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Sample records for cell cycle inhibition

  1. Cell-cycle inhibition by Helicobacter pylori L-asparaginase.

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    Claudia Scotti

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major human pathogen causing chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. One of the mechanisms whereby it induces damage depends on its interference with proliferation of host tissues. We here describe the discovery of a novel bacterial factor able to inhibit the cell-cycle of exposed cells, both of gastric and non-gastric origin. An integrated approach was adopted to isolate and characterise the molecule from the bacterial culture filtrate produced in a protein-free medium: size-exclusion chromatography, non-reducing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, mutant analysis, recombinant protein expression and enzymatic assays. L-asparaginase was identified as the factor responsible for cell-cycle inhibition of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. Its effect on cell-cycle was confirmed by inhibitors, a knockout strain and the action of recombinant L-asparaginase on cell lines. Interference with cell-cycle in vitro depended on cell genotype and was related to the expression levels of the concurrent enzyme asparagine synthetase. Bacterial subcellular distribution of L-asparaginase was also analysed along with its immunogenicity. H. pylori L-asparaginase is a novel antigen that functions as a cell-cycle inhibitor of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. We give evidence supporting a role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-related diseases and discuss its potential diagnostic application.

  2. Cell-Cycle Inhibition by Helicobacter pylori L-Asparaginase

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    Scotti, Claudia; Sommi, Patrizia; Pasquetto, Maria Valentina; Cappelletti, Donata; Stivala, Simona; Mignosi, Paola; Savio, Monica; Chiarelli, Laurent Roberto; Valentini, Giovanna; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M.; Merrell, Douglas Scott; Franchini, Silvia; Verona, Maria Luisa; Bolis, Cristina; Solcia, Enrico; Manca, Rachele; Franciotta, Diego; Casasco, Andrea; Filipazzi, Paola; Zardini, Elisabetta; Vannini, Vanio

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major human pathogen causing chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. One of the mechanisms whereby it induces damage depends on its interference with proliferation of host tissues. We here describe the discovery of a novel bacterial factor able to inhibit the cell-cycle of exposed cells, both of gastric and non-gastric origin. An integrated approach was adopted to isolate and characterise the molecule from the bacterial culture filtrate produced in a protein-free medium: size-exclusion chromatography, non-reducing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, mutant analysis, recombinant protein expression and enzymatic assays. L-asparaginase was identified as the factor responsible for cell-cycle inhibition of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. Its effect on cell-cycle was confirmed by inhibitors, a knockout strain and the action of recombinant L-asparaginase on cell lines. Interference with cell-cycle in vitro depended on cell genotype and was related to the expression levels of the concurrent enzyme asparagine synthetase. Bacterial subcellular distribution of L-asparaginase was also analysed along with its immunogenicity. H. pylori L-asparaginase is a novel antigen that functions as a cell-cycle inhibitor of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. We give evidence supporting a role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-related diseases and discuss its potential diagnostic application. PMID:21085483

  3. Cell division cycle 20 promotes cell proliferation and invasion and inhibits apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells.

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    Shang, Guanning; Ma, Xu; Lv, Gang

    2018-01-01

    Cdc20 (cell division cycle 20 homologue) has been reported to exhibit an oncogenic role in human tumorigenesis. However, the function of Cdc20 in osteosarcoma (OS) has not been investigated. In the current study, we aim to explore the role of Cdc20 in human OS cells. Multiple approaches were used to measure cell growth, apoptosis, cell cycle, migration and invasion in OS cells after depletion of Cdc20 or overexpression of Cdc20. We found that down-regulation of Cdc20 inhibited cell growth, induced apoptosis and triggered cell cycle arrest in OS cells. Moreover, Cdc20 down-regulation let to inhibition of cell migration and invasion in OS cells. Consistently, overexpression of Cdc20 in OS cells promoted cell growth, inhibited apoptosis, enhanced cell migration and invasion. Mechanistically, our Western blotting results showed that overexpression of Cdc20 reduced the expression of Bim and p21, whereas depletion of Cdc20 upregulated Bim and p21 levels in OS cells. Altogether, our findings demonstrated that Cdc20 exerts its oncogenic role partly due to regulation of Bim and p21 in OS cells, suggesting that targeting Cdc20 could be useful for the treatment of OS.

  4. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Mice H22 Hepatoma Cells.

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    Shao, Yiye; Ni, Yanbo; Yang, Jing; Lin, Xutao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lixia

    2016-06-23

    BACKGROUND It is widely recognized that astaxanthin (ASX), a member of the carotenoid family, has strong biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and immune-modulation activities. Previous studies have confirmed that ASX can effectively inhibit hepatoma cells in vitro. MATERIAL AND METHODS MTT was used to assay proliferation of mice H22 cells, and flow cytometry was used to determine apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of H22 cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, anti-tumor activity of ASX was observed in mice. RESULTS ASX inhibited the proliferation of H22 cells, promoted cell necrosis, and induced cell cycle arrest in G2 phase in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS This study indicated that ASX can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in mice H22 hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Metformin inhibits cell cycle progression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

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    Bruno, Silvia; Ledda, Bernardetta; Tenca, Claudya; Ravera, Silvia; Orengo, Anna Maria; Mazzarello, Andrea Nicola; Pesenti, Elisa; Casciaro, Salvatore; Racchi, Omar; Ghiotto, Fabio; Marini, Cecilia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; DeCensi, Andrea; Fais, Franco

    2015-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was believed to result from clonal accumulation of resting apoptosis-resistant malignant B lymphocytes. However, it became increasingly clear that CLL cells undergo, during their life, iterative cycles of re-activation and subsequent clonal expansion. Drugs interfering with CLL cell cycle entry would be greatly beneficial in the treatment of this disease. 1, 1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride (metformin), the most widely prescribed oral hypoglycemic agent, inexpensive and well tolerated, has recently received increased attention for its potential antitumor activity. We wondered whether metformin has apoptotic and anti-proliferative activity on leukemic cells derived from CLL patients. Metformin was administered in vitro either to quiescent cells or during CLL cell activation stimuli, provided by classical co-culturing with CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. At doses that were totally ineffective on normal lymphocytes, metformin induced apoptosis of quiescent CLL cells and inhibition of cell cycle entry when CLL were stimulated by CD40-CD40L ligation. This cytostatic effect was accompanied by decreased expression of survival- and proliferation-associated proteins, inhibition of signaling pathways involved in CLL disease progression and decreased intracellular glucose available for glycolysis. In drug combination experiments, metformin lowered the apoptotic threshold and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of classical and novel antitumor molecules. Our results indicate that, while CLL cells after stimulation are in the process of building their full survival and cycling armamentarium, the presence of metformin affects this process. PMID:26265439

  6. Tempol inhibits growth of As4.1 juxtaglomerular cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

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    Han, Yong Hwan; Park, Woo Hyun

    2012-03-01

    A stable nitroxide 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-osyl (Tempol) is widely used as an antioxidant in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of Tempol on the growth of As4.1 juxtaglomerular cells in relation to cell cycle and cell death. Tempol dose-dependently decreased the growth of As4.1 cells with an IC50 of ~1 mM at 48 h. DNA flow cytometry analysis and BrdU staining indicated that Tempol induced S phase arrest, which is accompanied by a downregulation of cyclin A. Tempol also induced apoptotic cell death, which was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ∆Ψm), an activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1). Furthermore, Tempol increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). MEK and JNK inhibitors significantly attenuated a growth inhibition in Tempol-treated As4.1 cells. In conclusion, Tempol inhibited the growth of As4.1 cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Tempol also activated ERK and JNK signaling, which was responsible for cell growth inhibition. Our present data provide useful information for the toxicological effects of Tempol in juxtaglomerular cells in relation to cell growth inhibition and cell death.

  7. Zebularine inhibits the growth of A549 lung cancer cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

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    You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2014-11-01

    Zebularine (Zeb) is a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor to that has an anti-tumor effect. Here, we evaluated the anti-growth effect of Zeb on A549 lung cancer cells in relation to reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Zeb inhibited the growth of A549 cells with an IC50 of approximately 70 µM at 72 h. Cell cycle analysis indicated that Zeb induced an S phase arrest in A549 cells. Zeb also induced A549 cell death, which was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ΔΨm ), Bcl-2 decrease, Bax increase, p53 increase and activation of caspase-3 and -8. In contrast, Zeb mildly inhibited the growth of human pulmonary fibroblast (HPF) normal cells and lead to a G1 phase arrest. Zeb did not induce apoptosis in HPF cells. In relation to ROS level, Zeb increased ROS level in A549 cells and induced glutathione (GSH) depletion. The well-known antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) prevented the death of Zeb-treated A549 cells. Moreover, Zeb increased the level of thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) in A549 cells. While the overexpression of TrxR1 attenuated death and ROS level in Zeb-treated A549 cells, the downregulation of TrxR1 intensified death and ROS level in these cells. In conclusion, Zeb inhibited the growth of A549 lung cancer cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The inhibition was influenced by ROS and TrxR1 levels. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Modeling the effects of cell cycle M-phase transcriptional inhibition on circadian oscillation.

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    Bin Kang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are endogenous time-keeping systems that temporally organize biological processes. Gating of cell cycle events by a circadian clock is a universal observation that is currently considered a mechanism serving to protect DNA from diurnal exposure to ultraviolet radiation or other mutagens. In this study, we put forward another possibility: that such gating helps to insulate the circadian clock from perturbations induced by transcriptional inhibition during the M phase of the cell cycle. We introduced a periodic pulse of transcriptional inhibition into a previously published mammalian circadian model and simulated the behavior of the modified model under both constant darkness and light-dark cycle conditions. The simulation results under constant darkness indicated that periodic transcriptional inhibition could entrain/lock the circadian clock just as a light-dark cycle does. At equilibrium states, a transcriptional inhibition pulse of certain periods was always locked close to certain circadian phases where inhibition on Per and Bmal1 mRNA synthesis was most balanced. In a light-dark cycle condition, inhibitions imposed at different parts of a circadian period induced different degrees of perturbation to the circadian clock. When imposed at the middle- or late-night phase, the transcriptional inhibition cycle induced the least perturbations to the circadian clock. The late-night time window of least perturbation overlapped with the experimentally observed time window, where mitosis is most frequent. This supports our hypothesis that the circadian clock gates the cell cycle M phase to certain circadian phases to minimize perturbations induced by the latter. This study reveals the hidden effects of the cell division cycle on the circadian clock and, together with the current picture of genome stability maintenance by circadian gating of cell cycle, provides a more comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon of circading gating of

  9. Erianin inhibits the proliferation of T47D cells by inhibiting cell cycles, inducing apoptosis and suppressing migration.

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    Sun, Jing; Fu, Xueqi; Wang, Yongsen; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Yu; Hao, Tian; Hu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Erianin is a natural product extracted from Dendrobiumchrysotoxum. To investigate the antitumor activity of Erianin in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, we treated T47D cells with Erianin and evaluated the effects of Erianin treatment on multiple cancer-associated pathways. Erianin inhibited the proliferation of T47D cells effectively. Erianin induced apoptosis in T47D cells through reducing Bcl-2 expression and activating caspase signaling. Furthermore, it also suppressed the expression of CDKs and caused cell cycle arrest. In addition, Erianin treatment suppressed the migration of T47D cells, most likely through regulating the homeostatic expression of MPP and TIMP. Meanwhile, Erianin did not affect the proliferation of normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. Together, these results demonstrated that Erianin might have the potential to be an effective drug to treat the ER positive breast cancer.

  10. Andrographolide inhibits proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo; Chu, Haihan

    2018-04-01

    Andrographolide (Andro), a natural compound isolated from Andrographis paniculata , has been demonstrated to have anticancer efficacy in several types of tumors. In the present study, the anticancer effects and mechanism of Andro in human malignant melanoma were investigated. Cell viability analysis was performed using an MTT assay and the effect of Andro on the cell cycle and apoptosis of human malignant melanoma cells was determined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the protein expression levels of human malignant melanoma cells following treatment with Andro. The results revealed that Andro potently inhibited cell proliferation by inducing G2/M cell-cycle arrest in human malignant melanoma C8161 and A375 cell lines. In addition, treatment with Andro induced apoptosis, which was associated with the cleavage of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase and activation of caspase-3. It was observed that Andro induced activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 signaling pathway, which may be connected with cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that Andro may be a promising and effective agent for antitumor therapy against human malignant melanoma.

  11. Sparstolonin B inhibits pro-angiogenic functions and blocks cell cycle progression in endothelial cells.

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    Bateman, Henry R; Liang, Qiaoli; Fan, Daping; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Lessner, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Sparstolonin B (SsnB) is a novel bioactive compound isolated from Sparganium stoloniferum, an herb historically used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as an anti-tumor agent. Angiogenesis, the process of new capillary formation from existing blood vessels, is dysregulated in many pathological disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, tumor growth, and atherosclerosis. In functional assays, SsnB inhibited endothelial cell tube formation (Matrigel method) and cell migration (Transwell method) in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) demonstrated differential expression of several hundred genes in response to SsnB exposure (916 and 356 genes, respectively, with fold change ≥2, pcell types showed significant overlap, including genes associated with cell proliferation and cell cycle. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis of HUVECs treated with SsnB showed an increase of cells in the G1 phase and a decrease of cells in the S phase. Cyclin E2 (CCNE2) and Cell division cycle 6 (CDC6) are regulatory proteins that control cell cycle progression through the G1/S checkpoint. Both CCNE2 and CDC6 were downregulated in the microarray data. Real Time quantitative PCR confirmed that gene expression of CCNE2 and CDC6 in HUVECs was downregulated after SsnB exposure, to 64% and 35% of controls, respectively. The data suggest that SsnB may exert its anti-angiogenic properties in part by downregulating CCNE2 and CDC6, halting progression through the G1/S checkpoint. In the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, SsnB caused significant reduction in capillary length and branching number relative to the vehicle control group. Overall, SsnB caused a significant reduction in angiogenesis (ANOVA, p<0.05), demonstrating its ex vivo efficacy.

  12. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients

  13. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

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    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang, E-mail: wangjx@ihcams.ac.cn

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  14. Mefloquine inhibits chondrocytic proliferation by arresting cell cycle in G2/M phase.

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    Li, Qiong; Chen, Zeng-Gan; Xia, Qing; Lin, Jian-Ping; Yan, Zuo-Qin; Yao, Zheng-Jun; Dong, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Mefloquine (MQ), an analog of chloroquine, exhibits a promising cytotoxic activity against carcinoma cell lines and for the treatment of glioblastoma patients. The present study demonstrates the effect of mefloquine on proliferation and cell cycle in chondrocytes. MTT assay and propidium iodide staining were used for the analysis of proliferation and cell cycle distribution, respectively. Western blot analysis was used to examine the expression levels of cyclin B1/cdc2, cdc25c, p21WAF1/CIP1 and p53. The results revealed that mefloquine inhibited the proliferation of chondrocytes and caused cell cycle arrests in the G2/M phase. The proliferation of chondrocytes was reduced to 27% at 40 μM concentration of mefloquine after 48 h. The population of chondrocytes in G2/M phase was found to be 15.7 and 48.4%, respectively at 10 and 40 μM concentration of mefloquine at 48 h following treatment. The expression of the cell cycle regulatory proteins including, cyclin B1/cdc2 and cdc25c was inhibited. On the other hand, mefloquine treatment promoted the expression of p21WAF1/CIP1 and p53 at 40 μM concentration after 48 h. Therefore, mefloquine inhibits proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest in chondrocytes.

  15. Dihydroartemisinin inhibits the human erythroid cell differentiation by altering the cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finaurini, Sara; Basilico, Nicoletta; Corbett, Yolanda; D’Alessandro, Sarah; Parapini, Silvia; Olliaro, Piero; Haynes, Richard K.; Taramelli, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin derivatives such as dihydroartemisinin (DHA) induce significant depletion of early embryonic erythroblasts in animal models. We have reported previously that DHA specifically targets pro-erythroblasts and basophilic erythroblasts, when human CD34+ stem cells are differentiated toward the erythroid lineage, indicating that a window of susceptibility to artemisinins may exist also in human developmental erythropoiesis during pregnancy. To better investigate the toxicity of artemisinin derivatives, the structure–activity relationship was evaluated against the K562 leukaemia cell line, used as a model for differentiating early human erythroblasts. All artemisinins derivatives, except deoxyartemisinin, inhibited both spontaneous and induced erythroid differentiation, confirming that the peroxide bridge is responsible for the erythro-toxicity. On the contrary, cell growth was markedly reduced by DHA, artemisone and artesunate but not by artemisinin, 10-deoxoartemisinin or deoxy-artemisinin. The substituent at position C-10 is responsible only for the anti-proliferative effect, since 10-deoxoartemisinin did not reduce cell growth but arrested the differentiation of K562 cells. In particular, the results showed that DHA resulted the most potent and rapidly acting compound of the drug family, causing (i) the decreased expression of GpA surface receptors and the down regulation the γ-globin gene; (ii) the alteration of S phase of cell cycle and (iii) the induction of programmed cell death of early erythroblasts in a dose dependent manner within 24 h. In conclusion, these findings confirm that the active metabolite DHA is responsible for the erythro-toxicity of most of artemisinins used in therapy. Thus, as long as no further clinical data are available, current WHO recommendations of avoiding malaria treatment with artemisinins during the first trimester of pregnancy remain valid.

  16. Growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest effects of epigallocatechin gallate in the NBT-II bladder tumour cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J J; Ye, Z-Q; Koo, M W L

    2004-05-01

    To examine the growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major constituent of green tea polyphenols, on the NBT-II bladder tumour cell line. Growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest effects of EGCG were evaluated by the tetrazolium assay, flow cytometry and apoptotic DNA ladder tests. The cell cycle-related oncogene and protein expressions in NBT-II bladder tumour cells, when incubated with EGCG, were detected with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. EGCG inhibited growth of the NBT-II bladder tumour cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry showed a G0/G1 arrest in cells when cultured with EGCG at doses of 10, 20 or 40 micro mol/L for 48 or 72 h. The apoptotic DNA ladder test showed that EGCG at 10 micro mol/L induced early apoptosis after 48 h of incubation. A down-regulation of cyclin D1 was detected by RT-PCR when the cells were incubated with EGCG (20 micro mol/L for 48 h. EGCG also down-regulated protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, in both a time- and dose-dependent manner, when detected by Western blot. EGCG had growth inhibition and cell-cycle arrest effects in NBT-II bladder tumour cells by down-regulating the cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 and retinoblastoma protein machinery for regulating cell-cycle progression.

  17. A novel peptide sansalvamide analogue inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth through G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujiki, Michael B.; Milam, Ben; Ding Xianzhong; Roginsky, Alexandra B.; Salabat, M. Reza; Talamonti, Mark S.; Bell, Richard H.; Gu Wenxin; Silverman, Richard B.; Adrian, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have little hope for cure because no effective therapies are available. Sansalvamide A is a cyclic depsipeptide produced by a marine fungus. We investigated the effect of a novel sansalvamide A analogue on growth, cell-cycle phases, and induction of apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The sansalvamide analogue caused marked time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis and cell proliferation of two human pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1 and S2-013). The analogue induced G0/G1 phase cell-cycle arrest and morphological changes suggesting induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was confirmed by annexin V binding. This novel sansalvamide analogue inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer cells through G0/G1 arrest and induces apoptosis. Sansalvamide analogues may be valuable for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

  18. Itraconazole induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest via inhibiting Hedgehog signaling in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiang; Hou, Yi-Chao; Huang, Jiao; Fang, Jing-Yuan; Xiong, Hua

    2017-04-11

    Itraconazole has been proved therapeutically effective against a variety of human cancers. This study assessed the effect of itraconazole on the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway and proliferation of human gastric cancer cells. CCK-8 assay and colony formation assay were used to assess the effects of itraconazole on proliferation of gastric cancer cells. The expression of Hh signaling components in gastric cancer cells treated with itraconazole was evaluated by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and dual luciferase assay. Tumor xenograft models were used to assess the inhibitory effect of itraconazole on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells in vivo. Itraconazole could remarkably inhibit the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. When in combination with 5-FU, itraconazole significantly reduced the proliferation rate of cancer cells. Furthermore, itraconazole could regulate the G 1 -S transition and induce apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. Hh signaling was abnormally activated in human gastric cancer samples. In vitro, studies showed that the expression of glioma-associated zinc finger transcription factor 1 (Gli1) was decreased at both transcriptional and translational levels after treatment with itraconazole. Dual luciferase assay also indicated that itraconazole could inhibit the transcription of Gli1. In vivo studies demonstrated that monotherapy with itraconazole by oral administration could inhibit the growth of xenografts, and that itraconazole could significantly enhance the antitumor efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-FU. Hh signaling is activated in gastric tumor and itraconazole can inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cells by inhibiting Gli1 expression.

  19. Diterpenoid B derived from Plectranthus excisus inhibits the melanoma cell cycle in the B16 melanoma cell line.

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    Liu, Ya-Nan; Gu, Jun-Lian; Ma, Meng-Shi; Guo, Hua; Liu, Long; Guo, Li-Rong; Wang, Yue; Li, Yang

    2015-09-01

    Plectranthus excisus is widely distributed throughout northeast China. Its active ingredient, diterpenoids, exhibits significant antitumor effects. The present study examined the antitumor effects of diterpenoid B (DB), derived from Plectranthus excisus, and demonstrated that DB inhibited the proliferation of tumor cells by inhibiting the cell cycle. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to determine mRNA and protein expression levels, respectively. The results revealed that exposure to DB increased the expression levels of the transformation associated, protein 53, and cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitor 1A, and decreased the expression of cyclin‑dependent kinase 2. The results of the present study demonstrated that DB can inhibit cell cycle progression and, therefore, offers potential as a beneficial antitumor drug.

  20. Sulforaphane inhibits mitotic clonal expansion during adipogenesis through cell cycle arrest.

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    Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Lee, Youn-Sun; Sin, Dong-Mi; Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Yoo, Hwan-Soo

    2012-07-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for numerous metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. Adipocyte differentiation is triggered by adipocyte hyperplasia, which leads to obesity. In this study, the inhibitory effect of sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate, on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells was investigated. Sulforaphane decreased the accumulation of lipid droplets stained with Oil Red O and inhibited the elevation of triglycerides in the adipocytes (half-maximal inhibitory concentration = 7.3 µmol/l). The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), major transcription factors for adipocyte differentiation, was significantly reduced by sulforaphane. The major effects of sulforaphane on the inhibition of adipocyte differentiation occurred during the early stage of adipogenesis. Thus, the expression of C/EBPβ, an early-stage biomarker of adipogenesis, decreased in a concentration-dependent manner when the adipocytes were exposed to sulforaphane (0, 5, 10, and 20 µmol/l). The proliferation of adipocytes treated with 20 µmol/l sulforaphane for 24 and 48 h was also suppressed. These results indicate that sulforaphane may specifically affect mitotic clonal expansion to inhibit adipocyte differentiation. Sulforaphane arrested the cell cycle at the G(0)/G(1) phase, increased p27 expression, and decreased retinoblastoma (Rb) phosphorylation. Additionally, sulforaphane modestly decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. Our results indicate that the inhibition of early-stage adipocyte differentiation by sulforaphane may be associated with cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) phase through upregulation of p27 expression.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons disrupt cell cycle control in contact-inhibited rat liver oval cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kranz, A.; Andrysík, Zdeněk; Vondráček, Jan; Machala, M.; Faust, D.; Oesch, F.; Dietrich, C.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 371, Suppl. 1 (2005), R117 ISSN 0028-1298. [Spring Meeting /46./ - Deutsche Gessellshaft fűr Experimentelle und Klinische Pharmakologie und Toxikologie. 15.03.2005-14.03.2005, Mainz] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : AhR * cell cycle * PAU Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  2. ATR Kinase Inhibition Protects Non-cycling Cells from the Lethal Effects of DNA Damage and Transcription Stress*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Michael G.; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad-3-related) is a protein kinase that maintains genome stability and halts cell cycle phase transitions in response to DNA lesions that block DNA polymerase movement. These DNA replication-associated features of ATR function have led to the emergence of ATR kinase inhibitors as potential adjuvants for DNA-damaging cancer chemotherapeutics. However, whether ATR affects the genotoxic stress response in non-replicating, non-cycling cells is currently unknown. We therefore used chemical inhibition of ATR kinase activity to examine the role of ATR in quiescent human cells. Although ATR inhibition had no obvious effects on the viability of non-cycling cells, inhibition of ATR partially protected non-replicating cells from the lethal effects of UV and UV mimetics. Analyses of various DNA damage response signaling pathways demonstrated that ATR inhibition reduced the activation of apoptotic signaling by these agents in non-cycling cells. The pro-apoptosis/cell death function of ATR is likely due to transcription stress because the lethal effects of compounds that block RNA polymerase movement were reduced in the presence of an ATR inhibitor. These results therefore suggest that whereas DNA polymerase stalling at DNA lesions activates ATR to protect cell viability and prevent apoptosis, the stalling of RNA polymerases instead activates ATR to induce an apoptotic form of cell death in non-cycling cells. These results have important implications regarding the use of ATR inhibitors in cancer chemotherapy regimens. PMID:26940878

  3. Polyplex exposure inhibits cell cycle, increases inflammatory response, and can cause protein expression without cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Rebecca L; Erickson, Blake; Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta F; Baker, James R; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2013-04-01

    We sought to evaluate the relationship between cell division and protein expression when using commercial poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-based polyplexes. The membrane dye PKH26 was used to assess cell division, and cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) was used to monitor protein expression. When analyzed at the whole population level, a greater number of cells divided than expressed protein, regardless of the level of protein expression observed, giving apparent consistency with the hypothesis that protein expression requires cells to pass through mitosis in order for the transgene to overcome the nuclear membrane. However, when the polyplex-exposed population was evaluated for the amount of division in the protein-expressing subpopulation, it was observed that substantial amounts of expression had occurred in the absence of division. Indeed, in HeLa S3 cells, this represented the majority of expressing cells. Of interest, the doubling time for both cell lines was slowed by ~2-fold upon exposure to polyplexes. This change was not altered by the origin of the plasmid DNA (pDNA) transgene promoter (cytomegalovirus (CMV) or elongation factor-1 alpha (EF1α)). Gene expression arrays in polyplex-exposed HeLa S3 cells showed upregulation of cell cycle arrest genes and downregulation of genes related to mitosis. Chemokine, interleukin, and toll-like receptor genes were also upregulated, suggesting activation of proinflammatory pathways. In summary, we find evidence that a cell division-independent expression pathway exists, and that polyplex exposure slows cell division and increases inflammatory response.

  4. Morphine Can Inhibit the Growth of Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cells by Arresting the Cell Cycle and Inducing Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanhua; Qin, Yi; Li, Li; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Xu; Xie, Yubo

    2017-10-01

    Morphine is widely used for relieving cancer pain in patients with advanced cancer. However, whether morphine can suppress or promote the progression of cancer in breast cancer patients receiving morphine analgesia remains unclear. Therefore, we used an in vitro model treated with morphine and naloxone to investigate the effects of morphine on breast cancer cell line MCF-7. MCF-7 cells were cultured with different concentrations (0.01 to 10 µM) of morphine at 12th, 24th, 36th, 48th, 60th and 72nd hours. Then, cell viability was measured through the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and cell cycle and apoptosis assays were detected by flow cytometry (FCM). In addition, cell proliferation was conducted by colony formation assay. In this study, we have found that morphine (0.01 to 10 µM) could significantly reduce the cell vitality, growth and colony formation rate of MCF-7 cells, which has a certain relationship with cell cycle progression arrested at the G0/G1 and G2/M phase and MCF-7 cells apoptosis. Moreover, naloxone along with morphine could not reverse these effects, which indicates that the inhibition of MCF-7 breast cancer cell growth and proliferation by morphine could be its independent effect, not associated with opioid receptors. Morphine can inhibit cell growth by blocking the cell cycle and promote apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Hence, morphine may be unable to promote the progression of cancer in breast cancer patients receiving morphine analgesia.

  5. Autophagy Interplay with Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Regulation in the Growth Inhibiting Effect of Resveratrol in Glioma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo C.; Villodre, Emilly Schlee; Zamin, Lauren L.; Lenz, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains very poor, thus making the development of new drugs urgent. Resveratrol (Rsv) is a natural compound that has several beneficial effects such as neuroprotection and cytotoxicity for several GBM cell lines. Here we evaluated the mechanism of action of Rsv on human GBM cell lines, focusing on the role of autophagy and its crosstalk with apoptosis and cell cycle control. We further evaluated the role of autophagy and the effect of Rsv on GBM Cancer Stem Cells (gCSCs), involved in GBM resistance and recurrence. Glioma cells treated with Rsv was tested for autophagy, apoptosis, necrosis, cell cycle and phosphorylation or expression levels of key players of these processes. Rsv induced the formation of autophagosomes in three human GBM cell lines, accompanied by an upregulation of autophagy proteins Atg5, beclin-1 and LC3-II. Inhibition of Rsv-induced autophagy triggered apoptosis, with an increase in Bax and cleavage of caspase-3. While inhibition of apoptosis or autophagy alone did not revert Rsv-induced toxicity, inhibition of both processes blocked this toxicity. Rsv also induced a S-G2/M phase arrest, accompanied by an increase on levels of pCdc2(Y15), cyclin A, E and B, and pRb (S807/811) and a decrease of cyclin D1. Interestingly, this arrest was dependent on the induction of autophagy, since inhibition of Rsv-induced autophagy abolishes cell cycle arrest and returns the phosphorylation of Cdc2(Y15) and Rb(S807/811), and levels of cyclin A, and B to control levels. Finally, inhibition of autophagy or treatment with Rsv decreased the sphere formation and the percentage of CD133 and OCT4-positive cells, markers of gCSCs. In conclusion, the crosstalk among autophagy, cell cycle and apoptosis, together with the biology of gCSCs, has to be considered in tailoring pharmacological interventions aimed to reduce glioma growth using compounds with multiple targets such as Rsv. PMID:21695150

  6. Knockdown of XBP1 by RNAi in Mouse Granulosa Cells Promotes Apoptosis, Inhibits Cell Cycle, and Decreases Estradiol Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Granulosa cells are crucial for follicular growth, development, and follicular atresia. X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1, a basic region-leucine zipper protein, is widely involved in cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, cellular stress response, and other signaling pathways. In this study, RNA interference, flow cytometry, western blot, real-time PCR, Cell Counting Kit (CCK8, and ELISA were used to investigate the effect of XBP1 on steroidogenesis, apoptosis, cell cycle, and proliferation of mouse granulosa cells. ELISA analysis showed that XBP1 depletion significantly decreased the concentrations of estradiol (E2. Additionally, the expression of estrogen synthesis enzyme Cyp19a1 was sharply downregulated. Moreover, flow cytometry showed that knockdown of XBP1 increased the apoptosis rate and arrests the cell cycle in S-phase in granulosa cells (GCs. Further study confirmed these results. The expression of CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP, cysteinyl aspartate specific proteases-3 (caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, and Cyclin E was upregulated, while that of Bcl-2, Cyclin A1, and Cyclin B1 was downregulated. Simultaneously, CCK8 analysis indicated that XBP1 disruption inhibited cell proliferation. In addition, XBP1 knockdown also alters the expression of Has2 and Ptgs2, two essential genes for folliculogenesis. Collectively, these data reveal a novel critical role of XBP1 in folliculogenesis by regulating the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroid synthesis of mouse granulosa cells.

  7. Downregulation of HDAC9 inhibits cell proliferation and tumor formation by inducing cell cycle arrest in retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yiting; Wu, Dan; Xia, Fengjie; Xian, Hongyu; Zhu, Xinyue [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Ophthalmology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, 210002 (China); Cui, Hongjuan, E-mail: hcui@swu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Institute of Sericulture and Systems Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing, 400716 (China); Huang, Zhenping, E-mail: huangzhenping19633@163.com [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Ophthalmology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, 210002 (China)

    2016-04-29

    Histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) is a member of class II HDACs, which regulates a wide variety of normal and abnormal physiological functions. Recently, HDAC9 has been found to be overexpressed in some types of human cancers. However, the role of HDAC9 in retinoblastoma remains unclear. In this study, we found that HDAC9 was commonly expressed in retinoblastoma tissues and HDAC9 was overexpressed in prognostically poor retinoblastoma patients. Through knocking down HDAC9 in Y79 and WERI-Rb-1 cells, the expression level of HDAC9 was found to be positively related to cell proliferation in vitro. Further investigation indicated that knockdown HDAC9 could significantly induce cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in retinoblastoma cells. Western blot assay showed downregulation of HDAC9 could significantly decrease cyclin E2 and CDK2 expression. Lastly, xenograft study in nude mice showed that downregulation of HDAC9 inhibited tumor growth and development in vivo. Therefore, our results suggest that HDAC9 could serve as a novel potential therapeutic target in the treatment of retinoblastoma. - Highlights: • High expression of HDAC9 correlates with poor patient prognosis. • Downregulation of HDAC9 inhibits cell proliferation in retinoblastoma cells. • Downregulation of HDAC9 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in retinoblastoma cells. • Downregulation of HDAC9 suppresses tumor growth in nude mice.

  8. Downregulation of HDAC9 inhibits cell proliferation and tumor formation by inducing cell cycle arrest in retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yiting; Wu, Dan; Xia, Fengjie; Xian, Hongyu; Zhu, Xinyue; Cui, Hongjuan; Huang, Zhenping

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) is a member of class II HDACs, which regulates a wide variety of normal and abnormal physiological functions. Recently, HDAC9 has been found to be overexpressed in some types of human cancers. However, the role of HDAC9 in retinoblastoma remains unclear. In this study, we found that HDAC9 was commonly expressed in retinoblastoma tissues and HDAC9 was overexpressed in prognostically poor retinoblastoma patients. Through knocking down HDAC9 in Y79 and WERI-Rb-1 cells, the expression level of HDAC9 was found to be positively related to cell proliferation in vitro. Further investigation indicated that knockdown HDAC9 could significantly induce cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in retinoblastoma cells. Western blot assay showed downregulation of HDAC9 could significantly decrease cyclin E2 and CDK2 expression. Lastly, xenograft study in nude mice showed that downregulation of HDAC9 inhibited tumor growth and development in vivo. Therefore, our results suggest that HDAC9 could serve as a novel potential therapeutic target in the treatment of retinoblastoma. - Highlights: • High expression of HDAC9 correlates with poor patient prognosis. • Downregulation of HDAC9 inhibits cell proliferation in retinoblastoma cells. • Downregulation of HDAC9 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in retinoblastoma cells. • Downregulation of HDAC9 suppresses tumor growth in nude mice.

  9. Inhibition of exportin-1 function results in rapid cell cycle-associated DNA damage in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Russell T; Marcus, Joshua M; Orth, James D

    2017-06-13

    Selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE) are small molecules in development as anti-cancer agents. The first-in-class SINE, selinexor, is in clinical trials for blood and solid cancers. Selinexor forms a covalent bond with exportin-1 at cysteine-528, and blocks its ability to export cargos. Previous work has shown strong cell cycle effects and drug-induced cell death across many different cancer-derived cell lines. Here, we report strong cell cycle-associated DNA double-stranded break formation upon the treatment of cancer cells with SINE. In multiple cell models, selinexor treatment results in the formation of clustered DNA damage foci in 30-40% of cells within 8 hours that is dependent upon cysteine-528. DNA damage strongly correlates with G1/S-phase and decreased DNA replication. Live cell microscopy reveals an association between DNA damage and cell fate. Cells that form damage in G1-phase more often die or arrest, while those damaged in S/G2-phase frequently progress to cell division. Up to half of all treated cells form damage foci, and most cells that die after being damaged, were damaged in G1-phase. By comparison, non-transformed cell lines show strong cell cycle effects but little DNA damage and less death than cancer cells. Significant drug combination effects occur when selinexor is paired with different classes of agents that either cause DNA damage or that diminish DNA damage repair. These data present a novel effect of exportin-1 inhibition and provide a strong rationale for multiple combination treatments of selinexor with agents that are currently in use for the treatment of different solid cancers.

  10. Isoalantolactone inhibits UM-SCC-10A cell growth via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjun Wu

    Full Text Available Isoalantolactone is a sesquiterpene lactone compound isolated from the roots of Inula helenium L. Previous studies have demonstrated that isoalantolactone possesses antifungal, anti-bacterial, anti-helminthic and anti-proliferative properties in a variety of cells, but there are no studies concerning its effects on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. In the present study, an MTT assay demonstrated that isoalantolactone has anti-proliferative activity against the HNSCC cell line (UM-SCC-10A. Immunostaining identified that this compound induced UM-SCC-10A cell apoptosis but not necrosis. To explain the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects, flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that the apoptosis was associated with cell cycle arrest during the G1 phase, up-regulation of p53 and p21, and down-regulation of cyclin D. Furthermore, our results revealed that induction of apoptosis through a mitochondrial pathway led to up-regulation of pro-apoptotic protein expression (Bax, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein expression (Bcl-2, mitochondrial release of cytochrome c (Cyto c, reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP and activation of caspase-3 (Casp-3. Involvement of the caspase apoptosis pathway was confirmed using caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK pretreatment. Together, our findings suggest that isoalantolactone induced caspase-dependent apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway and was associated with cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase in UM-SCC-10A cells. Therefore, isoalantolactone may become a potential drug for treating HNSCC.

  11. Pyrogallol, ROS generator inhibits As4.1 juxtaglomerular cells via cell cycle arrest of G2 phase and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Woo Hyun; Han, Yong Hwan; Kim, Suhn Hee; Kim, Sung Zoo

    2007-01-01

    Pyrogallol as a catechin compound has been employed as an O 2 · - generator and often used to investigate the role of ROS in the biological system. Here, we investigated the in vitro effect of pyrogallol on cell growth, cell cycle and apoptosis in As4.1 juxtaglomerular cells. Dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth was observed with IC 50 of about 60 μM for 48 h using MTT assay. Pyrogallol (100 μM) did not alter intracellular H 2 O 2 level and catalase activity, but increased the intracellular O 2 · - level and decreased SOD activity in As4.1 cells. DNA flow cytometric analysis indicated that 50 and 100 μM pyrogallol significantly increased G2 phase cells as compared with those of pyrogallol-untreated cells. Also, pyrogallol induced apoptosis as evidenced by flow cytometric detection of sub-G1 DNA content, annexin V binding assay and DAPI staining. This apoptosis process was accompanied with the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨ m ), Bcl-2 decrease, caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. Pan caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD) could significantly rescue As4.1 cells from pyrogallol-induced cell death. But, the inhibitors of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 did not prevent apoptotic events in pyrogallol-treated As4.1 cells. Taken together, we have demonstrated that an ROS inducer, pyrogallol inhibits the growth of As4.1 JG cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and suggest that the compound exhibits an anti-proliferative efficacy on these cells

  12. Overexpression of transcription factor Sp1 leads to gene expression perturbations and cell cycle inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Deniaud

    of overexpressed Sp1 induces an inhibition of cell cycle progression that precedes apoptosis and a transcriptional response targeting genes containing Sp1 binding sites in their promoter or not suggesting both direct Sp1-driven transcription and indirect mechanisms.

  13. Hesperidin inhibits HeLa cell proliferation through apoptosis mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways and cell cycle arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yaoxian; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Jin; Gao, Jing; Ge, Xin; Lou, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Hesperidin (30, 5, 9-dihydroxy-40-methoxy-7-orutinosyl flavanone) is a flavanone that is found mainly in citrus fruits and has been shown to have some anti-neoplastic effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of hesperidin on apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells and to identify the mechanism involved. Cells were treated with hesperidin (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 μM) for 24, 48, or 72 h and relative cell viability was assessed using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Hesperidin inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Hesperidin-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells was characterized by increased nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, increased levels of GADD153/CHOP and GRP78 indicated hesperidin-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells involved a caspase-dependent pathway, presumably downstream of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway. Both of these proteins are hallmarks of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Hesperidin also promoted the formation of reactive oxygen species, mobilization of intracellular Ca 2+ , loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria, and promoted capase-3 activation. It also arrested HeLa cells in the G0/G1 phase in the cell cycle by downregulating the expression of cyclinD1, cyclinE1, and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 at the protein level. The effect of hesperidin was also verified on the human colon cancer cell HT-29 cells. We concluded that hesperidin inhibited HeLa cell proliferation through apoptosis involving endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways and cell cycle arrest

  14. MS4a4B, a CD20 homologue in T cells, inhibits T cell propagation by modulation of cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available MS4a4B, a CD20 homologue in T cells, is a novel member of the MS4A gene family in mice. The MS4A family includes CD20, FcεRIβ, HTm4 and at least 26 novel members that are characterized by their structural features: with four membrane-spanning domains, two extracellular domains and two cytoplasmic regions. CD20, FcεRIβ and HTm4 have been found to function in B cells, mast cells and hematopoietic cells respectively. However, little is known about the function of MS4a4B in T cell regulation. We demonstrate here that MS4a4B negatively regulates mouse T cell proliferation. MS4a4B is highly expressed in primary T cells, natural killer cells (NK and some T cell lines. But its expression in all malignant T cells, including thymoma and T hybridoma tested, was silenced. Interestingly, its expression was regulated during T cell activation. Viral vector-driven overexpression of MS4a4B in primary T cells and EL4 thymoma cells reduced cell proliferation. In contrast, knockdown of MS4a4B accelerated T cell proliferation. Cell cycle analysis showed that MS4a4B regulated T cell proliferation by inhibiting entry of the cells into S-G2/M phase. MS4a4B-mediated inhibition of cell cycle was correlated with upregulation of Cdk inhibitory proteins and decreased levels of Cdk2 activity, subsequently leading to inhibition of cell cycle progression. Our data indicate that MS4a4B negatively regulates T cell proliferation. MS4a4B, therefore, may serve as a modulator in the negative-feedback regulatory loop of activated T cells.

  15. Inhibition of Cell Survival by Curcumin Is Associated with Downregulation of Cell Division Cycle 20 (Cdc20) in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Xue, Ying-Bo; Li, Hang; Qiu, Dong; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Tan, Shi-Sheng

    2017-02-04

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors in the United States. Curcumin, a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, has been reported to exert its antitumor activity in pancreatic cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of curcumin-mediated tumor suppressive function have not been fully elucidated. In the current study, we explore whether curcumin exhibits its anti-cancer function through inhibition of oncoprotein cell division cycle 20 (Cdc20) in pancreatic cancer cells. We found that curcumin inhibited cell growth, enhanced apoptosis, induced cell cycle arrest and retarded cell invasion in pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that curcumin significantly inhibited the expression of Cdc20 in pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that overexpression of Cdc20 enhanced cell proliferation and invasion, and abrogated the cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin in pancreatic cancer cells. Consistently, downregulation of Cdc20 promoted curcumin-mediated anti-tumor activity. Therefore, our findings indicated that inhibition of Cdc20 by curcumin could be useful for the treatment of pancreatic cancer patients.

  16. Scoulerine affects microtubule structure, inhibits proliferation, arrests cell cycle and thus culminates in the apoptotic death of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habartova, Klara; Havelek, Radim; Seifrtova, Martina; Kralovec, Karel; Cahlikova, Lucie; Chlebek, Jakub; Cermakova, Eva; Mazankova, Nadezda; Marikova, Jana; Kunes, Jiri; Novakova, Lucie; Rezacova, Martina

    2018-03-19

    Scoulerine is an isoquinoline alkaloid, which indicated promising suppression of cancer cells growth. However, the mode of action (MOA) remained unclear. Cytotoxic and antiproliferative properties were determined in this study. Scoulerine reduces the mitochondrial dehydrogenases activity of the evaluated leukemic cells with IC 50 values ranging from 2.7 to 6.5 µM. The xCELLigence system revealed that scoulerine exerted potent antiproliferative activity in lung, ovarian and breast carcinoma cell lines. Jurkat and MOLT-4 leukemic cells treated with scoulerine were decreased in proliferation and viability. Scoulerine acted to inhibit proliferation through inducing G2 or M-phase cell cycle arrest, which correlates well with the observed breakdown of the microtubule network, increased Chk1 Ser345, Chk2 Thr68 and mitotic H3 Ser10 phosphorylation. Scoulerine was able to activate apoptosis, as determined by p53 upregulation, increase caspase activity, Annexin V and TUNEL labeling. Results highlight the potent antiproliferative and proapoptotic function of scoulerine in cancer cells caused by its ability to interfere with the microtubule elements of the cytoskeleton, checkpoint kinase signaling and p53 proteins. This is the first study of the mechanism of scoulerine at cellular and molecular level. Scoulerine is a potent antimitotic compound and that it merits further investigation as an anticancer drug.

  17. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester induces cell cycle arrest by the inhibition of nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HCT116 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung-Mi [Natural Products Research Institute, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Ji Ho [Natural Products Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Gangneung, 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Hwa [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Andong National University, Andong 760-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Gyun [Natural Products Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Gangneung, 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Kun Ho [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Andong National University, Andong 760-749 (Korea, Republic of); Nho, Chu Won, E-mail: cwnho@kist.re.kr [Natural Products Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Gangneung, 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeong Shik, E-mail: kims@snu.ac.kr [Natural Products Research Institute, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-17

    We demonstrate that chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (CME), a triterpenoid saponin from the root of Achyranthes japonica, has an anticancer activity. We investigate its molecular mechanism in depth in HCT116 cells. CME reduces the amount of β-catenin in nucleus and inhibits the binding of β-catenin to specific DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) in target gene promoters. Thus, CME appears to decrease the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Cyclin D1, as a representative target for β-catenin, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. As a result of the decrease of the cell cycle regulatory proteins, CME inhibits cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, we suggest that CME as a novel Wnt/β-catenin inhibitor can be a putative agent for the treatment of colorectal cancers. - Highlights: • CME inhibits cell proliferation in HCT116 cells. • CME increases cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis. • CME attenuates cyclin D1 and regulates cell cycle regulatory proteins. • CME inhibits β-catenin translocation to nucleus.

  18. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester induces cell cycle arrest by the inhibition of nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HCT116 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yun, Ji Ho; Lee, Dong Hwa; Park, Young Gyun; Son, Kun Ho; Nho, Chu Won; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (CME), a triterpenoid saponin from the root of Achyranthes japonica, has an anticancer activity. We investigate its molecular mechanism in depth in HCT116 cells. CME reduces the amount of β-catenin in nucleus and inhibits the binding of β-catenin to specific DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) in target gene promoters. Thus, CME appears to decrease the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Cyclin D1, as a representative target for β-catenin, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. As a result of the decrease of the cell cycle regulatory proteins, CME inhibits cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, we suggest that CME as a novel Wnt/β-catenin inhibitor can be a putative agent for the treatment of colorectal cancers. - Highlights: • CME inhibits cell proliferation in HCT116 cells. • CME increases cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis. • CME attenuates cyclin D1 and regulates cell cycle regulatory proteins. • CME inhibits β-catenin translocation to nucleus

  19. Targeting DTL induces cell cycle arrest and senescence and suppresses cell growth and colony formation through TPX2 inhibition in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chia; Chen, I-Shu; Huang, Guan-Jin; Kang, Chi-Hsiang; Wang, Kuo-Chiang; Tsao, Min-Jen; Pan, Hung-Wei

    2018-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has an increasing incidence and high mortality. Surgical operation is not a comprehensive strategy for liver cancer. Moreover, tolerating systemic chemotherapy is difficult for patients with HCC because hepatic function is often impaired due to underlying cirrhosis. Therefore, a comprehensive strategy for cancer treatment should be developed. DTL (Cdc10-dependent transcript 2) is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression and genomic stability. In our previous study, the upregulation of DTL expression in aggressive HCC correlated positively with tumor grade and poor patient survival. We hypothesize that targeting DTL may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for liver cancer. DTL small interference RNAs were used to knock down DTL protein expression. A clonogenic assay, immunostaining, double thymidine block, imaging flow cytometry analysis, and a tumor spheroid formation assay were used to analyze the role of DTL in tumor cell growth, cell cycle progression, micronucleation, ploidy, and tumorigenicity. Our results demonstrated that targeting DTL reduced cell cycle regulators and chromosome segregation genes, resulting in increased cell micronucleation. DTL depletion inhibited liver cancer cell growth, increased senescence, and reduced tumorigenesis. DTL depletion resulted in the disruption of the mitotic proteins cyclin B, CDK1, securin, seprase, Aurora A, and Aurora B as well as the upregulation of the cell cycle arrest gene p21 . A rescue assay indicated that DTL should be targeted through TPX2 downregulation for cancer cell growth inhibition. Moreover, DTL silencing inhibited the growth of patient-derived primary cultured HCC cells. Our study results indicate that DTL is a potential novel target gene for treating liver cancer through liver cancer cell senescence induction. Furthermore, our results provide insights into molecular mechanisms for targeting DTL in liver cancer cells. The results also indicate several other starting

  20. Downregulation of HDAC9 inhibits cell proliferation and tumor formation by inducing cell cycle arrest in retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiting; Wu, Dan; Xia, Fengjie; Xian, Hongyu; Zhu, Xinyue; Cui, Hongjuan; Huang, Zhenping

    2016-04-29

    Histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) is a member of class II HDACs, which regulates a wide variety of normal and abnormal physiological functions. Recently, HDAC9 has been found to be overexpressed in some types of human cancers. However, the role of HDAC9 in retinoblastoma remains unclear. In this study, we found that HDAC9 was commonly expressed in retinoblastoma tissues and HDAC9 was overexpressed in prognostically poor retinoblastoma patients. Through knocking down HDAC9 in Y79 and WERI-Rb-1 cells, the expression level of HDAC9 was found to be positively related to cell proliferation in vitro. Further investigation indicated that knockdown HDAC9 could significantly induce cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in retinoblastoma cells. Western blot assay showed downregulation of HDAC9 could significantly decrease cyclin E2 and CDK2 expression. Lastly, xenograft study in nude mice showed that downregulation of HDAC9 inhibited tumor growth and development in vivo. Therefore, our results suggest that HDAC9 could serve as a novel potential therapeutic target in the treatment of retinoblastoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Andrographis paniculata extracts and major constituent diterpenoids inhibit growth of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyo, Tawit; Pholphana, Nanthanit; Rangkadilok, Nuchanart; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2014-05-01

    Andrographis paniculata is an important herbal medicine widely used in several Asian countries for the treatment of various diseases due to its broad range of pharmacological activities. The present study reports that A. paniculata extracts potently inhibit the growth of liver (HepG2 and SK-Hep1) and bile duct (HuCCA-1 and RMCCA-1) cancer cells. A. paniculata extracts with different contents of major diterpenoids, including andrographolide, 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide, neoandrographolide, and 14-deoxyandrographolide, exhibited a different potency of growth inhibition. The ethanolic extract of A. paniculata at the first true leaf stage, which contained a high amount of 14-deoxyandrographolide but a low amount of andrographolide, showed a cytotoxic effect to cancer cells about 4 times higher than the water extract of A. paniculata at the mature leaf stage, which contained a high amount of andrographolide but a low amount of 14-deoxyandrographolide. Andrographolide, not 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide, neoandrographolide, or 14-deoxyandrographolide, possessed potent cytotoxic activity against the growth of liver and bile duct cancer cells. The cytotoxic effect of the water extract of A. paniculata at the mature leaf stage could be explained by the present amount of andrographolide, while the cytotoxic effect of the ethanolic extract of A. paniculata at the first true leaf stage could not. HuCCA-1 cells showed more sensitivity to A. paniculata extracts and andrographolide than RMCCA-1 cells. Furthermore, the ethanolic extract of A. paniculata at the first true leaf stage increased cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 and G2/M phases, and induced apoptosis in both HuCCA-1 and RMCCA-1 cells. The expressions of cyclin-D1, Bcl-2, and the inactive proenzyme form of caspase-3 were reduced by the ethanolic extract of A. paniculata in the first true leaf stage treatment, while a proapoptotic protein Bax was increased. The cleavage of poly (ADP

  2. Inhibition of CIP2A attenuates tumor progression by inducing cell cycle arrest and promoting cellular senescence in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Qu, Kai; Tao, Jie; Yin, Guozhi; Han, Shaoshan; Liu, Qingguang; Sun, Hao

    2018-01-08

    CIP2A is a recent identified oncogene that inhibits protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and stabilizes c-Myc in cancer cells. To investigate the potential oncogenic role and prognostic value of CIP2A, we comprehensively analyzed the CIP2A expression levels in pan-cancer and observed high expression level of CIP2A in majority cancer types, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Based on a validation cohort including 60 HCC and 20 non-tumorous tissue samples, we further confirmed the high mRNA and protein expression levels of CIP2A in HCC, and found high CIP2A mRNA expression level was associated with unfavorable overall and recurrence-free survival in patients with HCC. Mechanistic investigations revealed that inhibition of CIP2A significantly attenuated cellular proliferation in vitro and tumourigenicity in vivo. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that CIP2A might be involved in regulating cell cycle. Our experimental data further confirmed CIP2A knockdown induced cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. We found accumulated cellular senescence in HCC cells with CIP2A knockdown, companying expression changes of senescence associated proteins (p21, CDK2, CDK4, cyclin D1, MCM7 and FoxM1). Mechanistically, CIP2A knockdown repressed FoxM1 expression and induced FoxM1 dephosphorylation. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A by phosphatase inhibitor rescued the repression of FoxM1. Taken together, our results showed that CIP2A was highly expressed in HCC. Inhibition of CIP2A induced cell cycle arrest and promoted cellular senescence via repressing FoxM1 transcriptional activity, suggesting a potential anti-cancer target for patients with HCC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Inhibition of root growth by narciclasine is caused by DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest in lettuce seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanfeng; Li, Jiaolong; Yang, Lijing; Nan, Wenbin; Cao, Xiaoping; Bi, Yurong

    2014-09-01

    Narciclasine (NCS) is an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs. Its phytotoxic effects on plant growth were examined in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings. Results showed that high concentrations (0.5-5 μM) of NCS restricted the growth of lettuce roots in a dose-dependent manner. In NCS-treated lettuce seedlings, the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells and cell elongation in the mature region, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells, and cell cycle. Moreover, comet assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay indicated that higher levels NCS (0.5-5 μM) induced DNA damage in root cells of lettuce. The decrease in meristematic cells and increase in DNA damage signals in lettuce roots in responses to NCS are in a dose-dependent manner. NCS-induced reactive oxygen species accumulation may explain an increase in DNA damage in lettuce roots. Thus, the restraint of root growth is due to cell cycle arrest which is caused by NCS-induced DNA damage. In addition, it was also found that NCS (0.5-5 μM) inhibited the root hair development of lettuce seedlings. Further investigations on the underlying mechanism revealed that both auxin and ethylene signaling pathways are involved in the response of root hairs to NCS.

  4. Saponins from soy bean and mung bean inhibit the antigen specific activation of helper T cells by blocking cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk Jun; Bae, Joonbeom; Kim, Sunhee; Jeong, Seonah; Choi, Chang-Yong; Choi, Sang-Pil; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Jung, Woon-Won; Imm, Jee-Young; Kim, Sae Hun; Chun, Taehoon

    2013-02-01

    Treatment of helper T (Th) cells with saponins from soy bean and mung bean prevented their activation by inhibiting cell proliferation and cytokine secretion. However, the saponins did not affect the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (A(b)) and co-stimulatory molecule (CD86) on professional antigen-presenting cells. Instead, the saponins directly inhibited Th cell proliferation by blocking the G(1) to S phase cell cycle transition. Moreover, blocking of the cell cycle by the saponins was achieved by decreased expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and constitutive expression of p27(KIP1). Saponins also increased stability of p27(KIP1) in Th cells after antigenic stimulation.

  5. Natriuretic peptide receptor A inhibition suppresses gastric cancer development through reactive oxygen species-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Ji-Wei; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Zhi, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Qun; Li, Bo-Wen; Wang, Lin-Jun; Xie, Kun-Ling; Tao, Jin-Qiu; Tang, Jie; Wei, Song; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Dian-Cai; Yang, Li; Xu, Ze-Kuan

    2016-10-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), the major receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), has been implicated in tumorigenesis; however, the role of ANP-NPRA signaling in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that NPRA expression was positively associated with gastric tumor size and cancer stage. NPRA inhibition by shRNA induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, cell death, and autophagy in gastric cancer cells, due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy led to caspase-dependent cell death. Therefore, autophagy induced by NPRA silencing may represent a cytoprotective mechanism. ROS accumulation activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). ROS-mediated activation of JNK inhibited cell proliferation by disturbing cell cycle and decreased cell viability. In addition, AMPK activation promoted autophagy in NPRA-downregulated cancer cells. Overall, our results indicate that the inhibition of NPRA suppresses gastric cancer development and targeting NPRA may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase promotes tumor cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents via a mechanism involving delay in cell cycle progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Gail T.; Sullivan, Richard; Pare, Genevieve C.; Graham, Charles H.

    2010-01-01

    Approaches to overcome chemoresistance in cancer cells have involved targeting specific signaling pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, a stress response pathway known to be involved in the regulation of cell survival, apoptosis and growth. The present study determined the effect of PI3K inhibition on the clonogenic survival of human cancer cells following exposure to various chemotherapeutic agents. Treatment with the PI3K inhibitors LY294002 or Compound 15e resulted in increased survival of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells after exposure to doxorubicin, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil, and vincristine. Increased survival following PI3K inhibition was also observed in DU-145 prostate, HCT-116 colon and A-549 lung carcinoma cell lines exposed to doxorubicin. Increased cell survival mediated by LY294002 was correlated with a decrease in cell proliferation, which was linked to an increase in the proportion of cells in the G 1 phase of the cell cycle. Inhibition of PI3K signaling also resulted in higher levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 Waf1/Cip1 and p27 Kip1 ; and knockdown of p27 kip1 with siRNA attenuated resistance to doxorubicin in cells treated with LY294002. Incubation in the presence of LY294002 after exposure to doxorubicin resulted in decreased cell survival. These findings provide evidence that PI3K inhibition leads to chemoresistance in human cancer cells by causing a delay in cell cycle; however, the timing of PI3K inhibition (either before or after exposure to anti-cancer agents) may be a critical determinant of chemosensitivity.

  7. A novel muscarinic antagonist R2HBJJ inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1.

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    Nan Hua

    Full Text Available Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs. In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ presented a strong anticholinergic activity on carbachol-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea. R2HBJJ markedly suppressed the growth of NSCLC cells, such as H1299, H460 and H157. In H1299 cells, both R2HBJJ and its leading compound R2-PHC displayed significant anti-proliferative activity as M3 receptor antagonist darifenacin. Exogenous replenish of ACh could attenuate R2HBJJ-induced growth inhibition. Silencing M3 receptor or ChAT by specific-siRNAs resulted in a growth inhibition of 55.5% and 37.9% on H1299 cells 96 h post transfection, respectively. Further studies revealed that treatment with R2HBJJ arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1 by down-regulation of cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb. Therefore, the current study reveals that NSCLC cells express an autocrine and paracrine cholinergic system which stimulates the growth of NSCLC cells. R2HBJJ, as a novel mAChRs antagonist, can block the local cholinergic loop by antagonizing predominantly M3 receptors and inhibit NSCLC cell growth, which suggest that M3 receptor antagonist might be a potential chemotherapeutic regimen for NSCLC.

  8. A class of DNA-binding peptides from wheat bud causes growth inhibition, G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in HeLa cells

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    Elgjo Kjell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deproteinized DNA from eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells still contains a low-molecular weight peptidic fraction which can be dissociated by alkalinization of the medium. This fraction inhibits RNA transcription and tumor cell growth. Removal from DNA of normal cells causes amplification of DNA template activity. This effect is lower or absent in several cancer cell lines. Likewise, the amount of active peptides in cancer cell DNA extracts is lower than in DNA preparation of the corresponding normal cells. Such evidence, and their ubiquitous presence, suggests that they are a regulatory, conserved factor involved in the control of normal cell growth and gene expression. Results We report that peptides extracted from wheat bud chromatin induce growth inhibition, G2 arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis in HeLa cells. The growth rate is decreased in cells treated during the S phase only and it is accompanied by DNA damage and DNA synthesis inhibition. In G2 cells, this treatment induces inactivation of the CDK1-cyclin B1 complex and an increase of active chk1 kinase expression. Conclusion The data indicate that the chromatin peptidic pool inhibits HeLa cell growth by causing defective DNA replication which, in turn, arrests cell cycle progression to mitosis via G2 checkpoint pathway activation.

  9. Cdk5 phosphorylates non-genotoxically overexpressed p53 following inhibition of PP2A to induce cell cycle arrest/apoptosis and inhibits tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Ratna

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 is the most studied tumor suppressor and its overexpression may or may not cause cell death depending upon the genetic background of the cells. p53 is degraded by human papillomavirus (HPV E6 protein in cervical carcinoma. Several stress activated kinases are known to phosphorylate p53 and, among them cyclin dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is one of the kinase studied in neuronal cell system. Recently, the involvement of Cdk5 in phosphorylating p53 has been shown in certain cancer types. Phosphorylation at specific serine residues in p53 is essential for it to cause cell growth inhibition. Activation of p53 under non stress conditions is poorly understood. Therefore, the activation of p53 and detection of upstream kinases that phosphorylate non-genotoxically overexpressed p53 will be of therapeutic importance for cancer treatment. Results To determine the non-genotoxic effect of p53; Tet-On system was utilized and p53 inducible HPV-positive HeLa cells were developed. p53 overexpression in HPV-positive cells did not induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. However, we demonstrate that overexpressed p53 can be activated to upregulate p21 and Bax which causes G2 arrest and apoptosis, by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A. Additionally, we report that the upstream kinase cyclin dependent kinase 5 interacts with p53 to phosphorylate it at Serine20 and Serine46 residues thereby promoting its recruitment on p21 and bax promoters. Upregulation and translocation of Bax causes apoptosis through intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Interestingly, overexpressed activated p53 specifically inhibits cell-growth and causes regression in vivo tumor growth as well. Conclusion Present study details the mechanism of activation of p53 and puts forth the possibility of p53 gene therapy to work in HPV positive cervical carcinoma.

  10. Inhibition of tumor proliferation associated with cell cycle arrest caused by extract and fraction from Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe, Karina Bettega; Kviecinski, Maicon Roberto; da Silva, Fabiana Ourique; Bücker, Nádia Falcão; Farias, Mirelle Sinfroni; Castro, Luiza Sheyla Evenni Porfirio Will; de Souza Grinevicius, Valdelúcia Maria Alves; Motta, Nadia Sandrini; Correia, João Francisco Gomes; Rossi, Maria Helena; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi

    2014-09-29

    Casearia sylvestris is a tree found in tropical America. In Brazil it is known mainly as Guaçatonga. Literature reports suggest that the leaves and other plant parts have been used by indigenous populations from South America in preparations, mainly aqueous or hydroethanolic macerations or decoctions, most times taken orally for the primary treatment of several diseases, including cancer. This article reports the results of an investigation about the antiproliferative effects of Casearia sylvestris on tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Aqueous ethanolic maceration and column chromatography were done to obtain a crude aqueous ethanolic extract (CAE) and a chloroform fraction (f-CHCl3). The human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was used in culture. In vitro, non-cytotoxic concentrations were determined by MTT assay and the antiproliferative effect was assessed by the colony forming unit assay using non-cytotoxic concentrations. Effects on the cell cycle were observed through flow cytometry using a propidium iodide kit. Casearin C was identified in f-CHCl3 by chromatography and H(1) nuclear magnetic resonance. The effect on some key proteins of DNA damage (phosphorylation on the histone H2AX) and cell cycle control (p53, p16, cdk2) was evaluated through immunoblot. Antiproliferative effects in vivo were measured in tumor tissue from Ehrlich ascites-bearing mice through the (3)H-thymidine uptake assay and the trypan blue exclusion method. In vitro, EC50 values found at 24 h on MCF-7 cells were 141 µg/mL for CAE and 66 µg/mL for f-CHCl3. Inhibition on proliferation was recorded at concentrations as low as 4 µg/mL in the case of the f-CHCl3 (up to 40%) and up to 50% when CAE was added at 9 µg/mL. The cell cycle arrest was demonstrated by the reduction in terms of number of cells in phases G2/M and S, up to 38.9% and 51.9% when cells were treated with CAE, and 53.9% and 66.2%, respectively, when cells were treated with f-CHCl3. The number of cells in G1 was increased

  11. Methamphetamine induces hepatotoxicity via inhibiting cell division, arresting cell cycle and activating apoptosis: In vivo and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wei, Li-Wen; Xiao, Huan-Qin; Xue, Ye; Du, Si-Hao; Liu, Yun-Gang; Xie, Xiao-Li

    2017-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) resulted in acute hepatic injury. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully clarified. In the present study, rats were treated with METH (15 mg/kg B.W.) for 8 injections (i.p.), and the levels of alanine transaminase, asparatate transaminase and ammonia in serum were significantly elevated over those in the control group, suggesting hepatic injury, which was evidenced by histopathological observation. Analysis of the liver tissues with microarray revealed differential expressions of a total of 332 genes in METH-treated rats. According to the GO and KEGG annotations, a large number of down-regulated cell cycle genes were screened out, suggesting that METH induced cell cycle arrest and deficient of cell cycle checkpoint. Related genes and proteins were confirmed by RT-qPCR and western blotting in rat livers, respectively. Moreover, treatment of Brl-3A cells with METH caused significant cytotoxic response and marked cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, overexpressions of Cidea, cleaved caspase 3 and PARP 1 in METH-treated rats indicated activation of apoptosis, while its inhibition alleviated cell death in Brl-3A cells, suggesting that activation of apoptosis took an important role in METH-induced hepatotoxicity. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that METH induced hepatotoxicity via inducing cell cycle arrest and activating apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Notch1 signaling inhibits growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Runzi; An, Huazhang; Yu, Yizhi; Zhang, Minghui; Liu, Shuxun; Xu, Hongmei; Guo, Zhenghong; Cheng, Tao; Cao, Xuetao

    2003-12-01

    Notch signaling plays a critical role in maintaining the balance between cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis; hence, perturbed Notch signaling may contribute to tumorigenesis. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in Africa and Asia. The mechanisms that orchestrate the multiple oncogenic insults required for initiation and progression of HCC are not clear. We constitutively overexpressed active Notch1 in human HCC to explore the effects of Notch1 signaling on HCC cell growth and to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms. We show here that overexpression of Notch1 was able to inhibit the growth of HCC cells in vitro and in vivo. Biochemical analysis revealed the involvement of cell cycle regulated proteins in Notch1-mediated G(0)/G(1) arrest of HCC cells. Compared with green fluorescent protein (GFP) control, transient transfection of Notch1 ICN decreased expression of cyclin A (3.5-fold), cyclin D1 (2-fold), cyclin E (4.5-fold), CDK2 (2.8-fold), and the phosphorylated form of retinoblastoma protein (3-fold). Up-regulation of p21(waf/cip1) protein expression was observed in SMMC7721-ICN cells stably expressing active Notch1 but not in SMMC7721-GFP cells, which only express GFP. Furthermore, a 12-fold increase in p53 expression and an increase (4.8-fold) in Jun-NH(2)-terminal kinase activation were induced in SMMC7721-ICN cells compared with SMMC7721-GFP cells. In contrast, expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein could not be detected in SMMC7721-ICN cells. These findings suggest that Notch1 signaling may participate in the development of HCC cells, affecting multiple pathways that control both cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  13. LRD-22, a novel dual dithiocarbamatic acid ester, inhibits Aurora-A kinase and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huiling; Li, Ridong [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Li, Li [Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Ge, Zemei [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhou, Rouli, E-mail: rlzhou@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Li, Runtao, E-mail: lirt@bjmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2015-02-27

    In this study we investigated the antitumor activity of the novel dual dithiocarbamatic acid ester LRD-22 in vitro and in vivo. Several cancer cell lines were employed to determine the effect of LRD-22 on cell growth, and the MTT assay showed there was a significant decrease in viable tumor cell numbers in the presence of LRD-22, especially in the HepG2 cell line. Colony formation assay also showed LRD-22 strongly inhibits HepG2 cell growth. Evaluation of the mechanism involved showed that inhibitory effects of LRD-22 on cell growth are due to induction of apoptosis and G2/M arrest. LRD-22 inhibited Aurora-A phosphorylation at Thr{sub 288} and subsequently impaired p53 phosphorylation at Ser{sub 315} which was associated with the proteasome degradation pathway. Tumor suppressor protein p53 is stabilized by this mechanism and accumulates through inhibition of Aurora-A kinase activity via treatment with LRD-22. In vivo study of HepG2 xenograft in nude mice also shows LRD-22 suppresses tumor growth at a concentration of 5 mg/kg without animals suffering loss of body weight. In conclusion, our results demonstrate LRD-22 acts as an Aurora-A kinase inhibitor to induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation in HepG2 cells, and should be considered as a promising targeting agent for HCC therapy. - Highlights: • LRD-22 significantly inhibits cancer cell growth, especially in the HepG2 cell line. • The inhibitory effect of LRD-22 is due to induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. • LRD-22 inhibits Aurora-A phosphorylation which results in subsequent impairment of the p53 pathway. • LRD-22 suppresses tumor growth in xenograft mice without body weight loss.

  14. SRJ23, a new semisynthetic andrographolide derivative: in vitro growth inhibition and mechanisms of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hui Chyn; Wong, Charng Choon; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao; Loke, Seng Cheong; Lajis, Nordin Haji; Stanslas, Johnson

    2014-10-01

    3,19-(3-Chloro-4-fluorobenzylidene)andrographolide (SRJ23), a new semisynthetic derivative of andrographolide (AGP), exhibited selectivity against prostate cancer cells in the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) in vitro anti-cancer screen. Herein, we report the in vitro growth inhibition and mechanisms of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by SRJ23. 3-(4,5-Dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used in assessing in vitro growth inhibition of compounds against prostate cancer (PC-3, DU-145 and LNCaP) and mouse macrophage (RAW 264.7) cell lines. Flow cytometry was utilised to analyse cell cycle distribution, whereas fluorescence microscopy was performed to determine morphological cell death. DNA fragmentation and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) flow cytometry were done to confirm apoptosis induced by SRJ23. Quantitation of cell cycle and apoptotic regulatory proteins were determined by immunoblotting. AGP and SRJ23 selectively inhibited the growth of prostate cancer cells compared with RAW 264.7 cells at low micromolar concentrations; however, SRJ23 was more potent. Mechanistically, SRJ23-treated PC-3 cells displayed down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 1 without affecting levels of CDK4 and cyclin D1. However, SRJ23 induced down-regulation of CDK4 and cyclin D1 but without affecting CDK1 in DU145 and LNCaP cell lines. DNA histogram analysis revealed that the SRJ23 induced G2/M in PC-3 cells but G1 arrest in DU-145 and LNCaP cells. Morphologically, both compounds induced predominantly apoptosis, which was further confirmed by DNA fragmentation and annexin V-FITC staining. The DNA fragmentation was inhibited in the presence of caspase 8 inhibitor (Z-IETD-FMK). Apoptosis was associated with an increase in caspase 8 expression and activation. This thought to have induced cleavage of Bid into t-Bid. Additionally, increased expression and activation of caspase 9 and Bax proteins were

  15. Recovery of the Cell Cycle Inhibition in CCl4-Induced Cirrhosis by the Adenosine Derivative IFC-305

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    Victoria Chagoya de Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cirrhosis is a chronic degenerative illness characterized by changes in normal liver architecture, failure of hepatic function, and impairment of proliferative activity. The aim of this study is to know how IFC-305 compound induces proliferation of the liver during reversion of cirrhosis. Methods. Once cirrhosis has been installed by CCl4 treatment for 10 weeks in male Wistar rats, they were divided into four groups: two received saline and two received the compound; all were euthanized at 5 and 10 weeks of treatment. Liver homogenate, mitochondria, and nucleus were used to measure cyclins, CDKs, and cell cycle regulatory proteins PCNA, pRb, p53, E2F, p21, p27, HGF, liver ATP, and mitochondrial function. Results. Diminution and small changes were observed in the studied proteins in the cirrhotic animals without treatment. The IFC-305-treated rats showed a clear increase in most of the proteins studied mainly in PCNA and CDK6, and a marked increased in ATP and mitochondrial function. Discussion/Conclusion. IFC-305 induces a recovery of the cell cycle inhibition promoting recovery of DNA damage through the action of PCNA and p53. The increase in energy and preservation of mitochondrial function contribute to recovering the proliferative function.

  16. Ajwa Date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Extract Inhibits Human Breast Adenocarcinoma (MCF7) Cells In Vitro by Inducing Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fazal; Ahmed, Farid; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Abuzenadah, Adel; Kumosani, Taha; Barbour, Elie; AlQahtani, Mohammed; Gauthaman, Kalamegam

    2016-01-01

    Phoenix dactylifera L (Date palm) is a native plant of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) and other Middle Eastern countries. Ajwa date has been described in the traditional and alternative medicine to provide several health benefits including anticholesteremic, antioxidant, hepatoprotective and anticancer effects, but most remains to be scientifically validated. Herein, we evaluated the anticancer effects of the Methanolic Extract of Ajwa Date (MEAD) on human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) cells in vitro. MCF7 cells were treated with various concentrations (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg/ml) of MEAD for 24, 48 and 72 h and changes in cell morphology, cell cycle, apoptosis related protein and gene expression were studied. Phase contrast microscopy showed various morphological changes such as cell shrinkage, vacuolation, blebbing and fragmentation. MTT (2-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent inhibitions of MCF7 cell proliferation from 35% to 95%. Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL assays showed positive staining for apoptosis of MCF7 cells treated with MEAD (15 mg and 25 mg for 48 h). Flow cytometric analyses of MCF7 cells with MEAD (15 mg/ml and 20 mg/ml) for 24 h demonstrated cell cycle arrest at 'S' phase; increased p53, Bax protein expression; caspase 3activation and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed up-regulation of p53, Bax, Fas, and FasL and down-regulation of Bcl-2. MEAD inhibited MCF7 cells in vitro by the inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our results indicate the anticancer effects of Ajwa dates, which therefore may be used as an adjunct therapy with conventional chemotherapeutics to achieve a synergistic effect against breast cancer.

  17. Ajwa Date (Phoenix dactylifera L. Extract Inhibits Human Breast Adenocarcinoma (MCF7 Cells In Vitro by Inducing Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal Khan

    Full Text Available Phoenix dactylifera L (Date palm is a native plant of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA and other Middle Eastern countries. Ajwa date has been described in the traditional and alternative medicine to provide several health benefits including anticholesteremic, antioxidant, hepatoprotective and anticancer effects, but most remains to be scientifically validated. Herein, we evaluated the anticancer effects of the Methanolic Extract of Ajwa Date (MEAD on human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7 cells in vitro.MCF7 cells were treated with various concentrations (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg/ml of MEAD for 24, 48 and 72 h and changes in cell morphology, cell cycle, apoptosis related protein and gene expression were studied.Phase contrast microscopy showed various morphological changes such as cell shrinkage, vacuolation, blebbing and fragmentation. MTT (2-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent inhibitions of MCF7 cell proliferation from 35% to 95%. Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL assays showed positive staining for apoptosis of MCF7 cells treated with MEAD (15 mg and 25 mg for 48 h. Flow cytometric analyses of MCF7 cells with MEAD (15 mg/ml and 20 mg/ml for 24 h demonstrated cell cycle arrest at 'S' phase; increased p53, Bax protein expression; caspase 3activation and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis showed up-regulation of p53, Bax, Fas, and FasL and down-regulation of Bcl-2.MEAD inhibited MCF7 cells in vitro by the inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our results indicate the anticancer effects of Ajwa dates, which therefore may be used as an adjunct therapy with conventional chemotherapeutics to achieve a synergistic effect against breast cancer.

  18. An active extract of Ulmus pumila inhibits adipogenesis through regulation of cell cycle progression in 3T3-L1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Chiranjit; Chung, Ha-Yull; Nandre, Rahul M; Lee, John Hwa; Jeon, Tae-Il; Kim, In-Sook; Yang, Seung Hak; Hwang, Seong-Gu

    2012-06-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic disorders has become a major obstacle in improving the average life span. In this regard therapeutic approach using natural compounds are currently receiving much attention. Herbal compounds rich in triterpenes are well known to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. Here, we have found that Ulmus pumila (UP) contained at least four different triterpenoids and inhibited adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells. The cell viability was dose dependently decreased by UP showing the increase of cell accumulation in G1 phase while reducing in S and G2/M phase of cell cycle. UP treatment also significantly decreased the GPDH activity and intracellular lipid accumulation. In addition, UP inhibited the mRNA levels of adipogenic transcription factors and lipogenic genes such as PPARγ, C/EBPα, SREBP1c and FAS while showing no effects on C/EBP-β and C/EBP-δ. Importantly enough, treatment of cells with UP suppressed the TNF-α induced activation of NF-κB signaling. Collectively, our results indicate that UP extract effectively attenuated adipogenesis by controlling cell cycle progression and down regulating adipogenic gene expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of microRNA-92a maintains podocyte cell cycle quiescence and limits crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henique, Carole; Bollée, Guillaume; Loyer, Xavier; Grahammer, Florian; Dhaun, Neeraj; Camus, Marine; Vernerey, Julien; Guyonnet, Léa; Gaillard, François; Lazareth, Hélène; Meyer, Charlotte; Bensaada, Imane; Legrès, Luc; Satoh, Takashi; Akira, Shizuo; Bruneval, Patrick; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Tedgui, Alain; Karras, Alexandre; Thervet, Eric; Nochy, Dominique; Huber, Tobias B; Mesnard, Laurent; Lenoir, Olivia; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2017-11-28

    Crescentic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) represents the most aggressive form of acquired glomerular disease. While most therapeutic approaches involve potentially toxic immunosuppressive strategies, the pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. Podocytes are glomerular epithelial cells that are normally growth-arrested because of the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. An exception is in RPGN where podocytes undergo a deregulation of their differentiated phenotype and proliferate. Here we demonstrate that microRNA-92a (miR-92a) is enriched in podocytes of patients and mice with RPGN. The CDK inhibitor p57 Kip2 is a major target of miR-92a that constitutively safeguards podocyte cell cycle quiescence. Podocyte-specific deletion of miR-92a in mice de-repressed the expression of p57 Kip2 and prevented glomerular injury in RPGN. Administration of an anti-miR-92a after disease initiation prevented albuminuria and kidney failure, indicating miR-92a inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy for RPGN. We demonstrate that miRNA induction in epithelial cells can break glomerular tolerance to immune injury.

  20. Analysis of the prevalence, secretion and function of a cell cycle-inhibiting factor in the melioidosis pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornpan Pumirat

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli express a cell cycle-inhibiting factor (Cif, that is injected into host cells via a Type III secretion system (T3SS leading to arrest of cell division, delayed apoptosis and cytoskeletal rearrangements. A homologue of Cif has been identified in Burkholderia pseudomallei (CHBP; Cif homologue in B. pseudomallei; BPSS1385, which shares catalytic activity, but its prevalence, secretion and function are ill-defined. Among 43 available B. pseudomallei genome sequences, 33 genomes (76.7% harbor the gene encoding CHBP. Western blot analysis using antiserum raised to a synthetic CHBP peptide detected CHBP in 46.6% (7/15 of clinical B. pseudomallei isolates from the endemic area. Secretion of CHBP into bacterial culture supernatant could not be detected under conditions where a known effector (BopE was secreted in a manner dependent on the Bsa T3SS. In contrast, CHBP could be detected in U937 cells infected with B. pseudomallei by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting in a manner dependent on bsaQ. Unlike E. coli Cif, CHBP was localized within the cytoplasm of B. pseudomallei-infected cells. A B. pseudomallei chbP insertion mutant showed a significant reduction in cytotoxicity and plaque formation compared to the wild-type strain that could be restored by plasmid-mediated trans-complementation. However, there was no defect in actin-based motility or multinucleated giant cell formation by the chbP mutant. The data suggest that the level or timing of CHBP secretion differs from a known Bsa-secreted effector and that CHBP is required for selected virulence-associated phenotypes in vitro.

  1. Chamaejasmine Arrests Cell Cycle, Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Nuclear NF-κB Translocation in the Human Breast Cancer Cell Line MDA-MB-231

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxian Bai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the anticancer activity of chamaejasmine was characterized in the human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231. Cell viability and cell cycle distribution were determined by MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Western blotting was performed to determine changes in levels of various proteins. Results showed that treatment with chamaejasmine (4–16 μM inhibited cell proliferation, which correlated with G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. Chamaejasmine treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in induction of WAF1/p21 and KIP1/p27, decrease in cyclins A and cyclins B1. Cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk 2 and cdc2 was also decreased after chamaejasmine treatment. Moreover, inhibition of nuclear translocation, phosphorylation of NF-κB, activation of IKKα and IKKβ, inhibition of phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα were also detected in this work. Our findings suggested that chamaejasmine could be explored as a preventive and perhaps as a chemotherapeutic agent in the management of breast cancer.

  2. Lebein, a snake venom disintegrin, suppresses human colon cancer cells proliferation and tumor-induced angiogenesis through cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction and inhibition of VEGF expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakraoui, Ons; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Aloui, Zohra; Othman, Houcemeddine; Grépin, Renaud; Haoues, Meriam; Essafi, Makram; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Gasmi, Ammar; Karoui, Habib; Pagès, Gilles; Essafi-Benkhadir, Khadija

    2017-01-01

    Lebein, is an heterodimeric disintegrin isolated from Macrovipera lebetina snake venom that was previously characterized as an inhibitor of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. In this study, we investigated the effect of Lebein on the p53-dependent growth of human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. We found that Lebein significantly inhibited LS174 (p53wt), HCT116 (p53wt), and HT29 (p53mut) colon cancer cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest through the modulation of expression levels of the tumor suppression factor p53, cell cycle regulating proteins cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4, retinoblastoma (Rb), CDK1, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27. Interestingly, Lebein-induced apoptosis of colon cancer cells was dependent on their p53 status. Thus, in LS174 cells, cell death was associated with PARP cleavage and the activation of caspases 3 and 8 while in HCT116 cells, Lebein induced caspase-independent apoptosis through increased expression of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). In LS174 cells, Lebein triggers the activation of the MAPK ERK1/2 pathway through induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It also decreased cell adhesion and migration to fibronectin through down regulation of α5β1 integrin. Moreover, Lebein significantly reduced the expression of two angiogenesis stimulators, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Neuropilin 1 (NRP1). It inhibited the VEGF-induced neovascularization process in the quail embryonic CAM system and blocked the development of human colon adenocarcinoma in nude mice. Overall, our work indicates that Lebein may be useful to design a new therapy against colon cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Sulforaphane inhibits PDGF-induced proliferation of rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cell by up-regulation of p53 leading to G1/S cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Su-Hyang; Lim, Yong; Kim, Seung-Jung; Yoo, Kyu-Dong; Yoo, Hwan-Soo; Hong, Jin-Tae; Lee, Mi-Yea; Yun, Yeo-Pyo

    2013-01-01

    Vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis artery angioplasty are associated with vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and intimal thickening arterial walls. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate produced in cruciferous vegetables, on VSMC proliferation and neointimal formation in a rat carotid artery injury model. Sulforaphane at the concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μM significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced VSMC proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner, determined by cell count. The IC50 value of sulforaphane-inhibited VSMC proliferation was 0.8 μM. Sulforaphane increased the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and p53 levels, while it decreased CDK2 and cyclin E expression. The effects of sulforaphane on vascular thickening were determined 14 days after the injury to the rat carotid artery. The angiographic mean luminary diameters of the group treated with 2 and 4 μM sulforaphane were 0.25±0.1 and 0.09±0.1 mm², respectively, while the value of the control groups was 0.40±0.1 mm², indicating that sulforaphane may inhibit neointimal formation. The expression of PCNA, maker for cell cycle arrest, was decreased, while that of p53 and p21 was increased, which showed the same pattern as one in in-vitro study. These results suggest that sulforaphane-inhibited VSMC proliferation may occur through the G1/S cell cycle arrest by up-regulation of p53 signaling pathway, and then lead to the decreased neointimal hyperplasia thickening. Thus, sulforaphane may be a promising candidate for the therapy of atherosclerosis and post-angiography restenosis. © 2013.

  4. Proliferation inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced in HL-60 HL-60HL-60 HL-60 cells by a natural diterpene ester from Daphne mucronata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Yazdanparast

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available "n  "nBackground and the purpose of the study: Gnidilatimonoein (Gn, a new diterpene ester from Daphne mucronata, possesses strong anti-metastasis and anti-tumor activities. In this study, its apoptosis and differentiation capabilities were evaluated by using the leukemia HL-60 cell line. "nMaterial and methods: Cell prolifaration inhibition was estimated by MTT assay. The occurrence of apoptosis was evaluated by EtBr/AO double staining technique, cell cycle analyses and detection of apoptotic cells by Annexin V-FITC and propodium iodide (PI. Differentiation of the cells was determined by NBT reduction assay and the expression of specific cell surface markers such as CD14 and CD11b, were analyzed by flow cytometry.   "nResults: The drug decreased the growth of the cells dose- and time- dependently and the IC50 was found to be 1.3 µM. Our data suggested that Gn induced both monocytic differentiation  and apoptosis among HL-60 cells. In addition, cell cycle analyses showed an increase in G1 phase population by 24 hrs, which was gradually replaced by Sub-G1 cell population (apoptotic cells by 72 hrs. "nConclusion: Based on these data, the Gn-treated HL-60 cells displayed differentiation-dependent apoptosis. Thus, Gn might be a good candidate for differentiation therapy of leukemia, pending full biological evaluation of the compound among the wide array of leukemia cells. "nevaluation of the compound among the wide array of leukemia cells.

  5. Enteric pathogens deploy cell cycle inhibiting factors to block the bactericidal activity of Perforin-2

    OpenAIRE

    McCormack, Ryan M; Lyapichev, Kirill; Olsson, Melissa L; Podack, Eckhard R; Munson, George P

    2015-01-01

    eLife digest A wide range of bacteria and other microbes can infect animals and cause disease. Throughout evolution, these microbes and their hosts have been fighting never ending arms races in which the microbes deploy ever more elaborate weapons, while the hosts adapt to defend themselves. An animal's first line of defense is provided by its ?innate? immune system. This system is activated by the general features of microbial cells; for example, the molecules that make up the walls surround...

  6. Acteoside inhibits human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cell proliferation via inducing cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and differentiation into monocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Won; Kim, Hyoung Ja; Lee, Yong Sup; Park, Hee-Jun; Choi, Jong-Won; Ha, Joohun; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2007-09-01

    We investigated the in vitro effects of acteoside on the proliferation, cell cycle regulation and differentiation of HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells. Acteoside inhibited the proliferation of HL-60 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner with an IC50, approximately 30 microM. DNA flow cytometric analysis indicated that acteoside blocked cell cycle progression at the G1 phase in HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells. Among the G1 phase cell cycle-related proteins, the levels of cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK)2, CDK6, cyclin D1, cyclin D2, cyclin D3 and cyclin E were reduced by acteoside, whereas the steady-state level of CDK4 was unaffected. The protein and mRNA levels of CDK inhibitors (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors), such as p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1), were gradually increased after acteoside treatment in a time-dependent manner. In addition, acteoside markedly enhanced the binding of p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1) to CDK4 and CDK6, resulting in the reduction of CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6 activities. Moreover, the hypophosphorylated form of retinoblastoma increased, leading to the enhanced binding of protein retinoblastoma (pRb) and E2F1. Our results further suggest that acteoside is a potent inducer of differentiation of HL-60 cells based on biochemical activities and the expression level of CD14 cell surface antigen. In conclusion, the onset of acteoside-induced G1 arrest of HL-60 cells prior to the differentiation appears to be tightly linked to up-regulation of the p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1) levels and decreases in the CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6 activities. These findings, for the first time, reveal the mechanism underlying the anti-proliferative effect of acteoside on human promyelocytic HL-60 cells.

  7. Inhibition of cell proliferation and migration by oxidative stress from ascorbate-driven juglone redox cycling in human bladder-derived T24 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kviecinski, M.R.; Pedrosa, R.C.; Felipe, K.B.; Farias, M.S.; Glorieux, C.; Valenzuela, M.; Sid, B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The cytotoxicity of juglone is markedly increased by ascorbate. ► T24 cell death by oxidative stress is necrosis-like. ► Redox cycling by juglone/ascorbate inhibits cell proliferation. ► Cellular migration is impaired by juglone/ascorbate. -- Abstract: The effects of juglone on T24 cells were assessed in the presence and absence of ascorbate. The EC 50 value for juglone at 24 h decreased from 28.5 μM to 6.3 μM in the presence of ascorbate. In juglone-treated cells, ascorbate increased ROS formation (4-fold) and depleted GSH (65%). N-acetylcysteine or catalase restricted the juglone/ascorbate-mediated effects, highlighting the role of oxidative stress in juglone cytotoxicity. Juglone alone or associated with ascorbate did not cause caspase-3 activation or PARP cleavage, suggesting necrosis-like cell death. DNA damage and the mild ER stress caused by juglone were both enhanced by ascorbate. In cells treated with juglone (1–5 μM), a concentration-dependent decrease in cell proliferation was observed. Ascorbate did not impair cell proliferation but its association with juglone led to a clonogenic death state. The motility of ascorbate-treated cells was not affected. Juglone slightly restricted motility, but cells lost their ability to migrate most noticeably when treated with juglone plus ascorbate. We postulate that juglone kills cells by a necrosis-like mechanism inhibiting cell proliferation and the motility of T24 cells. These effects are enhanced in the presence of ascorbate.

  8. Inhibition of cell proliferation and migration by oxidative stress from ascorbate-driven juglone redox cycling in human bladder-derived T24 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kviecinski, M.R., E-mail: mrkviecinski@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Bioquimica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Pedrosa, R.C., E-mail: rozangelapedrosa@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Bioquimica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Felipe, K.B., E-mail: kakabettega@yahoo.com.br [Laboratorio de Bioquimica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Farias, M.S., E-mail: mirellesfarias@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Bioquimica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Glorieux, C., E-mail: christophe.glorieux@uclouvain.be [Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73 Avenue E. Mounier, GTOX 7309, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Valenzuela, M., E-mail: mavalenzuela@med.uchile.cl [Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73 Avenue E. Mounier, GTOX 7309, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Sid, B., E-mail: brice.sid@uclouvain.be [Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73 Avenue E. Mounier, GTOX 7309, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); and others

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cytotoxicity of juglone is markedly increased by ascorbate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T24 cell death by oxidative stress is necrosis-like. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Redox cycling by juglone/ascorbate inhibits cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular migration is impaired by juglone/ascorbate. -- Abstract: The effects of juglone on T24 cells were assessed in the presence and absence of ascorbate. The EC{sub 50} value for juglone at 24 h decreased from 28.5 {mu}M to 6.3 {mu}M in the presence of ascorbate. In juglone-treated cells, ascorbate increased ROS formation (4-fold) and depleted GSH (65%). N-acetylcysteine or catalase restricted the juglone/ascorbate-mediated effects, highlighting the role of oxidative stress in juglone cytotoxicity. Juglone alone or associated with ascorbate did not cause caspase-3 activation or PARP cleavage, suggesting necrosis-like cell death. DNA damage and the mild ER stress caused by juglone were both enhanced by ascorbate. In cells treated with juglone (1-5 {mu}M), a concentration-dependent decrease in cell proliferation was observed. Ascorbate did not impair cell proliferation but its association with juglone led to a clonogenic death state. The motility of ascorbate-treated cells was not affected. Juglone slightly restricted motility, but cells lost their ability to migrate most noticeably when treated with juglone plus ascorbate. We postulate that juglone kills cells by a necrosis-like mechanism inhibiting cell proliferation and the motility of T24 cells. These effects are enhanced in the presence of ascorbate.

  9. Two specific drugs, BMS-345541 and purvalanol A induce apoptosis of HTLV-1 infected cells through inhibition of the NF-kappaB and cell cycle pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Weilin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 induces adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL/L, a fatal lymphoproliferative disorder, and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP, a chronic progressive disease of the central nervous system after a long period of latent infection. Although the mechanism of transformation and leukemogenesis is not fully elucidated, there is evidence to suggest that the viral oncoprotein Tax plays a crucial role in these processes through the regulation of several pathways including NF-κB and the cell cycle pathways. The observation that NF-κB, which is strongly induced by Tax, is indispensable for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype of HTLV-1 by regulating the expression of various genes involved in cell cycle regulation and inhibition of apoptosis provides a possible molecular target for these infected cells. To develop potential new therapeutic strategies for HTLV-1 infected cells, in this present study, we initially screened a battery of NF-κB and CDK inhibitors (total of 35 compounds to examine their effects on the growth and survival of infected T-cell lines. Two drugs namely BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A exhibited higher levels of growth inhibition and apoptosis in infected cell as compared to uninfected cells. BMS-345541 inhibited IKKβ kinase activity from HTLV-1 infected cells with an IC50 (the 50% of inhibitory concentration value of 50 nM compared to 500 nM from control cells as measured by in vitro kinase assays. The effects of Purvalanol A were associated with suppression of CDK2/cyclin E complex activity as previously shown by us. Combination of both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A showed a reduced level of HTLV-1 p19 Gag production in cell culture. The apparent apoptosis in these infected cells were associated with increased caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage. The potent and selective apoptotic effects of these drugs suggest that both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A

  10. AZD2014 Radiosensitizes Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma by Inhibiting AKT/mTOR Axis and Inducing G1/G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest.

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    Chih-Chia Yu

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is one of the most common malignant neoplasms in Taiwan. Activation of the mTOR signaling pathway has been linked to decreased radiation responsiveness in human oral cancer, thus it limits efficacy of radiotherapy. To address this question, we investigated the effect of AZD2014, a novel small molecular ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2 kinase, as a radiosensitizer in primary OSCC and OSCC-derived cell line models.We isolated primary tumor cells from OSCC tissues and cell lines. AZD2014 was administered with and without ionizing radiation. The radiosensitizing effect of AZD2014 were then assessed using cell viability assays, clonogenic survival assays, and cell cycle analyses. Western blotting was used to detect protein expression.Combination treatment with AZD2014 and irradiation resulted in significant reduction in OSCC cell line and primary OSCC cell colony formation due to the enhanced inhibition of AKT and both mTORC1 and mTORC2 activity. Pre-treatment with AZD2014 in irradiated oral cancer cells induced tumor cell cycle arrest at the G1 and G2/M phases, which led to disruption of cyclin D1-CDK4 and cyclin B1-CDC2 complexes. Moreover, AZD2014 synergized with radiation to promote both apoptosis and autophagy by increasing caspase-3 and LC3 in primary OSCC cells.These findings suggest that in irradiated OSCC cells, co-treatment with AZD2014, which targets mTORC1 and mTORC2 blockade, is an effective radiosensitizing strategy for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  11. Cryptotanshinone induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of multidrug resistant human chronic myeloid leukemia cells by inhibiting the activity of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuqing; Cheng, Rubin; Zhou, Yuhong; Shen, Jianping; Peng, Laijun; Xu, Xiaofeng; Dai, Qun; Liu, Pei; Wang, Haibing; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Jia, Jia; Chen, Zhe

    2012-09-01

    Cryptotanshinone (CPT), a diterpene quinone isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza, is recently reported to have obvious anticancer activities against diverse cancer cells. However, the effect and regulatory mechanism of CPT remain unclear in human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative activity of CPT on the multidrug resistant CML cells K562/ADM. Our results demonstrated that CPT decreased the cell viability of K562/ADM cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through suppressing the expression of cyclin D1 and Bcl-2. Further studies indicated that CPT mainly functions at post-transcriptional levels, suggesting the involvement of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). CPT significantly reduced the expression and activity of eIF4E in K562/ADM cells. Overexpression of eIF4E obvious conferred resistance to the CPT antiproliferation and proapoptotic activity as well as the cyclin D1 and Bcl-2 expressions. Knockdown of eIF4E significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of CPT in K562/ADM, confirming the participation of eIF4E during CPT function process. More importantly, the relative inhibitory efficiency of CPT positively correlated with the reductions on eIF4E in primary CML specimens. These results demonstrated that CPT played antitumor roles in K562/ADM cells by inhibiting the eIF4E regulatory system. Our results provide a novel anticancer mechanism of CPT in human CML cells.

  12. Induction of p21CIP1 protein and cell cycle arrest after inhibition of Aurora B kinase is attributed to aneuploidy and reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Geeta; Ulrich, Tanja; Krause, Michael; Finkernagel, Florian; Gaubatz, Stefan

    2014-06-06

    Cell cycle progression requires a series of highly coordinated events that ultimately lead to faithful segregation of chromosomes. Aurora B is an essential mitotic kinase, which is involved in regulation of microtubule-kinetochore attachments and cytokinesis. Inhibition of Aurora B results in stabilization of p53 and induction of p53-target genes such as p21 to inhibit proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that induction of p21 by p53 after inhibition of Aurora B is dependent on the p38 MAPK, which promotes transcriptional elongation of p21 by RNA Pol II. In this study, we show that a subset of p53-target genes are induced in a p38-dependent manner upon inhibition of Aurora B. We also demonstrate that inhibition of Aurora B results in down-regulation of E2F-mediated transcription and that the cell cycle arrest after Aurora B inhibition depends on p53 and pRB tumor suppressor pathways. In addition, we report that activation of p21 after inhibition of Aurora B is correlated with increased chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy but not with binucleation or tetraploidy. We provide evidence that p21 is activated in aneuploid cells by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and p38 MAPK. Finally, we demonstrate that certain drugs that act on aneuploid cells synergize with inhibitors of Aurora B to inhibit colony formation and oncogenic transformation. These findings provide an important link between aneuploidy and the stress pathways activated by Aurora B inhibition and also support the use of Aurora B inhibitors in combination therapy for treatment of cancer. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Resveratrol analogue 3,4,4′,5-tetramethoxystilbene inhibits growth, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in ovarian SKOV‐3 and A-2780 cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotrowska, Hanna; Myszkowski, Krzysztof; Ziółkowska, Alicja [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kulcenty, Katarzyna [Chair of Medical Biotechnology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Wierzchowski, Marcin [Department of Chemical Technology of Drugs, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kaczmarek, Mariusz [Department of Clinical Immunology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Murias, Marek [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kwiatkowska-Borowczyk, Eliza [Chair of Medical Biotechnology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Department of Cancer Diagnostics and Immunology, Greater Poland Cancer Centre, Poznan (Poland); Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga, E-mail: liebert@ump.edu.pl [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland)

    2012-08-15

    In the screening studies, cytotoxicity of 12 methylated resveratrol analogues on 11 human cancer cell lines was examined. The most active compound 3,4,4′5-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) and two ovarian cancer cell lines A-2780 (IC{sub 50} = 0.71 μM) and SKOV-3 (IC{sub 50} = 11.51 μM) were selected for further investigation. To determine the mechanism of DMU-212 cytotoxicity, its ability to induce apoptosis was examined. DMU-212 arrested cell cycle in the G2/M or G0/G1 phase which resulted in apoptosis of both cell lines. The expression level of 84 apoptosis-related genes was investigated. In SKOV-3 cells DMU-212 caused up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax, Apaf-1 and p53 genes, specific to intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, and a decrease in Bcl-2 and Bcl 2110 mRNA expressions. Conversely, in A-2780 cells an increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes Fas, FasL, TNF, TNFRSF10A, TNFRSF21, TNFRSF16 specific to extracellular mechanism of apoptosis was observed. There are no data published so far regarding the receptor mediated apoptosis induced by DMU-212. The activation of caspase-3/7 was correlated with decreased TRAF-1 and BIRC-2 expression level in A-2780 cells exposed to DMU-212. DMU-212 caused a decrease in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA levels in A-2780 by 50% and 75%, and in SKOV-3 cells by 15% and 45%, respectively. The protein expression was also reduced in both cell lines. It is noteworthy that the expression of CYP1B1 protein was entirely inhibited in A-2780 cells treated with DMU-212. It can be suggested that different CYP1B1 expression patterns in either ovarian cell line may affect their sensitivity to cytotoxic activity of DMU-212. -- Highlights: ► DMU-212 was the most cytotoxic among 12 O-methylated resveratrol analogues. ► DMU-212 arrested cell cycle at G2/M and G0/G1phase ► DMU-212 triggered mitochondria- and receptor‐mediated apoptosis. ► DMU-212 entirely inhibited CYP1B1 protein expression in A-2780 cells.

  14. Midazolam activates caspase, MAPKs and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways, and inhibits cell cycle and Akt pathway, to induce apoptosis in TM3 mouse Leydig progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang FC

    2018-03-01

    in TM3 cells. Additionally, the expressions of cyclin A, cyclin B and CDK1 were inhibited by midazolam through the regulation of p53 in TM3 cells, indicating that midazolam could regulate cell cycle to induce apoptosis.Conclusion: Midazolam could activate caspase, MAPKs and ER stress pathways and impede Akt pathway and cell cycle to induce apoptosis in TM3 mouse Leydig progenitor cells. Keywords: midazolam, TM3, Leydig progenitor cells, apoptosis, caspase, MAPKs, ER stress, cell cycle 

  15. A metabolite of nobiletin, 4'-demethylnobiletin and atorvastatin synergistically inhibits human colon cancer cell growth by inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian; Song, Mingyue; Qiu, Peiju; Li, Fang; Wang, Minqi; Zheng, Jinkai; Wang, Qi; Xu, Fei; Xiao, Hang

    2018-01-24

    Combining different chemopreventive agents is a promising strategy to reduce cancer incidence and mortality due to potential synergistic interactions between these agents. Previously, we demonstrated that oral administration of nobiletin (NBT, a citrus flavonoid) at 0.05% (w/w, in diet) together with atorvastatin (ATST, a lipid-lowering drug) at 0.02% (w/w, in diet) produced much stronger inhibition against colon carcinogenesis in rats in comparison with that produced by NBT (at 0.1% w/w in diet) or ATST (at 0.04% w/w in diet) alone at higher doses. To further elucidate the mechanism of this promising synergy between NBT and ATST, herein, we measured the levels of NBT, its major metabolites and ATST in the colonic tissue of rats fed NBT (0.05% w/w, in diet) + ATST (0.02% w/w, in diet), and determined the mode of interaction between the major NBT metabolite and ATST in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth. HPLC-MS analysis showed that 4'-demethylnobiletin (4DN) is the most abundant metabolite of NBT with a level about 5-fold as high as that of NBT in the colonic tissue, which indicated the potential significance of 4DN in mediating the biological effects of NBT in the colon. We found that co-treatments of 4DN/ATST at 2 : 1 concentration ratio produced much stronger growth inhibitory effects on human colon cancer HT-29 cells than 4DN or ATST alone, and isobologram analysis confirmed that this enhanced inhibitory effect by the 4DN/ATST combination was highly synergistic. The co-treatment of 4DN/ATST led to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and induced extensive apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Furthermore, the 4DN/ATST co-treatment profoundly modulated key signaling proteins related to the regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Our results demonstrated a strong synergy produced by the 4DN/ATST co-treatment in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth, which provided a novel mechanism by which NBT/ATST in combination synergistically inhibit colon carcinogenesis.

  16. Growth inhibition, cell-cycle alteration and apoptosis in stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes by multiwalled carbon nanotube buckypaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeni, Olga; Sannino, Anna; Romeo, Stefania; Micciulla, Federico; Bellucci, Stefano; Scarfi, Maria Rosaria

    2015-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the cytotoxicity of multiwalled carbon nanotube buckypaper (BP) in stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Materials & methods & results: BP treatment led to a delay in the cell growth, as proven by a minor increase in the cell number over time relative to that seen in untreated cells, assessed by trypan blue, resazurin and neutral red assays. The analysis of cell-cycle profile, by propidium iodide staining, indicated that BP treatment blocked cell-cycle progression by arresting cells at the G0/G1 phase. Moreover, increased apoptosis was also recorded by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining. The results presented here demonstrate an inhibitor effect of BP on cell growth that was likely through cytostatic and cytotoxic events.

  17. Inhibition of mTORC2 Induces Cell-Cycle Arrest and Enhances the Cytotoxicity of Doxorubicin by Suppressing MDR1 Expression in HCC Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bryan Wei; Chen, Wei; Liang, Hui; Liu, Hao; Liang, Chao; Zhi, Xiao; Hu, Li-Qiang; Yu, Xia-Zhen; Wei, Tao; Ma, Tao; Xue, Fei; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Bin; Feng, Xin-Hua; Bai, Xue-Li; Liang, Ting-Bo

    2015-08-01

    mTOR is aberrantly activated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and plays pivotal roles in tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. Rapamycin has been reported to exert antitumor activity in HCC and sensitizes HCC cells to cytotoxic agents. However, due to feedback activation of AKT after mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition, simultaneous targeting of mTORC1/2 may be more effective. In this study, we examined the interaction between the dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor OSI-027 and doxorubicin in vitro and in vivo. OSI-027 was found to reduce phosphorylation of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 substrates, including 4E-BP1, p70S6K, and AKT (Ser473), and inhibit HCC cell proliferation. Similar to OSI-027 treatment, knockdown of mTORC2 induced G0-G1 phase cell-cycle arrest. In contrast, rapamycin or knockdown of mTORC1 increased phosphorylation of AKT (Ser473), yet had little antiproliferative effect. Notably, OSI-027 synergized with doxorubicin for the antiproliferative efficacy in a manner dependent of MDR1 expression in HCC cells. The synergistic antitumor effect of OSI-027 and doxorubicin was also observed in a HCC xenograft mouse model. Moreover, AKT was required for OSI-027-induced cell-cycle arrest and downregulation of MDR1. Our findings provide a rationale for dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitors, such as OSI-027, as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic agents to treat HCC. Mol Cancer Ther; 14(8); 1805-15. ©2015 AACR. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Nitrogen deficiency inhibits leaf blade growth in Lolium perenne by increasing cell cycle duration and decreasing mitotic and post-mitotic growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanová, Monika; Lattanzi, Fernando Alfredo; Schnyder, Hans

    2008-06-01

    Nitrogen deficiency severely inhibits leaf growth. This response was analysed at the cellular level by growing Lolium perenne L. under 7.5 mM (high) or 1 mM (low) nitrate supply, and performing a kinematic analysis to assess the effect of nitrogen status on cell proliferation and cell growth in the leaf blade epidermis. Low nitrogen supply reduced leaf elongation rate (LER) by 43% through a similar decrease in the cell production rate and final cell length. The former was entirely because of a decreased average cell division rate (0.023 versus 0.032 h(-1)) and thus longer cell cycle duration (30 versus 22 h). Nitrogen status did not affect the number of division cycles of the initial cell's progeny (5.7), and accordingly the meristematic cell number (53). Meristematic cell length was unaffected by nitrogen deficiency, implying that the division and mitotic growth rates were equally impaired. The shorter mature cell length arose from a considerably reduced post-mitotic growth rate (0.033 versus 0.049 h(-1)). But, nitrogen stress did not affect the position where elongation stopped, and increased cell elongation duration. In conclusion, nitrogen deficiency limited leaf growth by increasing the cell cycle duration and decreasing mitotic and post-mitotic elongation rates, delaying cell maturation.

  19. Inhibition of human prostate cancer cells proliferation by a selective alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist labedipinedilol-A involves cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liou, S.-F.; Lin, H.-H.; Liang, J.-C.; Chen, I.-J.; Yeh, J.-L.

    2009-01-01

    In this research, we conducted an in vitro analysis to evaluate the prostate cancer cells response to labedipinedilol-A in order to determine the effect of this selective α 1 -adrenoceptor antagonist to suppress prostate cancer cell growth by affecting cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we report that treatment of androgen-sensitive (LNCaP) and androgen-insensitive (PC-3) prostate cancer cells with labedipinedilol-A inhibited cell proliferation in concentration-dependent and time-dependent manners. Moreover, norepinephrine-stimulated proliferation of both cell lines are markedly inhibited by labedipinedilol-A. The probable involvement of α 1 -adrenoceptors in this cellular response is suggested. Labedipinedilol-A-induced growth inhibition was associated with G 0 /G 1 arrest, and G 2 /M arrest depending upon concentrations. Cell cycle blockade was associated with reduced amounts of cyclin D1/2, cyclin E, Cdk2, Cdk4, and Cdk6 and increased levels of the Cdk inhibitory proteins (Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27). In addition, labedipinedilol-A also induced apoptosis in PC-3 cells, as determined by using Hoechst 33342 staining, DNA fragmentation, and Annexin V staining assay. Furthermore, labedipinedilol-A triggered the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, as indicated by increasing the expression of Bax, but decreasing the level of Bcl-2, resulting in mitochondrial membrane potential loss, cytochrome c release, and activation of caspase-9 and -3. We further investigated the role of MAPK cascades in the anti-proliferative and apoptosis effects of labedipinedilol-A, and confirmed that labedipinedilol-A could activate JNK1/2 but not p38 in both cell lines. Unlike JNK1/2, however, labedipinedilol-A treatment resulted in down-regulation of phospho-ERK1/2 expression. We concluded that labedipinedilol-A possessed the growth-suppressive and apoptotic effects on LNCaP and PC-3 cells by its α 1 -adrenoceptor blockade, and the apoptotic effects of labedipinedilol-A primarily through

  20. Dendrobium candidum inhibits MCF-7 cells proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and regulating key biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun J

    2015-12-01

    <0.05. The general apoptosis biomarker, Bcl-2, was significantly decreased and the Bax was significantly increased compared to the control group (P<0.05. In contrast to that in MCF-7, D. candidum does not affect cell proliferation at any concentration and any time points in normal breast epithelial cells, MCF10A cells. Conclusion: D. candidum could decrease the cell viability of MCF-7 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and regulating the key biomarkers in breast cancer cells. Keywords: breast cancer, D. candidum, proliferation, biomarker, inhibition

  1. The role of cell cycle in retinal development: cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors co-ordinate cell-cycle inhibition, cell-fate determination and differentiation in the developing retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitou, Aikaterini; Ohnuma, Shin-ichi

    2010-03-01

    The mature retina is formed through multi-step developmental processes, including eye field specification, optic vesicle evagination, and cell-fate determination. Co-ordination of these developmental events with cell-proliferative activity is essential to achieve formation of proper retinal structure and function. In particular, the molecular and cellular dynamics of the final cell cycle significantly influence the identity that a cell acquires, since cell fate is largely determined at the final cell cycle for the production of postmitotic cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of the cellular mechanisms that underlie the co-ordination of cell-cycle and cell-fate determination, and also describes a molecular role of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) as co-ordinators of cell-cycle arrest, cell-fate determination and differentiation. Copyright (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Overexpression of DOC-1R inhibits cell cycle G1/S transition by repressing CDK2 expression and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Liu, Xing; Gao, Jinlan; Shi, Xiuyan; Hu, Xihua; Wang, Shusen; Luo, Yang

    2013-01-01

    DOC-1R (deleted in oral cancer-1 related) is a novel putative tumor suppressor. This study investigated DOC-1R antitumor activity and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cell phenotypes were assessed using flow cytometry, BrdU incorporation and CDK2 kinase assays in DOC-1R overexpressing HeLa cells. In addition, RT-PCR and Western blot assays were used to detect underlying molecular changes in these cells. The interaction between DOC-1R and CDK2 proteins was assayed by GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation-Western blot assays. The data showed that DOC-1R overexpression inhibited G1/S phase transition, DNA replication and suppressed CDK2 activity. Molecularly, DOC-1R inhibited CDK2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels, and there were decreased levels of G1-phase cyclins (cyclin D1 and E) and elevated levels of p21, p27, and p53 proteins. Meanwhile, DOC-1R associated with CDK2 and inhibited CDK2 activation by obstructing its association with cyclin E and A. In conclusion, the antitumor effects of DOC-1R may be mediated by negatively regulating G1 phase progression and G1/S transition through inhibiting CDK2 expression and activation.

  3. Cucurbitacin B inhibits proliferation, induces G2/M cycle arrest and autophagy without affecting apoptosis but enhances MTT reduction in PC12 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanhong Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of cucurbitacin B (a natural product with anti-cancer effect was studied on PC12 cells. It significantly reduced the cell number, changed cell morphology and inhibited colony formation while MTT results showed increased cell viability. Cucurbitacin B treatment increased activity of succinode hydrogenase. No alteration in the integrity of mem-brane, the release of lactic dehydrogenase, the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the expression of apoptotic proteins suggested that cucurbitacin B did not induce apoptosis. The cell cycle was remarkably arrested at G2/M phase. Furthermore, cucurbitacin B induced autophagy as evidence by accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and the increase of LC3II. In addition, cucurbitacin B up-regulated the expression of p-beclin-1, p-ULK1, p-Wee1, p21 and down-regulated p-mTOR, p-p70S6K, CDC25C, CDK1, Cyclin B1. In conclusion, cucurbitacin B inhibited PC12 proliferation but caused MTT pitfall. Cucurbitacin B induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, autophagy, but not the apoptosis in PC12 cells.

  4. G1 cell cycle arrest due to the inhibition of erbB family receptor tyrosine kinases does not require the retinoblastoma protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, Andrea J.; Fry, David W.

    2005-01-01

    The erbB receptor family (EGFr, erbB-2, erbB-3, and erbB-4) consists of transmembrane glycoproteins that transduce extracellular signals to the nucleus when activated. erbB family members are widely expressed in epithelial, mesenchymal, and neuronal cells and contribute to the proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival of these cell types. The present study evaluates the effects of erbB family signaling on cell cycle progression and the role that pRB plays in regulating this process. ErbB family RTK activity was inhibited by PD 158780 in the breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. PD 158780 (0.5 μM) inhibited EGF-stimulated and heregulin-stimulated autophosphorylation and caused a G1 cell cycle arrest within 24 h, which correlated with hypophosporylation of pRB. MCF10A cells lacking functional pRB retained the ability to arrest in G1 when treated with PD 158780. Both cell lines showed induction of p27 KIP1 protein when treated with PD 158780 and increased association of p27 KIP1 with cyclin E-CDK2. Furthermore, CDK2 kinase activity was dramatically inhibited with drug treatment. Changes in other pRB family members were noted with drug treatment, namely a decrease in p107 and an increase in p130. These findings show that the G1 arrest induced through inhibition of erbB family RTK activity does not require functional pRB

  5. Posttranslational nitrotyrosination of alpha-tubulin induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Phung, A.D.; Souček, Karel; Kubala, Lukáš; Harper, R.W.; Bulinski, J.Ch.; Eiserich, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 12 (2006), s. 1241-1252 ISSN 0171-9335 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : vascular smooth muscle cells * microtubules * tubulin tyrosine ligase Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.039, year: 2006

  6. Anticancer effects of kaempferol in A375 human malignant melanoma cells are mediated via induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, inhibition of cell migration and downregulation of m-TOR/PI3K/AKT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia; Xiao, Peng; Sun, Jiaming; Guo, Liang

    2018-01-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive form of human cancer with limited treatment options currently available. The present study was aimed to evaluate the anticancer activity of kaempferol (KAM) against the human malignant melanoma A375 cell line along with evaluation of its effects on apoptosis, cell cycle, cell migration and m-TOR/PI3K/AKT pathway. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT assay while clonogenic assay measured the effects of KAM on colony formation. Annexin V assay evaluated the apoptotic effects of KAM in these cells using flow cytometry. Effects on cell cycle were determined by using flow cytometry with propidium iodide (PI) as probe. The effects of KAM on m-TOR/ PI3K/AKT signalling pathway were evaluated by western blot assay. MTT assay indicated that KAM exhibits a significant anticancer activity against A375 cells with an IC50 of 20 μM. These antiproliferative effects of KAM were also supported by the colony formation assay wherein KAM reduced the colony formation in a dose-dependent manner. The anticancer effect of KAM was found to be due to the initiation of apoptosis in human malignant melanoma A375 cells. Additionally, KAM also exhibited the capacity to trigger G2/M cell cycle arrest and to inhibit the cell migratory potential of A375 cells. KAM caused significant downregulation of m-TOR, phosphorylated (p) m-TOR, PI3K, p-PI3K and Akt protein levels in A375 malignantmelanoma cells. KAM exerts potent anticancer effects via induction of apoptosis, G2/M cell cycle arrest, cell migration inhibition and downregulation of m-TOR, pm-TOR, PI3K, p-PI3K and Akt protein levels.

  7. UV-B inhibition of hypocotyl growth in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings is a consequence of cell cycle arrest initiated by photodimer accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biever, Jessica J.; Brinkman, Doug; Gardner, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an important constituent of sunlight that determines plant morphology and growth. It induces photomorphogenic responses but also causes damage to DNA. Arabidopsis mutants of the endonucleases that function in nucleotide excision repair, xpf-3 and uvr1-1, showed hypersensitivity to UV-B (280–320nm) in terms of inhibition of hypocotyl growth. SOG1 is a transcription factor that functions in the DNA damage signalling response after γ-irradiation. xpf mutants that carry the sog1-1 mutation showed hypocotyl growth inhibition after UV-B irradiation similar to the wild type. A DNA replication inhibitor, hydroxyurea (HU), also inhibited hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings, but xpf-3 was not hypersensitive to HU. UV-B irradiation induced accumulation of the G2/M-specific cell cycle reporter construct CYCB1;1-GUS in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings that was consistent with the expected accumulation of photodimers and coincided with the time course of hypocotyl growth inhibition after UV-B treatment. Etiolated mutants of UVR8, a recently described UV-B photoreceptor gene, irradiated with UV-B showed inhibition of hypocotyl growth that was not different from that of the wild type, but they lacked UV-B-specific expression of chalcone synthase (CHS), as expected from previous reports. CHS expression after UV-B irradiation was not different in xpf-3 compared with the wild type, nor was it altered after HU treatment. These results suggest that hypocotyl growth inhibition by UV-B light in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings, a photomorphogenic response, is dictated by signals originating from UV-B absorption by DNA that lead to cell cycle arrest. This process occurs distinct from UVR8 and its signalling pathway responsible for CHS induction. PMID:24591052

  8. Fluoroquinolone-mediated inhibition of cell growth, S-G2/M cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in canine osteosarcoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung won Seo

    Full Text Available Despite significant advancements in osteosarcoma research, the overall survival of canine and human osteosarcoma patients has remained essentially static over the past 2 decades. Post-operative limb-spare infection has been associated with improved survival in both species, yet a mechanism for improved survival has not been clearly established. Given that the majority of canine osteosarcoma patients experiencing post-operative infections were treated with fluoroquinolone antibiotics, we hypothesized that fluoroquinolone antibiotics might directly inhibit the survival and proliferation of canine osteosarcoma cells. Ciprofloxacin or enrofloxacin were found to inhibit p21(WAF1 expression resulting in decreased proliferation and increased S-G(2/M accumulation. Furthermore, fluoroquinolone exposure induced apoptosis of canine osteosarcoma cells as demonstrated by cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP, and activation of caspase-3/7. These results support further studies examining the potential impact of quinolones on survival and proliferation of osteosarcoma.

  9. Benzyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Prostate Cancer Development in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP Model, Which Is Associated with the Induction of Cell Cycle G1 Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jin Cho

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC is a hydrolysis product of glucotropaeolin, a compound found in cruciferous vegetables, and has been shown to have anti-tumor properties. In the present study, we investigated whether BITC inhibits the development of prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP mice. Five-week old, male TRAMP mice and their nontransgenic littermates were gavage-fed with 0, 5, or 10 mg/kg of BITC every day for 19 weeks. The weight of the genitourinary tract increased markedly in TRAMP mice and this increase was suppressed significantly by BITC feeding. H and E staining of the dorsolateral lobes of the prostate demonstrated that well-differentiated carcinoma (WDC was a predominant feature in the TRAMP mice. The number of lobes with WDC was reduced by BITC feeding while that of lobes with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia was increased. BITC feeding reduced the number of cells expressing Ki67 (a proliferation marker, cyclin A, cyclin D1, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK2 in the prostatic tissue. In vitro cell culture results revealed that BITC decreased DNA synthesis, as well as CDK2 and CDK4 activity in TRAMP-C2 mouse prostate cancer cells. These results indicate that inhibition of cell cycle progression contributes to the inhibition of prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice treated with BITC.

  10. Piperlongumine decreases cell proliferation and the expression of cell cycle-associated proteins by inhibiting Akt pathway in human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Jin Sil; Jeong, Chang Hee; Petriello, Michael C; Seo, Han Geuk; Yoo, Hyunjin; Hong, Kwonho; Han, Sung Gu

    2018-01-01

    Piperlongumine (PL) is an alkaloid of a pepper plant found in Southeast Asia. PL is known to induce selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types. To explore the possible anti-lung cancer effects of PL, A549 cells were treated with PL (0-40 μM) for 24 h. Alterations in the expression of cell cycle-associated proteins (cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), CDK6 and retinoblastoma (Rb)) and intracellular signaling molecules (extracellular signal receptor-activated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), Akt, p38 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)) were examined in cells following treatment of PL using Western blot analysis. Results showed that proliferation of cells were significantly decreased by PL in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry results demonstrated increased number of cells in G1 phase in PL (40 μM)-treated group. Reactive oxygen species was significantly increased in cells treated with PL at 20-40 μM. The expression of cyclin D1, CDK4, CDK6 and p-Rb were markedly decreased in cells treated with PL at 40 μM. Treatment of cells with PL suppressed phosphorylation of Akt but increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Treatment of PL significantly decreased nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in cells. These results suggest that PL possesses antiproliferative properties in A549 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of AMPK and Krebs cycle gene expression drives metabolic remodeling of Pten-deficient preneoplastic thyroid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antico Arciuch, Valeria G; Russo, Marika A; Kang, Kristy S; Di Cristofano, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Rapidly proliferating and neoplastically transformed cells generate the energy required to support rapid cell division by increasing glycolysis and decreasing flux through the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) pathway, usually without alterations in mitochondrial function. In contrast, little is known of the metabolic alterations, if any, which occur in cells harboring mutations that prime their neoplastic transformation. To address this question, we used a Pten-deficient mouse model to examine thyroid cells where a mild hyperplasia progresses slowly to follicular thyroid carcinoma. Using this model, we report that constitutive phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activation caused by PTEN deficiency in nontransformed thyrocytes results in a global downregulation of Krebs cycle and OXPHOS gene expression, defective mitochondria, reduced respiration, and an enhancement in compensatory glycolysis. We found that this process does not involve any of the pathways classically associated with the Warburg effect. Moreover, this process was independent of proliferation but contributed directly to thyroid hyperplasia. Our findings define a novel metabolic switch to glycolysis driven by PI3K-dependent AMPK inactivation with a consequent repression in the expression of key metabolic transcription regulators. ©2013 AACR.

  12. Growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 by schizandrin, a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignan isolated from Schisandra chinensis, on T47D human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Jack; Min, Hye-Young; Lee, Eun Jin; Kim, Yeong Shik; Bae, KiHwan; Kang, Sam Sik; Lee, Sang Kook

    2010-02-01

    Schizandrin is one of the main dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans present in the fruit of Schisandra chinensis (Schisandraceae). Biological activities including hepatoprotective, antiviral and neuroprotective effects of schizandrin and other dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans have been reported previously. However, the antiproliferative effect of schizandrin against human cancer cells has been poorly determined to date. This study examined the antiproliferative effect of schizandrin in human breast cancer cells. Schizandrin exhibited growth inhibitory activities in cultured human breast cancer cells, and the effect was the more profound in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive T47D cells than in ER-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. When treated with the compound in T47D cells, schizandrin induced the accumulation of a cell population in the G0/G1 phase, which was further demonstrated by the induction of CDK inhibitors p21 and p27 and the inhibition of the expression of cell cycle checkpoint proteins including cyclin D1, cyclin A, CDK2 and CDK4. These results suggest that schizandrin inhibits cell proliferation through the induction of cell cycle arrest with modulating cell cycle-related proteins in human breast cancer cells. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. [Knockdown of DNA-PKcs inhibits cell cycle and its mechanism of drug-resistant Bel7402/5-Fu hepatocellular carcinoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dayu; Liu, Yun; Yu, Chunbo; Liu, Xiping; Fan, Fang

    2017-12-01

    Objective To study the effect of the knock-down of the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) on the cell cycle of the multidrug-resistant (MDR) Bel7402/5-Fu hepatocellular carcinoma cells and its MDR mechanism. Methods After cationic liposome-mediated siDNA-PKcs oligonucleotide transfection, the drug sensitivity of Bel7402/5-Fu cells to 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) and adriamycin (ADM) was determined by MTT assay; the cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry; meanwhile, the protein expressions of cell cycle-related proteins P21, cell cycle protein B1 (cyclin B1), cell cycle division protein 2 (CDC2) were tested by Western blotting; the expressions of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and p53 at both mRNA and protein levels were detected by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Results The MTT results showed siDNA-PKcs increased the chemotherapeutic sensitivity of Bel7402/5-Fu cells to 5-Fu and ADM. The flow cytometric analysis showed siDNA-PKcs decreased the percentage of S-phase cells but increased the percentage of G2/M phase cells. Western blotting showed siDNA-PKcs increased the protein expression of P21 but decreased cyclinB1 and CDC2 proteins. In addition, siDNA-PKcs also increased the expressions of ATM and p53. Conclusion DNA-PKcs silencing increases P21 while decreases cyclin B1 and CDC2 expressions, and finally induces G2/M phase arrest in Bel7402/5-Fu cells, which may be related to ATM-p53 signaling pathway.

  14. Methionine-restricted diet inhibits growth of MCF10AT1-derived mammary tumors by increasing cell cycle inhibitors in athymic nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hens, J. R.; Sinha, I.; Perodin, F.; Cooper, T.; Sinha, R.; Plummer, J.; Perrone, C. E.; Orentreich, D.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary methionine restriction (MR) improves healthspan in part by reducing adiposity and by increasing insulin sensitivity in rodent models. The purpose of this study was to determine whether MR inhibits tumor progression in breast cancer xenograft model and breast cancer cell lines. Athymic nude mice were injected with MCF10AT1 cells in Matrigel® and fed a diet containing either 0.86 % methionine (control fed, CF), or 0.12 % methionine (MR) for 12 weeks. Plasma amino acid concentrations were measured by UPLC, and proliferation and apoptosis were examined using RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Cell Titer 96® Aqueous One Solution Cell Proliferation assay. Mice on the MR diet had reduced body weight and decreased adiposity. They also had smaller tumors when compared to the mice bearing tumors on the CF diet. Plasma concentrations of the sulfur amino acids (methionine, cysteine, and taurine) were reduced, whereas ornithine, serine, and glutamate acid were increased in mice on the MR diet. MR mice exhibited decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis in cells that comprise the mammary glands and tumors of mice. Elevated expression of P21 occurred in both MCF10AT1-derived tumor tissue and endogenously in mammary gland tissue of MR mice. Breast cancer cell lines MCF10A and MDA-MB-231 grown in methionine-restricted cysteine-depleted media for 24 h also up-regulated P21 and P27 gene expression, and MDA-MB-231 cells had decreased proliferation. MR hinders cancer progression by increasing cell cycle inhibitors that halt cell cycle progression. The application of MR in a clinical setting may provide a delay in the progression of cancer, which would provide more time for conventional cancer therapies to be effective. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2367-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  15. Glycoprotein 5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain SD16 inhibits viral replication and causes G2/M cell cycle arrest, but does not induce cellular apoptosis in Marc-145 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Yang, E-mail: muyang@nwsuaf.edu.cn [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Li, Liangliang, E-mail: lifeiyang2007@126.com [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Zhang, Beibei, E-mail: diana851218@163.com [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Huang, Baicheng, E-mail: hbch228@163.com [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Gao, Jiming, E-mail: jimingao2006@163.com [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); and others

    2015-10-15

    Cell apoptosis is common after infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). PRRSV GP5 has been reported to induce cell apoptosis. To further understand the role of GP5 in PRRSV induced cell apoptosis, we established Marc-145 cell lines stably expressing full-length GP5, GP5{sup Δ84-96} (aa 84-96 deletion), and GP5{sup Δ97-119} (aa 97-119 deletion). Cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cell apoptosis and virus replication in these cell lines were evaluated. Neither truncated nor full-length GP5 induced cell apoptosis in Marc-145 cells. However, GP5{sup Δ97-119}, but not full-length or GP5{sup Δ84-96}, induced a cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase resulting in a reduction in the growth of Marc-145 cells. Additionally, GP5{sup Δ84-96} inhibited the replication of PRRSV in Marc-145 cells through induction of IFN-β. These findings suggest that PRRSV GP5 is not responsible for inducing cell apoptosis in Marc-145 cells under these experimental conditions; however it has other important roles in virus/host cell biology. - Highlights: • Marc-145 cell lines stable expression PRRSV GP5 or truncated GP5 were constructed. • GP5{sup Δ97-119} expression in Marc-145 cell induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. • Expression of GP5 and truncated GP5 could not induce Marc-145 cells apoptosis. • PRRSV replication in Marc-145-GP5{sup Δ84-96} was significantly inhibited.

  16. Evaluation of cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma cell-25 cell lines by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl -2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and determination of percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle by flow cytometry: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visveswaraiah Paranjyothi Magadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malignancies constitute a wide variety of disorders having high mortality and morbidity rates. Current protocols for management include surgical intervention, chemotherapy, and radiation which possess numerous adverse effects. Many phytochemicals are available with anticancer properties similar to anticancer drugs. Major benefit of these compounds is apparent lack of toxicity to normal tissues. Graviola (botanical name: Annona Muricata contain bioactive compound “annonaceous acetogenins” known for anticancer activity on cancer cell lines. Aims: To determine cytotoxicity of Graviola and percentage cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle. Settings and Design: The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC-25 cell lines at various concentrations evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Methods: Graviola Leaves, American Type Culture Collection SCC-25 cell lines were procured from Skanda Laboratories, Bengaluru. The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola on SCC-25 cells at various concentrations evaluated using MTT assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA. Results: MTT assay showed statistically significant (P < 0.001 dose-dependent inhibition of SCC-25 cell lines by Graviola with IC50 value of 12.42 μg/ml. Flow cytometry revealed that Graviola at 25 and 50 g/ml arrested 53.39% and 52.09% cells in G2M phase of cell cycle respectively, which was statistically significant. Conclusion: Graviola showed significant cytotoxic activity and percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase cell cycle against SCC-25 cell lines.

  17. Evaluation of cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma cell-25 cell lines by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl) -2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and determination of percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle by flow cytometry: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magadi, Visveswaraiah Paranjyothi; Ravi, Venkatadasappa; Arpitha, Anantharaju; Litha; Kumaraswamy, Kikkerilakshminarayana; Manjunath, Krishnappa

    2015-01-01

    Malignancies constitute a wide variety of disorders having high mortality and morbidity rates. Current protocols for management include surgical intervention, chemotherapy, and radiation which possess numerous adverse effects. Many phytochemicals are available with anticancer properties similar to anticancer drugs. Major benefit of these compounds is apparent lack of toxicity to normal tissues. Graviola (botanical name: Annona Muricata) contain bioactive compound "annonaceous acetogenins" known for anticancer activity on cancer cell lines. To determine cytotoxicity of Graviola and percentage cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle. The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC-25) cell lines at various concentrations evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Graviola Leaves, American Type Culture Collection SCC-25 cell lines were procured from Skanda Laboratories, Bengaluru. The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola on SCC-25 cells at various concentrations evaluated using MTT assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA. MTT assay showed statistically significant (P < 0.001) dose-dependent inhibition of SCC-25 cell lines by Graviola with IC50 value of 12.42 μg/ml. Flow cytometry revealed that Graviola at 25 and 50 g/ml arrested 53.39% and 52.09% cells in G2M phase of cell cycle respectively, which was statistically significant. Graviola showed significant cytotoxic activity and percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase cell cycle against SCC-25 cell lines.

  18. Novel 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazones Ga(III) complexes with a high antiproliferative activity by promoting apoptosis and inhibiting cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jinxu; Deng, Jungang; Qian, Kun; Tian, Liang; Li, Jiaming; He, Kunhuan; Huang, Xueren; Cheng, Zhen; Zheng, Yunyun; Wang, Yihong

    2017-07-07

    Two types of 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazones Ga(III) complexes, which are 2:1 and 1:1 ligand/Ga(III) complexes, were synthesized and determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction. The antiproliferative activity of these Ga(III) complexes have been examined to illuminate the structure-activity relationships essential to form Ga(III) complexes with remarkable anticancer activity. In addition, Ga(III) complexes where the metal/ligand ratio was 1:1 (C4) had observably higher antiproliferative activity than 1:2 (C3). Ga(III) complexes caused a marked increase of caspase-3 and 9 activity in NCI-H460 cells compared to the metal free ligand. Caspase activation was somewhat mediated by the release of Cyt C from mitochondria after incubation with selected agents. Both types of Ga(III) complexes showed more effective in inhibition of the G1/S transition than the ligand alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibition of Anchorage-Independent Proliferation and G0/G1 Cell-Cycle Regulation in Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells by 4,7-Dimethoxy-5-Methyl-l,3-Benzodioxole Isolated from the Fruiting Body of Antrodia camphorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Man Lien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 4,7-dimethoxy-5-methyl-l,3-benzodioxole (SY-1 was isolated from three different sources of dried fruiting bodies of Antrodia camphorate (AC. AC is a medicinal mushroom that grows on the inner heartwood wall of Cinnamomum kanehirai Hay (Lauraceae, an endemic species that is used in Chinese medicine for its anti-tumor and immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we demonstrated that SY-1 profoundly decreased the proliferation of human colon cancer cells (COLO 205 through G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest (50–150 μM and induction of apoptosis (>150 μM. Cell-cycle arrest induced by SY-1 was associated with a significant increase in levels of p53, p21/Cip1 and p27/Kip1, and a decrease in cyclins D1, D3 and A. In contrast, SY-1 treatment did not induce significant changes in G0/G1 phase cell-cycle regulatory proteins in normal human colonic epithelial cells (FHC. The cells were cultured in soft agar to evaluate anchorage-independent colony formation, and we found that the number of transformed colonies was significantly reduced in the SY-1-treated COLO 205 cells. These findings demonstrate for the first time that SY-1 inhibits human colon cancer cell proliferation through inhibition of cell growth and anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar. However, the detailed mechanisms of these processes remain unclear and will require further investigation.

  20. Omeprazole Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Induces G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest through Up-regulating miR-203a-3p Expression in Barrett’s Esophagus Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichao Hou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing data suggest that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, particularly omeprazole, have significant anti-tumor action in monotherapy and or combination chemotherapy. Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway represents a leading candidate as a molecular mediator of Barrett’s esophagus (BE. Studies have indicated reduced miRNAs in BE progression, however, little is known about the latent anti-neoplasm effects of miRNAs in BE cells. Here, we investigated whether omeprazole could inhibit BE progression by regulating Hh pathway and explored the promising Hh-targeted miRNAs in BE cells. We conducted qRT-PCR and immunoblotting assay to evaluate the effects of omeprazole on the expression of Hh signaling components and miR-203a-3p in CP-A and CP-B cells. The promising target genes of miR-203a-3p were predicted by bioinformatics methods, and verified by luciferase assays and qRT-PCR. The effects of omeprazole on BE cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution were determined. The overexpression or silencing of miR-203a-3p was performed to test its anti-proliferative effects. Finally, rescue experiments that miR-203a-3p inhibitor alleviated the effects of omeprazole on decreasing the levels of Gli1 mRNA, protein and luciferase were performed. Mechanistic studies showed that omeprazole could inhibit the expression of Gli1 and the nuclear localization of Gli1. Moreover, we determined that omeprazole could selectively up-regulated the expression of miR-203a-3p, and Gli1 was a bona fide target of miR-203a-3p. miR-203a-3p inhibitor alleviated the suppressing effects of omeprazole on Gli1 luciferase activity, mRNA and protein level. The functional assay suggested that omeprazole could dose-dependently inhibit BE cell growth and induce cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Additionally, overexpression and silencing of miR-203a-3p in BE cells disrupted cell cycle progress, resulting in suppressing and accelerating cell proliferation, respectively. Taken together, these data

  1. Omeprazole Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Induces G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest through Up-regulating miR-203a-3p Expression in Barrett's Esophagus Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yichao; Hu, Qiang; Huang, Jiao; Xiong, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Existing data suggest that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), particularly omeprazole, have significant anti-tumor action in monotherapy and or combination chemotherapy. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway represents a leading candidate as a molecular mediator of Barrett's esophagus (BE). Studies have indicated reduced miRNAs in BE progression, however, little is known about the latent anti-neoplasm effects of miRNAs in BE cells. Here, we investigated whether omeprazole could inhibit BE progression by regulating Hh pathway and explored the promising Hh-targeted miRNAs in BE cells. We conducted qRT-PCR and immunoblotting assay to evaluate the effects of omeprazole on the expression of Hh signaling components and miR-203a-3p in CP-A and CP-B cells. The promising target genes of miR-203a-3p were predicted by bioinformatics methods, and verified by luciferase assays and qRT-PCR. The effects of omeprazole on BE cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution were determined. The overexpression or silencing of miR-203a-3p was performed to test its anti-proliferative effects. Finally, rescue experiments that miR-203a-3p inhibitor alleviated the effects of omeprazole on decreasing the levels of Gli1 mRNA, protein and luciferase were performed. Mechanistic studies showed that omeprazole could inhibit the expression of Gli1 and the nuclear localization of Gli1. Moreover, we determined that omeprazole could selectively up-regulated the expression of miR-203a-3p, and Gli1 was a bona fide target of miR-203a-3p. miR-203a-3p inhibitor alleviated the suppressing effects of omeprazole on Gli1 luciferase activity, mRNA and protein level. The functional assay suggested that omeprazole could dose-dependently inhibit BE cell growth and induce cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Additionally, overexpression and silencing of miR-203a-3p in BE cells disrupted cell cycle progress, resulting in suppressing and accelerating cell proliferation, respectively. Taken together, these data provide a novel

  2. miR-24 inhibits cell proliferation by suppressing expression of E2F2, MYC and other cell cycle regulatory genes by binding to “seedless” 3′UTR microRNA recognition elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Ashish; Navarro, Francisco; Maher, Christopher; Maliszewski, Laura E.; Yan, Nan; O'Day, Elizabeth; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Tsai, Perry; Hofman, Oliver; Becker, Kevin G.; Gorospe, Myriam; Hide, Winston; Lieberman, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Summary miR-24, up-regulated during terminal differentiation of multiple lineages, inhibits cell cycle progression. Antagonizing miR-24 restores post-mitotic cell proliferation and enhances fibroblast proliferation, while over-expressing miR-24 increases the G1 compartment. The 248 mRNAs down-regulated upon miR-24 over-expression are highly enriched for DNA repair and cell cycle regulatory genes that form a direct interaction network with prominent nodes at genes that enhance (MYC, E2F2, CCNB1, CDC2) or inhibit (p27Kip1, VHL) cell cycle progression. miR-24 directly regulates MYC and E2F2 and some genes they transactivate. Enhanced proliferation from antagonizing miR-24 is abrogated by knocking down E2F2, but not MYC, and cell proliferation, inhibited by miR-24 over-expression, is rescued by miR-24-insensitive E2F2. Therefore, E2F2 is a critical miR-24 target. The E2F2 3′UTR lacks a predicted miR-24 recognition element. In fact, miR-24 regulates expression of E2F2, MYC, AURKB, CCNA2, CDC2, CDK4 and FEN1 by recognizing seedless, but highly complementary, sequences. PMID:19748357

  3. miR-34a inhibits differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by regulating cell cycle and senescence induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ho; Park, Hyeon; Pak, Ha-Jin; Yang, Dong-Yun; Kim, Yun-Hong; Choi, Won-Jun; Park, Se-Jin; Cho, Jung-Ah; Lee, Kyo-Won

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical in the maintenance, differentiation, and lineage commitment of stem cells. Stem cells have the unique property to differentiate into tissue-specific cell types (lineage commitment) during cell division (self-renewal). In this study, we investigated whether miR-34a, a cell cycle-regulating microRNA, could control the stem cell properties of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs). First, we found that the expression level of miR-34a was increased as the cell passage number was increased. This finding, however, was inversely correlated with our finding that the overexpression of miR-34a induced the decrease of cell proliferation. In addition, miR-34a overexpression decreased the expression of various cell cycle regulators such as CDKs (-2, -4, -6) and cyclins (-E, -D), but not p21 and p53. The cell cycle analysis showed accumulation of dividing cells at S phase by miR-34a, which was reversible by co-treatment with anti-miR-34a. The potential of adipogenesis and osteogenesis of ADSCs was also decreased by miR-34a overexpression, which was recovered by co-treatment with anti-miR-34a. The surface expression of stem cell markers including CD44 was also down-regulated by miR-34a overexpression as similar to that elicited by cell cycle inhibitors. miR-34a also caused a significant decrease in mRNA expression of stem cell transcription factors as well as STAT-3 expression and phosphorylation. Cytokine profiling revealed that miR-34a significantly modulated IL-6 and -8 production, which was strongly related to cellular senescence. These data suggest the importance of miR-34a for the fate of ADSCs toward senescence rather than differentiation. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of JAK1, 2/STAT3 Signaling Induces Apoptosis, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Reduces Tumor Cell Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xiong

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in the STAT3 pathway are involved in the oncogenesis of several cancers. However, the mechanism by which dysregulated STAT3 signaling contributes to the progression of human colorectal cancer (CRC has not been elucidated, nor has the role of JAK, the physiological activator of STAT3, been evaluated. To investigate the role of both JAK and STAT3 in CRC progression, we inhibited JAK with AG490 and depleted STAT3 with a SiRNA. Our results demonstrate that STAT3 and both JAK1 and 2 are involved in CRC cell growth, survival, invasion, and migration through regulation of gene expression, such as Bcl-2, p16ink4a, p21waf1/cip1, p27kip1, E-cadherin, VEGF, and MMPs. Importantly, the FAK is not required for STAT3-mediated regulation, but does function downstream of JAK. In addition, our data show that proteasome-mediated proteolysis promotes dephosphorylation of the JAK2, and consequently, negatively regulates STAT3 signaling in CRC. Moreover, immunohistochemical staining reveals that nuclear staining of phospho-STAT3 mostly presents in adenomas and adenocarcinomas, and a positive correlation is found between phospho-JAK2 immunoreactivity and the differentiation of colorectal adenocarcinomas. Therefore, our findings illustrate the biologic significance of JAK1, 2/STAT3 signaling in CRC progression and provide novel evidence that the JAK/STAT3 pathway may be a new potential target for therapy of CRC.

  5. CARI III Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Melanoma-Bearing Mouse Model through Induction of G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jin Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mushroom-derived natural products have been used to prevent or treat cancer for millennia. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of CARI (Cell Activation Research Institute III, which consists of a blend of mushroom mycelia from Phellinus linteus grown on germinated brown rice, Inonotus obliquus grown on germinated brown rice, Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice and Ganoderma lucidum. Here, we showed that CARI III exerted anti-cancer activity, which is comparable to Dox against melanoma in vivo. B16F10 cells were intraperitoneally injected into C57BL6 mice to develop solid intra-abdominal tumors. Three hundred milligrams of the CARI III/kg/day p.o. regimen reduced tumor weight, comparable to the doxorubicin (Dox-treated group. An increase in life span (ILS% = 50.88% was observed in the CARI III-administered group, compared to the tumor control group. CARI III demonstrates anti-proliferative activity against B16F10 melanoma cells through inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. CARI III inhibits the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK2 and induces p21. Therefore, CARI III could be a potential chemopreventive supplement to melanoma patients.

  6. CUDC-907 Promotes Bone Marrow Adipocytic Differentiation Through Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase and Regulation of Cell Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Dalia; Alshammari, Hassan; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    with quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed significant increase in H3K9ac epigenetic marker in the promoter regions of AdipoQ, FABP4, PPARγ, KLF15, and CEBPA in CUDC-907-treated hBMSCs. Follow-up experiments corroborated that the inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity enhanced adipocytic...

  7. Growth inhibition of the intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia by a dietary lectin is associated with arrest of the cell cycle.

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega-Barria, E; Ward, H D; Keusch, G T; Pereira, M E

    1994-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, a cause of diarrheal disease throughout the world, is a protozoan parasite that thrives in the small intestine. It is shown here that wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), a naturally occurring lectin widely consumed in normal human diets, reversibly inhibits the growth of G. lamblia trophozoites in vitro, and reduces infection by G. muris in the adult mouse model of giardiasis. The inhibitory effect was dose related, not associated with cytotoxicity and reversed by N-acetyl-D-glucosa...

  8. The pterocarpanquinone LQB-118 inhibits tumor cell proliferation by downregulation of c-Myc and cyclins D1 and B1 mRNA and upregulation of p21 cell cycle inhibitor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Thiago; Magalhães, Fernanda C J; Justo, Graça A; Coelho, Marsen G P; Netto, Chaquip D; Costa, Paulo R R; Sabino, Kátia C C

    2014-06-15

    The incidence of cancer grows annually worldwide and in Brazil it is the second cause of death. The search for anti-cancer drugs has then become urgent. It depends on the studies of natural and chemical synthesis products. The antitumor action of LQB-118, a pterocarpanquinone structurally related to lapachol, has been demonstrated to induce mechanisms linked to leukemia cell apoptosis. This work investigated some mechanisms of the in vitro antitumor action of LQB-118 on prostate cancer cells. LQB-118 reduced the expression of the c-Myc transcription factor, downregulated the cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 mRNA levels and upregulated the p21 cell cycle inhibitor. These effects resulted in cell cycle arrest in the S and G2/M phases and inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. LQB-118 also induced programmed cell death of the prostate cancer cells, as evidenced by internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and annexin-V positive cells. Except the cell cycle arrest in the S phase and enhanced c-Myc expression, all the mechanisms observed here for the in vitro antitumor action of LQB-118 were also found for Paclitaxel, a traditional antineoplastic drug. These findings suggest new molecular mechanisms for the LQB-118 in vitro antitumor action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Blueberry and malvidin inhibit cell cycle progression and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis by abrogating the JAK/STAT-3 signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Abdul Basit; Nivetha, Ramesh; Chattopadhyay, Indranil; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2017-11-01

    Blueberries, a rich source of anthocyanins have attracted considerable attention as functional foods that confer immense health benefits including anticancer properties. Herein, we assessed the potential of blueberry and its major constituent malvidin to target STAT-3, a potentially druggable oncogenic transcription factor with high therapeutic index. We demonstrate that blueberry abrogates the JAK/STAT-3 pathway and modulates downstream targets that influence cell proliferation and apoptosis in a hamster model of oral oncogenesis. Further, we provide mechanistic evidence that blueberry and malvidin function as STAT-3 inhibitors in the oral cancer cell line SCC131. Blueberry and malvidin suppressed STAT-3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation thereby inducing cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. However, the combination of blueberry and malvidin with the STAT-3 inhibitor S3I-201 was more efficacious in STAT-3 inhibition relative to single agents. The present study has provided leads for the development of novel combinations of compounds that can serve as inhibitors of STAT-mediated oncogenic signalling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tangeretin and its metabolite 4'-hydroxytetramethoxyflavone attenuate EGF-stimulated cell cycle progression in hepatocytes; role of inhibition at the level of mTOR/p70S6K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z; Surichan, S; Ruparelia, K; Arroo, R; Boarder, M R

    2011-04-01

    The mechanisms by which the dietary compound tangeretin has anticancer effects may include acting as a prodrug, forming an antiproliferative product in cancer cells. Here we show that tangeretin also inhibits cell cycle progression in hepatocytes and investigate the role of its primary metabolite 4'-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (4'-OH-TMF) in this effect. We used epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated rat hepatocytes, with [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA as an index of progression to S-phase of the cell cycle, and Western blots for phospho-proteins involved in the cell signalling cascade. Incubation of tangeretin with microsomes expressing CYP1A, or with hepatocytes, generated a primary product we identified as 4'-OH-TMF. Low micromolar concentrations of tangeretin or 4'-OH-TMF gave a concentration-dependent inhibition of EGF-stimulated progression to S-phase while having little effect on cell viability. To determine whether time for conversion of tangeretin to an active metabolite would enhance the inhibitory effect we used long pre-incubations; this reduced the inhibitory effect, in parallel with a reduction in the concentration of tangeretin. The EGF-stimulation of hepatocyte cell cycle progression requires signalling through Akt/mTOR/p70S6K kinase cascades. The tangeretin metabolite 4'-OH-TMF selectively inhibited S6K phosphorylation in the absence of significant inhibition of upstream Akt activity, suggesting an effect at the level of mTOR. Tangeretin and 4'-OH-TMF both inhibit cell cycle progression in primary hepatocytes. The inhibition of p70S6K phosphorylation by 4'-OH-TMF raises the possibility that inhibition of the mTOR pathway may contribute to the anticancer influence of a flavonoid-rich diet. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Tangeretin and its metabolite 4′-hydroxytetramethoxyflavone attenuate EGF-stimulated cell cycle progression in hepatocytes; role of inhibition at the level of mTOR/p70S6K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z; Surichan, S; Ruparelia, K; Arroo, R; Boarder, MR

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The mechanisms by which the dietary compound tangeretin has anticancer effects may include acting as a prodrug, forming an antiproliferative product in cancer cells. Here we show that tangeretin also inhibits cell cycle progression in hepatocytes and investigate the role of its primary metabolite 4′-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (4′-OH-TMF) in this effect. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated rat hepatocytes, with [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA as an index of progression to S-phase of the cell cycle, and Western blots for phospho-proteins involved in the cell signalling cascade. KEY RESULTS Incubation of tangeretin with microsomes expressing CYP1A, or with hepatocytes, generated a primary product we identified as 4′-OH-TMF. Low micromolar concentrations of tangeretin or 4′-OH-TMF gave a concentration-dependent inhibition of EGF-stimulated progression to S-phase while having little effect on cell viability. To determine whether time for conversion of tangeretin to an active metabolite would enhance the inhibitory effect we used long pre-incubations; this reduced the inhibitory effect, in parallel with a reduction in the concentration of tangeretin. The EGF-stimulation of hepatocyte cell cycle progression requires signalling through Akt/mTOR/p70S6K kinase cascades. The tangeretin metabolite 4′-OH-TMF selectively inhibited S6K phosphorylation in the absence of significant inhibition of upstream Akt activity, suggesting an effect at the level of mTOR. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Tangeretin and 4′-OH-TMF both inhibit cell cycle progression in primary hepatocytes. The inhibition of p70S6K phosphorylation by 4′-OH-TMF raises the possibility that inhibition of the mTOR pathway may contribute to the anticancer influence of a flavonoid-rich diet. PMID:21198542

  12. The effects of a growth-inhibiting tripeptide, acetylGlu-Ser-GlyNH2 (Ac-ESG), on gene expression and cell cycle progression of two lymphoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Reichelt, Wenche H; Luna, Luisa; Elgjo, Kjell; Reichelt, Karl L

    2003-01-01

    We recently isolated and characterized a tripeptide, acetylGlu-Ser-GlyNH2 (Ac-ESG), which inhibits proliferation of lymphoid cells. In this paper we describe the effects of Ac-ESG on growth-related gene expression and cell cycle progression in two lymphoma cell lines, Ramos and Molt, representing B and T lymphocytes, respectively. RNA was extracted from Molt and Ramos cells with or without the tripeptide treatment. Gene expression was examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Northern blot hybridization, and cell cycle progression was detected by flow cytometry. In the Molt cells, p53 gene expression was increased following treatment while c-myc was decreased after treatment shorter than 24 hours; N-ras expression was significantly reduced at picomolar concentration for 24-hour treatment; cyclinD1 and cdk4 expression did not show any change; DNA flow cytometry demonstrated that Molt cells were arrested or delayed predominantly in G2-M. Untreated Ramos cells had higher gene expression levels of c-myc, N-Ras and cdk4 than Molt cells, but lower p53 expression. These cells were not sensitive to Ac-ESG. The tripeptide Ac-ESG alters the expression of several growth-related genes in the Molt cell line and brings about an arrest or delay of cells in G2-M.

  13. MC1R and cAMP signaling inhibit cdc25B activity and delay cell cycle progression in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jesse; Bastian, Boris C; McCormick, Frank

    2013-08-20

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) mediates the tanning response through induction of cAMP and downstream pigmentary enzymes. Diminished function alleles of MC1R are associated with decreased tanning and increased melanoma risk, which has been attributed to increased rates of mutation. We have found that MC1R or cAMP signaling also directly decreases proliferation in melanoma cell lines. MC1R overexpression, treatment with the MC1R ligand, or treatment with small-molecule activators of cAMP signaling causes delayed progression from G2 into mitosis. This delay is caused by phosphorylation and inhibition of cdc25B, a cyclin dependent kinase 1-activating phosphatase, and is rescued by expression of a cdc25B mutant that cannot be phosphorylated at the serine 323 residue. These results show that MC1R and cAMP signaling can directly inhibit melanoma growth through regulation of the G2/M checkpoint.

  14. Flavokawain C Inhibits Cell Cycle and Promotes Apoptosis, Associated with Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulation of MAPKs and Akt Signaling Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Weng Phang

    Full Text Available Flavokawain C (FKC is a naturally occurring chalcone which can be found in Kava (Piper methysticum Forst root. The present study evaluated the effect of FKC on the growth of various human cancer cell lines and the underlying associated mechanisms. FKC showed higher cytotoxic activity against HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner in comparison to other cell lines (MCF-7, HT-29, A549 and CaSki, with minimal toxicity on normal human colon cells. The apoptosis-inducing capability of FKC on HCT 116 cells was evidenced by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and increased phosphatidylserine externalization. FKC was found to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of Smac/DIABLO, AIF and cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. Our results also revealed that FKC induced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis via upregulation of the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bak and death receptors (DR5, while downregulation of the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (XIAP, cIAP-1, c-FlipL, Bcl-xL and survivin, resulting in the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. FKC was also found to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, as suggested by the elevation of GADD153 protein after FKC treatment. After the cells were exposed to FKC (60μM over 18hrs, there was a substantial increase in the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. The expression of phosphorylated Akt was also reduced. FKC also caused cell cycle arrest in the S phase in HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner and with accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase. This was accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK2 and CDK4, consistent with the upregulation of CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1, and hypophosphorylation of Rb.

  15. Analysis of Cell Cycle Dynamics using Probabilistic Cell Cycle Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Schupp, Jane E.; Kinsella, Timothy J.; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we develop asynchronous probabilistic cell cycle models to quantitatively assess the effect of ionizing radiation on a human colon cancer cell line. We use both synchronous and asynchronous cell populations and follow treated cells for up to 2 cell cycle times. The model outputs quantify the changes in cell cycle dynamics following ionizing radiation treatment, principally in the duration of both G1 and G2/M phases. PMID:22254270

  16. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of microRNA-92a maintains podocyte cell cycle quiescence and limits crescentic glomerulonephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Henique, Carole; Bollée, Guillaume; Loyer, Xavier; Grahammer, Florian; Dhaun, Neeraj; Camus, Marine; Vernerey, Julien; Guyonnet, Léa; Gaillard, François; Lazareth, Hélène; Meyer, Charlotte; Bensaada, Imane; Legrès, Luc; Satoh, Takashi; Akira, Shizuo

    2017-01-01

    Crescentic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) represents the most aggressive form of acquired glomerular disease. While most therapeutic approaches involve potentially toxic immunosuppressive strategies, the pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. Podocytes are glomerular epithelial cells that are normally growth-arrested because of the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. An exception is in RPGN where podocytes undergo a deregulation of their differenti...

  17. Inhibition of miR301 enhances Akt-mediated cell proliferation by accumulation of PTEN in nucleus and its effects on cell-cycle regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mayur V; Shareef, Ahmad; Likus, Wirginia; Cieślar-Pobuda, Artur; Ghavami, Saeid; Łos, Marek J

    2016-04-12

    Micro-RNAs (miRs) represent an innovative class of genes that act as regulators of gene expression. Recently, the aberrant expression of several miRs has been associated with different types of cancers. In this study, we show that miR301 inhibition influences PI3K-Akt pathway activity. Akt overexpression in MCF7 and MDAMB468 cells caused downregulation of miR301 expression. This effect was confirmed by co-transfection of miR301-modulators in the presence of Akt. Cells overexpressing miR301-inhibitor and Akt, exhibited increased migration and proliferation. Experimental results also confirmed PI3K, PTEN and FoxF2 as regulatory targets for miR301. Furthermore, Akt expression in conjunction with miR301-inhibitor increased nuclear accumulation of PTEN, thus preventing it from downregulating the PI3K-signalling. In summary, our data emphasize the importance of miR301 inhibition on PI3K-Akt pathway-mediated cellular functions. Hence, it opens new avenues for the development of new anti-cancer agents preferentially targeting PI3K-Akt pathway.

  18. The inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells proliferation by arctigenin through G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest: persistent p27(Kip1) induction by interfering with PI3K/Akt/FOXO3a signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ao; Wang, Jun; Wu, Mingjun; Zhang, Xiaoxun; Zhang, Hongzhi

    2015-01-15

    Proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is vital for the development of fibrosis during liver injury. In this study, we describe that arctigenin (ATG), a major bioactive component of Fructus Arctii, exhibited selective cytotoxic activity via inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-activated HSCs proliferation and arrested cell cycle at G0/G1 phase, which could not be observed in normal human hepatocytes in vitro. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 activities could be strongly inhibited by ATG through down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4/6 expression in early G1 phase arrest. In the ATG-treated HSCs, the expression level of p27(Kip1) and the formation of CDK2-p27(Kip1) complex were also increased. p27(Kip1) silencing significantly attenuated the effect of ATG, including cell cycle arrest and suppression of proliferation in activated HSCs. We also found that ATG suppressed PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream transcription factor Forkhead box O 3a (FOXO3a), decreased binding of FOXO3a to 14-3-3 protein, and stimulated nuclear translocation of FOXO3a in activated HSCs. Furthermore, knockdown of FOXO3a expression by FOXO3a siRNA attenuated ATG-induced up-regulation of p27(Kip1) in activated HSCs. All the above findings suggested that ATG could increase the levels of p27(Kip1) protein through inhibition of Akt and improvement of FOXO3a activity, in turn inhibited the CDK2 kinase activity, and eventually caused an overall inhibition of HSCs proliferation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel phyto-derivative BRM270 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cells proliferation by inducing G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in xenograft mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Mongre, Raj; Sharma, Neelesh; Singh Sodhi, Simrinder; Ghosh, Mrinmoy; Kumar Singh, Amit; Kim, Nameun; Park, Yang Ho; Shin, Young Gyu; Kim, Sung Jin; Jiao Jiao, Zhang; Huynh, Do Luong; Jeong, Dong Kee

    2017-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major threat to human health worldwide and development of novel antineoplastic drug is demanding task. BRM270 is a proprietary combination of traditional medicinal herbs, has been shown to be effective against a wide range of stem-like cancer initiating cells (SLCICs). However, the underlying mechanism and antitumor efficacy of BRM270 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells have not been well elucidated till date. Here we studied the tumoricidal effect of BRM270 on human-CD133 + expressing stem-like HepG-2 and SNU-398 cells. Gene expression profiling by qPCR and specific cellular protein expressions was measured using immunocytochemistry/western blot analysis. In vivo efficacy of BRM270 has been elucidated in the SLCICs induced xenograft model. In addition, 2DG-(2-Deoxy-d-Glucose) optical-probe guided tumor monitoring was performed to delineate the size and extent of metastasized tumor. Significant (PBRM270 significantly (PBRM270 can effectively inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in hepatoma cells by down-regulating CyclinD1/Bcl2 mediated c-Jun apoptotic pathway. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Dietary Compound Proanthocyanidins from Chinese bayberry (Myrica rubra Sieb. et Zucc.) leaves inhibit angiogenesis and regulate cell cycle of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells via targeting Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Chen, Shiguo; Wei, Chaoyang; Rankin, Gary O; Rojanasakul, Yon; Ren, Ning; Ye, Xingqian; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2018-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancy and natural products have drawn great attention for cancer treatment. Chinese bayberry leaves proanthocyanidin (BLPs) with epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) as its terminal and major extension units is unusual in the plant kingdom. In the present study, BLPs showed strong growth inhibitory effects on cisplatin-resistant A2780/CP70 cells by inhibiting angiogenesis and inducing G1 cell cycle arrest. BLPs reduced the tube formation in HUVECs and attenuated the wound healing ability in A2780/CP70 cells. BLPs further reduced the level of ROS and targeted Akt/mTOR/p70S6K/4E-BP-1 pathway to reduce the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, and thus inhibited angiogenesis. Furthermore, BLPs induced G1 cell cycle arrest by reducing the expressions of c-Myc, cyclin D1 and CDK4, which was also in accordance with the flow cytometry analysis. Overall, these results indicated that BLPs could be a valuable resource of natural compounds for cancer treatment.

  1. Downregulation of ROS-FIG inhibits cell proliferation, colony-formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, while inducing apoptosis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    DENG, GANG; HU, CHENGHUAN; ZHU, LEI; HUANG, FEIZHOU; HUANG, WEI; XU, HONGBO; NIE, WANPIN

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is the second most common primary liver cancer with poor responsiveness to existing drug therapies. Therefore, novel treatment strategies against ICC are required to improve survival. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of fused-in-glioblastoma-c-ros-oncogene1 (FIG-ROS) fusion gene in ICC. ROS was positively expressed in ICC tissues and HUCCT1 cells. Plasmids expressing ROS- and FIG-specific shRNAs were constructed and transfected into HUCCT...

  2. microRNA-365, down-regulated in colon cancer, inhibits cell cycle progression and promotes apoptosis of colon cancer cells by probably targeting Cyclin D1 and Bcl-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jing; Liu, Lin; Zheng, Wei; Chen, Lin; Wu, Xin; Xu, Yingxin; Du, Xiaohui; Han, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    Deregulated microRNAs participate in carcinogenesis and cancer progression, but their roles in cancer development remain unclear. In this study, miR-365 expression was found to be downregulated in human colon cancer tissues as compared with that in matched non-neoplastic mucosa tissues, and its downregulation was correlated with cancer progression and poor survival in colon cancer patients. Functional studies revealed that restoration of miR-365 expression inhibited cell cycle progression, promoted 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis and repressed tumorigenicity in colon cancer cell lines. Furthermore, bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation were used to identify miR-365 target genes and indicated that the antitumor effects of miR-365 were probably mediated by its targeting and repression of Cyclin D1 and Bcl-2 expression, thus inhibiting cell cycle progression and promoting apoptosis. These results suggest that downregulation of miR-365 in colon cancer may have potential applications in prognosis prediction and gene therapy in colon cancer patients.

  3. Regulation of the cell cycle by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Makoto

    1995-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of cell proliferation is extremely complex; deregulation results in neoplastic transformation. In eukaryotes, proliferation of cells is finely regulated through the cell cycle. Studies have shown that the cell cycle is regulated by s series of enzymes known as cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The activities of CDKs are controlled by their association with regulatory subunits, cyclins; the expression of cyclins and the activation of the different cyclin-CDK complexes are required for the cell to cycle. Thus, the cell cycle is regulated by activating and inhibiting phosphorylation of the CDK subunits and this program has internal check points at different stages of the cell cycle. When cells are exposed to external insults such as DNA damaging agents, negative regulation of the cell cycle occurs; arrest in either G1 or G2 stage is induced to prevent the cells from prematurely entering into the next stage before DNA is repaired. Recently, a potent inhibitor of CDKs, which inhibits the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma susceptibility (Rb) gene product by cyclin A-CDK2, cyclin E-CDK2, cyclin D1-CDK4, and cyclin D2-CDK4 complexes has been identified. This protein named WAF1, Sdi1, Cip1, or p21 (a protein of Mr 21,000) contains a p53-binding site in its promoter and studies have reported that the expression of WAF1 was directly regulated by p53; cells with loss of p53 activity due to mutational alteration were unable to induce WAF1. This chapter will be focused on the mechanisms of the cell cycle including inhibitors of CDKs, and the induction of WAF1 by irradiation through a pathway independent of p53 will be also described. (author)

  4. Regulation of the cell cycle by irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akashi, Makoto [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1995-12-01

    The molecular mechanism of cell proliferation is extremely complex; deregulation results in neoplastic transformation. In eukaryotes, proliferation of cells is finely regulated through the cell cycle. Studies have shown that the cell cycle is regulated by s series of enzymes known as cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The activities of CDKs are controlled by their association with regulatory subunits, cyclins; the expression of cyclins and the activation of the different cyclin-CDK complexes are required for the cell to cycle. Thus, the cell cycle is regulated by activating and inhibiting phosphorylation of the CDK subunits and this program has internal check points at different stages of the cell cycle. When cells are exposed to external insults such as DNA damaging agents, negative regulation of the cell cycle occurs; arrest in either G1 or G2 stage is induced to prevent the cells from prematurely entering into the next stage before DNA is repaired. Recently, a potent inhibitor of CDKs, which inhibits the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma susceptibility (Rb) gene product by cyclin A-CDK2, cyclin E-CDK2, cyclin D1-CDK4, and cyclin D2-CDK4 complexes has been identified. This protein named WAF1, Sdi1, Cip1, or p21 (a protein of Mr 21,000) contains a p53-binding site in its promoter and studies have reported that the expression of WAF1 was directly regulated by p53; cells with loss of p53 activity due to mutational alteration were unable to induce WAF1. This chapter will be focused on the mechanisms of the cell cycle including inhibitors of CDKs, and the induction of WAF1 by irradiation through a pathway independent of p53 will be also described. (author)

  5. Novel ciprofloxacin hybrids using biology oriented drug synthesis (BIODS) approach: Anticancer activity, effects on cell cycle profile, caspase-3 mediated apoptosis, topoisomerase II inhibition, and antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, Asmaa E; Gedawy, Ehab M

    2018-03-09

    As we are interested in synthetizing biologically active leads with dual anticancer and antibacterial activity, we adopted biology oriented drug synthesis (BIODS) strategy to synthesize a series of novel ciprofloxacin (CP) hybrids. The National Cancer Institute (USA) selected seventeen newly synthesized compounds for anticancer evaluation against 59 different human tumor cell lines. Five compounds 3e, 3f, 3h, 3o and 3p were further studied through determination of IC 50 values against the most sensitive cancer cell lines. In vitro results showed that the five compounds exhibited potent anticancer activity against test cell lines in nanomolar to micromolar range, with IC 50 values between 0.72 and 4.92 μM, which was 9 to1.5 folds more potent than doxorubicin. In this study, two promising potent anticancer CP hybrids, 3f and 3o, were identified. The anti-proliferative activity of these compounds appears to correlate well with their ability to inhibit Topo II (IC 50  = 0.58 and 0.86 μM). It is worth mentioning that compound 3f was 6 folds more potent than doxorubicin, 5 folds more potent than amsacrine and 1.5 folds more potent than etoposide. At the same time, compound 3o showed 4 folds more inhibitory activity against Topo II than doxorubicin, 3 folds more potent than amsacrine and almost equipotent activity to etoposide. Activation of damage response pathway of the DNA leads to cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase, accumulation of cells in pre-G1 phase and annexin-V and propidium iodide staining, indicating that cell death proceeds through an apoptotic mechanism. Moreover, compounds 3f and 3o showed potent pro-apoptotic effect through induction of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. This mechanistic pathway was confirmed by a significant increase in the level of active caspase-3 compared to control. This observation may indicate that both CP hybrids can chelate with zinc, a powerful inhibitor of procaspase-3 enzymatic activity, so procaspase-3

  6. Inhibition of protein kinase C in PHA-activated PBMC treated with anti-HLA class I monoclonal antibody is associated to decreased proliferation and expression of cell cycle related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rita, S; Michele, R; Patrizia, O; Alessansdra, B; Sara, B; Enrico, G

    1994-01-01

    Treatment of PHA-activated PBMC with anti-HLA class I monoclonal antibody (mAb 01.65) shows: 1) depletion of particulate protein Kinase C (PKC) and partial reduction of cytosolic PKC after only 10 min.; 2) inhibition of tritiated thymidine (3H-Td) incorporation; 3) slowing down of cell cycle; 4) reduced expression of four cell cycle related genes. These findings suggest that the depletion of PKC is reflected on the cell cycle progression and expression of cell cycle related genes. We studied, in PHA-activated PBMC cultures, the effect of N-N-Staurosporine (StSp) acting as PKC inhibitor at nanomolar concentrations, alone and combined with mAb 01.65. StSp, inhibits the proliferative response of PHA stimulated PBMC in a competitive fashion with mAb 01.65. We report here that StSp alone and combined with mAb 01.65 affects also the expression of c-myc and cdc2 and the membrane expression of two proliferation markers: IL-2R (CD25) and TfR (CD71).

  7. Soy milk digestion extract inhibits progression of prostate cancer cell growth via regulation of prostate cancer‑specific antigen and cell cycle-regulatory genes in human LNCaP cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nam-Hee; Shin, Hee-Chang; Oh, Seunghyun; Lee, Kyun-Hee; Lee, Yoon-Bok; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-08-01

    Soy milk, which is produced from whole soybeans, contains a variety of biologically active components. Isoflavones are a class of soy-derived phytoestrogens with beneficial effects, among which genistein (GEN) has been previously indicated to reduce the risk of prostate cancer. The present study evaluated the effects of soy milk digestion extract (SMD) on the progression of prostate cancer via the estrogen receptor (ER)β in human LNCaP prostate cancer cells. To evaluate the effects of SMD (daizein, 1.988 mg/100g, glycitein, 23.537 mg/100 g and GEN, 0.685 mg/100g) on cell proliferation, LNCaP cells were cultured in media containing vehicle (0.1% dimethyl sulfoxide), 17β‑estradiol (E2; 2.7x10‑7 mg/ml), GEN (2.7x10-2 mg/ml) of SMD (total aglycon concentration, 0.79 mg/ml), after which the cell viability was examined using an MTT assay. The cell viability was significantly elevated by E2 (by 45±0.18%), while it was markedly reduced by GEN (73.2±0.03%) or SMD (74.8±0.09%). Semi‑quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to assess the mRNA expression levels of target genes, including ERβ, prostate cancer‑specific antigen (PSA) and cell cycle regulators p21, Cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4. The expression of ERβ was almost completely diminished by E2, whereas it was significantly elevated by SMD. In addition, the expression levels of PSA were considerably reduced by SMD. The expression of p21 was significantly elevated by SMD, while it was markedly reduced by E2. Of note, the expression levels of Cyclin D1 and CDK4 were considerably elevated by E2, while being significantly reduced by GEN and SMD. All of these results indicated that SMD may inhibit the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells via regulating the expression of ERβ, PSA, p21, Cyclin D1 and CDK4 in an ER-dependent manner.

  8. Atorvastatin Calcium Inhibits PDGF-ββ-Induced Proliferation and Migration of VSMCs Through the G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest and Suppression of Activated PDGFRβ-PI3K-Akt Signaling Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs is a hallmark of vascular lesions, such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. PDGF-ββ, an isoform of PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor, has been demonstrated to induce proliferation and migration of VSMCs. Atorvastatin calcium, a selective inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, has favorable protective effects on VSMCs. This study examined the effects of atorvastatin calcium on the proliferation and migration of PDGF-ββ-treated VSMCs, as well as its underlying mechanisms. Methods: MTT assays, Edu imaging, cell cycle analysis, wound healing assays, transwell migration assays, and western blot analysis were performed. Results: Atorvastatin calcium significantly inhibited cell proliferation, DNA synthesis and cell migration of PDGF-ββ-treated VSMCs. We demonstrated that atorvastatin calcium induced cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase in response to PDGF-ββ stimulation and decreased the expression of G0/G1-specific regulatory proteins, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, CDK2, cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK4 in PDGF-ββ-treated VSMCs. Moreover, pretreatment with atorvastatin calcium inhibited the PDGF-ββ-treated phosphorylation of PDGFRβ and Akt, whereas atorvastatin calcium did not affect the phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 or (ERK 1/2. Conclusion: Our data suggested that atorvastatin calcium inhibited abnormal proliferation and migration of VSMCs through G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and suppression of the PDGFRβ-Akt signaling cascade.

  9. Atorvastatin Calcium Inhibits PDGF-ββ-Induced Proliferation and Migration of VSMCs Through the G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest and Suppression of Activated PDGFRβ-PI3K-Akt Signaling Cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Dong, Siyuan; Li, Zhao; Guo, Xiaofan; Zhang, Naijin; Yu, Bo; Sun, Yingxian

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a hallmark of vascular lesions, such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. PDGF-ββ, an isoform of PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor), has been demonstrated to induce proliferation and migration of VSMCs. Atorvastatin calcium, a selective inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, has favorable protective effects on VSMCs. This study examined the effects of atorvastatin calcium on the proliferation and migration of PDGF-ββ-treated VSMCs, as well as its underlying mechanisms. MTT assays, Edu imaging, cell cycle analysis, wound healing assays, transwell migration assays, and western blot analysis were performed. Atorvastatin calcium significantly inhibited cell proliferation, DNA synthesis and cell migration of PDGF-ββ-treated VSMCs. We demonstrated that atorvastatin calcium induced cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase in response to PDGF-ββ stimulation and decreased the expression of G0/G1-specific regulatory proteins, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), CDK2, cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK4 in PDGF-ββ-treated VSMCs. Moreover, pretreatment with atorvastatin calcium inhibited the PDGF-ββ-treated phosphorylation of PDGFRβ and Akt, whereas atorvastatin calcium did not affect the phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 or (ERK) 1/2. Our data suggested that atorvastatin calcium inhibited abnormal proliferation and migration of VSMCs through G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and suppression of the PDGFRβ-Akt signaling cascade. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Ethyl acetate extract of Chinese medicinal herb Sarcandra glabra induces growth inhibition on human leukemic HL-60 cells, associated with cell cycle arrest and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax/Bcl-2 ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W Y; Chiu, Lawrence C M; Lam, W S; Wong, W Y; Chan, Y T; Ho, Y P; Wong, Elaine Y L; Wong, Y S; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2007-02-01

    Sarcandra glabra (Thunb.) Nakai, colloquially known as Caoshanhu, is a Chinese medicinal herb with reported anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral and non-specific immunoenhancing properties. Although the plant has been clinically used for treating a variety of diseases, its bioactive ingredients are largely unknown and its mode of action has never been investigated. In this study, the anti-tumor property of ethyl acetate (EA) extract of S. glabra was investigated by determining its in vitro growth-inhibitory effects on a panel of human cancer cell lines of different histotypes. Growth inhibition of the EA extract on the cancer cells seemed to be selective, and the leukemic HL-60 was found to be the most responsive after 48 h of treatment (IC50=58 microg/ml). Flow cytometric studies further illustrated that the extract might interfere with DNA replication and thus arrested the cell cycle at S phase in the leukemic cells, followed by DNA fragmentation and loss of phospholipid asymmetry in the plasma membrane after 72 h of treatment. Concurrently, the pro-apoptotic Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was also up-regulated by more than 178% of the control level. All these findings suggested that the extract had initiated apoptosis to kill the leukemic cells. Results from this pioneer study help to establish a scientific foundation for future research and development of the bioactive ingredients in EA extract of S. glabra as efficacious anti-cancer agents.

  11. Beta-escin inhibits colonic aberrant crypt foci formation in rats and regulates the cell cycle growth by inducing p21(waf1/cip1) in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlolla, Jagan M R; Raju, Jayadev; Swamy, Malisetty V; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2006-06-01

    Extracts of Aesculus hippocastanum (horse chestnut) seed have been used in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, edema, and hemorrhoids. Most of the beneficial effects of horse chestnut are attributed to its principal component beta-escin or aescin. Recent studies suggest that beta-escin may possess anti-inflammatory, anti-hyaluronidase, and anti-histamine properties. We have evaluated the chemopreventive efficacy of dietary beta-escin on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF). In addition, we analyzed the cell growth inhibitory effects and the induction of apoptosis in HT-29 human colon cancer cell line. To evaluate the inhibitory properties of beta-escin on colonic ACF, 7-week-old male F344 rats were fed experimental diets containing 0%, 0.025%, or 0.05% beta-escin. After 1 week, the rats received s.c. injections of azoxymethane (15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for 2 weeks) or an equal volume of normal saline (vehicle). Rats were continued on respective experimental diets and sacrificed 8 weeks after the azoxymethane treatment. Colons were evaluated histopathologically for ACF. Administration of dietary 0.025% and 0.05% beta-escin significantly suppressed total colonic ACF formation up to approximately 40% (P escin showed dose-dependent inhibition (approximately 49% to 65%, P escin and analyzed by flow cytometry for apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Beta-escin treatment in HT-29 cells induced growth arrest at the G1-S phase, which was associated with the induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1), and this correlated with reduced phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. Results also indicate that beta-escin inhibited growth of colon cancer cells with either wild-type or mutant p53. This novel feature of beta-escin, a triterpene saponin, may be a useful candidate agent for colon cancer chemoprevention and treatment.

  12. Cell growth and division cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darzynkiewicz, Z.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of the cell cycle in its present form was introduced more than three decades ago. Studying incorporation of DNA precursors by autoradiography, these authors observed that DNA synthesis in individual cells was discontinuous and occupied a discrete portion of the cell life (S phase). Mitotic division was seen to occur after a certain period of time following DNA replication. A distinct time interval between mitosis and DNA replication was also apparent. Thus, the cell cycle was subdivided into four consecutive phases, G/sub 1/, S, G/sub 2/, and M. The G/sub 1/ and G/sub 2/ phases represented the ''gaps'' between mitosis and the start of DNA replication, and between the end of DNA replication and the onset of mitosis, respectively. The cell cycle was defined as the interval between the midpoint of mitosis and the midpoint of the subsequent mitosis of the daughter cell(s). The authors' present knowledge on the cell cycle benefited mostly from the development of four different techniques: autoradiography, time-lapse cinematography, cell synchronization and flow cytometry. Of these, autoradiography has been the most extensively used, especially during the past two decades. By providing a means to analyse incorporation of precursors of DNA, RNA or proteins by individual cells and, in combination with various techniques of cell synchronization, autoradiography yielded most of the data fundamental to the current understanding of the cell cycle-related phenomena. Kinetics of cell progression through the cell cycle could be analysed in great detail after development of such sophisticated autoradiographic approaches as measurements of the fraction of labeled mitoses (''FLM curves'') or multiple sequential cell labelling with /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-TdR

  13. Bumetanide-induced NKCC1 inhibition attenuates oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced decrease in proliferative activity and cell cycle progression arrest in cultured OPCs via p-38 MAPKs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peicai; Tang, Ronghua; Yu, Zhiyuan; Huang, Shanshan; Xie, Minjie; Luo, Xiang; Wang, Wei

    2015-07-10

    The Na-K-Cl co-transporter 1 (NKCC1; a member of the cation-chloride co-transporter family) mediates the coupled movement of Na(+) and/or K(+) with Cl(-) across the plasma membrane of cells (Haas and Forbush, 2000, Annu. Rev. Physiol., 62, 515-534; Russell, 2000, Physiol. Rev., 80, 211-276). Although it acts as an important regulator of cell volume, secretion, and modulator of cell apoptosis and proliferation (Chen et al., 2005, J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab., 25, 54-66; Kahle et al., 2008, Nat. Clin. Pract. Neurol., 4, 490-503; Kidokoro et al., 2014, Am. J. Physiol. Ren. Physiol., 306, F1155-F1160; Wang et al., 2011, Cell. Physiol. Biochem., 28, 703-714), NKCC1׳s effects on oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) have not been characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and to what extent inhibition of NKCC1 alters oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced cell cycle progression. In the present study, we demonstrated that inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide attenuates the decrease in OGD-induced DNA synthesis in cultured OPCs. Western blots showed that NKCC1 inhibition led to an increased expression of cyclin D1, CDK 4, and cyclin E in OGD-treated cells. Furthermore, our results showed bumetanide attenuated the decrease in OGD-induced proliferation and arrest of cell cycle progression via the P-38 MAPK signaling cascade. Thus, NKCC1 plays important roles in the proliferation of OPCs under OGD-induced stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by enhancing AMP-activated protein kinase and cell cycle regulation, and delays atherosclerosis in ApoE deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jojima, Teruo; Uchida, Kohsuke; Akimoto, Kazumi; Tomotsune, Takanori; Yanagi, Kazunori; Iijima, Toshie; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Kasai, Kikuo; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2017-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that both native glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-1 receptor agonists suppress the progression of atherosclerosis in animal models. We investigated whether liraglutide, a GLP-1 analogue, could prevent the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (ApoE -/- ) on a high-fat diet. We also examined the influence of liraglutide on angiotensin II-induced proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via enhancement of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and regulation of cell cycle progression. Treatment of ApoE -/- mice with liraglutide (400 μg/day for 4 weeks) suppressed atherosclerotic lesions and increased AMPK phosphorylation in the aortic wall. Liraglutide also improved the endothelial function of thoracic aortas harvested from ApoE -/- mice in an ex vivo study. Furthermore, liraglutide increased AMPK phosphorylation in rat VSMCs, while liraglutide-induced activation of AMPK was abolished by exendin 9-39, a GLP-1 antagonist. Moreover, angiotensin (Ang) II-induced proliferation of VSMCs was suppressed by liraglutide in a dose-dependent manner, and flow cytometry of Ang II-stimulated VSMCs showed that liraglutide reduced the percentage of cells in G2/M phase (by arrest in G0/G1 phase). These findings suggest that liraglutide may inhibit Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation by activating AMPK signaling and inducing cell cycle arrest, thus delaying the progression of atherosclerosis independently of its glucose-lowering effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. SUV2, which encodes an ATR-related cell cycle checkpoint and putative plant ATRIP, is required for aluminium-dependent root growth inhibition in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, Caroline A; Larsen, Paul B

    2017-09-01

    A suppressor mutagenesis screen was conducted in order to identify second site mutations that could reverse the extreme hypersensitivity to aluminium (Al) seen for the Arabidopsis mutant, als3-1. From this screen, it was found that a loss-of-function mutation in the previously described SUV2 (SENSITIVE TO UV 2), which encodes a putative plant ATRIP homologue that is a component of the ATR-dependent cell checkpoint response, reversed the als3-1 phenotype. This included prevention of hallmarks associated with als3-1 including Al-dependent terminal differentiation of the root tip and transition to endoreduplication. From this analysis, SUV2 was determined to be required for halting cell cycle progression and triggering loss of the quiescent centre (QC) following exposure to Al. In conjunction with this, SUV2 was found to have a similar role as ATR, ALT2 and SOG1 in Al-dependent stoppage of root growth, all of which are required for promotion of expression of a suite of genes that likely are part of an Al-dependent DNA damage transcriptional response. This work argues that these Al response factors work together to detect Al-dependent damage and subsequently activate a DNA damage response pathway that halts the cell cycle and subsequently promotes QC differentiation and entrance into endocycling. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Fueling the Cell Division Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Roa, María; Malumbres, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Cell division is a complex process with high energy demands. However, how cells regulate the generation of energy required for DNA synthesis and chromosome segregation is not well understood. Recent data suggest that changes in mitochondrial dynamics and metabolic pathways such as oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and glycolysis crosstalk with, and are tightly regulated by, the cell division machinery. Alterations in energy availability trigger cell-cycle checkpoints, suggesting a bidirectional connection between cell division and general metabolism. Some of these connections are altered in human disease, and their manipulation may help in designing therapeutic strategies for specific diseases including cancer. We review here recent studies describing the control of metabolism by the cell-cycle machinery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Berberine and a Berberis lycium extract inactivate Cdc25A and induce α-tubulin acetylation that correlate with HL-60 cell cycle inhibition and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Musa; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Vonach, Caroline; Madlener, Sibylle; Prinz, Sonja; Herbaceck, Irene; Hoelzl, Christine; Bauer, Sabine; Viola, Katharina; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Quereshi, Rizwana Aleem; Knasmueller, Siegfried; Grusch, Michael; Kopp, Brigitte; Krupitza, Georg

    2010-01-01

    Berberis lycium Royle (Berberidacea) from Pakistan and its alkaloids berberine and palmatine have been reported to possess beneficial pharmacological properties. In the present study, the anti-neoplastic activities of different B. lycium root extracts and the major constituting alkaloids, berberine and palmatine were investigated in p53-deficient HL-60 cells. The strongest growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects were found in the n-butanol (BuOH) extract followed by the ethyl acetate (EtOAc)-, and the water (H 2 O) extract. The chemical composition of the BuOH extract was analyzed by TLC and quantified by HPLC. 11.1 μg BuOH extract (that was gained from 1 mg dried root) contained 2.0 μg berberine and 0.3 μg/ml palmatine. 1.2 μg/ml berberine inhibited cell proliferation significantly, while 0.5 μg/ml palmatine had no effect. Berberine and the BuOH extract caused accumulation of HL-60 cells in S-phase. This was preceded by a strong activation of Chk2, phosphorylation and degradation of Cdc25A, and the subsequent inactivation of Cdc2 (CDK1). Furthermore, berberine and the extract inhibited the expression of the proto-oncogene cyclin D1. Berberine and the BuOH extract induced the acetylation of α-tubulin and this correlated with the induction of apoptosis. The data demonstrate that berberine is a potent anti-neoplastic compound that acts via anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic mechanisms independent of genotoxicity.

  18. Berberine and a Berberis lycium extract inactivate Cdc25A and induce {alpha}-tubulin acetylation that correlate with HL-60 cell cycle inhibition and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Musa [Department of Plant Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad (Pakistan); Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14 (Austria); Giessrigl, Benedikt; Vonach, Caroline; Madlener, Sibylle [Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prinz, Sonja [Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14 (Austria); Herbaceck, Irene; Hoelzl, Christine [Department of Medicine I, Institute of Cancer Research, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a (Austria); Bauer, Sabine; Viola, Katharina [Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mikulits, Wolfgang [Department of Medicine I, Institute of Cancer Research, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a (Austria); Quereshi, Rizwana Aleem [Department of Plant Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad (Pakistan); Knasmueller, Siegfried; Grusch, Michael [Department of Medicine I, Institute of Cancer Research, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a (Austria); Kopp, Brigitte [Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14 (Austria); Krupitza, Georg, E-mail: georg.krupitza@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-01-05

    Berberis lycium Royle (Berberidacea) from Pakistan and its alkaloids berberine and palmatine have been reported to possess beneficial pharmacological properties. In the present study, the anti-neoplastic activities of different B. lycium root extracts and the major constituting alkaloids, berberine and palmatine were investigated in p53-deficient HL-60 cells. The strongest growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects were found in the n-butanol (BuOH) extract followed by the ethyl acetate (EtOAc)-, and the water (H{sub 2}O) extract. The chemical composition of the BuOH extract was analyzed by TLC and quantified by HPLC. 11.1 {mu}g BuOH extract (that was gained from 1 mg dried root) contained 2.0 {mu}g berberine and 0.3 {mu}g/ml palmatine. 1.2 {mu}g/ml berberine inhibited cell proliferation significantly, while 0.5 {mu}g/ml palmatine had no effect. Berberine and the BuOH extract caused accumulation of HL-60 cells in S-phase. This was preceded by a strong activation of Chk2, phosphorylation and degradation of Cdc25A, and the subsequent inactivation of Cdc2 (CDK1). Furthermore, berberine and the extract inhibited the expression of the proto-oncogene cyclin D1. Berberine and the BuOH extract induced the acetylation of {alpha}-tubulin and this correlated with the induction of apoptosis. The data demonstrate that berberine is a potent anti-neoplastic compound that acts via anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic mechanisms independent of genotoxicity.

  19. 1,25(OH)2D3 disrupts glucose metabolism in prostate cancer cells leading to a truncation of the TCA cycle and inhibition of TXNIP expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El Maaty, Mohamed A; Alborzinia, Hamed; Khan, Shehryar J; Büttner, Michael; Wölfl, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cell metabolism exhibits distinct profiles pre- and post-malignancy. The malignant metabolic shift converts prostate cells from "citrate-producing" to "citrate-oxidizing" cells, thereby enhancing glucose metabolism, a phenotype that contrasts classical tumoral Warburg metabolism. An on-line biosensor chip system (BIONAS 2500) was used to monitor metabolic changes (glycolysis and respiration) in response to the putative anti-cancer nutraceutical 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 [1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ], in different prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines (LNCaP, VCaP, DU145 and PC3). LNCaP cells exhibited profound metabolic responsiveness to the treatment and thus extensive analysis of metabolism-modulating effects of 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 were performed, including mRNA expression analysis of key metabolic genes (e.g. GLUT1 and PDHK1), analysis of TCA cycle metabolites, glucose uptake/consumption measurements, ATP production, and mitochondrial biogenesis/activity. Altogether, data demonstrate a vivid disruption of glucose metabolism by 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 , illustrated by a decreased glucose uptake and an accumulation of citrate/isocitrate due to TCA cycle truncation. Depletion of glycolytic intermediates led to a consistent decrease in TXNIP expression in response to 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 , an effect that coincided with the activation of AMPK signaling and a reduction in c-MYC expression. Reduction in TXNIP levels in response to 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 was rescued by an AMPK signaling inhibitor and mimicked by a MYC inhibitor highlighting the possible involvement of both pathways in mediating 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 's metabolic effects in PCa cells. Furthermore, pharmacological and genetic modulation of the androgen receptor showed similar and disparate effects on metabolic parameters compared to 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 treatment, highlighting the AR-independent nature of 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 's metabolism-modulating effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Computational Discovery of Niclosamide Ethanolamine, a Repurposed Drug Candidate That Reduces Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells In Vitro and in Mice by Inhibiting Cell Division Cycle 37 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Wei, Wei; Ma, Li; Yang, Bin; Gill, Ryan M; Chua, Mei-Sze; Butte, Atul J; So, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    hepatocytes. Oral administration of NEN to mice significantly slowed growth of genetically induced liver tumors and patient-derived xenografts, whereas niclosamide did not, coinciding with the observed greater bioavailability of NEN compared with niclosamide. The combination of NEN and sorafenib was more effective at slowing growth of patient-derived xenografts than either agent alone. In HepG2 cells and in patient-derived xenografts, administration of niclosamide or NEN increased expression of 20 genes down-regulated in HCC and reduced expression of 29 genes up-regulated in the 274-gene HCC signature. Administration of NEN to mice with patient-derived xenografts reduced expression of proteins in the Wnt-β-catenin, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, AKT-mechanistic target of rapamycin, epidermal growth factor receptor-Ras-Raf signaling pathways. Using immunoprecipitation assays, we found NEN to bind cell division cycle 37 protein and disrupt its interaction with heat shock protein 90. In a bioinformatics search for agents that alter the HCC-specific gene expression pattern, we identified the anthelmintic niclosamide as a potential anti-tumor agent. Its ethanolamine salt, with greater bioavailability, was more effective than niclosamide at slowing the growth of genetically induced liver tumors and patient-derived xenografts in mice. Both agents disrupted interaction between cell division cycle 37 and heat shock protein 90 in HCC cells, with concomitant inhibition of their downstream signaling pathways. NEN might be effective for treatment of patients with HCC. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Virus manipulation of cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, R; Costa, H; Parkhouse, R M E

    2012-07-01

    Viruses depend on host cell resources for replication and access to those resources may be limited to a particular phase of the cell cycle. Thus manipulation of cell cycle is a commonly employed strategy of viruses for achieving a favorable cellular environment. For example, viruses capable of infecting nondividing cells induce S phase in order to activate the host DNA replication machinery and provide the nucleotide triphosphates necessary for viral DNA replication (Flemington in J Virol 75:4475-4481, 2001; Sullivan and Pipas in Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 66:179-202, 2002). Viruses have developed several strategies to subvert the cell cycle by association with cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase complexes and molecules that regulate their activity. Viruses tend to act on cellular proteins involved in a network of interactions in a way that minimal protein-protein interactions lead to a major effect. The complex and interactive nature of intracellular signaling pathways controlling cell division affords many opportunities for virus manipulation strategies. Taking the maxim "Set a thief to catch a thief" as a counter strategy, however, provides us with the very same virus evasion strategies as "ready-made tools" for the development of novel antivirus therapeutics. The most obvious are attenuated virus vaccines with critical evasion genes deleted. Similarly, vaccines against viruses causing cancer are now being successfully developed. Finally, as viruses have been playing chess with our cell biology and immune responses for millions of years, the study of their evasion strategies will also undoubtedly reveal new control mechanisms and their corresponding cellular intracellular signaling pathways.

  2. Flow Cytometry Analysis of Cell Cycle and Specific Cell Synchronization with Butyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cong-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. We explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells and we characterize the properties of butyrate-induced cell cycle arrest. The site of growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest was analyzed using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and flow cytometry analyses. Exposure of MDBK cells to 10 mM butyrate caused growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest in a reversible manner. Butyrate affected the cell cycle at a specific point both immediately after mitosis and at a very early stage of the G1 phase. After release from butyrate arrest, MDBK cells underwent synchronous cycles of DNA synthesis and transited through the S phase. It takes at least 8 h for butyrate-induced G1-synchronized cells to begin the progression into the S phase. One cycle of cell division for MDBK cells is about 20 h. By combining BrdU incorporation and DNA content analysis, not only can the overlapping of different cell populations be eliminated, but the frequency and nature of individual cells that have synthesized DNA can be determined.

  3. Inhibition of brain tumor cell proliferation by alternating electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyesun; Oh, Seung-ick; Hong, Sunghoi, E-mail: shong21@korea.ac.kr, E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr [School of Biosystem and Biomedical Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-703 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Jiwon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Yoon, Myonggeun, E-mail: shong21@korea.ac.kr, E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr [Department of Bio-convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-703 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Eui Kwan [Seoul Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-17

    This study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which electric fields affect cell function, and to determine the optimal conditions for electric field inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Low-intensity (<2 V/cm) and intermediate-frequency (100–300 kHz) alternating electric fields were applied to glioblastoma cell lines. These electric fields inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and abnormal mitosis due to the malformation of microtubules. These effects were significantly dependent on the intensity and frequency of applied electric fields.

  4. Inhibition of brain tumor cell proliferation by alternating electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hyesun; Oh, Seung-ick; Hong, Sunghoi; Sung, Jiwon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Yoon, Myonggeun; Koh, Eui Kwan

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which electric fields affect cell function, and to determine the optimal conditions for electric field inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Low-intensity (<2 V/cm) and intermediate-frequency (100–300 kHz) alternating electric fields were applied to glioblastoma cell lines. These electric fields inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and abnormal mitosis due to the malformation of microtubules. These effects were significantly dependent on the intensity and frequency of applied electric fields

  5. External Qi of Yan Xin Qigong Inhibits Activation of Akt, Erk1/2 and NF-ĸB and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer death in the Western countries. Novel approaches of treatment are needed for CRC. The purpose of the present study was to investigate cytotoxic effect of external Qi of Yan Xin Qigong (YXQ-EQ on human colorectal cancer cells. Methods: The effect of YXQ-EQ on viability, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in colorectal cancer HT-29 cells was investigated. Phosphorylation of Akt and Erk1/2, activation of NF-ĸB and the expression of proteins involved in regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis were examined by Western blot analysis. Results: YXQ-EQ markedly decreased viability and blocked colony formation of HT-29 cells. YXQ-EQ downregulated cyclin D1 expression and increased accumulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1, resulting in G1 cell cycle arrest. YXQ-EQ induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells in association with decreased expression of antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-xL, XIAP, survivin and Mcl-1 and elevated expression of proapoptotic protein Bax. YXQ-EQ significantly repressed phosphorylation of Akt and Erk1/2 and NF-ĸB activation in HT-29 cells, suggesting that YXQ-EQ may exert cytotoxic effect through regulating signaling pathways critical for cell proliferation and survival. Furthermore, YXQ-EQ treated PBS and an YXQ-EQ treated plant extract induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Conclusion: These findings show that YXQ-EQ has potent cytotoxic effect on HT-29 cells and suggest that YXQ-EQ could be potentially used for colorectal cancer treatment either directly or indirectly via carriers.

  6. Cell cycle control by the thyroid hormone in neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Silva, Susana; Perez-Juste, German; Aranda, Ana

    2002-01-01

    The thyroid hormone (T3) blocks proliferation and induces differentiation of neuroblastoma N2a-β cells that overexpress the β1 isoform of the T3 receptor. An element in the region responsible for premature termination of transcription mediates a rapid repression of c-myc gene expression by T3. The hormone also causes a decrease of cyclin D1 gene transcription, and is able to antagonize the activation of the cyclin D1 promoter by Ras. In addition, a strong and sustained increase of the levels of the cyclin kinase inhibitor (CKI) p27 Kip1 are found in T3-treated cells. The increased levels of p27 Kip1 lead to a marked inhibition of the kinase activity of the cyclin-CDK2 complexes. As a consequence of these changes, retinoblastoma proteins are hypophosphorylated in T3-treated N2a-β cells, and progression through the restriction point in the cell cycle is blocked

  7. "Constructing" the Cell Cycle in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Isil; Turan, Merve

    2012-01-01

    The cycle of duplication and division, known as the "cell cycle," is the essential mechanism by which all living organisms reproduce. This activity allows students to develop an understanding of the main events that occur during the typical eukaryotic cell cycle mostly in the process of mitotic phase that divides the duplicated genetic material…

  8. Vitamin K3 (menadione) redox cycling inhibits cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism and inhibits parathion intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, Yi-Hua; Richardson, Jason R.; Baker, Angela A.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Parathion, a widely used organophosphate insecticide, is considered a high priority chemical threat. Parathion toxicity is dependent on its metabolism by the cytochrome P450 system to paraoxon (diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate), a cytotoxic metabolite. As an effective inhibitor of cholinesterases, paraoxon causes the accumulation of acetylcholine in synapses and overstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors, leading to characteristic signs of organophosphate poisoning. Inhibition of parathion metabolism to paraoxon represents a potential approach to counter parathion toxicity. Herein, we demonstrate that menadione (methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, vitamin K3) is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of parathion. Menadione is active in redox cycling, a reaction mediated by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase that preferentially uses electrons from NADPH at the expense of their supply to the P450s. Using human recombinant CYP 1A2, 2B6, 3A4 and human liver microsomes, menadione was found to inhibit the formation of paraoxon from parathion. Administration of menadione bisulfite (40 mg/kg, ip) to rats also reduced parathion-induced inhibition of brain cholinesterase activity, as well as parathion-induced tremors and the progression of other signs and symptoms of parathion poisoning. These data suggest that redox cycling compounds, such as menadione, have the potential to effectively mitigate the toxicity of organophosphorus pesticides including parathion which require cytochrome P450-mediated activation. - Highlights: • Menadione redox cycles with cytochrome P450 reductase and generates reactive oxygen species. • Redox cycling inhibits cytochrome P450-mediated parathion metabolism. • Short term administration of menadione inhibits parathion toxicity by inhibiting paraoxon formation.

  9. Epigenetic dynamics across the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kheir, Tony Bou; Lund, Anders H.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of the mammalian cell cycle depends on correct timing and co-ordination of a series of events, which are managed by the cellular transcriptional machinery and epigenetic mechanisms governing genome accessibility. Epigenetic chromatin modifications are dynamic across the cell cycle...... a correct inheritance of epigenetic chromatin modifications to daughter cells. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge on the dynamics of epigenetic chromatin modifications during progression of the cell cycle....

  10. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism reduces human myeloma cells proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Tirado-Vélez

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a haematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of plasma cells. It has been proposed that targeting cancer cell metabolism would provide a new selective anticancer therapeutic strategy. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis would reduce cell proliferation in human myeloma cells. We evaluated the effect of etomoxir and orlistat on fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, cell cycle distribution, proliferation, cell death and expression of G1/S phase regulatory proteins in myeloma cells. Etomoxir and orlistat inhibited β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis respectively in myeloma cells, without altering significantly glucose metabolism. These effects were associated with reduced cell viability and cell cycle arrest in G0/G1. Specifically, etomoxir and orlistat reduced by 40-70% myeloma cells proliferation. The combination of etomoxir and orlistat resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Orlistat induced apoptosis and sensitized RPMI-8226 cells to apoptosis induction by bortezomib, whereas apoptosis was not altered by etomoxir. Finally, the inhibitory effect of both drugs on cell proliferation was associated with reduced p21 protein levels and phosphorylation levels of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid metabolism represents a potential therapeutic approach to treat human multiple myeloma.

  11. N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase inhibits p53-mediated cell cycle arrest and coordinates with p53 to determine sensitivity to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shanshan; Xing, Guichun; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shan; Yin, Yuxin; Tian, Chunyan; He, Fuchu; Zhang, Lingqiang

    2012-08-01

    Alkylating agents induce genome-wide base damage, which is repaired mainly by N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG). An elevated expression of MPG in certain types of tumor cells confers higher sensitivity to alkylation agents because MPG-induced apurinic/apyrimidic (AP) sites trigger more strand breaks. However, the determinant of drug sensitivity or insensitivity still remains unclear. Here, we report that the p53 status coordinates with MPG to play a pivotal role in such process. MPG expression is positive in breast, lung and colon cancers (38.7%, 43.4% and 25.3%, respectively) but negative in all adjacent normal tissues. MPG directly binds to the tumor suppressor p53 and represses p53 activity in unstressed cells. The overexpression of MPG reduced, whereas depletion of MPG increased, the expression levels of pro-arrest gene downstream of p53 including p21, 14-3-3σ and Gadd45 but not proapoptotic ones. The N-terminal region of MPG was specifically required for the interaction with the DNA binding domain of p53. Upon DNA alkylation stress, in p53 wild-type tumor cells, p53 dissociated from MPG and induced cell growth arrest. Then, AP sites were repaired efficiently, which led to insensitivity to alkylating agents. By contrast, in p53-mutated cells, the AP sites were repaired with low efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence to show that a DNA repair enzyme functions as a selective regulator of p53, and these findings provide new insights into the functional linkage between MPG and p53 in cancer therapy.

  12. Cell division cycle 45 promotes papillary thyroid cancer progression via regulating cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Shi, Run; Zhao, Sha; Li, Xiaona; Lu, Shan; Bu, Hemei; Ma, Xianghua

    2017-05-01

    Cell division cycle 45 was reported to be overexpressed in some cancer-derived cell lines and was predicted to be a candidate oncogene in cervical cancer. However, the clinical and biological significance of cell division cycle 45 in papillary thyroid cancer has never been investigated. We determined the expression level and clinical significance of cell division cycle 45 using The Cancer Genome Atlas, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. A great upregulation of cell division cycle 45 was observed in papillary thyroid cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, overexpression of cell division cycle 45 positively correlates with more advanced clinical characteristics. Silence of cell division cycle 45 suppressed proliferation of papillary thyroid cancer cells via G1-phase arrest and inducing apoptosis. The oncogenic activity of cell division cycle 45 was also confirmed in vivo. In conclusion, cell division cycle 45 may serve as a novel biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for papillary thyroid cancer.

  13. Molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelalim, Essam M

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are originated from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst stage embryo. They can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated state (self-renewal), and differentiate into any cell type (pluripotency). ES cells have an unusual cell cycle structure, consists mainly of S phase cells, a short G1 phase and absence of G1/S checkpoint. Cell division and cell cycle progression are controlled by mechanisms ensuring the accurate transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Therefore, control of cell cycle is a complicated process, involving several signaling pathways. Although great progress has been made on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ES cell cycle, many regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms regulating the cell cycle of ES cells and describes the relationship existing between cell cycle progression and the self-renewal.

  14. Ziyuglycoside I Inhibits the Proliferation of MDA-MB-231 Breast Carcinoma Cells through Inducing p53-Mediated G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest and Intrinsic/Extrinsic Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the aggressive clinical behavior, poor outcome, and lack of effective specific targeted therapies, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC has currently been recognized as one of the most malignant types of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of ziyuglycoside I, one of the major components extracted from Chinese anti-tumor herbal Radix Sanguisorbae, on the TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231. Methods: The underlying molecular mechanism of the cytotoxic effect ziyuglycoside I on MDA-MB-231 cells was investigated with cell viability assay, flow cytometric analysis and Western blot. Results: Compared to normal mammary gland Hs 578Bst cells, treatment of ziyuglycoside I resulted in a significant growth inhibitory effect on MDA-MB-231 cells. Ziyuglycoside I induced the G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were found to be partially mediated through the up-regulation of p53 and p21WAF1, elevated Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and the activation of both intrinsic (mitochondrial-initiated and extrinsic (Fas/FasL-initiated apoptotic pathways. Furthermore, the p53 specific siRNA attenuated these effects. Conclusion: Our study suggested that ziyuglycoside I-triggered MDA-MB-231 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were probably mediated by p53. This suggests that ziyuglycoside I might be a potential drug candidate for treating TNBC.

  15. Pseudolaric acid B induced cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence in murine fibrosarcoma l929 cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing hua; Liu, Chun yu; Zheng, Gui bin; Zhang, Li Ying; Yan, Ming hui; Zhang, Wen yan; Meng, Xian ying; Yu, Xiao fang

    2013-01-01

    PAB induced various cancer cell apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence. But in cell line murine fibrosarcoma L929, PAB did not induce apoptosis, but autophagy, therefore it was thought by us as a good model to research the relationship of cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence bypass apoptosis. Inhibitory ratio was assessed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis. Phase contrast microscopy visualized cell morphology. Hoechst 33258 staining for nuclear change, propidium iodode (PI) staining for cell cycle, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining for autophagy, and rodanmine 123 staining for mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were measured by fluorescence microscopy or flowcytometry. Apoptosis was determined by DNA ladder test. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity was detected by PKC assay kit. SA-β-galactosidase assay was used to detect senescence. Protein expression was examined by western blot. PAB inhibited L929 cell growth in time-and dose-dependent manner. At 12 h, 80 μmol/L PAB induced obvious mitotic arrest; at 24 h, PAB began to induce autophagy; at 36 h, cell-treated with PAB slip into G1 cell cycle; and 3 d PAB induced senescence. In time sequence PAB induced firstly cell cycle arrest, then autophagy, then slippage into G1 phase, lastly senescence. Senescent cells had high level of autophagy, inhibiting autophagy led to apoptosis, and no senescence. PAB activated PKC activity to induce cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence, inhibiting PKC activity suppressed cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence. PAB induced cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence in murine fibrosarcoma L929 cell through PKC.

  16. Cell cycle control by components of cell anchorage

    OpenAIRE

    Gad, Annica

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular factors, such as growth factors and cell anchorage to the extracellular matrix, control when and where cells may proliferate. This control is abolished when a normal cell transforms into a tumour cell. The control of cell proliferation by cell anchorage was elusive and less well studied than the control by growth factors. Therefore, we aimed to clarify at what points in the cell cycle and through which molecular mechanisms cell anchorage controls cell cycle pro...

  17. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan; Trnka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70-4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes.

  18. 10H-3,6-Diazaphenothiazine induces G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis and inhibits cell invasion of A2780 ovarian carcinoma cells through the regulation of NF-κB and (BIRC6-XIAP complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang J

    2017-10-01

    (mitochondria-dependent and extrinsic (cell death receptor-dependent pathway. Inhibition of NF-κB and subsequent inhibition of (BIRC6-XIAP complex activities reduced the invasion rate of A2780 cancer cells penetrating through the Matrigel™ Invasion Chamber. Lastly, the cell cycle analysis hypothesizes that the compound is cytostatic and significantly arrests cell proliferation at G2/M phase. Hence, the exploration of the underlying anticancer mechanism of PTZ suggested its usage as promising chemotherapeutic agent.Keywords: anticancer, programmed cell death, ovarian cancer, oxidative damage, mitochondrial function disruption, cancer cell invasion

  19. Sulfa Drugs Inhibit Sepiapterin Reduction and Chemical Redox Cycling by Sepiapterin Reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaojun; Jan, Yi-Hua; Mishin, Vladimir; Richardson, Jason R.; Hossain, Muhammad M.; Heindel, Ned D.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2015-01-01

    Sepiapterin reductase (SPR) catalyzes the reduction of sepiapterin to dihydrobiopterin (BH2), the precursor for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor critical for nitric oxide biosynthesis and alkylglycerol and aromatic amino acid metabolism. SPR also mediates chemical redox cycling, catalyzing one-electron reduction of redox-active chemicals, including quinones and bipyridinium herbicides (e.g., menadione, 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, and diquat); rapid reaction of the reduced radicals with molecular oxygen generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using recombinant human SPR, sulfonamide- and sulfonylurea-based sulfa drugs were found to be potent noncompetitive inhibitors of both sepiapterin reduction and redox cycling. The most potent inhibitors of sepiapterin reduction (IC50s = 31–180 nM) were sulfasalazine, sulfathiazole, sulfapyridine, sulfamethoxazole, and chlorpropamide. Higher concentrations of the sulfa drugs (IC50s = 0.37–19.4 μM) were required to inhibit redox cycling, presumably because of distinct mechanisms of sepiapterin reduction and redox cycling. In PC12 cells, which generate catecholamine and monoamine neurotransmitters via BH4-dependent amino acid hydroxylases, sulfa drugs inhibited both BH2/BH4 biosynthesis and redox cycling mediated by SPR. Inhibition of BH2/BH4 resulted in decreased production of dopamine and dopamine metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptamine. Sulfathiazole (200 μM) markedly suppressed neurotransmitter production, an effect reversed by BH4. These data suggest that SPR and BH4-dependent enzymes, are “off-targets” of sulfa drugs, which may underlie their untoward effects. The ability of the sulfa drugs to inhibit redox cycling may ameliorate ROS-mediated toxicity generated by redox active drugs and chemicals, contributing to their anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:25550200

  20. Sepiapterin Reductase Mediates Chemical Redox Cycling in Lung Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaojun; Jan, Yi-Hua; Gray, Joshua P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    In the lung, chemical redox cycling generates highly toxic reactive oxygen species that can cause alveolar inflammation and damage to the epithelium, as well as fibrosis. In this study, we identified a cytosolic NADPH-dependent redox cycling activity in mouse lung epithelial cells as sepiapterin reductase (SPR), an enzyme important for the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. Human SPR was cloned and characterized. In addition to reducing sepiapterin, SPR mediated chemical redox cycling of bipyridinium herbicides and various quinones; this activity was greatest for 1,2-naphthoquinone followed by 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone, menadione, and 2,3-dimethyl-1,4-naphthoquinone. Whereas redox cycling chemicals inhibited sepiapterin reduction, sepiapterin had no effect on redox cycling. Additionally, inhibitors such as dicoumarol, N-acetylserotonin, and indomethacin blocked sepiapterin reduction, with no effect on redox cycling. Non-redox cycling quinones, including benzoquinone and phenylquinone, were competitive inhibitors of sepiapterin reduction but noncompetitive redox cycling inhibitors. Site-directed mutagenesis of the SPR C-terminal substrate-binding site (D257H) completely inhibited sepiapterin reduction but had minimal effects on redox cycling. These data indicate that SPR-mediated reduction of sepiapterin and redox cycling occur by distinct mechanisms. The identification of SPR as a key enzyme mediating chemical redox cycling suggests that it may be important in generating cytotoxic reactive oxygen species in the lung. This activity, together with inhibition of sepiapterin reduction by redox-active chemicals and consequent deficiencies in tetrahydrobiopterin, may contribute to tissue injury. PMID:23640889

  1. Stretched cell cycle model for proliferating lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Mark R.; Kan, Andrey; Heinzel, Susanne; Zhou, Jie H. S.; Marchingo, Julia M.; Wellard, Cameron J.; Markham, John F.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic variation in cell cycle time is a consistent feature of otherwise similar cells within a growing population. Classic studies concluded that the bulk of the variation occurs in the G1 phase, and many mathematical models assume a constant time for traversing the S/G2/M phases. By direct observation of transgenic fluorescent fusion proteins that report the onset of S phase, we establish that dividing B and T lymphocytes spend a near-fixed proportion of total division time in S/G2/M phases, and this proportion is correlated between sibling cells. This result is inconsistent with models that assume independent times for consecutive phases. Instead, we propose a stretching model for dividing lymphocytes where all parts of the cell cycle are proportional to total division time. Data fitting based on a stretched cell cycle model can significantly improve estimates of cell cycle parameters drawn from DNA labeling data used to monitor immune cell dynamics. PMID:24733943

  2. α-Mangostin Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Ho Kwak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mangosteen has long been used as a traditional medicine and is known to have antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. Although the effects of α-mangostin, a natural compound extracted from the pericarp of mangosteen, have been investigated in many studies, there is limited data on the effects of the compound in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. In this study, α-mangostin was assessed as a potential anticancer agent against human OSCC cells. α-Mangostin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in OSCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with little to no effect on normal human PDLF cells. α-Mangostin treatment clearly showed apoptotic evidences such as nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of annexin V and PI-positive cells on OSCC cells. α-Mangostin treatment also caused the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and the translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol. The expressions of the mitochondria-related proteins were activated by α-mangostin. Treatment with α-mangostin also induced G1 phase arrest and downregulated cell cycle-related proteins (CDK/cyclin. Hence, α-mangostin specifically induces cell death and inhibits proliferation in OSCC cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, suggesting that α-mangostin may be an effective agent for the treatment of OSCC.

  3. Lactobacillus decelerates cervical epithelial cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Vielfort

    Full Text Available We investigated cell cycle progression in epithelial cervical ME-180 cells during colonization of three different Lactobacillus species utilizing live cell microscopy, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays, and flow cytometry. The colonization of these ME-180 cells by L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri, originating from human gastric epithelia and saliva, respectively, was shown to reduce cell cycle progression and to cause host cells to accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The G1 phase accumulation in L. rhamnosus-colonized cells was accompanied by the up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of p21. By contrast, the vaginal isolate L. crispatus did not affect cell cycle progression. Furthermore, both the supernatants from the lactic acid-producing L. rhamnosus colonies and lactic acid added to cell culture media were able to reduce the proliferation of ME-180 cells. In this study, we reveal the diversity of the Lactobacillus species to affect host cell cycle progression and demonstrate that L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri exert anti-proliferative effects on human cervical carcinoma cells.

  4. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. → Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. → Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  5. Cell cycle entry in C. elegans development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korzelius, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Cell division is controlled by a mechanism that uses Cyclins, in association with their Cyclin-dependent kinase partners (Cdk’s), to regulate the transitions in the cell cycle.Studies in mammalian cell culture and single cell eukaryotes such as budding and fission yeast have uncovered much about how

  6. Cell cycle control factors and skeletal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Ogasawara

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the oral and maxillofacial region, conditions such as delayed bone healing after tooth extraction, bone fracture, trauma-induced bone or cartilage defects, and tumors or birth defects are common, and it is necessary to identify the molecular mechanisms that control skeletogenesis or the differentiation of cells, in order to establish new treatment strategies for these conditions. Multiple studies have been conducted to investigate the involvement of factors that may be crucial for skeletogenesis or the differentiation of cells, including transcription factors, growth factors and cell cycle factors. Several genetically engineered mouse models of cell cycle factors have been generated in research seeking to identify cell cycle factor(s involved in the differentiation of cells, carcinogenesis, etc. Many groups have also reported the importance of cell cycle factors in the differentiation of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chondrocytes and other cell types. Herein, we review the phenotypes of the genetically engineered mouse models of cell cycle factors with a particular focus on the size, body weight and skeletal abnormalities of the mice, and we discuss the potential of cell cycle factors as targets of clinical applications.

  7. Cell cycle in egg cell and its progression during zygotic development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukawa, Yumiko; Okamoto, Takashi

    2018-03-01

    Rice egg is arrested at G1 phase probably by OsKRP2. After fusion with sperm, karyogamy, OsWEE1-mediated parental DNA integrity in zygote nucleus, zygote progresses cell cycle to produce two-celled embryo. In angiosperms, female and male gametes exist in gametophytes after the complementation of meiosis and the progression of nuclear/cell division of the haploid cell. Within the embryo sac, the egg cell is specially differentiated for fertilization and subsequent embryogenesis, and cellular programs for embryonic development, such as restarting the cell cycle and de novo gene expression, are halted. There is only limited knowledge about how the cell cycle in egg cells restarts toward zygotic division, although the conversion of the cell cycle from a quiescent and arrested state to an active state is the most evident transition of cell status from egg cell to zygote. This is partly due to the difficulty in direct access and analysis of egg cells, zygotes and early embryos, which are deeply embedded in ovaries. In this study, precise relative DNA amounts in the nuclei of egg cells, developing zygotes and cells of early embryos were measured, and the cell cycle of a rice egg cell was estimated as the G1 phase with a 1C DNA level. In addition, increases in DNA content in zygote nuclei via karyogamy and DNA replication were also detectable according to progression of the cell cycle. In addition, expression profiles for cell cycle-related genes in egg cells and zygotes were also addressed, and it was suggested that OsKRP2 and OsWEE1 function in the inhibition of cell cycle progression in egg cells and in checkpoint of parental DNA integrity in zygote nucleus, respectively.

  8. Cell cycle checkpoints: methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available As it is well known at the end of each cell cycle step there are checkpoints to verify that DNA duplication and segregation (among other events met every requirements before the cell is allowed to proceed to the next step. Multiple signaling molecules, notably cyclins and the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs, play major roles in the cell cycle checkpoint’s control....

  9. 7-Piperazinethylchrysin inhibits melanoma cell proliferation by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PEC) on melanoma cell lines. Methods: Cell viability was analyzed by trypan blue exclusion assays and the cell cycle by flow cytometry using ModFit LT software. Specifically, cells were stained with propidium iodide (0.5 mg/mL) supplemented ...

  10. Chemical dissection of the cell cycle: probes for cell biology and anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senese, S; Lo, Y C; Huang, D; Zangle, T A; Gholkar, A A; Robert, L; Homet, B; Ribas, A; Summers, M K; Teitell, M A; Damoiseaux, R; Torres, J Z

    2014-10-16

    Cancer cell proliferation relies on the ability of cancer cells to grow, transition through the cell cycle, and divide. To identify novel chemical probes for dissecting the mechanisms governing cell cycle progression and cell division, and for developing new anti-cancer therapeutics, we developed and performed a novel cancer cell-based high-throughput chemical screen for cell cycle modulators. This approach identified novel G1, S, G2, and M-phase specific inhibitors with drug-like properties and diverse chemotypes likely targeting a broad array of processes. We further characterized the M-phase inhibitors and highlight the most potent M-phase inhibitor MI-181, which targets tubulin, inhibits tubulin polymerization, activates the spindle assembly checkpoint, arrests cells in mitosis, and triggers a fast apoptotic cell death. Importantly, MI-181 has broad anti-cancer activity, especially against BRAF(V600E) melanomas.

  11. Radiosensitization of colorectal carcinoma cell lines by histone deacetylase inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flatmark, Kjersti; Nome, Ragnhild V; Folkvord, Sigurd; Bratland, Åse; Rasmussen, Heidi; Ellefsen, Mali Strand; Fodstad, Øystein; Ree, Anne Hansen

    2006-01-01

    The tumor response to preoperative radiotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer varies greatly, warranting the use of experimental models to assay the efficacy of molecular targeting agents in rectal cancer radiosensitization. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, agents that cause hyperacetylation of histone proteins and thereby remodeling of chromatin structure, may override cell cycle checkpoint responses to DNA damage and amplify radiation-induced tumor cell death. Human colorectal carcinoma cell lines were exposed to ionizing radiation and HDAC inhibitors, and cell cycle profiles and regulatory factors, as well as clonogenicity, were analyzed. In addition to G 2 /M phase arrest following irradiation, the cell lines displayed cell cycle responses typical for either intact or defective p53 function (the presence or absence, respectively, of radiation-induced expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 and subsequent accumulation of G 1 phase cells). In contrast, histone acetylation was associated with complete depletion of the G 1 population of cells with functional p53 but accumulation of both G 1 and G 2 /M populations of cells with defective p53. The cellular phenotypes upon HDAC inhibition were consistent with the observed repression of Polo-like kinase-1, a regulatory G 2 /M phase kinase. Following pre-treatment with HDAC inhibitors currently undergoing clinical investigation, the inhibitory effect of ionizing radiation on clonogenicity was significantly amplified. In these experimental models, HDAC inhibition sensitized the tumor cells to ionizing radiation, which is in accordance with the concept of increased probability of tumor cell death when chromatin structure is modified

  12. Resveratrol inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and induces apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussier, Bertrand; Cordova, Alfredo C; Becquemin, Jean-Pierre; Sumpio, Bauer E

    2005-12-01

    In France, despite a high intake of dietary cholesterol and saturated fat, the cardiovascular death rate is one of the lowest among developed countries. This "French paradox" has been postulated to be related to the high red wine intake in France. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of resveratrol, a major polyphenol component of red wine, on vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation in vitro. SMCs were exposed to 10(-6) to 10(-4) M resveratrol and cell proliferation was assessed by cell counting. Cell cycle analysis was done by treating cells with propidium iodide followed by flow-activated cell sorting. Apoptosis was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling staining. We demonstrate that resveratrol inhibited bovine aortic SMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. The lowest concentration of resveratrol resulting in a significant decrease in SMC proliferation compared with control was 10(-5) M. By flow cytometry, we observed a block in the G1-S phase of the SMC cycle. Resveratrol treatment also resulted in a dose-dependent apoptosis of SMCs but had no effects on SMC morphology. The results indicated that vascular SMC proliferation could be inhibited by resveratrol through a block on G1-S phase and by an increase in apoptosis. It supports the conjecture that red wine consumption may have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular mortality. Our results suggest that resveratrol inhibits, in a dose-dependent manner, smooth muscle cell proliferation, which may help to partially explain a beneficial effect of wine drinking. This inhibition is related to an early block in the cell cycle and also to a dose-dependent apoptotic effect. The present study demonstrates that resveratrol not only is an indirect marker of a healthy life style and alimentation but may also be directly responsible for the French paradox.

  13. Cell cycle activation by plant parasitic nematodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverse, A.; Almeida Engler, de J.; Verhees, J.; Krol, van der S.; Helder, J.; Gheysen, G.

    2000-01-01

    Sedentary nematodes are important pests of crop plants. They are biotrophic parasites that can induce the (re)differentiation of either differentiated or undifferentiated plant cells into specialized feeding cells. This (re)differentiation includes the reactivation of the cell cycle in specific

  14. Transcriptional landscape of the human cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Chen, Sujun; Wang, Su; Soares, Fraser; Fischer, Martin; Meng, Feilong; Du, Zhou; Lin, Charles; Meyer, Clifford; DeCaprio, James A; Brown, Myles; Liu, X Shirley; He, Housheng Hansen

    2017-03-28

    Steady-state gene expression across the cell cycle has been studied extensively. However, transcriptional gene regulation and the dynamics of histone modification at different cell-cycle stages are largely unknown. By applying a combination of global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq), RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and histone-modification Chip sequencing (ChIP-seq), we depicted a comprehensive transcriptional landscape at the G0/G1, G1/S, and M phases of breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Importantly, GRO-seq and RNA-seq analysis identified different cell-cycle-regulated genes, suggesting a lag between transcription and steady-state expression during the cell cycle. Interestingly, we identified genes actively transcribed at early M phase that are longer in length and have low expression and are accompanied by a global increase in active histone 3 lysine 4 methylation (H3K4me2) and histone 3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27ac) modifications. In addition, we identified 2,440 cell-cycle-regulated enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) that are strongly associated with differential active transcription but not with stable expression levels across the cell cycle. Motif analysis of dynamic eRNAs predicted Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) as a key regulator of G1/S transition, and this identification was validated experimentally. Taken together, our combined analysis characterized the transcriptional and histone-modification profile of the human cell cycle and identified dynamic transcriptional signatures across the cell cycle.

  15. Hippo signaling controls cell cycle and restricts cell plasticity in planarians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nídia de Sousa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hippo pathway plays a key role in regulating cell turnover in adult tissues, and abnormalities in this pathway are consistently associated with human cancers. Hippo was initially implicated in the control of cell proliferation and death, and its inhibition is linked to the expansion of stem cells and progenitors, leading to larger organ size and tumor formation. To understand the mechanism by which Hippo directs cell renewal and promotes stemness, we studied its function in planarians. These stem cell-based organisms are ideal models for the analysis of the complex cellular events underlying tissue renewal in the whole organism. hippo RNA interference (RNAi in planarians decreased apoptotic cell death, induced cell cycle arrest, and could promote the dedifferentiation of postmitotic cells. hippo RNAi resulted in extensive undifferentiated areas and overgrowths, with no effect on body size or cell number. We propose an essential role for hippo in controlling cell cycle, restricting cell plasticity, and thereby preventing tumoral transformation.

  16. 2-Aminopurine overrides multiple cell cycle checkpoints in BHK cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Andreassen, P R; Margolis, R L

    1992-01-01

    BHK cells blocked at any of several points in the cell cycle override their drug-induced arrest and proceed in the cycle when exposed concurrently to the protein kinase inhibitor 2-aminopurine (2-AP). For cells arrested at various points in interphase, 2-AP-induced cell cycle progression is made evident by arrival of the drug-treated cell population in mitosis. Cells that have escaped from mimosine G1 arrest, from hydroxyurea or aphidicolin S-phase arrest, or from VM-26-induced G2 arrest subs...

  17. Identification of a novel EGF-sensitive cell cycle checkpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Francesca; Zhang Huihua; Burgess, Antony W.

    2007-01-01

    The site of action of growth factors on mammalian cell cycle has been assigned to the boundary between the G1 and S phases. We show here that Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) is also required for mitosis. BaF/3 cells expressing the EGFR (BaF/wtEGFR) synthesize DNA in response to EGF, but arrest in S-phase. We have generated a cell line (BaF/ERX) with defective downregulation of the EGFR and sustained activation of EGFR signalling pathways: these cells undergo mitosis in an EGF-dependent manner. The transit of BaF/ERX cells through G2/M strictly requires activation of EGFR and is abolished by AG1478. This phenotype is mimicked by co-expression of ErbB2 in BaF/wtEGFR cells, and abolished by inhibition of the EGFR kinase, suggesting that sustained signalling of the EGFR, through impaired downregulation of the EGFR or heterodimerization, is required for completion of the cycle. We have confirmed the role of EGFR signalling in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle using a human tumor cell line which overexpresses the EGFR and is dependent on EGFR signalling for growth. These findings unmask an EGF-sensitive checkpoint, helping to understand the link between sustained EGFR signalling, proliferation and the acquisition of a radioresistant phenotype in cancer cells

  18. A hybrid mammalian cell cycle model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Noël

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid modeling provides an effective solution to cope with multiple time scales dynamics in systems biology. Among the applications of this method, one of the most important is the cell cycle regulation. The machinery of the cell cycle, leading to cell division and proliferation, combines slow growth, spatio-temporal re-organisation of the cell, and rapid changes of regulatory proteins concentrations induced by post-translational modifications. The advancement through the cell cycle comprises a well defined sequence of stages, separated by checkpoint transitions. The combination of continuous and discrete changes justifies hybrid modelling approaches to cell cycle dynamics. We present a piecewise-smooth version of a mammalian cell cycle model, obtained by hybridization from a smooth biochemical model. The approximate hybridization scheme, leading to simplified reaction rates and binary event location functions, is based on learning from a training set of trajectories of the smooth model. We discuss several learning strategies for the parameters of the hybrid model.

  19. Hippo signaling controls cell cycle and restricts cell plasticity in planarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Nídia; Rodríguez-Esteban, Gustavo; Rojo-Laguna, Jose Ignacio; Saló, Emili

    2018-01-01

    The Hippo pathway plays a key role in regulating cell turnover in adult tissues, and abnormalities in this pathway are consistently associated with human cancers. Hippo was initially implicated in the control of cell proliferation and death, and its inhibition is linked to the expansion of stem cells and progenitors, leading to larger organ size and tumor formation. To understand the mechanism by which Hippo directs cell renewal and promotes stemness, we studied its function in planarians. These stem cell–based organisms are ideal models for the analysis of the complex cellular events underlying tissue renewal in the whole organism. hippo RNA interference (RNAi) in planarians decreased apoptotic cell death, induced cell cycle arrest, and could promote the dedifferentiation of postmitotic cells. hippo RNAi resulted in extensive undifferentiated areas and overgrowths, with no effect on body size or cell number. We propose an essential role for hippo in controlling cell cycle, restricting cell plasticity, and thereby preventing tumoral transformation. PMID:29357350

  20. Cell cycle control across the eukaryotic kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harashima, Hirofumi; Dissmeyer, Nico; Schnittger, Arp

    2013-07-01

    Almost two billion years of evolution have generated a vast and amazing variety of eukaryotic life with approximately 8.7 million extant species. Growth and reproduction of all of these organisms depend on faithful duplication and distribution of their chromosomes to the newly forming daughter cells in a process called the cell cycle. However, most of what is known today about cell cycle control comes from a few model species that belong to the unikonts; that is, to only one of five 'supergroups' that comprise the eukaryotic kingdom. Recently, analyzing species from distantly related clades is providing insights into general principles of cell cycle regulation and shedding light on its evolution. Here, referring to animal and fungal as opposed to non-unikont systems, especially flowering plants from the archaeplastid supergroup, we compare the conservation of central cell cycle regulator functions, the structure of network topologies, and the evolutionary dynamics of substrates of core cell cycle kinases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of norcantharidin on the proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle of human mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Kun; Wei, Qiaoyu; Gong, Zhifeng; Huang, Yunfeng; Liu, Hong; Li, Ying; Peng, Xiaomei

    2017-11-01

    Norcantharidin (NCTD) regulates immune system function and reduces proteinuria. We sought to investigate the effect of NCTD on proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle of cultured human mesangial cells (HMC) in vitro. HMC cells were divided into a normal control group, and various concentrations of NCTD group (2.5, 5, 10, 20, or 40 μg/mL). Cell proliferation was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, apoptosis was detected by Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) assays, and morphological analysis was performed by Hoechest 33258 staining. Finally, cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. NCTD dose and time dependently inhibits HMC proliferation significantly (p Cell-cycle analysis revealed that the number of cells in the G2 phase increased significantly, whereas the fraction of cells in the S phase decreased, especially 24 h after 5 μg/ml NCTD treatment. NCTD inhibits HMC cell proliferation, induces apoptosis, and affects the cell cycle.

  2. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetty, Chandramu [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Dontula, Ranadheer [Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, 840 South Wood Street, Suite 820-E, Chicago, IL-60612 (United States); Ganji, Purnachandra Nagaraju [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Gujrati, Meena [Department of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Lakka, Sajani S., E-mail: slakka@uic.edu [Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, 840 South Wood Street, Suite 820-E, Chicago, IL-60612 (United States)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  3. Fuel cell hybrid taxi life cycle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Patricia, E-mail: patricia.baptista@ist.utl.pt [IDMEC-Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ribau, Joao; Bravo, Joao; Silva, Carla [IDMEC-Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Adcock, Paul; Kells, Ashley [Intelligent Energy, Charnwood Building, HolywellPark, Ashby Road, Loughborough, LE11 3GR (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    A small fleet of classic London Taxis (Black cabs) equipped with hydrogen fuel cell power systems is being prepared for demonstration during the 2012 London Olympics. This paper presents a Life Cycle Analysis for these vehicles in terms of energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions, focusing on the impacts of alternative vehicle technologies for the Taxi, combining the fuel life cycle (Tank-to-Wheel and Well-to-Tank) and vehicle materials Cradle-to-Grave. An internal combustion engine diesel taxi was used as the reference vehicle for the currently available technology. This is compared to battery and fuel cell vehicle configurations. Accordingly, the following energy pathways are compared: diesel, electricity and hydrogen (derived from natural gas steam reforming). Full Life Cycle Analysis, using the PCO-CENEX drive cycle, (derived from actual London Taxi drive cycles) shows that the fuel cell powered vehicle configurations have lower energy consumption (4.34 MJ/km) and CO{sub 2} emissions (235 g/km) than both the ICE Diesel (9.54 MJ/km and 738 g/km) and the battery electric vehicle (5.81 MJ/km and 269 g/km). - Highlights: > A Life Cycle Analysis of alternative vehicle technologies for the London Taxi was performed. > The hydrogen powered vehicles have the lowest energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions results. > A hydrogen powered solution can be a sustainable alternative in a full life cycle framework.

  4. Fuel cell hybrid taxi life cycle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Patricia; Ribau, Joao; Bravo, Joao; Silva, Carla; Adcock, Paul; Kells, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    A small fleet of classic London Taxis (Black cabs) equipped with hydrogen fuel cell power systems is being prepared for demonstration during the 2012 London Olympics. This paper presents a Life Cycle Analysis for these vehicles in terms of energy consumption and CO 2 emissions, focusing on the impacts of alternative vehicle technologies for the Taxi, combining the fuel life cycle (Tank-to-Wheel and Well-to-Tank) and vehicle materials Cradle-to-Grave. An internal combustion engine diesel taxi was used as the reference vehicle for the currently available technology. This is compared to battery and fuel cell vehicle configurations. Accordingly, the following energy pathways are compared: diesel, electricity and hydrogen (derived from natural gas steam reforming). Full Life Cycle Analysis, using the PCO-CENEX drive cycle, (derived from actual London Taxi drive cycles) shows that the fuel cell powered vehicle configurations have lower energy consumption (4.34 MJ/km) and CO 2 emissions (235 g/km) than both the ICE Diesel (9.54 MJ/km and 738 g/km) and the battery electric vehicle (5.81 MJ/km and 269 g/km). - Highlights: → A Life Cycle Analysis of alternative vehicle technologies for the London Taxi was performed. → The hydrogen powered vehicles have the lowest energy consumption and CO 2 emissions results. → A hydrogen powered solution can be a sustainable alternative in a full life cycle framework.

  5. A nuclear glutathione cycle within the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Vivancos, Pedro; Wolff, Tonja; Markovic, Jelena; Pallardó, Federico V; Foyer, Christine H

    2010-10-15

    The complex antioxidant network of plant and animal cells has the thiol tripeptide GSH at its centre to buffer ROS (reactive oxygen species) and facilitate cellular redox signalling which controls growth, development and defence. GSH is found in nearly every compartment of the cell, including the nucleus. Transport between the different intracellular compartments is pivotal to the regulation of cell proliferation. GSH co-localizes with nuclear DNA at the early stages of proliferation in plant and animal cells. Moreover, GSH recruitment and sequestration in the nucleus during the G1- and S-phases of the cell cycle has a profound impact on cellular redox homoeostasis and on gene expression. For example, the abundance of transcripts encoding stress and defence proteins is decreased when GSH is sequestered in the nucleus. The functions of GSHn (nuclear GSH) are considered in the present review in the context of whole-cell redox homoeostasis and signalling, as well as potential mechanisms for GSH transport into the nucleus. We also discuss the possible role of GSHn as a regulator of nuclear proteins such as histones and PARP [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase] that control genetic and epigenetic events. In this way, a high level of GSH in the nucleus may not only have an immediate effect on gene expression patterns, but also contribute to how cells retain a memory of the cellular redox environment that is transferred through generations.

  6. Caffeine inhibits cell proliferation by G0/G1 phase arrest in JB6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takashi; He, Zhiwei; Ma, Wei-Ya; Schmid, Patricia C; Bode, Ann M; Yang, Chung S; Dong, Zigang

    2004-05-01

    Caffeine is a major biologically active constituent in coffee and tea. Because caffeine has been reported to inhibit carcinogenesis in UVB-exposed mice, the cancer-preventing effect of caffeine has attracted considerable attention. In the present study, the effect of caffeine in quiescent (G0 phase) cells was investigated. Pretreatment with caffeine suppressed cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner 36 h after addition of fetal bovine serum as a cell growth stimulator. Analysis by flow cytometry showed that caffeine suppressed cell cycle progression at the G0/G1 phase, i.e., 18 h after addition of fetal bovine serum, the percentages of cells in G0/G1 phase in 1 mM caffeine-treated cells and in caffeine-untreated cells were 61.7 and 29.0, respectively. The percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase at 0 h was 75.5. Caffeine inhibited phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein at Ser780 and Ser807/Ser811, the sites where retinoblastoma protein has been reported to be phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (cdk4). Furthermore, caffeine inhibited the activation of the cyclin D1-cdk4 complex in a dose-dependent manner. However this compound did not directly inhibit the activity of this complex. In addition, caffeine did not affect p16INK4 or p27Kip1 protein levels, but inhibited the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and glycogen synthase kinase 3beta. Our results showed that caffeine suppressed the progression of quiescent cells into the cell cycle. The inhibitory mechanism may be due to the inhibition of cell growth signal-induced activation of cdk4, which may be involved in the inhibition of carcinogenesis in vivo.

  7. Two inhibitory systems and CKIs regulate cell cycle exit of mammalian cardiomyocytes after birth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tane, Shoji; Okayama, Hitomi; Ikenishi, Aiko; Amemiya, Yuki [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Nakayama, Keiichi I. [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Takeuchi, Takashi, E-mail: takeuchi@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan)

    2015-10-16

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes actively proliferate during embryonic stages, following which they exit their cell cycle after birth, and the exit is maintained. Previously, we showed that two inhibitory systems (the G1-phase inhibitory system: repression of cyclin D1 expression; the M-phase inhibitory system: inhibition of CDK1 activation) maintain the cell cycle exit of mouse adult cardiomyocytes. We also showed that two CDK inhibitors (CKIs), p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}, regulate the cell cycle exit in a portion of postnatal cardiomyocytes. It remains unknown whether the two inhibitory systems are involved in the cell cycle exit of postnatal cardiomyocytes and whether p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} also inhibit entry to M-phase. Here, we showed that more than 40% of cardiomyocytes entered an additional cell cycle by induction of cyclin D1 expression at postnatal stages, but M-phase entry was inhibited in the majority of cardiomyocytes. Marked cell cycle progression and endoreplication were observed in cardiomyocytes of p21{sup Cip1} knockout mice at 4 weeks of age. In addition, tri- and tetranucleated cardiomyocytes increased significantly in p21{sup Cip1} knockout mice. These data showed that the G1-phase inhibitory system and two CKIs (p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}) inhibit entry to an additional cell cycle in postnatal cardiomyocytes, and that the M-phase inhibitory system and p21{sup Cip1} inhibit M-phase entry of cardiomyocytes which have entered the additional cell cycle. - Highlights: • Many postnatal cardiomyocytes entered an additional cell cycle by cyclin D1 induction. • The majority of cardiomyocytes could not enter M-phase after cyclin D1 induction. • Cell cycle progressed markedly in p21{sup Cip1} knockout mice after postnatal day 14. • Tri- and tetranucleated cardiomyocytes increased in p21{sup Cip1} knockout mice.

  8. Improved Gene Targeting through Cell Cycle Synchronization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Tsakraklides

    Full Text Available Gene targeting is a challenge in organisms where non-homologous end-joining is the predominant form of recombination. We show that cell division cycle synchronization can be applied to significantly increase the rate of homologous recombination during transformation. Using hydroxyurea-mediated cell cycle arrest, we obtained improved gene targeting rates in Yarrowia lipolytica, Arxula adeninivorans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris demonstrating the broad applicability of the method. Hydroxyurea treatment enriches for S-phase cells that are active in homologous recombination and enables previously unattainable genomic modifications.

  9. Flavonoids: from cell cycle regulation to biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ho-Hyung; Jeong, Byeong Ryong; Hawes, Martha C

    2005-03-01

    Flavonoids have been proposed to play diverse roles in plant growth and development, including defense, symbiosis, pollen development and male fertility, polar auxin transport, and protection against ultraviolet radiation. Recently, a new role in cell cycle regulation has emerged. Genetic alteration of glucuronide metabolism by altered expression of a Pisum sativum UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (PsUGT1) results in an altered cell cycle in pea, alfalfa, and Arabidopsis. In alfalfa, altered expression of PsUGT1 results in accumulation of a flavonoid-like compound that suppresses growth of cultured cells. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that PsUGT1 functions by controlling cellular levels of a factor controlling cell cycle (FCC).

  10. The cell cycle regulators p15, p16, p18 and p19 : functions and regulation during normal cell cycle and in multistep carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Thullberg, Minna

    2000-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p16INK4a and its family members p15INK4b, p18INK4c and p19INK4d (the INK4 proteins) inhibit the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6, which are key regulators of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). pRb guards entry into the S phase of the mammalian cell division cycle (the cell cycle), a process evolved to ensure balanced cell proliferation. Deregulation of the cell cycle including the 'RB pathway' may have devastating consequences such as develo...

  11. Do lipids shape the eukaryotic cell cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furse, Samuel; Shearman, Gemma C

    2018-01-01

    Successful passage through the cell cycle presents a number of structural challenges to the cell. Inceptive studies carried out in the last five years have produced clear evidence of modulations in the lipid profile (sometimes referred to as the lipidome) of eukaryotes as a function of the cell cycle. This mounting body of evidence indicates that lipids play key roles in the structural transformations seen across the cycle. The accumulation of this evidence coincides with a revolution in our understanding of how lipid composition regulates a plethora of biological processes ranging from protein activity through to cellular signalling and membrane compartmentalisation. In this review, we discuss evidence from biological, chemical and physical studies of the lipid fraction across the cell cycle that demonstrate that lipids are well-developed cellular components at the heart of the biological machinery responsible for managing progress through the cell cycle. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanisms by which this careful control is exercised. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Choosing Cell Fate Through a Dynamic Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinyue; Hartman, Amaleah; Guo, Shangqin

    2015-01-01

    A close relationship between proliferation and cell fate specification has been well documented in many developmental systems. In addition to the gradual cell fate changes accompanying normal development and tissue homeostasis, it is now commonly appreciated that cell fate could also undergo drastic changes, as illustrated by the induction of pluripotency from many differentiated somatic cell types during the process of Yamanaka reprogramming. Strikingly, the drastic cell fate change induced by Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc) is preceded by extensive cell cycle acceleration. Prompted by our recent discovery that progression toward pluripotency from rare somatic cells could bypass the stochastic phase of reprogramming and that a key feature of these somatic cells is an ultrafast cell cycle (~8 h/cycle), we assess whether cell cycle dynamics could provide a general framework for controlling cell fate. Several potential mechanisms on how cell cycle dynamics may impact cell fate determination by regulating chromatin, key transcription factor concentration, or their interactions are discussed. Specific challenges and implications for studying and manipulating cell fate are considered.

  13. K+ channels and cell cycle progression in tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HALIMA eOUADID-AHIDOUCH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available K+ ions play a major role in many cellular processes. The deregulation of K+ signaling is associated with a variety of diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, or diabetes. K+ ions are important for setting the membrane potential, the driving force for Ca2+ influx, and regulate volume of growing cells. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that K+ channels control cell proliferation through a novel signaling mechanisms triggered and modulated independently of ion fluxes. In cancer, aberrant expression, regulation and/or sublocalization of K+ channels can alter the downstream signals that converge on the cell cycle machinery. Various K+ channels are involved in cell cycle progression and are needed only at particular stages of the cell cycle. Consistent with this idea, the expression of Eag1 and HERG channels fluctuate along the cell cycle. Despite of acquired knowledge, our understanding of K+ channels functioning in cancer cells requires further studies. These include identifying the molecular mechanisms controling the cell cycle machinery. By understanding how K+ channels regulate cell cycle progression in cancer cells, we will gain insights into how cancer cells subvert the need for K+ signal and its downstream targets to proliferate.

  14. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  15. Transcriptional control of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, I; Dynlacht, B D

    1996-06-01

    Although a significant amount of evidence has demonstrated that there are intimate connections between transcriptional controls and cell cycle regulation, the precise mechanisms underlying these connections remain largely obscure. A number of recent advances have helped to define how critical cell cycle regulators, such as the retinoblastoma family of tumor suppressor proteins and the cyclin-dependent kinases, might function on a biochemical level and how such mechanisms of action have been conserved not only in the regulation of transcription by all three RNA polymerases but also across species lines. In addition, the use of in vivo techniques has begun to explain how the activity of the E2F transcription factor family is tied to the cell cycle dependent expression of target genes.

  16. CGGBP1 regulates cell cycle in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uhrbom Lene

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CGGBP1 is a CGG-triplet repeat binding protein, which affects transcription from CGG-triplet-rich promoters such as the FMR1 gene and the ribosomal RNA gene clusters. Earlier, we reported some previously unknown functions of CGGBP1 in gene expression during heat shock stress response. Recently we had found CGGBP1 to be a cell cycle regulatory midbody protein required for normal cytokinetic abscission in normal human fibroblasts, which have all the cell cycle regulatory mechanisms intact. Results In this study we explored the role of CGGBP1 in the cell cycle in various cancer cell lines. CGGBP1 depletion by RNA interference in tumor-derived cells caused an increase in the cell population at G0/G1 phase and reduced the number of cells in the S phase. CGGBP1 depletion also increased the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes CDKN1A and GAS1, associated with reductions in histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation in their promoters. By combining RNA interference and genetic mutations, we found that the role of CGGBP1 in cell cycle involves multiple mechanisms, as single deficiencies of CDKN1A, GAS1 as well as TP53, INK4A or ARF failed to rescue the G0/G1 arrest caused by CGGBP1 depletion. Conclusions Our results show that CGGBP1 expression is important for cell cycle progression through multiple parallel mechanisms including the regulation of CDKN1A and GAS1 levels.

  17. Stable redox-cycling nitroxide Tempol inhibits NET formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava eHosseinzadeh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available To prevent the spread of pathogens neutrophils as the first line of defence are able to release Neu-trophil Extracellular Traps (NETs, a recently discovered form of immune response. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been shown to be essential for many different induction routes of NET formation. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of ROS generation has implications for research and medicine related to NETs. The application of diphenylene iodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase activity, is limited due to its toxicity to host cells as well as microbes. Therefore, we investigated the effect of 4-Hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (Tempol a mem-brane-permeable radical scavenger on NET formation triggered by phorbol esters and C. albicans. We quantified the amount of NETs with two complementary methods, using a microscopic analysis and an online fluorescence-based assay. In line with removal of ROS, Tempol reduced the amount of NET formation by neutrophils challenged with those stimuli significantly. Since Tempol effi-ciently blocks NET formation in vitro, it might be promising to test the effect of Tempol in experi-mental models of disorders in which NETs probably have hazardous effects.

  18. Prp19 Arrests Cell Cycle via Cdc5L in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzheng Huang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pre-mRNA processing factor 19 (Prp19 is involved in many cellular events including pre-mRNA processing and DNA damage response. Recently, it has been identified as a candidate oncogene in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However, the role of Prp19 in tumor biology is still elusive. Here, we reported that Prp19 arrested cell cycle in HCC cells via regulating G2/M transition. Mechanistic insights revealed that silencing Prp19 inhibited the expression of cell division cycle 5-like (Cdc5L via repressing the translation of Cdc5L mRNA and facilitating lysosome-mediated degradation of Cdc5L in HCC cells. Furthermore, we found that silencing Prp19 induced cell cycle arrest could be partially resumed by overexpressing Cdc5L. This work implied that Prp19 participated in mitotic progression and thus could be a promising therapeutic target of HCC.

  19. Toona Sinensis Extracts Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in the Human Lung Large Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Toona sinensis extracts have been shown to exhibit anti-cancer effects in human ovarian cancer cell lines, human promyelocytic leukemia cells and human lung adenocarcinoma. Its safety has also been confirmed in animal studies. However, its anti-cancer properties in human lung large cell carcinoma have not been studied. Here, we used a powder obtained by freeze-drying the super-natant of centrifuged crude extract from Toona sinensis leaves (TSL-1 to treat the human lung carcinoma cell line H661. Cell viability was evaluated by the 3-(4-,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that TSL-1 blocked H661 cell cycle progression. Western blot analysis showed decreased expression of cell cycle proteins that promote cell cycle progression, including cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and cyclin D1, and increased the expression of proteins that inhibit cell cycle progression, including p27. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that TSL-1 induced H661 cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed that TSL-1 reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2, and degraded the DNA repair protein, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase. TSL-1 shows potential as a novel therapeutic agent or for use as an adjuvant for treating human lung large cell carcinoma.

  20. AS160 controls eukaryotic cell cycle and proliferation by regulating the CDK inhibitor p21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongpan, Pianchou; Lu, Yanting; Wang, Fang; Xu, Yuhui; Xiong, Wenyong

    2016-07-02

    AS160 (TBC1D4) has been implicated in multiple biological processes. However, the role and the mechanism of action of AS160 in the regulation of cell proliferation remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that AS160 knockdown led to blunted cell proliferation in multiple cell types, including fibroblasts and cancer cells. The results of cell cycle analysis showed that these cells were arrested in the G1 phase. Intriguingly, this inhibition of cell proliferation and the cell cycle arrest caused by AS160 depletion were glucose independent. Moreover, AS160 silencing led to a marked upregulation of the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. Furthermore, whereas AS160 overexpression resulted in p21 downregulation and rescued the arrested cell cycle in AS160-depeleted cells, p21 silencing rescued the inhibited cell cycle and proliferation in the cells. Thus, our results demonstrated that AS160 regulates glucose-independent eukaryotic cell proliferation through p21-dependent control of the cell cycle, and thereby revealed a molecular mechanism of AS160 modulation of cell cycle and proliferation that is of general physiological significance.

  1. Innovative qPCR using interfacial effects to enable low threshold cycle detection and inhibition relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshman, Dustin K.; Rao, Brianna M.; McLain, Jean E.; Watts, George S.; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics offers quick access to information but fails to operate at a speed required for clinical decision-making. Our novel methodology, droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette real-time polymerase chain reaction (DOTS qPCR), uses interfacial effects for droplet actuation, inhibition relief, and amplification sensing. DOTS qPCR has sample-to-answer times as short as 3 min 30 s. In infective endocarditis diagnosis, DOTS qPCR demonstrates reproducibility, differentiation of antibiotic susceptibility, subpicogram limit of detection, and thermocycling speeds of up to 28 s/cycle in the presence of tissue contaminants. Langmuir and Gibbs adsorption isotherms are used to describe the decreasing interfacial tension upon amplification. Moreover, a log-linear relationship with low threshold cycles is presented for real-time quantification by imaging the droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette with a smartphone. DOTS qPCR resolves several limitations of commercially available real-time PCR systems, which rely on fluorescence detection, have substantially higher threshold cycles, and require expensive optical components and extensive sample preparation. Due to the advantages of low threshold cycle detection, we anticipate extending this technology to biological research applications such as single cell, single nucleus, and single DNA molecule analyses. Our work is the first demonstrated use of interfacial effects for sensing reaction progress, and it will enable point-of-care molecular diagnosis of infections. PMID:26601245

  2. Control points within the cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van't Hof, J.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence of the temporal order of chromosomal DNA replication argues favorably for the view that the cell cycle is controlled by genes acting in sequence whose time of expression is determined by mitosis and the amount of nuclear DNA (2C vs 4C) in the cell. Gl and G2 appear to be carbohydrate dependent in that cells starved of either carbohydrate of phosphate fail to make these transitions. Cells deprived of nitrate, however, fail only at Gl to S transition indicating that the controls that operate in G1 differ from those that operate in G2. 46 references, 5 figures

  3. Cell cycle and apoptosis genes in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, Lianne Simone Mirjam

    2006-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was aimed at identifying the role of cell cycle and apoptosis genes in atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of cardiovascular disease, a disorder occurring in the large and medium-sized arteries of the body. Although in the beginning 90s promising

  4. Regulatory mechanism of radiation-induced cancer cell death by the change of cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Soo Jin; Jeong, Min Ho; Jang, Ji Yeon [College of Medicine, Donga Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    In our previous study, we have shown the main cell death pattern induced by irradiation or protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors in K562 human myelogenous leukemic cell line. Death of the cells treated with irradiation alone was characterized by mitotic catastrophe and typical radiation-induced apoptosis was accelerated by herbimycin A (HMA). Both types of cell death were inhibited by genistein. In this study, we investigated the effects of HMA and genistein on cell cycle regulation and its correlation with the alterations of radiation-induced cell death. K562 cells in exponential growth phase were used for this study. The cells were irradiated with 10 Gy using 6 MeV Linac (200-300 cGy/min). Immediately after irradiation, cells were treated with 250 nM of HMA or 25{mu}M of genistein. The distributions of cell cycle, the expressions of cell cycle-related protein, the activities of cyclin-dependent kinase, and the yield of senescence and differentiation were analyzed. X-irradiated cells were arrested in the G2 phase of the cell cycle but unlike the p53-positive cells, they were not able to sustain the cell cycle arrest. An accumulation of cells in G2 phase of first cell-cycle post-treatment and an increase of cyclin B1 were correlated with spontaneous, premature, chromosome condensation and mitotic catastrophe. HMA induced rapid G2 checkpoint abrogation and concomitant p53-independent G1 accumulation HMA-induced cell cycle modifications correlated with the increase of cdc2 kinase activity, the decrease of the expressions of cyclins E and A and of CDK2 kinase activity, and the enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis. Genistein maintained cells that were arrested in the G2-phase, decreased the expressions of cyclin B1 and cdc25C and cdc2 kinase activity, increased the expression of p16, and sustained senescence and megakaryocytic differentiation. The effects of HMA and genistein on the radiation-induced cell death of K562 cells were closely related to the cell

  5. Mechanisms of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma cells induced by hybrid-compound histone deacetylase inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Seiko [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Kyushu Dental University (Japan); Division of Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental University (Japan); Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Kyushu Dental University (Japan); Oral Biology Research Center, Kyushu Dental University (Japan); Takahashi, Osamu; Iwanaga, Kenjiro [Division of Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental University (Japan); Nishino, Norikazu [Oral Biology Research Center, Kyushu Dental University (Japan); Tominaga, Kazuhiro [Division of Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental University (Japan); Nishihara, Tatsuji, E-mail: tatsujin@kyu-dent.ac.jp [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Kyushu Dental University (Japan); Oral Biology Research Center, Kyushu Dental University (Japan)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Ky-2, remarkably inhibits myeloma cell growth. •Ky-2 demonstrates no cytotoxicity against normal lymphocytic cells. •Ky-2 induces cell cycle arrest through the cell cycle-associated proteins. •Ky-2 induces Bcl-2-inhibitable apoptosis through a caspase-dependent cascade. -- Abstract: Objectives: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are new therapeutic agents, used to treat various types of malignant cancers. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ky-2, a hybrid-compound HDAC inhibitor, on the growth of mouse myeloma cells. Materials and methods: Myeloma cells, HS-72, P3U1, and mouse normal cells were used in this study. Effect of HDAC inhibitors on cell viability was determined by WST-assay and trypan blue assay. Cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometer. The expression of cell cycle regulatory and the apoptosis associated proteins were examined by Western blot analysis. Hoechst’s staining was used to detect apoptotic cells. Results: Our findings showed that Ky-2 decreased the levels of HDACs, while it enhanced acetylation of histone H3. Myeloma cell proliferation was inhibited by Ky-2 treatment. Interestingly, Ky-2 had no cytotoxic effects on mouse normal cells. Ky-2 treatment induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest and accumulation of a sub-G1 phase population, while Western blotting analysis revealed that expressions of the cell cycle-associated proteins were up-regulated. Also, Ky-2 enhanced the cleavage of caspase-9 and -3 in myeloma cells, followed by DNA fragmentation. In addition, Ky-2 was not found to induce apoptosis in bcl-2 overexpressing myeloma cells. Conclusion: These findings suggest that Ky-2 induces apoptosis via a caspase-dependent cascade and Bcl-2-inhibitable mechanism in myeloma cells.

  6. The sweet side of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ee Phie; Duncan, Francesca E; Slawson, Chad

    2017-04-15

    Cell division (mitosis) and gamete production (meiosis) are fundamental requirements for normal organismal development. The mammalian cell cycle is tightly regulated by different checkpoints ensuring complete and precise chromosomal segregation and duplication. In recent years, researchers have become increasingly interested in understanding how O -GlcNAc regulates the cell cycle. The O -GlcNAc post-translation modification is an O -glycosidic bond of a single β- N -acetylglucosamine sugar to serine/threonine residues of intracellular proteins. This modification is sensitive toward changes in nutrient levels in the cellular environment making O -GlcNAc a nutrient sensor capable of influencing cell growth and proliferation. Numerous studies have established that O-GlcNAcylation is essential in regulating mitosis and meiosis, while loss of O-GlcNAcylation is lethal in growing cells. Moreover, aberrant O-GlcNAcylation is linked with cancer and chromosomal segregation errors. In this review, we will discuss how O -GlcNAc controls different aspects of the cell cycle with a particular emphasis on mitosis and meiosis. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. Argentatin B Inhibits Proliferation of Prostate and Colon Cancer Cells by Inducing Cell Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ela Alcántara-Flores

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Argentatin B has been shown to inhibit the growth of colon HCT-15, and prostate PC-3 cancer cells. However, the mechanism by which argentatin B inhibits cell proliferation is still unknown. We aimed to investigate the mechanism by which argentatin B inhibits cell proliferation. The cell cycle was studied by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was evaluated by Annexin-V-Fluos, and Hoechst 33342 dye staining. Cell senescence was evaluated by proliferation tests, and staining for SA-β-galactosidase. Senescence-related proteins (PCNA, p21, and p27 were analyzed by Western blotting. Potential toxicity of argentatin B was evaluated in CD-1 mice. Its effect on tumor growth was tested in a HCT-15 and PC-3 xenograft model. Argentatin B induced an increment of cells in sub G1, but did not produce apoptosis. Proliferation of both cell lines was inhibited by argentatin B. Forty-three percent HCT-15, and 66% PC-3 cells showed positive SA-β-galactosidase staining. The expression of PCNA was decreased, p21 expression was increased in both cell lines, but p27 expression increased only in PC-3 cells after treatment. Administration of argentatin B to healthy mice did not produce treatment-associated pathologies. However, it restricted the growth of HCT-15 and PC-3 tumors. These results indicate that treatment with argentatin B induces cell senescence.

  8. Anti-proliferative effect of isorhamnetin on HeLa cells through inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Juan; Su, Hailan; Bi, Yang; Li, Jixin; Feng, Lidan; Sheng, Wenjun

    2018-04-01

    As a major cancer type in females, cervical cancer has been explored in depth by researchers. HeLa is a cervical cancer cell line. Isorhamnetin is an O-methylated flavonol that is primarily extracted from sea buckthorn. In the present study, the anti-proliferative effect of isorhamnetin on HeLa cells was evaluated using a Trypan blue dye exclusion assay. Isorhamnetin inhibited the cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis of the cell cycle distribution revealed that isorhamnetin inhibited the cell cycle progression of HeLa by causing G2/M phase arrest and decreasing the proportion of cells in G1 phase. In addition, western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the presence of certain cell cycle-associated proteins. It was demonstrated that isorhamnetin inhibited the protein expression of cyclin B1, cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25C) and Cdc2, but enhanced checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), Cdc25C and Cdc2 phosphorylation. In addition, tubulin depolymerization participated in the isorhamnetin-induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the anti-proliferative action of isorhamnetin is associated with arrest of the cell cycle in G2/M phase, which is a consequence of activation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated Chk2 pathway and disruption of microtubule function.

  9. Bisphenol A Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Reduces the Motile Potential of Murine LM8 Osteosarcoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidani, Teruki; Yasuda, Rie; Miyawaki, Joji; Oshima, Yusuke; Miura, Hiromasa; Masuno, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of bisphenol A (BPA) on the proliferation and motility potential of murine LM8 osteosarcoma cells. LM8 cells were treated for 3 days with or without 80 μM BPA. The effect of BPA on cell proliferation was determined by DNA measurement in the cultures and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation study. Ethanol-fixed cells were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) to visualize cell morphology. Cell motility was assayed using inserts with uncoated membranes in invasion chambers. Expression of cell division cycle 42 (CDC42) was determined by immunofluorescence staining and western blotting. BPA reduced the DNA content of cultures and the number of BrdU-positive cells. BPA induced a change in morphology from cuboidal with multiple filopodia on the cell surface to spindle-shaped with a smooth cell surface. BPA-treated cells expressed less CDC42 and were less motile than untreated cells. BPA inhibited DNA replication and cell proliferation. BPA inhibited filopodia formation and motile potential by inhibiting CDC42 expression in LM8 cells. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Human herpesvirus 6B inhibits cell proliferation by a p53-independent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Bodil; Kaspersen, M.D.; Kofod-Olsen, Emil

    2006-01-01

    inhibitor, did not reverse the HHV-6B-induced cell cycle block. In support of this, HHV-6B infection of p53(-/-) cells induced a cell cycle block before S-phase with kinetics similar to or faster than that observed by infection in wt cells. CONCLUSIONS: HHV-6B infection inhibited host cell proliferation......BACKGROUND: Various forms of cellular stress can activate the tumour suppressor protein p53, an important regulator of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Cells infected by human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) accumulate aberrant amounts of p53. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study...... was to investigate the role of p53 accumulation in the HHV-6B-induced cell cycle arrest. STUDY DESIGN: The role of p53 was studied using the p53 inhibitor pifithrin-a, and cells genetically deficient in functional p53 by homologous recombination. RESULTS: In response to HHV-6B infection, epithelial cells were...

  11. Cell cycle regulation and radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favaudon, V.

    2000-01-01

    Tight control of cell proliferation is mandatory to prevent cancer formation as well as to normal organ development and homeostasis. This occurs through checkpoints that operate in both time and space and are involved in the control of numerous pathways including DNA replication and transcription, cell cycle progression, signal transduction and differentiation. Moreover, evidence has accumulated to show that apoptosis is tightly connected with the regulation of cell cycle progression. In this paper we describe the main pathways that determine checkpoints in the cell cycle and apoptosis. It is also recalled that in solid tumors radiation-induced cell death occurs most frequently through non-apoptotic mechanisms involving oncosis, and mitotic or delayed cell death. (author)

  12. Resveratrol causes cell cycle arrest, decreased collagen synthesis, and apoptosis in rat intestinal smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patricia; Schmiedlin-Ren, Phyllissa; Mathias, Jason S; Tang, Huaijing; Christman, Gregory M; Zimmermann, Ellen M

    2012-02-01

    One of the most difficult and treatment-resistant complications of Crohn's disease is the development of fibrotic intestinal strictures due to mesenchymal cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in berries, peanuts, grapes, and red wine, has been shown to inhibit fibrosis in vasculature, heart, lung, kidney, liver, and esophagus in animal models. Resveratrol has also been shown to inhibit oxidation, inflammation, and cell proliferation and to decrease collagen synthesis in several cell types or animal models. The aim of this study was to determine whether resveratrol has antifibrotic effects on intestinal smooth muscle cells. Responses to resveratrol by cultured smooth muscle cells isolated from colons of untreated Lewis rats were examined; this rat strain is used in a model of Crohn's disease with prominent intestinal fibrosis. A relative decrease in cell numbers following treatment with 50 and 100 μM resveratrol was evident at 24 h (P ≤ 0.005). This effect was largely due to cell cycle arrest, with an increase in the percent of cells in S phase from 8 to 25-35% (P intestinal smooth muscle cell numbers through its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and also decreases collagen synthesis by the cells. These effects could be useful in preventing the smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition that characterize stricture formation in Crohn's disease.

  13. MEIS1 inhibits clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells proliferation and in vitro invasion or migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Cui, Liang; Xu, Axiang; Yin, Xiaotao; Li, Fanglong; Gao, Jiangping

    2017-03-07

    Myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 (MEIS1) protein plays a synergistic causative role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, MEIS1 has also shown to be a potential tumor suppressor in some other cancers, such as non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and prostate cancer. Although multiple roles of MEIS1 in cancer development and progression have been identified, there is an urgent demand to discover more functions of this molecule for further therapeutic design. MEIS1 was overexpressed via adenovirus vector in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells. Western blot and real-time qPCR (quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction) was performed to examine the protein and mRNA levels of MEIS1. Cell proliferation, survival, in vitro migration and invasion were tested by MTT, colony formation, soft-agar, transwell (in vitro invasion/migration) assays, and tumor in vivo growthwas measured on nude mice model. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis was used to detect cell cycle arrest or non-apoptotic cell death of ccRCC cells induced by MEIS1. MEIS1 exhibits a decreased expression in ccRCC cell lines than that in non-tumor cell lines. MEIS1 overexpression inhibits ccRCC cells proliferation and induces G1/S arrest concomitant with marked reduction of G1/S transition regulators, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin A. Moreover, MEIS1-1 overexpression also induces non-apoptotic cell death of ccRCC cells via decreasing the levels of pro-survival regulators Survivin and BCL-2. Transwell migration assay (TMA) shows that MEIS1 attenuates in vitro invasion and migration of ccRCC cells with down-regulated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. Further, in nude mice model, MEIS1 inhibits the in vivo growth of Caki-1 cells. By investigating the role of MEIS1 in ccRCC cells' survival, proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, cell cycle progress, apoptosis and metastasis, in the present work, we propose that MEIS1 may play an important role in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (cc

  14. Effects of Auraptene on IGF-1 Stimulated Cell Cycle Progression in the Human Breast Cancer Cell Line, MCF-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Krishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Auraptene is being investigated for its chemopreventive effects in many models of cancer including skin, colon, prostate, and breast. Many mechanisms of action including anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and antiapoptotic effects are being suggested for the chemopreventive properties of auraptene. We have previously shown in the N-methylnitrosourea induced mammary carcinogenesis model that dietary auraptene (500 ppm significantly delayed tumor latency. The delay in time to tumor corresponded with a significant reduction in cyclin D1 protein expression in the tumors. Since cyclin D1 is a major regulator of cell cycle, we further studied the effects of auraptene on cell cycle and the genes related to cell cycle in MCF-7 cells. Here we show that auraptene significantly inhibited IGF-1 stimulated S phase of cell cycle in MCF-7 cells and significantly changed the transcription of many genes involved in cell cycle.

  15. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  16. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xianqi; Qiu, Shuifeng; Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. → Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. → Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-β-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  17. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiaolan, E-mail: huxiaolan1998@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Xianqi [The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Qiu, Shuifeng [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin [Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  18. An extract of Uncaria tomentosa inhibiting cell division and NF-kappa B activity without inducing cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, Christina; Lindgren, Hanna; Pero, Ronald W; Leanderson, Tomas; Ivars, Fredrik

    2003-12-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that extracts of the plant Uncaria tomentosa inhibit tumor cell proliferation and inflammatory responses. We have confirmed that C-Med 100, a hot water extract of this plant, inhibits tumor cell proliferation albeit with variable efficiency. We extend these findings by showing that this extract also inhibits proliferation of normal mouse T and B lymphocytes and that the inhibition is not caused by toxicity or by induction of apoptosis. Further, the extract did not interfere with IL-2 production nor IL-2 receptor signaling. Since there was no discrete cell cycle block in C-Med 100-treated cells, we propose that retarded cell cycle progression caused the inhibition of proliferation. Collectively, these data suggested interference with a common pathway controlling cell growth and cell cycle progression. Indeed, we provide direct evidence that C-Med 100 inhibits nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) activity and propose that this at least partially causes the inhibition of proliferation.

  19. The cell cycle as a brake for β-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-13

    The generation of insulin-producing β cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic β cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle machinery. Both β cells and ES cells possess unique cell cycle machinery yet with significant contrasts. In this review, we compare the cell cycle control mechanisms in both ES cells and β cells, and highlight the fundamental differences between pluripotent cells of embryonic origin and differentiated β cells. Through critical analysis of the differences of the cell cycle between these two cell types, we propose that the cell cycle of ES cells may act as a brake for β-cell regeneration. Based on these differences, we discuss the potential of modulating the cell cycle of ES cells for the large-scale generation of functionally mature β cells in vitro. Further understanding of the factors that modulate the ES cell cycle will lead to new approaches to enhance the production of functional mature insulin-producing cells, and yield a reliable system to generate bona fide β cells in vitro.

  20. Transient inhibition of cell proliferation does not compromise self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruoxing [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive 5018, Hattiesburg, MS 39406 (United States); Guo, Yan-Lin, E-mail: yanlin.guo@usm.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive 5018, Hattiesburg, MS 39406 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have unlimited capacity for self-renewal and can differentiate into various cell types when induced. They also have an unusual cell cycle control mechanism driven by constitutively active cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks). In mouse ESCs (mESCs). It is proposed that the rapid cell proliferation could be a necessary part of mechanisms that maintain mESC self-renewal and pluripotency, but this hypothesis is not in line with the finding in human ESCs (hESCs) that the length of the cell cycle is similar to differentiated cells. Therefore, whether rapid cell proliferation is essential for the maintenance of mESC state remains unclear. We provide insight into this uncertainty through chemical intervention of mESC cell cycle. We report here that inhibition of Cdks with olomoucine II can dramatically slow down cell proliferation of mESCs with concurrent down-regulation of cyclin A, B and E, and the activation of the Rb pathway. However, mESCs display can recover upon the removal of olomoucine II and are able to resume normal cell proliferation without losing self-renewal and pluripotency, as demonstrated by the expression of ESC markers, colony formation, embryoid body formation, and induced differentiation. We provide a mechanistic explanation for these observations by demonstrating that Oct4 and Nanog, two major transcription factors that play critical roles in the maintenance of ESC properties, are up-regulated via de novo protein synthesis when the cells are exposed to olomoucine II. Together, our data suggest that short-term inhibition of cell proliferation does not compromise the basic properties of mESCs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Cdks slows down mESCs proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mESCs display remarkable recovery capacity from short-term cell cycle interruption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short-term cell cycle interruption does not compromise mESC self-renewal. Black

  1. XIAP Antagonist Embelin Inhibited Proliferation of Cholangiocarcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrkamp, Cody J.; Gutwein, Ashley R.; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Phillippi, Mary Anne; Mott, Justin L.

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma cells are dependent on antiapoptotic signaling for survival and resistance to death stimuli. Recent mechanistic studies have revealed that increased cellular expression of the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) impairs TRAIL- and chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity, promoting survival of cholangiocarcinoma cells. This study was undertaken to determine if pharmacologic antagonism of XIAP protein was sufficient to sensitize cholangiocarcinoma cells to cell death. We employed malignant cholangiocarcinoma cell lines and used embelin to antagonize XIAP protein. Embelin treatment resulted in decreased XIAP protein levels by 8 hours of treatment with maximal effect at 16 hours in KMCH and Mz-ChA-1 cells. Assessment of nuclear morphology demonstrated a concentration-dependent increase in nuclear staining. Interestingly, embelin induced nuclear morphology changes as a single agent, independent of the addition of TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). However, caspase activity assays revealed that increasing embelin concentrations resulted in slight inhibition of caspase activity, not activation. In addition, the use of a pan-caspase inhibitor did not prevent nuclear morphology changes. Finally, embelin treatment of cholangiocarcinoma cells did not induce DNA fragmentation or PARP cleavage. Apoptosis does not appear to contribute to the effects of embelin on cholangiocarcinoma cells. Instead, embelin caused inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle analysis indicated that embelin increased the number of cells in S and G2/M phase. Our results demonstrate that embelin decreased proliferation in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines. Embelin treatment resulted in decreased XIAP protein expression, but did not induce or enhance apoptosis. Thus, in cholangiocarcinoma cells the mechanism of action of embelin may not be dependent on apoptosis. PMID:24603802

  2. XIAP antagonist embelin inhibited proliferation of cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody J Wehrkamp

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma cells are dependent on antiapoptotic signaling for survival and resistance to death stimuli. Recent mechanistic studies have revealed that increased cellular expression of the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP impairs TRAIL- and chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity, promoting survival of cholangiocarcinoma cells. This study was undertaken to determine if pharmacologic antagonism of XIAP protein was sufficient to sensitize cholangiocarcinoma cells to cell death. We employed malignant cholangiocarcinoma cell lines and used embelin to antagonize XIAP protein. Embelin treatment resulted in decreased XIAP protein levels by 8 hours of treatment with maximal effect at 16 hours in KMCH and Mz-ChA-1 cells. Assessment of nuclear morphology demonstrated a concentration-dependent increase in nuclear staining. Interestingly, embelin induced nuclear morphology changes as a single agent, independent of the addition of TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL. However, caspase activity assays revealed that increasing embelin concentrations resulted in slight inhibition of caspase activity, not activation. In addition, the use of a pan-caspase inhibitor did not prevent nuclear morphology changes. Finally, embelin treatment of cholangiocarcinoma cells did not induce DNA fragmentation or PARP cleavage. Apoptosis does not appear to contribute to the effects of embelin on cholangiocarcinoma cells. Instead, embelin caused inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle analysis indicated that embelin increased the number of cells in S and G2/M phase. Our results demonstrate that embelin decreased proliferation in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines. Embelin treatment resulted in decreased XIAP protein expression, but did not induce or enhance apoptosis. Thus, in cholangiocarcinoma cells the mechanism of action of embelin may not be dependent on apoptosis.

  3. Phytochemicals radiosensitize cancer cells by inhibiting DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rana P.

    2017-01-01

    Solid tumors are mostly treated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is toxic to normal tissues and also promote the invasiveness and radioresistance in cancer cells. The resistance against radiotherapy and adverse effects to normal cells reduce the overall therapeutic effects of the treatment. Radiosensitizing agents usually show limited success during clinical trials. Therefore, the search and development of new radiosensitizers showing selective response to only cancer cells is desirable. We analyzed the radiosensitizing effects including cell death effect of silibinin, a phytochemical on prostate cancer cells. Silibinin enhanced gamma radiation (2.5-10 Gy) induced inhibition in colony formation selectively in prostate cancer cells. In cell cycle progression, G2/M phase is the most sensitive phase for radiation-induced damage which was delayed by the compound treatment in radiation exposed cells. The lower concentrations of silibinin substantially enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. A prolonged reactive oxygen species production was also observed in these treatments EGFR signaling pathway can contribute to radiation-induced pro-survival mechanisms and to the therapeutic resistance. Agent treatment reduced the IR-induced EGFR phosphorylation and consequently reversed the resistance mediating mechanisms within the cancer cell. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair in cancer cells would enhance therapeutic response of radiation in cancer cells. Silibinin affected the localization of EGFR and DNA-dependent protein kinase, the DNA-PK is known to be an important mediator of DSB repair in human cells, and showed increased number of pH2AX (ser139) foci, and thus indicating lower DNA repair in these cancer cells. This was also confirmed in the tumor xenograft study. Our findings suggest that a combination of silibinin with radiation could be an effective treatment of radioresistant human prostate cancer and warrants further investigation. (author)

  4. Mitochondrial regulation of cell cycle progression through SLC25A43

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrielson, Marike; Reizer, Edwin [School of Health and Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, SE 70182 Örebro (Sweden); Stål, Olle [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, SE 58185 Linköping (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Linköping University, SE 58185 Linköping (Sweden); Tina, Elisabet, E-mail: elisabet.tina@regionorebrolan.se [Department of Clinical Research Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, SE 70182 Örebro (Sweden)

    2016-01-22

    An increasing body of evidence is pointing towards mitochondrial regulation of the cell cycle. In a previous study of HER2-positive tumours we could demonstrate a common loss in the gene encoding for the mitochondrial transporter SLC25A43 and also a significant relation between SLC25A43 protein expression and S-phase fraction. Here, we investigated the consequence of suppressed SLC25A43 expression on cell cycle progression and proliferation in breast epithelial cells. In the present study, we suppressed SLC25A43 using siRNA in immortalised non-cancerous breast epithelial MCF10A cells and HER2-positive breast cancer cells BT-474. Viability, apoptosis, cell proliferation rate, cell cycle phase distribution, and nuclear Ki-67 and p21, were assessed by flow cytometry. Cell cycle related gene expressions were analysed using real-time PCR. We found that SLC25A43 knockdown in MCF10A cells significantly inhibited cell cycle progression during G{sub 1}-to-S transition, thus significantly reducing the proliferation rate and fraction of Ki-67 positive MCF10A cells. In contrast, suppressed SLC25A43 expression in BT-474 cells resulted in a significantly increased proliferation rate together with an enhanced G{sub 1}-to-S transition. This was reflected by an increased fraction of Ki-67 positive cells and reduced level of nuclear p21. In line with our previous results, we show a role for SLC25A43 as a regulator of cell cycle progression and proliferation through a putative mitochondrial checkpoint. These novel data further strengthen the connection between mitochondrial function and the cell cycle, both in non-malignant and in cancer cells. - Highlights: • Proposed cell cycle regulation through the mitochondrial transporter SLC25A43. • SLC25A43 alters cell proliferation rate and cell cycle progression. • Suppressed SLC25A43 influences transcription of cell cycle regulatory genes.

  5. LTA4H regulates cell cycle and skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Naomi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Langfald, Alyssa; Bai, Ruihua; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2017-07-01

    Leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H), a bifunctional zinc metallo-enzyme, is reportedly overexpressed in several human cancers. Our group has focused on LTA4H as a potential target for cancer prevention and/or therapy. In the present study, we report that LTA4H is a key regulator of cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase acting by negatively regulating p27 expression in skin cancer. We found that LTA4H is overexpressed in human skin cancer tissue. Knocking out LTA4H significantly reduced skin cancer development in the 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted two-stage skin cancer mouse model. LTA4H depletion dramatically decreased anchorage-dependent and -independent skin cancer cell growth by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. Moreover, our findings showed that depletion of LTA4H enhanced p27 protein stability, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation of CDK2 at Thr160 and inhibition of the CDK2/cyclin E complex, resulting in down-regulated p27 ubiquitination. These findings indicate that LTA4H is critical for skin carcinogenesis and is an important mediator of cell cycle and the data begin to clarify the mechanisms of LTA4H's role in cancer development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelli Luserna di Rora', A; Iacobucci, I; Martinelli, G

    2017-03-29

    The inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway in the treatment of cancers has recently reached an exciting stage with several cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors that are now being tested in several clinical trials in cancer patients. Although the great amount of pre-clinical and clinical data are from the solid tumor experience, only few studies have been done on leukemias using specific cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors. This review aims to summarize the most recent data found on the biological mechanisms of the response to DNA damages highlighting the role of the different elements of the DDR pathway in normal and cancer cells and focusing on the main genetic alteration or aberrant gene expression that has been found on acute and chronic leukemias. This review, for the first time, outlines the most important pre-clinical and clinical data available on the efficacy of cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors in single agent and in combination with different agents normally used for the treatment of acute and chronic leukemias.

  7. Inhibition of Geranylgeranyl Transferase-I Decreases Cell Viability of HTLV-1-Transformed Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia A. Pise-Masison

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL, an aggressive and highly chemoresistant malignancy. Rho family GTPases regulate multiple signaling pathways in tumorigenesis: cytoskeletal organization, transcription, cell cycle progression, and cell proliferation. Geranylgeranylation of Rho family GTPases is essential for cell membrane localization and activation of these proteins. It is currently unknown whether HTLV-1-transformed cells are preferentially sensitive to geranylgeranylation inhibitors, such as GGTI-298. In this report, we demonstrate that GGTI-298 decreased cell viability and induced G2/M phase accumulation of HTLV-1-transformed cells, independent of p53 reactivation. HTLV-1-LTR transcriptional activity was inhibited and Tax protein levels decreased following treatment with GGTI-298. Furthermore, GGTI-298 decreased activation of NF-κB, a downstream target of Rho family GTPases. These studies suggest that protein geranylgeranylation contributes to dysregulation of cell survival pathways in HTLV-1-transformed cells.

  8. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaro, Christopher; Lazarova, Darina L.; Bordonaro, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. ► Tcf3 modulates butyrate’s effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. ► Tcf3 modulation of butyrate’s effects differ by cell context. ► Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. ► Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G 1 to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that prevent or reverse butyrate resistance.

  9. Sphingosine 1-phosphate regulates proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cells via syndecan-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ye; Liu, Xiaoheng; Yan, Zhiping; Xie, Linshen

    2017-11-24

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) plays an important role in hepatocarcinogenesis. We previously demonstrated that S1P induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells via an MMP-7/Syndecan-1/TGF-β autocrine loop. In the present study, we investigated the regulative role of S1P in cell survival and progression of HCC cells, and tested whether syndecan-1 is required in the S1P action. After transfected with syndecan-1 shRNA, HepG2 and SMMC7721 cells were treated with S1P for 72 h, and then cell proliferation was detected by CCK8 assay, and cell cycle progression and cell apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry. The levels of apoptosis markers including cleaved-Caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP in SMMC7721 cells were examined by western blotting. Results showed that S1P significantly enhanced cell proliferation in HCC cells, which was significantly inhibited by syndecan-1 shRNA. S1P induced the cell proportion in S phase in HCC cells, whereas S1P decreased the proportion of cells in both early and late apoptosis. Syndecan-1 shRNA induced the G2/M arrest in the presence of S1P. In the syndecan-1 shRNA transfected HCC cells, the proportions of late and early apoptotic cells, and levels of cleaved-Caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP were significantly increased in cells with or without S1P treatment. Thus, S1P augments the proportion of cells in S phase of the cell cycle that might translate to enhance HCC cell proliferation and inhibit the cell apoptosis via syndecan-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaro, Christopher, E-mail: cchiaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Lazarova, Darina L., E-mail: dlazarova@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Bordonaro, Michael, E-mail: mbordonaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that

  11. Curcumin Induces Autophagy, Apoptosis, and Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaping Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Curcumin is an active extract from turmeric. The aim of this study was to identify the underlying mechanism of curcumin on PCa cells and the role of autophagy in this process. Methods. The inhibitory effect of curcumin on the growth of PANC1 and BxPC3 cell lines was detected by CCK-8 assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were tested by flow cytometry. Autophagosomes were tested by cell immunofluorescence assay. The protein expression was detected by Western blot. The correlation between LC3II/Bax and cell viability was analyzed. Results. Curcumin inhibited the cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Curcumin could induce cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and apoptosis of PCa cells. The autophagosomes were detected in the dosing groups. Protein expression of Bax and LC3II was upregulated, while Bcl2 was downregulated in the high dosing groups of curcumin. There was a significant negative correlation between LC3II/Bax and cell viability. Conclusions. Autophagy could be triggered by curcumin in the treatment of PCa. Apoptosis and cell cycle arrest also participated in this process. These findings imply that curcumin is a multitargeted agent for PCa cells. In addition, autophagic cell death may predominate in the high concentration groups of curcumin.

  12. Repression of c-Myc responsive genes in cycling cells causes G1 arrest through reduction of cyclin E/CDK2 kinase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berns, K.; Hijmans, E.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The c-myc gene encodes a sequence-specific DNA binding protein involved in proliferation and oncogenesis. Activation of c-myc expression in quiescent cells is sufficient to mediate cell cycle entry, whereas inhibition of c-myc expression causes cycling cells to withdraw from the cell cycle. To

  13. Caffeine as a repair inhibitor and its action on the normal cell cycle in protozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eades, M.; Calkins, J.; Wheeler, J.

    1987-01-01

    Caffeine has been demonstrated to inhibit repair of ionizing radiation damage, UV, and chemical DNA damage. The mechanism of caffeine action is not completely established at the present time but it has been clearly demonstrated that excision repair is inhibited in prokaryotes. The levels of caffeine which inhibit DNA repair are well tolerated by unirradiated organisms but radiation might impose an extra stress which would cause the irradiated organism to die from the normal caffeine sensitive function. The authors have tested synchronized protozoans at various times in the growth cycle for caffeine sensitivity. They infer sensitivity by the measured disruption of the normal growth cycle induced by a pulse treatment with lethal levels of caffeine. Some parts (G1) of the cell cycle show little sensitivity while late cycle (late S) may be quite sensitive. The relationship of cyclic caffeine sensitivity to repair inhibition is not obvious

  14. Effects of PPARα inhibition in head and neck paraganglioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba Florio

    Full Text Available Head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs are rare tumors that may cause important morbidity, because of their tendency to infiltrate the skull base. At present, surgery is the only therapeutic option, but radical removal may be difficult or impossible. Thus, effective targets and molecules for HNPGL treatment need to be identified. However, the lack of cellular models for this rare tumor hampers this task. PPARα receptor activation was reported in several tumors and this receptor appears to be a promising therapeutic target in different malignancies. Considering that the role of PPARα in HNPGLs was never studied before, we analyzed the potential of modulating PPARα in a unique model of HNPGL cells. We observed an intense immunoreactivity for PPARα in HNPGL tumors, suggesting that this receptor has an important role in HNPGL. A pronounced nuclear expression of PPARα was also confirmed in HNPGL-derived cells. The specific PPARα agonist WY14643 had no effect on HNPGL cell viability, whereas the specific PPARα antagonist GW6471 reduced HNPGL cell viability and growth by inducing cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. GW6471 treatment was associated with a marked decrease of CDK4, cyclin D3 and cyclin B1 protein expression, along with an increased expression of p21 in HNPGL cells. Moreover, GW6471 drastically impaired clonogenic activity of HNPGL cells, with a less marked effect on cell migration. Notably, the effects of GW6471 on HNPGL cells were associated with the inhibition of the PI3K/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathway. In conclusion, the PPARα antagonist GW6471 reduces HNPGL cell viability, interfering with cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. The mechanisms affecting HNPGL cell viability involve repression of the PI3K/GSK3β/β-catenin pathway. Therefore, PPARα could represent a novel therapeutic target for HNPGL.

  15. Methyl Jasmonate: Putative Mechanisms of Action on Cancer Cells Cycle, Metabolism, and Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cesari, Italo Mario; Carvalho, Erika; Figueiredo Rodrigues, Mariana; Mendonça, Bruna dos Santos; Amôedo, Nivea Dias; Rumjanek, Franklin David

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MJ), an oxylipid that induces defense-related mechanisms in plants, has been shown to be active against cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, without affecting normal cells. Here we review most of the described MJ activities in an attempt to get an integrated view and better understanding of its multifaceted modes of action. MJ (1) arrests cell cycle, inhibiting cell growth and proliferation, (2) causes cell death through the intrinsic/extrinsic proapoptotic, p53-independe...

  16. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  17. New castanospermine glycoside analogues inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis without affecting normal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Allan

    Full Text Available sp²-Iminosugar-type castanospermine analogues have been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity. However, their effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis and the molecular mechanism at play are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the effect of two representatives, namely the pseudo-S- and C-octyl glycoside 2-oxa-3-oxocastanospermine derivatives SO-OCS and CO-OCS, on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and MCF-10A mammary normal cell lines. We found that SO-OCS and CO-OCS inhibited breast cancer cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This effect is specific to breast cancer cells as both molecules had no impact on normal MCF-10A cell proliferation. Both drugs induced a cell cycle arrest. CO-OCS arrested cell cycle at G1 and G2/M in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells respectively. In MCF-7 cells, the G1 arrest is associated with a reduction of CDK4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4, cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression, pRb phosphorylation, and an overexpression of p21(Waf1/Cip1. In MDA-MB-231 cells, CO-OCS reduced CDK1 but not cyclin B1 expression. SO-OCS accumulated cells in G2/M in both cell lines and this blockade was accompanied by a decrease of CDK1, but not cyclin B1 expression. Furthermore, both drugs induced apoptosis as demonstrated by the increased percentage of annexin V positive cells and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Interestingly, in normal MCF-10A cells the two drugs failed to modify cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cyclins, or CDKs expression. These results demonstrate that the effect of CO-OCS and SO-OCS is triggered by both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting that these castanospermine analogues may constitute potential anti-cancer agents against breast cancer.

  18. Cell cycle dependency of 67gallium uptake and cytotoxicity in human cell lines of hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leeuwen-Stok, E A; Jonkhoff, A R; Visser-Platier, A W; Dräger, L M; Teule, G J; Huijgens, P C; Schuurhuis, G J

    1998-11-01

    67Gallium (67Ga) is a radionuclide which accumulates in hematological malignancies and is used for diagnostic imaging. We investigated in this in vitro study the cell cycle dependency of cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of 67Ga. Cell cycle synchronization of cells was achieved by counterflow centrifugal elutriation and the use of cytostatic drugs. The human lymphoma cell lines U-937 and U-715 were used and in elutriation experiments we also used the leukemic cell line HL-60. The transferrin receptor (CD71) expression, 67Ga uptake and cell proliferation inhibition were the parameters measured. We also studied cytotoxicity in various schedules for combination of 67Ga and drugs and the residual proliferative capacity was measured. The CD71 expression in the three cell lines increased from 106-177% on S phase cells and from 118-233% on G2M cells, as compared to the G0/G1 cell fraction. The 67Ga uptake varied from 108-127% for S cells and 128-139% for G2M cells. The drugs chosen induced cell cycle phase accumulation in S and/or G2M phase during preincubation. 67Ga preincubation induced accumulation in the G2M phase. Almost all combinations of 67Ga and drugs resulted in a non-interactive effect, except for methotrexate which resulted in an antagonistic effect. No preferential effect of any of the incubation schemes was seen. CD71 expression and 67Ga uptake were increased in S and G2M cells. Combination of 67Ga with drugs which arrest cells in these cell cycle phases did not result in a change in cytotoxicity. However, these results implicate that 67Ga and the cytostatic drugs tested except for methotrexate might be used together or sequentially in therapy.

  19. Exogenous lactate interferes with cell-cycle control in BALB/3T3 mouse fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutz, H. Peter; Little, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that exogenous lactate may influence proliferation rates, radiation sensitivity, and postirradiation repair capacity of mammalian cells. In the present study, we addressed the question of potential underlying mechanisms and, therefore, examined effects of exogenous lactate on proliferation rates and cell-cycle distribution in immortal but nontumorigenic mammalian cells. Methods and Materials: Cells were grown at 37 deg. C in an incubator with 5% CO 2 and 95% air, in a culture medium supplemented or not with lactate at a 10 mM concentration. Daily, we changed the culture medium and counted cells per dish. On selected days, cell-cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry. Balb/3T3 mouse fibroblasts were used. Results: During the exponential phase of cell proliferation, mean population doubling time was significantly increased from 17.7 to 19.9 h, due to selective prolongation of G 2 /M. However, in density-inhibited cultures, exogenous lactate stimulated entry into S and proliferation to a significantly higher saturation density. Conclusions: These findings indicate that exogenous lactate interferes with mechanisms of cell-cycle control at two different points in the cell-cycle, depending on cell density and the resulting absence or presence of inhibition of cell proliferation. Interference with cell-cycle control may underlay the modification by exogenous lactate of radiosensitivity and postirradiation repair capacity in mammalian cells

  20. Andrographolide Inhibits Proliferation and Metastasis of SGC7901 Gastric Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Gang; Pan, Wensheng

    2017-01-01

    To explore the mechanisms by which andrographolide inhibits gastric cancer cell proliferation and metastasis, we employed the gastric cell line SGC7901 to investigate the anticancer effects of andrographolide. The cell survival ratio, cell migration and invasion, cell cycle, apoptosis, and matrix metalloproteinase activity were assessed. Moreover, western blotting and real-time PCR were used to examine the protein expression levels and the mRNA expression levels, respectively. The survival ra...

  1. An antitubulin agent BCFMT inhibits proliferation of cancer cells and induces cell death by inhibiting microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Rai

    Full Text Available Using cell based screening assay, we identified a novel anti-tubulin agent (Z-5-((5-(4-bromo-3-chlorophenylfuran-2-ylmethylene-2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one (BCFMT that inhibited proliferation of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa (IC(50, 7.2 ± 1.8 µM, human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7 (IC(50, 10.0 ± 0.5 µM, highly metastatic breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231 (IC(50, 6.0 ± 1 µM, cisplatin-resistant human ovarian carcinoma (A2780-cis (IC(50, 5.8 ± 0.3 µM and multi-drug resistant mouse mammary tumor (EMT6/AR1 (IC(50, 6.5 ± 1 µM cells. Using several complimentary strategies, BCFMT was found to inhibit cancer cell proliferation at G2/M phase of the cell cycle apparently by targeting microtubules. In addition, BCFMT strongly suppressed the dynamics of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells. At its half maximal proliferation inhibitory concentration (10 µM, BCFMT reduced the rates of growing and shortening phases of microtubules in MCF-7 cells by 37 and 40%, respectively. Further, it increased the time microtubules spent in the pause (neither growing nor shortening detectably state by 135% and reduced the dynamicity (dimer exchange per unit time of microtubules by 70%. In vitro, BCFMT bound to tubulin with a dissociation constant of 8.3 ± 1.8 µM, inhibited tubulin assembly and suppressed GTPase activity of microtubules. BCFMT competitively inhibited the binding of BODIPY FL-vinblastine to tubulin with an inhibitory concentration (K(i of 5.2 ± 1.5 µM suggesting that it binds to tubulin at the vinblastine site. In cultured cells, BCFMT-treatment depolymerized interphase microtubules, perturbed the spindle organization and accumulated checkpoint proteins (BubR1 and Mad2 at the kinetochores. BCFMT-treated MCF-7 cells showed enhanced nuclear accumulation of p53 and its downstream p21, which consequently activated apoptosis in these cells. The results suggested that BCFMT inhibits proliferation of several types of cancer cells including drug

  2. Inhibition of cell proliferation by glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, J.P.; Dinsdale, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of glycerol on proliferation of BHK, CHO, HBL, MCF-7, and human glioma cells was studied. Cell proliferation was significantly decreased in all the cell lines at glycerol concentrations of 2-4% in the culture medium. The inhibition was dose-dependent, complete suppression of proliferation occurring at a glycerol concentration of 4% for the MCF-7 cell line and 6-8% for the BHK, CHO and human glioma cells. Studies on [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation correlate with the effect on cell proliferation. The viability of the cells was not significantly affected until higher concentrations of glycerol were present. Recovery studies with BHK cells indicated that replacement of the glycerol medium with glycerol-free medium resulted in full recovery following exposure to 4% glycerol and only partial recovery of proliferation rate following exposure to 10-12% glycerol. It is concluded that glycerol, a substance that is normally present in tissues, can serve as a potent inhibitor of cell proliferation

  3. Blue light inhibits proliferation of melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Anja; Distler, Elisabeth; Klapczynski, Anna; Arpino, Fabiola; Kuch, Natalia; Simon-Keller, Katja; Sticht, Carsten; van Abeelen, Frank A.; Gretz, Norbert; Oversluizen, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    Photobiomodulation with blue light is used for several treatment paradigms such as neonatal jaundice, psoriasis and back pain. However, little is known about possible side effects concerning melanoma cells in the skin. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of blue LED irradiation with respect to proliferation of melanoma cells. For that purpose we used the human malignant melanoma cell line SK-MEL28. Cell proliferation was decreased in blue light irradiated cells where the effect size depended on light irradiation dosage. Furthermore, with a repeated irradiation of the melanoma cells on two consecutive days the effect could be intensified. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting with Annexin V and Propidium iodide labeling did not show a higher number of dead cells after blue light irradiation compared to non-irradiated cells. Gene expression analysis revealed down-regulated genes in pathways connected to anti-inflammatory response, like B cell signaling and phagosome. Most prominent pathways with up-regulation of genes were cytochrome P450, steroid hormone biosynthesis. Furthermore, even though cells showed a decrease in proliferation, genes connected to the cell cycle were up-regulated after 24h. This result is concordant with XTT test 48h after irradiation, where irradiated cells showed the same proliferation as the no light negative control. In summary, proliferation of melanoma cells can be decreased using blue light irradiation. Nevertheless, the gene expression analysis has to be further evaluated and more studies, such as in-vivo experiments, are warranted to further assess the safety of blue light treatment.

  4. Arctigenin induces cell cycle arrest by blocking the phosphorylation of Rb via the modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins in human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Hong, Se Chul; Jeong, Hyung Jin; Koo, Jin Suk

    2011-10-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, worldwide being second only to lung cancer as a cause of death. Arctigenin, a representative dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, occurs in a variety of plants. However, the molecular mechanisms of arctigenin for anti-tumor effect on gastric cancer have not been examined. This study examined the biological effects of arctigenin on the human gastric cancer cell line SNU-1 and AGS. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. In MTT assay, the proliferation of SNU-1 and AGS cells was significantly inhibited by arctigenin in a time and dose dependent manner, as compared with SNU-1 and AGS cells cultured in the absence of arctigenin. Inhibition of cell proliferation by arctigenin was in part associated with apoptotic cell death, as shown by changes in the expression ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax by arctigenin. Also, arctigenin blocked cell cycle arrest from G(1) to S phase by regulating the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Rb, cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK4, CDK2, p21Waf1/Cip1 and p15 INK4b. The antiproliferative effect of arctigenin on SNU-1 and AGS gastric cancer cells revealed in this study suggests that arctigenin has intriguing potential as a chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ryan Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP, decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231 breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC protein levels, although other protein levels were

  6. ALG-2 knockdown in HeLa cells results in G2/M cell cycle phase accumulation and cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høj, Berit Rahbek; la Cour, Peter Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    downregulation induces accumulation of HeLa cells in the G2/M cell cycle phase and increases the amount of early apoptotic and dead cells. Caspase inhibition by the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk attenuated the increase in the amount of dead cells following ALG-2 downregulation. Thus, our results indicate...... that ALG-2 has an anti-apoptotic function in HeLa cells by facilitating the passage through checkpoints in the G2/M cell cycle phase.......ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene-2 encoded protein) has been shown to be upregulated in a variety of human tumors questioning its previously assumed pro-apoptotic function. The aim of the present study was to obtain insights into the role of ALG-2 in human cancer cells. We show that ALG-2...

  7. Kaempferol inhibits cell proliferation and glycolysis in esophagus squamous cell carcinoma via targeting EGFR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shihua; Wang, Xiaowei; Li, Chunguang; Zhao, Tiejun; Jin, Hai; Fang, Wentao

    2016-08-01

    Antitumor activity of kaempferol has been studied in various tumor types, but its potency in esophagus squamous cell carcinoma is rarely known. Here, we reported the activity of kaempferol against esophagus squamous cell carcinoma as well as its antitumor mechanisms. Results of cell proliferation and colony formation assay showed that kaempferol substantially inhibited tumor cell proliferation and clone formation in vitro. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that tumor cells were induced G0/G1 phase arrest after kaempferol treatment, and the expression of protein involved in cell cycle regulation was dramatically changed. Except the potency on cell proliferation, we also discovered that kaempferol had a significant inhibitory effect against tumor glycolysis. With the downregulation of hexokinase-2, glucose uptake and lactate production in tumor cells were dramatically declined. Mechanism studies revealed kaempferol had a direct effect on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity, and along with the inhibition of EGFR, its downstream signaling pathways were also markedly suppressed. Further investigations found that exogenous overexpression of EGFR in tumor cells substantially attenuated glycolysis suppression induced by kaempferol, which implied that EGFR also played an important role in kaempferol-mediated glycolysis inhibition. Finally, the antitumor activity of kaempferol was validated in xenograft model and kaempferol prominently restrained tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, dramatic decrease of EGFR activity and hexokinase-2 expression were observed in kaempferol-treated tumor tissue, which confirmed these findings in vitro. Briefly, these studies suggested that kaempferol, or its analogues, may serve as effective candidates for esophagus squamous cell carcinoma management.

  8. Danusertib, a potent pan-Aurora kinase and ABL kinase inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death and inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated signaling pathway in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan CX

    2015-03-01

    autophagy-inducing effects on AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Danusertib arrested AGS and NCI-N78 cells in G2/M phase, with downregulation of expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and upregulation of expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danusertib induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, with an increase in expression of proapoptotic protein and a decrease in antiapoptotic proteins in both cell lines. Danusertib induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and triggered activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Further, danusertib induced autophagy, with an increase in expression of beclin 1 and conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-I to LC3-II in both cell lines. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways as well as activation of 5' AMP-activated protein kinase contributed to the proautophagic effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. SB202191 and wortmannin enhanced the autophagy-inducing effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. In addition, danusertib inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition with an increase in expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in expression of N-cadherin in both cell lines. Taken together, danusertib has potent inducing effects on cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy, but has an inhibitory effect on epithelial to mesenchymal transition, with involvement of signaling pathways mediated by PI3K/Akt/mTOR, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and 5' AMP-activated protein kinase in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Keywords: danusertib, gastric cancer, Aurora kinase, apoptosis, autophagy, epithelial to mesenchymal transition

  9. Cell cycle phase of nondividing cells in aging human cell cultures determined by DNA content and chromosomal constitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanishevsky, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    Human diploid cell cultures, strain WI-38, have a finite proliferative capacity and have been proposed as a model of biological aging. To identify the cell cycle phase of the nondividing cells, cultures of various ages were exposed to 3 Hdt for 48 hours to label dividing cells, then the cycle phase was identified for individual cells by one of two methods, and finally, the proliferative status of the same cells was scored by autoradiographic evidence of 3 HdT uptake. The methods to identify the cycle phase were: determination of DNA strain content by Feulgen scanning cytophotometry, and determination of chromosome constitution by the technique of premature chromosome condensation (PCC). Preliminary experiments showed the effect of continuous exposure to various levels of 3 HdT on cell growth. High levels of 3 HdT inhibited cell cycle traverse: the cell number and labeling index curves reached a plateau; the cell volume increased; the cells accumulated with 4C DNA contents and it appeared that they blocked in G 2 phase. This pattern is consistent with a radiation effect. (U.S.)

  10. TIMP-3 recruits quiescent hematopoietic stem cells into active cell cycle and expands multipotent progenitor pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Ito, Miyuki; Smookler, David S; Shibata, Fumi; Fukuchi, Yumi; Morikawa, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Arai, Fumio; Suda, Toshio; Khokha, Rama; Kitamura, Toshio

    2010-11-25

    Regulating transition of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) between quiescent and cycling states is critical for maintaining homeostasis of blood cell production. The cycling states of HSCs are regulated by the extracellular factors such as cytokines and extracellular matrix; however, the molecular circuitry for such regulation remains elusive. Here we show that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3), an endogenous regulator of metalloproteinases, stimulates HSC proliferation by recruiting quiescent HSCs into the cell cycle. Myelosuppression induced TIMP-3 in the bone marrow before hematopoietic recovery. Interestingly, TIMP-3 enhanced proliferation of HSCs and promoted expansion of multipotent progenitors, which was achieved by stimulating cell-cycle entry of quiescent HSCs without compensating their long-term repopulating activity. Surprisingly, this effect did not require metalloproteinase inhibitory activity of TIMP-3 and was possibly mediated through a direct inhibition of angiopoietin-1 signaling, a critical mediator for HSC quiescence. Furthermore, bone marrow recovery from myelosuppression was accelerated by over-expression of TIMP-3, and in turn, impaired in TIMP-3-deficient animals. These results suggest that TIMP-3 may act as a molecular cue in response to myelosuppression for recruiting dormant HSCs into active cell cycle and may be clinically useful for facilitating hematopoietic recovery after chemotherapy or ex vivo expansion of HSCs.

  11. Aqueous Extracts of the Edible Gracilaria tenuistipitata are Protective Against H2O2-Induced DNA Damage, Growth Inhibition, and Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chen Yeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Potential antioxidant properties of an aqueous extract of the edible red seaweed Gracilaria tenuistipitata (AEGT against oxidative DNA damage were evaluated. The AEGT revealed several antioxidant molecules, including phenolics, flavonoids and ascorbic acid. In a cell-free assay, the extract exhibited 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity that significantly reduced H2O2-induced plasmid DNA breaks in a dose-response manner (P < 0.001. The AEGT also suppressed H2O2-induced oxidative DNA damage in H1299 cells by reducing the percentage of damaged DNA in a dose-response manner (P < 0.001 as measured by a modified alkaline comet-nuclear extract (comet-NE assay. The MTT assay results showed that AEGT confers significant protection against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity and that AEGT itself is not cytotoxic (P < 0.001. Moreover, H2O2-induced cell cycle G2/M arrest was significantly released when cells were co-treated with different concentrations of AEGT (P < 0.001. Taken together, these findings suggest that edible red algae Gracilaria water extract can prevent H2O2-induced oxidative DNA damage and its related cellular responses.

  12. Centchroman induces redox-dependent apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human endometrial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Hari; Singh, Neetu; Kaushik, Shweta; Sharma, Ramesh; Balapure, Anil K

    2017-04-01

    Centchroman (CC) or Ormeloxifene has been shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in various types of cancer cells. This has, however, not been addressed for endometrial cancer cells where its (CC) mechanism of action remains unclear. This study focuses on the basis of antineoplasticity of CC by blocking the targets involved in the cell cycle, survival and apoptosis in endometrial cancer cells. Ishikawa Human Endometrial Cancer Cells were cultured under estrogen deprived medium, exposed to CC and analyzed for proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we also analyzed oxidative stress induced by CC. Cell viability studies confirmed the IC 50 of CC in Ishikawa cells to be 20 µM after 48 h treatment. CC arrests the cells in G0/G1 phase through cyclin D1 and cyclin E mediated pathways. Phosphatidylserine externalization, nuclear morphology changes, DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage, and alteration of Bcl-2 family protein expression clearly suggest ongoing apoptosis in the CC treated cells. Activation of caspase 3 & 9, up-regulation of AIF and inhibition of apoptosis by z-VAD-fmk clearly explains the participation of the intrinsic pathway of programmed cell death. Further, the increase of ROS, loss of MMP, inhibition of antioxidant (MnSOD, Cu/Zn-SOD and GST) and inhibition of apoptosis with L-NAC suggests CC induced oxidative stress leading to apoptosis via mitochondria mediated pathway. Therefore, CC could be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of Endometrial Cancer adjunct to its utility as a contraceptive and an anti-breast cancer agent.

  13. Cinnamon effectively inhibits the activity of leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, X; Su, M C; Zhao, R B; Ouyang, H M; Dong, X D; Hu, P; Pei, Q; Lu, J; Li, Z F; Zhang, C R; Yang, T-H

    2016-08-19

    Cinnamon is the main component of Sanyangxuedai, which is one of the effective traditional Chinese medicines for treating malignancies. Leukemia is a prevalent malignant disease that Sanyangxuedai has been used to treat. Although successful in several studies, there is a lack of solid evidence as to why Sanyangxuedai has an effect on leukemia, and little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, the active ingredients of cinnamon were isolated, purified, and identified. The transwell transport pool formed with the Caco-2 cell model was used to filter the active ingredients of cinnamon by simulating the gastrointestinal barrier in vitro. Moreover, the cell morphology, cell cycle status, apoptosis status, and antigenic variation of the cell surface antigens were observed and measured in K562 cells after treatment with the active ingredients of cinnamon. Our results showed that 50-75 μM was a safe concentration of cinnamon extract for treatment of K562 cells for 72 h. The cinnamon extract caused growth inhibition of K562 cells. Cinnamon extract seemed to arrest the cells at the G1 stage and increased the apoptosis rate significantly. Interestingly, cinnamon extract treatment upregulated the expression of erythroid and myeloid differentiation antigens and downregulated that of the megakaryocytic differentiation antigens in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings indicate that cinnamon extract from Sanyangxuedai may be effective for treating leukemia.

  14. Histamine inhibits adrenocortical cell proliferation but does not affect steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagotto, Romina Maria; Pereyra, Elba Nora; Monzón, Casandra; Mondillo, Carolina; Pignataro, Omar Pedro

    2014-04-01

    Histamine (HA) is a neurotransmitter synthesized in most mammalian tissues exclusively by histidine decarboxylase enzyme. Among the plethora of actions mediated by HA, the modulatory effects on steroidogenesis and proliferation in Leydig cells (LCs) have been described recently. To determine whether the effects on LCs reported could be extrapolated to all steroidogenic systems, in this study, we assessed the effect of this amine on adrenal proliferation and steroidogenesis, using two adrenocortical cell lines as experimental models, murine Y1 cells and human NCI-H295R cells. Even when steroidogenesis was not modified by HA in adrenocortical cells, the biogenic amine inhibited the proliferation of H295R cells. This action was mediated by the activation of HRH1 subtype and an increase in the production of inositol phosphates as second messengers, causing cell-cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. These results indicate a new role for HA in the proliferation of human adrenocortical cells that could contribute to a better understanding of tumor pathology as well as to the development of new therapeutic agents.

  15. Cellular Plasticity Enables Adaptation to Unforeseen Cell-Cycle Rewiring Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzir, Yair; Stolovicki, Elad; Stern, Shay; Braun, Erez

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental dynamics of the cell cycle, underlying cell growth and reproduction, were previously found to be robust under a wide range of environmental and internal perturbations. This property was commonly attributed to its network structure, which enables the coordinated interactions among hundreds of proteins. Despite significant advances in deciphering the components and autonomous interactions of this network, understanding the interfaces of the cell cycle with other major cellular processes is still lacking. To gain insight into these interfaces, we used the process of genome-rewiring in yeast by placing an essential metabolic gene HIS3 from the histidine biosynthesis pathway, under the exclusive regulation of different cell-cycle promoters. In a medium lacking histidine and under partial inhibition of the HIS3p, the rewired cells encountered an unforeseen multitasking challenge; the cell-cycle regulatory genes were required to regulate the essential histidine-pathway gene in concert with the other metabolic demands, while simultaneously driving the cell cycle through its proper temporal phases. We show here that chemostat cell populations with rewired cell-cycle promoters adapted within a short time to accommodate the inhibition of HIS3p and stabilized a new phenotypic state. Furthermore, a significant fraction of the population was able to adapt and grow into mature colonies on plates under such inhibiting conditions. The adapted state was shown to be stably inherited across generations. These adaptation dynamics were accompanied by a non-specific and irreproducible genome-wide transcriptional response. Adaptation of the cell-cycle attests to its multitasking capabilities and flexible interface with cellular metabolic processes and requirements. Similar adaptation features were found in our previous work when rewiring HIS3 to the GAL system and switching cells from galactose to glucose. Thus, at the basis of cellular plasticity is the emergence of a yet

  16. Somatomedins inhibit protein degradation in muscle cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, R.A.; Blann, D.L.; Bauer, C.A.; Hossner, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    Protein degradation has been measured in cultures of L6 myotubes as the rate of release of trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity after prelabeling cell protein with [ 3 H] leucine. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1), ovine somatomedin (oSM) and insulin (I), at concentrations from 10 -11 M to 10 -7 M (5 x 10 -7 M-oSM) were added at the beginning of a 4-hour degradation period to determine the effects of these hormones on inducible proteolysis occurring in serum-free media. In addition the effects of fetal bovine serum, at concentrations from 1% to 30%, on protein degradation were determined in parallel experiments to relate serum inhibition of proteolysis to somatomedin actions. Results from this study indicate the apparent half maximal inhibition of proteolysis (18%, 15%, 11%) occurred at .4nM-IGF-1, .6nM-oSM and 4nM-I, respectively. Thus protein degradation was approximately 10 times more sensitive to somatomedins than insulin. The half maximal inhibition of proteolysis (15%) observed with serum occurred at 7.7%. The magnitude of the response between IFG-I and serum (37% vs. 31%) was similar. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that somatomedins are important factors in regulating growth and development of muscle

  17. DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Protoporphyrin IX in Sarcoma 180 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Porphyrin derivatives have been widely used in photodynamic therapy as effective sensitizers. Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX, a well-known hematoporphyrin derivative component, shows great potential to enhance light induced tumor cell damage. However, PpIX alone could also exert anti-tumor effects. The mechanisms underlying those direct effects are incompletely understood. This study thus investigated the putative mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor effects of PpIX on sarcoma 180 (S180 cells. Methods: S180 cells were treated with different concentrations of PpIX. Following the treatment, cell viability was evaluated by the 3-(4, 5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT assay; Disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by flow cytometry; The trans-location of apoptosis inducer factor (AIF from mitochondria to nucleus was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy; DNA damage was detected by single cell gel electrophoresis; Cell cycle distribution was analyzed by DNA content with flow cytometry; Cell cycle associated proteins were detected by western blotting. Results: PpIX (≥ 1 µg/ml significantly inhibited proliferation and reduced viability of S180 cells in a dose-dependent manner. PpIX rapidly and significantly triggered mitochondrial membrane depolarization, AIF (apoptosis inducer factor translocation from mitochondria to nucleus and DNA damage, effects partially relieved by the specific inhibitor of MPTP (mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Furthermore, S phase arrest and upregulation of the related proteins of P53 and P21 were observed following 12 and 24 h PpIX exposure. Conclusion: PpIX could inhibit tumor cell proliferation by induction of DNA damage and cell cycle arrest in the S phase.

  18. Effects of cyclin D1 gene silencing on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Li, Xue; Cheng, Qi; Ning, Deng; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Jiang, Li

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of Cyclin D1 silencing on cell cycle, cell proliferation, and apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC). Cells were divided into the blank group, negative control group (HCC cells transfected with control shRNA), Cyclin D1 shRNA group (HCC cells transfected with Cyclin D1 shRNA), and the normal group (human normal liver L-02 cells). Expressions of Cyclin D1, Caspase-3, Bcl-2, and C-myc were detected by RT-qPCR and Western blotting. Cell proliferation was detected by Cell Counting Kit-8. Cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry. Tumor xenograft in nude mice was performed to detect in vivo tumorigenesis. HCC tissues and HCC cells exhibited elevated expression levels of Cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 expression levels was found to be correlated with tumor size and tumor staging. Compared with the normal group, the blank group showed enhanced cell proliferation, a reduction in the amount of cells in G0/G1 phase, increased number cells in S and G2/M phase, reduced apoptosis, elevated expressions of Cyclin D1, Bcl-2, and C-myc, decreased Caspase-3 activity and significant tumorigenicity. In comparison with the blank group, the Cyclin D1 shRNA group revealed weakened cell proliferation, reduced cells in S and G2/M phase, increased cells in G0/G1 phase, increased Annexin V positive cell ratio, decreased expression of Cyclin D1, Bcl-2, and C-myc, elevated Caspase-3 activity and inhibited tumorigenicity. In conclusion, Cyclin D1 gene silencing suppresses cell proliferation and inhibits cell apoptosis, which may be a new target approach in the treatment and management for HCC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Emeli M.; Brokken, Leon J.S.; Haerkoenen, Pirkko L.

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  20. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Emeli M., E-mail: Emeli.Nilsson@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden); Brokken, Leon J.S., E-mail: Leon.Brokken@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden); Haerkoenen, Pirkko L., E-mail: Pirkko.Harkonen@med.lu.se [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tumour Biology, Lund University, CRC, Building 91, Plan 10, Entrance 72, UMAS, 205 02 Malmoe (Sweden)

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  1. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Isegawa, Naohisa [Laboratory Animal Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Shirasawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: sirasawa@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  2. Loratadine dysregulates cell cycle progression and enhances the effect of radiation in human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soule, Benjamin P; Simone, Nicole L; DeGraff, William G; Choudhuri, Rajani; Cook, John A; Mitchell, James B

    2010-01-01

    The histamine receptor-1 (H1)-antagonist, loratadine has been shown to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenografts in part due to cell cycle arrest in G2/M. Since this is a radiation sensitive phase of the cell cycle, we sought to determine if loratadine modifies radiosensitivity in several human tumor cell lines with emphasis on human colon carcinoma (HT29). Cells were treated with several doses of loratadine at several time points before and after exposure to radiation. Radiation dose modifying factors (DMF) were determined using full radiation dose response survival curves. Cell cycle phase was determined by flow cytometry and the expression of the cell cycle-associated proteins Chk1, pChk1 ser345 , and Cyclin B was analyzed by western blot. Loratadine pre-treatment of exponentially growing cells (75 μM, 24 hours) increased radiation-induced cytotoxicity yielding a radiation DMF of 1.95. However, treatment of plateau phase cells also yielded a DMF of 1.3 suggesting that mechanisms other than cell cycle arrest also contribute to loratadine-mediated radiation modification. Like irradiation, loratadine initially induced G2/M arrest and activation of the cell-cycle associated protein Chk1 to pChk1 ser345 , however a subsequent decrease in expression of total Chk1 and Cyclin B correlated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint. Analysis of DNA repair enzyme expression and DNA fragmentation revealed a distinct pattern of DNA damage in loratadine-treated cells in addition to enhanced radiation-induced damage. Taken together, these data suggest that the observed effects of loratadine are multifactorial in that loratadine 1) directly damages DNA, 2) activates Chk1 thereby promoting G2/M arrest making cells more susceptible to radiation-induced DNA damage and, 3) downregulates total Chk1 and Cyclin B abrogating the radiation-induced G2/M checkpoint and allowing cells to re-enter the cell cycle despite the persistence of damaged DNA. Given this unique possible

  3. Loratadine dysregulates cell cycle progression and enhances the effect of radiation in human tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook John A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histamine receptor-1 (H1-antagonist, loratadine has been shown to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenografts in part due to cell cycle arrest in G2/M. Since this is a radiation sensitive phase of the cell cycle, we sought to determine if loratadine modifies radiosensitivity in several human tumor cell lines with emphasis on human colon carcinoma (HT29. Methods Cells were treated with several doses of loratadine at several time points before and after exposure to radiation. Radiation dose modifying factors (DMF were determined using full radiation dose response survival curves. Cell cycle phase was determined by flow cytometry and the expression of the cell cycle-associated proteins Chk1, pChk1ser345, and Cyclin B was analyzed by western blot. Results Loratadine pre-treatment of exponentially growing cells (75 μM, 24 hours increased radiation-induced cytotoxicity yielding a radiation DMF of 1.95. However, treatment of plateau phase cells also yielded a DMF of 1.3 suggesting that mechanisms other than cell cycle arrest also contribute to loratadine-mediated radiation modification. Like irradiation, loratadine initially induced G2/M arrest and activation of the cell-cycle associated protein Chk1 to pChk1ser345, however a subsequent decrease in expression of total Chk1 and Cyclin B correlated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint. Analysis of DNA repair enzyme expression and DNA fragmentation revealed a distinct pattern of DNA damage in loratadine-treated cells in addition to enhanced radiation-induced damage. Taken together, these data suggest that the observed effects of loratadine are multifactorial in that loratadine 1 directly damages DNA, 2 activates Chk1 thereby promoting G2/M arrest making cells more susceptible to radiation-induced DNA damage and, 3 downregulates total Chk1 and Cyclin B abrogating the radiation-induced G2/M checkpoint and allowing cells to re-enter the cell cycle despite the persistence of

  4. Abnormal mitosis triggers p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in human tetraploid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffer, Christian; Kuznetsova, Anastasia Yurievna; Storchová, Zuzana

    2013-08-01

    Erroneously arising tetraploid mammalian cells are chromosomally instable and may facilitate cell transformation. An increasing body of evidence shows that the propagation of mammalian tetraploid cells is limited by a p53-dependent arrest. The trigger of this arrest has not been identified so far. Here we show by live cell imaging of tetraploid cells generated by an induced cytokinesis failure that most tetraploids arrest and die in a p53-dependent manner after the first tetraploid mitosis. Furthermore, we found that the main trigger is a mitotic defect, in particular, chromosome missegregation during bipolar mitosis or spindle multipolarity. Both a transient multipolar spindle followed by efficient clustering in anaphase as well as a multipolar spindle followed by multipolar mitosis inhibited subsequent proliferation to a similar degree. We found that the tetraploid cells did not accumulate double-strand breaks that could cause the cell cycle arrest after tetraploid mitosis. In contrast, tetraploid cells showed increased levels of oxidative DNA damage coinciding with the p53 activation. To further elucidate the pathways involved in the proliferation control of tetraploid cells, we knocked down specific kinases that had been previously linked to the cell cycle arrest and p53 phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the checkpoint kinase ATM phosphorylates p53 in tetraploid cells after abnormal mitosis and thus contributes to proliferation control of human aberrantly arising tetraploids.

  5. Sulfated Galactans from Red Seaweed Gracilaria fisheri Target EGFR and Inhibit Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-Lao, Thannicha; Tohtong, Rutaiwan; Bates, David O; Wongprasert, Kanokpan

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is increasing in incidence worldwide and is resistant to chemotherapeutic agents, making treatment of CCA a major challenge. Previous studies reported that natural sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) disrupted growth factor receptor activation in cancer cells. The present study, therefore, aimed at investigating the antiproliferation effect of sulfated galactans (SG) isolated from the red seaweed Gracilaria fisheri (G. fisheri) on CCA cell lines. Direct binding activity of SG to CCA cells, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were determined. The effect of SG on proliferation of CCA cells was investigated. Cell cycle analyses and expression of signaling molecules associated with proliferation were also determined. The results demonstrated that SG bound directly to EGFR. SG inhibited proliferation of various CCA cell lines by inhibiting EGFR and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) phosphorylation, and inhibited EGF-induced increased cell proliferation. Cell cycle analyses showed that SG induced cell cycle arrest at the G 0 /G 1 phase, down-regulated cell cycle genes and proteins (cyclin-D, cyclin-E, cdk-4, cdk-2), and up-regulated the tumor suppressor protein P53 and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P21. Taken together, these data demonstrate that SG from G. fisheri inhibited proliferation of CCA cells, and its mechanism of inhibition is mediated, to some extent, by inhibitory effects on EGFR activation and EGFR/ERK signaling pathway. SG presents a potential EGFR targeted molecule, which may be further clinically developed in a combination therapy for CCA treatment.

  6. P27 in cell cycle control and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe

    2000-01-01

    In order to survive, cells need tight control of cell cycle progression. The control mechanisms are often lost in human cancer cells. The cell cycle is driven forward by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The CDK inhibitors (CKIs) are important regulators of the CDKs. As the name implies, CKIs were...

  7. Implication of unfolded protein response in resveratrol-induced inhibition of K562 cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bao-Qin; Gao, Yan-Yan; Niu, Xiao-Fang [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Xie, Ji-Sheng [Youjiang Medical College for Nationalities, Guangxi 533000 (China); Meng, Xin; Guan, Yifu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Wang, Hua-Qin, E-mail: wanghq_doctor@hotmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China)

    2010-01-01

    Resveratrol (RES), a natural plant polyphenol, is an effective inducer of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a variety of carcinoma cell types. In addition, RES has been reported to inhibit tumorigenesis in several animal models suggesting that it functions as a chemopreventive and anti-tumor agent in vivo. The chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties associated with resveratrol offer promise for the design of new chemotherapeutic agents. However, the mechanisms by which RES mediates its effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we showed that RES caused cell cycle arrest and proliferation inhibition via induction of unfolded protein response (UPR) in human leukemia K562 cell line. Treatment of K562 cells with RES induced a number of signature UPR markers, including transcriptional induction of GRP78 and CHOP, phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2{alpha} (eIF2{alpha}), ER stress-specific XBP-1 splicing, suggesting the induction of UPR by RES. RES inhibited proliferation of K562 in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that K562 cells were arrested in G1 phase upon RES treatment. Salubrinal, an eIF2{alpha} inhibitor, or overexpression of dominant negative mutants of PERK or eIF2{alpha}, effectively restored RES-induced cell cycle arrest, underscoring the important role of PERK/eIF2{alpha} branch of UPR in RES-induced inhibition of cell proliferation.

  8. Troglitazone inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells with t(14;18).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenokuchi, M; Saigo, K; Nakamachi, Y; Kawano, S; Hashimoto, M; Fujioka, T; Koizumi, T; Tatsumi, E; Kumagai, S

    2006-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, has been detected in several human leukemia cells. Recent studies reported that PPARgamma ligands inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in both normal and malignant B-lineage cells. We investigated the expression of PPARgamma and the effects of PPARgamma ligands on UTree-O2, Bay91 and 380, three B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) cell lines with t(14;18), which show a poor prognosis, accompanying c-myc abnormality. Western blot analysis identified expression of PPARgamma protein and real-time PCR that of PPARgamma mRNA on the three cell lines. Troglitazone (TGZ), a synthetic PPARgamma ligand, inhibited cell growth in these cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, which was associated with G(1) cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We also found this effect PPARgamma independent since PPARgamma antagonists failed to reverse this effect. We assessed the expression of c-myc, an apoptosis-regulatory gene, since c-myc abnormality was detected in most B-ALL cells with t(14;18). TGZ was found to dose-dependently downregulate the expression of c-myc mRNA and c-myc protein in the three cell lines. These results suggest that TGZ inhibits cell growth via induction of G(1) cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in these cell lines and that TGZ-induced apoptosis, at least in part, may be related to the downregulation of c-myc expression. Moreover, the downregulation of c-myc expression by TGZ may depend on a PPARgamma-independent mechanism. Further studies indicate that PPARgamma ligands may serve as a therapeutic agent in B-ALL with t(14;18).

  9. Mechanisms involved in alternariol-induced cell cycle arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solhaug, A., E-mail: Anita.Solhaug@vetinst.no [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway); Vines, L.L. [Michigan State University, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, East Lansing, MI (United States); Ivanova, L.; Spilsberg, B. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway); Holme, J.A. [Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Environmental Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Pestka, J. [Michigan State University, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, East Lansing, MI (United States); Collins, A. [University of Oslo, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Eriksen, G.S. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-10-15

    Alternariol (AOH), a mycotoxin produced by Alternaria sp, is often found as a contaminant in fruit and cereal products. Here we employed the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 to test the hypothesis that AOH causes toxicity as a response to DNA damage. AOH at concentrations of 15-30 {mu}M almost completely blocked cell proliferation. Within 30 min treatment, AOH (30 {mu}M) significantly increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, DNA base oxidations as well as DNA strand breaks and/or alkaline labile sites were detected by the comet assay after 2 h exposure of AOH. Cell death (mostly necrosis) was observed after prolonged exposure to the highest concentration of AOH (60 {mu}M for 24 and 48 h) in our study. The DNA damage response involved phosphorylation (activation) of histone H2AX and check point kinase-1- and 2 (Chk-1/2). Moreover, AOH activated p53 and increased the expression of p21, Cyclin B, MDM2, and Sestrin 2; likewise the level of several miRNA was affected. AOH-induced Sestrin 2 expression was regulated by p53 and could at least partly be inhibited by antioxidants, suggesting a role of ROS in the response. Interestingly, the addition of antioxidants did not inhibit cell cycle arrest. Although the formation of ROS by itself was not directly linked cell proliferation, AOH-induced DNA damage and resulting transcriptional changes in p21, MDM2, and Cyclin B likely contribute to the reduced cell proliferation; while Sestrin 2 would contribute to the oxidant defense.

  10. Analysis of Cell Cycle Switches in Drosophila Oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dongyu; Huang, Yi-Chun; Deng, Wu-Min

    2015-01-01

    The study of Drosophila oogenesis provides invaluable information about signaling pathway regulation and cell cycle programming. During Drosophila oogenesis, a string of egg chambers in each ovariole progressively develops toward maturity. Egg chamber development consists of 14 stages. From stage 1 to stage 6 (mitotic cycle), main-body follicle cells undergo mitotic divisions. From stage 7 to stage 10a (endocycle), follicle cells cease mitosis but continue three rounds of endoreduplication. From stage 10b to stage 13 (gene amplification), instead of whole genome duplication, follicle cells selectively amplify specific genomic regions, mostly for chorion production. So far, Drosophila oogenesis is one of the most well studied model systems used to understand cell cycle switches, which furthers our knowledge about cell cycle control machinery and sheds new light on potential cancer treatments. Here, we give a brief summary of cell cycle switches, the associated signaling pathways and factors, and the detailed experimental procedures used to study the cell cycle switches.

  11. Effect of Sterols Isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans on Growth Inhibition of Colon and Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Augusto Bolaños-Carrillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore the effect of peniocerol and macdougallin on HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and PARP cleavage. Methods. HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells were treated with various concentrations of peniocerol and macdougallin (10–80 μM during 24 or 48 h. Crystal Violet Assay was used to evaluate the inhibition effect. Cell cycle regulation was examined by a propidium iodide method. Cell apoptosis was detected through both Annexin–V FLUOS/PI double-labeled cytometry assays and Western blot was applied to assess PARP cleavage. Results. Peniocerol and macdougallin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in vitro in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, peniocerol and macdougallin induced arrest of cell cycle-dependent manner and increased the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase. PARP cleavage in HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells was induced by treatment with peniocerol and macdougallin after 36 hours. Conclusions. Our results showed that the mechanism of cytotoxicity displayed by peniocerol and macdougallin is related to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in both cell lines. This is a significant observation because it helps to understand the way some oxysterols isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans develop their biological activities against cancer cells.

  12. KOH concentration effect on cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. III - Cycle life test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    A cycle life test of Ni/H2 cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations and a sintered type nickel electrode was carried out at 23 C using a 45 min accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. One of three cells containing 26 percent KOH has achieved over 28,000 cycles, and the other two 19,000 cycles, without a sign of failure. Two other cells containing 31 percent KOH electrolyte, which is the concentration presently used in aerospace cells, failed after 2,979 and 3,620 cycles. This result indicates that the cycle life of the present type of Ni/H2 cells may be extended by a factor of 5 to 10 simply by lowering the KOH concentration. Long cycle life of a Ni/H2 battery at high depth-of-discharge operation is desired, particularly for an LEO spacecraft application. Typically, battery life of about 30,000 cycles is required for a five year mission in an LEO. Such a cycle life with presently available cells can be assured only at a very low depth-of-discharge operation. Results of testing already show that the cycle life of an Ni/H2 cell is tremendously improved by simply using an electrolyte of low KOH concentration.

  13. Modulation of G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by luteolin in human colon cancer cells and xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhicheng; Zhang, Bo; Gao, Feng; Shi, Renjie

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of the potent cell cycle inhibition and apoptotic effect of luteolin on LoVo human colon cancer cells. In the present study, Cell Counting kit-8 assay revealed that luteolin exerted notable cytotoxicity on LoVo cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with a 50% inhibitory concentration value of 66.70 and 30.47 µmol/l at the time points of 24 and 72 h, respectively. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed that luteolin promoted cell cycle arrest at the G 2 /M phase, and subsequently induced cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis further revealed that luteolin exhibited an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of LoVo cells by inhibiting cell cycle arrest at the G 2 /M phase transition, with an inactivation of cyclin B1/cell division cycle 2 and induction of cell apoptosis, in part via cytochrome c- and deoxyadenosine triphosphate-mediated activation of apoptotic protease activating factor 1. In vivo studies revealed that luteolin effectively decreased the colon tumor body weight of mice. Therefore, the evidence suggests that luteolin may be a potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent against human colon cancer.

  14. Growth inhibition of human cancer cells in vitro by T-type calcium channel blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Yeol; Park, Seong Jun; Park, Sung Jun; Lee, Min Joo; Rhim, Hyewhon; Seo, Seon Hee; Kim, Ki-Sun

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the preliminary biological results that novel T-type calcium channel blockers inhibit the growth of human cancer cells by blocking calcium influx into the cell, based on unknown mechanism on the cell cycle responsible for cellular proliferation. Among the selected compounds from compound library, compound 9c (KYS05041) was identified to be nearly equipotent with Cisplatin against some human cancers in the micromolar range.

  15. A novel mitosis-associated lncRNA, MA-linc1, is required for cell cycle progression and sensitizes cancer cells to Paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bida, Or; Gidoni, Moriah; Ideses, Diana; Efroni, Sol; Ginsberg, Doron

    2015-09-29

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are major regulators of many cellular processes including cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis. In this study, we identify a novel lncRNA, MA-linc1, and reveal its effects on cell cycle progression and cancer growth. Inhibition of MA-linc1 expression alters cell cycle distribution, leading to a decrease in the number of G1 cells and a concomitant increase in all other stages of the cell cycle, and in particular G2/M, suggesting its involvement in the regulation of M phase. Accordingly, knock down of MA-linc1 inhibits M phase exit upon release from a mitotic block. We further demonstrate that MA-linc1 predominantly functions in cis to repress expression of its neighboring gene, Purα, which is often deleted in human cancers and whose ectopic expression inhibits cell cycle progression. Knock down of Purα partially rescues the MA-linc1 dependent inhibition of M phase exit. In agreement with its suggested role in M phase, inhibition of MA-linc1 enhances apoptotic cell death induced by the antimitotic drug, Paclitaxel and this enhancement of apoptosis is rescued by Purα knockdown. Furthermore, high levels of MA-linc1 are associated with reduced survival in human breast and lung cancer patients.Taken together, our data identify MA-linc1 as a novel lncRNA regulator of cell cycle and demonstrate its potential role in cancer progression and treatment.

  16. Inhibition of Host Cell Ribosomal Ribonucleic Acid Methylation by Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascione, Richard; Vande Woude, George F.

    1969-01-01

    A study of protein and ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis in cells infected by foot-and-mouth disease virus has indicated possible mechanisms of viral control over host cell metabolism. Foot-and-mouth disease virus infection of baby hamster kidney cells resulted in 50% inhibition of host cell protein synthesis at 180 min postinfection. A viral-induced interference with host cell RNA methylation was observed to be more rapidly inhibited than protein synthesis. To determine the nature of methylation inhibition, the kinetics of several host cell methylated RNA species were examined subsequent to virus infection. Data from sucrose zonal centrifugation and methylated albumin kieselguhr chromatography showed that methylation of nuclear RNA was inhibited 50% at 60 min postinfection. Inhibition of nuclear ribosomal RNA precursors and formation of nascent ribosomes correlated with inhibition kinetics of nuclear RNA methylation. It is suggested that the viral interference with the host nuclear RNA methylation is directly responsible for the observed loss of nascent ribosome formation. Moreover, early in the infectious cycle, methylation inhibition of host cell RNA could, in part, account for the cessation of host protein synthesis. PMID:4311801

  17. Menadione inhibits MIBG uptake in two neuroendocrine cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.; Tytgat, G. A.; van den Brug, M.; van Kuilenburg, A. B.; Voûte, P. A.; van Gennip, A. H.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we report on our studies of the effect of menadione on the uptake of MIBG in the neuroendocrine cell lines PC12 and SK-N-SH. Menadione inhibits the uptake of MIBG in both cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of MIBG uptake is most pronounced in the PC12 cell line.

  18. Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and In Vitro Tumorigenesis by a New Red Apple Cultivar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuditta Fiorella Schiavano

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative activity in breast cancer cells and the inhibition of tumorigenesis in pre-neoplastic cells of a new apple cultivar with reddish pulp, called the Pelingo apple.The antiproliferative activity was evaluated in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. The inhibition of tumorigenesis was performed in JB6 promotion-sensitive (P+ cells.Results showed that Pelingo apple juice is characterized by a very high polyphenol content and strongly inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation. Its antiproliferative activity was found to be higher than the other five apple juices tested. Pelingo juice induced cell accumulation in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and autophagy through overexpression of p21, inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 activity and an increase in lipidated microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 beta (LC3B. Remarkably, Pelingo juice inhibited the 12-o-tetra-decanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA-induced tumorigenesis of JB6 P+ cells, suppressing colony formation in semi-solid medium and TPA-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation.Our data indicate that the Pelingo apple is rich in food components that can markedly inhibit in vitro tumorigenesis and growth of human breast cancer cells and could provide natural bioactive non-nutrient compounds, with potential chemopreventive activity.

  19. Cell cycle regulation by the retinoblastoma family of growth inhibitory proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Beijersbergen, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    The retinoblastoma family of growth-inhibitory proteins act by binding and inhibiting several proteins with growth-stimulatory activity, the most prominent of which is the cellular transcription factor E2F. In higher organisms, progression through the cell division cycle is accompanied by the

  20. Triptolide inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell proliferation in rat airway smooth muscle cells by suppressing Smad signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ming; Lv, Zhiqiang; Huang, Linjie [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Institute for Respiratory disease of Sun Yat-sen University, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510120 (China); Zhang, Wei [Department of Geratology, the Second People' s Hospital of Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518000 (China); Lin, Xiaoling; Shi, Jianting; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Ruiyun [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Institute for Respiratory disease of Sun Yat-sen University, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510120 (China); Jiang, Shanping, E-mail: shanpingjiang@126.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Institute for Respiratory disease of Sun Yat-sen University, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510120 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Background: We have reported that triptolide can inhibit airway remodeling in a murine model of asthma via TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of triptolide on airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) proliferation and the possible mechanism. Methods: Rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized, then pretreated with different concentration of triptolide before stimulated by TGF-β1. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to study the influence of triptolide on cell cycle and apoptosis. Signal proteins (Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7) were detected by western blotting analysis. Results: Triptolide significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced ASMC proliferation (P<0.05). The cell cycle was blocked at G1/S-interphase by triptolide dose dependently. No pro-apoptotic effects were detected under the concentration of triptolide we used. Western blotting analysis showed TGF-β1 induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation was inhibited by triptolide pretreatment, and the level of Smad7 was increased by triptolide pretreatment. Conclusions: Triptolide may function as an inhibitor of asthma airway remodeling by suppressing ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway. - Highlights: • In this study, rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized. • Triptolide inhibited TGF-β1-induced airway smooth muscle cells proliferation. • Triptolide inhibited ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway.

  1. Serum Proteases Potentiate BMP-Induced Cell Cycle Re-entry of Dedifferentiating Muscle Cells during Newt Limb Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ines; Wang, Heng; Weissert, Philipp M; Straube, Werner L; Shevchenko, Anna; Gentzel, Marc; Brito, Goncalo; Tazaki, Akira; Oliveira, Catarina; Sugiura, Takuji; Shevchenko, Andrej; Simon, András; Drechsel, David N; Tanaka, Elly M

    2017-03-27

    Limb amputation in the newt induces myofibers to dedifferentiate and re-enter the cell cycle to generate proliferative myogenic precursors in the regeneration blastema. Here we show that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and mature BMPs that have been further cleaved by serum proteases induce cell cycle entry by dedifferentiating newt muscle cells. Protease-activated BMP4/7 heterodimers that are present in serum strongly induced myotube cell cycle re-entry with protease cleavage yielding a 30-fold potency increase of BMP4/7 compared with canonical BMP4/7. Inhibition of BMP signaling via muscle-specific dominant-negative receptor expression reduced cell cycle entry in vitro and in vivo. In vivo inhibition of serine protease activity depressed cell cycle re-entry, which in turn was rescued by cleaved-mimic BMP. This work identifies a mechanism of BMP activation that generates blastema cells from differentiated muscle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of digoxin on cell cycle, apoptosis and NF-κB pathway in Burkitt's lymphoma cells and animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Xu, Peipei; Wang, Fan; Zhou, Di; Wang, Ruju; Meng, Li; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Min; Chen, Bing; Ouyang, Jian

    2017-07-01

    Digoxin has potential antitumor properties. This study investigated whether digoxin suppressed Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells. Raji and NAMALWA cells were exposed to digoxin, followed by assay of cell viability, apoptosis and cell cycle. Western blotting was used to analyze NF-κB activity. A xenograft model was established for therapeutic efficacy evaluation. Digoxin inhibited cell growth and resulted in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest (G0/G1 for Raji cells; G2/M for NAMALWA cells). Digoxin inhibited DNA synthesis and induced morphological apoptotic characteristics. Besides, digoxin inhibited NF-κB and TNF-α-stimulated NF-κB activity, and suppressed NF-κB initiating genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, cyclin D1, and c-myc), however, increased p21 cip1 . Digoxin activated caspase-9/3. Furthermore, digoxin inhibited xenograft tumors growth and reduced Ki-67 and c-myc. Digoxin exerted antitumor effects on BL cells in vitro and in vivo might through regulating NF-κB and caspase pathway. These outcomes highlight the potential of digoxin as a therapeutic agent for BL.

  3. Cell cycle-dependent activity of the volume- and Ca2+-activated anion currents in Ehrlich lettre ascites cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Bergdahl, Andreas; Christophersen, Palle

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) and other anion currents in control or modulation of cell cycle progression; however, the precise involvement of anion channels in this process is unclear. Here, Cl- currents in Ehrlich Lettre Ascites (ELA) cells were monitored......+ in the pipette), was unaltered from G0 to G1, but decreased in early S phase. A novel high-affinity anion channel inhibitor, the acidic di-aryl-urea NS3728, which inhibited both VRAC and CaCC, attenuated ELA cell growth, suggesting a possible mechanistic link between cell cycle progression and cell cycle......-dependent changes in the capacity for conductive Cl- transport. It is suggested that in ELA cells, entrance into the S phase requires an increase in VRAC activity and/or an increased potential for regulatory volume decrease (RVD), and at the same time a decrease in CaCC magnitude....

  4. [Inhibition of rhodiola on the growth of EVC-304 cell line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xiu-lan; Yang, Feng; Chen, Rong-hua; Ga, Bu; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Shi-fu; Zhang, Jing-ling

    2006-07-01

    To observe the effect of rhodiola on human umbilical vein endothelial cell line EVC-304. EVC-304 was cultured and divided into two groups: control group and rhodiola-treated group. Three days after treatment, cell survival rate-drug concentration curve was obtained by counting the survival cells, and cells in each group were stained by Wright's stain and observed under microscope. Cell cycle was determined by flow cytometry (FCM). The survival cells in rhodiola-treated group was much less than those in control group. More cells in rhodiola-treated group stayed in G(1) phase while less in S phase when compared with those in control group by FCM. Rhodiola can inhibit the growth of human endothelial cell line EVC-304, perhaps through inhibiting the proliferation of the cells. This may lay the foundation for the mechanism study and clinical application of rhodiola in prevention of pulmonary artery hypertension.

  5. Microsporidia infection impacts the host cell's cycle and reduces host cell apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higes, Mariano; Sagastume, Soledad; Juarranz, Ángeles; Dias-Almeida, Joyce; Budge, Giles E.; Meana, Aránzazu; Boonham, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular parasites can alter the cellular machinery of host cells to create a safe haven for their survival. In this regard, microsporidia are obligate intracellular fungal parasites with extremely reduced genomes and hence, they are strongly dependent on their host for energy and resources. To date, there are few studies into host cell manipulation by microsporidia, most of which have focused on morphological aspects. The microsporidia Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae are worldwide parasites of honey bees, infecting their ventricular epithelial cells. In this work, quantitative gene expression and histology were studied to investigate how these two parasites manipulate their host’s cells at the molecular level. Both these microsporidia provoke infection-induced regulation of genes involved in apoptosis and the cell cycle. The up-regulation of buffy (which encodes a pro-survival protein) and BIRC5 (belonging to the Inhibitor Apoptosis protein family) was observed after infection, shedding light on the pathways that these pathogens use to inhibit host cell apoptosis. Curiously, different routes related to cell cycle were modified after infection by each microsporidia. In the case of N. apis, cyclin B1, dacapo and E2F2 were up-regulated, whereas only cyclin E was up-regulated by N. ceranae, in both cases promoting the G1/S phase transition. This is the first report describing molecular pathways related to parasite-host interactions that are probably intended to ensure the parasite’s survival within the cell. PMID:28152065

  6. Cell cycle checkpoints: reversible when possible, irreversible when needed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krenning, L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints are reversible in nature, and can prevent progression into the next cell cycle phase if needed. In the case of DNA damage, cells can prevent progression from G1 into S phase, and from G2 into mitosis in the presence of DNA double strand breaks. Following DNA repair, these

  7. Eukaryotic checkpoints are absent in the cell division cycle of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    are known to control the cell cycle of most eukaryotes, these genes may be structurally altered and their equiva- lent function yet to be ... points controlling the cell division of these organisms? Is the cell division cycle of these organisms ..... mitotic-phase inhibitor and may become a useful tool for studies on the relationship ...

  8. Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, Paul L.; Williams, Mark C.; Sudhoff, Frederick A.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

  9. Mitochondrial dynamics and the cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny M.A. Kianian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear-mitochondrial (NM communication impacts many aspects of plant development including vigor, sterility and viability. Dynamic changes in mitochondrial number, shape, size, and cellular location takes place during the cell cycle possibly impacting the process itself and leading to distribution of this organelle into daughter cells. The genes that underlie these changes are beginning to be identified in model plants such as Arabidopsis. In animals disruption of the drp1 gene, a homolog to the plant drp3A and drp3B, delays mitochondrial division. This mutation results in increased aneuploidy due to chromosome mis-segregation. It remains to be discovered if a similar outcome is observed in plants. Alloplasmic lines provide an opportunity to understand the communication between the cytoplasmic organelles and the nucleus. Examples of studies in these lines, especially from the extensive collection in wheat, point to the role of mitochondria in chromosome movement, pollen fertility and other aspects of development. Genes involved in NM interaction also are believed to play a critical role in evolution of species and interspecific cross incompatibilities.

  10. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noolu, Bindu; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Chauhan, Anitha; Nagalla, Balakrishna; Manchala, Raghunath; Ismail, Ayesha

    2013-01-09

    Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves), a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE) was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau's method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death. Therefore, identification of active component(s) from the leaf

  11. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noolu Bindu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves, a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Methods Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau’s method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. Results CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Conclusions Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death

  12. Subversion of Cell Cycle Regulatory Mechanisms by HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Andrew P.; Kimata, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    To establish a productive infection, HIV-1 must counteract cellular innate immune mechanisms and redirect cellular process towards viral replication. Recent studies have discovered that HIV-1 and other primate immunodeficiency viruses subvert cell cycle regulatory mechanisms to achieve these ends. The viral Vpr and Vpx proteins target cell cycle controls to counter innate immunity. The cell cycle-related protein Cyclin L2 is also utilized to counter innate immunity. The viral Tat protein util...

  13. Cell cycle controls: potential targets for chemical carcinogens?

    OpenAIRE

    Afshari, C A; Barrett, J C

    1993-01-01

    The progression of the cell cycle is controlled by the action of both positive and negative growth regulators. The key players in this activity include a family of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases, which are themselves regulated by other kinases and phosphatases. Maintenance of balanced cell cycle controls may be directly linked to genomic stability. Loss of the check-points involved in cell cycle control may result in unrepaired DNA damage during DNA synthesis or mitosis leading to genet...

  14. Quantitative characterization of cell behaviors through cell cycle progression via automated cell tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Wang

    Full Text Available Cell behaviors are reflections of intracellular tension dynamics and play important roles in many cellular processes. In this study, temporal variations in cell geometry and cell motion through cell cycle progression were quantitatively characterized via automated cell tracking for MCF-10A non-transformed breast cells, MCF-7 non-invasive breast cancer cells, and MDA-MB-231 highly metastatic breast cancer cells. A new cell segmentation method, which combines the threshold method and our modified edge based active contour method, was applied to optimize cell boundary detection for all cells in the field-of-view. An automated cell-tracking program was implemented to conduct live cell tracking over 40 hours for the three cell lines. The cell boundary and location information was measured and aligned with cell cycle progression with constructed cell lineage trees. Cell behaviors were studied in terms of cell geometry and cell motion. For cell geometry, cell area and cell axis ratio were investigated. For cell motion, instantaneous migration speed, cell motion type, as well as cell motion range were analyzed. We applied a cell-based approach that allows us to examine and compare temporal variations of cell behavior along with cell cycle progression at a single cell level. Cell body geometry along with distribution of peripheral protrusion structures appears to be associated with cell motion features. Migration speed together with motion type and motion ranges are required to distinguish the three cell-lines examined. We found that cells dividing or overlapping vertically are unique features of cell malignancy for both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas abrupt changes in cell body geometry and cell motion during mitosis are unique to highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, our live cell tracking system serves as an invaluable tool to identify cell behaviors that are unique to malignant and/or highly metastatic breast cancer cells.

  15. Andrographolide Inhibits Proliferation and Metastasis of SGC7901 Gastric Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Gang; Pan, Wensheng

    2017-01-01

    To explore the mechanisms by which andrographolide inhibits gastric cancer cell proliferation and metastasis, we employed the gastric cell line SGC7901 to investigate the anticancer effects of andrographolide. The cell survival ratio, cell migration and invasion, cell cycle, apoptosis, and matrix metalloproteinase activity were assessed. Moreover, western blotting and real-time PCR were used to examine the protein expression levels and the mRNA expression levels, respectively. The survival ratio of cells decreased with an increasing concentration of andrographolide in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent results were also obtained using an apoptosis assay, as detected by flow cytometry. The cell cycle was blocked at the G2/M2 phase by andrographolide treatment, and the proportion of cells arrested at G1/M was enhanced as the dose increased. Similarly, wound healing and Transwell assays showed reduced migration and invasion of the gastric cancer cells at various concentrations of andrographolide. Andrographolide can inhibit cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, block the cell cycle, and promote apoptosis in SGC7901 cells. The mechanisms may include upregulated expression of Timp-1/2, cyclin B1, p-Cdc2, Bax, and Bik and downregulated expression of MMP-2/9 and antiapoptosis protein Bcl-2.

  16. Andrographolide Inhibits Proliferation and Metastasis of SGC7901 Gastric Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Dai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore the mechanisms by which andrographolide inhibits gastric cancer cell proliferation and metastasis, we employed the gastric cell line SGC7901 to investigate the anticancer effects of andrographolide. The cell survival ratio, cell migration and invasion, cell cycle, apoptosis, and matrix metalloproteinase activity were assessed. Moreover, western blotting and real-time PCR were used to examine the protein expression levels and the mRNA expression levels, respectively. The survival ratio of cells decreased with an increasing concentration of andrographolide in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent results were also obtained using an apoptosis assay, as detected by flow cytometry. The cell cycle was blocked at the G2/M2 phase by andrographolide treatment, and the proportion of cells arrested at G1/M was enhanced as the dose increased. Similarly, wound healing and Transwell assays showed reduced migration and invasion of the gastric cancer cells at various concentrations of andrographolide. Andrographolide can inhibit cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, block the cell cycle, and promote apoptosis in SGC7901 cells. The mechanisms may include upregulated expression of Timp-1/2, cyclin B1, p-Cdc2, Bax, and Bik and downregulated expression of MMP-2/9 and antiapoptosis protein Bcl-2.

  17. Albumin Suppresses Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Proliferation and the Cell Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Nojiri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many investigations have revealed that a low recurrence rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is associated with high serum albumin levels in patients; therefore, high levels of serum albumin are a major indicator of a favorable prognosis. However, the mechanism inhibiting the proliferation of HCC has not yet been elucidated, so we investigated the effect of serum albumin on HCC cell proliferation. Hep3B was cultured in MEM with no serum or containing 5 g/dL human albumin. As control samples, Prionex was added to generate the same osmotic pressure as albumin. After 24-h incubation, the expressions of α-fetoprotein (AFP, p53, p21, and p57 were evaluated with real-time PCR using total RNA extracted from the liver. Protein expressions and the phosphorylation of Rb (retinoblastoma were determined by Western blot analysis using total protein extracted from the liver. For flow cytometric analysis of the cell cycle, FACS analysis was performed. The percentages of cell cycle distribution were evaluated by PI staining, and all samples were analyzed employing FACScalibur (BD with appropriate software (ModFit LT; BD. The cell proliferation assay was performed by counting cells with using a Scepter handy automated cell counter (Millipore. The mRNA levels of AFP relative to Alb(−: Alb(−, Alb(+, and Prionex, were 1, 0.7 ± 0.2 (p < 0.001 for Alb(−, and 1 ± 0.3, respectively. The mRNA levels of p21 were 1, 1.58 ± 0.4 (p = 0.007 for Alb(− and p = 0.004 for Prionex, and 0.8 ± 0.2, respectively. The mRNA levels of p57 were 1, 4.4 ± 1.4 (p = 0.002 for Alb(− and Prionex, and 1.0 ± 0.1, respectively. The protein expression levels of Rb were similar in all culture media. The phosphorylation of P807/811 and P780 of Rb protein was reduced in Alb(+. More cells in the G0/G1 phase and fewer cells in S and G2/M phases were obtained in Alb(+ than in Alb(− (G0/G1: 60.9%, 67.7%, 61.5%; G2/M: 16.5%, 13.1%, 15.6%; S: 22.6%, 19.2%, 23.0%, Alb(−, Alb

  18. Protein kinase C signaling and cell cycle regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    A link between T cell proliferation and the protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases has been recognized for about thirty years. However, despite the wealth of information on PKC-mediated control of T cell activation, understanding of the effects of PKCs on the cell cycle machinery in this cell type remains limited. Studies in other systems have revealed important cell cycle-specific effects of PKC signaling that can either positively or negatively impact proliferation. Th...

  19. 17,β-estradiol inhibits hepatitis C virus mainly by interference with the release phase of its life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Andrea; Barbaglia, Matteo N; Foglia, Chiara Z; Boccato, Elisa; Burlone, Michela E; Cole, Sarah; Giarda, Paola; Grossini, Elena; Patel, Arvind H; Minisini, Rosalba; Pirisi, Mario

    2017-05-01

    Oestrogen and oestrogen-mediated signalling protect from hepatitis C virus through incompletely understood mechanisms. We aimed to ascertain which phase(s) of hepatitis C virus life cycle is/are affected by oestrogens. Huh7 cells infected with the JFH1 virus (genotype 2a) were exposed to dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone, progesterone and 17β-estradiol (tested with/without its receptor antagonist fulvestrant). Dose-response curves were established to calculate half maximal inhibitory concentration values. To dissect how 17β-estradiol interferes with phases of hepatitis C virus life cycle, its effects were measured on the hepatitis C virus pseudo-particle system (viral entry), the subgenomic replicon N17/JFH1 and the replicon cell line Huh7-J17 (viral replication). Finally, in a dual-step infection model, infectious supernatants, collected from infected cells exposed to hormones, were used to infect naïve cells. Progesterone and testosterone showed no inhibitory effect on hepatitis C virus; dehydroepiandrosterone was only mildly inhibitory. In contrast, 17β-estradiol inhibited infection by 64%-67% (IC 50 values 140-160 nmol/L). Fulvestrant reverted the inhibition by 17β-estradiol in a dose-dependent manner. 17β-estradiol exerted only a slight inhibition (<20%) on hepatitis C virus pseudo-particles, and had no effect on cells either transiently or stably (Huh7-J17 cells) expressing the N17/JFH1 replicon. In the dual-step infection model, a significant half maximal inhibitory concentration decline occurred between primary (134 nmol/L) and secondary (100 nmol/L) infections (P=.02), with extracellular hepatitis C virus RNA and infectivity being reduced to a higher degree in comparison to its intracellular counterpart. 17β-estradiol inhibits hepatitis C virus acting through its intracellular receptors, mainly interfering with late phases (assembly/release) of the hepatitis C virus life cycle. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Human keloid cell characterization and inhibition of growth with human Wharton's jelly stem cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Chui-Yee; Biswas, Arijit; Subramanian, Arjunan; Srinivasan, Akshaya; Choolani, Mahesh; Bongso, Ariff

    2014-05-01

    Keloids are firm rubbery growths that grow beyond the boundaries of human wounds and their treatment has met with limited success. Their properties and growth behavior have not been properly characterized and it has been suggested that a benign neoplastic stem cell-like phenotype in an altered cytokine microenvironment drives their uncontrolled cell proliferation. Modification of the stem cell niche may be an attractive approach to its prevention. We studied the growth behavior, stemness, and tumorigenic characteristics of keloid cells in prolonged culture. Since human Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) secrete high levels of cytokines and have anti-tumorigenic properties we explored its role on the inhibition of keloid growth in vitro. Keloid cells grew readily in both adherent and sphere culture and expressed high levels of mesenchymal CD and tumor-associated fibroblast (TAF) markers up to passage 10. When they were exposed to repeat doses of hWJSC conditioned medium (hWJSC-CM) and lysate (hWJSC-CL) every 72 h up to 9 days their growth was inhibited with a reduction in CD and TAF marker expression. On Days 3, 6, and 9 treated keloid cells showed linear decreases in cell proliferation (BrdU), increases in Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL-positive cells, interruptions of the cell cycle and inhibition of migration in scratch-wound assays. Immunocytochemistry and qRT-PCR confirmed a significant downregulation of TAF and anti-apoptotic-related gene (SURVIVIN) expression and upregulation of autophagy-related (BAX, ATG5, ATG7, BECLIN-1) gene expression. The results suggest that hWJSCs or molecules secreted by them may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of keloids. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Red blood cells inhibit tumour cell adhesion to the peritoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rossen, M E; Stoop, M P; Hofland, L J; van Koetsveld, P M; Bonthuis, F; Jeekel, J; Marquet, R L; van Eijck, C H

    1999-04-01

    Perioperative blood transfusion has been associated with increased tumour recurrence and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer. Blood loss in the peritoneal cavity might be a tumour-promoting factor for local recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate whether blood in the peritoneal cavity affects local tumour recurrence. In an established in vivo rat model the effect of 1.5 ml syngeneic whole blood on tumour cell adhesion and tumour growth was investigated. In the same model the effect of 1.5 ml pure red blood cell (RBC) concentrate and 1.5 ml RBC-derived substances on tumour cell adhesion was studied. In an established in vitro model the effect of increasing numbers of RBCs (0-250 bx 10(6)) on tumour cell adhesion and tumour growth was assessed. Both the presence of blood and RBC concentrate in the peritoneal cavity prevented tumour cell adhesion in vivo (overall P effect on tumour cell adhesion. In in vitro studies RBCs inhibited tumour cell adhesion but not tumour growth. RBC-derived factors prevent tumour cell adhesion to the peritoneum, and consequently tumour recurrence.

  2. Tumor Suppressors and Cell-Cycle Proteins in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Baldi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell cycle is the cascade of events that allows a growing cell to duplicate all its components and split into two daughter cells. Cell cycle progression is mediated by the activation of a highly conserved family of protein kinases, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. CDKs are also regulated by related proteins called cdk inhibitors grouped into two families: the INK4 inhibitors (p16, p15, p19, and p18 and the Cip/Kip inhibitors (p21, p27, and p53. Several studies report the importance of cell-cycle proteins in the pathogenesis and the prognosis of lung cancer. This paper will review the most recent data from the literature about the regulation of cell cycle. Finally, based essentially on the data generated in our laboratory, the expression, the diagnostic, and prognostic significance of cell-cycle molecules in lung cancer will be examined.

  3. The ubiquitin-proteasome system in glioma cell cycle control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlachostergios Panagiotis J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A major determinant of cell fate is regulation of cell cycle. Tight regulation of this process is lost during the course of development and progression of various tumors. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS constitutes a universal protein degradation pathway, essential for the consistent recycling of a plethora of proteins with distinct structural and functional roles within the cell, including cell cycle regulation. High grade tumors, such as glioblastomas have an inherent potential of escaping cell cycle control mechanisms and are often refractory to conventional treatment. Here, we review the association of UPS with several UPS-targeted proteins and pathways involved in regulation of the cell cycle in malignant gliomas, and discuss the potential role of UPS inhibitors in reinstitution of cell cycle control.

  4. Drug targets for cell cycle dysregulators in leukemogenesis: in silico docking studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Jayaraman

    Full Text Available Alterations in cell cycle regulating proteins are a key characteristic in neoplastic proliferation of lymphoblast cells in patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the routinely administered ALL chemotherapeutic agents would be able to bind and inhibit the key deregulated cell cycle proteins such as--Cyclins E1, D1, D3, A1 and Cyclin Dependent Kinases (CDK 2 and 6. We used Schrödinger Glide docking protocol to dock the chemotherapeutic drugs such as Doxorubicin and Daunorubicin and others which are not very common including Clofarabine, Nelarabine and Flavopiridol, to the crystal structures of these proteins. We observed that the drugs were able to bind and interact with cyclins E1 and A1 and CDKs 2 and 6 while their docking to cyclins D1 and D3 were not successful. This binding proved favorable to interact with the G1/S cell cycle phase proteins that were examined in this study and may lead to the interruption of the growth of leukemic cells. Our observations therefore suggest that these drugs could be explored for use as inhibitors for these cell cycle proteins. Further, we have also highlighted residues which could be important in the designing of pharmacophores against these cell cycle proteins. This is the first report in understanding the mechanism of action of the drugs targeting these cell cycle proteins in leukemia through the visualization of drug-target binding and molecular docking using computational methods.

  5. Role of the retinoblastoma protein in cell cycle arrest mediated by a novel cell surface proliferation inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enebo, D. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Moos, P. J.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A novel cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS-18), purified from the cell surface of bovine cerebral cortex cells has been shown to be a potent and reversible inhibitor of proliferation of a wide array of fibroblasts as well as epithelial-like cells and nontransformed and transformed cells. To investigate the possible mechanisms by which CeReS-18 exerts its inhibitory action, the effect of the inhibitor on the posttranslational regulation of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (RB), a tumor suppressor gene, has been examined. It is shown that CeReS-18 mediated cell cycle arrest of both human diploid fibroblasts (HSBP) and mouse fibroblasts (Swiss 3T3) results in the maintenance of the RB protein in the hypophosphorylated state, consistent with a late G1 arrest site. Although their normal nontransformed counterparts are sensitive to cell cycle arrest mediated by CeReS-18, cell lines lacking a functional RB protein, through either genetic mutation or DNA tumor virus oncoprotein interaction, are less sensitive. The refractory nature of these cells is shown to be independent of specific surface receptors for the inhibitor, and another tumor suppressor gene (p53) does not appear to be involved in the CeReS-18 inhibition of cell proliferation. The requirement for a functional RB protein product, in order for CeReS-18 to mediate cell cycle arrest, is discussed in light of regulatory events associated with density-dependent growth inhibition.

  6. Regulation of Cell Cycle to Stimulate Adult Cardiomyocyte Proliferation and Cardiac Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tamer M A; Ang, Yen-Sin; Radzinsky, Ethan; Zhou, Ping; Huang, Yu; Elfenbein, Arye; Foley, Amy; Magnitsky, Sergey; Srivastava, Deepak

    2018-03-22

    Human diseases are often caused by loss of somatic cells that are incapable of re-entering the cell cycle for regenerative repair. Here, we report a combination of cell-cycle regulators that induce stable cytokinesis in adult post-mitotic cells. We screened cell-cycle regulators expressed in proliferating fetal cardiomyocytes and found that overexpression of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), CDK4, cyclin B1, and cyclin D1 efficiently induced cell division in post-mitotic mouse, rat, and human cardiomyocytes. Overexpression of the cell-cycle regulators was self-limiting through proteasome-mediated degradation of the protein products. In vivo lineage tracing revealed that 15%-20% of adult cardiomyocytes expressing the four factors underwent stable cell division, with significant improvement in cardiac function after acute or subacute myocardial infarction. Chemical inhibition of Tgf-β and Wee1 made CDK1 and cyclin B dispensable. These findings reveal a discrete combination of genes that can efficiently unlock the proliferative potential in cells that have terminally exited the cell cycle. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The apple polyphenol phloretin inhibits breast cancer cell migration and proliferation via inhibition of signals by type 2 glucose transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Hsun Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is the most aggressive and poorly understood subclass of breast cancer. Glucose transporters (GLUTs are required for glucose uptake in malignant cancer cells and are ideal targets for cancer therapy. To determine whether the inhibition of GLUTs could be used in TNBC cell therapy, the apple polyphenol phloretin (Ph was used as a specific antagonist of GLUT2 protein function in human TNBC cells. Interestingly, we found that Ph (10–150 μM, for 24 h inhibited cell growth and arrested the cell cycle in MDA-MB-231 cells in a p53 mutant-dependent manner, which was confirmed by pre-treatment of the cells with a p53-specific dominant-negative expression vector. We also found that Ph treatment (10–150 μM, for 24 h significantly decreased the migratory activity of the MDA-MB-231 cells through the inhibition of paxillin/FAK, Src, and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-sMA and through the activation of E-cadherin. Furthermore, the anti-tumorigenic effect of Ph (10, 50 mg/kg or DMSO twice a week for six weeks was demonstrated in vivo using BALB/c nude mice bearing MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts. A decrease in N-cadherin, vimentin and an increase in p53, p21 and E-cadherin were detected in the tumor tissues. In conclusion, inhibition of GLUT2 by the apple polyphenol Ph could potentially suppress TNBC tumor cell growth and metastasis.

  8. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement G. Yedjou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO32] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60 cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO32 for 24 h. Live cells and necrotic death cells were measured by the propidium idiode (PI assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by the flow cytometry and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by the flow cytometry. The result of the PI demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05 increase of necrotic cell death in Pb(NO32-treated cells, indicative of membrane rupture by Pb(NO32 compared to the control. Data generated from the comet assay indicated a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage, showing a significant increase (p < 0.05 in comet tail-length and percentages of DNA cleavage. Data generated from the flow cytometry assessment indicated that Pb(NO32 exposure significantly (p < 0.05 increased the proportion of caspase-3 positive cells (apoptotic cells compared to the control. The flow cytometry assessment also indicated Pb(NO32 exposure caused cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint. The result of DNA laddering assay showed presence of DNA smear in the agarose gel with little presence of DNA fragments in the treated cells compared to the control. In summary, Pb(NO32 inhibits HL-60 cells proliferation by not only inducing DNA damage and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint but also triggering the apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied by secondary necrosis. We believe that our study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of Pb(NO32 exposure and its associated adverse

  9. Effect of sodium butyrate on cell proliferation and cell cycle in porcine intestinal epithelial (IPEC-J2) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yueqin; Ma, Xianyong; Yang, Xuefen; Wang, Li; Jiang, Zongyong

    2017-04-01

    Conflicting results have been reported that butyrate in normal piglets leads either to an increase or to a decrease of jejunal villus length, implying a possible effect on the proliferation of enterocytes. No definitive study was found for the biological effects of butyrate in porcine jejunal epithelial cells. The present study used IPEC-J2 cells, a non-transformed jejunal epithelial line to evaluate the direct effects of sodium butyrate on cell proliferation, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis. Low concentrations (0.5 and 1 mM) of butyrate had no effect on cell proliferation. However, at 5 and 10 mM, sodium butyrate significantly decreased cell viability, accompanied by reduced levels of p-mTOR and PCNA protein. Sodium butyrate, in a dose-dependent manner, induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and reduced the numbers of cells in S phase. In addition, relative expression of p21, p27, and pro-apoptosis bak genes, and protein levels of p21Waf1/Cip1, p27Kip1, cyclinD3, CDK4, and Cleave-caspase3 were increased by higher concentrations of sodium butyrate (1, 5, 10 mM), and the levels of cyclinD1 and CDK6 were reduced by 5 and 10 mM butyrate. Butyrate increased the phosphorylated form of the signaling molecule p38 and phosphorylated JNK. In conclusion, the present in vitro study indicated that sodium butyrate inhibited the proliferation of IPEC-J2 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase of cell cycles and by increasing apoptosis at high concentrations.

  10. Competing memories of mitogen and p53 signalling control cell-cycle entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee Won; Chung, Mingyu; Kudo, Takamasa; Meyer, Tobias

    2017-09-21

    Regulation of cell proliferation is necessary for immune responses, tissue repair, and upkeep of organ function to maintain human health. When proliferating cells complete mitosis, a fraction of newly born daughter cells immediately enter the next cell cycle, while the remaining cells in the same population exit to a transient or persistent quiescent state. Whether this choice between two cell-cycle pathways is due to natural variability in mitogen signalling or other underlying causes is unknown. Here we show that human cells make this fundamental cell-cycle entry or exit decision based on competing memories of variable mitogen and stress signals. Rather than erasing their signalling history at cell-cycle checkpoints before mitosis, mother cells transmit DNA damage-induced p53 protein and mitogen-induced cyclin D1 (CCND1) mRNA to newly born daughter cells. After mitosis, the transferred CCND1 mRNA and p53 protein induce variable expression of cyclin D1 and the CDK inhibitor p21 that almost exclusively determines cell-cycle commitment in daughter cells. We find that stoichiometric inhibition of cyclin D1-CDK4 activity by p21 controls the retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F transcription program in an ultrasensitive manner. Thus, daughter cells control the proliferation-quiescence decision by converting the memories of variable mitogen and stress signals into a competition between cyclin D1 and p21 expression. We propose a cell-cycle control principle based on natural variation, memory and competition that maximizes the health of growing cell populations.

  11. Lysis of lysis-inhibited bacteriophage T4-infected cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Abedon, S T

    1992-01-01

    T4 bacteriophage (phage)-infected cells show a marked increase in latent-period length, called lysis inhibition, upon adsorption of additional T4 phages (secondary adsorption). Lysis inhibition is a complex phenotype requiring the activity of at least six T4 genes. Two basic mysteries surround our understanding of the expression of lysis inhibition: (i) the mechanism of initiation (i.e., how secondary adsorption leads to the expression of lysis inhibition) and (ii) the mechanism of lysis (i.e...

  12. [Impact of stromal interaction molecule 1 silencing on cell cycle of endothelial progenitor cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Chun-Yan; Huang, Lan; Yu, Yang; Deng, Meng-Yang; Wang, Kui; Qian, De-Hui

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the effect of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) silencing on EPCs cell cycle. Rat bone marrow derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were isolated and cultured in L-DMEM with 20% FBS. Ad-si/rSTIM1 and Ad-hSTIM1 were then transfected into EPCs and the expression of STIM1 mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. The cell cycle was determined using flow cytometry analysis and intracellular free Ca2+ was measured using LSCM. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed to examine the interaction between STIM1 and TRPC1. Protein levels of inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate were analyzed with ELISA assay. Forty-eight hours after transfection, the expression of STIM1 mRNA was significantly downregulated (0.37 +/- 0.02 vs. 1.00 +/- 0.02, P si/rSTIM1 group compared with control group. The cell cycle was arrested at G1 phase [(90.91 +/- 1.10)% vs. (77.10 +/- 0.56)%, P si/rSTIM1. However, cotransfection of Ad-hSTIM1 with Ad-si/rSTIM1 significantly reversed these responses. Interestingly, co-immunoprecipitation study showed that STIM1 co-precipitated with TRPC1, and IP3 levels measured by ELISA were similar among three groups (P > 0.05). siRNA-mediated knockdown of STIM1 inhibited EPCs proliferation by reducing intracellular free Ca2+ through TRPC1-SOC signaling pathway.

  13. Combined inhibition of glycolysis, the pentose cycle, and thioredoxin metabolism selectively increases cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in human breast and prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of glycolysis using 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2DG, 20 mM, 24–48 h combined with inhibition of the pentose cycle using dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, 300 µM, 24–48 h increased clonogenic cell killing in both human prostate (PC-3 and DU145 and human breast (MDA-MB231 cancer cells via a mechanism involving thiol-mediated oxidative stress. Surprisingly, when 2DG+DHEA treatment was combined with an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH synthesis (l-buthionine sulfoximine; BSO, 1 mM that depleted GSH>90% of control, no further increase in cell killing was observed during 48 h exposures. In contrast, when an inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR activity (Auranofin; Au, 1 µM, was combined with 2DG+DHEA or DHEA-alone for 24 h, clonogenic cell killing was significantly increased in all three human cancer cell lines. Furthermore, enhanced clonogenic cell killing seen with the combination of DHEA+Au was nearly completely inhibited using the thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 20 mM. Redox Western blot analysis of PC-3 cells also supported the conclusion that thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1 oxidation was enhanced by treatment DHEA+Au and inhibited by NAC. Importantly, normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC were not as sensitive to 2DG, DHEA, and Au combinations as their cancer cell counterparts (MDA-MB-231. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that inhibition of glycolysis and pentose cycle activity, combined with inhibition of Trx metabolism, may provide a promising strategy for selectively sensitizing human cancer cells to oxidative stress-induced cell killing.

  14. Dysplasia in view of the cell cycle

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    RG Steinbeck

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Dysplasia is linked to altered tissue architecture. The lesion belongs into the diagnostic field of human pathology and is highly relevant for the clinical physician, because it breaks the criteria of hyperplasia and regeneration. Dysplasia is a precancerous disorder leading in all probability to malignant transformation if not treated. However, different descriptions do apply for dysplasia in different human tissues, and conventional pathology cannot arrive at unequivocal stringency. In contrast to the previous situation, now, dysplasia is defined by a unifying concept, which works upon cell cycle criteria. The decisive element for the proposed definition is unbalanced segregation of chromosomes and persistent genomic asymmetry through telophase, leading to aneuploid interphase nuclei. Progress of dysplasia can be estimated from the frequency of pathologic mitoses that directly measure cellular proliferation. In routine work, progress of dysplasia shall be quantified by frequency increase of aneuploidy in the increasing fraction of proliferating interphase nuclei. Thus, dysplasia is defined not only by aberrations from healthy histological architecture and normal cytological differentiation, but also by violations of the DNA standard from mitotic nuclei. The proposed classification of dysplasia measures the frequency of pathologic mitoses and the degree of genomic alterations in interphase nuclei. Both these criteria discriminate between low-grade and highgrade dysplasia and ascertain the malignant potential of a dysplastic lesion.

  15. Profiling of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Cycle Regulating Genes Targeted by Calycosin

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    Dongqing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We cocultured calycosin with human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (BEL-7402 to investigate the effect on cell proliferation. Calycosin can markedly block the cell growth in G1 phase (P<0.01 on the IC50 concentration. There were seventeen genes involved in cell-cycle regulation showing differentially expressed in treated cells detected by gene chip. Eight genes were upregulated and nine genes were downregulated. Downregulated TFDP-1, CDKN2D, and SPK2 and upregulated CDC2 and CCNB1 might affect cell cycle of tumor cells. Furthermore, we checked the transcription pattern using 2D gel method to find different expression of proteins in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells after exposure to calycosin. Fourteen proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Twelve proteins expression were increased such as transgelin 2, pyridoxine 5′-phosphate, stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1, peroxiredoxin 1, endoplasmic reticulum protein 29, and phosphoglycerate mutase 1. Only thioredoxin peroxidase and high-mobility group box1 proteins’ expression decreased. Both genes and proteins changes might be relate to the mechanism of antitumor effect under treatment of calycosin. In conclusion, calycosin has a potential effect to inhibit the BEL-7402 cell growth by inhibiting some oncogene expression and increasing anticancer genes expression, what is more, by blocking cell cycle.

  16. Effects of exogenous agmatine in human leukemia HMC-1 and HL-60 cells on proliferation, polyamine metabolism and cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenisch, Britta; Bönisch, Heinz; Cichon, Sven; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Novak, Natalija; Molderings, Gerhard J

    2011-09-01

    Impairment of agmatine homeostasis is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation in malignant solid tumors. The present study aimed at analyzing the relevance of agmatine homeostasis in pathophysiology of human leukemia. Proliferation of the human leukemia cells HMC-1 and HL-60 was determined in the absence or presence of agmatine. Apoptosis and cell cycle distribution was investigated by determination of caspase-3 activity and/or flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide. Expression analysis was performed by qPCR and by a microarray genechip. Exogenous agmatine inhibited proliferation of both HMC-1 and HL-60 cells. The antiproliferative effect was due to interference of agmatine with the cell cycle with no evident signs of apoptosis. Comparative analysis of expression of mRNA in untreated HMC-1 cells and in non-leukemic human mast cells revealed a much lower expression of agmatinase and diamine oxidase in HMC-1 cells indicating a significantly reduced agmatine catabolism in the leukemic cells. At the mRNA level, inhibition of proliferation of both cell lines by agmatine was associated with cell type-specific alterations of the expression of enzymes of the polyamine pathway. The present results point to a significant role of agmatine homeostasis in the (patho)physiology of cell proliferation of leukemic cells, at least in HMC-1 and HL-60 cells, that may serve as a potential target for an adjuvant therapy in the treatment of human leukemia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Progesterone arrested cell cycle progression through progesterone receptor isoform A in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Samaneh; Kasajima, Atsuko; Onodera, Yoshiaki; McNamara, Keely May; Ise, Kazue; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Tachibana, Tomoyoshi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Unno, Michiaki; Sasano, Hironobu

    2018-04-01

    In pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (Pan-NEN) progesterone signaling has been shown to have both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on cell proliferation. The ability of progesterone to inhibit tumor proliferation is of particular interest and is suggested to be mediated through the less abundantly expressed progesterone receptor (PR) isoform A (PRA). To date the mechanistic processes underlying this inhibition of proliferation remain unclear. To examine the mechanism of PRA actions, the human Pan-NEN cell line QGP-1, that endogenously expresses PR isoform B (PRB) without PRA, was transfected with PRA. PRA transfection suppressed the majority of cell cycle related genes increased by progesterone including cyclin A2 (CCNA2), cyclin B1 (CCNB1), cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Importantly, following progesterone administration cell cycle distribution was shifted to S and G2/M phases in the naïve cell line but in PRA-transfected cells, this effect was suppressed. To see if these mechanistic insights were confirmed in patient samples PRA, PRB, CCNA2, CCNB, CDK1 and CDK2 immunoreactivities were assessed in Pan-NEN cases. Higher levels of cell cycle markers were associated with higher WHO grade tumors and correlations between the markers suggested formation of cyclin/CDK activated complexes in S and G2/M phases. PRA expression was associated with inverse correlation of all cell cycle markers. Collectively, these results indicate that progesterone signals through PRA negatively regulates cell cycle progression through suppressing S and G2/M phases and downregulation of cell cycle phases specific cyclins/CDKs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Context-dependent cell cycle checkpoint abrogation by a novel kinase inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Massey

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1/Chk2, and the Aurora kinases play a critical role in the activation of the DNA damage response and mitotic spindle checkpoints. We have identified a novel inhibitor of these kinases and utilized this molecule to probe the functional interplay between these two checkpoints.Fragment screening, structure guided design, and kinase cross screening resulted in the identification of a novel, potent small molecule kinase inhibitor (VER-150548 of Chk1 and Chk2 kinases with IC(50s of 35 and 34 nM as well as the Aurora A and Aurora B kinases with IC(50s of 101 and 38 nM. The structural rationale for this kinase specificity could be clearly elucidated through the X-ray crystal structure. In human carcinoma cells, VER-150548 induced reduplication and the accumulation of cells with >4N DNA content, inhibited histone H3 phosphorylation and ultimately gave way to cell death after 120 hour exposure; a phenotype consistent with cellular Aurora inhibition. In the presence of DNA damage induced by cytotoxic chemotherapeutic drugs, VER-150548 abrogated DNA damage induced cell cycle checkpoints. Abrogation of these checkpoints correlated with increased DNA damage and rapid cell death in p53 defective HT29 cells. In the presence of DNA damage, reduplication could not be observed. These observations are consistent with the Chk1 and Chk2 inhibitory activity of this molecule.In the presence of DNA damage, we suggest that VER-150548 abrogates the DNA damage induced checkpoints forcing cells to undergo a lethal mitosis. The timing of this premature cell death induced by Chk1 inhibition negates Aurora inhibition thereby preventing re-entry into the cell cycle and subsequent DNA reduplication. This novel kinase inhibitor therefore serves as a useful chemical probe to further understand the temporal relationship between cell cycle checkpoint pathways, chemotherapeutic agent induced DNA damage and cell death.

  19. Sodium butyrate reverses the inhibition of Krebs cycle enzymes induced by amphetamine in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valvassori, Samira S; Calixto, Karen V; Budni, Josiane; Resende, Wilson R; Varela, Roger B; de Freitas, Karolina V; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing interest in the possibility that mitochondrial impairment may play an important role in bipolar disorder (BD). The Krebs cycle is the central point of oxidative metabolism, providing carbon for biosynthesis and reducing agents for generation of ATP. Recently, studies have suggested that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors may have antimanic effects. The present study aims to investigate the effects of sodium butyrate (SB), a HDAC inhibitor, on Krebs cycle enzymes activity in the brain of rats subjected to an animal model of mania induced by D-amphetamine (D-AMPH). Wistar rats were first given D-AMPH or saline (Sal) for 14 days, and then, between days 8 and 14, rats were treated with SB or Sal. The citrate synthase (CS), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were evaluated in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats. The D-AMPH administration inhibited Krebs cycle enzymes activity in all analyzed brain structures and SB reversed D-AMPH-induced dysfunction analyzed in all brain regions. These findings suggest that Krebs cycle enzymes' inhibition can be an important link for the mitochondrial dysfunction seen in BD and SB exerts protective effects against the D-AMPH-induced Krebs cycle enzymes' dysfunction.

  20. Puerariae radix isoflavones and their metabolites inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.-J.; Hou, Y.C.; Lin, C.-H.; Hsu, Y.-A.; Sheu, Jim J.C.; Lai, C.-H.; Chen, B.-H.; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn; Wan Lei; Tsai, F.-J.

    2009-01-01

    Puerariae radix (PR) is a popular natural herb and a traditional food in Asia, which has antithrombotic and anti-allergic properties and stimulates estrogenic activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the PR isoflavones puerarin, daidzein, and genistein on the growth of breast cancer cells. Our data revealed that after treatment with PR isoflavones, a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth occurred in HS578T, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7 cell lines. Results from cell cycle distribution and apoptosis assays revealed that PR isoflavones induced cell apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent pathway and mediated cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, we observed that the serum metabolites of PR (daidzein sulfates/glucuronides) inhibited proliferation of the breast cancer cells at a 50% cell growth inhibition (GI 50 ) concentration of 2.35 μM. These results indicate that the daidzein constituent of PR can be metabolized to daidzein sulfates or daidzein glucuronides that exhibit anticancer activities. The protein expression levels of the active forms of caspase-9 and Bax in breast cancer cells were significantly increased by treatment with PR metabolites. These metabolites also increased the protein expression levels of p53 and p21. We therefore suggest that PR may act as a chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic agent against breast cancer by reducing cell viability and inducing apoptosis.

  1. Extracellular matrix-dependent myosin dynamics during G1-S phase cell cycle progression in hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Hansen, Linda K.

    2004-01-01

    Cell spreading and proliferation are tightly coupled in anchorage-dependent cells. While adhesion-dependent proliferation signals require an intact actin cytoskeleton, and some of these signals such as ERK activation have been characterized, the role of myosin in spreading and cell cycle progression under different extracellular matrix (ECM) conditions is not known. Studies presented here examine changes in myosin activity in freshly isolated hepatocytes under ECM conditions that promote either proliferation (high fibronectin density) or growth arrest (low fibronectin density). Three different measures were obtained and related to both spreading and cell cycle progression: myosin protein levels and association with cytoskeleton, myosin light chain phosphorylation, and its ATPase activity. During the first 48 h in culture, corresponding with transit through G1 phase, there was a six-fold increase in both myosin protein levels and myosin association with actin cytoskeleton. There was also a steady increase in myosin light chain phosphorylation and ATPase activity with spreading, which did not occur in non-spread, growth-arrested cells on low density of fibronectin. Myosin-inhibiting drugs blocked ERK activation, cyclin D1 expression, and S phase entry. Overexpression of the cell cycle protein cyclin D1 overcame both ECM-dependent and actomyosin-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that cyclin D1 is a key event downstream of myosin-dependent cell cycle regulation

  2. Boletus edulis biologically active biopolymers induce cell cycle arrest in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Cardoso, Claudia; Ferreira Milheiro Nunes, Fernando Hermínio; Ramos Novo Amorim de Barros, Ana Isabel; Marques, Guilhermina; Pożarowski, Piotr; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-04-25

    The use of biologically active compounds isolated from edible mushrooms against cancer raises global interest. Anticancer properties are mainly attributed to biopolymers including mainly polysaccharides, polysaccharopeptides, polysaccharide proteins, glycoproteins and proteins. In spite of the fact that Boletus edulis is one of the widely occurring and most consumed edible mushrooms, antitumor biopolymers isolated from it have not been exactly defined and studied so far. The present study is an attempt to extend this knowledge on molecular mechanisms of their anticancer action. The mushroom biopolymers (polysaccharides and glycoproteins) were extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The antiproliferative activity in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (LS180) was screened by means of MTT and BrdU assays. At the same time fractions' cytotoxicity was examined on the human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) by means of the LDH assay. Flow cytometry and Western blotting were applied to cell cycle analysis and protein expression involved in anticancer activity of the selected biopolymer fraction. In vitro studies have shown that fractions isolated from Boletus edulis were not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells and in the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells. The best results were obtained in the case of the fraction designated as BE3. The tested compound inhibited cancer cell proliferation which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase. Growth inhibition was associated with modulation of the p16/cyclin D1/CDK4-6/pRb pathway, an aberration of which is a critical step in the development of many human cancers including colon cancer. Our results indicate that a biopolymer BE3 from Boletus edulis possesses anticancer potential and may provide a new therapeutic/preventive option in colon cancer chemoprevention.

  3. Matrine Activates PTEN to Induce Growth Inhibition and Apoptosis in V600EBRAF Harboring Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiying Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a natural chemical Matrine, which exhibits anti-melanoma potential with its PTEN activation mechanism. Matrine effectively inhibited proliferation of several carcinoma cell lines, including melanoma V600EBRAF harboring M21 cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed Matrine induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in M21 cells dose-dependently. Apoptosis in M21 cells induced by Matrine was identified by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL analysis and Annexin-V/FITC staining. Molecular mechanistic study suggested that Matrine upregulated both mRNA level and protein expression level of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN, leading to inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Downregulation of phosphor-Aktser473 by Matrine activated p21 and Bax, which contributed to G0/G1 cell cycle and apoptosis. Besides, Matrine enhanced the PI3K/Akt inhibition effects to inhibit the cell proliferation with PI3K inhibitor, LY2940002. In summary, our findings suggest Matrine is a promising antitumor drug candidate with its possible PTEN activation mechanisms for treating cancer diseases, such as melanomas.

  4. TFF1 inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Ge

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Trefoil Factor Family (TFF plays an essential role in the intestinal epithelial restitution, but the relationship between TFF1 and gastric cancer (GC is still unclear. The present study aimed to determine the role of TFF1 in repairing gastric mucosa and in the pathogenesis of GC.The TFF1 expression in different gastric mucosas was measured with immunohistochemistry. Then, siRNA targeting TFF1 or plasmids expressing TFF1 gene were transfected into BGC823 cells, SGC7901 cells and GES-1 cells. The cell proliferation was detected with MTT assay and apoptosis and cell cycle measured by flow cytometry.From normal gastric mucosa to mucosa with dysplasia and to gastric cancer, the TFF1 expression had a decreasing trend. Down-regulation of TFF1 expression significantly reduced the apoptosis of three cell lines and markedly facilitated their proliferation but had no significant effect on cell cycle. Over-expression of TFF1 could promote apoptosis of three cell lines and inhibit proliferation but had no pronounced effect on cell cycle. TFF1 can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of GC cells in vitro.

  5. Cycle inhibiting factors (CIFs are a growing family of functional cyclomodulins present in invertebrate and mammal bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Jubelin

    Full Text Available The cycle inhibiting factor (Cif produced by enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli was the first cyclomodulin to be identified that is injected into host cells via the type III secretion machinery. Cif provokes cytopathic effects characterized by G(1 and G(2 cell cycle arrests, accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs p21(waf1/cip1 and p27(kip1 and formation of actin stress fibres. The X-ray crystal structure of Cif revealed it to be a divergent member of a superfamily of enzymes including cysteine proteases and acetyltransferases that share a conserved catalytic triad. Here we report the discovery and characterization of four Cif homologs encoded by different pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria isolated from vertebrates or invertebrates. Cif homologs from the enterobacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Photorhabdus luminescens, Photorhabdus asymbiotica and the beta-proteobacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei all induce cytopathic effects identical to those observed with Cif from pathogenic E. coli. Although these Cif homologs are remarkably divergent in primary sequence, the catalytic triad is strictly conserved and was shown to be crucial for cell cycle arrest, cytoskeleton reorganization and CKIs accumulation. These results reveal that Cif proteins form a growing family of cyclomodulins in bacteria that interact with very distinct hosts including insects, nematodes and humans.

  6. Characterization and functional analysis of a slow-cycling subpopulation in colorectal cancer enriched by cell cycle inducer combined chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng-Hua; Mu, Lei; Li, Xiao-Lan; Hu, Yi-Bing; Liu, Hui; Han, Lin-Tao; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2017-10-03

    The concept of cancer stem cells has been proposed in various malignancies including colorectal cancer. Recent studies show direct evidence for quiescence slow-cycling cells playing a role in cancer stem cells. There exists an urgent need to isolate and better characterize these slow-cycling cells. In this study, we developed a new model to enrich slow-cycling tumor cells using cell-cycle inducer combined with cell cycle-dependent chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo . Our results show that Short-term exposure of colorectal cancer cells to chemotherapy combined with cell-cycle inducer enriches for a cell-cycle quiescent tumor cell population. Specifically, these slow-cycling tumor cells exhibit increased chemotherapy resistance in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo . Notably, these cells are stem-cell like and participate in metastatic dormancy. Further exploration indicates that slow-cycling colorectal cancer cells in our model are less sensitive to cytokine-induced-killer cell mediated cytotoxic killing in vivo and in vitro . Collectively, our cell cycle inducer combined chemotherapy exposure model enriches for a slow-cycling, dormant, chemo-resistant tumor cell sub-population that are resistant to cytokine induced killer cell based immunotherapy. Studying unique signaling pathways in dormant tumor cells enriched by cell cycle inducer combined chemotherapy treatment is expected to identify novel therapeutic targets for preventing tumor recurrence.

  7. Eukaryotic checkpoints are absent in the cell division cycle of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    checkpoints' which are known to regulate the eukaryotic cell cycle may be absent or altered in. E. histolytica. [Banerjee S, Das S and Lohia A 2002 Eukaryotic checkpoints are absent in the cell division cycle of Entamoeba histolytica; J. Biosci. (Suppl.

  8. Effects of nanosecond pulsed electrical fields (nsPEFs) on the cell cycle of CHO and Jurkat cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlke, Megan A.; Navara, Christopher; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-03-01

    Exposure to nano-second pulsed electrical fields (nsPEFs) can cause poration of external and internal cell membranes, DNA damage, and disassociation of cytoskeletal components, all of which are capable of disrupting a cell's ability to replicate. Variations between cell lines in membrane and cytoskeletal structure as well as in survival of nsPEF exposure should correspond to unique line-dependent cell cycle effects. Additionally, phase of cell cycle during exposure may be linked to differential sensitivities to nsPEFs across cell lines, as DNA structure, membrane elasticity, and cytoskeletal structure change dramatically during the cell cycle. Populations of Jurkat and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were examined post-exposure (10 ns pulse trains at 150kV/cm) by analysis of DNA content via propidium iodide staining and flow cytometric analysis at various time points (1, 6, and 12h post-exposure) to determine population distribution in cell cycle phases. Additionally, CHO and Jurkat cells were synchronized in G1/S and G2/M phases, pulsed, and analyzed to evaluate role of cell cycle phase in survival of nsPEFs. CHO populations recovered similarly to sham populations postnsPEF exposure and did not exhibit a phase-specific change in response. Jurkat cells exhibited considerable apoptosis/necrosis in response to nsPEF exposure and were unable to recover and proliferate in a manner similar to sham exposed cells. Additionally, Jurkat cells appear to be more sensitive to nsPEFs in G2/M phases than in G1/S phases. Recovery of CHO populations suggests that nsPEFs do not inhibit proliferation in CHO cells; however, inhibition of Jurkat cells post-nsPEF exposure coupled with preferential cell death in G2/M phases suggest that cell cycle phase during exposure may be an important factor in determining nsPEF toxicity in certain cell lines. Interestingly, CHO cells have a more robust and rigid cytoskeleton than Jurkat cells which is thought to contribute to their ability to

  9. Tributyltin induces G2/M cell cycle arrest via NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase in human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanagi, Miki; Yamada, Shigeru; Hirata, Naoya; Itagaki, Hiroshi; Kotake, Yaichiro; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2016-04-01

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT), are well-known endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). We have recently reported that TBT induces growth arrest in the human embryonic carcinoma cell line NT2/D1 at nanomolar levels by inhibiting NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which catalyzes the irreversible conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate. However, the molecular mechanisms by which NAD-IDH mediates TBT toxicity remain unclear. In the present study, we examined whether TBT at nanomolar levels affects cell cycle progression in NT2/D1 cells. Propidium iodide staining revealed that TBT reduced the ratio of cells in the G1 phase and increased the ratio of cells in the G2/M phase. TBT also reduced cell division cycle 25C (cdc25C) and cyclin B1, which are key regulators of G2/M progression. Furthermore, apigenin, an inhibitor of NAD-IDH, mimicked the effects of TBT. The G2/M arrest induced by TBT was abolished by NAD-IDHα knockdown. Treatment with a cell-permeable α-ketoglutarate analogue recovered the effect of TBT, suggesting the involvement of NAD-IDH. Taken together, our data suggest that TBT at nanomolar levels induced G2/M cell cycle arrest via NAD-IDH in NT2/D1 cells. Thus, cell cycle analysis in embryonic cells could be used to assess cytotoxicity associated with nanomolar level exposure of EDCs.

  10. Pekinenin E Inhibits the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Promoting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mediated Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a malignant primary liver cancer with poor prognosis. In the present study, we report that pekinenin E (PE, a casbane diterpenoid derived from the roots of Euphorbia pekinensis, has a strong antitumor activity against human HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. PE suppressed the growth of human HCC cells Hep G2 and SMMC-7721. In addition, PE-mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress caused increasing expressions of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP, leading to apoptosis in HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of ER stress with CHOP small interfering RNA or 4-phenyl-butyric acid partially reversed PE-induced cell death. Furthermore, PE induced S cell cycle arrest, which could also be partially reversed by CHOP knockdown. In all, these findings suggest that PE causes ER stress-associated cell death and cell cycle arrest, and it may serve as a potent agent for curing human HCC.

  11. Effects of berberine on proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis of human breast cancer T47D and MCF7 cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmira Barzegar

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Berberine alone and in combination with doxorubicin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and altered cell cycle distribution of breast cancer cells. Therefore, berberine showed to be a good candidate for further studies as a new anticancer drug in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  12. Variety in intracellular diffusion during the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selhuber-Unkel, C.; Yde, P.; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2009-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces Pombe using optical tweezers. The cell cycle was divided into interphase and mitotic cell division, and the mitotic cell division was further subdivided in its stages. During all stages of the cell cycle, the granules predominantly underwent subdiffusive motion, characterized by an exponent......During the cell cycle, the organization of the cytoskeletal network undergoes dramatic changes. In order to reveal possible changes of the viscoelastic properties in the intracellular space during the cell cycle we investigated the diffusion of endogenous lipid granules within the fission yeast...... a that is also linked to the viscoelastic moduli of the cytoplasm. The exponent a was significantly smaller during interphase than during any stage of the mitotic cell division, signifying that the cytoplasm was more elastic during interphase than during division. We found no significant differences...

  13. Kalanchoe tubiflora extract inhibits cell proliferation by affecting the mitotic apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Jen; Yang, Ming-Yeh; Leu, Yann-Lii; Chen, Chinpiao; Wan, Chin-Fung; Chang, Meng-Ya; Chang, Chih-Jui

    2012-09-10

    Kalanchoe tubiflora (KT) is a succulent plant native to Madagascar, and is commonly used as a medicinal agent in Southern Brazil. The underlying mechanisms of tumor suppression are largely unexplored. Cell viability and wound-healing were analyzed by MTT assay and scratch assay respectively. Cell cycle profiles were analyzed by FACS. Mitotic defects were analyzed by indirect immunofluoresence images. An n-Butanol-soluble fraction of KT (KT-NB) was able to inhibit cell proliferation. After a 48 h treatment with 6.75 μg/ml of KT, the cell viability was less than 50% of controls, and was further reduced to less than 10% at higher concentrations. KT-NB also induced an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle as well as an increased level of cells in the subG1 phase. Instead of disrupting the microtubule network of interphase cells, KT-NB reduced cell viability by inducing multipolar spindles and defects in chromosome alignment. KT-NB inhibits cell proliferation and reduces cell viability by two mechanisms that are exclusively involved with cell division: first by inducing multipolarity; second by disrupting chromosome alignment during metaphase. KT-NB reduced cell viability by exclusively affecting formation of the proper structure of the mitotic apparatus. This is the main idea of the new generation of anti-mitotic agents. All together, KT-NB has sufficient potential to warrant further investigation as a potential new anticancer agent candidate.

  14. Garcinol, a Histone Acetyltransferase Inhibitor, Radiosensitizes Cancer Cells by Inhibiting Non-Homologous End Joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oike, Takahiro [Division of Multistep Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Ogiwara, Hideaki [Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Torikai, Kohta [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Yokota, Jun [Division of Multistep Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Takashi, E-mail: tkkohno@ncc.go.jp [Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), a major pathway used to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated by ionizing radiation (IR), requires chromatin remodeling at DSB sites through the acetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs). However, the effect of compounds with HAT inhibitory activities on the DNA damage response (DDR), including the NHEJ and cell cycle checkpoint, as well as on the radiosensitivity of cancer cells, remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated whether garcinol, a HAT inhibitor found in the rinds of Garcinia indica fruit (called mangosteens), has effects on DDR, and whether it can be used for radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: The following assays were used to examine the effect of garcinol on the inhibition of DSB repair, including the following: a conventional neutral comet assay; a cell-based assay recently developed by us, in which NHEJ repair of DSBs on chromosomal DNA was evaluated; the micrococcal nuclease sensitivity assay; and immunoblotting for autophosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). We assessed the effect of garcinol on the cell cycle checkpoint after IR treatment by analyzing the phosphorylation levels of checkpoint kinases CHK1 and CHK2 and histone H3, and by cell cycle profile analysis using flow cytometry. The radiosensitizing effect of garcinol was assessed by a clonogenic survival assay, whereas its effects on apoptosis and senescence were examined by annexin V and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-Gal) staining, respectively. Results: We found that garcinol inhibits DSB repair, including NHEJ, without affecting cell cycle checkpoint. Garcinol radiosensitized A549 lung and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells with dose enhancement ratios (at 10% surviving fraction) of 1.6 and 1.5, respectively. Cellular senescence induced by IR was enhanced by garcinol. Conclusion: These results suggest that garcinol is a radiosensitizer that

  15. Capsaicin Inhibits Multiple Bladder Cancer Cell Phenotypes by Inhibiting Tumor-Associated NADH Oxidase (tNOX) and Sirtuin1 (SIRT1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Hung; Lee, Yi-Hui; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Chen, Huei-Yu; Jhuang, Fong-Han; Chueh, Pin Ju

    2016-06-28

    Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent cancers among males, and its poor survival rate reflects problems with aggressiveness and chemo-resistance. Recent interest has focused on the use of chemopreventatives (nontoxic natural agents that may suppress cancer progression) to induce targeted apoptosis for cancer therapy. Capsaicin, which has anti-cancer properties, is one such agent. It is known to preferentially inhibit a tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX) that is preferentially expressed in cancer/transformed cells. Here, we set out to elucidate the correlation between tNOX expression and the inhibitory effects of capsaicin in human bladder cancer cells. We showed that capsaicin downregulates tNOX expression and decreases bladder cancer cell growth by enhancing apoptosis. Moreover, capsaicin was found to reduce the expression levels of several proteins involved in cell cycle progression, in association with increases in the cell doubling time and enhanced cell cycle arrest. Capsaicin was also shown to inhibit the activation of ERK, thereby reducing the phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK, which leads to decreased cell migration. Finally, our results indicate that RNA interference-mediated tNOX depletion enhances spontaneous apoptosis, prolongs cell cycle progression, and reduces cell migration and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We also observed a downregulation of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in these tNOX-knockdown cells, a deacetylase that is important in multiple cellular functions. Taken together, our results indicate that capsaicin inhibits the growth of bladder cancer cells by inhibiting tNOX and SIRT1 and thereby reducing proliferation, attenuating migration, and prolonging cell cycle progression.

  16. Capsaicin Inhibits Multiple Bladder Cancer Cell Phenotypes by Inhibiting Tumor-Associated NADH Oxidase (tNOX and Sirtuin1 (SIRT1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hung Lin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent cancers among males, and its poor survival rate reflects problems with aggressiveness and chemo-resistance. Recent interest has focused on the use of chemopreventatives (nontoxic natural agents that may suppress cancer progression to induce targeted apoptosis for cancer therapy. Capsaicin, which has anti-cancer properties, is one such agent. It is known to preferentially inhibit a tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX that is preferentially expressed in cancer/transformed cells. Here, we set out to elucidate the correlation between tNOX expression and the inhibitory effects of capsaicin in human bladder cancer cells. We showed that capsaicin downregulates tNOX expression and decreases bladder cancer cell growth by enhancing apoptosis. Moreover, capsaicin was found to reduce the expression levels of several proteins involved in cell cycle progression, in association with increases in the cell doubling time and enhanced cell cycle arrest. Capsaicin was also shown to inhibit the activation of ERK, thereby reducing the phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK, which leads to decreased cell migration. Finally, our results indicate that RNA interference-mediated tNOX depletion enhances spontaneous apoptosis, prolongs cell cycle progression, and reduces cell migration and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We also observed a downregulation of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 in these tNOX-knockdown cells, a deacetylase that is important in multiple cellular functions. Taken together, our results indicate that capsaicin inhibits the growth of bladder cancer cells by inhibiting tNOX and SIRT1 and thereby reducing proliferation, attenuating migration, and prolonging cell cycle progression.

  17. Variation in traction forces during cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianay, Benoit; Senger, Fabrice; Alamos, Simon; Anjur-Dietrich, Maya; Bearce, Elizabeth; Cheeseman, Bevan; Lee, Lisa; Théry, Manuel

    2018-02-01

    Tissue morphogenesis results from the interplay between cell growth and mechanical forces. While the impact of geometrical confinement and mechanical forces on cell proliferation has been fairly well characterised, the inverse relationship is much less understood. Here, we investigated how traction forces vary during cell cycle progression. Cell shape was constrained on micropatterned substrates in order to distinguish variations in cell contractility from cell size increase. We performed traction force measurements of asynchronously dividing cells expressing a cell-cycle reporter, to obtain measurements of contractile forces generated during cell division. We found that forces tend to increase as cells progress through G1, before reaching a plateau in S phase, and then decline during G2. While cell size increases regularly during cell cycle progression, traction forces follow a biphasic behaviour based on specific and opposite regulation of cell contractility during early and late growth phases. These results highlight the key role of cellular signalling in the regulation of cell contractility, independently of cell size and shape. Non-monotonous variations of cell contractility during cell cycle progression are likely to impact the mechanical regulation of tissue homoeostasis in a complex and non-linear manner. © 2018 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Inhibition of Human Cervical Cancer Cell Growth by Ethanolic Extract of Boerhaavia diffusa Linn. (Punarnava Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Indian traditional medicine, Boerhaavia diffusa (punarnava roots have been widely used for the treatment of dyspepsia, jaundice, enlargement of spleen, abdominal pain and as an anti-stress agent. Pharmacological evaluation of the crude ethanolic extract of B. diffusa roots has been shown to possess antiproliferative and immunomodulatory properties. The extract of B. diffusa was studied for anti-proliferative effects on the growth of HeLa cells and for its effect on cell cycle. Bio-assays of extracts from B. diffusa root showed that a methanol : chloroform fraction (BDF 5 had an antiproliferative effect on HeLa cells. After 48 h of exposure, this fraction at a concentration of 200 μg mL−1 significantly reduced cell proliferation with visible morphological changes in HeLa cells. Cell cycle analysis suggests that antiproliferative effect of BDF 5 could be due to inhibition of DNA synthesis in S-phase of cell cycle in HeLa cells, whereas no significant change in cell cycle was detected in control cells. The fraction BDF 5 caused cell death via apoptosis as evident from DNA fragmentation and caspase-9 activation. Thus the extract has potential to be evaluated in detail to assess the molecular mechanism-mediated anticancer activities of this plant.

  19. Chromatin association of UHRF1 during the cell cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Gashgari, Bothayna

    2017-05-01

    Ubiquitin-like with PHD and RING Finger domains 1 (UHRF1) is a nuclear protein that associates with chromatin. Regardless of the various functions of UHRF1 in the cell, one of its more important functions is its role in the maintenance of DNA methylation patterns by the recruitment of DNMT1. Studies on UHRF1 based on this function have revealed the importance of UHRF1 during the cell cycle. Moreover, based on different studies various factors were described to be involved in the regulation of UHRF1 with different functionalities that can control its binding affinity to different targets on chromatin. These factors are regulated differently in a cell cycle specific manner. In light of this, we propose that UHRF1 has different binding behaviors during the cell cycle in regard to its association with chromatin. In this project, we first analyzed the binding behavior of endogenous UHRF1 from different unsynchronized cell systems in pull-down assays with peptides and oligonucleotides. Moreover, to analyze UHRF1 binding behavior during the cell cycle, we used two different approaches. First we sorted Jurkat and HT1080 cells based on their cell cycle stage using FACS analysis. Additionally, we synchronized HeLa cells to different stages of the cell cycle by chemical treatments, and used extracts from cellsorting and cell synchronization experiments for pull-down assays. We observed that UHRF1 in different cell systems has different preferences in regard to its binding to H3 unmodified and H3K9me3. Moreover, we detected that UHRF1, in general, displays different patterns between different stages of cell cycle; however, we cannot draw a final model for UHRF1 binding pattern during cell cycle.

  20. Ca2+-Induced Mitochondrial ROS Regulate the Early Embryonic Cell Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Han

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: While it is appreciated that reactive oxygen species (ROS can act as second messengers in both homeostastic and stress response signaling pathways, potential roles for ROS during early vertebrate development have remained largely unexplored. Here, we show that fertilization in Xenopus embryos triggers a rapid increase in ROS levels, which oscillate with each cell division. Furthermore, we show that the fertilization-induced Ca2+ wave is necessary and sufficient to induce ROS production in activated or fertilized eggs. Using chemical inhibitors, we identified mitochondria as the major source of fertilization-induced ROS production. Inhibition of mitochondrial ROS production in early embryos results in cell-cycle arrest, in part, via ROS-dependent regulation of Cdc25C activity. This study reveals a role for oscillating ROS levels in early cell cycle regulation in Xenopus embryos. : Han et al. show that the fertilization-triggered calcium wave induces reactive oxygen species production from mitochondria, which oscillate with each cell division in Xenopus embryos. Moreover, they demonstrate that inhibition of mitochondrial ROS production disrupts cell cycle progression. Keywords: mitochondria, reactive oxygen species, ROS, Xenopus, Cdc25C, cell cycle, fertilization, Ca2+ wave, HyPer, respiratory burst

  1. Cyclin A2: a genuine cell cycle regulator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendris, Nawal; Loukil, Abdelhalim; Cheung, Caroline; Arsic, Nikola; Rebouissou, Cosette; Hipskind, Robert; Peter, Marion; Lemmers, Bénédicte; Blanchard, Jean Marie

    2012-12-01

    Abstract Cyclin A2 belongs to the core cell cycle regulators and participates in the control of both S phase and mitosis. However, several observations suggest that it is also endowed with other functions, and our recent data shed light on its involvement in cytoskeleton dynamic and cell motility. From the transcription of its gene to its posttranslational modifications, cyclin A2 regulation reveals the complexity of the regulatory network shaping cell cycle progression. We summarize our current knowledge on this cell cycle regulator and discuss recent findings raising the possibility that cyclin A2 might play a much broader role in epithelial tissues homeostasis.

  2. Daphnoretin Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Osteosarcoma (HOS Cells

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    Jinhai He

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study antiproliferation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by daphnoretin in human osteosarcoma (HOS cells were investigated. Antiproliferative activity was measured with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The IC50 value of daphnoretin was 3.89 μM after 72 h treatment. Induction of apoptosis was evidenced by apoptotic body appearance and Annexin V-FITC/PI apoptosis detection kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated daphnoretin arrested the cell cycle in the G2/M phase. Western-blot assay showed that the G2/M phase arrest was accompanied by down-regulation of cdc2, cyclin A and cyclin B1. Moreover, daphnoretin inhibited Bcl-2 expression and induced Bax expression to desintegrate the outer mitochondrial membrane and causing cytochrome c release. Mitochondrial cytochrome c release was associated with the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 cascade. Our results demonstrated that daphnoretin caused death of HOS cells by blocking cells successively in G2/M phases and activating the caspase-3 pathway.

  3. The Cell Cycle: An Activity Using Paper Plates to Represent Time Spent in Phases of the Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Yvette D.

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, students are given the opportunity to combine skills in math and geometry for a biology lesson in the cell cycle. Students utilize the data they collect and analyze from an online onion-root-tip activity to create a paper-plate time clock representing a 24-hour cell cycle. By dividing the paper plate into appropriate phases of…

  4. Cordycepin Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Proliferation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Line H1975 via Inhibiting the Phosphorylation of EGFR

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    Zheng Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is an active component of the traditional Chinese medicine Cordyceps sinensis and Cordyceps militaris with notable anticancer activity. Though the prominent inhibitory activity was reported in different kinds of cancer cell lines, the concrete mechanisms remain elusive. It was reported that cordycepin could be converted into tri-phosphates in vivo to confuse a number of enzymes and interfere the normal cell function. For the inhibitory mechanism of EGFR inhibitors and the structure similarity of ATP and tri-phosphated cordycepin, human lung cancer cell line H1975 was employed to investigate the inhibitory effect of cordycepin. The results showed that cordycepin could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed that H1975 cells could be arrested at the G0/G1 phase after cordycepin treatment. The expression levels of apoptosis-related protein Caspase-3 and Bcl-2 and phosphorylated expression levels of EGFR, AKT and ERK1/2 were all decreased compared with the control group stimulated with EGF. However, the protein expression levels of proapoptotic protein Bax and cleaved caspase-3 were increased. These results implied that cordycepin could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis via the EGFR signaling pathway. Our results indicated that there was potential to seek a novel EGFR inhibitor from cordycepin and its chemical derivatives.

  5. Cell Cycle Dynamics of Cultured Coral Endosymbiotic Microalgae (Symbiodinium) Across Different Types (Species) Under Alternate Light and Temperature Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujise, Lisa; Nitschke, Matthew R; Frommlet, Jörg C; Serôdio, João; Woodcock, Stephen; Ralph, Peter J; Suggett, David J

    2018-01-08

    Dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium live in symbiosis with many invertebrates, including reef-building corals. Hosts maintain this symbiosis through continuous regulation of Symbiodinium cell density via expulsion and degradation (postmitotic) and/or constraining cell growth and division through manipulation of the symbiont cell cycle (premitotic). Importance of premitotic regulation is unknown since little data exists on cell cycles for the immense genetic diversity of Symbiodinium. We therefore examined cell cycle progression for several distinct SymbiodiniumITS2-types (B1, C1, D1a). All types exhibited typical microalgal cell cycle progression, G 1 phase through to S phase during the light period, and S phase to G 2 /M phase during the dark period. However, the proportion of cells in these phases differed between strains and reflected differences in growth rates. Undivided larger cells with 3n DNA content were observed especially in type D1a, which exhibited a distinct cell cycle pattern. We further compared cell cycle patterns under different growth light intensities and thermal regimes. Whilst light intensity did not affect cell cycle patterns, heat stress inhibited cell cycle progression and arrested all strains in G 1 phase. We discuss the importance of understanding Symbiodinium functional diversity and how our findings apply to clarify stability of host-Symbiodinium symbioses. © 2018 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2018 International Society of Protistologists.

  6. A Vitex agnus-castus extract inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in prostate epithelial cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, M; Schaffner, W; Jundt, G; Sulser, T; Wyler, S; Tullberg-Reinert, H

    2005-10-01

    Extracts of Vitex agnus-castus fruits (VACF) are described to have beneficial effects on disorders related to hyperprolactinemia (cycle disorders, premenstrual syndrome). A VACF extract has recently been shown to exhibit antitumor activities in different human cancer cell lines. In the present study, we explored the antiproliferative effects of a VACF extract with a particular focus on apoptosis-inducing and potential cytotoxic effects. Three different human prostate epithelial cell lines (BPH-1, LNCaP, PC-3) representing different disease stages and androgen responsiveness were chosen. The action of VACF on cell viability was assessed using the WST-8-tetrazolium assay. Cell proliferation in cells receiving VACF alone or in combination with a pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-fmk) was quantified using a Crystal Violet assay. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis and measurement of DNA fragmentation using an ELISA method were used for studying the induction of apoptosis. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was determined as a marker of cytotoxicity. The extract inhibited proliferation of all three cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner with IC (50) values below 10 microg/mL after treatment for 48 h. Cell cycle analysis and DNA fragmentation assays suggest that part of the cells were undergoing apoptosis. The VACF-induced decrease in cell number was partially inhibited by Z-VAD-fmk, indicating a caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. However, the concentration-dependent LDH activity of VACF treated cells indicated cytotoxic effects as well. These data suggest that VACF contains components that inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in human prostate epithelial cell lines. The extract may be useful for the prevention and/or treatment not only of benign prostatic hyperplasia but also of human prostate cancer.

  7. Isodeoxyelephantopin from Elephantopus scaber (Didancao) induces cell cycle arrest and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis in breast carcinoma T47D cells and lung carcinoma A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeer, Farha Arakkaveettil; Sreedevi, Geetha Balakrishnan; Nair, Mangalam Sivasankaran; Rajalekshmi, Dhanya Sethumadhavannair; Gopalakrishnan, Latha Panickaparambil; Prathapan, Remani

    2014-01-01

    Isodeoxyelephantopin (IDOE) isolated from Elephantopus scaber L. (Didancao) is used in Chinese medicine for the treatment of some types of cancer. The anti-cancer mechanism of IDOE remains unclear. This study aims to investigate the antiproliferative activity of IDOE on breast carcinoma T47D cells and lung carcinoma A549 cells. The growth inhibitory effects of IDOE on breast carcinoma T47D cells, lung carcinoma A549 cells, and normal lymphocytes were evaluated by the MTT assay. Morphological analysis of apoptosis induction was performed by acridine orange/ethidium bromide dual-staining and Hoechst 33342 nuclear staining. The cell cycle profile, caspase-3 expression, and annexin V staining were evaluated by flow cytometry. IDOE inhibited the growth of A549 and T47D cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with IC50 values of 10.46 and 1.3 μg/mL, respectively. IDOE was not significantly toxic to normal lymphocytes. The cells became detached from the monolayer and rounded up, had fragmented nuclei and condensed chromatin, and the numbers of apoptotic cells increased (P = 0.0003). IDOE-induced cell death was associated with activated caspase-3 expression followed by cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. IDOE inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cells and lung carcinoma cells and induced caspase-3-mediated apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the treated cells.

  8. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

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    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  9. The transcription factor NFAT5 is required for cyclin expression and cell cycle progression in cells exposed to hypertonic stress.

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    Katherine Drews-Elger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertonicity can perturb cellular functions, induce DNA damage-like responses and inhibit proliferation. The transcription factor NFAT5 induces osmoprotective gene products that allow cells to adapt to sustained hypertonic conditions. Although it is known that NFAT5-deficient lymphocytes and renal medullary cells have reduced proliferative capacity and viability under hypertonic stress, less is understood about the contribution of this factor to DNA damage responses and cell cycle regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated conditional knockout mice to obtain NFAT5(-/- T lymphocytes, which we used as a model of proliferating cells to study NFAT5-dependent responses. We show that hypertonicity triggered an early, NFAT5-independent, genotoxic stress-like response with induction of p53, p21 and GADD45, downregulation of cyclins, and cell cycle arrest. This was followed by an NFAT5-dependent adaptive phase in wild-type cells, which induced an osmoprotective gene expression program, downregulated stress markers, resumed cyclin expression and proliferation, and displayed enhanced NFAT5 transcriptional activity in S and G2/M. In contrast, NFAT5(-/- cells failed to induce osmoprotective genes and exhibited poorer viability. Although surviving NFAT5(-/- cells downregulated genotoxic stress markers, they underwent cell cycle arrest in G1/S and G2/M, which was associated with reduced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1. We also show that pathologic hypertonicity levels, as occurring in plasma of patients and animal models of osmoregulatory disorders, inhibited the induction of cyclins and aurora B kinase in response to T cell receptor stimulation in fresh NFAT5(-/- lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that NFAT5 facilitates cell proliferation under hypertonic conditions by inducing an osmoadaptive response that enables cells to express fundamental regulators needed for cell cycle progression.

  10. Induction of Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Colorectal Carcinoma by Litchi Seed Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Hsu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Litchi (Litchi chinensis fruit products possess rich amounts of flavanoids and proanthocyanidins. Its pericarp has been shown to inhibit breast and liver cancer cell growth. However, the anticolorectal cancer effect of Litchi seed extract has not yet been reported. In this study, the effects of polyphenol-rich Litchi seed ethanol extract (LCSP on the proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis of two colorectal cancer cell lines Colo320DM and SW480 were examined. The results demonstrated that LCSP significantly induced apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner and arrested cell cycle in G2/M in colorectal carcinoma cells. LCSP also suppressed cyclins and elevated the Bax : Bcl-2 ratio and caspase 3 activity. This study provides in vitro evidence that LCSP serves as a potential chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer.

  11. Brucella abortus Cell Cycle and Infection Are Coordinated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bolle, Xavier; Crosson, Sean; Matroule, Jean-Yves; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Brucellae are facultative intracellular pathogens. The recent development of methods and genetically engineered strains allowed the description of cell-cycle progression of Brucella abortus, including unipolar growth and the ordered initiation of chromosomal replication. B. abortus cell-cycle progression is coordinated with intracellular trafficking in the endosomal compartments. Bacteria are first blocked at the G1 stage, growth and chromosome replication being resumed shortly before reaching the intracellular proliferation compartment. The control mechanisms of cell cycle are similar to those reported for the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, and they are crucial for survival in the host cell. The development of single-cell analyses could also be applied to other bacterial pathogens to investigate their cell-cycle progression during infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Phagocytosis of Extracellular Vesicles Extruded From the Placenta by Ovarian Cancer Cells Inhibits Growth of the Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Rutten, Victoria; Cheng, Wei-Tzu; Tong, Mancy; Wei, Jia; Stone, Peter; Ching, Lai-Ming; Chamley, Lawrence W

    2018-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is a common gynecological cancer, and parity is negatively associated with the incidence of this disease. This negative association is hypothesized to be due in part to shifting the balance of estrogen and progesterone toward more progesterone and reduced ovulation during pregnancy. However, studies suggested that parity is also associated with estrogen-independent gynecological cancers suggesting balance of hormones may not be the only protective factor. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) play an important role in cell-to-cell communication in physiological and pathological conditions. During pregnancy, large amounts of EVs are extruded from the placenta, and they seem to be involved in the remarkable adaptation of a woman's body to normal pregnancy. We hypothesized that EVs extruded from the placenta play a role in this protective effect. Placental EVs were collected from first-trimester placentae, and cancer cell EVs were isolated from ovarian cancer cells. The EVs were exposed to ovarian cancer cells for 48 hours. The proliferation of cancer cells and the cell cycle were measured. In addition, phagocytosis of deported placental EVs by cancer cells was also measured. The proliferation of cancer cells was significantly reduced by treatment with placental EVs (P = 0.001, analysis of variance), but not EVs from monocytes (P = 0.195), compared with untreated cancer cells. Furthermore, placental EVs also prevented the proliferation of cancer cells induced by cancer cell-derived EVs (P = 0.001). This inhibition of proliferation of ovarian cancer cells was partially due to phagocytosis of placental EVs by cancer cells. Phagocytosis of placental EVs delayed progression through the cell cycle. Calreticulin, a phagocytic "eat me" signal carried by placental EVs significantly inhibited ovarian cancer growth (P = 0.001). Our data demonstrated that EVs extruded from the placenta prevented ovarian cancer cell growth by a mechanism that involved delaying progression

  13. Achieving Precision Death with Cell-Cycle Inhibitors that Target DNA Replication and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aimee Bence; McNeely, Samuel C; Beckmann, Richard P

    2017-07-01

    All cancers are characterized by defects in the systems that ensure strict control of the cell cycle in normal tissues. The consequent excess tissue growth can be countered by drugs that halt cell division, and, indeed, the majority of chemotherapeutics developed during the last century work by disrupting processes essential for the cell cycle, particularly DNA synthesis, DNA replication, and chromatid segregation. In certain contexts, the efficacy of these classes of drugs can be impressive, but because they indiscriminately block the cell cycle of all actively dividing cells, their side effects severely constrain the dose and duration with which they can be administered, allowing both normal and malignant cells to escape complete growth arrest. Recent progress in understanding how cancers lose control of the cell cycle, coupled with comprehensive genomic profiling of human tumor biopsies, has shown that many cancers have mutations affecting various regulators and checkpoints that impinge on the core cell-cycle machinery. These defects introduce unique vulnerabilities that can be exploited by a next generation of drugs that promise improved therapeutic windows in patients whose tumors bear particular genomic aberrations, permitting increased dose intensity and efficacy. These developments, coupled with the success of new drugs targeting cell-cycle regulators, have led to a resurgence of interest in cell-cycle inhibitors. This review in particular focuses on the newer strategies that may facilitate better therapeutic targeting of drugs that inhibit the various components that safeguard the fidelity of the fundamental processes of DNA replication and repair. Clin Cancer Res; 23(13); 3232-40. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. BET bromodomain inhibition rescues erythropoietin differentiation of human erythroleukemia cell line UT7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goupille, Olivier; Penglong, Tipparat; Lefèvre, Carine; Granger, Marine; Kadri, Zahra; Fucharoen, Suthat; Maouche-Chrétien, Leila; Leboulch, Philippe; Chrétien, Stany

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► UT7 erythroleukemia cells are known to be refractory to differentiate. ► Brief JQ1 treatment initiates the first steps of erythroid differentiation program. ► Engaged UT7 cells then maturate in the presence of erythropoietin. ► Sustained JQ1 treatment inhibits both proliferation and erythroid differentiation. -- Abstract: Malignant transformation is a multistep process requiring oncogenic activation, promoting cellular proliferation, frequently coupled to inhibition of terminal differentiation. Consequently, forcing the reengagement of terminal differentiation of transformed cells coupled or not with an inhibition of their proliferation is a putative therapeutic approach to counteracting tumorigenicity. UT7 is a human leukemic cell line able to grow in the presence of IL3, GM-CSF and Epo. This cell line has been widely used to study Epo-R/Epo signaling pathways but is a poor model for erythroid differentiation. We used the BET bromodomain inhibition drug JQ1 to target gene expression, including that of c-Myc. We have shown that only 2 days of JQ1 treatment was required to transitory inhibit Epo-induced UT7 proliferation and to restore terminal erythroid differentiation. This study highlights the importance of a cellular erythroid cycle break mediated by c-Myc inhibition before initiation of the erythropoiesis program and describes a new model for BET bromodomain inhibitor drug application.

  15. BET bromodomain inhibition rescues erythropoietin differentiation of human erythroleukemia cell line UT7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goupille, Olivier [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Penglong, Tipparat [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Thalassemia Research Center and Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University (Thailand); Lefevre, Carine; Granger, Marine; Kadri, Zahra [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Fucharoen, Suthat [Thalassemia Research Center and Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University (Thailand); Maouche-Chretien, Leila [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Leboulch, Philippe [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Genetics Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Chretien, Stany, E-mail: stany.chretien@cea.fr [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); UMR INSERM U.962, University Paris XI, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UT7 erythroleukemia cells are known to be refractory to differentiate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brief JQ1 treatment initiates the first steps of erythroid differentiation program. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Engaged UT7 cells then maturate in the presence of erythropoietin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustained JQ1 treatment inhibits both proliferation and erythroid differentiation. -- Abstract: Malignant transformation is a multistep process requiring oncogenic activation, promoting cellular proliferation, frequently coupled to inhibition of terminal differentiation. Consequently, forcing the reengagement of terminal differentiation of transformed cells coupled or not with an inhibition of their proliferation is a putative therapeutic approach to counteracting tumorigenicity. UT7 is a human leukemic cell line able to grow in the presence of IL3, GM-CSF and Epo. This cell line has been widely used to study Epo-R/Epo signaling pathways but is a poor model for erythroid differentiation. We used the BET bromodomain inhibition drug JQ1 to target gene expression, including that of c-Myc. We have shown that only 2 days of JQ1 treatment was required to transitory inhibit Epo-induced UT7 proliferation and to restore terminal erythroid differentiation. This study highlights the importance of a cellular erythroid cycle break mediated by c-Myc inhibition before initiation of the erythropoiesis program and describes a new model for BET bromodomain inhibitor drug application.

  16. Radiosensitization in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Effect of polo-like kinase 1 inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jenny Ling-Yu; Chen, Jo-Pai; Huang, Yu-Sen; Tsai, Yuan-Chun; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) inhibition on radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo by a pharmacologic approach using the highly potent PLK1 inhibitor volasertib. Human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines KYSE 70 and KYSE 150 were used to evaluate the synergistic effect of volasertib and irradiation in vitro using cell viability assay, colony formation assay, cell cycle phase analysis, and western blot, and in vivo using ectopic tumor models. Volasertib decreased ESCC cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Combination of volasertib and radiation caused G2/M cell cycle arrest, increased cyclin B levels, and induced apoptosis. Volasertib significantly enhanced radiation-induced death in ESCC cells by a mechanism involving the enhancement of histone H3 phosphorylation and significant cell cycle interruption. The combination of volasertib plus irradiation delayed the growth of ESCC tumor xenografts markedly compared with either treatment modality alone. The in vitro results suggested that targeting PLK1 might be a viable approach to improve the effects of radiation in ESCC. In vivo studies showed that PLK1 inhibition with volasertib during irradiation significantly improved local tumor control when compared to irradiation or drug treatment alone. (orig.) [de

  17. B-cell translocation gene 3 overexpression inhibits proliferation and invasion of colorectal cancer SW480 cells via Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, D; Qiao, L; Lu, H; Feng, Y

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences have shown that B-cell translocation gene 3 (BTG3) inhibits metastasis of multiple cancer cells. However, the role of BTG3 in colorectal cancer (CRC) and its possible mechanism have not yet been reported. In our study, we evaluated BTG3 expression in several CRC cell lines. Then, pcDNA3.1-BTG3 was transfected into SW480 cells. We found that BTG3 was upregulated in SW480 cells after overexpression plasmid transfection. BTG3 overexpression significantly inhibited cell growth and decreased PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) and Ki67 levels. BTG3 overexpression markedly downregulated Cyclin D1 and Cyclin E1 levels, whereas elevated p27. Overexpression of BTG3 arrested the cell cycle at G1 phase, which was abrogated by p27 silencing. Furthermore, migration, invasion and EMT of SW480 cells were significantly suppressed by BTG3 overexpression. Further investigations showed the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. We then used GSK3β specific inhibitor SB-216763 to activate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. We found that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway activation reversed the effect of BTG3 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, invasion and EMT. In conclusion, BTG3 overexpression inhibited cell growth, induced cell cycle arrest and suppressed the metastasis of SW480 cells via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. BTG3 may be considered as a therapeutic target in CRC treatment.

  18. Galiellalactone induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through the ATM/ATR pathway in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Víctor; Lara-Chica, Maribel; Cantarero, Irene; Sterner, Olov; Calzado, Marco A; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2016-01-26

    Galiellalactone (GL) is a fungal metabolite that presents antitumor activities on prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. In this study we show that GL induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, caspase-dependent apoptosis and also affected the microtubule organization and migration ability in DU145 cells. GL did not induce double strand DNA break but activated the ATR and ATM-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) inducing CHK1, H2AX phosphorylation (fH2AX) and CDC25C downregulation. Inhibition of the ATM/ATR activation with caffeine reverted GL-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA damage measured by fH2AX. In contrast, UCN-01, a CHK1 inhibitor, prevented GL-induced cell cycle arrest but enhanced apoptosis in DU145 cells. Furthermore, we found that GL did not increase the levels of intracellular ROS, but the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely prevented the effects of GL on fH2AX, G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In contrast to NAC, other antioxidants such as ambroxol and EGCG did not interfere with the activity of GL on cell cycle. GL significantly suppressed DU145 xenograft growth in vivo and induced the expression of fH2AX in the tumors. These findings identify for the first time that GL activates DDR in prostate cancer.

  19. Sulforaphane induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koramit Suppipat

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common hematological cancer in children. Although risk-adaptive therapy, CNS-directed chemotherapy, and supportive care have improved the survival of ALL patients, disease relapse is still the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. Therefore, new drugs are needed as frontline treatments in high-risk disease and as salvage agents in relapsed ALL. In this study, we report that purified sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, has anti-leukemic properties in a broad range of ALL cell lines and primary lymphoblasts from pediatric T-ALL and pre-B ALL patients. The treatment of ALL leukemic cells with sulforaphane resulted in dose-dependent apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest, which was associated with the activation of caspases (3, 8, and 9, inactivation of PARP, p53-independent upregulation of p21(CIP1/WAF1, and inhibition of the Cdc2/Cyclin B1 complex. Interestingly, sulforaphane also inhibited the AKT and mTOR survival pathways in most of the tested cell lines by lowering the levels of both total and phosphorylated proteins. Finally, the administration of sulforaphane to the ALL xenograft models resulted in a reduction of tumor burden, particularly following oral administration, suggesting a potential role as an adjunctive agent to improve the therapeutic response in high-risk ALL patients with activated AKT signaling.

  20. Endothelial cell subpopulations in vitro: cell volume, cell cycle, and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.; Bauer, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (EC) are important clinical targets of radiation and other forms of free radical/oxidant stresses. In this study, we found that the extent of endothelial damage may be determined by the different cytotoxic responses of EC subpopulations. The following characteristics of EC subpopulations were examined: (1) cell volume; (2) cell cycle position; and (3) cytotoxic indexes for both acute cell survival and proliferative capacity after irradiation (137Cs, gamma, 0-10 Gy). EC cultured from bovine aortas were separated by centrifugal elutriation into subpopulations of different cell volumes. Through flow cytometry, we found that cell volume was related to the cell cycle phase distribution. The smallest EC were distributed in G1 phase and the larger cells were distributed in either early S, middle S, or late S + G2M phases. Cell cycle phase at the time of irradiation was not associated with acute cell loss. However, distribution in the cell cycle did relate to cell survival based on proliferative capacity (P less than 0.01). The order of increasing radioresistance was cells in G1 (D0 = 110 cGy), early S (135 cGy), middle S (145 cGy), and late S + G2M phases (180 cGy). These findings (1) suggest an age-related response to radiation in a nonmalignant differentiated cell type and (2) demonstrate EC subpopulations in culture

  1. Protein kinase C signaling and cell cycle regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian R Black

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A link between T cell proliferation and the protein kinase C (PKC family of serine/threonine kinases has been recognized for about thirty years. However, despite the wealth of information on PKC-mediated control of T cell activation, understanding of the effects of PKCs on the cell cycle machinery in this cell type remains limited. Studies in other systems have revealed important cell cycle-specific effects of PKC signaling that can either positively or negatively impact proliferation. The outcome of PKC activation is highly context-dependent, with the precise cell cycle target(s and overall effects determined by the specific isozyme involved, the timing of PKC activation, the cell type, and the signaling environment. Although PKCs can regulate all stages of the cell cycle, they appear to predominantly affect G0/G1 and G2. PKCs can modulate multiple cell cycle regulatory molecules, including cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks, cdk inhibitors and cdc25 phosphatases; however, evidence points to Cip/Kip cdk inhibitors and D-type cyclins as key mediators of PKC-regulated cell cycle-specific effects. Several PKC isozymes can target Cip/Kip proteins to control G0/G1→S and/or G2→M transit, while effects on D-type cyclins regulate entry into and progression through G1. Analysis of PKC signaling in T cells has largely focused on its roles in T cell activation; thus, observed cell cycle effects are mainly positive. A prominent role is emerging for PKCθ, with non-redundant functions of other isozymes also described. Additional evidence points to PKCδ as a negative regulator of the cell cycle in these cells. As in other cell types, context-dependent effects of individual isozymes have been noted in T cells, and Cip/Kip cdk inhibitors and D-type cyclins appear to be major PKC targets. Future studies are anticipated to take advantage of the similarities between these various systems to enhance understanding of PKC-mediated cell cycle regulation in

  2. Estrogen receptor alpha is cell cycle-regulated and regulates the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JavanMoghadam, Sonia; Weihua, Zhang; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-06-17

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in several cell cycle regulatory events and is an important predictive marker of disease outcome in breast cancer patients. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism through which ERα influences proliferation in breast cancer cells. Our results show that ERα protein is cell cycle-regulated in human breast cancer cells and that the presence of 17-β-estradiol (E2) in the culture medium shortened the cell cycle significantly (by 4.5 hours, P fashion. These results provide the rationale for an effective treatment strategy that includes a cell cycle inhibitor in combination with a drug that lowers estrogen levels, such as an aromatase inhibitor, and an antiestrogen that does not result in the degradation of ERα, such as tamoxifen.

  3. Subversion of Cell Cycle Regulatory Mechanisms by HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Andrew P; Kimata, Jason T

    2015-06-10

    To establish a productive infection, HIV-1 must counteract cellular innate immune mechanisms and redirect cellular processes toward viral replication. Recent studies have discovered that HIV-1 and other primate immunodeficiency viruses subvert cell cycle regulatory mechanisms to achieve these ends. The viral Vpr and Vpx proteins target cell cycle controls to counter innate immunity. The cell-cycle-related protein Cyclin L2 is also utilized to counter innate immunity. The viral Tat protein utilizes Cyclin T1 to activate proviral transcription, and regulation of Cyclin T1 levels in CD4(+) T cells has important consequences for viral replication and latency. This review will summarize this emerging evidence that primate immunodeficiency viruses subvert cell cycle regulatory mechanisms to enhance replication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. miR-141-3p inhibits human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Weimin; Kassem, Moustapha

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling determines human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cell (hMSC) differentiation fate into the osteoblast or adipocyte lineage. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules of 21-25 nucleotides that regulate many aspects of osteoblast biology. Thus, we examined miRNAs regulated by Wnt signaling...... in hMSC. We identified miRNA (miR)-141-3p as a Wnt target which in turn inhibited Wnt signaling. Moreover, miR-141-3p inhibited hMSC proliferation by arresting cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. miR-141-3p inhibited osteoblast differentiation of hMSC as evidenced by reduced alkaline phosphatase...

  5. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  6. Cell cycle progression in response to oxygen levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmann, Brian; Druker, Jimena; Rocha, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Hypoxia' or decreases in oxygen availability' results in the activation of a number of different responses at both the whole organism and the cellular level. These responses include drastic changes in gene expression, which allow the organism (or cell) to cope efficiently with the stresses associated with the hypoxic insult. A major breakthrough in the understanding of the cellular response to hypoxia was the discovery of a hypoxia sensitive family of transcription factors known as the hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). The hypoxia response mounted by the HIFs promotes cell survival and energy conservation. As such, this response has to deal with important cellular process such as cell division. In this review, the integration of oxygen sensing with the cell cycle will be discussed. HIFs, as well as other components of the hypoxia pathway, can influence cell cycle progression. The role of HIF and the cell molecular oxygen sensors in the control of the cell cycle will be reviewed.

  7. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  8. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Ranedo, Jon; Hernando, Eva; Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M

    2015-06-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  9. Dual Pressure versus Hybrid Recuperation in an Integrated Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cycle – Steam Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    A SOFC (solid oxide fuel cell) cycle running on natural gas was integrated with a ST (steam turbine) cycle. The fuel is desulfurized and pre-reformed before entering the SOFC. A burner was used to combust the remaining fuel after the SOFC stacks. The off-gases from the burner were used to produce...... steam in a HRSG (heat recovery steam generator). The bottoming steam cycle was modeled with two configurations: (1) a simple single pressure level and (2) a dual pressure level with both a reheat and a pre-heater. The SOFC stacks in the present SOFC-ST hybrid cycles were not pressurized. The dual...... pressure configuration steam cycle combined with SOFC cycle (SOFC-ST) was new and has not been studied previously. In each of the configuration, a hybrid recuperator was used to recovery the remaining energy of the off-gases after the HRSG. Thus, four different plants system setups were compared to each...

  10. Studies on regulation of the cell cycle in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Požgajová

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All living organisms including plants and animals are composed of millions of cells. These cells perform different functions for the organism although they possess the same chromosomes and carry the same genetic information. Thus, to be able to understand multicellular organism we need to understand the life cycle of individual cells from which the organism comprises. The cell cycle is the life cycle of a single cell in the plant or animal body. It involves series of events in which components of the cell doubles and afterwards equally segregate into daughter cells. Such process ensures growth of the organism, and specialized reductional cell division which leads to production of gamets, assures sexual reproduction. Cell cycle is divided in the G1, S, G2 and M phase. Two gap-phases (G1 and G2 separate S phase (or synthesis and M phase which stays either for mitosis or meiosis. Essential for normal life progression and reproduction is correct chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Defects in the division program lead to aneuploidy, which in turn leads to birth defects, miscarriages or cancer. Even thou, researchers invented much about the regulation of the cell cycle, there is still long way to understand the complexity of the regulatory machineries that ensure proper segregation of chromosomes. In this paper we would like to describe techniques and materials we use for our studies on chromosome segregation in the model organism Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

  11. Sulforaphane induces cell cycle arrest by protecting RB-E2F-1 complex in epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Robert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate phytochemical present predominantly in cruciferous vegetables such as brussels sprout and broccoli, is considered a promising chemo-preventive agent against cancer. In-vitro exposure to SFN appears to result in the induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in a variety of tumor types. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the inhibition of cell cycle progression by SFN are poorly understood in epithelial ovarian cancer cells (EOC. The aim of this study is to understand the signaling mechanisms through which SFN influences the cell growth and proliferation in EOC. Results SFN at concentrations of 5 - 20 μM induced a dose-dependent suppression of growth in cell lines MDAH 2774 and SkOV-3 with an IC50 of ~8 μM after a 3 day exposure. Combination treatment with chemotherapeutic agent, paclitaxel, resulted in additive growth suppression. SFN at ~8 μM decreased growth by 40% and 20% on day 1 in MDAH 2774 and SkOV-3, respectively. Cells treated with cytotoxic concentrations of SFN have reduced cell migration and increased apoptotic cell death via an increase in Bak/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of procaspase-9 and poly (ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP. Gene expression profile analysis of cell cycle regulated proteins demonstrated increased levels of tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein (RB and decreased levels of E2F-1 transcription factor. SFN treatment resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest through down modulation of RB phosphorylation and by protecting the RB-E2F-1 complex. Conclusions SFN induces growth arrest and apoptosis in EOC cells. Inhibition of retinoblastoma (RB phosphorylation and reduction in levels of free E2F-1 appear to play an important role in EOC growth arrest.

  12. Krebs cycle rewired for macrophage and dendritic cell effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Dylan Gerard; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2017-10-01

    The Krebs cycle is an amphibolic pathway operating in the mitochondrial matrix of all eukaryotic organisms. In response to proinflammatory stimuli, macrophages and dendritic cells undergo profound metabolic remodelling to support the biosynthetic and bioenergetic requirements of the cell. Recently, it has been discovered that this metabolic shift also involves the rewiring of the Krebs cycle to regulate cellular metabolic flux and the accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates, notably, citrate, succinate and fumarate. Interestingly, a new role for Krebs cycle intermediates as signalling molecules and immunomodulators that dictate the inflammatory response has begun to emerge. This review will discuss the latest developments in Krebs cycle rewiring and immune cell effector functions, with a particular focus on the regulation of cytokine production. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Corepressor MMTR/DMAP1 is an intrinsic negative regulator of CAK kinase to regulate cell cycle progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Co-repressor MMTR/DMAP1 is an intrinsic negative regulator of CAK kinase. → MMTR inhibited cell proliferation due to delays of G1/S and G2/M transitions. → Co-expression of MAT1 and MMTR rescued both cell growth and proliferation rate. → MMTR blocked the CAK kinase-mediated phosphorylation of CDK1. → The expression level of MMTR was modulated during cell cycle progression. -- Abstract: We have previously reported that MMTR (MAT1-mediated transcriptional repressor) is a co-repressor that inhibits TFIIH-mediated transcriptional activity via interaction with MAT1 (Kang et al., 2007). Since MAT1 is a member of the CAK kinase complex that is crucial for cell cycle progression and that regulates CDK phosphorylation as well as the general transcription factor TFIIH, we investigated MMTR function in cell cycle progression. We found that MMTR over-expression delayed G1/S and G2/M transitions, whereas co-expression of MAT1 and MMTR rescued the cell growth and proliferation rate. Moreover, MMTR was required for inhibition of CAK kinase-mediated CDK1 phosphorylation. We also showed that the expression level of MMTR was modulated during cell cycle progression. Our data support the notion that MMTR is an intrinsic negative cell cycle regulator that modulates the CAK kinase activity via interaction with MAT1.

  14. Aphidicolin inhibits cell proliferation via the p53-GADD45β pathway in AtT-20 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Kazunori; Sugiyama, Aya; Murasawa, Shingo; Asari, Yuko; Niioka, Kanako; Oki, Yutaka; Daimon, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's disease is primarily caused by pituitary corticotroph adenomas, which autonomically secrete adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). ACTH production may be associated with tumor cell proliferation; however, the effects of cell cycle progression on ACTH production and cell proliferation are little known in corticotroph tumor cells. A DNA polymerase inhibitor, aphidicolin, arrests cells at the entrance to the S phase and blocks the cell cycle; aphidicolin also induces apoptosis in tumor cells. In the present study, we determined ACTH production and cell proliferation of AtT-20 corticotroph tumor cells following treatment with aphidicolin. Aphidicolin decreased proopiomelanocortin mRNA levels in AtT-20 cells and the levels of ACTH in the culture medium of these cells. Aphidicolin also decreased cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in AtT-20 cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses revealed that this agent increased the percentage of G0/G1 phase cells, and decreased S phase cells. Aphidicolin decreased the phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein and Akt. Aphidicolin increased the levels of tumor protein 27 (p27) and 53 (p53), while it decreased cyclin E levels. Aphidicolin also increased the mRNA levels of the stress response gene growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45β (GADD45β), a putative downstream target of p53. The p53 knockdown increased GADD45β mRNA levels. The GADD45β knockdown inhibited the decreases in cell proliferation. Thus, aphidicolin inhibits cell proliferation via the p53-GADD45β pathway in AtT-20 cells.

  15. Cucurbitacin B Causes Increased Radiation Sensitivity of Human Breast Cancer Cells via G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwit Duangmano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To explore the effects of cucurbitacin B on the radiation survival of human breast cancer cells and to elucidate the cellular mechanism of radiosensitization if any. Materials and Methods. Human breast carcinoma cell lines were treated with cucurbitacin B before irradiation with 0–10 Gy of C137s gamma rays. The effect of cucurbitacin B on cell-survival following irradiation was evaluated by colony-forming assay. Cell cycle distributions were investigated using flow cytometry. Real-time PCR and western blots were performed to investigate the expression of cell cycle checkpoints. Results. Cucurbitacin B inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Only MDA-MB-231 and MCF7:5C cells but not SKBR-3 cells were radiosensitized by cucurbitacin B. Flow cytometric analysis for DNA content indicated that cucurbitacin B resulted in G2/M arrest in MDA-MB-231 and MCF7:5C but not SKBR-3 cells. Moreover, Real-time PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated upregulated p21 expression before irradiation, a likely cause of the cell cycle arrest. Conclusion. Taken together, these findings suggest that cucurbitacin B causes radiosensitization of some breast cancer cells, and that cucurbitacin B induced G2/M arrest is an important mechanism. Therefore, combinations of cucurbitacin B with radiotherapy may be appropriate for experimental breast cancer treatment.

  16. Knockdown of Pokemon protein expression inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation by suppression of AKT activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaosan; Dai, Yichen; Chen, Zhangxin; Xie, Junpei; Zeng, Wei; Lin, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of Pokemon, which is an erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor protein, occurs in different cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Pokemon is also reported to have an oncogenic activity in various human cancers. This study investigated the effect of Pokemon knockdown on the regulation of HCC growth. POK shRNA suppressed the expression of Pokemon protein in HepG2 cells compared to the negative control vector-transfected HCC cells. Pokemon knockdown also reduced HCC cell viability and enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HCC cells. AKT activation and the expression of various cell cycle-related genes were inhibited following Pokemon knockdown. These data demonstrate that Pokemon may play a role in HCC progression, suggesting that inhibition of Pokemon expression using Pokemon shRNA should be further evaluated as a novel target for the control of HCC.

  17. Regulation of cell cycle by the anaphase spindle midzone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sluder Greenfield

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of proteins accumulate in the spindle midzone and midbody of dividing animal cells. Besides proteins essential for cytokinesis, there are also components essential for interphase functions, suggesting that the spindle midzone and/or midbody may play a role in regulating the following cell cycle. Results We microsurgically severed NRK epithelial cells during anaphase or telophase, such that the spindle midzone/midbody was associated with only one of the daughter cells. Time-lapse recording of cells severed during early anaphase indicated that the cell with midzone underwent cytokinesis-like cortical contractions and progressed normally through the interphase, whereas the cell without midzone showed no cortical contraction and an arrest or substantial delay in the progression of interphase. Similar microsurgery during telophase showed a normal progression of interphase for both daughter cells with or without the midbody. Microsurgery of anaphase cells treated with cytochalasin D or nocodazole indicated that interphase progression was independent of cortical ingression but dependent on microtubules. Conclusions We conclude that the mitotic spindle is involved in not only the separation of chromosomes but also the regulation of cell cycle. The process may involve activation of components in the spindle midzone that are required for the cell cycle, and/or degradation of components that are required for cytokinesis but may interfere with the cell cycle.

  18. Changes of Constituents and Activity to Apoptosis and Cell Cycle During Fermentation of Tea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hang; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Lu; Ge, Ya-kun; Sheng, Jun; Shi, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Tea is believed to be beneficial for health, and the effects of the fermentation process on its contributions to apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of gastric cancer cells have not been completely investigated. In this study, the chemical components in green tea, black tea and pu-erh tea aqueous extracts were analyzed and compared. The polysaccharide and caffeine levels were substantially higher in the fermented black tea and pu-erh tea, while the polyphenol level was higher in the unfermented green tea. Hence, a treatment of tea aqueous extract and the components, which are emerging as promising anticancer agents, were pursued to determine whether this treatment could lead to enhance apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. In the human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901, the cell viability and flow cytometry analysis for apoptotic cells indicated effects in a dose-dependent inhibition manner for the three tea treatment groups. The apoptosis rates were found to be elevated after 48 h of treatment with 31.2, 125, and 500 μg/mL of green tea extract, the higher catechins content may be involved in the mechanism. Cell cycle was arrested in S phase in the fermented black tea and pu-erh tea, and the populations were significantly decreased in G2/M phases, possibly due to the oxidation of tea polyphenols, which causes an increase of theabrownins. CCC-HEL-1 normal cells were not sensitive to tea extract. These findings suggest that the fermentation process causes changes of the compounds which might be involved in the changes of cell proliferation inhibition, apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21673927

  19. Methyl jasmonate: putative mechanisms of action on cancer cells cycle, metabolism, and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, Italo Mario; Carvalho, Erika; Figueiredo Rodrigues, Mariana; Mendonça, Bruna Dos Santos; Amôedo, Nivea Dias; Rumjanek, Franklin David

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MJ), an oxylipid that induces defense-related mechanisms in plants, has been shown to be active against cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, without affecting normal cells. Here we review most of the described MJ activities in an attempt to get an integrated view and better understanding of its multifaceted modes of action. MJ (1) arrests cell cycle, inhibiting cell growth and proliferation, (2) causes cell death through the intrinsic/extrinsic proapoptotic, p53-independent apoptotic, and nonapoptotic (necrosis) pathways, (3) detaches hexokinase from the voltage-dependent anion channel, dissociating glycolytic and mitochondrial functions, decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, favoring cytochrome c release and ATP depletion, activating pro-apoptotic, and inactivating antiapoptotic proteins, (4) induces reactive oxygen species mediated responses, (5) stimulates MAPK-stress signaling and redifferentiation in leukemia cells, (6) inhibits overexpressed proinflammatory enzymes in cancer cells such as aldo-keto reductase 1 and 5-lipoxygenase, and (7) inhibits cell migration and shows antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activities. Finally, MJ may act as a chemosensitizer to some chemotherapics helping to overcome drug resistant. The complete lack of toxicity to normal cells and the rapidity by which MJ causes damage to cancer cells turn MJ into a promising anticancer agent that can be used alone or in combination with other agents.

  20. Methyl Jasmonate: Putative Mechanisms of Action on Cancer Cells Cycle, Metabolism, and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Mario Cesari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl jasmonate (MJ, an oxylipid that induces defense-related mechanisms in plants, has been shown to be active against cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, without affecting normal cells. Here we review most of the described MJ activities in an attempt to get an integrated view and better understanding of its multifaceted modes of action. MJ (1 arrests cell cycle, inhibiting cell growth and proliferation, (2 causes cell death through the intrinsic/extrinsic proapoptotic, p53-independent apoptotic, and nonapoptotic (necrosis pathways, (3 detaches hexokinase from the voltage-dependent anion channel, dissociating glycolytic and mitochondrial functions, decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, favoring cytochrome c release and ATP depletion, activating pro-apoptotic, and inactivating antiapoptotic proteins, (4 induces reactive oxygen species mediated responses, (5 stimulates MAPK-stress signaling and redifferentiation in leukemia cells, (6 inhibits overexpressed proinflammatory enzymes in cancer cells such as aldo-keto reductase 1 and 5-lipoxygenase, and (7 inhibits cell migration and shows antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activities. Finally, MJ may act as a chemosensitizer to some chemotherapics helping to overcome drug resistant. The complete lack of toxicity to normal cells and the rapidity by which MJ causes damage to cancer cells turn MJ into a promising anticancer agent that can be used alone or in combination with other agents.

  1. Genome-wide examination of myoblast cell cycle withdrawal duringdifferentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xun; Collier, John Michael; Hlaing, Myint; Zhang, Leanne; Delshad, Elizabeth H.; Bristow, James; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2002-12-02

    Skeletal and cardiac myocytes cease division within weeks of birth. Although skeletal muscle retains limited capacity for regeneration through recruitment of satellite cells, resident populations of adult myocardial stem cells have not been identified. Because cell cycle withdrawal accompanies myocyte differentiation, we hypothesized that C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line previously used to characterize myocyte differentiation, also would provide a model for studying cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. C2C12 cells were differentiated in culture medium containing horse serum and harvested at various time points to characterize the expression profiles of known cell cycle and myogenic regulatory factors by immunoblot analysis. BrdU incorporation decreased dramatically in confluent cultures 48 hr after addition of horse serum, as cells started to form myotubes. This finding was preceded by up-regulation of MyoD, followed by myogenin, and activation of Bcl-2. Cyclin D1 was expressed in proliferating cultures and became undetectable in cultures containing 40 percent fused myotubes, as levels of p21(WAF1/Cip1) increased and alpha-actin became detectable. Because C2C12 myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle during myocyte differentiation following a course that recapitulates this process in vivo, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify other gene products involved in this process. Using microarrays containing approximately 10,000 minimally redundant mouse sequences that map to the UniGene database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, we compared gene expression profiles between proliferating, differentiating, and differentiated C2C12 cells and verified candidate genes demonstrating differential expression by RT-PCR. Cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed groups of gene products involved in cell cycle withdrawal, muscle differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, we identified several genes, including DDAH2 and Ly

  2. Melatonin inhibits proliferation and invasion via repression of miRNA-155 in glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Junyi; Lu, Zhongsheng; Ji, Chenghong; Chen, Yuchao; Liu, Yuzhao; Lei, Zhe; Wang, Longqiang; Zhang, Hong-Tao; Li, Xiangdong

    2017-09-01

    Melatonin, an indolamine mostly synthesized in the pineal gland, exerts the anti-cancer effect by various mechanisms in glioma cells. Our previous study showed that miR-155 promoted glioma cell proliferation and invasion. However, the question of whether melatonin may inhibit glioma by regulating miRNAs has not yet been addressed. In this study, we found that melatonin (100μM, 1μM and 1nM) significantly inhibited the expression of miR-155 in human glioma cell lines U87, U373 and U251. Especially, the lowest expression of miR-155 was detected in 1μM melatonin-treated glioma cells. Melatonin (1μM) inhibits cell proliferation of U87 by promoting cell apoptosis. Nevertheless, melatonin had no effect on cell cycle distribution of U87 cells. Moreover, U87 cells treated with 1μM melatonin presented significantly lower migration and invasion ability when compared with control cells. Importantly, melatonin inhibited c-MYB expression, and c-MYB knockdown reduced miR-155 expression and migration and invasion in U87 cells. Taken together, for the first time, our findings show that melatonin inhibits miR-155 expression and thereby represses glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and suggest that melatonin may downregulate the expression of miR-155 via repression of c-MYB. This will provide a theoretical basis for revealing the anti-glioma mechanisms of melatonin. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Cellular Clocks : Coupled Circadian Dispatch and Cell Division Cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, Martha; Roenneberg, Till

    2004-01-01

    Gating of cell division by the circadian clock is well known, yet its mechanism is little understood. Genetically tractable model systems have led to new hypotheses and questions concerning the coupling of these two cellular cycles.

  4. Technoeconomy of different solid oxide fuel cell based hybrid cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Gas turbine, steam turbine and heat engine (Stirling engine) is used as bottoming cycle for a solid oxide fuel cell plant to compare different plants efficiencies, CO2 emissionsand plants cost in terms of $/kW. Each plant is then integrated with biomass gasification and finally six plants...... configurations are compared with each other. Technoeconomy is used when calculating the cost if the plants. It is found that when a solid oxide fuel cell plant is combined with a gas turbine cycle then the plant efficiency will be the highest one while if a biomass gasification plant is integrated...... with these hybrid cycles then integrated biomass gasification with solid oxide fuel cell and steam cycle will have the highest plant efficiency. The cost of solid oxide fuel cell with steam plant is found to be the lowest one with a value of about 1030$/kW....

  5. Dimethylfumarate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via regulating intracellular redox systems in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guocan; Zhou, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    Dimethylfumarate (DMF) is cytotoxic to several kinds of cells and serves as an anti-tumor drug. This study was designed to investigate the effects and underlying mechanism of DMF on cervical cancer cells. HeLa cells were cultured and treated with 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 μM DMF, respectively. After 24 h, cell growth was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and the cell cycle was examined using flow cytometry. In addition, cell apoptosis was detected by Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) staining and the expressions of caspase-3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were detected using western blotting. The redox-related factors were then assessed. Furthermore, all of the indicators were detected in HeLa cells after combined treatment of DMF and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an oxygen-free radical scavenger). The cell number and cell growth of HeLa were obviously inhibited by DMF in a dose-dependent manner, as the cell cycle was arrested at G0/G1 phase (P HeLa cells were markedly increased, and the expression levels of caspase-3 and PARP were significantly increased in a DMF concentration-dependent way (P cell proliferation and apoptosis of HeLa cells was mainly related to the intracellular redox systems by depletion of intracellular GSH.

  6. Does Arabidopsis thaliana DREAM of cell cycle control?

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Martin; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-01-01

    Strict temporal control of cell cycle gene expression is essential for all eukaryotes including animals and plants. DREAM complexes have been identified in worm, fly, and mammals, linking several distinct transcription factors to coordinate gene expression throughout the cell cycle. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Kobayashi et al (2015) identify distinct activator and repressor complexes for genes expressed during the G2 and M phases in Arabidopsis that can be temporarily separated during ...

  7. A novel role for the cell cycle regulatory complex cyclin D1?CDK4 in gluconeogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hosooka, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of gluconeogenesis is a key pathological feature of type 2 diabetes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of gluconeogenesis remain unclear. Bhalla et?al. recently reported that cyclin D1 suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis through CDK4?dependent phosphorylation of PGC1alpha and consequent inhibition of its activity. The cyclin D1?CDK4 might thus serve as an important link between the cell cycle and control of energy metabolism through modulation of PGC1alp...

  8. A novel role for the cell cycle regulatory complex cyclin D1-CDK4 in gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosooka, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of gluconeogenesis is a key pathological feature of type 2 diabetes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of gluconeogenesis remain unclear. Bhalla et al. recently reported that cyclin D1 suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis through CDK4-dependent phosphorylation of PGC1alpha and consequent inhibition of its activity. The cyclin D1-CDK4 might thus serve as an important link between the cell cycle and control of energy metabolism through modulation of PGC1alpha activity.

  9. Cell cycle regulation by the bacterial nucleoid

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, David William; Wu, Ling Juan; Errington, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Division site selection presents a fundamental challenge to all organisms. Bacterial cells are small and the chromosome (nucleoid) often fills most of the cell volume. Thus, in order to maximise fitness and avoid damaging the genetic material, cell division must be tightly co-ordinated with chromosome replication and segregation. To achieve this, bacteria employ a number of different mechanisms to regulate division site selection. One such mechanism, termed nucleoid occlusion, allows the nucl...

  10. Therapeutic potential of targeting cell division cycle associated 5 for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuzen, Norihiko; Nakashiro, Koh-ichi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Kazuki; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-19

    Molecularly targeted drugs are used in the treatment of a variety of malignant tumors, but this approach to developing novel therapies for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has lagged behind the progress seen for other cancers. We have attempted to find appropriate molecular targets for OSCC and identified cell division cycle associated 5 (CDCA5) as a cancer-related gene which was overexpressed in all the human OSCC cells tested by microarray analysis. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of CDCA5 in OSCC. First, we confirmed that CDCA5 was overexpressed in 4 human OSCC cell lines by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. We then tested the effect of synthetic small interfering RNAs specific for CDCA5 on the growth and invasion of human OSCC cells. Knockdown of CDCA5 markedly inhibited the growth of OSCC cells in vitro and in vivo. We also examined the expression of CDCA5 protein in 80 cases of OSCC immunohistochemically and found a significant association between CDCA5 expression levels and overall survival. These results suggest that CDCA5 functions as a critical gene supporting OSCC progression and that targeting CDCA5 may be a useful therapeutic strategy for OSCC.

  11. Genetic changes in oral premalignant lesion, condition, and oral squamous cell carcinoma - A study based on inhibition of G2M phase by colchicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kanwar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To assess the percentage of cell arrested in G2M phase by colchicine in the early detection and prognosis of oral cancer, by comparison of oral squamous cell with leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF using flow cytometry analysis. Materials and Methods: Biopsy samples 5 each of clinically diagnosed and histopathologically confirmed case of leukoplakia, OSMF, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC are included in the study. Results: Colchicines significantly inhibited the growth of oral SCC-9 cell line by arresting G2M phase of the cell cycle (94.90%. This cell cycle result indicated that doubling of DNA is a characteristic feature of cancer. Colchicines significantly inhibited the G2M phase of the cell cycle in leukoplakia (33.51% as compared to control (23.60%. Colchicines marginally inhibited the G2M phase of the cell cycle in OSMF (31.83% as compared to control (28.36%. Colchicines significantly inhibited the G2M phase of the cell cycle in SCC (63.05% as compared to control (26.40%. Conclusion: DNA analysis by inhibition of G2M phase of cell cycle using colchicine facilitates early detection and also helps determine the prognosis of leukoplakia, OSMF, and oral cancer.

  12. Restoration of contact inhibition in human glioblastoma cell lines after MIF knockdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Bernhard

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of the role of the cytokine macrophage-migration-inhibitory-factor (MIF in malignant tumors have revealed its stimulating influence on cell-cycle progression, angiogenesis and anti-apoptosis. Results Here we show that in vitro targeting MIF in cultures of human malignant glioblastoma cells by either antisense plasmid introduction or anti-MIF antibody treatment reduced the growth rates of tumor cells. Of note is the marked decrease of proliferation under confluent and over-confluent conditions, implying a role of MIF in overcoming contact inhibition. Several proteins involved in contact inhibition including p27, p21, p53 and CEBPalpha are upregulated in the MIF antisense clones indicating a restoration of contact inhibition in the tumor cells. Correspondingly, we observed a marked increase in MIF mRNA and protein content under higher cell densities in LN18 cells. Furthermore, we showed the relevance of the enzymatic active site of MIF for the proliferation of glioblastoma cells by using the MIF-tautomerase inhibitor ISO-1. Conclusion Our study adds another puzzle stone to the role of MIF in tumor growth and progression by showing the importance of MIF for overcoming contact inhibition.

  13. Restoration of contact inhibition in human glioblastoma cell lines after MIF knockdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, Jörg; Reese, Jens P; Bacher, Michael; Deuster, Oliver; Rinn, Birgit; Schulz, Martina; Kautz, Andreas; Dodel, Richard; Meyer, Bernhard; Al-Abed, Yousef; Balakrishnan, Karthikeyan

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the role of the cytokine macrophage-migration-inhibitory-factor (MIF) in malignant tumors have revealed its stimulating influence on cell-cycle progression, angiogenesis and anti-apoptosis. Here we show that in vitro targeting MIF in cultures of human malignant glioblastoma cells by either antisense plasmid introduction or anti-MIF antibody treatment reduced the growth rates of tumor cells. Of note is the marked decrease of proliferation under confluent and over-confluent conditions, implying a role of MIF in overcoming contact inhibition. Several proteins involved in contact inhibition including p27, p21, p53 and CEBPalpha are upregulated in the MIF antisense clones indicating a restoration of contact inhibition in the tumor cells. Correspondingly, we observed a marked increase in MIF mRNA and protein content under higher cell densities in LN18 cells. Furthermore, we showed the relevance of the enzymatic active site of MIF for the proliferation of glioblastoma cells by using the MIF-tautomerase inhibitor ISO-1. Our study adds another puzzle stone to the role of MIF in tumor growth and progression by showing the importance of MIF for overcoming contact inhibition

  14. Inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1 suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis of epithelium originated cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Lizhao; Song, Yan; Gao, Jian; Gao, Jianjun; Wang, KeWei

    2016-11-29

    ANO1, a calcium-activated chloride channel, has been reported to be amplified or overexpressed in tissues of several cancers. However, reports on its roles in tumor progression obtained from cancer cell lines are inconsistent, suggesting that the role of ANO1 in tumorigenesis is likely dependent on either its expression level or cell-type expressing ANO1. To investigate the biological roles of ANO1 in different tumor cells, we, in this study, selected several cancer cell lines and a normal HaCaT cell line with high expression levels of ANO1, and examined the function of ANO1 in these cells using approaches of lentiviral knockdown and pharmacological inhibition. We found that ANO1 knockdown significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in either tumor cell lines or normal HaCaT cell line. Moreover, silencing ANO1 arrested cancer cells at G1 phase of cell cycle. Treatment with ANO1 inhibitor CaCCinh-A01 reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, both ANO1 inhibitors CaCCinh-A01 and T16Ainh-A01 significantly suppressed cell migration. Our findings show that ANO1 overexpression promotes cancer cell proliferation and migration; and genetic or pharmacological inhibition of ANO1 induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in different types of epithelium-originated cancer cells.

  15. [Effects of extract of Polygonum multiflorum on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human liver cell line L02].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Chen; Liu, Bin; Sun, Zhen-Xiao; Xu, Dong-Yan

    2010-06-01

    To analyze the chemical constituents of Polygonum multiflorum extract which may cause human liver cell damage and to explore the mechanism. Raw and processed Polygonum multiflorum were extracted by 70% ethanol, then raw and processed Polygonum multiflorum water-eluted material (RW and PW), 50% ethanol-eluted material (R50 and P50) and 95% ethanol-eluted material (R95 and P95) were obtained by absorbing through AB-8 macroporous resin, followed by water, 50% ethanol and 95% ethanol elution in order. The water extracts of raw and processed Polygonum multiflorum (RWE or PWE) were obtained by boiling them in water as usual. Normal human liver L02 cells were treated by different concentrations of eluted Polygonum multiflorum materials for different time, and the cell growth inhibition of each group was determined by methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide method. The chemical constituents which had a significant cytotoxicity to L02 cells were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Morphological changes of L02 cells were observed by Giemsa staining and cell cycle distribution was observed by flow cytometry. It was found that 95% ethanol-eluted extracts of raw and processed Polygonum multiflorum showed significant growth inhibition on normal human liver L02 cells, while the other components showed no significant inhibition on cell growth. HPLC analysis showed that the main component in 95% ethanol-eluted extract of raw and processed Polygonum multiflorum was emodin at content of (18.53+/-2.96)% and (10.28+/-1.34)% respectively. Cell cycle analysis showed that 95% ethanol-eluted material of Polygonum multiflorum and emodin had a similar significant effect of S phase arrest and all could induce L02 cell apoptosis. The main part of Polygonum multiflorum causing liver cell damage is the 95% ethanol-eluted extract, and emodin is one of the important chemical constituents leading to liver cell damage.

  16. Thermally regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell power cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morehouse, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Two innovative thermodynamic power cycles are analytically examined for future engineering feasibility. The power cycles use a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell for electrical energy production and use the thermal dissociation of water for regeneration of the hydrogen and oxygen. The TDS (thermal dissociation system) uses a thermal energy input at over 2000 K to thermally dissociate the water. The other cycle, the HTE (high temperature electrolyzer) system, dissociates the water using an electrolyzer operating at high temperature (1300 K) which receives its electrical energy from the fuel cell. The primary advantages of these cycles is that they are basically a no moving parts system, thus having the potential for long life and high reliability, and they have the potential for high thermal efficiency. Both cycles are shown to be classical heat engines with ideal efficiency close to Carnot cycle efficiency. The feasibility of constructing actual cycles is investigated by examining process irreversibilities and device efficiencies for the two types of cycles. The results show that while the processes and devices of the 2000 K TDS exceed current technology limits, the high temperature electrolyzer system appears to be a state-of-the-art technology development. The requirements for very high electrolyzer and fuel cell efficiencies are seen as determining the feasbility of the HTE system, and these high efficiency devices are currently being developed. It is concluded that a proof-of-concept HTE system experiment can and should be conducted.

  17. Phytol isolated from watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) sprouts induces cell death in human T-lymphoid cell line Jurkat cells via S-phase cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Ono, Akito; Kawaguchi, Kaori; Teraoka, Sayaka; Harada, Mayo; Sumi, Keitaro; Ando, Masashi; Tsukamasa, Yasuyuki; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Koketsu, Mamoru; Hashizume, Toshiharu

    2018-05-01

    The phytol isolated from watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) sprouts inhibited the growth of a human T-cell leukemia line Jurkat cell and suppressed tumor progression in a xenograft model of human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line A549 in nude mice. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the phytol-induced cell death in the present study, we examined the changes in cell morphology, DNA fragmentation, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and performed flow cytometric analysis to evaluate cell cycle stage. There were no significant changes in apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis marker in cells treated with the phytol. But, we found, for the first time, that phytol remarkably induced S-phase cell cycle arrest accompanied with intracellular ROS production. Western blot analyses showed that phytolinduced S-phase cell cycle arrest was mediated through the decreased expression of cyclins A and D and the downregulations of MAPK and PI3K/Akt. The tumor volume levels in mice treated with phytol were lower than those of non-treatment groups, and it showed very similar suppression compared with those of mice treated with cyclophosphamide. Based on the data of in vitro and in vivo studies and previous studies, we suggest phytol as a potential therapeutic compound for cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The timing of T cell priming and cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard eObst

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of specific lymphocytes is the central tenet of the clonal selection paradigm. Antigen recognition by T cells triggers a series of events that produces expanded clones of differentiated effector cells. TCR signaling events are detectable within seconds and minutes and are likely to continue for hours and days in vivo. Here, I review the work done on the importance of TCR signals in the later part of the expansion phase of the primary T cell response, primarily regarding the regulation of the cell cycle in CD4+ and CD8+ cells. The results suggest a degree of programming by early signals for effector differentiation, particularly in the CD8+ T cell compartment, with optimal expansion supported by persistent antigen presentation later on. Differences to CD4+ T cell expansion and new avenues towards a molecular understanding of cell cycle regulation in lymphocytes are discussed.

  19. The Dynamical Mechanisms of the Cell Cycle Size Checkpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Shi-Fu; Yang Ling; Yan Jie; Liu Zeng-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Cell division must be tightly coupled to cell growth in order to maintain cell size, whereas the mechanisms of how initialization of mitosis is regulated by cell size remain to be elucidated. We develop a mathematical model of the cell cycle, which incorporates cell growth to investigate the dynamical properties of the size checkpoint in embryos of Xenopus laevis. We show that the size checkpoint is naturally raised from a saddle-node bifurcation, and in a mutant case, the cell loses its size control ability due to the loss of this saddle-node point

  20. The inhibition of PARP but not EGFR results in the radiosensitization of HPV/p16-positive HNSCC cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Güster, Julian David; Weissleder, Stephanie Valerie; Busch, Chia-Jung; Kriegs, Malte; Petersen, Cordula; Knecht, Rainald; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Rieckmann, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: HPV-negative and HPV-positive HNSCC comprise distinct tumor entities with different biological characteristics. Specific regimens for the comparably well curable HPV-positive entity that reduce side effects without compromising outcome have yet to be established. Therefore, we tested here whether the inhibition of EGFR or PARP may be used to specifically enhance the radiosensitivity of HPV-positive HNSCC cells. Materials and methods: Experiments were performed with five HPV/p16-positive HNSCC cell lines. Inhibitors used were cetuximab, olaparib and PF-00477736. The respective inhibition of EGFR, PARP and Chk1 was evaluated by Western blot, immunofluorescence analysis and assessment of cell cycle distribution. Cell survival was assessed by colony formation assay. Results: Inhibition of EGFR by cetuximab failed to radiosensitize any of the HPV-positive HNSCC cell lines tested. In contrast, PARP-inhibition resulted in a substantial radiosensitization of all strains, with the sensitization being further enhanced by the additional inhibition of Chk1. Conclusions: PARP-inhibition effectively radiosensitizes HPV-positive HNSCC cells and may therefore represent a viable alternative to chemotherapy possibly even allowing for a reduction in radiation dose. For the latter, PARP-inhibition may be combined with the inhibition of Chk1. In contrast, the inhibition of EGFR cannot be expected to radiosensitize HPV-positive HNSCC through the modulation of cellular radiosensitivity

  1. Cell proliferation inhibition in reduced gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Extended durations of spaceflight have been shown to be deleterious on an organismic level; however, mechanisms underlying cellular sensitivity to the gravitational environment remain to be elucidated. The majority of the gravitational studies to date indicates that cell regulatory pathways may be influenced by their gravitational environment. Still, few cell biology experiments have been performed in space flight and even fewer experiments have been repeated on subsequent flights. With flight opportunities on STS-50, 54, and 57, Sf9 cells were flown in the BioServe Fluids Processing Apparatus and cell proliferation was measured with and without exposure to a cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) inhibitor. Results from these flights indicate that the Sf9 cells grew comparable to ground controls, that the CeReS inhibitor bound to its specific receptor, and that its signal transduction cascade was not gravity sensitive.

  2. Lithium inhibits tumorigenic potential of PDA cells through targeting hedgehog-GLI signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonglu Peng

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a critical role in the initiation and development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA and represents an attractive target for PDA treatment. Lithium, a clinical mood stabilizer for mental disorders, potently inhibits the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β that promotes the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome degradation of GLI1, an important downstream component of hedgehog signaling. Herein, we report that lithium inhibits cell proliferation, blocks G1/S cell-cycle progression, induces cell apoptosis and suppresses tumorigenic potential of PDA cells through down-regulation of the expression and activity of GLI1. Moreover, lithium synergistically enhances the anti-cancer effect of gemcitabine. These findings further our knowledge of mechanisms of action for lithium and provide a potentially new therapeutic strategy for PDA through targeting GLI1.

  3. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yo-Han; Kee, Ji-Ye; Kim, Dae-Seung; Mun, Jeong-Geon; Jeong, Mi-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Min; Park, Sung-Joo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2016-08-27

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis.

  4. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo-Han Han

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Arctigenin (ARC has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC. In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis.

  5. Cyclin D1 in ASM Cells from Asthmatics Is Insensitive to Corticosteroid Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jodi C; Seidel, Petra; Schlosser, Tobias; Ramsay, Emma E; Ge, Qi; Ammit, Alaina J

    2012-01-01

    Hyperplasia of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a feature of the remodelled airway in asthmatics. We examined the antiproliferative effectiveness of the corticosteroid dexamethasone on expression of the key regulator of G(1) cell cycle progression-cyclin D1-in ASM cells from nonasthmatics and asthmatics stimulated with the mitogen platelet-derived growth factor BB. While cyclin D1 mRNA and protein expression were repressed in cells from nonasthmatics in contrast, cyclin D1 expression in asthmatics was resistant to inhibition by dexamethasone. This was independent of a repressive effect on glucocorticoid receptor translocation. Our results corroborate evidence demonstrating that corticosteroids inhibit mitogen-induced proliferation only in ASM cells from subjects without asthma and suggest that there are corticosteroid-insensitive proliferative pathways in asthmatics.

  6. Arecoline decreases interleukin-6 production and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human basal cell carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Bau-Shan; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Hu, Yu-Chen [Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wen-Tsan [Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Division of Hepatobiliarypancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kee-Lung, E-mail: Chang.KeeLung@msa.hinet.net [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China)

    2012-01-15

    Arecoline, the most abundant areca alkaloid, has been reported to decrease interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in epithelial cancer cells. Since IL-6 overexpression contributes to the tumorigenic potency of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), this study was designed to investigate whether arecoline altered IL-6 expression and its downstream regulation of apoptosis and the cell cycle in cultured BCC-1/KMC cells. BCC-1/KMC cells and a human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, were treated with arecoline at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 μg/ml, then IL-6 production and expression of apoptosis- and cell cycle progress-related factors were examined. After 24 h exposure, arecoline inhibited BCC-1/KMC cell growth and decreased IL-6 production in terms of mRNA expression and protein secretion, but had no effect on HaCaT cells. Analysis of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation showed that arecoline induced apoptosis of BCC-1/KMC cells in a dose-dependent manner, activated caspase-3, and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition, arecoline induced progressive and sustained accumulation of BCC-1/KMC cells in G2/M phase as a result of reducing checkpoint Cdc2 activity by decreasing Cdc25C phosphatase levels and increasing p53 levels. Furthermore, subcutaneous injection of arecoline led to decreased BCC-1/KMC tumor growth in BALB/c mice by inducing apoptosis. This study demonstrates that arecoline has potential for preventing BCC tumorigenesis by reducing levels of the tumor cell survival factor IL-6, increasing levels of the tumor suppressor factor p53, and eliciting cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis. Highlights: ► Arecoline has potential to prevent against basal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis. ► It has more effectiveness on BCC as compared with a human keratinocyte cell line. ► Mechanisms involved including reducing tumor cells’ survival factor IL-6, ► Decreasing Cdc25C phosphatase, enhancing tumor suppressor factor p53, ► Eliciting G2/M

  7. Study of the cell cycle control for human malignant mesothelioma lines. Interferon and radiations effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivo, C.

    1999-01-01

    In order to better understand the inhibition mechanisms of the IFN-R-HU on tumoral development, the IFN-R-U effect on MM lines has been studied. Three groups of lines has been distinguished: eight sensitive lines, two intermediate and three resistant. The sensitive lines showed a triple locking of the cell cycle: in phases S, G1 and G2. The study of the cell cycle control points function, realized by the MM lines radiation exposure showed the points function on G1/S and-or on G2/M and the dependence or non dependence of the cycle stop of the protein P53 and P21 W at F1/CIP1. (A.L.B.)

  8. Cell cycles and proliferation patterns in Haematococcus pluvialis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunhui; Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Litao

    2017-09-01

    Most studies on Haematococcus pluvialis have been focused on cell growth and astaxanthin accumulation; far less attention has been paid to cell cycles and proliferation patterns. The purpose of this study was to clarify cell cycles and proliferation patterns in H. pluvialis microscopically using a camera and video recorder system. The complicated life history of H. pluvialis can be divided into two stages: the motile stage and the non-motile stage. All the cells can be classified into forms as follows: motile cell, nonmotile cell, zoospore and aplanospore. The main cell proliferation, both in the motile phase and non-motile phase in H. pluvialis, is by asexual reproduction. Under normal growth conditions, a motile cell usually produces two, sometimes four, and exceptionally eight zoospores. Under unfavorable conditions, the motile cell loses its flagella and transforms into a non-motile cell, and the non-motile cell usually produces 2, 4 or 8 aplanospores, and occasionally 20-32 aplanospores, which further develop into non-motile cells. Under suitable conditions, the non-motile cell is also able to release zoospores. The larger non-motile cells produce more than 16 zoospores, and the smaller ones produce 4 or 8 zoospores. Vegetative reproduction is by direct cell division in the motile phase and by occasional cell budding in the non-motile phase. There is, as yet, no convincing direct evidence for sexual reproduction.

  9. Toll-like receptor 4 is involved in the cell cycle modulation and required for effective human cytomegalovirus infection in THP-1 macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina, E-mail: mariacristina.arcangeletti@unipr.it [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Germini, Diego; Rodighiero, Isabella [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Mirandola, Prisco [Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological and Translational Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); De Conto, Flora; Medici, Maria-Cristina [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Gatti, Rita [Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological and Translational Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Chezzi, Carlo; Calderaro, Adriana [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy)

    2013-05-25

    Suitable host cell metabolic conditions are fundamental for the effective development of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic cycle. Indeed, several studies have demonstrated the ability of this virus to interfere with cell cycle regulation, mainly by blocking proliferating cells in G1 or G1/S. In the present study, we demonstrate that HCMV deregulates the cell cycle of T