fluorescamine. Phospholipids were extracted and the amounts of phosphatidylethanolamine and of its fluorescamine derivative were determined. (1). The plasma membrane of intact Friend cells appeared

  6. Inhibition of nitrogen-fixing activity of the cyanobiont affects the localization of glutamine synthetase in hair cells of Azolla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uheda, Eiji; Maejima, Kazuhiro

    2009-10-15

    In the Azolla-Anabaena association, the host plant Azolla efficiently incorporates and assimilates ammonium ions that are released from the nitrogen-fixing cyanobiont, probably via glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) in hair cells, which are specialized cells protruding into the leaf cavity. In order to clarify the regulatory mechanism underlying ammonium assimilation in the Azolla-Anabaena association, Azolla plants were grown under an argon environment (Ar), in which the nitrogen-fixing activity of the cyanobiont was inhibited specifically and completely. The localization of GS in hair cells was determined by immunoelectron microscopy and quantitative analysis of immunogold labeling. Azolla plants grew healthily under Ar when nitrogen sources, such as NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+), were provided in the growth medium. Both the number of cyanobacterial cells per leaf and the heterocyst frequency of the plants under Ar were similar to those of plants in a nitrogen environment (N(2)). In hair cells of plants grown under Ar, regardless of the type of nitrogen source provided, only weak labeling of GS was observed in the cytoplasm and in chloroplasts. In contrast, in hair cells of plants grown under N(2), abundant labeling of GS was observed in both sites. These findings indicate that specific inhibition of the nitrogen-fixing activity of the cyanobiont affects the localization of GS isoenzymes. Ammonium fixed and released by the cyanobiont could stimulate GS synthesis in hair cells. Simultaneously, the abundant GS, probably GS1, in these cells, could assimilate ammonium rapidly. PMID:19464754

  7. Planar cell polarity enables posterior localization of nodal cilia and left-right axis determination during mouse and Xenopus embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Antic

    Full Text Available Left-right asymmetry in vertebrates is initiated in an early embryonic structure called the ventral node in human and mouse, and the gastrocoel roof plate (GRP in the frog. Within these structures, each epithelial cell bears a single motile cilium, and the concerted beating of these cilia produces a leftward fluid flow that is required to initiate left-right asymmetric gene expression. The leftward fluid flow is thought to result from the posterior tilt of the cilia, which protrude from near the posterior portion of each cell's apical surface. The cells, therefore, display a morphological planar polarization. Planar cell polarity (PCP is manifested as the coordinated, polarized orientation of cells within epithelial sheets, or as directional cell migration and intercalation during convergent extension. A set of evolutionarily conserved proteins regulates PCP. Here, we provide evidence that vertebrate PCP proteins regulate planar polarity in the mouse ventral node and in the Xenopus gastrocoel roof plate. Asymmetric anterior localization of VANGL1 and PRICKLE2 (PK2 in mouse ventral node cells indicates that these cells are planar polarized by a conserved molecular mechanism. A weakly penetrant Vangl1 mutant phenotype suggests that compromised Vangl1 function may be associated with left-right laterality defects. Stronger functional evidence comes from the Xenopus GRP, where we show that perturbation of VANGL2 protein function disrupts the posterior localization of motile cilia that is required for leftward fluid flow, and causes aberrant expression of the left side-specific gene Nodal. The observation of anterior-posterior PCP in the mouse and in Xenopus embryonic organizers reflects a strong evolutionary conservation of this mechanism that is important for body plan determination.

  8. Comparison of fresh tissue incubation assay and the in vivo localization of monoclonal antibodies to renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few in vitro tests currently available are able to accurately predict the in vivo localization of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) to cancer. We report on a fresh tissue incubation assay (FTIA) and compare the results of this assay to the in vivo localization of renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-reactive Mab A6H and control Mab AFP-22 to RCC and non-RCC xenografts implanted in nude mice. Both the FTIA and in vivo localization study demonstrated highly selective uptake of A6H in RCC but not in non-RCC xenografts. Radioimmunoscintigraphy using A6H clearly visualized RCC xenografts in every attempt, while AFP-22 did not highlight any of the tumor xenografts. The results demonstrate that FTIA may be a useful in vitro assay for selecting Mabs for in vivo application, and that radioimmunoscintigraphy is a potentially useful tool in detecting cancer sites

  9. Localization of anticoagulantly active heparan sulfate proteoglycans in vascular endothelium: Antithrombin binding on cultured endothelial cells and perfused rat aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the interaction of 125I-antithrombin (125I-AT) with microvascular endothelial cells (RFPEC) to localize the cellular site of anticoagulantly active heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). The radiolabeled protease inhibitor bound specifically to the above HSPG with a Kd of approximately 50 nM. Confluent monolayer RFPEC cultures exhibited a linear increase in the amount of AT bound per cell for up to 16 d, whereas suspension RFPEC cultures possessed a constant number of protease inhibitor binding sites per cell for up to 5 d. These results suggest that monolayer RFPEC cultures secrete anticoagulantly active HSPG, which then accumulate in the extracellular matrix. This hypothesis was confirmed by quantitative light and EM level autoradiography which demonstrated that the AT binding sites are predominantly located in the extracellular matrix with only small quantities of protease inhibitor complexed to the cell surface. We have also pinpointed the in vivo position of anticoagulantly active HSPG within the blood vessel wall. Rat aortas were perfused, in situ, with 125I-AT, and bound labeled protease inhibitor was localized by light and EM autoradiography. The anticoagulantly active HSPG were concentrated immediately beneath the aortic and vasa vasorum endothelium with only a very small extent of labeling noted on the luminal surface of the endothelial cells. Based upon the above data, we propose a model whereby luminal and abluminal anticoagulantly active HSPG regulate coagulation mechanism activity

  10. Smooth muscle cells healing atherosclerotic plaque disruptions are of local, not blood, origin in apolipoprotein E knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, Jacob F; Sondergaard, Claus S; Kassem, Mustafa;

    2007-01-01

    circulating bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. Here, we analyzed the contribution of this mechanism to plaque healing after spontaneous and mechanical plaque disruption in apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE-/-) mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: To determine the origin of SMCs after spontaneous plaque disruption......GFP+ SMCs were detected. To examine the origin of healing SMCs in a model that recapitulates more features of human plaque rupture and healing, we developed a mechanical technique that produced consistent plaque disruption, superimposed thrombosis, and SMC-mediated plaque healing in apoE-/- mice. Mechanical...... originating from outside the local arterial segment were detected in healed plaques. CONCLUSIONS: Healing SMCs after atherosclerotic plaque disruption are derived entirely from the local arterial wall and not circulating progenitor cells in apoE-/- mice. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Oct-30...

  11. Graft-infiltrating cells expressing a CD200 transgene prolong allogeneic skin graft survival in association with local increases in Foxp3(+)Treg and mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczynski, Reginald M; Chen, Zhiqi; Khatri, Ismat; Yu, Kai

    2011-12-01

    Expression of the molecule CD200 has been reported to increase allograft survival by suppression of inflammation and acquired immunity. In previous studies we have shown that increased skin and cardiac allograft survival in transgenic mice over-expressing CD200 (CD200(tg)) occurs in association with increased intra-graft expression of mRNAs for genes associated with altered T cell subset differentiation. We investigated changes in graft-infiltrating cells, Treg and mast cells in skin grafts post transplantation into control or CD200(tg) mice, using focused gene array and real-time PCR to assess altered gene expression, and FACS, immunohistology and MLC to determine numbers/function of those cells. Graft-infiltrating cells isolated from CD200(tg) recipients suppressed induction of CTL from control lymph node cells in vitro, and contained increased numbers of infiltrating, non-degranulating, mast cells and Foxp3(+)Treg. Mast cells were also evident in graft tissue of control animals, but there these cells showed evidence for degranulation, and fewer Foxp3(+)Treg were present than was the case of CD200(tg) mice. The infusion of a competitive inhibitor of CD200:CD200R interactions, CD200(tr), at high concentrations (50μg/mouse iv) caused rapid rejection of grafts in CD200(tg) mice, mast cell degranulation within graft tissue, and a decrease in Treg infiltrates. These effects were attenuated by simultaneous infusion of the mast cell stabilizer, sodium cromoglycate. We conclude that CD200 expression contributes to graft prolongation through local suppression of mast cell degranulation, attraction/expansion of Treg, and attenuation of T cell effector activation. PMID:21801836

  12. Intracellular Localization of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Protein: Absence of Nucleolar Accumulation during Infection and after Expression as a Recombinant Protein in Vero Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rowland, Raymond R. R.; Chauhan, Vinita; Fang, Ying; Pekosz, Andrew; Kerrigan, Maureen; Burton, Miriam D.

    2005-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of several members within the order Nidovirales localizes to the nucleolus during infection and after transfection of cells with N genes. However, confocal microscopy of N protein localization in Vero cells infected with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) or transfected with the SARS-CoV N gene failed to show the presence of N in the nucleoplasm or nucleolus. Amino acids 369 to 389, which contain putative nuclear localization signal (NLS)...

  13. Localization and translocation of RhoA protein in the human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the localization of RhoA in gastric SGC-7901 cancer cells and its translocation by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and/or 8-chlorophenylthio cAMP (CPT-cAMP). METHODS: Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to determine the localization of RhoA. Western blotting was used to detect both endogenous and exogenous RhoA in different cellular compartments (membrane, cytosol, nucleus) and the translocation of RhoA following treatment with LPA, CPT-cAMP, or CPT-cAMP+LPA. RESULTS: Immunofluorescence staining revealed endogenous RhoA to be localized in the membrane, the cytosol, and the nucleus, and its precise localization within the nucleus to be the nucleolus. Western blotting identified both endogenous and exogenous RhoA within different cellular compartments (membrane, cytosol, nucleus, nucleolus). After stimulation with LPA, the amount of RhoA within membrane and nuclear extracts increased, while it decreased in the cytosol fractions. After treatment with CPT-cAMP the amount of RhoA within the membrane and the nuclear extracts decreased, while it increased within the cytosol fraction. Treatment with a combination of both substances led to a decrease in RhoA in the membrane and the nucleus but to an increase in the cytosol. CONCLUSION: In SGC-7901 cells RhoA was found to be localized within the membrane, the cytosol, and the nucleus. Within the nucleus its precise localization could be demonstrated to be the nucleolus. Stimulation with LPA caused a translocation of RhoA from the cytosol towards the membrane and the nucleus; treatment with CPT-cAMP caused the opposite effect. Furthermore, pre-treatment with CPT-cAMP was found to block the effect of LPA.

  14. Nuclear localization of Vpr is crucial for the efficient replication of HIV-1 in primary CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) accessory protein Vpr appears to make a substantial contribution to the replication of HIV-1 in established T cell lines when HIV-1 is present at very low multiplicities of infection. However, the role of Vpr in viral replication in primary CD4+ T cells remains to be clarified. In this study, we generated a panel of viruses that encoded mutant forms of Vpr that lacked either the ability to accumulate in the nucleus and induce G2 arrest or the ability to induce apoptosis, which has been shown to occur independently of G2 arrest of the cell cycle. We demonstrate here that the nuclear localization of Vpr and consequent G2 arrest but not the induction of apoptosis by Vpr are important for viral replication in primary CD4+ T cells at both high and low multiplicities of infection. Viruses that encoded mutant forms of Vpr that failed to be imported into the nucleus in the presence of cytoplasmic extracts from primary CD4+ T cells in an in vitro nuclear import assay replicated at drastically reduced rates. Thus, Vpr might be a key regulator of the viral nuclear import process during infection in primary CD4+ T cells. By contrast, a mutant form of Vpr that exhibited diffuse cytosolic staining exclusively in an immunofluorescence assay of HeLa cells and was not imported into nucleus by the cytosol from HeLa cells was effectively imported into the nucleus by cytosol from primary CD4+ T cells. This Vpr mutant virus replicated well in primary CD4+ T cells, indicating that cellular factors in primary CD4+ T cells are indispensable for the accumulation of Vpr in the nucleus and, thus, for viral replication. Our results suggest that the nuclear import of Vpr might be a good target in efforts to block the early stages of replication of HIV-1

  15. Immunohistochemical localization of polypeptide hormones in pancreatic endocrine cells of a dipnoan fish, Protopterus aethiopicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, D W; Adriaensen, D; Timmermans, J P; De Groodt-Lasseel, M H

    1991-01-01

    Light microscopical immunohistochemistry was used to demonstrate the regulatory peptides present in the endocrine pancreas of Protopterus aethiopicus. The peptides studied included insulin, glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide and somatostatin. The results showed that the 4 regulatory peptides commonly detected in the mammalian endocrine pancreas were immunologically discernible in this dipnoan fish. Large amounts of insulin-immunoreactive cells, in the centre of the pancreatic islets, were surrounded by a small rim of glucagon-or pancreatic polypeptide-immunoreactive cells. In addition, adjacent sections stained with anti-glucagon and anti-pancreatic polypeptide revealed that these hormones could be found in the same cells. Somatostatin-positive cells were scattered throughout the islets. Their processes were seen to contact many different endocrine pancreatic cells, suggesting that the somatostatin-immunoreactive cells control the functions of other endocrine pancreatic cells. PMID:1687100

  16. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for melanoma and renal cell carcinoma: impact of single fraction equivalent dose on local control

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson William; Lewis Karl; Flaig Thomas; Gonzalez Rene; Schefter Tracey E; Kavanagh Brian D; Stinauer Michelle A; Chidel Mark; Glode Michael; Raben David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are traditionally considered less radioresponsive than other histologies. Whereas stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) involves radiation dose intensification via escalation, we hypothesize SBRT might result in similar high local control rates as previously published on metastases of varying histologies. Methods The records of patients with metastatic melanoma (n = 17 patients, 28 lesions) or RCC (n = 13 patients, 25 lesions) t...

  17. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Strategies for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Selek, Uğur; Bölükbaşı, Yasemin; Welsh, James W.; Topkan, Erkan

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is the current standard of care in patients with advanced inoperable stage IIIA or IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) has been a trusted method for a long time and has well-known drawbacks, most of which could be improved by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). IMRT is not currently the standard treatment of locally advanced NSCLC, but almost all patients could benefit to a degree in organ at risk sparing, dose coverage confor...

  18. Localization of HPV-18 E2 at Mitochondrial Membranes Induces ROS Release and Modulates Host Cell Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah Lai; Chye Ling Tan; Jayantha Gunaratne; Ling Shih Quek; Wenlong Nei; Françoise Thierry; Sophie Bellanger

    2013-01-01

    Papillomavirus E2 proteins are predominantly retained in the nuclei of infected cells, but oncogenic (high-risk) HPV-18 and 16 E2 can shuttle between the host nucleus and cytoplasm. We show here that cytoplasmic HPV-18 E2 localizes to mitochondrial membranes, and independent mass spectrometry analyses of the E2 interactome revealed association to the inner mitochondrial membrane including components of the respiratory chain. Mitochondrial E2 association modifies the cristae morphology when an...

  19. Has the practice of radiation oncology for locally advanced and metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer changed in Canada?

    OpenAIRE

    Han, K.; Bezjak, A.; Xu, W.; Kane, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aim Previous surveys have revealed wide variations in the management by radiation oncologists of non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) in Canada. The aim of the present study was to determine the current patterns of practice for locally advanced and metastatic nsclc among Canadian radiation oncologists. Materials and Methods An online survey was distributed electronically to all members of the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncologists. Those who treat lung cancer were invited to participate....

  20. Comparative Localization and Functional Activity of the Main Hepatobiliary Transporters in HepaRG Cells and Primary Human Hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Bachour-El Azzi, Pamela; Sharanek, Ahmad; Burban, Audrey; Li, Ruoya; Guével, Rémy Le; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Stieger, Bruno; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2015-01-01

    The role of hepatobiliary transporters in drug-induced liver injury remains poorly understood. Various in vivo and in vitro biological approaches are currently used for studying hepatic transporters; however, appropriate localization and functional activity of these transporters are essential for normal biliary flow and drug transport. Human hepatocytes (HHs) are considered as the most suitable in vitro cell model but erratic availability and inter-donor functional variations limit their use....

  1. Association Between the Cytogenetic Profile of Tumor Cells and Response to Preoperative Radiochemotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    González-González, María; Garcia, Jacinto; Alcazar, José A.; Gutiérrez, María L; Gónzalez, Luis M.; Bengoechea, Oscar; Abad, María M.; Santos-Briz, Angel; Blanco, Oscar; Martín, Manuela; Rodríguez, Ana; Fuentes, Manuel; Muñoz-Bellvis, Luis; ORFAO, ALBERTO; Sayagues, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy to locally advanced rectal carcinoma patients has proven efficient in a high percentage of cases. Despite this, some patients show nonresponse or even disease progression. Recent studies suggest that different genetic alterations may be associated with sensitivity versus resistance of rectal cancer tumor cells to neoadjuvant therapy. We investigated the relationship between intratumoral pathways of clonal evolution as assessed by interphase fluorescence ...

  2. Localization of the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent. Protein kinase in cultured cells using a specific antibody

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    We developed a specific antibody to the catalytic subunit (C-subunit) of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and used it to localize C- subunit in cultured cells. C-subunit antigen was purified from bovine cardiac muscle and cross-linked to hemocyanin with glutaraldehyde. Immunized goat serum showed a low titer of antibody after boosting; it was enriched 100-fold by affinity chromatography on catalytic subunit- Sepharose. The antibody immunoprecipitated C-subunit from type I and type II holoe...

  3. Motif discovery in promoters of genes co-localized and co-expressed during myeloid cells differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppe, Alessandro; Ferrari, Francesco; Bisognin, Andrea; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Ferrari, Sergio; Bicciato, Silvio; Bortoluzzi, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Genes co-expressed may be under similar promoter-based and/or position-based regulation. Although data on expression, position and function of human genes are available, their true integration still represents a challenge for computational biology, hampering the identification of regulatory mechanisms. We carried out an integrative analysis of genomic position, functional annotation and promoters of genes expressed in myeloid cells. Promoter analysis was conducted by a novel multi-step method for discovering putative regulatory elements, i.e. over-represented motifs, in a selected set of promoters, as compared with a background model. The combination of transcriptional, structural and functional data allowed the identification of sets of promoters pertaining to groups of genes co-expressed and co-localized in regions of the human genome. The application of motif discovery to 26 groups of genes co-expressed in myeloid cells differentiation and co-localized in the genome showed that there are more over-represented motifs in promoters of co-expressed and co-localized genes than in promoters of simply co-expressed genes (CEG). Motifs, which are similar to the binding sequences of known transcription factors, non-uniformly distributed along promoter sequences and/or occurring in highly co-expressed subset of genes were identified. Co-expressed and co-localized gene sets were grouped in two co-expressed genomic meta-regions, putatively representing functional domains of a high-level expression regulation. PMID:19059999

  4. TMC1 and TMC2 Localize at the Site of Mechanotransduction in Mammalian Inner Ear Hair Cell Stereocilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoto Kurima

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanosensitive ion channels at stereocilia tips mediate mechanoelectrical transduction (MET in inner ear sensory hair cells. Transmembrane channel-like 1 and 2 (TMC1 and TMC2 are essential for MET and are hypothesized to be components of the MET complex, but evidence for their predicted spatiotemporal localization in stereocilia is lacking. Here, we determine the stereocilia localization of the TMC proteins in mice expressing TMC1-mCherry and TMC2-AcGFP. Functionality of the tagged proteins was verified by transgenic rescue of MET currents and hearing in Tmc1Δ/Δ;Tmc2Δ/Δ mice. TMC1-mCherry and TMC2-AcGFP localize along the length of immature stereocilia. However, as hair cells develop, the two proteins localize predominantly to stereocilia tips. Both TMCs are absent from the tips of the tallest stereocilia, where MET activity is not detectable. This distribution was confirmed for the endogenous proteins by immunofluorescence. These data are consistent with TMC1 and TMC2 being components of the stereocilia MET channel complex.

  5. TMC1 and TMC2 Localize at the Site of Mechanotransduction in Mammalian Inner Ear Hair Cell Stereocilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurima, Kiyoto; Ebrahim, Seham; Pan, Bifeng; Sedlacek, Miloslav; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Millis, Bryan A; Cui, Runjia; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Fujikawa, Taro; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Choi, Byung Yoon; Monahan, Kelly; Holt, Jeffrey R; Griffith, Andrew J; Kachar, Bechara

    2015-09-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels at stereocilia tips mediate mechanoelectrical transduction (MET) in inner ear sensory hair cells. Transmembrane channel-like 1 and 2 (TMC1 and TMC2) are essential for MET and are hypothesized to be components of the MET complex, but evidence for their predicted spatiotemporal localization in stereocilia is lacking. Here, we determine the stereocilia localization of the TMC proteins in mice expressing TMC1-mCherry and TMC2-AcGFP. Functionality of the tagged proteins was verified by transgenic rescue of MET currents and hearing in Tmc1(Δ/Δ);Tmc2(Δ/Δ) mice. TMC1-mCherry and TMC2-AcGFP localize along the length of immature stereocilia. However, as hair cells develop, the two proteins localize predominantly to stereocilia tips. Both TMCs are absent from the tips of the tallest stereocilia, where MET activity is not detectable. This distribution was confirmed for the endogenous proteins by immunofluorescence. These data are consistent with TMC1 and TMC2 being components of the stereocilia MET channel complex. PMID:26321635

  6. Predictors of Individual Tumor Local Control After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garsa, Adam A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Badiyan, Shahed N.; DeWees, Todd; Simpson, Joseph R.; Huang, Jiayi; Drzymala, Robert E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Barani, Igor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Dowling, Joshua L.; Rich, Keith M.; Chicoine, Michael R.; Kim, Albert H.; Leuthardt, Eric C. [Department of Neurosurgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Robinson, Clifford G., E-mail: crobinson@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control rates and predictors of individual tumor local control for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Between June 1998 and May 2011, 401 brain metastases in 228 patients were treated with Gamma Knife single-fraction SRS. Local failure was defined as an increase in lesion size after SRS. Local control was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazards model was used for univariate and multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to identify an optimal cutpoint for conformality index relative to local control. A P value <.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Median age was 60 years (range, 27-84 years). There were 66 cerebellar metastases (16%) and 335 supratentorial metastases (84%). The median prescription dose was 20 Gy (range, 14-24 Gy). Median overall survival from time of SRS was 12.1 months. The estimated local control at 12 months was 74%. On multivariate analysis, cerebellar location (hazard ratio [HR] 1.94, P=.009), larger tumor volume (HR 1.09, P<.001), and lower conformality (HR 0.700, P=.044) were significant independent predictors of local failure. Conformality index cutpoints of 1.4-1.9 were predictive of local control, whereas a cutpoint of 1.75 was the most predictive (P=.001). The adjusted Kaplan-Meier 1-year local control for conformality index ≥1.75 was 84% versus 69% for conformality index <1.75, controlling for tumor volume and location. The 1-year adjusted local control for cerebellar lesions was 60%, compared with 77% for supratentorial lesions, controlling for tumor volume and conformality index. Conclusions: Cerebellar tumor location, lower conformality index, and larger tumor volume were significant independent predictors of local failure after SRS for brain metastases from NSCLC. These results warrant further investigation in a prospective

  7. Predictors of Individual Tumor Local Control After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate local control rates and predictors of individual tumor local control for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Between June 1998 and May 2011, 401 brain metastases in 228 patients were treated with Gamma Knife single-fraction SRS. Local failure was defined as an increase in lesion size after SRS. Local control was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazards model was used for univariate and multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to identify an optimal cutpoint for conformality index relative to local control. A P value <.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Median age was 60 years (range, 27-84 years). There were 66 cerebellar metastases (16%) and 335 supratentorial metastases (84%). The median prescription dose was 20 Gy (range, 14-24 Gy). Median overall survival from time of SRS was 12.1 months. The estimated local control at 12 months was 74%. On multivariate analysis, cerebellar location (hazard ratio [HR] 1.94, P=.009), larger tumor volume (HR 1.09, P<.001), and lower conformality (HR 0.700, P=.044) were significant independent predictors of local failure. Conformality index cutpoints of 1.4-1.9 were predictive of local control, whereas a cutpoint of 1.75 was the most predictive (P=.001). The adjusted Kaplan-Meier 1-year local control for conformality index ≥1.75 was 84% versus 69% for conformality index <1.75, controlling for tumor volume and location. The 1-year adjusted local control for cerebellar lesions was 60%, compared with 77% for supratentorial lesions, controlling for tumor volume and conformality index. Conclusions: Cerebellar tumor location, lower conformality index, and larger tumor volume were significant independent predictors of local failure after SRS for brain metastases from NSCLC. These results warrant further investigation in a prospective

  8. Enhancement of radiation cytotoxicity in breast-cancer cells by localized attachment of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Tao; Zeng, Jie; Wang, Xiaoping; Yang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jing; McQuarrie, Steve; McEwan, Alexander; Roa, Wilson; Chen, Jie; Xing, James Z

    2008-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and modified GNPs having two kinds of functional molecules, cysteamine (AET) and thioglucose (Glu), are synthesized. Cell uptake and radiation cytotoxicity enhancement in a breast-cancer cell line (MCF-7) versus a nonmalignant breast-cell line (MCF-10A) are studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show that cancer cells take up functional Glu-GNPs significantly more than naked GNPs. The TEM results also indicate that AET-capped GNPs are mostly bound to the MCF-7 cell membrane, while Glu-GNPs enter the cells and are distributed in the cytoplasm. After MCF-7 cell uptake of Glu-GNPs, or binding of AET-GNPs, the in vitro cytotoxicity effects are observed at 24, 48, and 72 hours. The results show that these functional GNPs have little or no toxicity to these cells. To validate the enhanced killing effect on cancer cells, various forms of radiation are applied such as 200 kVp X-rays and gamma-rays, to the cells, both with and without functional GNPs. By comparison with irradiation alone, the results show that GNPs significantly enhance cancer killing. PMID:18712753

  9. Study on development and localization of CTGF-immunoreactive cells in central nervous system of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Bing-yin; CAI Wen-qin; ZHANNG Cheng-gang; B.Perbal

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the development of connective tissue growth factor(CTGF) immunoreactive cells in the central nervous system (CNS) of E8-P300 rats. Methods: Immunocytochemistry was employed in our study. Results: No CTGF-immunoreactive cells were detected in the CNS of rats during prenatal stages. A few of CTGF-positive cells were detected in the early postnatal stage. However, the positive cells increased gradually in later stages. CTGF-immunoreactive cells widely distributed in the CNS of rats in the first 30 to 60 days postnatally, and the density of immunoreactive products was the highest in these days. The number and staining intensity of CTGF-positive cells decreased and their area of distribution diminished gradually with age. The positive cells included neurons mainly located in the cingulate cortex,striatum, hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum, and astrocytes in white matter of the spinal cord and ependymal cells of the brain. Most of CTGF-immunoreactive cells were quite big in size with a long process. Conclusion: CTGF-immunoreactive cells were found in the CNS of rats, and their numbers and positive signal decreased with the age.

  10. Local Microenvironment Controls the Compartmentalization of NK Cell Responses during Systemic Inflammation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasid, Orhan; Ciulean, Ioana Sonya; Fitting, Catherine; Doyen, Noelle; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc

    2016-09-15

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a whole-body reaction to a triggering insult that often results in life-threatening illness. Contributing to the development of this inflammatory cascade are numerous cellular partners, among which NK cells were shown to play a key role. Accumulating evidence points to organ-specific properties of systemic inflammation and NK cells. However, little is known about compartment-specific activation of NK cells during systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the relative contribution of NK cell-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental cues. In this study, we undertook a sequential characterization of NK responses in the spleen, lungs, bone marrow, peritoneum, and blood using a mouse model of endotoxemia. We report that, despite similar systemic dynamics of NK cell responses, expression of activation markers (CD69 and CD25) and effector molecules (IFN-γ, granzyme B, and IL-10) display organ-specific thresholds of maximum activation. Using adoptive transfers of spleen and lung NK cells, we found that these cells have the capacity to quickly adapt to a new environment and adjust their response levels to that of resident NK cells. This functional adaptation occurs without significant alterations in phenotype and independently of subpopulation-specific trafficking. Thus, using a dynamic in vivo-transfer system, to our knowledge our study is the first to report the compartmentalization of NK cells responses during systemic inflammation and to show that NK cell-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental cues are involved in this process, in a sequential manner. PMID:27521338

  11. Comparative Localization and Functional Activity of the Main Hepatobiliary Transporters in HepaRG Cells and Primary Human Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachour-El Azzi, Pamela; Sharanek, Ahmad; Burban, Audrey; Li, Ruoya; Guével, Rémy Le; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Stieger, Bruno; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2015-05-01

    The role of hepatobiliary transporters in drug-induced liver injury remains poorly understood. Various in vivo and in vitro biological approaches are currently used for studying hepatic transporters; however, appropriate localization and functional activity of these transporters are essential for normal biliary flow and drug transport. Human hepatocytes (HHs) are considered as the most suitable in vitro cell model but erratic availability and inter-donor functional variations limit their use. In this work, we aimed to compare localization of influx and efflux transporters and their functional activity in differentiated human HepaRG hepatocytes with fresh HHs in conventional (CCHH) and sandwich (SCHH) cultures. All tested influx and efflux transporters were correctly localized to canalicular [bile salt export pump (BSEP), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), and MDR3] or basolateral [Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) and MRP3] membrane domains and were functional in all models. Contrary to other transporters, NTCP and BSEP were less abundant and active in HepaRG cells, cellular uptake of taurocholate was 2.2- and 1.4-fold and bile excretion index 2.8- and 2.6-fold lower, than in SCHHs and CCHHs, respectively. However, when taurocholate canalicular efflux was evaluated in standard and divalent cation-free conditions in buffers or cell lysates, the difference between the three models did not exceed 9.3%. Interestingly, cell imaging showed higher bile canaliculi contraction/relaxation activity in HepaRG hepatocytes and larger bile canaliculi networks in SCHHs. Altogether, our results bring new insights in mechanisms involved in bile acids accumulation and excretion in HHs and suggest that HepaRG cells represent a suitable model for studying hepatobiliary transporters and drug-induced cholestasis. PMID:25690737

  12. Expression and subcellular localization of aquaporin water channels in the polarized hepatocyte cell line, WIF-B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinelli Raúl A

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent data suggest that canalicular bile secretion involves selective expression and coordinated regulation of aquaporins (AQPs, a family of water channels proteins. In order to further characterize the role of AQPs in this process, an in vitro cell system with retained polarity and expression of AQPs and relevant solute transporters involved in bile formation is highly desirable. The WIF-B cell line is a highly differentiated and polarized rat hepatoma/human fibroblast hybrid, which forms abundant bile canalicular structures. This cell line has been reported to be a good in vitro model for studying hepatocyte polarity. Results Using RT-PCR, immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence, we showed that WIF-B cells express the aquaporin water channels that facilitate the osmotically driven water movements in the liver, i.e. AQP8, AQP9, and AQP0; as well as the key solute transporters involved in the generation of canalicular osmotic gradients, i.e., the bile salt export pump Bsep, the organic anion transporter Mrp2 and the chloride bicarbonate exchanger AE2. The subcellular localization of the AQPs and the solute transporters in WIF-B cells was similar to that in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes and in intact liver. Immunofluorescent costaining studies showed intracellular colocalization of AQP8 and AE2, suggesting the possibility that these transporters are expressed in the same population of pericanalicular vesicles. Conclusion The hepatocyte cell line WIF-B retains the expression and subcellular localization of aquaporin water channels as well as key solute transporters for canalicular bile secretion. Thus, these cells can work as a valuable tool for regulatory and mechanistic studies of the biology of bile formation.

  13. Localization of cell wall polysaccharides in normal and compression wood of radiata pine: relationships with lignification and microfibril orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Lloyd A; Knox, J Paul

    2012-02-01

    The distribution of noncellulosic polysaccharides in cell walls of tracheids and xylem parenchyma cells in normal and compression wood of Pinus radiata, was examined to determine the relationships with lignification and cellulose microfibril orientation. Using fluorescence microscopy combined with immunocytochemistry, monoclonal antibodies were used to detect xyloglucan (LM15), β(1,4)-galactan (LM5), heteroxylan (LM10 and LM11), and galactoglucomannan (LM21 and LM22). Lignin and crystalline cellulose were localized on the same sections used for immunocytochemistry by autofluorescence and polarized light microscopy, respectively. Changes in the distribution of noncellulosic polysaccharides between normal and compression wood were associated with changes in lignin distribution. Increased lignification of compression wood secondary walls was associated with novel deposition of β(1,4)-galactan and with reduced amounts of xylan and mannan in the outer S2 (S2L) region of tracheids. Xylan and mannan were detected in all lignified xylem cell types (tracheids, ray tracheids, and thick-walled ray parenchyma) but were not detected in unlignified cell types (thin-walled ray parenchyma and resin canal parenchyma). Mannan was absent from the highly lignified compound middle lamella, but xylan occurred throughout the cell walls of tracheids. Using colocalization measurements, we confirmed that polysaccharides containing galactose, mannose, and xylose have consistent correlations with lignification. Low or unsubstituted xylans were localized in cell wall layers characterized by transverse cellulose microfibril orientation in both normal and compression wood tracheids. Our results support the theory that the assembly of wood cell walls, including lignification and microfibril orientation, may be mediated by changes in the amount and distribution of noncellulosic polysaccharides. PMID:22147521

  14. DEADSouth protein localizes to germ plasm and is required for the development of primordial germ cells in Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Yamaguchi

    2012-11-01

    DEADSouth mRNA is a component of germ plasm in Xenopus laevis and encodes a DDX25 DEAD-box RNA helicase. To determine the intracellular localization of DEADSouth protein, we injected mRNA encoding DEADSouth tagged with mCherry fluorescent protein into fertilized eggs from transgenic Xenopus expressing EGFP fused with a mitochondrial targeting signal. The DEADSouth-mCherry fusion protein was localized to the germ plasm, a mitochondria-rich region in primordial germ cells (PGCs. DEADSouth overexpression resulted in a reduction of PGC numbers after stage 20. Conversely, DEADSouth knockdown using an antisense locked nucleic acid gapmer inhibited movement of the germ plasm from the cortex to the perinuclear region, resulting in inhibition of PGC division at stage 12 and a decrease in PGC numbers at later stages. The knockdown phenotype was rescued by intact DEADSouth mRNA, but not mutant mRNA encoding inactive DEADSouth helicase. Surprisingly, it was also rescued by mouse vasa homolog and Xenopus vasa-like gene 1 mRNAs that encode DDX4 RNA helicases. The rescue was dependent on the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR of DEADSouth mRNA, which was used for PGC-specific expression. The 3′UTR contributed to localization of the injected mRNA to the germ plasm, resulting in effective localization of DEADSouth protein. These results demonstrate that localization of DEADSouth helicase to the germ plasm is required for proper PGC development in Xenopus laevis.

  15. Locally-Delivered T-Cell-Derived Cellular Vehicles Efficiently Track and Deliver Adenovirus Delta24-RGD to Infiltrating Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutger K. Balvers

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenoviral vectors are a promising alternative for the treatment of glioblastoma. Recent publications have demonstrated the advantages of shielding viral particles within cellular vehicles (CVs, which can be targeted towards the tumor microenvironment. Here, we studied T-cells, often having a natural capacity to target tumors, for their feasibility as a CV to deliver the oncolytic adenovirus, Delta24-RGD, to glioblastoma. The Jurkat T-cell line was assessed in co-culture with the glioblastoma stem cell (GSC line, MGG8, for the optimal transfer conditions of Delta24-RGD in vitro. The effect of intraparenchymal and tail vein injections on intratumoral virus distribution and overall survival was addressed in an orthotopic glioma stem cell (GSC-based xenograft model. Jurkat T-cells were demonstrated to facilitate the amplification and transfer of Delta24-RGD onto GSCs. Delta24-RGD dosing and incubation time were found to influence the migratory ability of T-cells towards GSCs. Injection of Delta24-RGD-loaded T-cells into the brains of GSC-bearing mice led to migration towards the tumor and dispersion of the virus within the tumor core and infiltrative zones. This occurred after injection into the ipsilateral hemisphere, as well as into the non-tumor-bearing hemisphere. We found that T-cell-mediated delivery of Delta24-RGD led to the inhibition of tumor growth compared to non-treated controls, resulting in prolonged survival (p = 0.007. Systemic administration of virus-loaded T-cells resulted in intratumoral viral delivery, albeit at low levels. Based on these findings, we conclude that T-cell-based CVs are a feasible approach to local Delta24-RGD delivery in glioblastoma, although efficient systemic targeting requires further improvement.

  16. Local NSAID infusion inhibits satellite cell proliferation in human skeletal muscle after eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, U R; Langberg, H; Helmark, I C;

    2009-01-01

    exercise in vivo in human skeletal muscle. Eight young healthy males performed 200 maximal eccentric contractions with each leg. An NSAID was infused via a microdialysis catheter into the vastus lateralis muscle of one leg (NSAID leg) before, during, and for 4.5 h after exercise, with the other leg working...... as a control (unblocked leg). Muscle biopsies were collected before and 8 days after exercise. Changes in satellite cells and inflammatory cell numbers were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Satellite cells were identified using antibodies against neural cell adhesion molecule and Pax7. The number of Pax7...

  17. Ultrastructure of Guerin's carcinoma cells after chemotherapy and local tumor irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was established that administration of cisplatin (CP) resulted in pronounced disorders in Guerin's carcinoma cell ultrastructure and did not influence the number of mitoses in the tumor. Main effect of TT was significant reduction of mitotic activity in the tumor against a background of inconsiderable changes in the cell ultrastructure. Administration of CP followed by irradiation changed little in the structural functional state of Guerin's carcinoma cells while Taxotere administration prior to irradiation caused necroses of the tumor tissue and significant reduction of the number of mitoses in the survived cells

  18. Low-power, Confocal Imaging of Protein Localization in Living Cells (7214-150) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed technology genetically labels intracellular structures and visualizes protein interactions in living cells using a compact, confocal microscope with...

  19. Peculiarities in the CT findings of germ cell tumors in various tumor localizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CT findings of 17 germ cell tumors were studied in relation to the locations of the tumor, the pathological diagnoses, and the tumor markers (AFP and HCG). Generally, the CT findings of germ cell tumors depended on the pathological diagnoses more strongly than on the location of the tumors. On plain CT of 7 germ cell tumors in the pineal region, all of them demonstrated heterogeneous findings. Hydrocephalus was seen in 6 cases (86%) and calcification in 6 cases (86%) of the germ cell tumors in the pineal region. Calcification and hydrocephalus that appeared more often than in other regions were characteristic of germ cell tumors of the pineal region. The germ cell tumors in the basal ganglia had a slightly homogenous high density, with small cysts and calcification in most of them on plain CT. On enhanced CT, the tumors were moderately enhanced in all cases located in the basal ganglia. Four cases of germ cell tumors located in the basal ganglia revealed the dilatation of lateral ventricle due to hemispheric atrophy in the tumor side. The germ cell tumors showing an increase in the tumor markers such as AFP and HCG, which were usually malignant germ cell tumors, were strongly enhanced on enhanced CT. (author)

  20. Suppression of local RNA silencing is not sufficient to promote cell-to-cell movement of Turnip crinkle virus in Nicotiana benthamiana

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yan; Ryabov, Eugene V.; van Wezel, Rene; Li, Chunyang; Jin, Mingfei; Wang, Wenjing; Fan, Zaifeng; Hong, Yiguo

    2009-01-01

    The biological relationship between suppression of RNA silencing and virus movement poses an intriguing question in virus-plant interactions. Here, we have used a local RNA silencing assay, based on a movement-deficient Turnip crinkle virus TCV/GFPΔCP, to investigate the influence of silencing suppression by three different viral suppressors: the TCV 38K coat protein (CP), the 126K protein of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and P19 of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) on cell-to-cell movement and l...

  1. Effect of local UV irradiation of generative nuclei of Paramecium caudatum on sexual functions of the cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The functions of micronucleus (MI) were studied in the period of the sexual process in Paramecium caudatum-infusoria the descendants of the cells, whose micronucleus was locally irradiated with UV rays at the dose of 3060 erg/mm2. It has been found that the descendants of the irradiated cells (the cells of UV clones) can be involved into the sexual process irrespoctive of the morphological type of their MI. Four out of forteen UV clones have changed the initial mating type for the opposite one. It is suggested that the change of the mating type is related to the changes of MI genome resulted from UV irradiation. The pathway of nuclear transformations in the course of sexual process was traced in cells of three UV clones. It has been found, that local UV irradiation of MI causes a number of deviations in the behaviour of MI derivatives in the metagamic part of the sexual process in the clones, whose MI have undergone substantial morphological changes. The exconjugants produced by crossing of UV clones with such changed MI and the normal test-clone were characterized by low viability

  2. VINDESINE WITH CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE-EPIRUBICIN-CISPLATIN IN THE TREATMENT LOCALLY ADVANCED NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yan-ping; KE Yu-hua; FU Xiao-yu

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the addition of vindesine to a cyclophosphamide-epirubicin-cisplatin (CAP) regimen for treating the patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: From May 1994to August 1998, 59 previously untreated patients with stage Ⅲa and Ⅲb non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled into this trial. Patients characteristics were the following: the median age was 52 years; the median performance status was 1; there were 19 stage Ⅲa and 40 stage Ⅲb; there were 47 adenocarcinoma, 10squamous cell carcinoma and 2 large cell carcinoma. All patients were treated with vindesine (2 mg/m2, on day 1and day 8), cyclophosphamide (0.6/m2, on day 1),epirubicin (40 mg/m2, on day 1) and cisplatin (60 mg/m2,on day 1) every 3 or 4 weeks. Results: Four achieved a complete response (6.8%), 29 achieved a partial response (49.2%), 15 had stable disease, and 10 had progressive disease. A clinical improvement was in 45 of 59 patients (76.3%). The most frequent major toxic effects were myelosuppression, nausea and vomiting.Conclusion: The vindesine with CAP regimen was active combination chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced NSCLC accompanied by the limited side effects.

  3. Truncated SSX protein suppresses synovial sarcoma cell proliferation by inhibiting the localization of SS18-SSX fusion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Yoneda

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is a relatively rare high-grade soft tissue sarcoma that often develops in the limbs of young people and induces the lung and the lymph node metastasis resulting in poor prognosis. In patients with synovial sarcoma, specific chromosomal translocation of t(X; 18 (p11.2;q11.2 is observed, and SS18-SSX fusion protein expressed by this translocation is reported to be associated with pathogenesis. However, role of the fusion protein in the pathogenesis of synovial sarcoma has not yet been completely clarified. In this study, we focused on the localization patterns of SS18-SSX fusion protein. We constructed expression plasmids coding for the full length SS18-SSX, the truncated SS18 moiety (tSS18 and the truncated SSX moiety (tSSX of SS18-SSX, tagged with fluorescent proteins. These plasmids were transfected in synovial sarcoma SYO-1 cells and we observed the expression of these proteins using a fluorescence microscope. The SS18-SSX fusion protein showed a characteristic speckle pattern in the nucleus. However, when SS18-SSX was co-expressed with tSSX, localization of SS18-SSX changed from speckle patterns to the diffused pattern similar to the localization pattern of tSSX and SSX. Furthermore, cell proliferation and colony formation of synovial sarcoma SYO-1 and YaFuSS cells were suppressed by exogenous tSSX expression. Our results suggest that the characteristic speckle localization pattern of SS18-SSX is strongly involved in the tumorigenesis through the SSX moiety of the SS18-SSX fusion protein. These findings could be applied to further understand the pathogenic mechanisms, and towards the development of molecular targeting approach for synovial sarcoma.

  4. Checkpoints Studies Using the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Analysis of changes in protein level and subcellular localization during cell cycle progression

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaorong; Liu, Lili; HUANG, Mingxia

    2011-01-01

    Methods are described here to monitor changes in protein level and subcellular localization during the cell cycle progression in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae. Cell synchronization is achieved by an α-factor mediated block-and-release protocol. Cells are collected at different time points for the first two cell cycles upon release. Cellular DNA contents are analyzed by flow cytometry. Trichloroacetic acid protein precipitates are prepared for monitoring levels of cell cycle regulated protei...

  5. Tomato spotted wilt virus glycoproteins exhibit trafficking and localization signals that are functional in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikkert, M.; Verschoor, A.; Kormelink, R.; Rottier, P.; Goldbach, R.

    2001-01-01

    The glycoprotein precursor (G1/G2) gene of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was expressed in BHK cells using the Semliki Forest virus expression system. The results reveal that in this cell system, the precursor is efficiently cleaved and the resulting G1 and G2 glycoproteins are transported from th

  6. Tcf7l2 localization of putative stem/progenitor cells in mouse conjunctiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yadan; Zhang, Xinchun; Xu, Siying; Li, Kang; Zhu, Feng; Li, Qian; Cai, Xianxian; Lu, Rong

    2016-08-01

    Conjunctival integrity and preservation is indispensable for vision. The self-renewing capacity of conjunctival cells controls conjunctival homeostasis and regeneration; however, the source of conjunctival self-renewal and the underlying mechanism is currently unclear. Here, we characterize the biochemical phenotype and proliferative potential of conjunctival epithelial cells in adult mouse by detecting proliferation-related signatures and conducting clonal analysis. Further, we show that transcription factor 7-like 2 (T-cell-specific transcription factor 4), a DNA binding protein expressed in multiple types of adult stem cells, is highly correlated with proliferative signatures in basal conjunctival epithelia. Clonal studies demonstrated that Transcription factor 7-like 2 (Tcf7l2) was coexpressed with p63α and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in propagative colonies. Furthermore, Tcf7l2 was actively transcribed concurrently with conjunctival epithelial proliferation in vitro. Collectively, we suggest that Tcf7l2 may be involved in maintenance of stem/progenitor cells properties of conjunctival epithelial stem/progenitor cells, and with the fornix as the optimal site to isolate highly proliferative conjunctival epithelial cells in adult mice. PMID:27281479

  7. BIM-EL localization: The key to understanding anoikis resistance in inflammatory breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Cassandra L; Schafer, Zachary T

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a highly metastatic and rare type of breast cancer, accounting for 2-6% of newly diagnosed breast cancer cases each year. The highly metastatic nature of IBC cells remains poorly understood. Here we describe our recent data regarding the ability of IBC cells to overcome anoikis. PMID:27308529

  8. BIM-EL localization: The key to understanding anoikis resistance in inflammatory breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Buchheit, Cassandra L.; Schafer, Zachary T.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a highly metastatic and rare type of breast cancer, accounting for 2–6% of newly diagnosed breast cancer cases each year. The highly metastatic nature of IBC cells remains poorly understood. Here we describe our recent data regarding the ability of IBC cells to overcome anoikis.

  9. Genetic and proteomic evidences support the localization of yeast enolase in the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Villar, Elena; Monteoliva, Lucía; Larsen, Martin Røssel;

    2006-01-01

    Although enolase, other glycolytic enzymes, and a variety of cytoplasmic proteins lacking an N-terminal secretion signal have been widely described as located at the cell surface in yeast and in mammalian cells, their presence in this external location is still controversial. Here, we report that...

  10. Pannexin2 oligomers localize into endosomal vesicles in mammalian cells while Pannexin1 channels traffic to the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eBoassa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pannexin2 (Panx2 is the largest of three members of the pannexin proteins. Pannexins are topologically related to connexins and innexins, but serve different functional roles than forming gap junctions. We previously showed that pannexins form oligomeric channels but unlike connexins and innexins, they form only single membrane channels. High levels of Panx2 mRNA and protein in the Central Nervous System (CNS have been documented. Whereas Pannexin1 (Panx1 is fairly ubiquitous and Pannexin3 (Panx3 is found in skin and connective tissue, both are fully glycosylated, traffic to the plasma membrane and have functions correlated with extracellular ATP release. Here, we describe trafficking and subcellular localizations of exogenous Panx2 and Panx1 protein expression in MDCK, HeLa and HEK293T cells as well as endogenous Panx1 and Panx2 patterns in the CNS. Panx2 was found in intracellular localizations, was partially N-glycosylated, and localizations were non-overlapping with Panx1. Confocal images of hippocampal sections immunolabeled for the astrocytic protein GFAP, Panx1 and Panx2 demonstrated that the two isoforms, Panx1 and Panx2, localized at different subcellular compartments in both astrocytes and neurons. Using recombinant fusions of Panx2 with appended genetic tags developed for correlated light and electron microscopy and then expressed in different cell lines, we determined that Panx2 is localized in the membrane of intracellular vesicles and not in the endoplasmic reticulum as initially indicated by calnexin colocalization experiments. Dual immunofluorescence imaging with protein markers for specific vesicle compartments showed that Panx2 vesicles are early endosomal in origin. In electron tomographic volumes, cross-sections of these vesicles displayed fine structural details and close proximity to actin filaments. Thus, pannexins expressed at different subcellular compartments likely exert distinct functional roles, particularly in the

  11. Light and electron microscopic localization of GABAA-receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes using immunohistochemical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Hösli, E; Belhage, B;

    1991-01-01

    light microscope level specific staining of GABAA-receptors was localized in various types of neurones in explant cultures of rat cerebellum using the indirect peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) technique, whereas no specific staining was found in astrocytes. At the electron microscope level labeling of...... GABAA-receptors was observed in the plasma membrane of both the cell bodies and processes in dissociated primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells using an indirect preembedding immunogold staining technique which in contrast to the classical PAP technique allows quantitative estimations to be...... performed. Quantification of the labeling intensity revealed a higher concentration of GABAA-receptors per microns plasma membrane in the cell bodies than in the processes. In discrete areas an extremely high density of the GABAA-receptors was observed. No specific labeling of GABAA-receptors was observed...

  12. Fluorescence imaging for bacterial cell biology: from localization to dynamics, from ensembles to single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhizhong; Carballido-López, Rut

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins and developments in superresolution (nanoscopy) and single-molecule techniques bring high sensitivity, speed, and one order of magnitude gain in spatial resolution to live-cell imaging. These technologies have only recently been applied to prokaryotic cell biology, revealing the exquisite subcellular organization of bacterial cells. Here, we review the parallel evolution of fluorescence microscopy methods and their application to bacteria, mainly drawing examples from visualizing actin-like MreB proteins in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We describe the basic principles of nanoscopy and conventional techniques and their advantages and limitations to help microbiologists choose the most suitable technique for their biological question. Looking ahead, multidimensional live-cell nanoscopy combined with computational image analysis tools, systems biology approaches, and mathematical modeling will provide movie-like, mechanistic, and quantitative description of molecular events in bacterial cells. PMID:25002084

  13. Custom-Built Optical Tweezers for Locally Probing the Viscoelastic Properties of Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavano, Federica; Bonin, Serena; Pinato, Giulietta; Stanta, Giorgio; Cojoc, Dan

    2011-07-01

    We report a home built optical tweezers setup to investigate the mechanism of the membrane tether formation from single cells in vitro. Using an optically trapped microbead as probe, we have determined the force-elongation curve during tether formation and extracted several parameters characterizing the viscoelastic behavior of the cell membrane: tether stiffness, force, and viscosity. Breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells have been studied in two different conditions, at room and physiological temperatures, showing a strong temperature dependence of the visoelastic properties of the cell membrane. To get detailed inside information about the tether formation mechanism we have extended the analysis of the force-elongation curves fitting them with a Kelvin model. These preliminary results are part of a larger project of whose goal is to compare the viscoelastic properties of several types of cancer cell lines, characterized by different aggressiveness and metastatic potential.

  14. Different concentrations of berberine result in distinct cellular localization patterns and cell cycle effects in a melanoma cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Serafim, Teresa; Oliveira, Paulo; Sardao, Vilma; Perkins, Ed; Parke, Donna; Holy, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Natural products represent a rich reservoir of potential small molecule inhibitors exhibiting antiproliferative and tumoricidal properties. An example is the isoquinoline alkaloid berberine, which is found in plants such as goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis). Studies have shown that berberine is able to trigger apoptosis in different malignant cell lines, and can also lead to cell cycle arrest at sub-apoptotic doses. A particularly interesting feature of berberine is the fact...

  15. Prediction of the local power factor in BWR fuel cells by means of a multilayer neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To the beginning of a new operation cycle in a BWR reactor the reactivity of this it increases by means of the introduction of fresh fuel, the one denominated reload fuel. The problem of the definition of the characteristics of this reload fuel represents a combinatory optimization problem that requires significantly a great quantity of CPU time for their determination. This situation has motivated to study the possibility to substitute the Helios code, the one which is used to generate the new cells of the reload fuel parameters, by an artificial neuronal network, with the purpose of predicting the parameters of the fuel reload cell of a BWR reactor. In this work the results of the one training of a multilayer neuronal net that can predict the local power factor (LPPF) in such fuel cells are presented. The prediction of the LPPF is carried out in those condition of beginning of the life of the cell (0.0 MWD/T, to 40% of holes in the one moderator, temperature of 793 K in the fuel and a moderator temperature of 560 K. The cells considered in the present study consist of an arrangement of 10x10 bars, of those which 92 contains U235, some of these bars also contain a concentration of Gd2O3 and 8 of them contain only water. The axial location inside the one assembles of recharge of these cells it is exactly up of the cells that contain natural uranium in the base of the reactor core. The training of the neuronal net is carried out by means of a retro-propagation algorithm that uses a space of training formed starting from previous evaluations of cells by means of the Helios code. They are also presented the results of the application of the neuronal net found for the prediction of the LPPF of some cells used in the real operation of the Unit One of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power station. (Author)

  16. Local variations of HER2 dimerization in breast cancer cells discovered by correlative fluorescence and liquid electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckys, Diana B; Korf, Ulrike; de Jonge, Niels

    2015-07-01

    The formation of HER2 homodimers plays an important role in breast cancer aggressiveness and progression; however, little is known about its localization. We have studied the intra- and intercellular variation of HER2 at the single-molecule level in intact SKBR3 breast cancer cells. Whole cells were visualized in hydrated state with correlative fluorescence microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The locations of individual HER2 receptors were detected using an anti-HER2 affibody in combination with a quantum dot (QD), a fluorescent nanoparticle. Fluorescence microscopy revealed considerable differences of HER2 membrane expression between individual cells and between different membrane regions of the same cell (that is, membrane ruffles and flat areas). Subsequent ESEM of the corresponding cellular regions provided images of individually labeled HER2 receptors. The high spatial resolution of 3 nm and the close proximity between the QD and the receptor allowed quantifying the stoichiometry of HER2 complexes, distinguishing between monomers, dimers, and higher-order clusters. Downstream data analysis based on calculating the pair correlation function from receptor positions showed that cellular regions exhibiting membrane ruffles contained a substantial fraction of HER2 in homodimeric state. Larger-order clusters were also present. Membrane areas with homogeneous membrane topography, on the contrary, displayed HER2 in random distribution. Second, HER2 homodimers appeared to be absent from a small subpopulation of cells exhibiting a flat membrane topography, possibly resting cells. Local differences in homodimer presence may point toward functional differences with possible relevance for studying metastasis and drug response. PMID:26601217

  17. Improved Efficiency of Silicon Nanoholes/Gold Nanoparticles/Organic Hybrid Solar Cells via Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ronghua; Xu, Ling; Ge, Zhaoyun; Li, Rui; Xu, Jun; Yu, Linwei; Chen, Kunji

    2016-03-01

    Silicon is the most widely used material for solar cells due to its abundance, non-toxicity, reliability, and mature fabrication process. In this paper, we fabricated silicon nanoholes (SiNHS)/gold nanoparticles (AuNPS)/organic hybrid solar cells and investigated their spectral and opto-electron conversion properties. SiNHS nanocomposite films were fabricated by metal-assisted electroless etching (EE) method. Then, we modified the surface of the nanocomposite films by exposing the samples in the air. After that, polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly (styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) blended with AuNPS were spin-coated on the surface of the SiNHS nanocomposite films as a hole-transporting layer. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) values of the solar cells with AuNPS are higher than that of the samples without AuNPS in the spectral region of 600-1000 nm, which were essential to achieve high performance photovoltaic cells. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the solar cells incorporating AuNPS exhibited an enhancement of 27 %, compared with that of the solar cells without AuNPS. We thought that the improved efficiency were attributed to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) triggered by gold nanoparticles in SiNHS nanocomposite films.

  18. Localization of tritiated vitamin A in lymph nodes of the mouse: an autoradiographic study of vitamin A-storing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Localization of tritiated vitamin A in lymph nodes of the mouse was investigated by the use of light- and electron-microscopic autoradiography. Young male mice were fed a diet containing 3H-vitamin A acetate for a week. Lymph nodes were removed and prepared for autoradiography. Lipid droplets in fibroblast-like cells showed high concentrations of radioactivity. These cells were distributed around lymphatic sinuses and blood vessels. The cells can, therefore, be classified as ''vitamin A-storing cells'' according to criteria proposed earlier by Yamada and Hirosawa (1976). Control animals from the same litter were maintained on ordinary laboratory food for the same period and examined by electron microscopy. Lipid-droplet-containing cells were found in the same areas as in the experimental animals but in fewer numbers. This suggests that the increased number of vitamin A-containing lipid droplets is due to hypervitaminosis A in the experimental animals. The presence of some cells containing these droplets in the control animals would imply that even under normal feeding conditions the animals ingested excess amounts of vitamin A, which was retained in lipid droplets. The stored vitamin A probably participates in metabolic processes such as the formation of glycoproteins in ground substance

  19. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddback, Ida E M; Pedersen, Line M I; Pedersen, Sara R; Steffensen, Maria A; Holst, Peter J; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu nucleoprotein have previously been found to induce short-term protection in mice. In this study we confirm that systemic (subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization rapidly induced heterosubtypic protection predominantly mediated by CD8 T cells, but within three months clinical protection completely disappeared. Local (intranasal (i.n.)) immunization elicited delayed, but more lasting protection despite relatively inefficient immunization. However, by far, the most robust protection was induced by simultaneous, combined (i.n. + s.c.) vaccination, and, notably, in this case clinical protection lasted at least 8 months without showing any evidence of fading. Interestingly, the superior ability of the latter group to resist reinfection correlated with a higher number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in the spleen. Thus, detailed analysis of the underlying CD8 T cell responses highlights the importance of T cells already positioned in the lungs prior to challenge, but at the same time underscores an important back-up role for circulating antigen-specific cells with the capacity to expand and infiltrate the infected lungs. PMID:26831578

  20. Subcellular localization of cadmium in the root cells of Allium cepa by electron energy loss spectroscopy and cytochemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Donghua Liu; Ingrid Kottke

    2004-09-01

    The ultrastructural investigation of the root cells of Allium cepa L. exposed to 1 mM and 10 mM cadmium (Cd) for 48 and 72 h was carried out. The results indicated that Cd induced several obvious ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolation, condensed cytoplasm with increased density of the matrix, reduction of mitochondrial cristae, severe plasmolysis and highly condensed nuclear chromatin. Electron dense granules appeared between the cell wall and plasmalemma. In vacuoles, electron dense granules encircled by the membrane were aggregated and formed into larger precipitates, which increase in number and volume as a consequence of excessive Cd exposure. Data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) confirmed that these granules contained Cd and showed that significantly higher level of Cd in vacuoles existed in the vacuolar precipitates of meristematic or cortical parenchyma cells of the differentiating and mature roots treated with 1 mM and 10 mM Cd. High levels of Cd were also observed in the crowded electron dense granules of nucleoli. However, no Cd was found in cell walls or in cells of the vascular cylinder. A positive Gomori-Swift reaction showed that small metallic silver grains were abundantly localized in the vesicles, which were distributed in the cytoplasm along the cell wall.

  1. Localized secretion of ATP and opioids revealed through single Ca2+ channel modulation in bovine chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabelli, V; Carra, I; Carbone, E

    1998-06-01

    In bovine chromaffin cells, the Ca2+ channels involved in exocytosis are effectively inhibited by ATP and opioids that are coreleased with catecholamines during cell activity. This autocrine loop causes a delay in Ca2+ channel activation that is quickly removed by preceding depolarizations. Changes in Ca2+ channel gating by secreted products thus make it possible to correlate Ca2+ channel activity to secretory events. Here, using cell-attached patch recordings, we found a remarkable correlation between delayed Ca2+ channel openings and neurotransmitter secretion induced by either local or whole-cell Ba2+ stimulation. The action is specific for N- and P/Q-type channels and largely prevented by PTX and mixtures of purinergic and opioid receptor antagonists. Overall, our data provide evidence that exocytosis, viewed through the autocrine inhibition of non-L-type channels, is detectable in membrane patches of approximately 1 microm2 distributed over 30%-40% of the total cell surface, while Ca2+ channels and autoreceptors are uniformly distributed over most of the cell membrane. PMID:9655512

  2. Expression and localization of prohormone convertase PC1 in the calcitonin-producing cells of the bullfrog ultimobranchial gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Yuichi; Suzuki, Masakazu; Tomura, Hideaki; Kurabuchi, Shingo; Sasayama, Yuichi; Tanaka, Shigeyasu

    2003-11-01

    We examined the expression and localization of the prohormone convertases, PC1 and PC2, in the ultimobranchial gland of the adult bullfrog using immunohistochemical (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) techniques. In the ultimobranchial gland, PC1-immunoreactive cells were columnar, and were present in the follicular epithelium. When serial sections were immunostained with anti-calcitonin, anti-CGRP, anti-PC1, and anti-PC2 sera, PC1 was found only in the calcitonin/CGRP-producing cells. No PC2-immunopositive cells were detected. In the ISH, PC1 mRNA-positive cells were detected in the follicle cells in the ultimobranchial gland. No PC2 mRNA-positive cells were detected. RT-PCR revealed expression of the mRNAs of PC1 and the PC2 in the ultimobranchial gland. However, very little of the PC2 mRNA is probably translated because no PC2 protein was detected either by IHC staining or by Western blotting analysis. We conclude that the main prohormone convertase that is involved in the proteolytic cleavage of procalcitonin in the bullfrog is PC1. PMID:14566018

  3. Climatology of the relationship of cusp-related density anomaly with zonal wind and large-scale FAC based on CHAMP observations: IMF By and solar cycle dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervalishvili, Guram; Lühr, Hermann

    2014-05-01

    We present climatology of the relationship of cusp-related density enhancement with the neutral zonal wind velocity, large-scale field-aligned current (FAC), small-scale FAC, and electron temperature using the superposed epoch analysis (SEA) method. The dependence of these variables on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By component orientation and solar cycle are of particular interest. In addition, the obtained results of relative density enhancement (ρrel), zonal wind, electron temperature and FAC are subdivided into three local seasons of 130 days each: local winter (1 January ±65 days), combined equinoxes (1 April ±32 days and 1 October ±32 days), and local summer (1 July ±65 days). Our investigation is based on CHAMP satellite observations and NASA/GSFC's OMNI online data set for solar maximum (Mar/2002-2007) and minimum (Mar/2004-2009) conditions in the Northern Hemisphere. The SEA technique uses the time and location of the thermospheric mass density anomaly peaks as reference parameters. The relative amplitude of cusp-related density enhancement does on average not depend on the IMF By orientation, solar cycle phase, and local season. Also, it is apparent that the IMF By amplitude does not have a big influence on the relative amplitude of the density anomaly. Conversely, there exists a good correlation between ρrel and the negative amplitude of IMF Bz prevailing about half an hour earlier. In the cusp region, both large-scale FAC distribution and thermospheric zonal wind velocity exhibit a clear dependence on the IMF By orientation. In the case of positive (negative) IMF By there is a systematic imbalance between downward (upward) and upward (downward) FACs peaks equatorward and poleward of the reference point, respectively. The zonal wind velocity is directed towards west i.e. towards dawn in a geomagnetic latitude-magnetic local time (MLat-MLT) frame. This is true for all local seasons and solar conditions. The thermospheric density

  4. ABCG2 Localizes to the Nucleus and Modulates CDH1 Expression in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ching Liang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer resistance protein [BCRP/ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2] is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family. The presence of ABCG2 on the plasma membrane in many kinds of human cancer cells contributes to multidrug resistance during chemotherapy, and it has been used as the side population marker for identifying cancer stem cells in lung cancers. We report here that, in addition to the membranous form, ABCG2 proteins are also found inside the nucleus, where they bind to the E-box of CDH1 (E-cadherin promoter and regulate transcription of this gene. Increased expression of ABCG2 causes an increase of E-cadherin and attenuates cell migration, whereas knockdown of ABCG2 downregulates E-cadherin and enhances cell motility. In mice, xenografted A549 cells that have less ABCG2 are more likely to metastasize from the subcutaneous inoculation site to the internal organs. However, for the cancer cells that have already entered the blood circulation, an increased level of ABCG2, and correspondingly increased E-cadherin, may facilitate circulating cancer cells to colonize at a distant site and form a metastatic tumor. We propose a novel role for nuclear ABCG2 that functions as a transcription regulator and participates in modulation of cancer metastasis.

  5. Pre-treatment number of clonogenic cells and their radiosensitivity are major determinants of local tumour control after fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The response of tumours to fractionated radiotherapy is determined by many factors including repopulation, reoxygenation, the number of clonogenic cells, and their intrinsic radiosensitivity. However, after single radiation doses given under conditions of clamp hypoxia, the dose to control a tumour locally is dependent only on the number of clonogenic cells and their cellular radiosensitivity. Therefore, these parameters were investigated using local control after single doses given under hypoxia, to predict the outcome of fractionated irradiation. Materials and methods: Ten hSCC cell lines (FaDu, UT-SCC-15, UT-SCC-14, XF354, UT-SCC-5, UT-SCC-45, SAS, CAL-33, UT-SCC-8, and HSC-4) were transplanted subcutaneously into the right hind-leg of NMRI nude mice. At 7 mm in diameter, tumours were irradiated either with graded single doses under clamp blood flow conditions (n = 873) or with 30 graded fractions within 6 weeks (n = 905) under ambient conditions. Local tumour control was determined 120 days after irradiation. Radiation response was quantified in terms of TCD50, i.e. the dose required to control 50% of tumours locally. Results: Ten tumour lines investigated showed a pronounced heterogeneity in both TCD50(30fx/6w) after fractionated irradiation and TCD50(SDclamp) after single dose irradiation. TCD50(30fx/6w) varied between 45 Gy for UT-SCC-45 and 127 Gy for SAS; TCD50(SDclamp) varied between 42 Gy for UT-SCC-14 and 66 Gy for CAL-33. Two tumours were excluded from further analysis due to immunogenicity or non-defined TCD50. Linear regression analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between TCD50(SDclamp) and TCD50(30fx/6w) (R 2 = 0.82, p = 0.002). Conclusions: Significant association between TCD50(SDclamp) and TCD50(30fx/6w) suggests that the pre-treatment number of clonogenic tumour cells and their cellular radiosensitivity have a major impact on local control after fractionated radiotherapy

  6. Proof of concept for inhibiting metastasis: circulating tumor cell-triggered localized release of anticancer agent via a structure-switching aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nandi; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Qing; Jian, Lixin; Shi, Hui; Qin, Shiya; Wang, Kemin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Wenjing

    2016-05-21

    Existing drug delivery systems were not suitable for killing cells in the circulatory system specifically. Herein, we developed a novel localized drug delivery strategy, in which the release of anticancer agents was specifically triggered by circulating tumor cells. Meanwhile, damage to non-target cells was avoided. PMID:27121864

  7. Weak mitochondrial targeting sequence determines tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase in liver and brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gideon D; Gur, Noa; Koopman, Werner J H; Pines, Ophry; Vardimon, Lily

    2010-02-01

    Evolution of the uricotelic system for ammonia detoxification required a mechanism for tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase (GS). In uricotelic vertebrates, GS is mitochondrial in liver cells and cytoplasmic in brain. Because these species contain a single copy of the GS gene, it is not clear how tissue-specific subcellular localization is achieved. Here we show that in chicken, which utilizes the uricotelic system, the GS transcripts of liver and brain cells are identical and, consistently, there is no difference in the amino acid sequence of the protein. The N-terminus of GS, which constitutes a 'weak' mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS), is sufficient to direct a chimeric protein to the mitochondria in hepatocytes and to the cytoplasm in astrocytes. Considering that a weak MTS is dependent on a highly negative mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi) for import, we examined the magnitude of DeltaPsi in hepatocytes and astrocytes. Our results unexpectedly revealed that DeltaPsi in hepatocytes is considerably more negative than that of astrocytes and that converting the targeting signal into 'strong' MTS abolished the capability to confer tissue-specific subcellular localization. We suggest that evolutional selection of weak MTS provided a tool for differential targeting of an identical protein by taking advantage of tissue-specific differences in DeltaPsi. PMID:20053634

  8. Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Coupled with Nuclear Localization Signal Peptide for Cell-Nucleus Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G; Chin, Y. Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2008-01-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe3O4 nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear locali...

  9. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    OpenAIRE

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; LÜTZ-MEINDL, URSULA

    2012-01-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essent...

  10. Distinctive localization of antigen-presenting cells in human lymph nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Angel, Catherine E.; Chen, Chun-Jen J.; Horlacher, Oliver C.; Winkler, Sintia; John, Thomas; Browning, Judy; MacGregor, Duncan; Cebon, Jonathan; Dunbar, P. Rod

    2009-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are sentinel cells of the immune system that present antigen to T lymphocytes and mediate an appropriate immune response. It is therefore surprising that knowledge of the professional APCs in human lymph nodes is limited. Using 3-color immunohistochemistry, we have identified APCs in human lymph nodes, excluding plasmacytoid APCs, that fall into 2 nonoverlapping classes: (1) CD209+ APCs, coexpressing combinations of CD206, CD14, and CD68, that occu...

  11. Immunohistochemical localization of granzyme B antigen in cytotoxic cells in human tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Hameed, A.; Truong, L D; Price, V; Kruhenbuhl, O.; Tschopp, J

    1991-01-01

    Human granzyme B antigen is expressed in cytoplasmic granules of activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Recombinant granzyme B was generated using a prokaryotic expression vector under the control of T7 transcription and translation signals. The 25-kd recombinant protein (granzyme B) was used to develop a rabbit polyclonal antiserum. Purified anti-granzyme B antibodies were used to detect the antigen expression in cytotoxic cells in human tissues. Using the avidin-biotin-...

  12. The subcellular localization of IGFBP5 affects its cell growth and migration functions in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sahin Aysegul; Hu Limei; Akkiprik Mustafa; Hao Xishan; Zhang Wei

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 (IGFBP5) has been shown to be associated with breast cancer metastasis in clinical marker studies. However, a major difficulty in understanding how IGFBP5 functions in this capacity is the paradoxical observation that ectopic overexpression of IGFBP5 in breast cancer cell lines results in suppressed cellular proliferation. In cancer tissues, IGFBP5 resides mainly in the cytoplasm; however, in transfected cells, IGFBP5 is mainly ...

  13. Local immunosuppressive microenvironment enhances migration of melanoma cells to lungs in DJ-1 knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Chien

    Full Text Available DJ-1 is an oncoprotein that promotes survival of cancer cells through anti-apoptosis. However, DJ-1 also plays a role in regulating IL-1β expression, and whether inflammatory microenvironment built by dysregulated DJ-1 affects cancer progression is still unclear. This study thus aimed to compare the metastatic abilities of melanoma cells in wild-type (WT and DJ-1 knockout (KO mice, and to check whether inflammatory microenvironment built in DJ-1 KO mice plays a role in migration of cancer cells to lungs. First, B16F10 melanoma cells (at 6 × 10(4 were injected into the femoral vein of mice, and formation of lung nodules, levels of lung IL-1β and serum cytokines, and accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs were compared between WT and DJ-1 KO mice. Second, the cancer-bearing mice were treated with an interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β neutralizing antibody to see whether IL-1β is involved in the cancer migration. Finally, cultured RAW 264.7 macrophage and B16F10 melanoma cells were respectively treated with DJ-1 shRNA and recombinant IL-1β to explore underlying molecular mechanisms. Our results showed that IL-1β enhanced survival and colony formation of cultured melanoma cells, and that IL-1β levels were elevated both in DJ-1 KO mice and in cultured macrophage cells with DJ-1 knockdown. The elevated IL-1β correlated with higher accumulation of immunosuppressive MDSCs and formation of melanoma module in the lung of DJ-1 KO mice, and both can be decreased by treating mice with IL-1β neutralizing antibodies. Taken together, these results indicate that immunosuppressive tissue microenvironment built in DJ-1 KO mice can enhance lung migration of cancer, and IL-1β plays an important role in promoting the cancer migration.

  14. Strategies of dose escalation in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: image guidance and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eChi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiation dose in the setting of chemo-radiation for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has been historically limited by the risk of normal tissue toxicity and this has been hypothesized to correlate with the poor results in regard to local tumor recurrences. Dose escalation, as a means to improve local control, with concurrent chemotherapy has been shown to be feasible with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in early phase studies with good clinical outcome. However, the potential superiority of moderate dose escalation to 74 Gy has not been shown in phase III randomized studies. In this review, the limitations in target volume definition in previous studies; and the factors that may be critical to safe dose escalation in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC, such as respiratory motion management, image guidance, intensity modulation, FDG-PET incorporation in the treatment planning process, and adaptive radiotherapy, are discussed. These factors, along with novel treatment approaches that have emerged in recent years, are proposed to warrant further investigation in future trials in a more comprehensive and integrated fashion.

  15. Limited-stage small cell lung cancer. Local failure after concurrent chemoradiotherapy with use of accelerated hyperfractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to update data of radiation therapy regimens for improvement in local control in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer, a retrospective study was conducted. Results of early concurrent chemoradiotherapy with accelerated hyperfractionation in 30 patients between 1998 and 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. The prescribed dose was 45 Gy in 30 fractions in all patients. All patients received a full dose of radiation therapy; however, interruptions for ≥5 days, mainly due to hematologic toxicity, were required in 18 patients (60%). The 5-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate and the median survival time were 26% and 26 months, respectively. The 4-year in-field control rate was 56%. Sites of relapse were local relapse in 9 patients (6 for in-field relapse, 3 for marginal relapse) and distant metastases in 16 patients (11 for distant metastases only, 5 for distant metastases with local relapse). The sites of marginal relapse were the upper margin in two patients and the peripheral margin in one patient. Grade 3 radiation esophagitis was observed in only three patients. Because in-field control was insufficient, a more effective approach should be sought to provide better local control. (author)

  16. Apoptotic Cell Localization in Preantral and Antral Follicles in Relation to Non-cyclic and Cyclic Gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoophitphong, D; Srisuwatanasagul, S; Koonjaenak, S; Tummaruk, P

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine apoptotic cell localization in preantral and antral follicles of porcine ovaries. Additionally, the proportion of cells undergoing apoptosis was also compared between delayed puberty gilts and normal cyclic gilts. Ovarian tissues were obtained from 34 culled gilts with age and weight of 270.1 ± 3.9 days and 143.8 ± 2.4 kg, respectively. The gilts were classified according to their ovarian appearance as 'non-cyclic' (n = 7) and 'cyclic' (n = 27) gilts. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay was used to determine apoptotic cell expression in different compartments of the ovarian tissue sections. All apparent preantral (n = 110) and antral (n = 262) follicles were evaluated using image analysis software. It was found that apoptotic cells were expressed in both granulosa (22.2%) and theca cell layers (21.3%) of the follicles in the porcine ovaries. The proportion of apoptotic cells in the granulosa layer in the follicles was positively correlated with that in the theca layer (r = 0.90, p  0.05) or theca cell layers (28.6% and 26.5%, p > 0.05). The proportion of apoptotic cells in non-cyclic gilts was higher than cyclic gilts in both granulosa (31.7% and 22.6%, p development/function and also that apoptosis was significantly associated with anoestrus or delayed puberty in gilts, commonly observed in tropical climates. PMID:27080320

  17. Methods of Cell Propulsion through the Local Stroma in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry J. Davies

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the normal breast, cellular structures change cyclically in response to ovarian hormones. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and differentiation are integral processes that are precisely regulated. Normal epithelial cells depend on the formation of intercellular adhesion contacts to form a continuous sheet of stratifying cell layers that are attached to one and other horizontally and vertically. Cells migrate by extending membrane protrusions to explore the extracellular space locating their targets in a chemotactic manner. The formation of cell protrusions is driven by the assembly of actin filaments at the leading edge. Reorganisation is regulated by a highly integrated signalling cascade that transduces extracellular stimuli to the actin filaments. This signalling cascade is governed by GTPases which act as molecular switches leading to actin polymerisation and the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia. This process is linked to downstream molecules known collectively as WASP proteins, which, in the presence of cortactin, form a complex leading to nucleation and formation of branched filaments. In breast cancer, the cortactin is over expressed leading to increased cellular motility and invasiveness. This hugely complex and integrated signalling cascade transduces extracellular stimuli. There are multiple genes related to cell motility which are dysregulated in human breast cancers.

  18. Local anesthetics inhibit kinesin motility and microtentacle protrusions in human epithelial and breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jennifer R; Whipple, Rebecca A; Balzer, Eric M; Cho, Edward H; Matrone, Michael A; Peckham, Michelle; Martin, Stuart S

    2011-10-01

    Detached breast tumor cells produce dynamic microtubule protrusions that promote reattachment of cells and are termed tubulin microtentacles (McTNs) due to their mechanistic distinctions from actin-based filopodia/invadopodia and tubulin-based cilia. McTNs are enriched with vimentin and detyrosinated α-tubulin, (Glu-tubulin). Evidence suggests that vimentin and Glu-tubulin are cross-linked by kinesin motor proteins. Using known kinesin inhibitors, Lidocaine and Tetracaine, the roles of kinesins in McTN formation and function were tested. Live-cell McTN counts, adhesion assays, immunofluorescence, and video microscopy were performed to visualize inhibitor effects on McTNs. Viability and apoptosis assays were used to confirm the non-toxicity of the inhibitors. Treatments of human non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial and breast tumor cells with Lidocaine or Tetracaine caused rapid collapse of vimentin filaments. Live-cell video microscopy demonstrated that Tetracaine reduces motility of intracellular GFP-kinesin and causes centripetal collapse of McTNs. Treatment with Tetracaine inhibited the extension of McTNs and their ability to promote tumor cell aggregation and reattachment. Lidocaine showed similar effects but to a lesser degree. Our current data support a model in which the inhibition of kinesin motor proteins by Tetracaine leads to the reductions in McTNs, and provides a novel mechanism for the ability of this anesthetic to decrease metastatic progression. PMID:21069453

  19. A Model for Cell Wall Dissolution in Mating Yeast Cells: Polarized Secretion and Restricted Diffusion of Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Induces Local Dissolution

    OpenAIRE

    Huberman, Lori B.; Murray, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell...

  20. Risk factors associated with fatal pulmonary hemorrhage in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with fatal pulmonary hemorrhage (PH) in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), treated with chemoradiotherapy. The medical records of 583 patients with locally advanced NSCLC, who were treated with chemoradiotherapy between July 1992 and December 2009 were reviewed. Fatal PH was defined as PH leading to death within 24 h of its onset. Tumor cavitation size was defined by the cavitation diameter/tumor diameter ratio and was classified as minimum (< 0.25), minor (≥ 0.25, but < 0.5), and major (≥ 0.5). Of the 583 patients, 2.1% suffered a fatal PH. The numbers of patients with minimum, minor, and major cavitations were 13, 11, and 14, respectively. Among the 38 patients with tumor cavitation, all 3 patients who developed fatal PH had major cavitations. On multivariate analysis, the presence of baseline major cavitation (odds ratio, 17.878), and a squamous cell histology (odds ratio, 5.491) proved to be independent significant risk factors for fatal PH. Interestingly, all patients with fatal PH and baseline major cavitation were found to have tumors with squamous cell histology, and the occurrence of fatal PH in patients having both risk factors was 33.3%. Patients at high risk of fatal PH could be identified using a combination of independent risk factors

  1. Conversion of alkylacetylglycerol to platelet-activating factor in HL-60 cells and subcellular localization of the mediator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cell line was used to investigate the conversion of 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (alkylacetyl-G) to platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) by intact cells and in subcellular fractions in order to examine the fate of PAF synthesized de novo. Lipid extracts obtained from undifferentiated HL-60 cells incubated with [3H]alkylacetyl-G contained 2-4% of the label as [3H]PAF; several related metabolites were also detected. The yield of [3H]PAF could be dramatically increased by pretreating the cells with either oleic acid, an activator of CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, or phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, an inhibitor of PAF acetylhydrolase. These results, together with a kinetic study of [3H]alkylacetyl-G metabolism, indicate the sequential participation of a cholinephosphotransferase for the conversion of [3H]-alkylacetyl-G to PAF and acetylhydrolase and transacylase activities in the remodeling pathway that metabolize the newly formed [3H]PAF to 1-[3H]alkyl-2-acyl(long chain)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. The dithiothreitol-insensitive cholinephosphotransferase activity capable of converting alkylacetyl-G to PAF was localized in subcellular fractions that contain CDP-choline:1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol cholinephosphotransferase (dithiothreitol-sensitive), as well as marker enzyme activities for the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes. Subcellular localization analyses also indicated that the majority of newly formed [3H]PAF and a large portion of its deacetylated metabolite were associated with the plasma membrane-containing fractions, whereas most of the 1-[3H]alkyl-2-acyl(long chain)-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine was present in the intracellular organelles. Incubations of HL-60 cells with exogenous [3H]PAF produced a similar subcellular distribution of metabolites

  2. Aluminum-induced gene expression and protein localization of a cell wall-associated receptor kinase in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Ezaki, Bunichi; He, Zheng-Hui; Tong, Hongyun; Osawa, Hiroki; Baluska, Frantisek; Volkmann, Dieter; Matsumoto, Hideaki

    2003-08-01

    Here, we report the aluminum (Al)-induced organ-specific expression of a WAK1 (cell wall-associated receptor kinase 1) gene and cell type-specific localization of WAK proteins in Arabidopsis. WAK1-specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed an Al-induced WAK1 gene expression in roots. Short- and long-term analysis of gene expression in root fractions showed a typical "on" and "off" pattern with a first peak at 3 h of Al exposure followed by a sharp decline at 6 h and a complete disappearance after 9 h of Al exposure, suggesting the WAK1 is a further representative of Al-induced early genes. In shoots, upon root Al exposure, an increased but stable WAK1 expression was observed. Using confocal microscopy, we visualized Al-induced closure of leaf stomata, consistent with previous suggestions that the Al stress primarily experienced in roots associated with the transfer of root-shoot signals. Elevated levels of WAK protein in root cells were observed through western blots after 6 h of Al exposure, indicating a lag time between the Al-induced WAK transcription and translation. WAK proteins are localized abundantly to peripheries of cortex cells within the elongation zone of the root apex. In these root cells, disintegration of cortical microtubules was observed after Al treatment but not after the Al analog lanthanum treatments. Tip-growing control root hairs, stem stomata, and leaf stomatal pores are characterized with high amounts of WAKs, suggesting WAKs are accumulating at plasma membrane domains, which suffer from mechanical stress and lack dense arrays of supporting cortical microtubules. Further, transgenic plants overexpressing WAK1 showed an enhanced Al tolerance in terms of root growth when compared with the wild-type plants, making the WAK1 one of the important candidates for plant defense against Al toxicity. PMID:12913180

  3. Mast cells facilitate local VEGF release as an early event in the pathogenesis of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Ronan A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Peritoneal injury sustained at laparotomy may evoke local inflammatory responses that result in adhesion formation. Peritoneal mast cells are likely to initiate this process, whereas vascular permeability\\/endothelial growth factor (VEGF) may facilitate the degree to which subsequent adhesion formation occurs. METHODS: Mast cell deficient mice (WBB6F1-\\/-), along with their mast cell sufficient counterparts (WBB6F1+\\/+), underwent a standardized adhesion-inducing operation (AIS) with subsequent sacrifice and adhesion assessment 14 days later in a blinded fashion. Additional CD-1 and WBB6F1+\\/+, and WBB6F1-\\/- mice were killed 2, 6, 12, and 24 hours after operation for measurement of VEGF by ELISA in systemic serum and peritoneal lavage fluid. Two further groups of CD-1 mice underwent AIS and received either a single perioperative dose of anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (10 mug\\/mouse) or a similar volume of IgG isotypic antibody and adhesion formation 2 weeks later was evaluated. RESULTS: WBB6F1-\\/- mice had less adhesions then did their WBB6F1+\\/+ counterparts (median [interquartile range] adhesion score 3[3-3] vs 1.5[1-2] respectively; P < .003). Local VEGF release peaked 6 hours after AIS in both WBB6F1+\\/+ and CD-1 mice whereas levels remained at baseline in WBB6F1-\\/- mice. CD-1 mice treated with a single dose of anti-VEGF therapy during operation had less adhesions than controls (2[1.25-2] vs 3[2.25-3], P = .0002). CONCLUSIONS: Mast cells and VEGF are central to the formation of postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions with mast cells being responsible, either directly or indirectly, for VEGF release into the peritoneal cavity after operation. In tandem with the recent clinical success of anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies in oncologic practice, our observations suggest an intriguing avenue for research and development of anti-adhesion strategy.

  4. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions and Assessment of Subcellular Localization in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Evan P S; Owens, Jake L; Hockerman, Gregory H; Hu, Chang-Deng

    2016-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is a fluorescence imaging technique used to visualize protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in live cells and animals. One unique application of BiFC is to reveal subcellular localization of PPIs. The superior signal-to-noise ratio of BiFC in comparison with fluorescence resonance energy transfer or bioluminescence resonance energy transfer enables its wide applications. Here, we describe how confocal microscopy can be used to detect and quantify PPIs and their subcellular localization. We use basic leucine zipper transcription factor proteins as an example to provide a step-by-step BiFC protocol using a Nikon A1 confocal microscope and NIS-Elements imaging software. The protocol given below can be readily adapted for use with other confocal microscopes or imaging software. PMID:27515079

  5. PKM2 uses control of HuR localization to regulate p27 and cell cycle progression in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Joydeep; Ohba, Shigeo; See, Wendy L; Phillips, Joanna J; Molinaro, Annette M; Pieper, Russell O

    2016-07-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PK) is upregulated in most cancers including glioblastoma. Although PKM2 has been reported to use dual kinase activities to regulate cell growth, it also interacts with phosphotyrosine (pY)-containing peptides independently of its kinase activity. The potential for PKM2 to use the binding of pY-containing proteins to control tumor growth has not been fully examined. We here describe a novel mechanism by which PKM2 interacts in the nucleus with the RNA binding protein HuR to regulate HuR sub-cellular localization, p27 levels, cell cycle progression and glioma cell growth. Suppression of PKM2 in U87, T98G and LN319 glioma cells resulted in increased p27 levels, defects in entry into mitosis, increased centrosome number, and decreased cell growth. These effects could be reversed by shRNA targeting p27. The increased levels of p27 in PKM2 knock-down cells were caused by a loss of the nuclear interaction between PKM2 and HuR, and a subsequent cytoplasmic re-distribution of HuR, which in turn led to increased cap-independent p27 mRNA translation. Consistent with these results, the alterations in p27 mRNA translation, cell cycle progression and cell growth caused by PKM2 suppression could be reversed in vitro and in vivo by suppression of HuR or p27 levels, or by introduction of forms of PKM2 that could bind pY, regardless of their kinase activity. These results define a novel mechanism by which PKM2 regulates glioma cell growth, and also define a novel set of potential therapeutic targets along the PKM2-HuR-p27 pathway. PMID:26874904

  6. Th2-Associated Alternative Kupffer Cell Activation Promotes Liver Fibrosis without Inducing Local Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana López-Navarrete, Espiridión Ramos-Martínez, Karina Suárez-Álvarez, Jesús Aguirre-García, Yadira Ledezma-Soto, Sonia León-Cabrera, Marco Gudiño-Zayas, Carolina Guzmán, Gabriela Gutiérrez-Reyes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirrhosis is the final outcome of liver fibrosis. Kupffer cell-mediated hepatic inflammation is considered to aggravate liver injury and fibrosis. Alternatively-activated macrophages are able to control chronic inflammatory events and trigger wound healing processes. Nevertheless, the role of alternative Kupffer cell activation in liver harm is largely unclear. Thus, we evaluated the participation of alternatively-activated Kupffer cells during liver inflammation and fibrosis in the murine model of carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic damage. To stimulate alternative activation in Kupffer cells, 20 Taenia crassiceps (Tc larvae were inoculated into BALBc/AnN female mice. Six weeks post-inoculation, carbon tetrachloride or olive oil were orally administered to Tc-inoculated and non-inoculated mice twice per week during other six weeks. The initial exposure of animals to T. crassiceps resulted in high serum concentrations of IL-4 accompanied by a significant increase in the hepatic mRNA levels of Ym-1, with no alteration in iNOS expression. In response to carbon tetrachloride, recruitment of inflammatory cell populations into the hepatic parenchyma was 5-fold higher in non-inoculated animals than Tc-inoculated mice. In contrast, carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis was significantly less in non-inoculated animals than in the Tc-inoculated group. The latter showed elevated IL-4 serum levels and low IFN-γ concentrations during the whole experiment, associated with hepatic expression of IL-4, TGF-β, desmin and α-sma, as well as increased mRNA levels of Arg-1, Ym-1, FIZZ-1 and MMR in Kupffer cells. These results suggest that alternative Kupffer cell activation is favored in a Th2 microenvironment, whereby such liver resident macrophages could exhibit a dichotomic role during chronic hepatic damage, being involved in attenuation of the inflammatory response but at the same time exacerbation of liver fibrosis.

  7. Local influence of south-east France topography and land cover on the distribution and characteristics of intense rainfall cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Florent

    2016-01-01

    The Greater Lyon area is strongly built up, grouping 58 communes and a population of 1.3 million in approximately 500 km2. The flood risk is high as the territory is crossed by two large watercourses and by streams with torrential flow. Floods may also occur in case of runoff after heavy rain or because of a rise in the groundwater level. The whole territory can therefore be affected, and it is necessary to possess in-depth knowledge of the depths, causes and consequences of rainfall to achieve better management of precipitation in urban areas and to reduce flood risk. This study is thus focused on the effects of topography and land cover on the occurrence, intensity and area of intense rainfall cells. They are identified by local radar meteorology (C-band) combined with a processing algorithm running in a geographic information system (GIS) which identified 109,979 weighted mean centres of them in a sample composed of the five most intense rainfall events from 2001 to 2005. First, analysis of spatial distribution at an overall scale is performed, completed by study at a more detailed scale. The results show that the distribution of high-intensity rainfall cells is spread in cluster form. Subsequently, comparison of intense rainfall cells with the topography shows that cell density is closely linked with land slope but that, above all, urbanised zones feature nearly twice as many rainfall cells as farm land or forest, with more intense intensity.

  8. Metastable states and information propagation in a 1D array of locally-coupled bistable cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anantram, M. P.; Roychowdhury, Vwani P.

    1998-01-01

    We study the effect of metastable states on the relaxation process (and hence information propagation) in locally coupled and boundary-driven structures. We first give a general argument to show that metastable states are inevitable even in the simplest of structures, a wire. At finite temperatures, the relaxation mechanism is a thermally assisted random walk. The time required to reach the ground state and its life time are determined by the coupling parameters. These time scales are studied...

  9. Local B cells and IgE production in the oesophageal mucosa in eosinophilic oesophagitis

    OpenAIRE

    Vicario, M; Blanchard, C; Stringer, K F; Collins, M.H.; Mingler, M K; Ahrens, A.; Putnam, P E; Abonia, J P; Santos, J.; Rothenberg, M E

    2009-01-01

    Background: Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EO) is an emerging yet increasingly prevalent disorder characterised by a dense and selective eosinophilic infiltration of the oesophageal wall. While EO is considered an atopic disease primarily triggered by food antigens, disparities between standard allergen testing and clinical responses to exclusion diets suggest the participation of distinct antigen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the pathophysiology of EO. Aim: To find evidence for a local IgE ...

  10. Immunohistochemical localization of inflammatory cells and cell cycle proteins in the gills of Loma salmonae infected rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Powell, M. D.; Yousaf, M. N.; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl;

    2014-01-01

    granulocyte infiltration of both the hyperplastic lesions as well as the xenomas. Similar immune-reactivity was seen in gill EGCs. Hyperplastic gill lesions showed a marked infiltration of CD8+ cells and expression of MHC class I antigens. These findings suggest that L salmonae xenomas may be subject to...

  11. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron–oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  12. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volland, Stefanie, E-mail: Stefanie.Volland@stud.sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Luetz, Cornelius, E-mail: cornelius.luetz@uibk.ac.at [Institute of Botany, University of Innsbruck, Sternwartestrasse 15, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Michalke, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.michalke@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Luetz-Meindl, Ursula, E-mail: ursula.luetz-meindl@sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-03-15

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 {mu}M Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron-oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  13. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2012-03-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron-oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  14. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron–oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  15. CHI3L1 nuclear localization in monocyte derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rosa, Michelino; Tibullo, Daniele; Saccone, Salvatore; Distefano, Gisella; Basile, Maria Sofia; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Malaguarnera, Lucia

    2016-02-01

    Chitinase-3-like-1 protein (CHI3L1) is a glycosyl hydrolase (GH) highly expressed in a variety of inflammatory diseases at infectious and non-infectious etiology. CHI3L1 is produced by a wide variety of cells including monocyte-derived macrophages cell lines such as polarized M1 and M2 type macrophages, osteoclasts and Kupffer cells. In this study we have examined the expression of CHI3L1 during the differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells. Magnetically-isolated peripheral blood monocytes were differentiated toward immature DCs (iDC) and mature DCs (mDCs) through a combination of factors and cytokines. Our result showed, for the first time, that CHI3L1 is expressed during the process of differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells in time dependent manner. Furthermore, the CHI3L1 is evenly distributed in cytoplasm and in the nucleus of both the iDCs and mDCs. These results suggest that CHI3L1 may play crucial role in the DCs immunoresponse. PMID:26466985

  16. Locally resolved measurements in a segmented HTPEM fuel cell with straight flow-fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, C. [Zentrum fuer BrennstoffzellenTechnik (ZBT), GmbH (Centre for Fuel Cell Technology), Carl-Benz-Str. 201, D-47057 Duisburg (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Institut fuer Energie- und Umweltverfahrenstechnik, Lotharstr. 1, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Siegel Schleimer Ingenieurs-Conseils s.a r.l. - Engineering and research, 2A, rue d' Ehlerange, L-3918 Mondercange (Luxembourg); Bandlamudi, G.; Heinzel, A. [Zentrum fuer BrennstoffzellenTechnik (ZBT), GmbH (Centre for Fuel Cell Technology), Carl-Benz-Str. 201, D-47057 Duisburg (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Institut fuer Energie- und Umweltverfahrenstechnik, Lotharstr. 1, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Filusch, F. [Zentrum fuer BrennstoffzellenTechnik (ZBT), GmbH (Centre for Fuel Cell Technology), Carl-Benz-Str. 201, D-47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Significant advances have been reported in building and testing of high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (HTPEM) fuel cells and stacks during recent years. Quantity distribution measurement techniques (e.g. current density, temperature and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)) using segmented cells are commonly used to characterise low-temperature PEM (LTPEM) fuel cells. Performing these measurements at higher temperatures is more difficult and a relatively new process. For this study, a fully operational segmented HTPEM fuel cell using a straight flow-field configuration was designed, constructed and tested. The cathode side bipolar half-plate consisted of 36 exchangeable segments, whereas, the anode side bipolar half-plate was not segmented. The cell was operated at various operating temperatures with various anode gas compositions and air (no backpressure). In addition to the experimental results, a simple computational fluid dynamics model based on COMSOL Multiphysics {sup registered} 3.5a was used to support the observed behaviour during segmented measurements. The computational domain consisted of the cathode side gas channels and the porous media. All of the boundary conditions and gas properties were defined in a manner similar to the experimental investigations. Some of the theoretical results were compared to the experimental results and conclusions were drawn. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhaohua, E-mail: ztang@jsd.claremont.edu [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Lin, Ren-Jang [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony [Genome Damage and Stability Center, University of Sussex, Falmer, BN1 9RQ (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  18. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A)+ RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G2 phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  19. Intratumoral administration of dendritic cells combined with hyperthermia induces both local and systemic antitumor effect in murine tumor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined whether intratumoral (i.t.) administration of dendritic cells (DCs) into a treated tumor could induce local and systemic antitumor effects in a mouse tumor model. C57BL/6 mice were inoculated s.c in the right and left thighs with MCA-102 fibrosarcoma cells on day 0 and on day 7, respectively. On day 7, the tumors (usually 6 mm in diameter) on the right thigh were heated by immersing the tumor-bearing leg in a circulating water bath at 43 .deg. C for 30 min; thereafter, the immature DCs were i.t. administered to the right thigh tumors. This immunization procedure was repeated on days 7, 14 and 21. The tumors in both the right and left thighs were measured every 7 days and the average sizes were determined by applying the following formula, tumor size = 0.5 x (length + width). Cytotoxicity assay was done to determine tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity. Hyperthermia induced apoptosis and heat shock proteins (HSPs) in tumor occurred maximally after 6 hr. For the local treated tumor, Hyperthermia (HT) alone inhibited tumor growth compared with the untreated tumors (ρ < 0.05), and furthermore, the i.t. administered DCs combined with hyperthermia (HT + DCs) additively inhibited tumor growth compared with HT alone (ρ < 0.05). On the distant untreated tumor, HT alone significantly inhibited tumor growth (ρ < 0.05), and also HT + DCs potently inhibited tumor growth (ρ < 0.001); however, compared with HT alone, the difference was not statistically significant. In addition, HT + DCs induced strong cytotoxicity of the splenocytes against tumor cells compared to DCs or HT alone. HT + DCs induced apoptosis and increased the expression of HSPs, and so this induced a potent local and systemic antitumor response in tumor-bearing mice. This regimen may be beneficial for the treatment of human cancers

  20. Concurrent radiochemotherapy in locally-regionally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: analysis of treatment results and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concurrent radiochemotherapy is a recommended treatment option for patients with locally advanced squamous cell head and neck carcinomas with recent data showing the most significant absolute overall and event-free survival benefit achieved in patients with oropharyngeal tumours. The aim of this study was to analyse the results of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy given with concomitant weekly cisplatin in patients with advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma and to identify prognostic factors influencing outcomes of this patients category. Sixty-five patients with stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who underwent concurrent radiochemotherapy between January 2005 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. All patients received radiotherapy to 70 Gy/35 fractions/2 Gy per fraction/5 fractions per week. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m2) started at the first day of radiotherapy. Median age was 57 years (range, 36 to 69 years) and 59 (90.8%) patients were male. Complete composite response was achieved in 47 patients (72.3%). Local and/or regional recurrence was the most frequent treatment failure present in 19 out of 25 patients (76.0%). At a median follow-up of 14 months (range, 5 to 72 months), 2-year local relapse-free, regional relapse-free, locoregional relapse-free, disease-free, and overall survival rates were 48.8%, 57.8%, 41.7%, 33.2% and 49.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis the only significant factor for inferior regional relapse-free survival was the advanced N stage (p = 0.048). Higher overall stage was independent prognostic factor for poorer local relapse-free survival, locoregional relapse-free survival and disease-free survival (p = 0.022, p = 0.003 and p = 0.003, respectively). Pre-treatment haemoglobin concentration was an independent prognostic factor for local relapse-free survival, regional relapse-free survival, locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival, and

  1. Regulatory B Cells from Hilar Lymph Nodes of Tolerant Mice in a Murine Model of Allergic Airway Disease are CD5+, Express TGF-β and Co-localize with CD4+Foxp3+ T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan, Prabitha; Singh, Anurag; McNamara, Jeffrey T.; Secor, Eric R.; Guernsey, Linda A.; Thrall, Roger S.; Craig M. Schramm

    2012-01-01

    In a biphasic, ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma model where allergic airway disease is followed by resolution and the development of local inhalational tolerance (LIT), TGFβ-expressing CD5+ B cells were selectively expanded locally in hilar lymph nodes (HLN) of LIT mice. LIT HLN CD5+ B cells but not LIT HLN CD5− B cells induced expression of Foxp3 in CD4+ CD25− T cells in vitro. These CD5+ regulatory B cells and CD4+Foxp3+ T cells demonstrated similar increases in expression of chemokine...

  2. Growing tumors induce a local STING dependent Type I IFN response in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andzinski, Lisa; Spanier, Julia; Kasnitz, Nadine; Kröger, Andrea; Jin, Lei; Brinkmann, Melanie M; Kalinke, Ulrich; Weiss, Siegfried; Jablonska, Jadwiga; Lienenklaus, Stefan

    2016-09-15

    The importance of endogenous Type I IFNs in cancer immune surveillance is well established by now. Their role in polarization of tumor-associated neutrophilic granulocytes into anti-tumor effector cells has been recently demonstrated. Yet, the cellular source of Type I IFNs as well as the mode of induction is not clearly defined. Here, we demonstrate that IFN-β is induced by growing murine tumors. Induction is mainly mediated via STING-dependent signaling pathways, suggesting tumor derived DNA as trigger. Transcription factors IRF3 and IRF5 were activated under these conditions which is consistent with tumor infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs) being the major cellular source of IFN-β at the tumor site. Besides DCs, tumor cells themselves are induced to contribute to the production of IFN-β. Taken together, our data provide further information on immune surveillance by Type I IFNs and suggest novel potent cellular targets for future cancer therapy. PMID:27116225

  3. Development of the CAS-LIBB single-particle microbeam for localized irradiation of living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xufei; XU Mingliang; WU Lijun; WANG Shaohu; FENG Huiyun; ZHAN Furu; PENG Shixiang; HU Chundong; ZHANG Shuqing; CHENG Jianjun; SHI Zhongtao; WANG Xiaohua; YUAN Hang; YUAN Haitao; YU Zengliang; CHEN Lianyun; HU Zhiwen; LI Jun; WU Yu; CHEN Bin; HU Suhua; ZHANG Jun

    2004-01-01

    A single-particle microbeam facility has been constructed at the Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering (LIBB), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The system was designed to deliver a defined numbers of hydrogen ions, produced by a van de Graaff accelerator, in an energy range of 2.0-3.0 MeV, into an area smaller than that of the nucleus of an individual living cell. The beam is collimated by a borosilicate glass capillary that forms the beam-line exit. An integrated computer program recognizes the cells and locates them one by one over the microbeam exit for irradiation. We present technical details of the CAS-LIBB microbeam facility, particularly on the collimator, hardware, control program, as well as cell irradiation protocols available. Various factors contributing to the targeting and positioning precision are discussed along with accuracy measurement results.

  4. Monte Carlo methods for localization of cones given multielectrode retinal ganglion cell recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, K; Gauthier, J L; Field, G D; Greschner, M; Agne, M; Chichilnisky, E J; Paninski, L

    2013-01-01

    It has recently become possible to identify cone photoreceptors in primate retina from multi-electrode recordings of ganglion cell spiking driven by visual stimuli of sufficiently high spatial resolution. In this paper we present a statistical approach to the problem of identifying the number, locations, and color types of the cones observed in this type of experiment. We develop an adaptive Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method that explores the space of cone configurations, using a Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson (LNP) encoding model of ganglion cell spiking output, while analytically integrating out the functional weights between cones and ganglion cells. This method provides information about our posterior certainty about the inferred cone properties, and additionally leads to improvements in both the speed and quality of the inferred cone maps, compared to earlier "greedy" computational approaches. PMID:23194406

  5. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein: localization in secretory granules of Paneth cells in the mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte;

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein involved in the host's response to endotoxin and mainly synthesized and secreted to the blood by the liver. But in addition, LBP is also made by extrahepatic cells, including the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. To study in...... closer detail the synthesis and storage of LBP in the intestinal mucosal epithelium, we performed an immunolocalization of LBP in mouse small intestine. By immunofluorescence microscopy, an antibody recognizing the 58-60 kDa protein of LBP distinctly labeled a small population of cells located deep into...... LBP together with other proteins acting in the innate immune response of the gut, such as lysozyme, defensins and intelectin....

  6. Treatment outcome of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients who received concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the response, toxicity, patterns of failure and survival rate of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel. Twenty-three patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients who received radical chemoradiotherapy from October 1999 to September 2004 were included in this retrospective study. Patients received total 55.4 ∼ 64.8 (median 64.8) Gy (daily 1.8 Gy per fraction, 5 days per weeks) over 7 ∼ 8 weeks. 50 or 60 mg/m2 of paclitaxel was administered on day 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 and 36 of radiotherapy. Four weeks after the concurrent chemoradiotherapy, three cycles of consolidation chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel 135 mg/m2 and cisplatin 75 mg/m2 was administered every 3 weeks. Of the 23 patients, 3 patients refused to receive the treatment during the concurrent chemoradiotherapy. One patient died of bacterial pneumonia during the concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Grade 2 radiation esophagitis was observed in 4 patients (17%). Sixteen patients received consolidation chemotherapy. During the consolidation chemotherapy, 8 patients (50%) experienced grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and one of those patients died of neutropenic sepsis. Overall response rate for 20 evaluable patients was 90% including 4 complete responses (20%) and 14 partial responses (70%). Among 18 responders, 9 had local failure, 3 had local and distant failure and 2 had distant failure only. Median progression-free survival time was 9.5 months and 2-year progression-free survival rate was 19%. Eleven patients received second-line or third-line chemotherapy after the treatment failure. The median overall survival time was 21 months. 2-year and 5-year survival rate were 43% and 33%, respectively. Age, performance status, tumor size were significant prognostic factors for progression-free survival. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel revealed high response rate and low toxicity

  7. Treatment outcome of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients who received concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Zy; Kim, Sung Whan; Shim, Byoung Yong [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-12-15

    To analyze the response, toxicity, patterns of failure and survival rate of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel. Twenty-three patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients who received radical chemoradiotherapy from October 1999 to September 2004 were included in this retrospective study. Patients received total 55.4 {approx} 64.8 (median 64.8) Gy (daily 1.8 Gy per fraction, 5 days per weeks) over 7 {approx} 8 weeks. 50 or 60 mg/m{sup 2} of paclitaxel was administered on day 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 and 36 of radiotherapy. Four weeks after the concurrent chemoradiotherapy, three cycles of consolidation chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel 135 mg/m{sup 2} and cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} was administered every 3 weeks. Of the 23 patients, 3 patients refused to receive the treatment during the concurrent chemoradiotherapy. One patient died of bacterial pneumonia during the concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Grade 2 radiation esophagitis was observed in 4 patients (17%). Sixteen patients received consolidation chemotherapy. During the consolidation chemotherapy, 8 patients (50%) experienced grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and one of those patients died of neutropenic sepsis. Overall response rate for 20 evaluable patients was 90% including 4 complete responses (20%) and 14 partial responses (70%). Among 18 responders, 9 had local failure, 3 had local and distant failure and 2 had distant failure only. Median progression-free survival time was 9.5 months and 2-year progression-free survival rate was 19%. Eleven patients received second-line or third-line chemotherapy after the treatment failure. The median overall survival time was 21 months. 2-year and 5-year survival rate were 43% and 33%, respectively. Age, performance status, tumor size were significant prognostic factors for progression-free survival. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel revealed high

  8. Acute esophagitis for patients with local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Yi; Brink, Carsten; Knap, Marianne;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Esophagitis is common in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy for local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose-effect relationship using clinical and dosimetric parameters in patients receiving intensity modulated...... radiotherapy (IMRT) and concomitant chemotherapy (CCT). METHODS: Between 2009 and 2013, 117 patients with stages IIB-IIIB NSCLC were treated in a multicenter randomized phase II trial with 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy followed by IMRT and CCT. The esophagitis was prospectively scored using the Common...

  9. GLP-2 receptor localizes to enteric neurons and endocrine cells expressing vasoactive peptides and mediates increased blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Xinfu; Karpen, Heidi E; Stephens, John;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-responsive hormone that exerts diverse actions in the gastrointestinal tract, including enhancing epithelial cell survival and proliferation, mucosal blood flow, and nutrient uptake and suppressing gastric motility and secretion...... in the gut. METHODS: Intestinal cellular GLP-2R localization was determined with real-time, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) of laser capture microdissected subtissue and fluorescence in situ hybridization and also with double and/or triple immunostaining of...

  10. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Shin Nishitani

    Full Text Available A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7 expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  11. FOXP3 Subcellular Localization Predicts Recurrence in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Donald T Weed; Gail Walker; Adriana C De La Fuente; Ronen Nazarian; Vella, Jennifer L.; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen R.; Paolo Serafini

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) expression in tumor infiltrating CD4(+)T cells is generally associated with an intrinsic capacity to suppress tumor immunity. Based on this notion, different studies have evaluated the prognostic value of this maker in cancer but contradictory results have been found. Indeed, even within the same cancer population, the presence of CD4(+)FOXP3(+)T cells has been associated,with either a poor or a good prognosis, or no correlation has beenfound. Here, we demonstr...

  12. Mechanism of oxidative stress generation in cells by localized near-infrared femtosecond laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hao; Chan, Kam Tai; Kong, Siu Kai; Lee, Rebecca Kit Ying

    2009-12-01

    We examined the effect of femtosecond (fs) and continuous wave (CW) lasers at near-infrared range on the creation of reactive oxygen species in a human liver cancer cell line. By controlling the mitochondria electron transport chain (ETC), it was found that a major part of the oxidative stress was generated by the laser induced thermal effect on the mitochondria while the remaining part was created by direct free electron liberation by the fs pulses, which could be observed after breaking the ETC. The study helps clarify the major effects produced on animal cells when excited by fs lasers.

  13. Nuclear localization of phosphorylated c-Myc protein in human tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Soldani

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Using immunocytochemical techniques at light and electron microscopy, we analysed the distribution of phosphorylated c-Myc in actively proliferating human HeLa cells. The distribution pattern of c-Myc was also compared with those of other ribonucleoprotein (RNP-containing components (PANA, hnRNP-core proteins, fibrillarin or RNP-associated nuclear proteins (SC-35 splicing factor. Our results provide the first evidence that phosphorylated c-Myc accumulates in the nucleus of tumor cells, where it colocalizes with fibrillarin, both in the nucleolus and in extranucleolar structures.

  14. FOXP3 Subcellular Localization Predicts Recurrence in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Weed, Donald T.; Walker, Gail; De la fuente, Adriana C.; Nazarian, Ronen; Vella, Jennifer L.; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen R.; Serafini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) expression in tumor infiltrating CD4+T cells is generally associated with an intrinsic capacity to suppress tumor immunity. Based on this notion, different studies have evaluated the prognostic value of this maker in cancer but contradictory results have been found. Indeed, even within the same cancer population, the presence of CD4+FOXP3+T cells has been associated,with either a poor or a good prognosis, or no correlation has beenfound. Here, we demonstrate,in...

  15. Early embryo loss is associated with local production of nitric oxide by decidual mononuclear cells

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    In early embryo loss, the fetus may be considered to be an allograft and, therefore, may be rejected by maternal immunocytes. However, the cytotoxic mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. We have previously shown the involvement of natural killer (NK) cells and mononuclear cells expressing Mac-1 (CD11b) and F4/80 in resorbing compared to nonresorbing embryos. In this study, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the mechanism of early embryo loss was studied. Pregnant CBA/J females mated ...

  16. Aiolos transcription factor controls cell death in T cells by regulating Bcl-2 expression and its cellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, F; Martínez-A, C; Camonis, J; Rebollo, A

    1999-01-01

    We searched for proteins that interact with Ras in interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated or IL-2-deprived cells, and found that the transcription factor Aiolos interacts with Ras. The Ras-Aiolos interaction was confirmed in vitro and in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation. Indirect immunofluorescence shows that IL-2 controls the cellular distribution of Aiolos and induces its tyrosine phosphorylation, required for dissociation from Ras. We also identified functional Aiolos-binding sites in the Bcl-2 promoter, which are able to activate the luciferase reporter gene. Mutation of Aiolos-binding sites within the Bcl-2 promoter inhibits transactivation of the reporter gene luciferase, suggesting direct control of Bcl-2 expression by Aiolos. Co-transfection experiments confirm that Aiolos induces Bcl-2 expression and prevents apoptosis in IL-2-deprived cells. We propose a model for the regulation of Bcl-2 expression via Aiolos. PMID:10369681

  17. Protein kinase TTK interacts and co-localizes with CENP-E to the kinetochore of human cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Spindle checkpoint is an important biochemical signaling cascade during mitosis which monitors the fidelity of chromosome segregation, and is mediated by protein kinases Mps1 and Bub1/BubR1. Our recent studies show that kinesin-related motor protein CENP-E interacts with BubR1 and participates in spindle checkpoint signaling. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying spindle checkpoint signaling, we carried out proteomic dissection of human cell kinetochore and revealed protein kinase TTK, human homologue of yeast Mps1. Our studies show that TTK is localized to the kinetochore of human cells, and interacts with CENP-E, suggesting that TTK may play an important role in chromosome segregation during mitosis.

  18. Localization of Alkaline Phosphatase and Cathepsin D during Cell Restoration after Colchicine Treatment in Primary Cultures of Fetal Rat Hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Localization of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and cathepsin D (CAPD) in primary cultures of fetal rat hepatocytes was examined using double immunofluorescent staining in order to investigate the relationship between lysosome movement and the fate of ALP during cell restoration after microtubule disruption by colchicine. At 3 hr and 24 hr after colchicine treatment, numerous coarse dots containing ALP were observed throughout the cytoplasm, and some of these showed colocalization with CAPD. At 48 hr and 72 hr after colchicine treatment, although most of the dots containing ALP in the cytoplasm disappeared, dots containing CAPD remained. The present results suggest that the denatured ALP proteins remaining in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes during cell restoration after colchicine treatment are digested by lysosomes

  19. Localization of phosphorylated TrkA in carrier vesicles involved in its nuclear translocation in U251 cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A number of transmembrane receptors are targeted to the nucleus and convincingly localized therein. However, what remains a conundrum is how these cell-surface receptors end up in the nucleus. In this study, we reported that the transmembrane receptor phosphorylated TrkA was located in a series of carrier vesicles, including ring-like vesicles near the plasma membrane, large core vesicles and small dense core vesicles around the nuclei, as well as in the nucleus in human glioma cell line U251 using immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. Meanwhile, we also showed that small dense core vesicles budded from large core vesicles, and interacted with the nuclear envelope. Accordingly, our results suggested that such a series of membrane compartments might be involved in the pathway of nuclear translocation of the transmembrane receptor TrkA.

  20. Localization of phosphorylated TrkA in carrier vesicles involved in its nuclear translocation in U251 cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG AiHua; ZHANG ZhiJian; XIAO DeSheng; YANG Yong; WANG YongZhong; CHEN YongChang

    2007-01-01

    A number of transmembrane receptors are targeted to the nucleus and convincingly localized therein.However, what remains a conundrum is how these cell-surface receptors end up in the nucleus. In this study, we reported that the transmembrane receptor phosphorylated TrkA was located in a series of carrier vesicles, including ring-like vesicles near the plasma membrane, large core vesicles and small dense core vesicles around the nuclei, as well as in the nucleus in human glioma cell line U251 using immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. Meanwhile, we also showed that small dense core vesicles budded from large core vesicles, and interacted with the nuclear envelope. Accordingly,our results suggested that such a series of membrane compartments might be involved in the pathway of nuclear translocation of the transmembrane receptor TrkA.