WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell culture infectivity

  1. Cryptosporidium cell culture infectivity assay design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B J; Keegan, A R; Robinson, B S; Monis, P T

    2011-05-01

    Members of the genus Cryptosporidium, which cause the gastrointestinal disease cryptosporidiosis, still represent a significant cause of water-borne disease worldwide. While intensive efforts have been invested in the development of techniques for parasite culture, in vitro growth has been hampered by a number of factors including low levels of infectivity as well as delayed life-cycle development and poor synchronicity. In this study we examined factors affecting the timing of contact between excysted sporozoites and target host cells and the subsequent impact of this upon the establishment of infection. We demonstrate that excystation rate impacts upon establishment of infection and that in our standard assay format the majority of sporozoites are not close enough to the cell monolayer when they are released from the oocyst to successfully establish infection. However, this can be easily overcome by centrifugation of oocysts onto the cell monolayer, resulting in approximately 4-fold increases in sporozoite attachment and subsequent infection. We further demonstrate that excystation procedures can be tailored to control excystation rate to match the assay end purpose and that excystation rate can influence data interpretation. Finally, the addition of both a centrifugation and washing step post-sporozoite attachment may be appropriate when considering the design of in vitro culture experiments for developmental analysis and stage-specific gene expression as this appears to increase the synchronicity of early developmental stages.

  2. Quantitative-PCR Assessment of Cryptosporidium parvum Cell Culture Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Di Giovanni, George D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative TaqMan PCR method was developed for assessing the Cryptosporidium parvum infection of in vitro cultivated human ileocecal adenocarcinoma (HCT-8) cell cultures. This method, termed cell culture quantitative sequence detection (CC-QSD), has numerous applications, several of which are presented. CC-QSD was used to investigate parasite infection in cell culture over time, the effects of oocyst treatment on infectivity and infectivity assessment of different C. parvum isolates. CC-Q...

  3. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130-170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  4. In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin A.; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-30

    Human noroviruses (NoV) cause severe, self-limiting gastroenteritis that typically lasts 24 - 48 hours. The true nature of NoV pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of suitable tissue culture or animal models. Here we show, for the first time, that NoV can infect and replicate in an organoid, three-dimensional (3-D) model of human small intestinal epithelium (INT-407). Cellular differentiation for this model was achieved by growing the cells in 3-D on porous collagen I-coated microcarrier beads under conditions of physiological fluid shear in rotating wall vessel bioreactors. Microscopy, PCR, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization were employed to provide evidence of NoV infection. CPE and norovirus RNA was detected at each of the five cell passages for both genogroup I and II viruses. Our results demonstrate that the highly differentiated 3-D cell culture model can support the natural growth of human noroviruses, whereas previous attempts using differentiated monolayer cultures failed.

  5. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Coyne G; Nickerson, Cheryl A; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and encounters the

  6. Iridovirus infection of cell cultures from the Diaprepes root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Hunter

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We here report the development and viral infection of a Diaprepes root weevil cell culture. Embryonic tissues of the root weevil were used to establish cell cultures for use in screening viral pathogens as potential biological control agents. Tissues were seeded into a prepared solution of insect medium and kept at a temperature of 24°C. The cell culture had primarily fibroblast-like morphology with some epithelial monolayers. Root weevil cells were successfully infected in vitro with a known insect virus, Invertebrate Iridescent Virus 6. Potential uses of insect cell cultures and insect viruses are discussed.

  7. Cultured corneas show dendritic spread and restrict herpes simplex virus infection that is not observed with cultured corneal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Neel; Jaishankar, Dinesh; Agelidis, Alex; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Mangano, Kyle; Patel, Shrey; Tekin, Sati Zeynep; Shukla, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) causes life-long morbidities in humans. While fever blisters are more common, occasionally the cornea is infected resulting in vision loss. A very intriguing aspect of HSV-1 corneal infection is that the virus spread is normally restricted to only a small fraction of cells on the corneal surface that connect with each other in a dendritic fashion. Here, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the susceptibility of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells to HSV-1 infection, we infected HCE cells at three different dosages of HSV-1 and measured the outcomes in terms of viral entry, gene and protein expression, viral replication and cytokine induction. In cultured cells, infectivity and cytokine induction were observed even at the minimum viral dosage tested, while a more pronounced dose-restricted infectivity was seen in ex vivo cultures of porcine corneas. Use of fluorescent HSV-1 virions demonstrated a pattern of viral spread ex vivo that mimics clinical findings. We conclude that HCE cell cultures are highly susceptible to infection whereas the cultured corneas demonstrate a higher ability to restrict the infection even in the absence of systemic immune system. The restriction is helped in part by local interferon response and the unique cellular architecture of the cornea. PMID:28198435

  8. Metabolic effects of influenza virus infection in cultured animal cells: Intra- and extracellular metabolite profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genzel Yvonne

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many details in cell culture-derived influenza vaccine production are still poorly understood and approaches for process optimization mainly remain empirical. More insights on mammalian cell metabolism after a viral infection could give hints on limitations and cell-specific virus production capacities. A detailed metabolic characterization of an influenza infected adherent cell line (MDCK was carried out based on extracellular and intracellular measurements of metabolite concentrations. Results For most metabolites the comparison of infected (human influenza A/PR/8/34 and mock-infected cells showed a very similar behavior during the first 10-12 h post infection (pi. Significant changes were observed after about 12 h pi: (1 uptake of extracellular glucose and lactate release into the cell culture supernatant were clearly increased in infected cells compared to mock-infected cells. At the same time (12 h pi intracellular metabolite concentrations of the upper part of glycolysis were significantly increased. On the contrary, nucleoside triphosphate concentrations of infected cells dropped clearly after 12 h pi. This behaviour was observed for two different human influenza A/PR/8/34 strains at slightly different time points. Conclusions Comparing these results with literature values for the time course of infection with same influenza strains, underline the hypothesis that influenza infection only represents a minor additional burden for host cell metabolism. The metabolic changes observed after12 h pi are most probably caused by the onset of apoptosis in infected cells. The comparison of experimental data from two variants of the A/PR/8/34 virus strain (RKI versus NIBSC with different productivities and infection dynamics showed comparable metabolic patterns but a clearly different timely behavior. Thus, infection dynamics are obviously reflected in host cell metabolism.

  9. Cell culture and animal infection with distinct Trypanosoma cruzi strains expressing red and green fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, S F; DaRocha, W D; Freitas, J M; Oliveira, L A; Kitten, G T; Machado, C R; Pena, S D J; Chiari, E; Macedo, A M; Teixeira, S M R

    2008-03-01

    Different strains of Trypanosoma cruzi were transfected with an expression vector that allows the integration of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) genes into the beta-tubulin locus by homologous recombination. The sites of integration of the GFP and RFP markers were determined by pulse-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blot analyses. Cloned cell lines selected from transfected epimastigote populations maintained high levels of fluorescent protein expression even after 6 months of in vitro culture of epimastigotes in the absence of drug selection. Fluorescent trypomastigotes and amastigotes were observed within Vero cells in culture as well as in hearts and diaphragms of infected mice. The infectivity of the GFP- and RFP-expressing parasites in tissue culture cells was comparable to wild type populations. Furthermore, GFP- and RFP-expressing parasites were able to produce similar levels of parasitemia in mice compared with wild type parasites. Cell cultures infected simultaneously with two cloned cell lines from the same parasite strain, each one expressing a distinct fluorescent marker, showed that at least two different parasites are able to infect the same cell. Double-infected cells were also detected when GFP- and RFP-expressing parasites were derived from strains belonging to two distinct T. cruzi lineages. These results show the usefulness of parasites expressing GFP and RFP for the study of various aspects of T. cruzi infection including the mechanisms of cell invasion, genetic exchange among parasites and the differential tissue distribution in animal models of Chagas disease.

  10. Metabolic effects of influenza virus infection in cultured animal cells: Intra- and extracellular metabolite profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritter, J.B.; Wahl, A.S.; Freund, S.; Genzel, Y.; Reichl, U.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many details in cell culture-derived influenza vaccine production are still poorly understood and approaches for process optimization mainly remain empirical. More insights on mammalian cell metabolism after a viral infection could give hints on limitations and cell-specific virus

  11. Transcriptional profiles of chicken embryo cell cultures following infection with infectious bursal disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Handberg, K.J.; Juul-Madsen, H.R.

    2007-01-01

    -host interaction, we measured steady-state levels of transcripts from 28 cellular genes of chicken embryo (CE) cell cultures infected with IBDV vaccine stain Bursine-2 during a 7-day infection course by use of the quantitative real-time RT-PCR SYBR green method. Of the genes tested, 21 genes (IRF-1, IFN 1...

  12. Cell Culture Models for the Investigation of Hepatitis B and D Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloi R. Verrier

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis D virus (HDV infections are major causes of liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Despite the presence of an efficient preventive vaccine, more than 250 million patients are chronically infected with HBV. Current antivirals effectively control but only rarely cure chronic infection. While the molecular biology of the two viruses has been characterized in great detail, the absence of robust cell culture models for HBV and/or HDV infection has limited the investigation of virus-host interactions. Native hepatoma cell lines do not allow viral infection, and the culture of primary hepatocytes, the natural host cell for the viruses, implies a series of constraints restricting the possibilities of analyzing virus-host interactions. Recently, the discovery of the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP as a key HBV/HDV cell entry factor has opened the door to a new era of investigation, as NTCP-overexpressing hepatoma cells acquire susceptibility to HBV and HDV infections. In this review, we summarize the major cell culture models for HBV and HDV infection, discuss their advantages and limitations and highlight perspectives for future developments.

  13. Cell Culture Models for the Investigation of Hepatitis B and D Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Eloi R.; Colpitts, Che C.; Schuster, Catherine; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) infections are major causes of liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Despite the presence of an efficient preventive vaccine, more than 250 million patients are chronically infected with HBV. Current antivirals effectively control but only rarely cure chronic infection. While the molecular biology of the two viruses has been characterized in great detail, the absence of robust cell culture models for HBV and/or HDV infection has limited the investigation of virus-host interactions. Native hepatoma cell lines do not allow viral infection, and the culture of primary hepatocytes, the natural host cell for the viruses, implies a series of constraints restricting the possibilities of analyzing virus-host interactions. Recently, the discovery of the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) as a key HBV/HDV cell entry factor has opened the door to a new era of investigation, as NTCP-overexpressing hepatoma cells acquire susceptibility to HBV and HDV infections. In this review, we summarize the major cell culture models for HBV and HDV infection, discuss their advantages and limitations and highlight perspectives for future developments. PMID:27657111

  14. Identification of XMRV infection-associated microRNAs in four cell types in culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketha V K Mohan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: XMRV is a gammaretrovirus that was thought to be associated with prostate cancer (PC and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS in humans until recently. The virus is culturable in various cells of human origin like the lymphocytes, NK cells, neuronal cells, and prostate cell lines. MicroRNAs (miRNA, which regulate gene expression, were so far not identified in cells infected with XMRV in culture. METHODS: Two prostate cell lines (LNCaP and DU145 and two primary cells, Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes [PBL] and Monocyte-derived Macrophages [MDM] were infected with XMRV. Total mRNA was extracted from mock- and virus-infected cells at 6, 24 and 48 hours post infection and evaluated for microRNA profile in a microarray. RESULTS: MicroRNA expression profiles of XMRV-infected continuous prostate cancer cell lines differ from that of virus-infected primary cells (PBL and MDMs. miR-193a-3p and miRPlus-E1245 observed to be specific to XMRV infection in all 4 cell types. While miR-193a-3p levels were down regulated miRPlus-E1245 on the other hand exhibited varied expression profile between the 4 cell types. DISCUSSION: The present study clearly demonstrates that cellular microRNAs are expressed during XMRV infection of human cells and this is the first report demonstrating the regulation of miR193a-3p and miRPlus-E1245 during XMRV infection in four different human cell types.

  15. Infection of Cultured Thin Cell Layer Roots of Lycopersicon esculentum by Meloidogyne incognita

    OpenAIRE

    Radin, D. N.; Eisenback, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A new aseptic culture system for studying interactions between tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and Meloidogyne incognita is described. Epidermal thin cell layer explants from peduncles of tomato produced up to 20 adventitious roots per culture in 4-9 days on Murashige &Scoog medium plus kinetin and indole acetic acid. Rooted cultures were transferred to Gamborg's B-5 medium and inoculated with infective second-stage juveniles. Gall formation was apparent 5 days after inoculation and egg prod...

  16. Comparison of in vitro cell culture and a mouse assay for measuring infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Paul A; Marshall, Marilyn M; Mead, Jan R; Johnson, Anne M; Korich, Dick G; Rosen, Jeffrey S; De Leon, Ricardo

    2002-08-01

    In vitro cell cultures were compared to neonatal mice for measuring the infectivity of five genotype 2 isolates of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocyst doses were enumerated by flow cytometry and delivered to animals and cell monolayers by using standardized procedures. Each dose of oocysts was inoculated into up to nine replicates of 9 to 12 mice or 6 to 10 cell culture wells. Infections were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining in CD-1 mice, by reverse transcriptase PCR in HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells, and by immunofluorescence microscopy in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Infectivity was expressed as a logistic transformation of the proportion of animals or cell culture wells that developed infection at each dose. In most instances, the slopes of the dose-response curves were not significantly different when we compared the infectivity models for each isolate. The 50% infective doses for the different isolates varied depending on the method of calculation but were in the range from 16 to 347 oocysts for CD-1 mice and in the ranges from 27 to 106, 31 to 629, and 13 to 18 oocysts for HCT-8, Caco-2, and MDCK cells, respectively. The average standard deviations for the percentages of infectivity for all replicates of all isolates were 13.9, 11.5, 13.2, and 10.7% for CD-1 mice, HCT-8 cells, Caco-2 cells, and MDCK cells, respectively, demonstrating that the levels of variability were similar in all assays. There was a good correlation between the average infectivity for HCT-8 cells and the results for CD-1 mice across all isolates for untreated oocysts (r = 0.85, n = 25) and for oocysts exposed to ozone and UV light (r = 0.89, n = 29). This study demonstrated that in vitro cell culture was equivalent to the "gold standard," mouse infectivity, for measuring the infectivity of C. parvum and should therefore be considered a practical and accurate alternative for assessing oocyst infectivity and inactivation. However, the high levels of variability displayed by all

  17. Teicoplanin inhibits Ebola pseudovirus infection in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yizhuo; Cui, Rui; Li, Guiming; Gao, Qianqian; Yuan, Shilin; Altmeyer, Ralf; Zou, Gang

    2016-01-01

    There is currently no approved antiviral therapy for treatment of Ebola virus disease. To discover readily available approved drugs that can be rapidly repurposed for treatment of Ebola virus infections, we screened 1280 FDA-approved drugs and identified glycopeptide antibiotic teicoplanin inhibiting Ebola pseudovirus infection by blocking virus entry in the low micromolar range. Teicoplanin could be evaluated further and incorporated into ongoing clinical studies.

  18. Antiviral activity produced by an IPNV-carrier EPC cell culture confers resistance to VHSV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, María Teresa; García-Valtanen, Pablo; Estepa, Amparo; Perez, Luis

    2013-10-25

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), a fish birnavirus, can establish a persistent infection on epithelioma papulosum cyprinid (EPC) cells producing a carrier state where a small fraction of IPNV-infected cells is maintained in the culture after continuous subculture. The EPC(IPNV) cells are resistant to challenge with IPNV as well as to challenge with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a rhabdovirus. In this work, the antiviral effect of the IPNV carrier culture conditioned medium (EPC(IPNV)-CM) was tested and analyzed in detail. EPC cells treated with the carrier culture supernatant become protected against VHSV challenge. Size-fractionation by filtration and acid and heat treatment showed that the IPNV persistently infected cells release an acid-resistant soluble factor in the molecular weight fraction bellow 50 kDa. The capacity of the EPC(IPNV)-CM to induce cytokine genes in EPC cells was also determined by real-time RT-PCR. We found that there is a positive correlation between up-regulation of mx gene expression in EPC cells treated with EPC(IPNV)-CM and protection against VHSV challenge. Our findings indicate that the control of IPNV multiplication in the carrier culture as well as the interference with rhabdovirus replication are connected to the production and release of an antiviral (interferon-like) factor to the medium.

  19. Detection and quantification of poliovirus infection using FTIR spectroscopy and cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee-Montiel Felipe T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a globalized word, prevention of infectious diseases is a major challenge. Rapid detection of viable virus particles in water and other environmental samples is essential to public health risk assessment, homeland security and environmental protection. Current virus detection methods, especially assessing viral infectivity, are complex and time-consuming, making point-of-care detection a challenge. Faster, more sensitive, highly specific methods are needed to quantify potentially hazardous viral pathogens and to determine if suspected materials contain viable viral particles. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy combined with cellular-based sensing, may offer a precise way to detect specific viruses. This approach utilizes infrared light to monitor changes in molecular components of cells by tracking changes in absorbance patterns produced following virus infection. In this work poliovirus (PV1 was used to evaluate the utility of FTIR spectroscopy with cell culture for rapid detection of infective virus particles. Results Buffalo green monkey kidney (BGMK cells infected with different virus titers were studied at 1 - 12 hours post-infection (h.p.i.. A partial least squares (PLS regression method was used to analyze and model cellular responses to different infection titers and times post-infection. The model performs best at 8 h.p.i., resulting in an estimated root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV of 17 plaque forming units (PFU/ml when using low titers of infection of 10 and 100 PFU/ml. Higher titers, from 103 to 106 PFU/ml, could also be reliably detected. Conclusions This approach to poliovirus detection and quantification using FTIR spectroscopy and cell culture could potentially be extended to compare biochemical cell responses to infection with different viruses. This virus detection method could feasibly be adapted to an automated scheme for use in areas such as water safety monitoring and

  20. Confirmation of Chlamydophila abortus in infected cell culture using Indirect Immunofluorescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Nair G

    Full Text Available Chlamydophila abortus (C. abortus is an important abortifacient agent in bovines and ovines. Clinical diagnosis of the disease is often difficult. An early diagnosis can be achieved based on direct demonstration of the organism in clinical material and through the cultural recovery of the organism in embryonated chicken egg. For confirmatory diagnosis antigen detection methods or serological techniques can be adopted. The present study is aimed at the confirmatory diagnosis of C. abortus infection by indirect immunofluorescence technique following the isolation of the organism in cell culture. Specific apple green fluorescing inclusions of C. abortus in McCoy cell lines was detected from 72 h to 96 h post infection employing anti-chlamydial group specific monoclonal antibodies. Thus, a confirmatory diagnosis of the infection was possible with this study. [Vet. World 2011; 4(10.000: 473-474

  1. Ambroxol inhibits rhinovirus infection in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaya, Mutsuo; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Nadine, Lusamba Kalonji; Ota, Chiharu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Nagatomi, Ryoichi

    2014-04-01

    The mucolytic drug ambroxol hydrochloride reduces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the frequency of exacerbation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the inhibitory effects of ambroxol on rhinovirus infection, the major cause of COPD exacerbations, have not been studied. We examined the effects of ambroxol on type 14 rhinovirus (RV14) infection, a major RV group, in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells. RV14 infection increased virus titers and cytokine content in the supernatants and RV14 RNA in the cells. Ambroxol (100 nM) reduced RV14 titers and cytokine concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 in the supernatants and RV14 RNA in the cells after RV14 infection, in addition to reducing susceptibility to RV14 infection. Ambroxol also reduced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), the receptor for RV14, and the number of acidic endosomes from which RV14 RNA enters the cytoplasm. In addition, ambroxol reduced the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the nucleus. These results suggest that ambroxol inhibits RV14 infection partly by reducing ICAM-1 and acidic endosomes via the inhibition of NF-κB activation. Ambroxol may modulate airway inflammation by reducing the production of cytokines in rhinovirus infection.

  2. Apparent reduction of ADAM10 in scrapie-infected cultured cells and in the brains of scrapie-infected rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cao; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Zhang, Jin; Shi, Qi; Wang, Jing; Tian, Chan; Gao, Chen; Xiao, Kang; Ren, Ke; Zhou, Wei; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-12-01

    It has been described that A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM10) may involve in the physiopathology of prion diseases, but the direct molecular basis still remains unsolved. In this study, we confirmed that ADAM10 was able to cleave recombinant human prion protein in vitro. Using immunoprecipitation tests (IP) and immunofluorescent assays (IFA), reliable molecular interaction between the native cellular form of PrP (PrP(C)) and ADAM10 was observed not only in various cultured neuronal cell lines but also in brain homogenates of healthy hamsters and mice. Only mature ADAM10 (after removal of its prodomain) molecules showed the binding activity with the native PrP(C). Remarkably more prion protein (PrP)-ADAM10 complexes were detected in the membrane fraction of cultured cells. In the scrapie-infected SMB cell model, the endogenous ADAM10 levels, especially the mature ADAM10, were significantly decreased in the fraction of cell membrane. IP and IFA tests of prion-infected SMB-S15 cells confirmed no detectable PrP-ADAM10 complex in the cellular lysates and PrP-ADAM10 co-localization on the cell surface. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the levels of ADAM10 in the brain homogenates of scrapie agent 263K-infected hamsters and agent ME7-infected mice were also almost diminished at the terminal stage, showing time-dependent decreases during the incubation period. Our data here provide the solid molecular basis for the endoproteolysis of ADAM10 on PrP molecules and interaction between ADAM10 and PrP(C). Obvious loss of ADAM10 during prion infection in vitro and in vivo highlights that ADAM10 may play essential pathophysiological roles in prion replication and accumulation.

  3. Borna disease virus infection perturbs energy metabolites and amino acids in cultured human oligodendroglia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzhong Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Borna disease virus is a neurotropic, non-cytolytic virus that has been widely employed in neuroscientific research. Previous studies have revealed that metabolic perturbations are associated with Borna disease viral infection. However, the pathophysiological mechanism underlying its mode of action remains unclear. METHODOLOGY: Human oligodendroglia cells infected with the human strain Borna disease virus Hu-H1 and non-infected matched control cells were cultured in vitro. At day 14 post-infection, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic approach was used to differentiate the metabonomic profiles of 28 independent intracellular samples from Borna disease virus-infected cells (n = 14 and matched control cells (n = 14. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was performed to demonstrate that the whole metabonomic patterns enabled discrimination between the two groups, and further statistical testing was applied to determine which individual metabolites displayed significant differences between the two groups. FINDINGS: Metabonomic profiling revealed perturbations in 23 metabolites, 19 of which were deemed individually significant: nine energy metabolites (α-glucose, acetate, choline, creatine, formate, myo-inositol, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, pyruvate, succinate and ten amino acids (aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, threonine, tyrosine, valine. Partial least squares discriminant analysis demonstrated that the whole metabolic patterns enabled statistical discrimination between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Borna disease viral infection perturbs the metabonomic profiles of several metabolites in human oligodendroglia cells cultured in vitro. The findings suggest that Borna disease virus manipulates the host cell's metabolic network to support viral replication and proliferation.

  4. Porcine deltacoronavirus infection: Etiology, cell culture for virus isolation and propagation, molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwonil; Hu, Hui; Saif, Linda J

    2016-12-02

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) (family Coronaviridae, genus Deltacoronavirus) is a novel swine enteropathogenic coronavirus that causes acute diarrhea/vomiting, dehydration and mortality in seronegative neonatal piglets. PDCoV diarrhea was first reported in the US in early 2014, concurrently with co-circulation of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) (family Coronaviridae, genus Alphacoronavirus). The origin of PDCoV in pigs and also its sudden emergence or route of introduction into the US still remains unclear. In the US, since 2013-2014, the newly emerged PDCoV and PEDV have spread nationwide, causing a high number of pig deaths and significant economic impacts. The current US PDCoV strains are enteropathogenic and infect villous epithelial cells of the entire small and large intestines although the jejunum and ileum are the primary sites of infection. Similar to PEDV infections, PDCoV infections also cause acute, severe atrophic enteritis accompanied by transient viremia (viral RNA) that leads to severe diarrhea and/or vomiting, followed by dehydration as the potential cause of death in nursing piglets. At present, differential diagnosis of PDCoV, PEDV, and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is essential to control viral diarrheas in US swine. Cell culture-adapted US PDCoV (TC-PDCoV) strains have been isolated and propagated by us and in several other laboratories. TC-PDCoV strains will be useful to develop serologic assays and to evaluate if serial cell-culture passage attenuates TC-PDCoV as a potential vaccine candidate strain. A comprehensive understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of epidemic PDCoV strains is currently needed to prevent and control the disease in affected regions and to develop an effective vaccine. This review focuses on the etiology, cell culture isolation and propagation, molecular epidemiology, disease mechanisms and pathogenesis of PDCoV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Infection of Cultured Thin Cell Layer Roots of Lycopersicon esculentum by Meloidogyne incognita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, D N; Eisenback, J D

    1991-10-01

    A new aseptic culture system for studying interactions between tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and Meloidogyne incognita is described. Epidermal thin cell layer explants from peduncles of tomato produced up to 20 adventitious roots per culture in 4-9 days on Murashige &Scoog medium plus kinetin and indole acetic acid. Rooted cultures were transferred to Gamborg's B-5 medium and inoculated with infective second-stage juveniles. Gall formation was apparent 5 days after inoculation and egg production by mature females occurred within 25 days at 25 C in the susceptible genotypes Rutgers and Red Alert. Resistant genotypes LA655, LA656, and LA1022 exhibited a characteristic hypersensitive response. This system provides large numbers of cultured root tips for studies on the molecular basis of the host-parasite relationship.

  6. Retrovirus-induced osteopetrosis in mice. Effects of viral infection on osteogenic differentiation in skeletoblast cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J.; Casser-Bette, M.; Murray, A. B.; Luz, A.; Erfle, V.

    1987-01-01

    Newborn female strain NMRI mice were injected with a mouse retrovirus (OA MuLV) known to induce osteopetrosis. Primary skeletoblast cell cultures were established from humeri and calvaria of 3-day-old, 7-day-old, and 28-day-old animals. Infectious ecotropic MuLV was found in all humerus cultures from infected animals and in 7-day and 28-day calvaria cell cultures. Levels of alkaline phosphatase activity were markedly higher in cultures of calvaria and humeri from infected mice than in those from controls. In vitro infection of undifferentiated periosteal cells was followed by a decrease in cell growth and an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity. In contrast, differentiated osteoblast-like cells were barely susceptible to OA MuLV infection, and the virus did not influence their cell growth or differentiation. Electron-microscopic studies of skeletal tissue from infected old osteopetrotic mice showed virus particles associated with and budding from osteocytes and accumulated in devitalized osteocyte lacunae. The results indicate that progenitor cells of the osteoblastic lineage represent the target cells for OA MuLV in bone tissue, that virus infection induces an increase in osteoblastic activity, and that infected cells produce virus until full development of the disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:2827489

  7. Isolation of a Polyoma-Nucleoprotein Complex from Infected Mouse-Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Melvin H.; Miller, Henry I.; Hendler, Sheldon

    1971-01-01

    A complex containing polyoma (py) DNA and protein (py complex) was isolated from polyoma-infected mouse-cell cultures. The complex sedimented unimodally at about 55 S. When labeled for long periods (2-3 hr) between 20 and 40 hr after infection, most of the [3H]DNA in the py complex was in the form of covalently closed, circular polyoma DNA (component I). When labeled for 5 min, the [3H]DNA in the py complex was nicked in one or both of the strands, as shown by alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation. Under all conditions studied, no free py DNA was extracted from mouse cells by the two methods described. PMID:4324998

  8. [Increase in the production of oncovirus type C by an L929 cell culture as a result of BCG infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitsunova, N V; Gosteva, V V; Kim, A A; Bykovskiĭ, A F

    1984-01-01

    The effect of BCG infection of L929 cells on replication of oncovirus type C was studied. Ultrathin sections of the BCG-infected culture were examined electron microscopically 1, 3, 6, 8, and 10 days postinfection. Most microorganisms with the morphology typical of mycobacteria were found inside phagosomes. The number of extracellular virions as well as budding and abnormal forms per one cell contour was counted. BCG-infected cells were found to produce significantly more virus than the controls. The difference was maximal 3 days postinoculation. Possible reasons for the increased oncovirus production by continuous cell lines after infection with BCG are discussed.

  9. Expression of herpes simplex virus 1 microRNAs in cell culture models of quiescent and latent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurak, Igor; Hackenberg, Michael; Kim, Ju Youn; Pesola, Jean M; Everett, Roger D; Preston, Chris M; Wilson, Angus C; Coen, Donald M

    2014-02-01

    To facilitate studies of herpes simplex virus 1 latency, cell culture models of quiescent or latent infection have been developed. Using deep sequencing, we analyzed the expression of viral microRNAs (miRNAs) in two models employing human fibroblasts and one using rat neurons. In all cases, the expression patterns differed from that in productively infected cells, with the rat neuron pattern most closely resembling that found in latently infected human or mouse ganglia in vivo.

  10. HCMV-infection in a human arterial organ culture model: effects on cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rössler Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of infections with the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV for the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis is still unclear. Both a clear correlation and no correlation at all have been reported in clinical, mostly serological studies. In our study we employed a human non-injury ex vivo organ culture model to investigate the effect of an in vitro permissive HCMV-infection on cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia for a period of 56 days. Results During routine-nephrectomies parts of renal arteries from 71 patients were obtained and prepared as human organ cultures. Cell free HCMV infection was performed with the fibroblast adapted HCMV strain AD169, the endotheliotropic strain TB40E, and a clinical isolate (AN 365. After 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 56 days in culture staining of HCMV-antigens was carried out and reactive cell proliferation and neointimal thickening were analysed. Successful HCMV-infection was accomplished with all three virus strains studied. During the first 21 days in organ culture no cell proliferation or neointimal hyperplasia was detected. At day 35 and day 56 moderate cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia was found both in HCMV-infected segments and mock infected controls. Neointimal hyperplasia in productively HCMV-infected segments was lower than in non infected at day 35 and day 56, but relatively higher after infection with the endotheliotropic TB40E in comparison with the two other strains. Conclusion The data do not support the hypothesis that HCMV-infection triggers restenosis via a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation and neointimal hyperplasia in comparison to non infected controls. Interestingly however, even after lytic infection, a virus strain specific difference was observed.

  11. On-line monitoring of respiration in recombinant-baculovirus infected and uninfected insect cell bioreactor cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, A A; Bédard, C; Tom, R; Perret, S; Jardin, B

    1996-04-05

    Respiration rates in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf-9) cell bioreactor cultures were successfully measured on-line using two methods: The O(2) uptake rate (OUR) was determined using gas phase pO(2) values imposed by a dissolved oxygen controller and the CO(2) evolution rate (CER) was measured using an infrared detector. The measurement methods were accurate, reliable, and relatively inexpensive. The CER was routinely determined in bioreactor cultures used for the production of several recombinant proteins. Simple linear relationships between viable cell densities and both OUR and CER in exponentially growing cultures were used to predict viable cell density. Respiration measurements were also used to follow the progress of baculoviral infections in Sf-9 cultures. Infection led to increases in volumetric and per-cell respiration rates. The relationships between respiration and several other culture parameters, including viable cell density, cell protein, cell volume, glucose consumption, lactate production, viral titer, and recombinant beta-galactosidase accumulation, were examined. The extent of the increase in CER following infection and the time postinfection at which maximum CER was attained were negatively correlated with the multiplicity of infection (MOI) at multiplicities below the level required to infect all the cells in a culture. Delays in the respiration peak related to the MOI employed were correlated with delays in the peak in recombinant protein accumulation. DO levels in the range 5-100% did not exert any major effects on viable cell densities, CER, or product titer in cultures infected with a baculovirus expressing recombinant beta-galactosidase.

  12. Interactions between airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells during viral infections using an in vitro co-culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Historically, single cell culture models have been limited in pathological and physiological relevance. A co-culture model of dendritic cells (DCs) and differentiated human airway epithelial cells was developed to examine potential interactions between these two cell t...

  13. Site of cleavage in infected cells and polypeptides of representative paramyxoviruses grown in cultured cells of the chorioallantoic membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seto, J.T.; Garten, W.; Rott, R. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1981-01-01

    Cultured cells of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) fulfilled the need of using the same cell system that was permissive for representative paramyxoviruses to carry out studies on the biosynthesis of their glycoproteins in infected cells. The polypeptide composition of the respective paramyxoviruses (Newcastle disease virus (NDV), paramyxovirus Yucaipa (PMY), and Sendai virus), grown in eggs and CAM-cells, was essentially identical. In egg-grown PMY a large glycoprotein (LGP) was present but only in some CAM-grown preparations of virus labeled with (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine and rarely in (/sup 35/S)-methionine or (/sup 3/H)-amino acids (valine, leucine, and tyrosine) labeled viruses. The site of cleavage of precursor F/sub 0/ to Fsub(1,2) was not the same. In contrast to the cleavage of Sendai virus glycoprotein, cleavage was intracellular in NDV and PMY infected cells. Homologous antisera against the glycoproteins failed to inhibit cleavage of HN/sub 0/ or F/sub 0/ in cells infected with the representative paramyxoviruses.

  14. Meganuclease-mediated Inhibition of HSV1 Infection in Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Stéphanie; Huot, Nicolas; Mahiet, Charlotte; Arnould, Sylvain; Barradeau, Sébastien; Clerre, Diane Le; Chion-Sotinel, Isabelle; Jacqmarcq, Cécile; Chapellier, Benoît; Ergani, Ayla; Desseaux, Carole; Cédrone, Frédéric; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Pâques, Frédéric; Labetoulle, Marc; Smith, Julianne

    2011-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) is a major health problem. As for most viral diseases, current antiviral treatments are based on the inhibition of viral replication once it has already started. As a consequence, they impair neither the viral cycle at its early stages nor the latent form of the virus, and thus cannot be considered as real preventive treatments. Latent HSV1 virus could be addressed by rare cutting endonucleases, such as meganucleases. With the aim of a proof of concept study, we generated several meganucleases recognizing HSV1 sequences, and assessed their antiviral activity in cultured cells. We demonstrate that expression of these proteins in African green monkey kidney fibroblast (COS-7) and BSR cells inhibits infection by HSV1, at low and moderate multiplicities of infection (MOIs), inducing a significant reduction of the viral load. Furthermore, the remaining viral genomes display a high rate of mutation (up to 16%) at the meganuclease cleavage site, consistent with a mechanism of action based on the cleavage of the viral genome. This specific mechanism of action qualifies meganucleases as an alternative class of antiviral agent, with the potential to address replicative as well as latent DNA viral forms.

  15. Inhibition of alphavirus infection in cell culture and in mice with antisense morpholino oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paessler, Slobodan; Rijnbrand, Rene; Stein, David A; Ni, Haolin; Yun, Nadezhda E; Dziuba, Natallia; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Seregin, Alexey; Ma, Yinghong; Blouch, Robert; Iversen, Patrick L; Zacks, Michele A

    2008-07-05

    The genus Alphavirus contains members that threaten human health, both as natural pathogens and as potential biological weapons. Peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PPMO) enter cells readily and can inhibit viral replication through sequence-specific steric blockade of viral RNA. Sindbis virus (SINV) has low pathogenicity in humans and is regularly utilized as a model alphavirus. PPMO targeting the 5'-terminal and AUG translation start site regions of the SINV genome blocked the production of infectious SINV in tissue culture. PPMO designed against corresponding regions in Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) were likewise found to be effective in vitro against several strains of VEEV. Mice treated with PPMO before and after VEEV infection were completely protected from lethal outcome while mice receiving only post-infection PPMO treatment were partially protected. Levels of virus in tissue samples correlated with animal survival. Uninfected mice suffered no apparent ill-effects from PPMO treatment. Thus, PPMO appear promising as candidates for therapeutic development against alphaviruses.

  16. Epstein-Barr virus infection in ex vivo tonsil epithelial cell cultures of asymptomatic carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pegtel, DM; Middeldorp, J.M.; Thorley-Lawson, DA

    2004-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is found frequently in certain epithelial pathologies, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and oral hairy leukoplakia, indicating that the virus can infect epithelial cells in vivo. Recent studies of cell lines imply that epithelial cells may also play a role in persistent EBV

  17. Mayaro virus infection alters glucose metabolism in cultured cells through activation of the enzyme 6-phosphofructo 1-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bacha, Tatiana; Menezes, Maíra M T; Azevedo e Silva, Melissa C; Sola-Penna, Mauro; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2004-11-01

    Although it is well established that cellular transformation with tumor virus leads to changes on glucose metabolism, the effects of cell infection by non-transforming virus are far to be completely elucidated. In this study, we report the first evidence that cultured Vero cells infected with the alphavirus Mayaro show several alterations on glucose metabolism. Infected cells presented a two fold increase on glucose consumption, accompanied by an increment in lactate production. This increase in glycolytic flux was also demonstrated by a significant increase on the activity of 6-phosphofructo 1-kinase, one of the regulatory enzymes of glycolysis. Analysis of the kinetic parameters revealed that the regulation of 6-phosphofructo 1-kinase is altered in infected cells, presenting an increase in Vmax along with a decrease in Km for fructose-6-phosphate. Another fact contributing to an increase in enzyme activity was the decrease in ATP levels observed in infected cells. Additionally, the levels of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, a potent activator of this enzyme, was significantly reduced in infected cells. These observations suggest that the increase in PFK activity may be a compensatory cellular response to the viral-induced metabolic alterations that could lead to an impairment of the glycolytic flux and energy production.

  18. THE CELLS WITH MYCOBACTERIA IN GRANULOMATOUS AGGREGATES FROM MICE WITH LATENT TUBERCULOUS INFECTION IN EX VIVO CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Ufimtseva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of this study was to obtain ex vivo monolayer culture cells migrated from individual granulomas isolated from the spleens of the Balb/c line mice through 1–2 months after BCG vaccine infection. The second goal was to evaluate influence of different types of cells in the development of granulomatic inflammation and analysis of BCG bacteria content in these cells in the latent stage of tuberculosis. Granulomas were presented by macrophages in general. The number of granulomas was varied as in one mouse as between mice. Granulomas contained also dendritic cells (in average 10% from macrophages of granulomas and lymphocytes. In some granulomas fibroblasts, neutrophils, eosiniphils, multinuclear cells of Pirogov–Langhans, megacariocytes and platelets were observed in all stages of infection. The number of these cells was also varied between granulomas. The acid staining BCG bacteria were only detected in macrophages, dendritic cells and Pirogov–Langhans cells of mice granulomas. Mice were different as by number of cells with BCG bacteria in granulomas as by number of granulomas with BCG-containing cells. The proposed model of granuloma cells of mice in ex vivo culture can be used to study interaction between host cells and mycobacteria to find new ways and methods of influence to intracellular pathogens in latent stage of tuberculosis. 

  19. Evaluation of urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infections by cell culture and the polymerase chain reaction using a closed system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars; Traulsen, J; Birkelund, Svend

    1993-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty-four specimens from males and females consulting a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases were analyzed for genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Each clinical sample was tested by the cell culture technique and the polymerase chain reaction using a closed system. When...... the two test systems were compared, the overall sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction was 96% and the specificity 94% when compared to the cell culture technique. By use of a closed system for DNA extraction and sample transfer for the polymerase chain reaction, contamination of the samples...

  20. Evaluation of urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infections by cell culture and the polymerase chain reaction using a closed system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars; Traulsen, J; Birkelund, Svend

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty-four specimens from males and females consulting a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases were analyzed for genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Each clinical sample was tested by the cell culture technique and the polymerase chain reaction using a closed system. When...... the two test systems were compared, the overall sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction was 96% and the specificity 94% when compared to the cell culture technique. By use of a closed system for DNA extraction and sample transfer for the polymerase chain reaction, contamination of the samples...

  1. Growth of cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV-2) in cell culture and experimental infection of goldfish Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takafumi; Kurita, Jun; Ozaki, Akiyuki; Sano, Motohiko; Fukuda, Hideo; Ototake, Mitsuru

    2013-09-03

    Herpesviral haematopoietic necrosis has caused great economic damage to goldfish Carassius auratus aquaculture in Japan. The existence of cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV-2), the causative agent, has also been reported from several other countries. To prevent spread to other areas, basic virological information such as viral kinetics in infected fish is essential. Experimental infection trials using reliably prepared CyHV-2 for defining viral kinetics are difficult to carry out because successful and sustainable propagation of this virus in cell culture has previously been limited. Here we describe a method for sustainable propagation of CyHV-2 in cell culture, and the results of fish infection experiments using the propagated virus. We found that goldfish fin (GFF) cells and standard Ryukin Takafumi (SRTF) cells established from goldfish fin can be used for continuous propagation of CyHV-2. Experimental infections using 2 varieties of goldfish, Ryukin and Edonishiki, were performed with the virus passaged 7 times in GFF cells. In transmission experiments with water temperature at 20°C, cumulative mortality was 30% in Ryukin infected by immersion, and 90 and 100% in Edonishiki and Ryukin intraperitoneally injected with the virus, respectively. In an experiment carried out at 25°C, 90% of Edonishiki challenged by immersion died. PCR detection of viral DNA from the organs of infected fish showed that systemic infection occurs and also that the kidney is a main viral multiplication site. Moreover, CyHV-2 was successfully re-isolated in GFF cells from the dead fish.

  2. Curcumin alleviates matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -9 activities during eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in cultured cells and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Parag; De, Ronita; Pal, Ipsita; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Saha, Dhira Rani; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2011-01-21

    Current therapy-regimens against Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infections have considerable failure rates and adverse side effects that urge the quest for an effective alternative therapy. We have shown that curcumin is capable of eradicating Hp-infection in mice. Here we examine the mechanism by which curcumin protects Hp infection in cultured cells and mice. Since, MMP-3 and -9 are inflammatory molecules associated to the pathogenesis of Hp-infection, we investigated the role of curcumin on inflammatory MMPs as well as proinflammatory molecules. Curcumin dose dependently suppressed MMP-3 and -9 expression in Hp infected human gastric epithelial (AGS) cells. Consistently, Hp-eradication by curcumin-therapy involved significant downregulation of MMP-3 and -9 activities and expression in both cytotoxic associated gene (cag)(+ve) and cag(-ve) Hp-infected mouse gastric tissues. Moreover, we demonstrate that the conventional triple therapy (TT) alleviated MMP-3 and -9 activities less efficiently than curcumin and curcumin's action on MMPs was linked to decreased pro-inflammatory molecules and activator protein-1 activation in Hp-infected gastric tissues. Although both curcumin and TT were associated with MMP-3 and -9 downregulation during Hp-eradication, but unlike TT, curcumin enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and inhibitor of kappa B-α. These data indicate that curcumin-mediated healing of Hp-infection involves regulation of MMP-3 and -9 activities.

  3. Curcumin alleviates matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -9 activities during eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in cultured cells and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Kundu

    Full Text Available Current therapy-regimens against Helicobacter pylori (Hp infections have considerable failure rates and adverse side effects that urge the quest for an effective alternative therapy. We have shown that curcumin is capable of eradicating Hp-infection in mice. Here we examine the mechanism by which curcumin protects Hp infection in cultured cells and mice. Since, MMP-3 and -9 are inflammatory molecules associated to the pathogenesis of Hp-infection, we investigated the role of curcumin on inflammatory MMPs as well as proinflammatory molecules. Curcumin dose dependently suppressed MMP-3 and -9 expression in Hp infected human gastric epithelial (AGS cells. Consistently, Hp-eradication by curcumin-therapy involved significant downregulation of MMP-3 and -9 activities and expression in both cytotoxic associated gene (cag(+ve and cag(-ve Hp-infected mouse gastric tissues. Moreover, we demonstrate that the conventional triple therapy (TT alleviated MMP-3 and -9 activities less efficiently than curcumin and curcumin's action on MMPs was linked to decreased pro-inflammatory molecules and activator protein-1 activation in Hp-infected gastric tissues. Although both curcumin and TT were associated with MMP-3 and -9 downregulation during Hp-eradication, but unlike TT, curcumin enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and inhibitor of kappa B-α. These data indicate that curcumin-mediated healing of Hp-infection involves regulation of MMP-3 and -9 activities.

  4. Study on persistent infection of Japanese encephalitis virus Beijing-1 strain in serum-free Sf9 cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hun; Lee, Su Jeen; Park, Jin Yong; Park, Yong Wook; Kim, Hyun Sung; Kang, Heui-Yun; Hur, Byung-Ki; Ryu, Yeon-Woo; Han, Sang In; Kim, Jong Su

    2004-03-01

    Sf9 cells have obvious advantages for the conventional production technology of vaccine. They are useful tools for high concentration and large-scale cultures. Sf9 cells were grown to maximal concentration, 8 x 10(6) cells/ml in a 500ml spinner flask, with a doubling time at the exponentially growing phase of 24.5 hours, using serum-free media. To explore the ability of Sf9 cells to be infected by the Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus Beijing-1 strain, Sf9 cells were infected with the virus. By 4-5 days post-infection, 10-15% of the Sf9 cells showed cytopathic effect (CPE), from granularity to the formation of syncytia and multinucleated giant cells continuously observed over a period of 35 days. Positive fluorescent reactions were detected in 30-40% of cells infected with the JE virus Beijing-1 strain, and the uninfected Sf9 cells were completely negative. Virus particles, propagated in Sf9 and Vero cells, were concentrated by sedimentation on 40% trehalose cushions by ultracentrifugation, and showed identical patterns of viral morphogenesis. Complete virus particles, 40 to 50 nm in diameter, were observed, and JE virus envelope (E) proteins, at 53 kDa, were found in the western blot analysis to the anti-JE virus E protein monoclonal antibody and reacted as a magenta band in the same position to the glycoprotein staining. To evaluate whether the infectious virus was produced in Sf9 cells inoculated with the JE virus Beijing-1 stain, Sf9 cells were inoculated with the virus, and sample harvested every 5 days. The titers of the JE virus Beijing-1 strain rose from 1.0 x 10(5) to 1.5 x 10(6) pfu/ml. The infected Sf9 cells could be sub-cultured in serum-free medium, with no change in the plaque sizes formed by the JE virus Beijing-1 strain in the plaque assay. It is suggested that the ability of the JE virus Beijing-1 strain to infect Sf9 cells in serum-free media will provide a useful insect cell system, where the JE virus replication, cytopathogenicity and vaccine

  5. Bactericidal Activity of Ceragenin CSA-13 in Cell Culture and in an Animal Model of Peritoneal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucki, Robert; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wnorowska, Urszula; Byfield, Fitzroy J; Piktel, Ewelina; Wątek, Marzena; Janmey, Paul A; Savage, Paul B

    2015-10-01

    Ceragenins constitute a novel family of cationic antibiotics characterized by a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities, which have mostly been assessed in vitro. Using a polarized human lung epithelial cell culture system, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of the ceragenin CSA-13 against two strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1 and Xen5). Additionally, the biodistribution and bactericidal activity of a CSA-13-IRDye 800CW derivate were assessed using an animal model of peritoneal infection after PAO1 challenge. In cell culture, CSA-13 bactericidal activities against PAO1 and Xen5 were higher than the activities of the human cathelicidin peptide LL-37. Increased CSA-13 activity was observed in polarized human lung epithelial cell cultures subjected to butyric acid treatment, which is known to increase endogenous LL-37 production. Eight hours after intravenous or intraperitoneal injection, the greatest CSA-13-IRDye 800CW accumulation was observed in mouse liver and kidneys. CSA-13-IRDye 800CW administration resulted in decreased bacterial outgrowth from abdominal fluid collected from animals subjected to intraperitoneal PAO1 infection. These observations indicate that CSA-13 may synergistically interact with antibacterial factors that are naturally present at mucosal surfaces and it maintains its antibacterial activity in the infected abdominal cavity. Cationic lipids such as CSA-13 represent excellent candidates for the development of new antibacterial compounds. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Hantavirus infection suppresses thrombospondin-1 expression in cultured endothelial cells in a strain-specific manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana F Khaiboullina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hantavirus infection is associated with two frequently fatal diseases in humans: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS. The pathogenesis of hantavirus infection is complex and not fully understood; however, it is believed to involve virus-induced hyperinflammatory immune responses. Thrombospondin-1 (THBS1 is a large homotrimeric protein that plays a putative role in regulating blood homeostasis. Hyperresponsiveness to inflammatory stimuli has also been associated with defects in the THBS1 gene. Our data suggest that hantavirus infection of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVEC suppress the accumulation of THBS1 in the extracellular matrix. Additionally, this suppression is dependent on virus replication, implying a direct mechanism of action. Our data also imply that the pathogenic Andes and Hantaan strains inhibit THBS1 expression while the non-pathogenic Prospect Hill strain showed little inhibition. These observations suggest that a dysregulation of THBS1 may contribute to the pathogenesis of hantavirus infection.

  7. Effect of ultrasound on herpes simplex virus infection in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwai Soichi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound has been shown to increase the efficiency of gene expression from retroviruses, adenoviruses and adeno-associated viruses. The effect of ultrasound to stimulate cell membrane permeabilization on infection with an oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 was examined. Results Vero monkey kidney cells were infected with HSV-1 and exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound after an adsorption period. The number of plaques was significantly greater than that of the untreated control. A combination of ultrasound and microbubbles further increased the plaque number. Similar results were obtained using a different type of HSV-1 and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells. The appropriate intensity, duty cycle and time of ultrasound to increase the plaque number were 0.5 W/cm2, 20% duty cycle and 10 sec, respectively. Ultrasound with microbubbles at an intensity of 2.0 W/cm2, at 50% duty cycle, or for 40 sec reduced cell viability. Conclusion These results indicate that ultrasound promotes the entry of oncolytic HSV-1 into cells. It may be useful to enhance the efficiency of HSV-1 infection in oncolytic virotherapy.

  8. Conserved host response to highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in human cell culture, mouse and macaque model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Jason E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding host response to influenza virus infection will facilitate development of better diagnoses and therapeutic interventions. Several different experimental models have been used as a proxy for human infection, including cell cultures derived from human cells, mice, and non-human primates. Each of these systems has been studied extensively in isolation, but little effort has been directed toward systematically characterizing the conservation of host response on a global level beyond known immune signaling cascades. Results In the present study, we employed a multivariate modeling approach to characterize and compare the transcriptional regulatory networks between these three model systems after infection with a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H5N1 subtype. Using this approach we identified functions and pathways that display similar behavior and/or regulation including the well-studied impact on the interferon response and the inflammasome. Our results also suggest a primary response role for airway epithelial cells in initiating hypercytokinemia, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of H5N1 viruses. We further demonstrate that we can use a transcriptional regulatory model from the human cell culture data to make highly accurate predictions about the behavior of important components of the innate immune system in tissues from whole organisms. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of a global regulatory network modeling conserved host response between in vitro and in vivo models.

  9. Elimination of toxicity and enhanced detection of lumpy skin disease virus on cell culture from experimentally infected bovine semen samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagla, V P; Osuagwuh, U I; Annandale, C H; Irons, P C; Venter, E H

    2006-12-01

    Lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV), a poxvirus of the genus Capripoxvirus, is shed in the semen of infected bulls. The screening of semen for infectious virus requires a sensitive diagnostic method. The isolation of the virus on cell cultures and/or the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are sensitive diagnostic tests which may be used to screen semen for LSD viral DNA prior to artificial insemination. Although cell culture detects infectious virus and is a sensitive method, there are major difficulties in using this method due to the toxic effect of semen on the cells. The aim of this study was to find a method that decreases the toxic effect of semen and enhances the isolation of LSDV on cell culture. Semen samples from LSDV sero-negative bulls were collected and infected with a field isolate of LSDV, strain V248/93, with a titre of 6.5 log TCID50. The semen samples were treated with one of four different methods: centrifugation, serial dilution, filtration and chemical treatment with kaolin. The samples subjected to centrifugation, serial dilution and filtration were supplemented with gentamycin. Semen toxicity on cell cultures was eliminated when supernatants of semen samples centrifuged at 2000 rpm for 1, 3 and 5 min and serially diluted were used to inoculate confluent monolayer bovine dermis cells. The toxicity recorded when the pellet fractions of semen samples centrifuged for 5 min at 2000 rpm was comparable to results obtained from serially diluted samples supplemented with gentamycin. Filtration and kaolin treatment of semen samples did not remove the toxic effect.

  10. Pediatric and Adult High-Grade Glioma Stem Cell Culture Models Are Permissive to Lytic Infection with Parvovirus H-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josupeit, Rafael; Bender, Sebastian; Kern, Sonja; Leuchs, Barbara; Hielscher, Thomas; Herold-Mende, Christel; Schlehofer, Jörg R; Dinsart, Christiane; Witt, Olaf; Rommelaere, Jean; Lacroix, Jeannine

    2016-05-19

    Combining virus-induced cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic effects, oncolytic virotherapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for high-grade glioma (HGG). A clinical trial has recently provided evidence for the clinical safety of the oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV) in adult glioblastoma relapse patients. The present study assesses the efficacy of H-1PV in eliminating HGG initiating cells. H-1PV was able to enter and to transduce all HGG neurosphere culture models (n = 6), including cultures derived from adult glioblastoma, pediatric glioblastoma, and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. Cytotoxic effects induced by the virus have been observed in all HGG neurospheres at half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) doses of input virus between 1 and 10 plaque forming units per cell. H-1PV infection at this dose range was able to prevent tumorigenicity of NCH421k glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) "stem-like" cells in NOD/SCID mice. Interestingly NCH421R, an isogenic subclone with equal capacity of xenograft formation, but resistant to H-1PV infection could be isolated from the parental NCH421k culture. To reveal changes in gene expression associated with H-1PV resistance we performed a comparative gene expression analysis in these subclones. Several dysregulated genes encoding receptor proteins, endocytosis factors or regulators innate antiviral responses were identified and represent intriguing candidates for to further study molecular mechanisms of H-1PV resistance.

  11. Pediatric and Adult High-Grade Glioma Stem Cell Culture Models Are Permissive to Lytic Infection with Parvovirus H-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Josupeit

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Combining virus-induced cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic effects, oncolytic virotherapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for high-grade glioma (HGG. A clinical trial has recently provided evidence for the clinical safety of the oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV in adult glioblastoma relapse patients. The present study assesses the efficacy of H-1PV in eliminating HGG initiating cells. H-1PV was able to enter and to transduce all HGG neurosphere culture models (n = 6, including cultures derived from adult glioblastoma, pediatric glioblastoma, and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. Cytotoxic effects induced by the virus have been observed in all HGG neurospheres at half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 doses of input virus between 1 and 10 plaque forming units per cell. H-1PV infection at this dose range was able to prevent tumorigenicity of NCH421k glioblastoma multiforme (GBM “stem-like” cells in NOD/SCID mice. Interestingly NCH421R, an isogenic subclone with equal capacity of xenograft formation, but resistant to H-1PV infection could be isolated from the parental NCH421k culture. To reveal changes in gene expression associated with H-1PV resistance we performed a comparative gene expression analysis in these subclones. Several dysregulated genes encoding receptor proteins, endocytosis factors or regulators innate antiviral responses were identified and represent intriguing candidates for to further study molecular mechanisms of H-1PV resistance.

  12. Kinetic analysis of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 gene expression in cell culture and infected animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Kesic, Matthew; Yin, Han; Yu, Lianbo; Green, Patrick L

    2009-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection causes adult T-cell leukemia and is associated with a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. It has been hypothesized that a highly regulated pattern of HTLV-1 gene expression is critical for virus survival and disease pathogenesis. In this study, real-time reverse transcriptase PCR was used to determine the kinetics of viral gene expression in cells transiently transfected with an HTLV-1 proviral plasmid, in newly infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and in PBMCs from newly infected rabbits. The HTLV-1 gene expression profiles in transiently transfected and infected cells were similar; over time, all transcripts increased and then maintained stable levels. gag/pol, tax/rex, and env mRNA were detected first and at the highest levels, whereas the expression levels of the accessory genes, including the antisense Hbz, were significantly lower than the tax/rex levels (ranging from 1 to 4 logs depending on the specific mRNA). In infected rabbits, tax/rex and gag/pol mRNA levels peaked early after inoculation and progressively decreased, which correlated inversely with the proviral load and host antibody response against viral proteins. Interestingly, Hbz mRNA was detectable at 1 week postinfection and increased and stabilized. The expression levels of all other HTLV-1 genes in infected rabbit PBMCs were at or below our limit of detection. This analysis provides insight into viral gene expression under various in vitro and in vivo experimental conditions. Our in vivo data indicate that in infected rabbits, Hbz mRNA expression over time directly correlates with the proviral load, which provides the first evidence linking Hbz expression to proviral load and the survival of the virus-infected cell in the host.

  13. Single strain isolation method for cell culture-adapted hepatitis C virus by end-point dilution and infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Sugiyama

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus (HCV culture system has enabled us to clarify the HCV life cycle and essential host factors for propagation. However, the virus production level of wild-type JFH-1 (JFH-1/wt is limited, and this leads to difficulties in performing experiments that require higher viral concentrations. As the cell culture-adapted JFH-1 has been reported to have robust virus production, some mutations in the viral genome may play a role in the efficiency of virus production. In this study, we obtained cell culture-adapted virus by passage of full-length JFH-1 RNA-transfected Huh-7.5.1 cells. The obtained virus produced 3 log-fold more progeny viruses as compared with JFH-1/wt. Several mutations were identified as being responsible for robust virus production, but, on reverse-genetics analysis, the production levels of JFH-1 with these mutations did not reach the level of cell culture-adapted virus. By using the single strain isolation method by end-point dilution and infection, we isolated two strains with additional mutations, and found that these strains have the ability to produce more progeny viruses. On reverse-genetics analysis, the strains with these additional mutations were able to produce robust progeny viruses at comparable levels as cell culture-adapted JFH-1 virus. The strategy used in this study will be useful for identifying strains with unique characteristics, such as robust virus production, from a diverse population, and for determining the responsible mutations for these characteristics.

  14. Proteome and transcript analysis of Vitis vinifera cell cultures subjected to Botrytis cinerea infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadakova, K; Havelkova, M; Kurkova, B; Tlolkova, I; Kasparovsky, T; Zdrahal, Z; Lochman, J

    2015-04-24

    Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important diseases of grapevine resulting in significant reductions in yield and fruit quality. In order to examine the molecular mechanisms that characterize the interaction between B. cinerea and the host plant, the grapevine cytoplasmic proteome was analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The interaction between Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay cells and B. cinerea was characterized by the increase in spot abundance of 30 proteins, of which 21 were successfully identified. The majority of these proteins were related to defence and stress responses and to cell wall modifications. Some of the modulated proteins have been previously found to be affected by other pathogens when they infect V. vinifera but interestingly, the proteins related to cell wall modification that were influenced by B. cinerea have not been shown to be modulated by any other pathogen studied to date. Transcript analysis using the quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction additionally revealed the up-regulation of several acidic, probably extracellular, chitinases. The results indicate that cell wall strengthening, accumulation of PR proteins and excretion of lytic enzymes are likely to be important mechanisms in the defence of grapevine against B. cinerea. Although gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important diseases of grapevine, little information is available about proteomic changes in this pathosystem. These results suggest that cell wall strengthening, accumulation of PR proteins and excretion of lytic enzymes are important molecular mechanisms in the defence of grapevine against B. cinerea. Surprisingly, the proteins related to cell wall modification that were modulated by B. cinerea have not been shown to be affected by any other pathogen studied to date. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Response to rhinovirus infection by human airway epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in an in vitro two-chamber tissue culture system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Rajan

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV infections are associated with the common cold, occasionally with more serious lower respiratory tract illnesses, and frequently with asthma exacerbations. The clinical features of HRV infection and its association with asthma exacerbation suggest that some HRV disease results from virus-induced host immune responses to infection. To study the HRV-infection-induced host responses and the contribution of these responses to disease, we have developed an in vitro model of HRV infection of human airway epithelial cells (Calu-3 cells and subsequent exposure of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs to these infected cells in a two-chamber trans-well tissue culture system. Using this model, we studied HRV 14 (species B and HRV 16 (species A induced cytokine and chemokine responses with PBMCs from four healthy adults. Infection of Calu-3 cells with either virus induced HRV-associated increases in FGF-Basic, IL-15, IL-6, IL-28A, ENA-78 and IP-10. The addition of PBMCs to HRV 14-infected cells gave significant increases in MIP-1β, IL-28A, MCP-2, and IFN-α as compared with mock-infected cells. Interestingly, ENA-78 levels were reduced in HRV 14 infected cells that were exposed to PBMCs. Addition of PBMCs to HRV 16-infected cells did not induce MIP-1β, IL-28A and IFN-α efficiently nor did it decrease ENA-78 levels. Our results demonstrate a clear difference between HRV 14 and HRV 16 and the source of PBMCs, in up or down regulation of several cytokines including those that are linked to airway inflammation. Such differences might be one of the reasons for variation in disease associated with different HRV species including variation in their link to asthma exacerbations as suggested by other studies. Further study of immune responses associated with different HRVs and PBMCs from different patient groups, and the mechanisms leading to these differences, should help characterize pathogenesis of HRV disease and generate

  16. Sarcocystis neurona infection in gamma interferon gene knockout (KO) mice: comparative infectivity of sporocysts in two strains of KO mice, effect of trypsin digestion on merozoite viability, and infectivity of bradyzoites to KO mice and cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Sundar, N; Kwok, O C H; Saville, W J A

    2013-09-01

    The protozoan Sarcocystis neurona is the primary cause of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM). EPM or EPM-like illness has been reported in horses, sea otters, and several other mammals. The gamma interferon gene knockout (KO) mouse is often used as a model to study biology and discovery of new therapies against S. neurona because it is difficult to induce clinical EPM in other hosts, including horses. In the present study, infectivity of three life cycle stages (merozoites, bradyzoites, sporozoites) to KO mice and cell culture was studied. Two strains of KO mice (C57-black, and BALB/c-derived, referred here as black or white) were inoculated orally graded doses of S. neurona sporocysts; 12 sporocysts were infective to both strains of mice and all infected mice died or became ill within 70 days post-inoculation. Although there was no difference in infectivity of sporocysts to the two strains of KO mice, the disease was more severe in black mice. S. neurona bradyzoites were not infectious to KO mice and cell culture. S. neurona merozoites survived 120 min incubation in 0.25% trypsin, indicating that trypsin digestion can be used to recover S. neurona from tissues of acutely infected animals. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Insect Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.; Lynn, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are widely used in studies on insect cell physiology, developmental biology and microbial pathology. In particular, insect cell culture is an indispensable tool for the study of insect viruses. The first continuously growing insect cell cultures were established from lepidoptera

  18. Insect Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.; Lynn, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are widely used in studies on insect cell physiology, developmental biology and microbial pathology. In particular, insect cell culture is an indispensable tool for the study of insect viruses. The first continuously growing insect cell cultures were established from lepidoptera

  19. CHLAMYDIA-TRACHOMATIS INFECTION IN A HIGH-RISK POPULATION - COMPARISON OF POLYMERASE CHAIN-REACTION AND CELL-CULTURE FOR DIAGNOSIS AND FOLLOW-UP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VOGELS, WHM; VADER, PCV; SCHRODER, FP

    1993-01-01

    A study to compare the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test with the cell culture method in diagnosing urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infections was performed. From 497 patients (212 women, 285 men) attending an outpatient clinic for sexually transmitted diseases, a total of 814 samples (female pa

  20. Tropism and Infectivity of Influenza Virus, Including Highly Pathogenic Avian H5N1 Virus, in Ferret Tracheal Differentiated Primary Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hui; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Maines, Taronna R.; Belser, Jessica A.; Gustin, Kortney M.; Pekosz, Andrew; Zaki, Sherif R.; Katz, Jacqueline M.

    2013-01-01

    Tropism and adaptation of influenza viruses to new hosts is partly dependent on the distribution of the sialic acid (SA) receptors to which the viral hemagglutinin (HA) binds. Ferrets have been established as a valuable in vivo model of influenza virus pathogenesis and transmission because of similarities to humans in the distribution of HA receptors and in clinical signs of infection. In this study, we developed a ferret tracheal differentiated primary epithelial cell culture model that consisted of a layered epithelium structure with ciliated and nonciliated cells on its apical surface. We found that human-like (α2,6-linked) receptors predominated on ciliated cells, whereas avian-like (α2,3-linked) receptors, which were less abundant, were presented on nonciliated cells. When we compared the tropism and infectivity of three human (H1 and H3) and two avian (H1 and H5) influenza viruses, we observed that the human influenza viruses primarily infected ciliated cells and replicated efficiently, whereas a highly pathogenic avian H5N1 virus (A/Vietnam/1203/2004) replicated efficiently within nonciliated cells despite a low initial infection rate. Furthermore, compared to other influenza viruses tested, VN/1203 virus replicated more efficiently in cells isolated from the lower trachea and at a higher temperature (37°C) compared to a lower temperature (33°C). VN/1203 virus infection also induced higher levels of immune mediator genes and cell death, and virus was recovered from the basolateral side of the cell monolayer. This ferret tracheal differentiated primary epithelial cell culture system provides a valuable in vitro model for studying cellular tropism, infectivity, and the pathogenesis of influenza viruses. PMID:23255802

  1. Expression of Heat Shock and Other Stress Response Proteins in Ticks and Cultured Tick Cells in Response to Anaplasma spp. Infection and Heat Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Villar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ticks are ectoparasites of animals and humans that serve as vectors of Anaplasma and other pathogens that affect humans and animals worldwide. Ticks and the pathogens that they transmit have coevolved molecular interactions involving genetic traits of both the tick and the pathogen that mediate their development and survival. In this paper, the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs and other stress response proteins (SRPs was characterized in ticks and cultured tick cells by proteomics and transcriptomics analyses in response to Anaplasma spp. infection and heat shock. The results of these studies demonstrated that the stress response was activated in ticks and cultured tick cells after Anaplasma spp. infection and heat shock. However, in the natural vector-pathogen relationship, HSPs and other SRPs were not strongly activated, which likely resulted from tick-pathogen coevolution. These results also demonstrated pathogen- and tick-specific differences in the expression of HSPs and other SRPs in ticks and cultured tick cells infected with Anaplasma spp. and suggested the existence of post-transcriptional mechanisms induced by Anaplasma spp. to control tick response to infection. These results illustrated the complexity of the stress response in ticks and suggested a function for the HSPs and other SRPs during Anaplasma spp. infection.

  2. Precision-cut intestinal slices as a culture system to analyze the infection of differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Winter, Christine; Mork, Ann-Kathrin; Amiri, Mahdi; Naim, Hassan Y; Rautenschlein, Silke; Herrler, Georg

    2015-02-01

    Many viruses infect and replicate in their host via the intestinal tract, e.g. many picornaviruses, several coronaviruses and avian influenza viruses of waterfowl. To analyze infection of enterocytes is a challenging task as culture systems for differentiated intestinal epithelial cells are not readily available and often have a life span that is too short for infection studies. Precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) from chicken embryos were prepared and shown that the epithelial cells lining the lumen of the intestine are viable for up to 4 days. Using lectin staining, it was demonstrated that α2,3-linked sialic acids, the preferred receptor determinants of avian influenza viruses, are present on the apical side of the epithelial cells. Furthermore, the epithelial cells (at the tips) of the villi were shown to be susceptible to infection by an avian influenza virus of the H9N2 subtype. This culture system will be useful to analyze virus infection of intestinal epithelial cells and it should be applicable also to the intestine of other species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Alisporivir inhibits MERS- and SARS-coronavirus replication in cell culture, but not SARS-coronavirus infection in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wilde, Adriaan H; Falzarano, Darryl; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Beugeling, Corrine; Fett, Craig; Martellaro, Cynthia; Posthuma, Clara C; Feldmann, Heinz; Perlman, Stanley; Snijder, Eric J

    2017-01-15

    Currently, there is no registered treatment for infections with emerging zoonotic coronaviruses like SARS- and MERS-coronavirus. We here report that in cultured cells low-micromolar concentrations of alisporivir, a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporin A-analog, inhibit the replication of four different coronaviruses, including MERS- and SARS-coronavirus. Ribavirin was found to further potentiate the antiviral effect of alisporivir in these cell culture-based infection models, but this combination treatment was unable to improve the outcome of SARS-CoV infection in a mouse model. Nevertheless, our data provide a basis to further explore the potential of Cyp inhibitors as host-directed, broad-spectrum inhibitors of coronavirus replication.

  4. Identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infection in honey bees: establishment of a medium throughput screening assay based on N. ceranae infected cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin) or presumed (surfactin) or no (paromomycin) activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole) totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae.

  5. [Comparison of methods of detection of bovine adenovirus serotype 3 in infected culture of calf kidney cells (MDBK)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliuzhnaia, A N; Trifonov, V D; Zil'berman, M I; Zalmanzon, E S; Kaledin, A S

    1988-10-01

    The comparative study of the dynamics of the main antigen (hexon) and viral DNA of the bovine adenovirus type 3 accumulation in the established cell line MDBK under the conditions of single- or multistep cycle of infection has been undertaken. The quantitative immunoelectrophoresis and immunoenzyme assay detected the viral antigens on the late stages of infection in the period of cellular monolayer degradation. The immunofluorescence reaction and histochemical immunoenzyme method detected the antigen in the infected cells concurrently with the primary expression of the viral cytopathic effect. The reaction of the spot molecular hybridization with the [32P]-DNA probes detected the viral DNA considerably earlier than the antigen was detected by the immunological methods, before the appearance of degenerative changes in the infected cells. Preference of the immunoenzyme assay and DNA-probes in diagnosis of the virus are discussed.

  6. Sequence adaptations during growth of rescued classical swine fever viruses in cell culture and within infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadsbjerg, Johanne; Friis, Martin Barfred; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    RNA could be detected. However, the animals inoculated with these mutant viruses seroconverted against CSFV. Thus, these mutant viruses were highly attenuated in vivo. All 4 rescued viruses were also passaged up to 20 times in cell culture. Using full genome sequencing, the same two adaptations within...... adaptation and to identify key determinants of viral replication efficiency in cells and within host animals....

  7. The behaviour of tomato golden mosaic virus DNA in cultured cells isolated from systemically infected tobacco leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, M J; Buck, K W; Coutts, R H

    1989-03-01

    When callus tissue was cultured from leaf pieces taken from a Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc. plant systemically infected with tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV), TGMV-specific DNA persisted for up to 6 months in culture. Analysis of TGMV-specific intracellular DNA forms indicated a decrease in double-stranded relative to single-stranded forms and an increase in sub-genomic relative to genomic single-stranded DNA species in the callus tissue compared to those in the original leaf explant. The implications of the results with regard to TGMV replication are discussed.

  8. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  9. Use of a feline respiratory epithelial cell culture system grown at the air-liquid interface to characterize the innate immune response following feline herpesvirus 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelli, Rahul K; Maes, Roger; Kiupel, Matti; Hussey, Gisela Soboll

    2016-03-02

    Infection with feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) accounts for 50% of viral upper respiratory diseases in domestic cats and is a significant cause of ocular diseases. Despite the clinical significance and high prevalence of FHV-1 infection, currently available vaccines cannot completely protect cats from infection and lifelong latency. FHV-1 infects via the mucous membranes and replicates in respiratory epithelial cells, but very little is known about the early innate immunity at this site. To address questions about immunity to FHV-1, feline respiratory epithelial cells cultured at air-liquid interface (ALI-FRECs) were established by collecting respiratory tracts from 6 healthy cats after euthanasia. Cells were isolated, cultured and characterized histologically and immunologically before infection with FHV-1. The expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokine and chemokine responses were measured by real time PCR. ALI-FRECs morphologically resembled the natural airways of cats with multilayered columnar epithelial cells and cilia. Immunological properties of the natural airways were maintained in ALI-FRECs, as evidenced by the expression of TLRs, cytokines, chemokines, interferons, beta-defensins, and other regulatory genes. Furthermore, ALI-FRECs were able to support infection and replication of FHV-1, as well as modulate transcriptional regulation of various immune genes in response to infection. IL-1β and TNFα were increased in ALI-FRECs by 24hpi, whereas expression levels of IFN-α and TLR9 were not increased until 36hpi. In contrast, TLR3, GM-CSF and TGF-1β expression was down-regulated at 36hpi. The data presented show the development of a system ideal for investigating the molecular pathogenesis and immunity of FHV-1 or other respiratory pathogens.

  10. Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Strains Elicit a Greater Innate Immune Response than Antigenically-Matched Seasonal Influenza Viruses during Infection of Human Nasal Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, William A.; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10–20% of the world’s population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the

  11. Live attenuated influenza vaccine strains elicit a greater innate immune response than antigenically-matched seasonal influenza viruses during infection of human nasal epithelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, William A; Chason, Kelly D; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-03-26

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10-20% of the world's population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the silent

  12. Disruption of glycosylation enhances ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation of Shadoo in Scrapie-infected rodents and cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Yan; Xie, Wu-Ling; Xu, Yin; Ren, Ke; Shi, Qi; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Chen, Cao; Tian, Chan; Gao, Chen; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-06-01

    Shadoo (Sho) is an N-glycosylated glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored protein that is expressed in the brain and exhibits neuroprotective properties. Recently, research has shown that a reduction of Sho levels may reflect the presence of PrPSc in the brain. However, the possible mechanism by which prion infection triggers down-regulation of Sho remains unclear. In the present study, Western blot and immunohistochemical assays revealed that Sho, especially glycosylated Sho, declined markedly in the brains of five scrapie agent-infected hamsters and mice at the terminal stages. Analyses of the down-regulation of Sho levels with the emergence of PrPSc C2 proteolytic fragments did not identify close association in all tested scrapie-infected models. To further investigate the mechanism of depletion of Sho in prion disease, a Sho-expressing plasmid with HA tag was introduced into a scrapie-infected cell line, SMB-S15, and its normal cell line, SMB-PS. Western blot assay revealed dramatically decreased Sho in SMB-S15 cells, especially its glycosylated form. Proteasome inhibitor MG132 reversed the decrease of nonglycosylated Sho, but had little effect on glycosylated Sho. N-acetylglucosamine transferase inhibitor tunicamycin efficiently reduced the glycosylations of Sho and PrPC in SMB-PS cells, while two other endoplasmic reticulum stress inducers showed clear inhibition of diglycosylated PrPC, but did not change the expression level and profile of Sho. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation of HA-Sho illustrated ubiquitination of Sho in SMB-S15 cells, but not in SMB-PS cells. We propose that the depletions of Sho in scrapie-infected cell lines due to inhibition of glycosylation mediate protein destabilization and subsequently proteasome degradation after modification by ubiquitination.

  13. Reduction of NF-κB (p65) in Scrapie-Infected Cultured Cells and in the Brains of Scrapie-Infected Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yue; Shi, Qi; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Kang; Sun, Jing; Lv, Yan; Guo, Man; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Cao; Gao, Chen; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2017-08-21

    Transcription factor NF-κB functions as a pleiotropic regulator of target genes controlling physiological function as well as pathological processes of many different diseases, including some neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of NF-κB in the pathogenesis of prion disease remains ambiguous. In this study, the status of NF-κB (p65) in a prion-infected cell line SMB-S15 was first evaluated. Significantly lower levels of p65 and the phosphorylated form of p65 (p-p65) were detected in SMB-S15 cells, compared with its normal partner cell line SMB-PS. Markedly slower responses of the NF-κB system to the stimulation of TNF-α were observed in SMB-S15 cells. Removal of PrP(Sc) replication in SMB-S15 cells rescued the expression and activity of NF-κB. However, overexpression of p65 in SMB-S15 cells did not influence the propagation of PrP(Sc). Moreover, significant decline of p65 level was also observed in the brain tissues of mice infected with the lysates of SMB-S15 cells and hamsters infected with scrapie agent 263K at terminal stage. Immunofluorescence assays (IFAs) on brain sections from either normal or scrapie-infected rodents revealed colocalization of p65 with neuronal nuclear (NeuN) protein positive cells but not with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive cells. Assays of the agents involving in the regulation of NF-κB showed down-regulated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) both in SMB-S15 cells and in the brains of scrapie-infected rodents. Those data indicate a remarkable repression of the classical NF-κB pathway during prion infection both in vitro and in vivo. The alteration of NF-κB (p65) shows close association with the replication and accumulation of PrP(Sc) in the cells.

  14. Expanding the host range of small insect RNA viruses: Providence virus (Carmotetraviridae) infects and replicates in a human tissue culture cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwaji, Meesbah; Short, James Roswell; Dorrington, Rosemary Ann

    2016-10-01

    Tetraviruses are small, positive (+ve)-sense ssRNA viruses that infect the midgut cells of lepidopteran larvae. Providence virus (PrV) is the only member of the family Carmotetraviridae (previously Tetraviridae). PrV particles exhibit the characteristic tetraviral T=4 icosahedral symmetry, but PrV is distinct from other tetraviruses with respect to genome organization and viral non-structural proteins. Currently, PrV is the only tetravirus known to infect and replicate in lepidopteran cell culture lines. In this report we demonstrate, using immunofluorescence microscopy, that PrV infects and replicates in a human tissue culture cell line (HeLa), producing infectious virus particles. We also provide evidence for PrV replication in vitro in insect, mammalian and plant cell-free systems. This study challenges the long-held view that tetraviruses have a narrow host range confined to one or a few lepidopteran species and highlights the need to consider the potential for apparently non-infectious viruses to be transferred to new hosts in the laboratory.

  15. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as bi...

  16. Inflammatory responses of a macrophage/epithelial cell co-culture model to mono and mixed infections with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodet, Charles; Chandad, Fatiha; Grenier, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Accumulated evidence points to Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia as three major etiologic agents of chronic periodontitis. Epithelial cells and macrophages play a major role in the host response to periodontopathogens, and the secretion of inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by these host cells is believed to contribute to periodontal tissue destruction. The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory response of a macrophage/epithelial cell co-culture model following mono or mixed infections with the above three periodontopathogens. An in vitro co-culture model composed of epithelial-like transformed cells (HeLa cell line) and macrophage-like cells (phorbol myristic acid-differentiated U937 monocytic cell line) was challenged with whole cells or lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia, individually and in combination. Following stimulation, the production of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and MMP-9 were quantified by enzyme-linked immunoassays. We observed that mono or mixed infections of the co-culture model induced the secretion of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, PGE2, and MMP-9. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia induced an increase in RANTES secretion, whereas T. denticola alone or in combination resulted in a significant decrease in RANTES levels. All LPS challenges induced an increase in chemokine, MMP-9, and PGE2 production. No synergistic effect on the production of cytokines, chemokines, PGE2, and MMP-9 was observed for any of the bacterial or LPS mixtures tested. This study supports the view that P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia may induce high levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and MMP-9 in periodontal lesions, thus contributing to the progression of periodontitis.

  17. High Incidence of Afebrile Bloodstream Infection Detected by Surveillance Blood Culture in Patients on Corticosteroid Therapy after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Kazuaki; Kimura, Shun-Ichi; Akahoshi, Yu; Nakano, Hirofumi; Harada, Naonori; Ugai, Tomotaka; Wada, Hidenori; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Ishihara, Yuko; Kawamura, Koji; Sakamoto, Kana; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Sato, Miki; Terasako-Saito, Kiriko; Nakasone, Hideki; Kikuchi, Misato; Yamazaki, Rie; Kanda, Junya; Kako, Shinichi; Tanihara, Aki; Nishida, Junji; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2016-02-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSI) are still important complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Patients who are receiving corticosteroid therapy can develop BSI without fever. The utility of surveillance blood cultures in these situations is controversial. We retrospectively analyzed 74 patients who received a corticosteroid consisting of ≥.5 mg/kg prednisolone or equivalent after allo-SCT. In principle, we performed surveillance blood culture weekly for these patients. Sixteen patients (21.6%) developed definite BSI. In a multivariate analysis, a myeloablative conditioning regimen, high-risk disease status at allo-SCT, and the presence of a central venous catheter at the initiation of corticosteroid therapy were identified as independent significant risk factors for the development of definite BSI. At the first definite BSI episode, 7 patients (46.7%) were afebrile and diagnosed by surveillance blood culture. However, 6 of these 7 afebrile patients showed various signs that could be attributed to infection at the time of positive blood culture. In conclusion, patients receiving corticosteroid therapy after allo-SCT frequently develop afebrile BSI. Although surveillance blood culture might be beneficial in these situations, it also seems important to not miss the signs of BSI, even when patients are afebrile.

  18. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  19. Enterococcus faecalis Infection and Reactive Oxygen Species Down-Regulates the miR-17-92 Cluster in Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper A. B. Strickertsson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation due to bacterial overgrowth of the stomach predisposes to the development of gastric cancer and is also associated with high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS. In recent years increasing attention has been drawn to microRNAs (miRNAs due to their role in the pathogenesis of many human diseases including gastric cancer. Here we studied the impact of infection by the gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis on global miRNA expression as well as the effect of ROS on selected miRNAs. Human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line MKN74 was infected with living E. faecalis for 24 h or for 5 days or with E. faecalis lysate for 5 days. The miRNA expression was examined by microarray analysis using Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA Arrays. To test the effect of ROS, MKN74 cells were treated with 100 mM tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP. Following 5 days of E. faecalis infection we found 91 differentially expressed miRNAs in response to living bacteria and 2 miRNAs responded to E. faecalis lysate. We verified the down-regulation of the miR-17-92 and miR-106-363 clusters and of other miRNAs involved in the oxidative stress-response by qRT-PCR. We conclude that only infection by living E. faecalis bacteria caused a significant global response in miRNA expression in the MKN74 cell culture. E. faecalis infection as well as ROS stimulation down-regulated the expression of the miR-17-92 cluster. We believe that these changes could reflect a general response of gastric epithelial cells to bacterial infections.

  20. Fish stem cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-04-13

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on "Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer", we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  1. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Hong, Zhendong Li, Yunhan Hong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on “Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer”, we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  2. Hepatitis E genotype 4 virus from feces of monkeys infected experimentally can be cultured in PLC/PRF/5 cells and upregulate host interferon-inducible genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Qi, Ying; Harrison, Tim J; Luo, Baobin; Zhou, Yan; Li, Xiuhua; Song, Aijing; Huang, Weijin; Wang, Youchun

    2014-10-01

    The understanding of the interaction between hepatitis E virus (HEV) and its host cells has been impeded greatly by the absence of a cell culture system. In this study, an efficient cultivation method was developed in PLC/PRF/5 cells for HEV genotype 4 from the feces of monkeys infected experimentally. Compared to minimal essential medium (MEM), mixed Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM)/M199 improved the infection efficiency of HEV in PLC/PRF/5 cells. The incubation time and temperature were set at 6 hr and 40°C, respectively. Compared to a 100% ELISA positive ratio (EPR) of 1 × 10(6)  copies/ml HEV inoculated flasks, the ELISA positive ratio was 100%, 75%, 37.5%, and 100% for flasks inoculated with HEV incubated for 30 min under the conditions of pH 3.0, pH 11.0, 56°C and delipidation treatment, respectively. Gene expression profiles of HEV inoculated and control PLC/PRF/5 cells were assayed using a microarray. Four interferon-inducible genes, IFI27, IFI6, Mx1, and CMPK2, were up-regulated during HEV-infection. Furthermore, the replication of HEV was inhibited at 3-14 days after treatment with 500 IU/ml IFN-α2b.

  3. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, caspase-3 and production of reactive oxygen intermediate on endothelial cells culture (HUVECs treated with P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and tumour necrosis factor-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loeki E. Fitri

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytoadherence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes on endothelial cells is a key factor in development of severe malaria. This process may associated with the activation of local immune that was enhanced by tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. This study was conducted to see the influence of P.falciparum infected erythrocytes cytoadherence and TNF-α treatment in inducing endothelial cells activation in vitro. inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and caspase-3 expression, also reactive oxygen intermediate (ROI production were used as parameters. An Experimental laboratory study had been done to observe endothelial cells activation (HUVECs after treatment with TNF-α for 20 hours or P. falciparum infected erythrocytes for 1 hour or both of them. Normal endothelial cells culture had been used as a control. Using immunocytochemistry local immune activation of endothelial cells was determined by iNOS and caspase-3 expression. Nitro Blue Tetrazolium reduction-assay was conducted to see the ROI production semi quantitatively. inducible nitric oxide synthase expression only found on endothelial cells culture treated with P. falciparum infected erythrocytes or both P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and TNF-α. Caspase-3 expression found slightly on normal endothelial cells culture. This expression increased significantly on endothelial cells culture treated with both P.falciparum infected erythrocytes and TNF-α (p=0.000. The normal endothelial cells release low level of ROI in the presence of non-specific trigger, PMA. In the presence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes or TNF-α or both of them, some cells showed medium to high levels of ROI. Cytoadherence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and TNF α treatment on endothelial cells can induce activation of local immune marked by increase inducible nitric oxide synthase and release of free radicals that cause cell damage. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:151-6 Keywords: P.falciparum ,HUVECs, TNF-α, i

  4. Perfusion based cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures and ti...

  5. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, T P; Bickham, U; Bayne, C J

    2013-06-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome.

  6. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc., has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc., is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  7. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid

  8. Comparison of quantitative RT-PCR with cell culture to detect viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) IVb infections in the Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Kristine M; Casey, Rufina N; Groocock, Geoffrey H; Getchell, Rodman G; Bowser, Paul R; Casey, James W

    2010-03-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is an important pathogen of cultured and wild fish in marine and freshwater environments. A new genotype, VHSV IVb, was isolated from a fish collected from the Great Lakes in 2003. Since the first isolation, VHSV IVb has been confirmed in 28 species, signaling the early invasion and continued spread of this Office International des Epizooties-reportable agent. For surveillance of this virus in both wild and experimental settings, we have developed a rapid and sensitive one-step quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay that amplifies a 100-base-pair conserved segment from both the genomic negative strand and the mRNA positive strand of the nucleoprotein (N) gene of VHSV IVb. This assay is linear over seven orders of magnitude, with an analytical capability of detecting a single copy of viral RNA and reproducibility at 100 copies. The assay is approximately linear with RNA input from 50 to 1000 ng per assay and works equally well with RNA prepared from a column-based or phenol-chloroform-based method. In wild-caught fish, 97% of the cases were found to be more than three orders of magnitude more sensitive using qRT-PCR than using cell culture. Of the 1,428 fish from the Great Lakes region tested in 2006 and 2007, 24% were positive by qRT-PCR whereas only 5% were positive by cell culture. All of the fish that were positive by cell culture were also positive by qRT-PCR. Importantly, qRT-PCR sensitivity is comparable to that of cell culture detection when comparing VHSV viral RNA levels with viral titer stocks, confirming that the high qRT-PCR signals obtained with diagnostic samples are due to the accumulation of N gene mRNA by transcriptional attenuation. The qRT-PCR assay is particularly valuable for rapid and high-throughput prescreening of fish before confirmatory testing by cell culture or sequencing tissue-derived amplicons and especially in detecting infection in fish that do not show clinical

  9. Culture Negative Infective Endocarditits: a Changing Paradigm

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, A

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, the modified Duke\\'s criteria, based primarily on positive blood cultures, is used to diagnose Infective Endocarditis (IE). However, reports demonstrate that 31% of cases are diagnosed as Culture Negative Infective Endocarditis (CNIE)1. Consequently, empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics are prescribed to cover unidentified organisms and, as a result, antibiotic therapy may be compromised. Molecular diagnostic techniques aid with identifying causative organisms in cases of CNIE and we question if the increasing use of such technologies will change the local epidemiology of CNIE. We present the first case of Tropheryma whipplei Infective Endocarditis (TWIE) reported in Ireland.

  10. Nuclear actin is partially associated with Cajal bodies in human cells in culture and relocates to the nuclear periphery after infection of cells by adenovirus 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedge, L J E; Morrison, E E; Blair, G E; Walker, J H

    2005-02-15

    Cajal bodies are intra-nuclear structures enriched in proteins involved in transcription and mRNA processing. In this study, immunofluorescence microscopy experiments using a highly specific antibody to actin revealed nuclear actin spots that colocalized in part with p80 coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Actin remained associated with Cajal bodies in cells extracted to reveal the nuclear matrix. Adenovirus infection, which is known to disassemble Cajal bodies, resulted in loss of actin from these structures late in infection. In infected cells, nuclear actin was observed to relocate to structures at the periphery of the nucleus, inside the nuclear envelope. Based on these findings, it is suggested that actin may play an important role in the organization or function of the Cajal body.

  11. Antivirals reduce the formation of key Alzheimer's disease molecules in cell cultures acutely infected with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Wozniak

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD afflicts around 20 million people worldwide and so there is an urgent need for effective treatment. Our research showing that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 is a risk factor for AD for the brains of people who possess a specific genetic factor and that the virus causes accumulation of key AD proteins (β-amyloid (Aβ and abnormally phosphorylated tau (P-tau, suggests that anti-HSV1 antiviral agents might slow AD progression. However, currently available antiviral agents target HSV1 DNA replication and so might be successful in AD only if Aβ and P-tau accumulation depend on viral DNA replication. Therefore, we investigated firstly the stage(s of the virus replication cycle required for Aβ and P-tau accumulation, and secondly whether antiviral agents prevent these changes using recombinant strains of HSV1 that progress only partly through the replication cycle and antiviral agents that inhibit HSV1 DNA replication. By quantitative immunocytochemistry we demonstrated that entry, fusion and uncoating of HSV1, are insufficient to induce Aβ and P-tau production. We showed also that none of the "immediate early" viral proteins is directly responsible, and that Aβ and P-tau are produced at a subsequent stage of the HSV1 replication cycle. Importantly, the anti-HSV1 antiviral agents acyclovir, penciclovir and foscarnet reduced Aβ and P-tau accumulation, as well as HSV1, with foscarnet being less effective in each case. P-tau accumulation was found to depend on HSV1 DNA replication, whereas Aβ accumulation was not. The antiviral-induced decrease in Aβ is attributable to the reduced number of new viruses, and hence the reduction in viral spread. Since antiviral agents reduce greatly Aβ and P-tau accumulation in HSV1-infected cells, they would be suitable for treating AD with great advantage unlike current AD therapies, only the virus, not the host cell, would be targeted.

  12. THE CHANGE OF KINETIK PARAMETERS OF THE WEAK-ASSOCIATED WITH WALL CELL PEROXIDASE IN THE SUSPENSION CULTURE OF POTATO CELLS IN THE BEGINNING OF INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graskova I.A.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The change in kinetic parameters of extracellular peroxidase of suspension cells of resistant potato variety (Lugovskoi and sensitive variety (Luk,ynovskii in the initial period of infection by 5369 Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus (Spieck. et Kotth. Skapt et Burkh. pathogen was examined. Extracellular peroxidases of resistant and sensitive potato variety without pathogens were shown to be concurrently inhibited. At the beginning of infection enzyme activity was extremely increased due to enhanced affinity to substrate as a result of reducing of competitive inhibiting. In increasing enzyme activity is sensitive potato variant evidently caused by other mechanism.

  13. Perfusion Based Cell Culture Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, A.; Emnéus, J.; Dufva, M.

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers.

  14. Perfusion based cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers.......Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures...

  15. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  16. Cell culture from sponges: pluripotency and immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Caralt, Sònia; Uriz, María J; Wijffels, René H

    2007-10-01

    Sponges are a source of compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications. In this article, methods of sponge cell culture for production of these bioactive compounds are reviewed, and new approaches for overcoming the problem of metabolite supply are examined. The use of embryos is proposed as a new source of sponge material for cell culture. Stem cells are present in high amounts in embryos and are more versatile and resistant to infections than adult cells. Additionally, genetic engineering and cellular research on apoptotic mechanisms are promising new fields that might help to improve cell survival in sponge-cell lines. We propose that one topic for future research should be how to reduce apoptosis, which appears to be very high in sponge cell cultures.

  17. Cell culture's spider silk road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkel, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    A number of synthetic and natural materials have been tried in cell culture and tissue engineering applications in recent years. Now Jeffrey Perkel takes a look at one new culture component that might surprise you-spider silk.

  18. Establishing of the HSV-2 infected cell culture system%单纯疱疹病毒2型感染的细胞培养系统的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁义; 林有坤; 梁铭

    2010-01-01

    目的 建立稳定的单纯疱疹病毒2型(HSV-2)感染的细胞培养系统,为研究药物的抗HSV-2作用搭建一个良好的平台.方法 以猴肾细胞(Vero)为繁殖细胞,选择人鼻咽癌上皮细胞(Hep-2)为靶细胞,观察HSV-2在Hep-2株中的致细胞病变效应(CPE).结果 HSV-2感染Vero细胞4 d后大量繁殖;HSV-2感染Hep-2细胞12 h后可出现明显的细胞病变.结论 以Vero为繁殖细胞,Hep-2为靶细胞的细胞培养系统是研究药物抗HSV-2作用的良好的平台.%Objective To establish a HSV-2 infected cell culture system,so as to confirm the suppressing effect of medicine on HSV-2 including effective concentration and safety.Methods A monkey kidney cell line,Vero ,and a human tracheal epithelial cell line,Hep-2 were used in HSV infected cell culture system.HSV-2 was propagated in Vero cells and Hep-2 cells was served as targets of HSV-2 infection.Then cytopathic effect(CPE) was performed.Results HSV-2 was propagated abundance in Vero cells after4 days:The CPE occurred in Hep-2 cells after 12 hours infected by HSV-2.Conclusion The HSV-2 infected cell culture system we established was stable for utilization.As well as to confirm the suppressing effect of medicine on HSV-2.

  19. Monocytotropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants detectable in all stages of HIV-1 infection lack T-cell line tropism and syncytium-inducing ability in primary T-cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuitemaker, H; Kootstra, N A; de Goede, R E; de Wolf, F; Miedema, F; Tersmette, M

    1991-01-01

    We previously demonstrated a correlation between the presence of syncytium-inducing (SI) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants showing tropism for cell line H9 and the occurrence of rapid CD4 cell decline and progression to AIDS. In contrast, in stable asymptomatic individuals, we detected only isolates with low replication rates that were non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) and nontropic for the H9 cell line. Here, we investigated the monocytotropism of established HIV-1 isolates with a panel of isolates and with biological HIV-1 clones with distinct phenotypes. Moreover, the prevalence and biological phenotypes of monocytotropic HIV-1 variants in the course of HIV-1 infection were analyzed in comparative primary isolation studies on peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). In cell-free infection studies with MDM from eight blood donors, 13 of 17 NSI isolates but only 4 of 14 SI isolates were able to infect MDM. NSI isolates also infected significantly more different donors than SI variants (median, 3 of 8 versus 0 of 8). This enhanced monocytotropism of NSI isolates was confirmed in experiments with biological HIV-1 clones with distinct phenotypes recovered from the same donor. To investigate the prevalence and biological phenotypes of monocytotropic variants in different stages of HIV-1 infection, sequential isolates from peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from nine asymptomatic individuals, five of whom progressed to AIDS and seven of whom had a known time of seroconversion, were recovered by cocultivation with both PBL and MDM. Monocytotropic variants were obtained from 37 of 42 time points. All monocytotropic variants were NSI in PBL culture and non-T-cell-line tropic, even when SI, T-cell-line-tropic HIV-1 variants could be recovered from the same patient sample by cocultivation with PBL. We conclude that monocytotropic HIV-1 variants mostly have an NSI phenotype in PBL and, in contrast to SI variants, are

  20. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  1. Prevention and Detection of Mycoplasma Contamination in Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Farzaneh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems in cell culture is mycoplasma infection. It can extensively affectcell physiology and metabolism. As the applications of cell culture increase in research,industrial production and cell therapy, more concerns about mycoplasma contaminationand detection will arise. This review will provide valuable information about: 1. the waysin which cells are contaminated and the frequency and source of mycoplasma species incell culture; 2. the ways to prevent mycoplasma contamination in cell culture; 3. the importanceof mycoplasma tests in cell culture; 4. different methods to identify mycoplasmacontamination; 5. the consequences of mycoplasma contamination in cell culture and 6.available methods to eliminate mycoplasma contamination. Awareness about the sourcesof mycoplasma and pursuing aseptic techniques in cell culture along with reliable detectionmethods of mycoplasma contamination can provide an appropriate situation to preventmycoplasma contamination in cell culture.

  2. Highly Efficient JFH1-Based Cell-Culture System for Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 5a: Failure of Homologous Neutralizing-Antibody Treatment to Control Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tanja B; Gottwein, Judith Margarete; Scheel, Troels Kasper Høyer

    2008-01-01

    was to adapt the system to employ genotype 5. Methods. @nbsp; Huh7.5 cells infected with SA13/JFH1, containing Core-NS2 of strain SA13 (genotype 5a), were monitored for Core expression and for supernatant infectivity and HCV-RNA titers. Adaptive mutations of SA13/JFH1 were identified by sequence analysis...

  3. Fungal cell gigantism during mammalian infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Zaragoza

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 microm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with gamma-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20-50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens.

  4. Fungal cell gigantism during mammalian infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Rodas, Rocío; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 microm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with gamma-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20-50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens.

  5. Recombinant Protein Production and Insect Cell Culture and Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Andrews, Angela D. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using virtually infected or stably transformed insect cells containing a gene encoding the described polypeptide. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  6. Evaluation of the suitability of six host genes as internal control in real-time RT-PCR assays in chicken embryo cell cultures infected with infectious bursal disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Bang, Dang Duong; Handberg, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    -time RT-PCR is needed to a suitable internal control. We thus investigated the expression pattern of six chicken genes, including P-actin, 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, glyceral dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and beta-2-microglobulin, in chicken embryo (CE) cell cultures...... and GAPDH had a lower expression level in CE cell cultures. Also, beta-actin showed no significant variation in both normalized and non-normalized assays and virus dose-independent of inoculation, while other genes did. beta-Actin was further successfully used as an internal control to quantitate Bursine-2...... virus-specific RNA load in CE cell cultures. Thus, beta-actin was suggested as a suitable internal control in studying gene expression as well as virus-specific RNA load in CE cell after IBDV infection....

  7. Interpretation of cell culture phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierck, J L; Dodson, M V

    2000-03-01

    This paper discusses the dilemma of interpreting unusual or abnormal phenomena seen in cell cultures and is not intended to address the statistical design of experiments. Problems that can be encountered when growing cells in experimental situations include low or decreasing cell numbers, abnormal cell morphology, microbial contamination, and detachment of the cell monolayer. If any of these situations occur, it is not realistic to proceed with data analysis until the problem is corrected. The best policy is to attempt to standardize all types of cultures used for analysis and to avoid using any cultures that display atypical characteristics.

  8. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-07-11

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4⁺ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo.

  9. Morphological changes in cultured bovine lymphoid cell lines associated with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) single and dual infections with bovine leukemia virus (BLV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) makes available two cell lines derived from the same lymphoblast-like suspension cell that have been confirmed by next-generation sequencing and RT-PCR to have either a single contaminate of BVDV2a (CRL-8037) or dual contaminates of both BVDV and BL...

  10. The Important Role of Lipid Raft-Mediated Attachment in the Infection of Cultured Cells by Coronavirus Infectious Bronchitis Virus Beaudette Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huichen; Huang, Mei; Yuan, Quan; Wei, Yanquan; Gao, Yuan; Mao, Lejiao; Gu, Lingjun; Tan, Yong Wah; Zhong, Yanxin; Liu, Dingxiang; Sun, Shiqi

    2017-01-01

    Lipid raft is an important element for the cellular entry of some viruses, including coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). However, the exact role of lipid rafts in the cellular membrane during the entry of IBV into host cells is still unknown. In this study, we biochemically fractionated IBV-infected cells via sucrose density gradient centrifugation after depleting plasma membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or Mevastatin. Our results demonstrated that unlike IBV non-structural proteins, IBV structural proteins co-localized with lipid raft marker caveolin-1. Infectivity assay results of Vero cells illustrated that the drug-induced disruption of lipid rafts significantly suppressed IBV infection. Further studies revealed that lipid rafts were not required for IBV genome replication or virion release at later stages. However, the drug-mediated depletion of lipid rafts in Vero cells before IBV attachment significantly reduced the expression of viral structural proteins, suggesting that drug treatment impaired the attachment of IBV to the cell surface. Our results indicated that lipid rafts serve as attachment factors during the early stages of IBV infection, especially during the attachment stage. PMID:28081264

  11. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Shengjuan [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100 (China); Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Bergen, Werner G. [Program in Cellular and Molecular Biosciences/Department of Animal Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Hausman, Gary J. [Animal Science Department, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2771 (United States); Zan, Linsen, E-mail: zanls@yahoo.com.cn [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100 (China); Dodson, Michael V., E-mail: dodson@wsu.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  12. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shengjuan; Bergen, Werner G; Hausman, Gary J; Zan, Linsen; Dodson, Michael V

    2013-04-12

    Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  13. Dendritic Cells Enhance HIV Infection of Memory CD4(+) T Cells in Human Lymphoid Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Rodriguez, Angel L; Reuter, Morgan A; McDonald, David

    2016-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in controlling infections by coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses to invading pathogens. Paradoxically, DCs can increase HIV-1 dissemination in vitro by binding and transferring infectious virions to CD4(+) T cells, a process called transinfection. Transinfection has been well characterized in cultured cell lines and circulating primary T cells, but it is unknown whether DCs enhance infection of CD4(+) T cells in vivo. In untreated HIV infection, massive CD4(+) T-cell infection and depletion occur in secondary lymphoid tissues long before decline is evident in the peripheral circulation. To study the role of DCs in HIV infection of lymphoid tissues, we utilized human tonsil tissues, cultured either as tissue blocks or as aggregate suspension cultures, in single-round infection experiments. In these experiments, addition of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) to the cultures increased T-cell infection, particularly in CD4(+) T cells expressing lower levels of HLA-DR. Subset analysis demonstrated that MDDCs increased HIV-1 infection of central and effector memory T-cell populations. Depletion of endogenous myeloid DCs (myDCs) from the cultures decreased memory T-cell infection, and readdition of MDDCs restored infection to predepletion levels. Using an HIV-1 fusion assay, we found that MDDCs equally increased HIV delivery into naïve, central, and effector memory T cells in the cultures, whereas predepletion of myDCs reduced fusion into memory T cells. Together, these data suggest that resident myDCs facilitate memory T-cell infection in lymphoid tissues, implicating DC-mediated transinfection in driving HIV dissemination within these tissues in untreated HIV/AIDS.

  14. Experimental feline enteric coronavirus infection reveals an aberrant infection pattern and shedding of mutants with impaired infectivity in enterocyte cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarets, Lowiese M. B.; Vermeulen, Ben L.; Theuns, Sebastiaan; Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Zeller, Mark; Roukaerts, Inge D. M.; Acar, Delphine D.; Olyslaegers, Dominique A. J.; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Nauwynck, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) results from mutations in the viral genome during a common feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) infection. Since many virological and immunological data on FECV infections are lacking, the present study investigated these missing links during experimental infection of three SPF cats with FECV strain UCD. Two cats showed mild clinical signs, faecal shedding of infectious virus from 4 dpi, a cell-associated viraemia at inconsistent time points from 5 dpi, a highly neutralising antibody response from 9 dpi, and no major abnormalities in leukocyte numbers. Faecal shedding lasted for 28–56 days, but virus shed during this stage was less infectious in enterocyte cultures and affected by mutations. Remarkably, in the other cat neither clinical signs nor acute shedding were seen, but virus was detected in blood cells from 3 dpi, and shedding of non-enterotropic, mutated viruses suddenly occurred from 14 dpi onwards. Neutralising antibodies arose from 21 dpi. Leukocyte numbers were not different compared to the other cats, except for the CD8+ regulatory T cells. These data indicate that FECV can infect immune cells even in the absence of intestinal replication and raise the hypothesis that the gradual adaptation to these cells can allow non-enterotropic mutants to arise. PMID:26822958

  15. Cell culture compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yiao, Jian

    2014-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6 (SEQ ID NO:1 encodes the full length endoglucanase; SEQ ID NO:4 encodes the mature form), and the corresponding endoglucanase VI amino acid sequence ("EGVI"; SEQ ID NO:3 is the signal sequence; SEQ ID NO:2 is the mature sequence). The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  16. COMPARISON OF TISSUE CULTURE AND ANIMAL MODELS FOR ASSESSMENT OF CRYPTOSPRIDIUM PARVUM INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data from three different disinfection studies using both cell culture and mouse infectivity to assess Cryptosporidium parvum inactivation were evaluated in a total of 35 comparison including process controls and treated samples. C. parvum infectivity in the in vitro FDM-MPN assa...

  17. NK Cells and Poxvirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah N. Burshtyn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years our understanding of the role of NK cells in the response to viral infection has grown rapidly. Not only do we realize viruses have many immune evasion strategies to escape NK cell responses, but that stimulation of NK cell subsets during an antiviral response occurs through receptors seemingly geared directly at viral products and that NK cells can provide a memory response to viral pathogens. Tremendous knowledge has been gained in this area through the study of Herpes viruses, but appreciation for the significance of NK cells in the response to other types of viral infections is growing. The function of NK cells in defense against poxviruses has emerged over several decades beginning with the early seminal studies showing the role of NK cells and the NK gene complex in susceptibility of mouse strains to Ectromelia, a poxvirus pathogen of mice. More recently, greater understanding has emerged of the molecular details of the response. Given that human diseases caused by poxviruses can be as lethal as smallpox or as benign as Molluscum contagiosum, and that Vaccinia virus, the prototypic member of the pox family, persists as a mainstay of vaccine design and has potential as an oncolytic virus for tumor therapy, further research in this area remains important. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding the role of NK cells in the immune response to poxviruses, the receptors involved in activation of NK cells during poxvirus infection, and the viral evasion strategies poxviruses employ to avoid the NK response.

  18. An improved protocol for the preparation of protoplasts from an established Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture and infection with RNA of turnip yellow mosaic tymovirus: a simple and reliable method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirawski, J; Planchais, S; Haenni, A L

    2000-04-01

    An improved method for preparation of protoplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana cells grown in suspension culture is presented. This method is fast, reliable and can be used for the production of virtually an unlimited number of protoplasts at any time. These protoplasts can be transformed efficiently with RNA from turnip yellow mosaic tymovirus (TYMV) by polyethyleneglycol-mediated transfection. The simple transfection procedure has been optimized at various steps. Replication of TYMV can be monitored routinely by detection of the coat protein in as few as 2 x 10(4) infected protoplasts.

  19. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo.

  20. Mast cells in viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Witczak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available  There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9, but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Furthermore, mast cells generate various mediators, cytokines and chemokines which modulate the intensity of inflammation and regulate the course of innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. Indirect evidence for the role of mast cells in viral infections is also provided by clinical observations and results of animal studies. Currently, more and more data indicate that mast cells can be infected by some viruses (dengue virus, adenoviruses, hantaviruses, cytomegaloviruses, reoviruses, HIV-1 virus. It is also demonstrated that mast cells can release pre formed mediators as well as synthesize de novo eicosanoids in response to stimulation by viruses. Several data indicate that virus-stimulated mast cells secrete cytokines and chemokines, including interferons as well as chemokines with a key role in NK and Tc lymphocyte influx. Moreover, some information indicates that mast cell stimulation via TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9 can affect their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and chemotaxis, and influence expression of some membrane molecules. Critical analysis of current data leads to the conclusion that it is not yet possible to make definitive statements about the role of mast cells in innate and acquired defense mechanisms developing in the course of viral infection and/or pathomechanisms of viral diseases.

  1. Insect Cell Culture and Biotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert R.Granados; Guoxun Li; G.W.Blissard

    2007-01-01

    The continued development of new cell culture technology is essential for the future growth and application of insect cell and baculovirus biotechnology. The use of cell lines for academic research and for commercial applications is currently dominated by two cell lines; the Spodoptera frugiperda line, SF21 (and its clonal isolate, SF9), and the Trichoplusia ni line, BTI 5B1-4, commercially known as High Five cells. The long perceived prediction that the immense potential application of the baculovirus-insect cell system, as a tool in cell and molecular biology, agriculture, and animal health, has been achieved. The versatility and recent applications of this popular expression system has been demonstrated by both academia and industry and it is clear that this cell-based system has been widely accepted for biotechnological applications. Numerous small to midsize startup biotechnology companies in North America and the Europe are currently using the baculovirus-insect cell technology to produce custom recombinant proteins for research and commercial applications. The recent breakthroughs using the baculovirus-insect cell-based system for the development of several commercial products that will impact animal and human health will further enhance interest in this technology by pharma. Clearly, future progress in novel cell and engineering advances will lead to fundamental scientific discoveries and serve to enhance the utility and applications of this baculovirus-insect cell system.

  2. Rapid dissociation of HIV-1 from cultured cells severely limits infectivity assays, causes the inactivation ascribed to entry inhibitors, and masks the inherently high level of infectivity of virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Emily J; Kozak, Susan L; Durnin, James P; Hope, Thomas J; Kabat, David

    2010-03-01

    By using immunofluorescence microscopy to observe and analyze freshly made HIV-1 virions adsorbed onto cells, we found that they are inherently highly infectious, rather than predominantly defective as previously suggested. Surprisingly, polycations enhance titers 20- to 30-fold by stabilizing adsorption and preventing a previously undescribed process of rapid dissociation, strongly implying that infectivity assays for many viruses are limited not only by inefficient virus diffusion onto cells but also by a postattachment race between entry and dissociation. This kinetic competition underlies inhibitory effects of CCR5 antagonists and explains why adaptive HIV-1 mutations overcome many cell entry limitations by accelerating entry.

  3. Rapid Dissociation of HIV-1 from Cultured Cells Severely Limits Infectivity Assays, Causes the Inactivation Ascribed to Entry Inhibitors, and Masks the Inherently High Level of Infectivity of Virions▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Emily J.; Kozak, Susan L.; Durnin, James P.; Hope, Thomas J.; Kabat, David

    2010-01-01

    By using immunofluorescence microscopy to observe and analyze freshly made HIV-1 virions adsorbed onto cells, we found that they are inherently highly infectious, rather than predominantly defective as previously suggested. Surprisingly, polycations enhance titers 20- to 30-fold by stabilizing adsorption and preventing a previously undescribed process of rapid dissociation, strongly implying that infectivity assays for many viruses are limited not only by inefficient virus diffusion onto cells but also by a postattachment race between entry and dissociation. This kinetic competition underlies inhibitory effects of CCR5 antagonists and explains why adaptive HIV-1 mutations overcome many cell entry limitations by accelerating entry. PMID:20042508

  4. Persistent, triple-virus co-infections in mosquito cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malasit Prida

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that insects and crustaceans can carry simultaneous, active infections of two or more viruses without showing signs of disease, but it was not clear whether co-infecting viruses occupied the same cells or different cells in common target tissues. Our previous work showed that successive challenge of mosquito cell cultures followed by serial, split-passage resulted in stabilized cultures with 100% of the cells co-infected with Dengue virus (DEN and an insect parvovirus (densovirus (DNV. By addition of Japanese encephalitis virus (JE, we tested our hypothesis that stable, persistent, triple-virus co-infections could be obtained by the same process. Results Using immunocytochemistry by confocal microscopy, we found that JE super-challenge of cells dually infected with DEN and DNV resulted in stable cultures without signs of cytopathology, and with 99% of the cells producing antigens of the 3 viruses. Location of antigens for all 3 viruses in the triple co-infections was dominant in the cell nuclei. Except for DNV, this differed from the distribution in cells persistently infected with the individual viruses or co-infected with DNV and DEN. The dependence of viral antigen distribution on single infection or co-infection status suggested that host cells underwent an adaptive process to accommodate 2 or more viruses. Conclusions Individual mosquito cells can accommodate at least 3 viruses simultaneously in an adaptive manner. The phenomenon provides an opportunity for genetic exchange between diverse viruses and it may have important medical and veterinary implications for arboviruses.

  5. HEPES inhibits the conversion of prion protein in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmouly, Karine; Belondrade, Maxime; Casanova, Danielle; Milhavet, Ollivier; Lehmann, Sylvain

    2011-05-01

    HEPES is a well-known buffering reagent used in cell-culture medium. Interestingly, this compound is also responsible for significant modifications of biological parameters such as uptake of organic molecules, alteration of oxidative stress mechanisms or inhibition of ion channels. While using cell-culture medium supplemented with HEPES on prion-infected cells, it was noticed that there was a significant concentration-dependent inhibition of accumulation of the abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)). This effect was present only in live cells and was thought to be related to modification of the PrP environment or biology. These results could modify the interpretation of cell-culture assays of prion therapeutic agents, as well as of previous cell biology results obtained in the field using HEPES buffers. This inhibitory effect of HEPES could also be exploited to prevent contamination or propagation of prions in cell culture.

  6. Susceptibility of different leukocyte cell types to Vaccinia virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Puig Juana M

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccinia virus, the prototype member of the family Poxviridae, was used extensively in the past as the Smallpox vaccine, and is currently considered as a candidate vector for new recombinant vaccines. Vaccinia virus has a wide host range, and is known to infect cultures of a variety of cell lines of mammalian origin. However, little is known about the virus tropism in human leukocyte populations. We report here that various cell types within leukocyte populations have widely different susceptibility to infection with vaccinia virus. Results We have investigated the ability of vaccinia virus to infect human PBLs by using virus recombinants expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP, and monoclonal antibodies specific for PBL subpopulations. Flow cytometry allowed the identification of infected cells within the PBL mixture 1–5 hours after infection. Antibody labeling revealed that different cell populations had very different infection rates. Monocytes showed the highest percentage of infected cells, followed by B lymphocytes and NK cells. In contrast to those cell types, the rate of infection of T lymphocytes was low. Comparison of vaccinia virus strains WR and MVA showed that both strains infected efficiently the monocyte population, although producing different expression levels. Our results suggest that MVA was less efficient than WR in infecting NK cells and B lymphocytes. Overall, both WR and MVA consistently showed a strong preference for the infection of non-T cells. Conclusions When infecting fresh human PBL preparations, vaccinia virus showed a strong bias towards the infection of monocytes, followed by B lymphocytes and NK cells. In contrast, very poor infection of T lymphocytes was detected. These finding may have important implications both in our understanding of poxvirus pathogenesis and in the development of improved smallpox vaccines.

  7. Stages of restricted HIV-1 infection in astrocyte cultures derived from human fetal brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messam, C A; Major, E O

    2000-05-01

    The predominant cell types infected by HIV-1 in AIDS associated encephalopathy are cells of the macrophage/microglial lineage. There has been consistent evidence, however, that astrocytes also become infected although not at the same frequency or level of multiplication as microglial cells. HIV-1 antigens and/or nucleic acid have been identified in astrocytes in brain autopsy tissue from both adult and pediatric AIDS cases. In cell cultures, HIV-1 infection of astrocytes results in an initial productive but non-cytopathogenic infection that diminishes to a viral persistence or latent state. Understanding the nature of HIV-1 infection of astrocytes, which represents the largest population of cells in the brain, will contribute to the understanding of AIDS encephalopathy and the dementia that occurs in nearly one-quarter of all AIDS patients.

  8. Bartonella henselae Infective Endocarditis Detected by a Prolonged Blood Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mito, Tsutomu; Hirota, Yusuke; Suzuki, Shingo; Noda, Kazutaka; Uehara, Takanori; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Ikusaka, Masatomi

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old Japanese man was admitted with a 4-month history of fatigue and exertional dyspnea. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a vegetation on the aortic valve and severe aortic regurgitation. Accordingly, infective endocarditis and heart failure were diagnosed. Although a blood culture was negative on day 7 after admission, a prolonged blood culture with subculture was performed according to the patient's history of contact with cats. Consequently, Bartonella henselae was isolated. Bartonella species are fastidious bacteria that cause blood culture-negative infective endocarditis. This case demonstrates that B. henselae may be detected by prolonged incubation of blood cultures. PMID:27746451

  9. Mast cells in viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Witczak; Ewa Brzezińska-Błaszczyk

    2012-01-01

     There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9), but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Fu...

  10. Astrocytes Enhance Streptococcus suis-Glial Cell Interaction in Primary Astrocyte-Microglial Cell Co-Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seele, Jana; Nau, Roland; Prajeeth, Chittappen K; Stangel, Martin; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Seitz, Maren

    2016-06-13

    Streptococcus (S.) suis infections are the most common cause of meningitis in pigs. Moreover, S. suis is a zoonotic pathogen, which can lead to meningitis in humans, mainly in adults. We assume that glial cells may play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions during S. suis infection of the central nervous system. Glial cells are considered to possess important functions during inflammation and injury of the brain in bacterial meningitis. In the present study, we established primary astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures to investigate interactions of S. suis with glial cells. For this purpose, microglial cells and astrocytes were isolated from new-born mouse brains and characterized by flow cytometry, followed by the establishment of astrocyte and microglial cell mono-cultures as well as astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures. In addition, we prepared microglial cell mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected astrocyte mono-culture supernatants and astrocyte mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected microglial cell mono-culture supernatants. After infection of the different cell cultures with S. suis, bacteria-cell association was mainly observed with microglial cells and most prominently with a non-encapsulated mutant of S. suis. A time-dependent induction of NO release was found only in the co-cultures and after co-incubation of microglial cells with uninfected supernatants of astrocyte mono-cultures mainly after infection with the capsular mutant. Only moderate cytotoxic effects were found in co-cultured glial cells after infection with S. suis. Taken together, astrocytes and astrocyte supernatants increased interaction of microglial cells with S. suis. Astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures are suitable to study S. suis infections and bacteria-cell association as well as NO release by microglial cells was enhanced in the presence of astrocytes.

  11. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  12. Three-dimensional cell culture models for investigating human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Chen, Guomin; Zeng, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture models are physiologically relevant, as they provide reproducible results, experimental flexibility and can be adapted for high-throughput experiments. Moreover, these models bridge the gap between traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures and animal models. 3D culture systems have significantly advanced basic cell science and tissue engineering, especially in the fields of cell biology and physiology, stem cell research, regenerative medicine, cancer research, drug discovery, and gene and protein expression studies. In addition, 3D models can provide unique insight into bacteriology, virology, parasitology and host-pathogen interactions. This review summarizes and analyzes recent progress in human virological research with 3D cell culture models. We discuss viral growth, replication, proliferation, infection, virus-host interactions and antiviral drugs in 3D culture models.

  13. In vitro Study on Human Trophoblast Cells Infected with HCMV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖娟; 张丹丹; 陈娟娟; 尹宗智; 刘涛; 艾继辉; 陈素华

    2010-01-01

    Human trophoblast cells were isolated and cultured in vitro in order to investigate possible pathogenesis of intrauterine infection caused by HCMV.Trophoblast cells were obtained by compound enzymes digestion and discontinuous percoll gradient.Cells and purity were identified by using immunocytochemistry assay with anti-CK7,Vim and β-hCG antibodies.HCMV AD169 strain replication in isolated trophoblast cells and cell apoptosis were detected at different time points post infection(p.i.).The results showed tha...

  14. [Decontamination of continual cell lines spontaneously infected with mycoplasmas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machatková, M; Jurmanová, K; Snejdar, V

    1986-07-01

    The continual cell lines of bovine kidneys MDBK and AUBEK, and porcine kidneys RPD and IBRS, spontaneously infected with Mycoplasma arginini and Acholeplasma laidlawii, were decontaminated by the method of selective elimination. Two elimination procedures were modified to be used for the decontamination: one based on the reduction of infection by the light treatment of the cultures, the other based on the selection of mycoplasma-free cell population through cell clonation. On the basis of a long-continued control of the cell clones a methodical procedure of the preparation of mycoplasma-free cell lines was worked out.

  15. Effect of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection on Nerve Growth Factor Expression in Human Glioma U251 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAI-TAO WANG; BIN WANG; ZHI-JUN LIU; ZHI-QIANG BAI; LING LI; HAI-YAN LIU; DONG-MENG QIAN; ZHI-YONG YAN; XU-XIA SONG

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To explore the change of endogenic nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in human glioma cells infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Methods U251 cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 culture medium and infected with HCMV AD169 strain in vitro to establish a cell model of viral infection. Morphologic changes of U251 cells were observed under inverted microscope before and after infection with HCMV. Expression of NGF gene and protein of cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting before and after infection with HCMV. Results The cytopathic effects of HCMV-infected cells appeared on day 5 after infection. However, differential NGF expression was evident on day 7. NGF expression was decreased significantly in U251 cells on day 7 after infection in comparison with control group (P<0.05). Conclusion HCMV can down-regulate endogenous NGF levels in human glioma cell line U251.

  16. Defining viability in mammalian cell cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, Susan M.; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A large number of assays are available to monitor viability in mammalian cell cultures with most defining loss of viability as a loss of plasma membrane integrity, a characteristic of necrotic cell death. However, the majority of cultured cells die by apoptosis and early apoptotic cells, although non-viable, maintain an intact plasma membrane and are thus ignored. Here we measure the viability of cultures of a number of common mammalian cell lines by assays that measure me...

  17. Dynamized Preparations in Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellanzhiyil Surendran Sunila

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929 and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The effect of dynamized medicines to induce apoptosis was also evaluated and we studied how dynamized medicines affected genes expressed during apoptosis. Mother tinctures as well as some dynamized medicines showed significant cytotoxicity to cells during short and long-term incubation. Potentiated alcohol control did not produce any cytotoxicity at concentrations studied. The dynamized medicines were found to inhibit CHO cell colony formation and thymidine uptake in L929 cells and those of Thuja, Hydrastis and Carcinosinum were found to induce apoptosis in DLA cells. Moreover, dynamized Carcinosinum was found to induce the expression of p53 while dynamized Thuja produced characteristic laddering pattern in agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA. These results indicate that dynamized medicines possess cytotoxic as well as apoptosis-inducing properties.

  18. Susceptibility of testicular cell cultures of crab, Scylla serrata (Forskal) to white spot syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashikumar, Anumol; Desai, P V

    2013-03-01

    Testicular cell culture of crab, Scylla serrata (Forskal) was used to study the effects of White spot syndrome virus (WSSV). We are showing the susceptibility of cell culture of crabs to WSSV. The proliferating cell culture of testes were maintained for more than 4 months in a medium prepared from L15 and crab saline supplemented with epidermal growth factor. The cell cultures inoculated with different concentrations of virus showed distinct cytopathic effects such as change in cell appearance, shrinkage and cell lysis. WSSV infection of cultured cells was confirmed by Nested PCR technique. The incorporation of viral DNA in cultured cells was shown by RAPD profile generated using 10-mer primers. The controls that were not exposed to WSSV did not show cytopathic effects. This work shows the usefulness of proliferating testicular cell culture for studying WSSV infection using molecular tools. Thus, this report gains significance as it opens new vistas for diagnostics and drugs for WSSV.

  19. A tubular segmented-flow bioreactor for the infection of insect cells with recombinant baculovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yu-Chen; Wang, Ming-Ying; Bentley, William E.

    1997-01-01

    A continuous process of insect cell (S f9) growth and baculovirus infection is tested with the sequential combination of a CSTR and a tubular reactor. A tubular infection reactor enables continuous introduction of baculovirus and therefore avoids the ‘passage effect’ observed in two-stage CSTR systems. Moreover, a tubular reactor can be used to test cell infection kinetics and the subsequent metabolism of infected insect cells. Unlike batch and CSTR culture, cells in a horizontally positioned...

  20. Hepatitis B virus infection and replication in primarily cultured human fetal hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Lin; Qun Chen; Li-Ye Yang; Wen-Yu Li; Xi-Biao Cao; Jiao-Ren Wu; You-Peng Peng; Mo-Rui Chen

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the infection and replication of hepatitis B virus(HBV)in primarily cultured human fetal hepatocytes(HFHs).METHODS:The human fetal hepatocytes were cultured in serum-free medium,HBV-positive serum was added into the medium to study the susceptibility of hepatocytes to HBV infection.The supernatant was collected for ELISA assay of HBsAg and HBeAg,and quantitative fluorescence PCR for HBV-DNA assay daily.Albumin and HBcAg,CK8 and CK18 expressions were detected by immunohistochemistry in cultured hepatocytes.Content of lactate dehydrogenate(LDH)was measured to find out the integrity of the cell membrane.RESULTS:A stable hepatocyte culture system was established.HBV could infect the hepatocytes and replicate,and HBcAg expression could be detected by immunohistochemistry in hepatocyte-like cells.HBV-DNA in the supernatant could be detected from d 2 to d 18 and HBsAg and HBeAg were positive on d 3-d 18 after HBV infection.HBV in medium increased from d 0 to d 6 and subsequently decreased as the cells were progressively loosing their hepatocyte phenotypes.CONCLUSION:HBV could infect human fetal hepatocytes and replicate.This in vitro model allowed a detailed Study on early events associated with human HBV entry into cells and subsequent replication.

  1. Latent herpesvirus infection arms NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Douglas W; Keppel, Catherine R; Schneider, Stephanie E; Reese, Tiffany A; Coder, James; Payton, Jacqueline E; Ley, Timothy J; Virgin, Herbert W; Fehniger, Todd A

    2010-06-03

    Natural killer (NK) cells were identified by their ability to kill target cells without previous sensitization. However, without an antecedent "arming" event, NK cells can recognize, but are not equipped to kill, target cells. How NK cells become armed in vivo in healthy hosts is unclear. Because latent herpesviruses are highly prevalent and alter multiple aspects of host immunity, we hypothesized that latent herpesvirus infection would arm NK cells. Here we show that NK cells from mice latently infected with Murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) were armed as evidenced by increased granzyme B protein expression, cytotoxicity, and interferon-gamma production. NK-cell arming occurred rapidly in the latently infected host and did not require acute viral infection. Furthermore, NK cells armed by latent infection protected the host against a lethal lymphoma challenge. Thus, the immune environment created by latent herpesvirus infection provides a mechanism whereby host NK-cell function is enhanced in vivo.

  2. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  3. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  4. Cell-mediated infection of cervix derived epithelial cells with primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X; Phillips, D M

    1996-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that HIV-infected transformed T-cells or monocytes adhere to monolayers of CD4-negative epithelial cells. Adhesion is soon followed by budding of HIV from infected mononuclear cells onto the surface of epithelial cells. Epithelial cells subsequently take up virus and become productively infected. Based on these findings, we proposed that sexual transmission of HIV may involve cell-mediated infection of intact mucosal epithelia of the urogenital tract. However, it has become increasingly clear that primary cells and HIV strains isolated from patients are more appropriate models for HIV infection than established cell lines and lab strains of virus. In the studies described here, we infected cervix-derived epithelial monolayers with primary monocytes infected with patient isolates of non-syncytial inducing (NSI) macrophage-tropic strains of HIV. Under the culture conditions employed, HIV-infected primary monocytes do not remain adherent to the apical surface of the epithelium, as did HIV-infected transformed cells. Instead, following adherence, the primary cells migrate between epithelial cells. Virus is secreted from a pseudopod as HIV-infected primary monocytes pass between cells of the epithelium. Productive infection of the epithelium was detected by p24 ELISA and PCR Southern blot analysis. Infection can be blocked by sera from HIV-seropositive individuals or by certain sulfated polysaccharides. These findings support the supposition that transmission of HIV may occur via cell-mediated infection of intact epithelia. The observations also hint at the possibility that-HIV-infected monocyte/macrophages in semen or cervical-vaginal secretions could cross intact epithelia by passing between epithelial cells. Blocking studies suggest that it may be possible to inhibit sexual transmission of HIV either by antibodies in genital tract secretions or by a topical formulation containing certain sulfated polysaccharides.

  5. Bacterial foodborne infections after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Nicole M; Podczervinski, Sara; Jordan, Kim; Stednick, Zach; Butler-Wu, Susan; McMillen, Kerry; Pergam, Steven A

    2014-11-01

    Diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever are common among patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but such symptoms are also typical with foodborne infections. The burden of disease caused by foodborne infections in patients undergoing HCT is unknown. We sought to describe bacterial foodborne infection incidence after transplantation within a single-center population of HCT recipients. All HCT recipients who underwent transplantation from 2001 through 2011 at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington were followed for 1 year after transplantation. Data were collected retrospectively using center databases, which include information from transplantation, on-site examinations, outside records, and collected laboratory data. Patients were considered to have a bacterial foodborne infection if Campylobacter jejuni/coli, Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Vibrio species, or Yersinia species were isolated in culture within 1 year after transplantation. Nonfoodborne infections with these agents and patients with pre-existing bacterial foodborne infection (within 30 days of transplantation) were excluded from analyses. A total of 12 of 4069 (.3%) patients developed a bacterial foodborne infection within 1 year after transplantation. Patients with infections had a median age at transplantation of 50.5 years (interquartile range [IQR], 35 to 57), and the majority were adults ≥18 years of age (9 of 12 [75%]), male gender (8 of 12 [67%]) and had allogeneic transplantation (8 of 12 [67%]). Infectious episodes occurred at an incidence rate of 1.0 per 100,000 patient-days (95% confidence interval, .5 to 1.7) and at a median of 50.5 days after transplantation (IQR, 26 to 58.5). The most frequent pathogen detected was C. jejuni/coli (5 of 12 [42%]) followed by Yersinia (3 of 12 [25%]), although Salmonella (2 of 12 [17%]) and Listeria (2 of 12 [17%]) showed equal frequencies; no cases of Shigella

  6. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maytawan Thanunchai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs are a subset of nonhematopoietic adult stem cells, readily isolated from various tissues and easily culture-expanded ex vivo. Intensive studies of the immune modulation and tissue regeneration over the past few years have demonstrated the great potential of MSCs for the prevention and treatment of steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD, immune-related disorders, and viral diseases. In immunocompromised individuals, the immunomodulatory activities of MSCs have raised safety concerns regarding the greater risk of primary viral infection and viral reactivation, which is a major cause of mortality after allogeneic transplantation. Moreover, high susceptibilities of MSCs to viral infections in vitro could reflect the destructive outcomes that might impair the clinical efficacy of MSCs infusion. However, the interplay between MSCs and virus is like a double-edge sword, and it also provides beneficial effects such as allowing the proliferation and function of antiviral specific effector cells instead of suppressing them, serving as an ideal tool for study of viral pathogenesis, and protecting hosts against viral challenge by using the antimicrobial activity. Here, we therefore review favorable and unfavorable consequences of MSCs and virus interaction with the highlight of safety and efficacy for applying MSCs as cell therapy.

  7. Lack of response of INT-407 cells to the presence of non-culturable Campylobacter jejuni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff-Bakkenes, L.; Hazeleger, W.C.; Zwietering, M.H.; Jonge, de R.

    2008-01-01

    Many contradictory articles on the infectivity of non-culturable Campylobacter jejuni can be found. We studied the effect of non-culturable C. jejuni in an in vitro assay. To prevent the potential effect of a few culturable bacteria in the non-culturable suspension, INT-407 cells, which mimic the

  8. Best practices in cell culture: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baust, John M; Buehring, Gertrude Case; Campbell, Lia; Elmore, Eugene; Harbell, John W; Nims, Raymond W; Price, Paul; Reid, Yvonne A; Simione, Frank

    2017-08-14

    This overview describes a series of articles to provide an unmet need for information on best practices in animal cell culture. The target audience primarily consists of entry-level scientists with minimal experience in cell culture. It also include scientists, journalists, and educators with some experience in cell culture, but in need of a refresher in best practices. The articles will be published in this journal over a six-month period and will emphasize best practices in: (1) media selection; (2) use and evaluation of animal serum as a component of cell culture medium; (3) receipt of new cells into the laboratory; (4) naming cell lines; (5) authenticating cell line identity; (6) detecting and mitigating risk of cell culture contamination; (7) cryopreservation and thawing of cells; and (8) storing and shipping viable cells.

  9. Transcription factor regulation and cytokine expression following in vitro infection of primary chicken cell culture with low pathogenic avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) induced proinflammatory cytokine expression is believed to contribute to the disease pathogenesis following infection. However, there is limited information on the avian immune response to infection with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV). To gain a better under...

  10. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  11. Cell density monitoring and control of microencapsulated CHO cell cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Harriet Emma

    2015-01-01

    Though mammalian cells play a key role in the manufacturing of recombinant glycosylated proteins, cell cultures and productivity are limited by the lack of suitable systems to enable stable perfusion culture. Microencapsulation, or entrapping cells within a semi-permeable membrane, offers the potential to generate high cell density cultures and improve the productivity by mimicking the cells natural environment. However, the cells being secluded by the microcapsules membrane are difficult to ...

  12. Cell culture techniques in honey bee research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell culture techniques are indispensable in most if not all life science disciplines to date. Wherever cell culture models are lacking scientific development is hampered. Unfortunately this has been and still is the case in honey bee research because permanent honey bee cell lines have not yet been...

  13. Cell Culture as an Alternative in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Roland M.

    1990-01-01

    Programs that are intended to inform and provide "hands-on" experience for students and to facilitate the introduction of cell culture-based laboratory exercises into the high school and college laboratory are examined. The components of the CellServ Program and the Cell Culture Toxicology Training Programs are described. (KR)

  14. Networked T cell death following macrophage infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H-F Macdonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depletion of T cells following infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb impairs disease resolution, and interferes with clinical test performance that relies on cell-mediated immunity. A number of mechanisms contribute to this T cell suppression, such as activation-induced death and trafficking of T cells out of the peripheral circulation and into the diseased lungs. The extent to which Mtb infection of human macrophages affects T cell viability however, is not well characterised. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that lymphopenia (<1.5 × 10(9 cells/l was prevalent among culture-positive tuberculosis patients, and lymphocyte counts significantly improved post-therapy. We previously reported that Mtb-infected human macrophages resulted in death of infected and uninfected bystander macrophages. In the current study, we sought to examine the influence of infected human alveolar macrophages on T cells. We infected primary human alveolar macrophages (the primary host cell for Mtb or PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells with Mtb H37Ra, then prepared cell-free supernatants. The supernatants of Mtb-infected macrophages caused dose-dependent, caspase-dependent, T cell apoptosis. This toxic effect of infected macrophage secreted factors did not require TNF-α or Fas. The supernatant cytotoxic signal(s were heat-labile and greater than 50 kDa in molecular size. Although ESAT-6 was toxic to T cells, other Mtb-secreted factors tested did not influence T cell viability; nor did macrophage-free Mtb bacilli or broth from Mtb cultures. Furthermore, supernatants from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille de Calmette et Guerin (BCG- infected macrophages also elicited T cell death suggesting that ESAT-6 itself, although cytotoxic, was not the principal mediator of T cell death in our system. CONCLUSIONS: Mtb-Infected macrophages secrete heat-labile factors that are toxic to T cells, and may contribute to the immunosuppression seen in tuberculosis as well as

  15. HIV infection of monocytes-derived dendritic cells inhibits Vγ9Vδ2 T cells functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Sacchi

    Full Text Available DCs act as sentinel cells against incoming pathogens and represent the most potent antigen presenting cells, having the unique capability to prime naïve T cells. In addition to their role in induction of adaptive immune responses, DC are also able to activate innate cells as γδ T cells; in particular, a reciprocal crosstalk between DC and γδ T cells was demonstrated. However, whether HIV infection may alter DC-Vγ9Vδ2 T cells cross-talk was not yet described. To clarify this issue, we cultured activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells with HIV infected monocyte derived DC (MoDC. After 5 days we evaluated MoDC phenotype, and Vγ9Vδ2 T cells activation and proliferation. In our model, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were not able to proliferate in response to HIV-infected MoDC, although an up-regulation of CD69 was observed. Upon phosphoantigens stimulation, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells proliferation and cytokine production were inhibited when cultured with HIV-infected MoDC in a cell-contact dependent way. Moreover, HIV-infected MoDC are not able to up-regulate CD86 molecules when cultured with activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, compared with uninfected MoDC. Further, activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are not able to induce HLA DR up-regulation and CCR5 down-regulation on HIV-infected MoDC. These data indicate that HIV-infected DC alter the capacity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to respond to their antigens, pointing out a new mechanisms of induction of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells anergy carried out by HIV, that could contribute to immune evasion.

  16. HIV infection of monocytes-derived dendritic cells inhibits Vγ9Vδ2 T cells functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Alessandra; Tumino, Nicola; Casetti, Rita; Agrati, Chiara; Turchi, Federica; Bordoni, Veronica; Cimini, Eleonora; Martini, Federico

    2014-01-01

    DCs act as sentinel cells against incoming pathogens and represent the most potent antigen presenting cells, having the unique capability to prime naïve T cells. In addition to their role in induction of adaptive immune responses, DC are also able to activate innate cells as γδ T cells; in particular, a reciprocal crosstalk between DC and γδ T cells was demonstrated. However, whether HIV infection may alter DC-Vγ9Vδ2 T cells cross-talk was not yet described. To clarify this issue, we cultured activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells with HIV infected monocyte derived DC (MoDC). After 5 days we evaluated MoDC phenotype, and Vγ9Vδ2 T cells activation and proliferation. In our model, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were not able to proliferate in response to HIV-infected MoDC, although an up-regulation of CD69 was observed. Upon phosphoantigens stimulation, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells proliferation and cytokine production were inhibited when cultured with HIV-infected MoDC in a cell-contact dependent way. Moreover, HIV-infected MoDC are not able to up-regulate CD86 molecules when cultured with activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, compared with uninfected MoDC. Further, activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are not able to induce HLA DR up-regulation and CCR5 down-regulation on HIV-infected MoDC. These data indicate that HIV-infected DC alter the capacity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to respond to their antigens, pointing out a new mechanisms of induction of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells anergy carried out by HIV, that could contribute to immune evasion.

  17. Primary Culture of Porcine Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a method for the primary culture of porcine pancreatic acinar cells. INTERVENTIONS: Dispersed pancreatic acinar cells available utilizing RPMI-1640 medium containing collagenase III. After purification, the isolated acinar cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium with the addition of 2.5% fetal bovine serum. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The morphological characteristics of acinar cells were described. (3)H-thymidine incorporation of acinar cells and the activity of amylase or l...

  18. [The preparation phosprenyl suppresses diarrhea and cattle infectious rhinotracheitis virus multiplication in sensitive cell cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozherelkov, S V; Belousova, R V; Danilov, L L; Deeva, A V; Mal'tsev, S D; Narovlianskiĭ, A N; Sanin, A V; Pronin, A V

    2001-01-01

    Fosprenil suppressed the multiplication of cattle diarrhea virus in calf coronary vessel cell culture. Added to the culture of infected cells in a dose of 200 mg, the drug decreased the virus titer 30-fold in comparison with infected control cultures. Antiviral activity of fosprenil towards infective rhinotracheitis virus multiplication was still higher: in a dose of 100 mg it decreased the virus titer in fetal calf lung culture 100-fold in comparison with the control. Moreover, the cytopathogenic effects of the viruses in infected cultures were 24-48 h delayed under the effect of fosprenil in comparison with infected control cultures. These results recommend fosprenil for the treatment of cattle viral diseases.

  19. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  20. Dengue virus infection perturbs lipid homeostasis in infected mosquito cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushika Perera

    Full Text Available Dengue virus causes ∼50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  1. Coronavirus infection of polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Horzinek, M C; Rottier, P J

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial cells are the first host cells to be infected by incoming c oronaviruses. Recent observations in vitro show that coronaviruses are released from a specific side of these polarized cells, and this polarized release might be important for the spread of the infection in vivo. Mechanisms for

  2. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  3. Primary Culture of Porcine Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao X

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop a method for the primary culture of porcine pancreatic acinar cells. INTERVENTIONS: Dispersed pancreatic acinar cells available utilizing RPMI-1640 medium containing collagenase III. After purification, the isolated acinar cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium with the addition of 2.5% fetal bovine serum. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The morphological characteristics of acinar cells were described. (3H-thymidine incorporation of acinar cells and the activity of amylase or lipase were determined during the culture process. RESULTS: There were no remarkable morphological changes in the pancreatic acinar cells during the 20 days culture. The acini showed a tendency to gather but did not attach to the walls of the culture disks. A good (3H-thymidine incorporation of acinar cells in the primary culture was maintained. The secretion of amylase or lipase from the acini decreased with the length of time of the culture. DISCUSSION: The primary culture of acinar cells from a porcine pancreas which was carried out in this study maintained the normal morphology of the acinar cells and their ability to grow but not their secretion of amylase or lipase. The method would benefit by the further experiments on acini of porcine pancreas.

  4. Zinc oxide tetrapods inhibit herpes simplex virus infection of cultured corneas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Neil; Jaishankar, Dinesh; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Hadigal, Satvik; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar; Adelung, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Infection of the human cornea by herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) can cause significant vision loss. The purpose of this study was to develop an ex vivo model to visualize viral growth and spread in the cornea. The model was also used to analyze cytokine production and study the antiviral effects of zinc oxide tetrapods. Methods A β-galactosidase-expressing recombinant virus, HSV-1(KOS)tk12, was used to demonstrate the ability of the virus to enter and develop blue plaques on human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells and corneal tissues. Freshly obtained porcine corneas were cultured and then scratched before infection with HSV-1(KOS)tk12. The blue plaques on the corneas were imaged using a stereomicroscope. Western blot analysis for HSV-1 proteins was performed to verify HSV-1 infection of the cornea. Using the ex vivo model, zinc oxide tetrapods were tested for their anti-HSV-1 potential, and a cytokine profile was developed to assess the effects of the treatment. Results Cultured corneas and the use of β-galactosidase-expressing HSV-1(KOS)tk12 virus can provide an attractive ex vivo model to visualize and study HSV-1 entry and spread of the infection in tissues. We found that unlike cultured HCE cells, which demonstrated nearly 100% infectivity, HSV-1 infection of the cultured cornea was more restrictive and took longer to develop. We also found that the zinc oxide tetrapod–shaped nano- and microstructures inhibited HSV infection of the cultured cells, as well as the cultured corneas. The cytokine profile of the infected samples was consistent with previous studies of HSV-1 corneal infection. Conclusions The ability to visualize HSV-1 growth and spread in corneal tissues can provide new details about HSV-1 infection of the cornea and the efficacy of new cornea-specific antiviral drug candidates. The ex vivo model also demonstrates antiviral effects of zinc oxide tetrapods and adequately portrays the drug delivery issues that cornea-specific treatments

  5. Challenges of culturing human norovirus in three-dimensional organoid intestinal cell culture models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathia Papafragkou

    Full Text Available Human noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Recently, cell culture systems have been described using either human embryonic intestinal epithelial cells (Int-407 or human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2 growing on collagen-I porous micro carrier beads in a rotating bioreactor under conditions of physiological fluid shear. Here, we describe the efforts from two independent laboratories to implement this three dimensional (3D cell culture system for the replication of norovirus. Int-407 and Caco-2 were grown in a rotating bioreactor for up to 28 days. Prior to infection, cells were screened for the presence of microvilli by electron microscopy and stained for junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and β-catenin. Differentiated 3D cells were transferred to 24-well plates and infected with bacteria-free filtrates of various norovirus genotypes (GI.1, GI.3, GI.8, GII.2, GII.4, GII.7, and GII.8. At 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h post inoculation, viral RNA from both cells and supernatants were collected and analyzed for norovirus RNA by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Despite observations of high expression of junction proteins and microvilli development in stained thin sections, our data suggest no significant increase in viral titer based on norovirus RNA copy number during the first 48 h after inoculation for the different samples and virus culture conditions tested. Our combined efforts demonstrate that 3D cell culture models using Int-407 or Caco-2 cells do not support norovirus replication and highlight the complexity and difficulty of developing a reproducible in vitro cell culture system for human norovirus.

  6. Repeat urine cultures in children with urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risky Vitria Prasetyo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs are the second leading cause of infection in children, following respiratory tract infections. Repeat urine cultures after antibiotic treatment are routinely obtained in clinical practice to verify proof of bacteriologic cure. The American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommended repeat cultures, due to increased cost and discomfort to patients. Objective To determine the frequency of positive repeat urine cultures after 3 days of antibiotics in children with UTIs. Methods We conducted a retrospective study on children with UTIs who visited the Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Department of Child Health at Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya from January 2006 to December 2011. Results of repeat urine cultures were obtained after 3 days of antibiotic treatment. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results Of the 779 pediatric UTI cases, repeat urine cultures were performed in 264 (33.9% cases. Of the 264 patients who comprised our study, there were similar numbers of girls and boys (50.4% vs. 49.6%, respectively. The mean age of patients was 43.9 (SD 1.59 months and 35.5% of subjects were aged under 1 year. In the initial urine cultures of our subjects, Escherichia coli was the most common organism found, with 92 cases (34.8%, compared to 58 cases (21.9% of Klebsiella pneumoniae and 29 cases (10.9% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Rrepeat urine cultures showed no bacterial growth in 168 cases (63.6%. Conclusion Mostly negative repeat urine cultures will probably obviate the need of this test in daily routine practice. [Paediatr Indones. 2012;52:170-4].

  7. HCV Infection and B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Ito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV has been recognized as a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. It has been suggested that HCV infects not only hepatocytes but also mononuclear lymphocytes including B cells that express the CD81 molecule, a putative HCV receptor. HCV infection of B cells is the likely cause of B-cell dysregulation disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, rheumatoid factor production, and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that may evolve into non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL. Epidemiological data indicate an association between HCV chronic infection and the occurrence of B-cell NHL, suggesting that chronic HCV infection is associated at least in part with B-cell lymphomagenesis. In this paper, we aim to provide an overview of recent literature, including our own, to elucidate a possible role of HCV chronic infection in B-cell lymphomagenesis.

  8. Mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures treated with ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin: brief report

    OpenAIRE

    Bita Soltanian; Shiva Irani; Sarvenaz Hashemi; Seyed Hamid Reza Mozhgani; Mehdi Ajorloo; Yoosef Cheraghi; Alireza Gholami

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures is considered as a major economic, research and production problem. In this study, mycoplasma-infected Vero cell lines were treated by various dilutions of ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin in a timely manner. Removal of mycoplasma contamination from infected cell cultures was evaluated and demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Methods: This study was done from October 2013 to May 2014, in Human Rabies Vaccine Laboratory,...

  9. Combination of anti-retroviral drugs and radioimmunotherapy specifically kills infected cells from HIV infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Tsukrov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Eliminating virally infected cells is an essential component of any HIV eradication strategy. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT, a clinically established method for killing cells using radiolabeled antibodies, was recently applied to target HIV-1 gp41 antigen expressed on the surface of infect-ed cells. Since gp41 expression by infected cells is likely down-regulated in patients on an-tiretroviral therapy (ART, we evaluated the ability of RIT to kill ART-treated infected cells us-ing both in vitro models and lymphocytes isolated from HIV-infected subjects. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were infected with HIV and cultured in the presence of two clinically relevant ART combinations. Scatchard analysis of the 2556 human monoclonal anti-body to HIV gp41 binding to the infected and ART-treated cells demonstrated sufficient residual expression of gp41 on the cell surface to warrant subsequent RIT. This is the first time the quantification of gp41 post-ART is being reported. Cells were then treated with Bismuth-213-labeled 2556 antibody. conjugated to the human monoclonal antibody 2556, which binds to HIV gp41. Cell survival was quantified by Trypan blue and residual viremia by p24 ELISA. Cell surface gp41 expression was assessed by Scatchard analysis. The experiments were repeated using PBMCs isolated from blood specimens obtained from 15 HIV-infected individuals: ten on ART and five ART-naive. We found that 213Bi-2556 killed ART-treated infected PBMCs and reduced viral production to undetectable levels. ART and RIT co-treatment was more effective at reducing viral load in vitro than either therapy alone, indicating that gp41 expression under ART was sufficient to allow 213Bi-2556 to deliver cytocidal doses of radiation to infected cells. This study provides proof of concept that 213Bi-2556 may represent an innovative and effective targeting method for killing HIV-infected cells treated with ART, and supports continued development of 213Bi

  10. Embryonic Stem Cells: Isolation, Characterization and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells isolated from the mammalian blastocyst. Traditionally, these cells have been derived and cultured with mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) supportive layers, which allow their continuous growth in an undifferentiated state. However, for any future industrial or clinical application hESCs should be cultured in reproducible, defined, and xeno-free culture system, where exposure to animal pathogens is prevented. From their derivation in 1998 the methods for culturing hESCs were significantly improved. This chapter wills discuss hESC characterization and the basic methods for their derivation and maintenance.

  11. Cell Suspension Culture of Neem Tree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The establishment of suspension culture system for neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) cells and the suspension culture condition was studied. It shows that the neem cell suspension culture system was best in B5 liquid medium, 2.0~4.0mg/L NAA with direct spill method. Based on the integrated analysis of cell biomass, Azadirachtin content and productivity, the optimum culture conditions were B5 liquid medium, 2.0-4.0 mg/L NAA, 3% sucrose at 25 ℃. The optimum rotating speed of the shaker and broth content d...

  12. Characteristics of HCV replication and expression in a cultured human liver carcinoma cell line in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhi-qing; HAO Fei; MIN Feng; LIU Dao-jian

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To establish a cell culture system to support HCV long-term replication in vitro. Methods: A human hepatoma cell line 7721 was tested for its susceptibility to HCV by incubating with a serum from chronic hepatitis C patient. Cells and supernatant of the culture medium were harvested at various time-phases during the culturing periods. The presence of HCV RNA, the expression of HCV antigens in cells and/or supematant were examined with RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry respectively. Results: It was found that the intracellular HCV RNA was first detected on the 2nd day after culture, and then could be intermittently detected in both cells and supernatant over a period of at least 3 months after culture. HCV NS3, CP10 antigens were expressed in the cells. The fresh cells could be infected with the supernatant from cultured infected cells and the transmission of viral genome from HCV-infected 7721 cells to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was also observed. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the human liver carcinoma cell line7721 is not only susceptible to HCV but also can support its long replication in vitro. This cell line with HCV infection in vitro can serve as a useful tool for the study of the mechanism of HCV infection and replication, the evaluation of antiviral agents, and the primary selection of neutralization assays and HCV vaccine development.

  13. Immune regulation in Chandipura virus infection: characterization of CD4+ T regulatory cells from infected mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahir Prajakta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Back ground Chandipura virus produces acute infection in mice. During infection drastic reduction of CD4+, CD8+ and CD19 + cell was noticed. Depletion of lymphocytes also noticed in spleen. The reduction may be due to the regulatory mechanism of immune system to prevent the bystander host tissue injury. There are several mechanisms like generation of regulatory cells, activation induced cell death (ACID etc were indicated to control the activation and maintain cellular homeostasis. Role of regulatory cells in homeostasis has been described in several viral diseases. This study was undertaken to characterize CD4+T regulatory cells from the infected mice. Method In this study we purified the CD4+ T cells from Chandipura virus infected susceptible Balb/c mice. CD4+ T regulatory cells were identified by expression of cell surface markers CD25, CD127 and CTLA-4 and intracellular markers Foxp3, IL-10 and TGF-beta. Antigen specificity and ability to suppress the proliferation of other lymphocytes were studied in vitro by purified CD4+CD25+T regulatory cells from infected mice. The proliferation was calculated by proliferation module of Flow Jo software. Expression of death receptors on regulatory cells were studied by flowcytometer. Results The CD4+ T cells isolated from infected mice expressed characteristic markers of regulatory phenotype at all post infective hours tested. The CD4+ T regulatory cells were proliferated when stimulated with Chandipura virus antigen. The regulatory cells did not suppress the proliferation of splenocytes stimulated with anti CD3 antibody when co cultured with them. Interesting observation was, while purification of CD4+ T cells by negative selection, the population of cells negative for CD4 also co purified along with CD4+ T cell. Flow cytometry analysis and light microscopy revealed that CD4 negative cells were of different size and shape (atypical compared to the normal lymphocytes. Greater percentage of

  14. [Effects of beryllium chloride on cultured cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, T; Sakaguchi, S; Nakamura, I; Kagami, M

    1984-05-01

    The effects of beryllium on cultured cells were investigated. Three cell-lines (HeLa-S3, Vero, HEL-R66) were used in these experiments and they were cultured in Eagle's MEM plus 5 or 10% FBS (Fetal Bovine Serum) containing beryllium in various concentrations. HeLa cells or Vero cells were able to grow in the medium with 10 micrograms Be/ml (1.1 mM). On the other hand, the growth of HEL cells were strongly inhibited, even when cultured in the medium with 1 microgram Be/ml (1.1 X 10(-1) mM) and the number of living cells showed markedly low level as compared to that of the control samples cultured in the medium without beryllium. The cytotoxic effects of beryllium on these cells, which were cultured for three days in the medium with beryllium, were observed. None of cytotoxic effects were found on HeLa cells cultured with 0.5 micrograms/ml (5.5 X 10(-2) mM) and on Vero cells cultured with 0.05 micrograms Be/ml (5.5 X 10(-3) mM), while HEL cells received cytotoxic effects even when cultured in the medium containing 0.05 micrograms Be/ml (5.5 X 10(-3) mM), and these effects on the cells appeared strong when cultured in the medium without FBS. It was revealed from these experiments that HEL cells are very sensitive in terms of toxic effects of beryllium. Therefore, there cells can be used for the toxicological study on low level concentrations of the metal.

  15. Effect of input multiplicity on the establishment of simian virus 40 persistent infections in rhesus monkey kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C

    1977-12-01

    Monolayer cultures of LLC-MK2 rhesus monkey kidney cells become persistently infected with simian virus 40 after infection at input multiplicities of 100, 10, or 1 plaque-forming unit per cell. After 3 weeks, all cells of the cultures infected at a multiplicity of 1 plaque-forming unit per cell produced the simian virus 40 T antigen. In contrast, 8 to 11 weeks elapsed before all the cells in the cultures infected at a multiplicity of 100 plaque-forming units per cell produced T antigen. Defective interfering particles and interferon production were not evident during this time.

  16. In-cell infection: a novel pathway for Epstein-Barr virus infection mediated by cell-in-cell structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Chao; Chen, Yuhui; Zeng, Musheng; Pei, Rongjuan; Du, Yong; Tang, Linquan; Wang, Mengyi; Hu, Yazhuo; Zhu, Hanyu; He, Meifang; Wei, Xiawei; Wang, Shan; Ning, Xiangkai; Wang, Manna; Wang, Jufang; Ma, Li; Chen, Xinwen; Sun, Qiang; Tang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoning

    2015-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can infect both susceptible B lymphocytes and non-susceptible epithelial cells (ECs). Viral tropism analyses have revealed two intriguing means of EBV infection, either by a receptor-mediated infection of B cells or by a cell-to-cell contact-mediated infection of non-susceptible ECs. Herein, we report a novel "in-cell infection" mechanism for EBV infection of non-susceptible ECs through the formation of cell-in-cell structures. Epithelial CNE-2 cells were invaded by EBV-infected Akata B cells to form cell-in-cell structures in vitro. Such unique cellular structures could be readily observed in the specimens of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Importantly, the formation of cell-in-cell structures led to the autonomous activation of EBV within Akata cells and subsequent viral transmission to CNE-2 cells, as evidenced by the expression of viral genes and the presence of virion particles in CNE-2 cells. Significantly, EBV generated from in-cell infected ECs displayed altered tropism with higher infection efficacy to both B cells and ECs. In addition to CNE-2 tumor cells, cell-in-cell structure formation could also mediate EBV infection of NPEC1-Bmi1 cells, an immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line. Furthermore, efficient infection by this mechanism involved the activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Thus, our study identified "in-cell infection" as a novel mechanism for EBV infection. Given the diversity of virus-infected cells and the prevalence of cell-in-cell structures during chronic infection, we speculate that "in-cell infection" is likely a general mechanism for EBV and other viruses to infect non-susceptible ECs.

  17. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived models to investigate human cytomegalovirus infection in neural cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D'Aiuto

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is one of the leading prenatal causes of congenital mental retardation and deformities world-wide. Access to cultured human neuronal lineages, necessary to understand the species specific pathogenic effects of HCMV, has been limited by difficulties in sustaining primary human neuronal cultures. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells now provide an opportunity for such research. We derived iPS cells from human adult fibroblasts and induced neural lineages to investigate their susceptibility to infection with HCMV strain Ad169. Analysis of iPS cells, iPS-derived neural stem cells (NSCs, neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons suggests that (i iPS cells are not permissive to HCMV infection, i.e., they do not permit a full viral replication cycle; (ii Neural stem cells have impaired differentiation when infected by HCMV; (iii NPCs are fully permissive for HCMV infection; altered expression of genes related to neural metabolism or neuronal differentiation is also observed; (iv most iPS-derived neurons are not permissive to HCMV infection; and (v infected neurons have impaired calcium influx in response to glutamate.

  18. Dynamic culture improves cell reprogramming efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sia, Junren; Sun, Raymond; Chu, Julia; Li, Song

    2016-06-01

    Cell reprogramming to pluripotency is an inefficient process and various approaches have been devised to improve the yield of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, the effect of biophysical factors on cell reprogramming is not well understood. Here we showed that, for the first time, dynamic culture with orbital shaking significantly improved the reprogramming efficiency in adherent cells. Manipulating the viscosity of the culture medium suggested that the improved efficiency is mainly attributed to convective mixing rather than hydrodynamic shear stress. Temporal studies demonstrated that the enhancement of reprogramming efficiency required the dynamic culture in the middle but not early phase. In the early phase, fibroblasts had a high proliferation rate, but as the culture became over-confluent in the middle phase, expression of p57 was upregulated to inhibit cell proliferation and consequently, cell reprogramming. Subjecting the over confluent culture to orbital shaking prevented the upregulation of p57, thus improving reprogramming efficiency. Seeding cells at low densities to avoid over-confluency resulted in a lower efficiency, and optimal reprogramming efficiency was attained at a high seeding density with dynamic culture. Our findings provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of how dynamic culture condition regulate cell reprogramming, and will have broad impact on cell engineering for regenerative medicine and disease modeling.

  19. New culture medium concepts for cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S; Kim, B Y; Yeo, J E; Nemeno, J G; Jo, Y H; Yang, W; Nam, B M; Namoto, S; Tanaka, S; Sato, M; Lee, K M; Hwang, H S; Lee, J I

    2013-10-01

    Before cell or tissue transplantation, cells or tissues have to be maintained for a certain period in vitro using culture medium and methods. Most culture media contain substances such as pH indicators and buffers. It is not known whether some of these substances are safe for subsequent application in the transplantation of cells or tissues into the human body. We investigated culture media and methods with respect to the safety of the components in future transplantation applications. A modified culture medium--medical fluid-based culture medium (FCM)--was designed by using various fluids and injectable drugs that are already currently permitted for use in clinical medicine. Medium components necessary for optimal cell growth were obtained from approved drugs. FCM was manufactured with adjusted final concentrations of the medium components similar to those in commercial Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). In particular, 1029.40 mg/L amino acids, approximately 88.85 mg/L vitamins, 13,525.77 mg/L inorganic salts, and 4500 mg/L D-glucose comprise the high-glucose FCM. Next, human fat synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells and rat H9c2 (2-1) cells were cultured under 2 conditions: (1) DMEM-high glucose (HG), an original commercial medium, and (2) optimized FCM-HG. We assessed the morphologies and proliferation rates of these cells. We observed that FCM-HG was able to induce the growth of FS-MSC and commercially available H9c2 cell. The morphologies and proliferation patterns of these cells cultured under FCM-HG showed no differences compared with cells grown in DMEM-HG. Our data suggest that FCM, which we developed for the first time according to the concept of drug repositioning, was a useful culture medium, especially in cultured cells intended for human cell transplantation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Autofluorescence of viable cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, J E

    1979-01-01

    The autofluorescence other than intrinsic protein emission of viable cultured mammalian cells has been investigated. The fluorescence was found to originate in discrete cytoplasmic vesicle-like regions and to be absent from the nucleus. Excitation and emission spectra of viable cells revealed at least two distinct fluorescent species. Comparison of cell spectra with spectra of known cellular metabolites suggested that most, if not all, of the fluorescence arises from intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and riboflavin and flavin coenzymes. Various changes in culture conditions did not affect the observed autofluorescence intensity. A multiparameter flow system (MACCS) was used to compare the fluorescence intensities of numerous cultured mammalian cells.

  1. Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae infection of human astrocytes and microglia in culture displays an active, rather than a persistent, phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreses-Werringloer, Ute; Gérard, Hervé C; Whittum-Hudson, Judith A; Hudson, Alan P

    2006-10-01

    The intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae can cause persistent infections during which its morphologic, molecular, and pathogenic characteristics differ importantly from those of active infection. This bacterium was identified within astrocytes and microglia in the brain of late-onset Alzheimer disease patients. We investigated whether infection of these two host cell types displays an active or persistent growth phenotype. The human astrocytoma and microglioma cell lines U-87 MG and CHME-5 (respectively) and the human epithelial cell line HEp-2 were infected by the standard method with C pneumoniae strain AR-39. Cultures were harvested at 24, 48, and 72 hours postinfection and subjected to analysis of inclusion morphology. DNA and RNA were prepared from portions of each infected culture sample and analyzed for relative chromosome accumulation and presence or absence of several specific bacterial mRNAs. Astrocytes and microglial cells infected in vitro with C pneumoniae displayed inclusions that were indistinguishable from those characteristic of active infection of the standard HEp-2 host cell line. Real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed that the relative accumulation of chlamydial chromosome over time during infection of these two cell lines also was virtually identical to that in actively infected HEp-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) analyses showed that mRNA from ftsK, pyk, and other chlamydial genes whose expression is abrogated during persistent infection were easily identifiable in infected CHME-5 and U-87 MG cells. In cultured human astrocytes and microglia, C pneumoniae displays an active, not a persistent, growth phenotype. This indicates normal passage through the developmental cycle with its probable concomitant destruction by lysis of some portion of host cells at the termination of that cycle.

  2. Effect of herpesvirus infection on pancreatic duct cell secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Péter Hegyi; András Varró; Mária K Kovács; Mike A Gray; Barry E Argent; Zsolt Boldogk(o)i; Balázs (O)rd(o)g; Zoltán Rakonczai Jr; Tamás Takács; János Lonovics; Annamária Szabolcs; Réka Sári; András Tóth; Julius G Papp

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of acute infection caused by herpesvirus (pseudorabies virus, PRV) on pancreatic ductal secretion.METHODS: The virulent Ba-DupGreen (BDG) and nonvirulent Ka-RREpOlacgfp (KEG) genetically modified strains of PRV were used in this study and both of them contain the gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP). Small intra/interlobular ducts were infected with BDG virus (107 PFU/mL for 6 h) or with KEG virus (1010 PFU/mL for 6 h), while non-infected ducts were incubated only with the culture media. The ducts were then cultured for a further 18 h.The rate of HCO3- secretion [base efflux -J(B-)] was determined from the buffering capacity of the cells and the initial rate of intracellular acidification (1) after sudden blockage of basolateral base loaders with dihydro-4,4,-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2,-disulfonic acid (500 μmol/L)and amiloride (200 μmol/L), and (2) after alkali loading the ducts by exposure to NH4Cl. All the experiments were performed in HCO3--buffered Ringer solution at 37 ℃ (n = 5ducts for each experimental condition). Viral structural proteins were visualized by immunohistochemistry. Virallyencoded GFP and immunofluorescence signals were recorded by a confocal laser scanning microscope.RESULTS: The BDG virus infected the majority of accessible cells of the duct as judged by the appearance of GFP and viral antigens in the ductal cells. KEG virus caused a similarly high efficiency of infection. After blockage of basolateral base loaders, BDG infection significantly elevated -J(B-) 24 h after the infection, compared to the non-infected group. However, KEG infection did not modify -J(B-). After alkali loading the ducts, -J(B-) was significantly elevated in the BDG group compared to the control group 24 h after the infection. As we found with the inhibitor stop method, no change was observed in the group KEG compared to the non-infected group.CONCLUSION: Incubation with the BDG or KEG strains of PRV results in an effective

  3. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  4. Myeloid infection links epithelial and B cell tropisms of Murid Herpesvirus-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Frederico

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-herpesviruses persist in lymphocytes and cause disease by driving their proliferation. Lymphocyte infection is therefore a key pathogenetic event. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 is a rhadinovirus that like the related Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus persists in B cells in vivo yet infects them poorly in vitro. Here we used MuHV-4 to understand how virion tropism sets the path to lymphocyte colonization. Virions that were highly infectious in vivo showed a severe post-binding block to B cell infection. Host entry was accordingly an epithelial infection and B cell infection a secondary event. Macrophage infection by cell-free virions was also poor, but improved markedly when virion binding improved or when macrophages were co-cultured with infected fibroblasts. Under the same conditions B cell infection remained poor; it improved only when virions came from macrophages. This reflected better cell penetration and correlated with antigenic changes in the virion fusion complex. Macrophages were seen to contact acutely infected epithelial cells, and cre/lox-based virus tagging showed that almost all the virus recovered from lymphoid tissue had passed through lysM(+ and CD11c(+ myeloid cells. Thus MuHV-4 reached B cells in 3 distinct stages: incoming virions infected epithelial cells; infection then passed to myeloid cells; glycoprotein changes then allowed B cell infection. These data identify new complexity in rhadinovirus infection and potentially also new vulnerability to intervention.

  5. Myeloid infection links epithelial and B cell tropisms of Murid Herpesvirus-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederico, Bruno; Milho, Ricardo; May, Janet S; Gillet, Laurent; Stevenson, Philip G

    2012-09-01

    Gamma-herpesviruses persist in lymphocytes and cause disease by driving their proliferation. Lymphocyte infection is therefore a key pathogenetic event. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) is a rhadinovirus that like the related Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus persists in B cells in vivo yet infects them poorly in vitro. Here we used MuHV-4 to understand how virion tropism sets the path to lymphocyte colonization. Virions that were highly infectious in vivo showed a severe post-binding block to B cell infection. Host entry was accordingly an epithelial infection and B cell infection a secondary event. Macrophage infection by cell-free virions was also poor, but improved markedly when virion binding improved or when macrophages were co-cultured with infected fibroblasts. Under the same conditions B cell infection remained poor; it improved only when virions came from macrophages. This reflected better cell penetration and correlated with antigenic changes in the virion fusion complex. Macrophages were seen to contact acutely infected epithelial cells, and cre/lox-based virus tagging showed that almost all the virus recovered from lymphoid tissue had passed through lysM(+) and CD11c(+) myeloid cells. Thus MuHV-4 reached B cells in 3 distinct stages: incoming virions infected epithelial cells; infection then passed to myeloid cells; glycoprotein changes then allowed B cell infection. These data identify new complexity in rhadinovirus infection and potentially also new vulnerability to intervention.

  6. Cell culture processes for monoclonal antibody production

    OpenAIRE

    LI Feng; Vijayasankaran, Natarajan; Shen, Amy (Yijuan); Kiss, Robert; Amanullah, Ashraf

    2010-01-01

    Animal cell culture technology has advanced significantly over the last few decades and is now generally considered a reliable, robust and relatively mature technology. A range of biotherapeutics are currently synthesized using cell culture methods in large scale manufacturing facilities that produce products for both commercial use and clinical studies. The robust implementation of this technology requires optimization of a number of variables, including (1) cell lines capable of synthesizin...

  7. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Andersen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent, and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue.

  8. Insect cell culture in reagent bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieffel, S; Roest, S; Klopp, J; Carnal, S; Marti, S; Gerhartz, B; Shrestha, B

    2014-01-01

    Growing insect cells with high air space in culture vessel is common from the early development of suspension cell culture. We believed and followed it with the hope that it allows sufficient air for optimal cell growth. However, we missed to identify how much air exactly cells need for its growth and multiplication. Here we present the innovative method that changed the way we run insect cell culture. The method is easy to adapt, cost-effective and useful for both academic and industrial research labs. We believe this method will revolutionize the way we run insect cell culture by increasing throughput in a cost-effective way. In our study we identified:•Insect cells need to be in suspension; air space in culture vessel and type of culture vessel is of less importance. Shaking condition that introduces small air bubbles and maintains it in suspension for longer time provides better oxygen transfer in liquid. For this, high-fill volume in combination with speed and shaking diameter are important.•Commercially available insect cells are not fragile as original isolates. These cells can easily withstand higher shaking speed.•Growth condition in particular lab set-up needs to be optimized. The condition used in one lab may not be optimum for another lab due to different incubators from different vendors.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Poliovirus in Cell Culture Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, Bruce R; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of enteroviruses by cell culture was accepted as the "gold standard" by clinical virology laboratories. Methods for the direct detection of all enteroviruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, targeting a conserved region of the genome, have largely supplanted cell culture as the principal diagnostic procedure. However, the World Health Organization's Global Polio Eradication Initiative continues to rely upon cell culture to isolate poliovirus due to the lack of a reliable sensitive genetic test for direct typing of enteroviruses from clinical specimens. Poliovirus is able to infect a wide range of mammalian cell lines, with CD155 identified as the primary human receptor for all three seroytpes, and virus replication leads to an observable cytopathic effect. Inoculation of cell lines with extracts of clinical specimens and subsequent passaging of the cells leads to an increased virus titre. Cultured isolates of poliovirus are suitable for testing by a variety of methods and remain viable for years when stored at low temperature.This chapter describes general procedures for establishing a cell bank and routine passaging of cell lines. While the sections on specimen preparation and virus isolation focus on poliovirus, the protocols are suitable for other enteroviruses.

  10. Chlamydia pneumoniae respiratory infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, William M; Corey, Lawrence

    2002-03-27

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in immunocompetent patients; however, its role as a respiratory pathogen in immunocompromised hosts has been infrequently recognized. We describe C. pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infection in a 19-year-old male after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The patient developed fever on day +14, and a subsequent computed tomography scan of the chest revealed a right lateral pleural-based opacity, which was then resected during thoracoscopy. Diagnosis was made by culture and staining of the resected tissue with C. pneumoniae-specific monoclonal antibodies, and azithromycin was administered. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. pneumoniae respiratory infection after stem cell or marrow transplantation. C. pneumoniae often coexists with other etiologic agents of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. Considering the infrequency of infections from this organism in this clinical setting, one must still rule out other more likely respiratory pathogens.

  11. Rapid, targeted and culture-free viral infectivity assay in drop-based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Rotem, Assaf; Zhang, Huidan; Chang, Connie B; Basu, Anindita; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Koehler, Stephan A; Ren, Yukun; Lin, Jeffrey S; Pipas, James M; Feldman, Andrew B; Wobus, Christiane E; Weitz, David A

    2015-10-07

    A key viral property is infectivity, and its accurate measurement is crucial for the understanding of viral evolution, disease and treatment. Currently viral infectivity is measured using plaque assays, which involve prolonged culturing of host cells, and whose measurement is unable to differentiate between specific strains and is prone to low number fluctuation. We developed a rapid, targeted and culture-free infectivity assay using high-throughput drop-based microfluidics. Single infectious viruses are incubated in a large number of picoliter drops with host cells for one viral replication cycle followed by in-drop gene-specific amplification to detect infection events. Using murine noroviruses (MNV) as a model system, we measure their infectivity and determine the efficacy of a neutralizing antibody for different variants of MNV. Our results are comparable to traditional plaque-based assays and plaque reduction neutralization tests. However, the fast, low-cost, highly accurate genomic-based assay promises to be a superior method for drug screening and isolation of resistant viral strains. Moreover our technique can be adapted to measuring the infectivity of other pathogens, such as bacteria and fungi.

  12. Improved Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection by Culturing Periprosthetic Tissue Specimens in Blood Culture Bottles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisha N. Peel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite known low sensitivity, culture of periprosthetic tissue specimens on agars and in broths is routine. Culture of periprosthetic tissue samples in blood culture bottles (BCBs is potentially more convenient, but it has been evaluated in a limited way and has not been widely adopted. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of inoculation of periprosthetic tissue specimens into blood culture bottles with standard agar and thioglycolate broth culture, applying Bayesian latent class modeling (LCM in addition to applying the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA criteria for prosthetic joint infection. This prospective cohort study was conducted over a 9-month period (August 2013 to April 2014 at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, and included all consecutive patients undergoing revision arthroplasty. Overall, 369 subjects were studied; 117 (32% met IDSA criteria for prosthetic joint infection, and 82% had late chronic infection. Applying LCM, inoculation of tissues into BCBs was associated with a 47% improvement in sensitivity compared to the sensitivity of conventional agar and broth cultures (92.1 versus 62.6%, respectively; this magnitude of change was similar when IDSA criteria were applied (60.7 versus 44.4%, respectively; P = 0.003. The time to microorganism detection was shorter with BCBs than with standard media (P < 0.0001, with aerobic and anaerobic BCBs yielding positive results within a median of 21 and 23 h, respectively. Results of our study demonstrate that the semiautomated method of periprosthetic tissue culture in blood culture bottles is more sensitive than and as specific as agar and thioglycolate broth cultures and yields results faster.

  13. Macrophages are required for dendritic cell uptake of respiratory syncytial virus from an infected epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugonna, Kelechi; Bingle, Colin D; Plant, Karen; Wilson, Kirsty; Everard, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that the respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] can productively infect monocyte derived dendritic cells [MoDC] and remain dormant within the same cells for prolonged periods. It is therefore possible that infected dendritic cells act as a reservoir within the airways of individuals between annual epidemics. In the present study we explored the possibility that sub-epithelial DCs can be infected with RSV from differentiated bronchial epithelium and that in turn RSV from DCs can infect the epithelium. A dual co-culture model was established in which a differentiated primary airway epithelium on an Air Liquid Interface (ALI) was cultured on a transwell insert and MoDCs were subsequently added to the basolateral membrane of the insert. Further experiments were undertaken using a triple co-culture model in which in which macrophages were added to the apical surface of the differentiated epithelium. A modified RSV [rr-RSV] expressing a red fluorescent protein marker of replication was used to infect either the MoDCs or the differentiated epithelium and infection of the reciprocal cell type was assessed using confocal microscopy. Our data shows that primary epithelium became infected when rr-RSV infected MoDCs were introduced onto the basal surface of the transwell insert. MoDCs located beneath the epithelium did not become infected with virus from infected epithelial cells in the dual co-culture model. However when macrophages were present on the apical surface of the primary epithelium infection of the basal MoDCs occurred. Our data suggests that RSV infected dendritic cells readily transmit infection to epithelial cells even when they are located beneath the basal layer. However macrophages appear to be necessary for the transmission of infection from epithelial cells to basal dendritic cells.

  14. Role of IFN-gamma and LPS on Neuron/Glial Co-Cultures Infected by Neospora caninum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Etelvina Viana De Jesus

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neospora caninum causes cattle abortion and neurological symptoms in dogs. Although infection is usually asymptomatic, classical neurological symptoms of neosporosis may be associated with encephalitis. This parasite can grow in brain endothelial cells without markedly damages, but it can modulate the cellular environment to promote its survival in the brain. In previous studies, we described that IFN-γ decreased the parasite proliferation and down regulated nitric oxide production in astrocyte/microglia cultures. However, it remains unclear how glial cells respond to N. caninum in the presence of neurons. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of 300 IU/mL IFN-γ or 1.0 μg/mL of LPS on infected rat neuron/glial co-cultures. After 72 hours of infection, LPS did not affect the mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. However, IFN-γ decreased this parameter by 15.5 and 12.0% in uninfected and infected cells, respectively. The number of tachyzoites decreased 54.1 and 44.3% in cells stimulated with IFN-γ and LPS, respectively. Infection or LPS treatment did not change NO production. On the other hand, IFN-γ induced increased nitrite release in 55.7%, but the infection reverted this induction. IL-10 levels increased only in infected cultures (treated or not, meanwhile PGE2 release was improved in IFN-γ/infected or LPS/infected cells. Although IFN-γ significantly reduced the neurite length in uninfected cultures (42.64%; p < 0.001, this inflammatory cytokine reverted the impairment of neurite outgrowth induced by the infection (81.39%. The results suggest a neuroprotective potential response of glia to N. caninum infection under IFN-γ stimulus. This observation contributes to understand the immune mediated mechanisms of neosporosis in CNS

  15. Rotating cell culture systems for human cell culture: human trophoblast cells as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Warner, Jessica A; Machado, Heather L; Morris, Cindy A; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin

    2012-01-18

    The field of human trophoblast research aids in understanding the complex environment established during placentation. Due to the nature of these studies, human in vivo experimentation is impossible. A combination of primary cultures, explant cultures and trophoblast cell lines support our understanding of invasion of the uterine wall and remodeling of uterine spiral arteries by extravillous trophoblast cells (EVTs), which is required for successful establishment of pregnancy. Despite the wealth of knowledge gleaned from such models, it is accepted that in vitro cell culture models using EVT-like cell lines display altered cellular properties when compared to their in vivo counterparts. Cells cultured in the rotating cell culture system (RCCS) display morphological, phenotypic, and functional properties of EVT-like cell lines that more closely mimic differentiating in utero EVTs, with increased expression of genes mediating invasion (e.g. matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)) and trophoblast differentiation. The Saint Georges Hospital Placental cell Line-4 (SGHPL-4) (kindly donated by Dr. Guy Whitley and Dr. Judith Cartwright) is an EVT-like cell line that was used for testing in the RCCS. The design of the RCCS culture vessel is based on the principle that organs and tissues function in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment. Due to the dynamic culture conditions in the vessel, including conditions of physiologically relevant shear, cells grown in three dimensions form aggregates based on natural cellular affinities and differentiate into organotypic tissue-like assemblies. The maintenance of a fluid orbit provides a low-shear, low-turbulence environment similar to conditions found in vivo. Sedimentation of the cultured cells is countered by adjusting the rotation speed of the RCCS to ensure a constant free-fall of cells. Gas exchange occurs through a permeable hydrophobic membrane located on the back of the bioreactor. Like their parental tissue in vivo, RCCS

  16. Porcine mitral valve interstitial cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, W; Rosenthal, A; Granton, B; Gotlieb, A I

    1988-11-01

    There are connective tissue cells present within the interstitium of the heart valves. This study was designed to isolate and characterize mitral valve interstitial cells from the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. Explants obtained from the distal part of the leaflet, having been scraped free of surface endocardial cells, were incubated in medium 199 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Cells grew out of the explant after 3 to 5 days and by 3 weeks these cells were harvested and passaged. Passages 1 to 22 were characterized in several explant sets. The cells showed a growth pattern reminiscent of fibroblasts. Growth was dependent on serum concentration. Cytoskeletal localization of actin and myosin showed prominent stress fibers. Ultrastructural studies showed many elongated cells with prominent stress fibers and some gap junctions and few adherens junctions. There were as well cells with fewer stress fibers containing prominent Golgi complex and dilated endoplasmic reticulum. In the multilayered superconfluent cultures, the former cells tended to be on the substratum of the dish or surface of the multilayered culture, whereas the latter was generally located within the layer of cells. Extracellular matrix was prominent in superconfluent cultures, often within the layers as well. Labeling of the cells with antibody HHF 35 (Tsukada T, Tippens D, Gordon D, Ross R, Gown AM: Am J Pathol 126:51, 1987), which recognizes smooth muscle cell actin, showed prominent staining of the elongated stress fiber-containing cells and much less in the secretory type cells. These studies show that interstitial mitral valve cells can be grown in culture and that either two different cell types or one cell type with two phenotypic expressions is present in culture.

  17. Cell culture processes for monoclonal antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Vijayasankaran, Natarajan; Shen, Amy Yijuan; Kiss, Robert; Amanullah, Ashraf

    2010-01-01

    Animal cell culture technology has advanced significantly over the last few decades and is now generally considered a reliable, robust and relatively mature technology. A range of biotherapeutics are currently synthesized using cell culture methods in large scale manufacturing facilities that produce products for both commercial use and clinical studies. The robust implementation of this technology requires optimization of a number of variables, including 1) cell lines capable of synthesizing the required molecules at high productivities that ensure low operating cost; 2) culture media and bioreactor culture conditions that achieve both the requisite productivity and meet product quality specifications; 3) appropriate on-line and off-line sensors capable of providing information that enhances process knowledge; and 4) good understanding of culture performance at different scales to ensure smooth scale-up. Successful implementation also requires appropriate strategies for process development, scale-up and process characterization and validation that enable robust operation that is compliant with current regulations. This review provides an overview of the state-of-the art technology in key aspects of cell culture, e.g., engineering of highly productive cell lines and optimization of cell culture process conditions. We also summarize the current thinking on appropriate process development strategies and process advances that might affect process development.

  18. Cell culture processes for monoclonal antibody production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Vijayasankaran, Natarajan; Shen, Amy (Yijuan); Kiss, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Animal cell culture technology has advanced significantly over the last few decades and is now generally considered a reliable, robust and relatively mature technology. A range of biotherapeutics are currently synthesized using cell culture methods in large scale manufacturing facilities that produce products for both commercial use and clinical studies. The robust implementation of this technology requires optimization of a number of variables, including (1) cell lines capable of synthesizing the required molecules at high productivities that ensure low operating cost; (2) culture media and bioreactor culture conditions that achieve both the requisite productivity and meet product quality specifications; (3) appropriate on-line and off-line sensors capable of providing information that enhances process control; and (4) good understanding of culture performance at different scales to ensure smooth scale-up. Successful implementation also requires appropriate strategies for process development, scale-up and process characterization and validation that enable robust operation and ensure compliance with current regulations. This review provides an overview of the state-of-the art technology in key aspects of cell culture, e.g., generation of highly productive cell lines and optimization of cell culture process conditions. We also summarize the current thinking on appropriate process development strategies and process advances that might affect process development. PMID:20622510

  19. Proteomic profile of human monocytic cells infected with dengue virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viviana Martnez-Betancur; Marlen Martnez-Gutierrez

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the changes in the proteome of U937 cells infected with dengue virus (DENV). Methods: In this study, differentiated U937 cultures were infected with two DENV-2 strains, one of which was associated with dengue (DENV-2/NG) and the other one with severe dengue (DENV-2/16681), with the aim of determining the cellular proteomic profiles under different infection conditions. Cellular proteins were extracted and sepa-rated by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and those proteins with differential expression profiles were identified by mass spectrometry. The obtained results were correlated with cellular viability, the number of infectious viral particles, and the viral DNA/protein quantity. Results: In comparison with non-infected cultures, in the cells infected with the DENV-2/NG strain, nine proteins were expressed differentially (five were upregulated and four were downregulated); in those cultures infected with the DENV-2/16681 strain, six proteins were differentially expressed (two were downregulated and four were upregu-lated). The downregulated proteins included fatty acid-binding protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein 1, protein disulfide isomerase, enolase 1, heat shock 70 kDa protein 9, phosphotyrosyl phosphatase, and annexin IV. The upregulated proteins included heat shock 90 kDa protein AA1, tubulin beta, enolase 1, pyruvate kinase, transaldolase and phospholipase C-alpha. Conclusions: Because the monocyte/macrophage lineage is critical for disease patho-genicity, additional studies on these proteins could provide a better understanding of the cellular response to DENV infection and could help identify new therapeutic targets against infection.

  20. Isolation of mitochondria from tissue culture cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, David A; Shadel, Gerald S

    2014-10-01

    The number of mitochondria per cell varies substantially from cell line to cell line. For example, human HeLa cells contain at least twice as many mitochondria as smaller mouse L cells. This protocol starts with a washed cell pellet of 1-2 mL derived from ∼10⁹ cells grown in culture. The cells are swollen in a hypotonic buffer and ruptured with a Dounce or Potter-Elvehjem homogenizer using a tight-fitting pestle, and mitochondria are isolated by differential centrifugation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Spectroscopic investigation of herpes simplex viruses infected cells and their response to antiviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to evaluate the antiviral activity of known antiviral agents against herpes viruses. The antiviral activity of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (which is an active compound of propolis) against herpes simplex type 1 and 2 was examined in cell culture. The advantage of microscopic FTIR spectroscopy over conventional FTIR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell culture or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and non-infected cells, and between infected cells treated with the used antiviral agent and those not treated. In infected cells, there was a considerable increase in phosphate levels. Our results show that treatment with used antiviral agent considerably abolish the spectral changes induced by the viral infection. In addition, it is possible to track by FTIR microscopy method the deferential effect of various doses of the drug.

  2. Agglutination of Trypanosoma cruzi in infected cells treated with serum from chronically infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelken, Jennifer L; Rowland, Edwin C

    2009-04-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The chronic stage of infection is characterized by a production of neutralizing antibodies in the vertebrate host. A polyclonal antibody, anti-egressin, has been found to inhibit egress of parasites from the host cell late in the intracellular cycle, after the parasites have transformed from the replicative amastigote into the trypomastigote. It has also been found that BALB/c mouse fibroblasts in the late stages of parasite infection become permeable to molecules as large as antibodies, leading to the possibility that anti-egressin affects the intracellular parasites. This project addresses the fate of the intracellular trypomastigotes that have been inhibited from egressing the host cell. Extended cultures of infected fibroblasts treated with chronic mouse serum reduced parasite egress at all time points measured. Parasites released from infected fibroblasts treated with chronic serum had a reduced ability to infect fibroblasts in culture, yet did not lose infectivity entirely. Absorption of chronic serum with living trypomastigotes removed the anti-egressin effect. The possibility that the target of anti-egressin is a parasite surface component is further indicated by the agglutination of extracellular trypomastigotes by chronic serum. The possibility that cross-linking by antibody occurs intracellularly, thus inhibiting egress, was reinforced by cleaving purified IgG into Fab fragments, which did not inhibit egress when added to infected cultures. From this work, it is proposed that the current, best explanation of the mechanism of egress inhibition by anti-egressin is intracellular agglutination, preventing normal parasite-driven egress.

  3. Culture and transfection of axolotl cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Jean-François; Sader, Fadi; Ferretti, Patrizia; Roy, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    The use of cells grown in vitro has been instrumental for multiple aspects of biomedical research and especially molecular and cellular biology. The ability to grow cells from multicellular organisms like humans, squids, or salamanders is important to simplify the analyses and experimental designs to help understand the biology of these organisms. The advent of the first cell culture has allowed scientists to tease apart the cellular functions, and in many situations these experiments help understand what is happening in the whole organism. In this chapter, we describe techniques for the culture and genetic manipulation of an established cell line from axolotl, a species widely used for studying epimorphic regeneration.

  4. Productive infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by feline immunodeficiency virus: implications for vector development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J; Power, C

    1999-03-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus causing immune suppression and neurological disease in cats. Like primate lentiviruses, FIV utilizes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for infection. In addition, FIV gene expression has been demonstrated in immortalized human cell lines. To investigate the extent and mechanism by which FIV infected primary and immortalized human cell lines, we compared the infectivity of two FIV strains, V1CSF and Petaluma, after cell-free infection. FIV genome was detected in infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages at 21 and 14 days postinfection, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis of FIV-infected human PBMC indicated that antibodies to FIV p24 recognized 12% of the cells. Antibodies binding the CCR3 chemokine receptor maximally inhibited infection of human PBMC by both FIV strains compared to antibodies to CXCR4 or CCR5. Reverse transcriptase levels increased in FIV-infected human PBMC, with detection of viral titers of 10(1.3) to 10(2.1) 50% tissue culture infective doses/10(6) cells depending on the FIV strain examined. Cell death in human PBMC infected with either FIV strain was significantly elevated relative to uninfected control cultures. These findings indicate that FIV can productively infect primary human cell lines and that viral strain specificity should be considered in the development of an FIV vector for gene therapy.

  5. Loss of circulating CD4 T cells with B cell helper function during chronic HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin L Boswell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between follicular T helper cells (TFH and B cells in the lymph nodes and spleen has a major impact on the development of antigen-specific B cell responses during infection or vaccination. Recent studies described a functional equivalent of these cells among circulating CD4 T cells, referred to as peripheral TFH cells. Here, we characterize the phenotype and in vitro B cell helper activity of peripheral TFH populations, as well as the effect of HIV infection on these populations. In co-culture experiments we confirmed CXCR5+ cells from HIV-uninfected donors provide help to B cells and more specifically, we identified a CCR7(highCXCR5(highCCR6(highPD-1(high CD4 T cell population that secretes IL-21 and enhances isotype-switched immunoglobulin production. This population is significantly decreased in treatment-naïve, HIV-infected individuals and can be recovered after anti-retroviral therapy. We found impaired immunoglobulin production in co-cultures from HIV-infected individuals and found no correlation between the frequency of peripheral TFH cells and memory B cells, or with neutralization activity in untreated HIV infection in our cohort. Furthermore, we found that within the peripheral TFH population, the expression level of TFH-associated genes more closely resembles a memory, non-TFH population, as opposed to a TFH population. Overall, our data identify a heterogeneous population of circulating CD4 T cells that provides in vitro help to B cells, and challenges the origin of these cells as memory TFH cells.

  6. Culture of Mouse Neural Stem Cell Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Currle, D. Spencer; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kolski-Andreaco, Aaron; Monuki, Edwin S

    2007-01-01

    Primary neural stem cell cultures are useful for studying the mechanisms underlying central nervous system development. Stem cell research will increase our understanding of the nervous system and may allow us to develop treatments for currently incurable brain diseases and injuries. In addition, stem cells should be used for stem cell research aimed at the detailed study of mechanisms of neural differentiation and transdifferentiation and the genetic and environmental signals that direct the...

  7. Wound Coverage by Cultured Skin Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    and spread. 6 We later coated collagen sponges with human or porcine plasma. Although this coating improved the plating of epidermal cells, it did not...healing by cultured epidermal grafts, we have found that: - We were able to grow epidermal cells on collapsed collagen sponges . As a result, we can create...plastic. Epidermal cells grown on collagen sponges formed four to five layers of nucleated cells, compared to only one layer on plastic surfaces. The use of

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell derived hematopoietic cells are permissive to HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent, self-renewing cells known for their differentiation potential into cells of mesenchymal lineage. The ability of single cell clones isolated from adipose tissue resident MSCs (ASCs to differentiate into cells of hematopoietic lineage has been previously demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated if the hematopoietic differentiated (HD cells derived from ASCs could productively be infected with HIV-1. Results HD cells were generated by differentiating clonally expanded cultures of adherent subsets of ASCs (CD90+, CD105+, CD45-, and CD34-. Transcriptome analysis revealed that HD cells acquire a number of elements that increase their susceptibility for HIV-1 infection, including HIV-1 receptor/co-receptor and other key cellular cofactors. HIV-1 infected HD cells (HD-HIV showed elevated p24 protein and gag and tat gene expression, implying a high and productive infection. HD-HIV cells showed decreased CD4, but significant increase in the expression of CCR5, CXCR4, Nef-associated factor HCK, and Vpu-associated factor BTRC. HIV-1 restricting factors like APOBEC3F and TRIM5 also showed up regulation. HIV-1 infection increased apoptosis and cell cycle regulatory genes in HD cells. Although undifferentiated ASCs failed to show productive infection, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of several hematopoietic lineage associated genes such as c-Kit, MMD2, and IL-10. Conclusions Considering the presence of profuse amounts of ASCs in different tissues, these findings suggest the possible role that could be played by HD cells derived from ASCs in HIV-1 infection. The undifferentiated ASCs were non-permissive to HIV-1 infection; however, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of some hematopoietic lineage related genes. The findings relate the importance of ASCs in HIV-1 research and facilitate the understanding of the disease process and management strategies.

  9. Murid herpesvirus-4 exploits dendritic cells to infect B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Miguel; May, Janet S; Sukla, Soumi; Frederico, Bruno; Gill, Michael B; Smith, Christopher M; Belz, Gabrielle T; Stevenson, Philip G

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in initiating immune responses. Some persistent viruses infect DCs and can disrupt their functions in vitro. However, these viruses remain strongly immunogenic in vivo. Thus what role DC infection plays in the pathogenesis of persistent infections is unclear. Here we show that a persistent, B cell-tropic gamma-herpesvirus, Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4), infects DCs early after host entry, before it establishes a substantial infection of B cells. DC-specific virus marking by cre-lox recombination revealed that a significant fraction of the virus latent in B cells had passed through a DC, and a virus attenuated for replication in DCs was impaired in B cell colonization. In vitro MuHV-4 dramatically altered the DC cytoskeleton, suggesting that it manipulates DC migration and shape in order to spread. MuHV-4 therefore uses DCs to colonize B cells.

  10. Ebola virus infection induces irregular dendritic cell gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Vanessa R; Kalina, Warren V; Williams, Priscilla

    2015-02-01

    Filoviruses subvert the human immune system in part by infecting and replicating in dendritic cells (DCs). Using gene arrays, a phenotypic profile of filovirus infection in human monocyte-derived DCs was assessed. Monocytes from human donors were cultured in GM-CSF and IL-4 and were infected with Ebola virus Kikwit variant for up to 48 h. Extracted DC RNA was analyzed on SuperArray's Dendritic and Antigen Presenting Cell Oligo GEArray and compared to uninfected controls. Infected DCs exhibited increased expression of cytokine, chemokine, antiviral, and anti-apoptotic genes not seen in uninfected controls. Significant increases of intracellular antiviral and MHC I and II genes were also noted in EBOV-infected DCs. However, infected DCs failed to show any significant difference in co-stimulatory T-cell gene expression from uninfected DCs. Moreover, several chemokine genes were activated, but there was sparse expression of chemokine receptors that enabled activated DCs to home to lymph nodes. Overall, statistically significant expression of several intracellular antiviral genes was noted, which may limit viral load but fails to stop replication. EBOV gene expression profiling is of vital importance in understanding pathogenesis and devising novel therapeutic treatments such as small-molecule inhibitors.

  11. Sponge cell culture? A molecular identification method for sponge cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Osinga, R.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Dissociated sponge cells are easily confused with unicellular organisms. This has been an obstacle in the development of sponge-cell lines. We developed a molecular detection method to identify cells of the sponge Dysidea avara in dissociated cell cultures. The 18S ribosomal RNA gene from a Dysidea

  12. Primary cell cultures of bovine colon epithelium: isolation and cell culture of colonocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föllmann, W; Weber, S; Birkner, S

    2000-10-01

    Epithelial cells from bovine colon were isolated by mechanical preparation combined with an enzymatic digestion from colon specimens derived from freshly slaughtered animals. After digestion with collagenase I, the isolated tissue was centrifuged on a 2% D-sorbitol gradient to separate epithelial crypts which were seeded in collagen I-coated culture flasks. By using colon crypts and omitting the seeding of single cells a contamination by fibroblasts was prevented. The cells proliferated under the chosen culture conditions and formed monolayer cultures which were maintained for several weeks, including subcultivation steps. A population doubling time of about 21 hr was estimated in the log phase of the corresponding growth curve. During the culture period the cells were characterized morphologically and enzymatically. By using antibodies against cytokeratine 7 and 13 the isolated cells were identified as cells of epithelial origin. Antibodies against vimentin served as negative control. Morphological features such as microvilli, desmosomes and tight junctions, which demonstrated the ability of the cultured cells to restore an epithelial like monolayer, were shown by ultrastructural investigations. The preservation of the secretory function of the cultured cells was demonstrated by mucine cytochemistry with alcian blue staining. A stable expression of enzyme activities over a period of 6 days in culture occurred for gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, acid phosphatase and NADH-dehydrogenase activity under the chosen culture conditions. Activity of alkaline phosphatase decreased to about 50% of basal value after 6 days in culture. Preliminary estimations of the metabolic competence of these cells revealed cytochrome P450 1A1-associated EROD activity in freshly isolated cells which was stable over 5 days in cultured cells. Then activity decreased completely. This culture system with primary epithelial cells from the colon will be used further as a model for the colon

  13. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  14. Flux analysis of mammalian cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.

    2010-01-01

    Animal cells are used for the production of vaccines and pharmaceutical proteins. The increase in demand for these products requires an increase in volumetric productivity of animal cell culture processes, which can be attained through an increase in biomass concentration and/or specific productivit

  15. Xylogenesis in zinnia (Zinnia elegans) cell cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, Elena T.; Woltering, Ernst J.

    2017-01-01

    Main conclusion: Physiological and molecular studies support the view that xylogenesis can largely be determined as a specific form of vacuolar programmed cell death (PCD). The studies in xylogenic zinnia cell culture have led to many breakthroughs in xylogenesis research and provided a background

  16. Flux analysis of mammalian cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.

    2010-01-01

    Animal cells are used for the production of vaccines and pharmaceutical proteins. The increase in demand for these products requires an increase in volumetric productivity of animal cell culture processes, which can be attained through an increase in biomass concentration and/or specific

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) Infection Using Co-Culture with Jurkat LTR-Luciferase or Jurkat LTR-GFP Reporter Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alais, Sandrine; Dutartre, Hélène; Mahieux, Renaud

    2017-01-01

    Unlike HIV-1, HTLV-1 viral transmission requires cell-to-cell contacts, while cell-free virions are poorly infectious and almost absent from body fluids. Though the virus uses three nonexclusive mechanisms to infect new target cells: (1) MTOC polarization followed by formation of a virological synapse and viral transfer into a synaptic cleft, (2) genesis of a viral biofilm and its transfer of embedded viruses, or (3) HTLV-1 transmission using conduits. The Tax transactivator and the p8 viral proteins are involved in virological synapse and nanotube formation respectively.HTLV-1 transcription from the viral promoter (i.e., LTR) requires the Tax protein that is absent from the viral particle and is expressed after productive infection. The present chapter focuses on a series of protocols used to quantify HTLV-1 de novo infection of target cells. These techniques do not discriminate between the different modes of transmission, but allow an accurate measure of productive infection. We used cell lines that are stably transfected with LTR-GFP or LTR-luciferase plasmids and quantified Green Fluorescent Protein expression or luciferase activity, since both of them reflect Tax expression.

  18. Pitfalls in cell culture work with xanthohumol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motyl, M; Kraus, B; Heilmann, J

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol, the most abundant prenylated chalcone in hop (Humulus lupulus L.) cones, is well known to exert several promising pharmacological activities in vitro and in vivo. Among these, the chemopreventive, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects are probably the most interesting. As xanthohumol is hardly soluble in water and able to undergo conversion to isoxanthohumol we determined several handling characteristics for cell culture work with this compound. Recovery experiments revealed that working with xanthohumol under cell culture conditions requires a minimal amount of 10% FCS to increase its solubility to reasonable concentrations (-50-75 micromol/l) for pharmacological in vitro tests. Additionally, more than 50% of xanthohumol can be absorbed to various plastic materials routinely used in the cell culture using FCS concentrations below 10%. In contrast, experiments using fluorescence microscopy in living cells revealed that detection of cellular intake of xanthohumol is hampered by concentrations above 1% FCS.

  19. Pathogenic Trichomonas vaginalis cytotoxicity to cell culture monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, J F; Pearlman, E

    1984-04-01

    Exposure of monolayer cultures of human urogenital and vaginal (HeLa), human epithelial (HEp-2), normal baboon testicular (NBT), and monkey kidney (Vero) cells to live pathogenic Trichomonas vaginalis resulted in extensive disruption of monolayers. Trypan blue was taken up by all host cells released from cell monolayers, which indicated irreversible damage of these cell types by trichomonads. Time and dose related data on cytotoxicity kinetics were obtained using increasing ratios of parasites to cells. All cell types were most sensitive to trichomonads at a multiplicity of infection of one. Release of tritiated thymidine (3H-thymidine) of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of prelabelled host cells after incubation with T vaginalis corroborated that extensive cytotoxicity was caused by pathogenic trichomonads in man. Only living parasites were cytotoxic, and no trichomonal toxic products were implicated in disruption of the cell monolayer cultures. A pathogenic bovine trichomonad, Tritrichomonas foetus KV-1, produced half as much cell damage as did T vaginalis. Trichomonas tenax, a non-pathogenic member of the normal flora of the oral cavity in man, produced no measurable cytotoxicity to HeLa cells when compared with the pathogenic human trichomonads.

  20. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  1. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  2. Sphingomonas sp. is a novel cell culture contaminant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Muhammad Tahir; Al-Ghanim, K; Mahboob, Shahid; Sharif, Muhammad; Nazir, Jawad; Shakoori, Abdul Rauf

    2015-06-01

    A novel contaminant was isolated from Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cells. The organism was unable to grow on standard microbiological media by conventional techniques, but grew well in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) containing high glucose concentration. The organism formed a white biofilm on the bottom without any signs of turbidity. Upon genome sequence analysis of 16 S rDNA, the contaminant was identified as Sphingomonas sp. Shah, a member of the group α-Proteobacteria. Neutral red dye uptake method confirmed clear cytotoxic potential of the bacterium on A-549 cells. The organism was capable of invading and infecting different mammalian cell lines: MDBK, ZZ-R, 293-T, A549, and HeLa cells. Infected cells showed a variety of cytopathic effects including vacuolation at perinuclear area, cytoplasmic granulation and membrane blebbing. Microscopic analysis of the infected cells revealed the presence of cytoplasmic vacuoles harboring motile organisms. Apparently local serum preparations seem to be the source of this contamination, which is imperceptibly passed on from one culture passage to the other and ultimately leading to serious cytopathic manifestations.

  3. Tick cell culture isolation and growth of Rickettsia raoultii from Dutch Dermacentor reticulatus ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, M Pilar; Nijhof, Ard M; Jongejan, Frans; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley

    2012-12-01

    Tick cell lines play an important role in research on ticks and tick-borne pathogenic and symbiotic microorganisms. In an attempt to derive continuous Dermacentor reticulatus cell lines, embryo-derived primary cell cultures were set up from eggs laid by field ticks originally collected as unfed adults in The Netherlands and maintained for up to 16 months. After several months, it became evident that cells in the primary cultures were infected with a Rickettsia-like intracellular organism. Supernatant medium containing some D. reticulatus cells was inoculated into cultures of 2 Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus cell lines, BME/CTVM2 and BME/CTVM23, where abundant growth of the bacteria occurred intracellularly on transfer to both cell lines. Bacterial growth was monitored by light (live, inverted microscope, Giemsa-stained cytocentrifuge smears) and transmission electron microscopy revealing heavy infection with typical intracytoplasmic Rickettsia-like bacteria, not present in uninfected cultures. DNA was extracted from bacteria-infected and uninfected control cultures, and primers specific for Rickettsia 16S rRNA, ompB, and sca4 genes were used to generate PCR products that were subsequently sequenced. D. reticulatus primary cultures and both infected tick cell lines were positive for all 3 Rickettsia genes. Sequencing of PCR products revealed 99-100% identity with published Rickettsia raoultii sequences. The R. raoultii also grew abundantly in the D. nitens cell line ANE58, poorly in the D. albipictus cell line DALBE3, and not at all in the D. andersoni cell line DAE15. In conclusion, primary tick cell cultures and cell lines are useful systems for isolation and propagation of fastidious tick-borne microorganisms. In vitro isolation of R. raoultii from Dutch D. reticulatus confirms previous PCR-based detection in field ticks, and presence of the bacteria in the tick eggs used to initiate the primary cultures confirms that transovarial transmission of this

  4. Pinoresinol from Ipomoea cairica cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páska, Csilla; Innocenti, Gabbriella; Ferlin, Mariagrazia; Kunvári, Mónika; László, Miklós

    2002-10-01

    Ipomoea cairica cell cultures produced a tetrahydrofuran lignan, (+)-pinoresinol, identified by UV, IR, MS and NMR methods, not yet found in the intact plant, and new in the Convolvulaceae family. Pinoresinol was found to have antioxidant and Ca2+ antagonist properties. As it could be requested for its biological activity, we examined the possibility to raise the pinoresinol yield of I. cairica cultures, as well as we continued investigations on lignans' response to optimization.

  5. Cell culture experiments planned for the space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Culturing of cells in a pilot-scale bioreactor remains to be done in microgravity. An approach is presented based on several studies of cell culture systems. Previous and current cell culture research in microgravity which is specifically directed towards development of a space bioprocess is described. Cell culture experiments planned for a microgravity sciences mission are described in abstract form.

  6. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro...

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells: viral shedding and cell contact-mediated infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asin, Susana N; Wildt-Perinic, Dunja; Mason, Sarah I; Howell, Alexandra L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-15

    We examined the mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells to gain a clearer understanding of the events by which HIV-1 infects cells within the female reproductive tract. We demonstrated that these cells can be productively infected by HIV-1 and that infection is associated with viral RNA reverse transcription, DNA transcription, and secretion of infectious virus. Levels of viral DNA and secreted virus decreased gradually after infection. Moreover, virus released by the uterine epithelial cells shortly after infection was able to infect human T cell lines, but virus released later did not. In contrast, human CD4(+) T cell lines were infected after cocultivation with epithelial cells at both early and late stages of infection. These data demonstrated that HIV-1 infects human epithelial cells of upper reproductive tract origin and that productive viral infection of epithelial cells may be an important mechanism of transmission of HIV-1 infection in women.

  8. Viral hepatitis: A new HCV cell culture model for the next clinical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Che C; Baumert, Thomas F

    2015-11-01

    Despite advances in hepatitis C treatment, substantial clinical hurdles remain to achieve universal cure and global control of infection. Saeed et al. identified SEC14L2 as a host factor permitting replication of clinical HCV isolates in cell culture, providing a novel system to model infection of patient-derived viruses.

  9. Preliminary study on Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection of human oral epithelial cell in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Zhao; Weibin Sun; Juan Wang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the functions and mechanisms of herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1) while infecting human oral epithelial cells in vitro(being similar to the infection in vivo). Methods:An abundance of HSV-1 strains amplified in Vero cells were used to infect human oral epithelial cells. The culture supernatant was collected to infect Veto cells again. Morphology of HSV-1 was identified by inverted microscope and transmission electron microscope. Nucleic acid of the virus was detected by PCR. Results:The infected human oral epithelial cells didn't display an obvious cytopathic effect(CPE) under inverted microscope(while Veto cells which were infected by the culture supematant showed typical(CPE). The virus particles were not observed in the cytoplasm nor in nucleus of human oral epithelial cells, however under transmission electron microscope in the cytoplasm of Vero cells, the nucleic acid of HSV-1 could be detected in infected human oral epithelial cells, by PCR. Conclusion:HSV-1 can successfully infect human oral epithelial cells. This model may provide a useful approach for studying the pathogenesis of herpes virus-associated periodontal disease.

  10. General overview of neuronal cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jennifer; Amini, Shohreh; White, Martyn K

    2013-01-01

    In this introductory chapter, we provide a general overview of neuronal cell culture. This is a rapidly evolving area of research and we provide an outline and contextual framework for the different chapters of this book. These chapters were all contributed by scientists actively working in the field who are currently using state-of-the-art techniques to advance our understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of the central nervous system. Each chapter provides detailed descriptions and experimental protocols for a variety of techniques ranging in scope from basic neuronal cell line culturing to advanced and specialized methods.

  11. A method for establishing human primary gastric epithelial cell culture from fresh surgical gastric tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Faisal; Yang, Xuesong; Wen, Qingping; Yan, Qiu

    2015-08-01

    At present, biopsy specimens, cancer cell lines and tissues obtained by gastric surgery are used in the study and analysis of gastric cancer, including the molecular mechanisms and proteomics. However, fibroblasts and other tissue components may interfere with these techniques. Therefore, the present study aimed to develop a procedure for the isolation of viable human gastric epithelial cells from gastric surgical tissues. A method was developed to culture human gastric epithelial cells using fresh, surgically excised tissues and was evaluated using immunocytochemistry, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and cell viability assays. Low cell growth was observed surrounding the gastric tissue on the seventh day of tissue explant culture. Cell growth subsequently increased, and at 12 days post-explant a high number of pure epithelial cells were detected. The gastric cancer cells exhibited rapid growth with a doubling time of 13-52 h, as compared to normal cells, which had a doubling time of 20-53 h. Immunocytochemical analyses of primary gastric cells revealed positive staining for cytokeratin 18 and 19, which indicated that the culture was comprised of pure epithelial cells and contained no fibroblasts. Furthermore, PAS staining demonstrated that the cultured gastric cells produced neutral mucin. Granulin and carbohydrate antigen 724 staining confirmed the purity of gastric cancer and normal cells in culture. This method of cell culture indicated that the gastric cells in primary culture consisted of mucin-secreting gastric epithelial cells, which may be useful for the study of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer.

  12. Monitoring infection: from blood culture to polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Book, Malte; Lehmann, Lutz Eric; Zhang, XiangHong; Stüber, Frank

    2013-06-01

    In patients with sepsis, diagnosis of blood stream infection (BSI) is a key concern to the therapist. Direct verification of pathogens in the blood stream executed by blood cultures (BC) still is regarded as the gold standard up to date. The quickest possible initiation of an appropriate antimicrobial therapy is a cornerstone of an effective therapy. Moreover, in this view BC can also serve to identify antimicrobial agents to target the pathogen. However, when employing BC the time needed until microbiological results are available ranges from 24 up to 72 h. Moreover, infections caused by multiple pathogens often remain undetected and concurrent antibiotic therapy may lower the overall sensitivity. Alternative pathogen characterization can be performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based amplification methods. Results using PCR can be obtained within 6-8 h. Therefore, the time delay until an appropriate therapy can be reduced enormously. Moreover, these methods have the potential to enhance the sensitivity in the diagnosis of blood stream infections. Therefore, PCR based methods might be a valuable adjunct to present procedures of diagnosing bacteraemia.

  13. Activation of lymphocytes induced by bronchial epithelial cells with prolonged RSV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Qin

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV preferentially infects airway epithelial cells,which might be responsible for susceptibility to asthma; however, the underlying mechanism is not clear. This study determined the activation of lymphocytes and drift of helper T (Th subsets induced by RSV-infected human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs in vitro. HBECs had prolonged infection with RSV, and lymphocytes isolated from human peripheral blood were co-cultured with RSV-infected HBECs. Four groups were established, as follows: lymphocytes (group L; lymphocytes infected with RSV (group RL; co-culture of lymphocytes with non-infected HBECs (group HL; and co-culture of lymphocytes with infected HBECs (group HRL. After co-culture with HBECs for 24 hours, lymphocytes were collected and the following were determined in the 4 groups: cell cycle status; apoptosis rate; and concentrations of IL-4, IFN-γ, and IL-17 in the supernatants. Cell cycle analysis for lymphocytes showed a significant increase in S phase cells, a decrease in G1 phase cells, and a higher apoptosis rate in group HRL compared with the other three groups. In group HRL, the levels of IL-4, IFN-γ, and IL-17 in supernatants were also higher than the other three groups. For further study, lymphocytes were individually treated with supernatants from non-infected and RSV-infected HBECs for 24 h. We showed that supernatants from RSV-infected HBECs induced the differentiation of Th2 and Th17 subsets, and suppressed the differentiation of Treg subsets. Our results showed that HBECs with prolonged RSV infection can induce lymphocyte proliferation and apoptosis, and enhance the release of cytokines by lymphocytes. Moreover, subset drift might be caused by RSV-infected HBECs.

  14. Inhibitory effect of interferon gamma on frequency of Ehrlichia canis-infected cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Tomoko; Wada, Makoto

    2013-12-15

    Ehrlichia canis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that infects the macrophage-monocyte cells of dogs, causing canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), along with other cytokines, mediates the immune response to such intracellular bacterial invasions. To determine the role of IFN-γ in the immunity of dogs to E. canis infection, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and white blood cells (WBC) were collected from E. canis-infected dogs and added to a culture of E. canis in DH82 cells. The number of E. canis inclusion-positive cells was significantly reduced in cultures containing PBMC and WBC from E. canis-infected dogs compared to uninfected dogs. However, this resistance was inhibited by the addition of an anti-dog IFN-γ antibody. Resistance was also observed when PBMC were added to the Cell Culture Inserts, which prohibited contact of PBMC to DH82 cells, while allowed the diffusion of soluble cell products. The results of this study indicate that resistance was not dependent on cell to cell contact, but was associated with soluble cell products, such as IFN-γ. The addition of recombinant canine IFN-γ to the E. canis culture also reduced the number of infected cells. A commercial recombinant canine IFN-γ, which is sold in Japan, was also effective at reducing E. canis-infected cell number. These results indicate that IFN-γ has an inhibitory effect on the frequency of E. canis-infected cells in vitro and that contact between effector and target cells is not necessary for the resistance.

  15. Cell Culture Derived AgMNPV Bioinsecticide: Biological Constraints and Bioprocess Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodas, Valeria M; Marques, Fabiano H; Honda, Marcelo T; Soares, Daniela M; Jorge, Soraia A C; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Medugno, Claudia; Castro, Maria E B; Ribeiro, Bergmann M; Souza, Marlinda L; Tonso, Aldo; Pereira, Carlos A

    2005-06-01

    We have studied parameters for optimizing the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cell culture and viral infection for the production of Anticarsia gemmatalis multiple nucleopolyhedrosis virus (AgMNPV) polyhedra inclusion bodies (PIBs) in shaker-Schott or spinner bottles and bioreactors. We have assayed the k(L)a of the systems, initial cell seeding, cell culture volume, dissolved oxygen (DO), multiplicity of infection (MOI), nutrients consumption, and metabolites production. The medium surface oxygen transfer was shown to be higher in shaker bottles than in spinner ones, which was in direct correlation to the higher cell density obtained. Best quantitative performances of PIBs production were obtained with a SF900II medium volume/shaker-bottle volume ratio of 15% and MOI of 0.5 to 1 performed at a cell concentration at infection (CCI) of 1 to 2.5x10(6) cells/ml in a medium containing enough glucose and glutamine. Upon infection, a decrease in the cell multiplication was observed to be dependent on the MOI used, and the muX at the exponential growth phase in infected and non-infected cultures were, respectively, of 0.2832 and 0.3914 (day(-1)). The glucose consumption and lactate production were higher in the infected cultures (muGlucose and muLactate of, respectively, 0.0248 and 0.0089x10(-8) g/cellxday in infected cultures and 0.0151 and 0.0046x10(-8) g/cellxday in non infected ones). The glutamine consumption did not differ in both cultures (muGlutamine of 0.0034 and 0.0037x10(-8) g/cellxday in, respectively, infected and non infected cultures). When a virus MOI of 0.1 to 1 was used for infection, a higher concentration of PIBs/ml was obtained. This was in direct correlation to a higher cell concentration present in these cultures, where a decrease in cell multiplication due to virus infection is minimized. When a MOI of 1 was used, a more effective decrease in cell multiplication was observed and a lower concentration of PIBs/ml was obtained, but with the best

  16. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways.

  17. Characterization of an infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) virus carrier cell culture with resistance to superinfection with heterologous viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Inmaculada; Galiana, Antonio; Falcó, Alberto; Estepa, Amparo; Perez, Luis

    2011-04-21

    A state of persistence of a non susceptible fish cell line with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was established in vitro by experimental infection. The persistently infected culture showed sustained production of infectious virus and could be continuously passaged for months. A distinct feature of this culture is that only a very small fraction of the cells harbours virus replication, in contrast to other reported IPNV-persistently infected cells from salmonid fish, where nearly all the cells express viral antigens. In spite of the small number of detectable IPNV-infected cells, the carrier culture shows resistance to superinfection with homologous as well as heterologous viruses. Temperature shift-up experiments indicate that viral interference is due to continuous replication of IPNV in the culture. Quantitation of Mx gene expression suggested that the interference phenomenon could be mediated by the activation of the interferon (IFN) system. However, conditioned medium from the IPNV-infected cell cultures only marginally protected other cells against VHSV infection, indicating that other type I IFN-independent mechanism may be underlying the resistance of the persistently infected culture to infection with heterologous viruses. Our study defines a novel in vitro model of IPNV persistence and contributes to the understanding of the widespread distribution of aquabirnaviruses in marine and fresh water environments by establishing a carrier state in non susceptible fish species.

  18. Phospholipid Synthesis in Sindbis Virus-Infected Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Marilynn R. F.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    We investigated the metabolic requirements for the decrease in phospholipid synthesis previously observed by Pfefferkorn and Hunter in primary cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts infected with Sindbis virus. The incorporation of 32PO4 into all classes of phospholipids was found to decline at the same rate and to the same extent; thus, incorporation of 14C-choline into acid-precipitable form provided a convenient measure of phospholipid synthesis that was used in subsequent experiments. Experiments with temperature-sensitive mutants suggested that some viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis was essential for the inhibition of choline incorporation, but that functional viral structural proteins were not required. The reduction in phospholipid synthesis was probably a secondary effect of infection resulting from viral inhibition of the cellular RNA and protein synthesis. All three inhibitory effects required about the same amount of viral RNA synthesis; the inhibition of host RNA and protein synthesis began sooner than the decline in phospholipid synthesis; and both actinomycin D and cycloheximide inhibited 14C-choline incorporation in uninfected cells. In contrast, incorporation of 14C-choline into BHK-21 cells was not decreased by 10 hr of exposure to actinomycin D and declined only slowly after cycloheximide treatment. Growth of Sindbis virus in BHK cells did not cause the marked stimulation of phospholipid synthesis seen in picornavirus infections of other mammalian cells; however, inhibition was seen only late in infection. PMID:5530011

  19. Manipulation of PrPres production in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bate, C.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Williams, A.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study the accumulation of protease resistant prion protein (PrPres) in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells (ScN2a cells) was shown to be dependent on culture conditions. The highest levels of PrPres were found in slow growing cells. Further increases in PrPres accumulation were obser

  20. Francisella Infection in Cultured Tilapia in Thailand and the Inflammatory Cytokine Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantrakajorn, Sasibha; Wongtavatchai, Janenuj

    2016-06-01

    Francisella infections developed in freshwater Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus and red tilapia Oreochromis spp. farms in Thailand during 2012-2014. The diseased fish were lethargic and pale in color and showed numerous white nodules in their enlarged spleens. Histopathological examination and electron microscopy suggested that the white nodules were multifocal granulomas consisting of coccobacilli within vacuolated cells. Isolation of Francisella-like bacteria was achieved from 42 of 100 samples, while polymerase chain reaction confirmed Francisella infections in all samples. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene from samples obtained from three different geographical culture areas revealed more than 99% similarity with F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis. The influence of Francisella infection on inflammatory cytokines was determined on splenic cells of fish intraperitoneally injected with the bacteria (0.8 × 10(5) colony-forming units per fish). Infected tilapia showed significantly greater expression of the pro-inflammatory genes interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrotic factor-α (TNF-α) within 24 h postinjection (hpi) and for up to 96 hpi. However, down-regulation of an anti-inflammatory gene, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was observed as early as 24 hpi. This investigation demonstrates that an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in response to the infection may account for the substantial number of granulomas in fish hematopoietic tissues that was found in the later stage of the disease. Received September 9, 2015; accepted December 13, 2015.

  1. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  2. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  3. Infectious salmon anaemia virus infection of Atlantic salmon gill epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weli Simon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family, infects and causes disease in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.. Previous studies have shown Atlantic salmon endothelial cells to be the primary targets of ISAV infection. However, it is not known if cells other than endothelial cells play a role in ISAV tropism. To further assess cell tropism, we examined ISAV infection of Atlantic salmon gill epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. We demonstrated the susceptibility of epithelial cells to ISAV infection. On comparison of primary gill epithelial cell cultures with ISAV permissive fish cell cultures, we found the virus yield in primary gill epithelial cells to be comparable with that of salmon head kidney (SHK-1 cells, but lower than TO or Atlantic salmon kidney (ASK-II cells. Light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed that the primary gill cells possessed characteristics consistent with epithelial cells. Virus histochemistry showed that gill epithelial cells expressed 4-O-acetylated sialic acid which is recognized as the ISAV receptor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of ISAV infection in Atlantic salmon primary gill epithelial cells. This study thus broadens our understanding of cell tropism and transmission of ISAV in Atlantic salmon.

  4. Shape memory polymers for active cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kevin A; Luo, Xiaofan; Mather, Patrick T; Henderson, James H

    2011-07-04

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a class of "smart" materials that have the ability to change from a fixed, temporary shape to a pre-determined permanent shape upon the application of a stimulus such as heat(1-5). In a typical shape memory cycle, the SMP is first deformed at an elevated temperature that is higher than its transition temperature, T(trans;) [either the melting temperature (T(m;)) or the glass transition temperature (T(g;))]. The deformation is elastic in nature and mainly leads to a reduction in conformational entropy of the constituent network chains (following the rubber elasticity theory). The deformed SMP is then cooled to a temperature below its T(trans;) while maintaining the external strain or stress constant. During cooling, the material transitions to a more rigid state (semi-crystalline or glassy), which kinetically traps or "freezes" the material in this low-entropy state leading to macroscopic shape fixing. Shape recovery is triggered by continuously heating the material through T(trans;) under a stress-free (unconstrained) condition. By allowing the network chains (with regained mobility) to relax to their thermodynamically favored, maximal-entropy state, the material changes from the temporary shape to the permanent shape. Cells are capable of surveying the mechanical properties of their surrounding environment(6). The mechanisms through which mechanical interactions between cells and their physical environment control cell behavior are areas of active research. Substrates of defined topography have emerged as powerful tools in the investigation of these mechanisms. Mesoscale, microscale, and nanoscale patterns of substrate topography have been shown to direct cell alignment, cell adhesion, and cell traction forces(7-14). These findings have underscored the potential for substrate topography to control and assay the mechanical interactions between cells and their physical environment during cell culture, but the substrates used to date

  5. NKT cells in HIV-1 infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique T cell population that have important immunoregulatory functions and have been shown to be involved in host immunity against a range of microorganisms. It also emerges that they might play a role in HIV-1 infection, and therefore be selectively depleted during the early stages of infection. Recent studies are reviewed regarding the dynamics of NKT depletion during HIV-I infection and their recovery under highly active antiretrovirai treatment (HAART). Possible mechanisms for these changes are proposed based on the recent developments in HIV pathogenesis. Further discussions are focused on HIV's disruption of NKT activation by downregulating CDId expression on antigen presentation cells (APC). HIV-1 protein Nefis found to play the major role by interrupting the intraceilular trafficking of nascent and recycling CDId molecules.

  6. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection of Endocervical Epithelial Cells Enhances Early HIV Transmission Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Lyndsey R; Amedee, Angela M; Albritton, Hannah L; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Lacour, Nedra; McGowin, Chris L; Schust, Danny J; Quayle, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis causes a predominantly asymptomatic, but generally inflammatory, genital infection that is associated with an increased risk for HIV acquisition. Endocervical epithelial cells provide the major niche for this obligate intracellular bacterium in women, and the endocervix is also a tissue in which HIV transmission can occur. The mechanism by which CT infection enhances HIV susceptibility at this site, however, is not well understood. Utilizing the A2EN immortalized endocervical epithelial cell line grown on cell culture inserts, we evaluated the direct role that CT-infected epithelial cells play in facilitating HIV transmission events. We determined that CT infection significantly enhanced the apical-to-basolateral migration of cell-associated, but not cell-free, HIVBaL, a CCR5-tropic strain of virus, across the endocervical epithelial barrier. We also established that basolateral supernatants from CT-infected A2EN cells significantly enhanced HIV replication in peripheral mononuclear cells and a CCR5+ T cell line. These results suggest that CT infection of endocervical epithelial cells could facilitate both HIV crossing the mucosal barrier and subsequent infection or replication in underlying target cells. Our studies provide a mechanism by which this common STI could potentially promote the establishment of founder virus populations and the maintenance of local HIV reservoirs in the endocervix. Development of an HIV/STI co-infection model also provides a tool to further explore the role of other sexually transmitted infections in enhancing HIV acquisition.

  7. Modelling and analysis of dynamics of viral infection of cells and of interferon resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getto, Ph.; Kimmel, M.; Marciniak-Czochra, A.

    2008-08-01

    Interferons are active biomolecules, which help fight viral infections by spreading from infected to uninfected cells and activate effector molecules, which confer resistance from the virus on cells. We propose a new model of dynamics of viral infection, including endocytosis, cell death, production of interferon and development of resistance. The novel element is a specific biologically justified mechanism of interferon action, which results in dynamics different from other infection models. The model reflects conditions prevailing in liquid cultures (ideal mixing), and the absence of cells or virus influx from outside. The basic model is a nonlinear system of five ordinary differential equations. For this variant, it is possible to characterise global behaviour, using a conservation law. Analytic results are supplemented by computational studies. The second variant of the model includes age-of-infection structure of infected cells, which is described by a transport-type partial differential equation for infected cells. The conclusions are: (i) If virus mortality is included, the virus becomes eventually extinct and subpopulations of uninfected and resistant cells are established. (ii) If virus mortality is not included, the dynamics may lead to extinction of uninfected cells. (iii) Switching off the interferon defense results in a decrease of the sum total of uninfected and resistant cells. (iv) Infection-age structure of infected cells may result in stabilisation or destabilisation of the system, depending on detailed assumptions. Our work seems to constitute the first comprehensive mathematical analysis of the cell-virus-interferon system based on biologically plausible hypotheses.

  8. Microanalysis of gene expression in cultured cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van der Veer (Eveliene)

    1982-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis two aspects of gene expression in cultured cells have been studied: the heterogeneity in gene expression in relation with the development and application of microchemical techniques for the prenatal diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism and the possibility of inducing g

  9. 3D culture for cardiac cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppinger, Christian

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses historical milestones, recent developments and challenges in the area of 3D culture models with cardiovascular cell types. Expectations in this area have been raised in recent years, but more relevant in vitro research, more accurate drug testing results, reliable disease models and insights leading to bioartificial organs are expected from the transition to 3D cell culture. However, the construction of organ-like cardiac 3D models currently remains a difficult challenge. The heart consists of highly differentiated cells in an intricate arrangement.Furthermore, electrical “wiring”, a vascular system and multiple cell types act in concert to respond to the rapidly changing demands of the body. Although cardiovascular 3D culture models have been predominantly developed for regenerative medicine in the past, their use in drug screening and for disease models has become more popular recently. Many sophisticated 3D culture models are currently being developed in this dynamic area of life science. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  10. Cell Culture Microfluidic Biochips: Experimental Throughput Maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips offer a promising alternative to a conventional biochemical laboratory, integrating all necessary functionalities on-chip in order to perform biochemical applications. Researchers have started to propose computer-aided design tools for the synthesis of such biochips. Our focus...... metaheuristic for experimental design generation for the cell culture microfluidic biochips, and we have evaluated our approach using multiple experimental setups....

  11. [Drosophila melanogaster Cell Culture as an Experimental Model to Study Recombination in Wolbachia pipientis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryacheva, I I; Gorelova, T V; Andrianov, B V

    2015-12-01

    Wolbachiapipientis is an obligate intracellular endosymbiont that commonly infects arthropods. Comparative genomic studies of Wolbachia reveal traces of numerous events of intergenic and intragenic recombination. The molecular mechanisms of recombination in Wolbachia are not currently known. We conducted experimental verification of the possibility of recombination of two strains of Wolbachia: wMel and wRi, after using these strains for double infection of the Dm2008Wb1 (D. melanogaster) cell culture clone permissive to Wolbachia. We obtained cell culture subclones with double Wolbachia infection and subclones infected only by strain wMel. Dual infection with the Wolbachia strains wMel and wRi has been stably maintained in the subclones for two years. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of the obtained subclones revealed the presence of dual infection for all five Wolbachia genes used for MLST Cloning and nucleotide sequence analysis of individual forms of the fbpA gene of Wolbachia from cell clones with dual infection showed intragenic recombination events between strains wMel and wRi, which occurred in the permanent D. melanogaster culture cell culture. The fact that putative recombination sites contain no insertions of nucleotide sequences of phages or IS elements, as well as the asymmetrical character of recombinants, favors the hypothesis that gene conversion is the most probable molecular mechanism of recombination in Wolbachia.

  12. Differences between Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Latent Tuberculous Infection of Mice Ex Vivo and Mycobacterial Infection of Mouse Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The search for factors that account for the reproduction and survival of mycobacteria, including vaccine strains, in host cells is the priority for studies on tuberculosis. A comparison of BCG-mycobacterial loads in granuloma cells obtained from bone marrow and spleens of mice with latent tuberculous infection and cells from mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophage cultures infected with the BCG vaccine in vitro has demonstrated that granuloma macrophages each normally contained a single BCG-Mycobacterium, while those acutely infected in vitro had increased mycobacterial loads and death rates. Mouse granuloma cells were observed to produce the IFNγ, IL-1α, GM-CSF, CD1d, CD25, CD31, СD35, and S100 proteins. None of these activation markers were found in mouse cell cultures infected in vitro or in intact macrophages. Lack of colocalization of lipoarabinomannan-labeled BCG-mycobacteria with the lysosomotropic LysoTracker dye in activated granuloma macrophages suggests that these macrophages were unable to destroy BCG-mycobacteria. However, activated mouse granuloma macrophages could control mycobacterial reproduction in cells both in vivo and in ex vivo culture. By contrast, a considerable increase in the number of BCG-mycobacteria was observed in mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophages after BCG infection in vitro, when no expression of the activation-related molecules was detected in these cells.

  13. Does health care role and experience influence perception of safety culture related to preventing infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Barbara I; Harris, Anthony D; Richards, Cheryl L; Belton, Beverly M; Dembry, Louise-Marie; Morton, David J; Xiao, Yan

    2013-07-01

    Growing evidence reveals the importance of improving safety culture in efforts to eliminate health care-associated infections. This multisite, cross-sectional survey examined the association between professional role and health care experience on infection prevention safety culture at 5 hospitals. The findings suggest that frontline health care technicians are less directly engaged in improvement efforts and safety education than other staff and that infection prevention safety culture varies more by hospital than by staff position and experience.

  14. Nanotechnology, Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Haraguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have fabricated new types of polymer hydrogels and polymer nanocomposites, i.e., nanocomposite gels (NC gels and soft, polymer nanocomposites (M-NCs: solid, with novel organic/inorganic network structures. Both NC gels and M-NCs were synthesized by in-situ free-radical polymerization in the presence of exfoliated clay platelets in aqueous systems and were obtained in various forms such as film, sheet, tube, coating, etc. and sizes with a wide range of clay contents. Here, disk-like inorganic clay nanoparticles act as multi-functional crosslinkers to form new types of network systems. Both NC gels and M-NCs have extraordinary optical and mechanical properties including ultra-high reversible extensibility, as well as a number of new characteristics relating to optical anisotropy, polymer/clay morphology, biocompatibility, stimuli-sensitive surfaces, micro-patterning, etc. For examples, the biological testing of medical devices, comprised of a sensitization test, an irritation test, an intracutaneous test and an in vitro cytotoxicity test,was carried out for NC gels and M-NCs. The safety of NC gels and M-NCs was confirmed in all tests. Also, the interaction of living tissue with NC gel was investigated in vivo by implantation in live goats; neither inflammation nor concrescence occurred around the NC gels. Furthermore, it was found that both N-NC gels consisting of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide(PNIPA/clay network and M-NCs consisting of poly(2-methoxyethyacrylate(PMEA/clay network show characteristic cell culture and subsequent cell detachment on their surfaces, although it was almost impossible to culture cells on conventional, chemically-crosslinked PNIPA hydrogels and chemically crossslinked PMEA, regardless of their crosslinker concentration. Various kinds of cells, such ashumanhepatoma cells (HepG2, normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, could be cultured to be confluent on the surfaces of N

  15. Mutations Inactivating Herpes Simplex Virus 1 MicroRNA miR-H2 Do Not Detectably Increase ICP0 Gene Expression in Infected Cultured Cells or Mouse Trigeminal Ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dongli; Pesola, Jean M; Li, Gang; McCarron, Seamus; Coen, Donald M

    2017-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) latency entails the repression of productive ("lytic") gene expression. An attractive hypothesis to explain some of this repression involves inhibition of the expression of ICP0, a lytic gene activator, by a viral microRNA, miR-H2, which is completely complementary to ICP0 mRNA. To test this hypothesis, we engineered mutations that disrupt miR-H2 without affecting ICP0 in HSV-1. The mutant virus exhibited drastically reduced expression of miR-H2 but showed wild-type levels of infectious virus production and no increase in ICP0 expression in lytically infected cells, which is consistent with the weak expression of miR-H2 relative to the level of ICP0 mRNA in that setting. Following corneal inoculation of mice, the mutant was not significantly different from wild-type virus in terms of infectious virus production in the trigeminal ganglia during acute infection, mouse mortality, or the rate of reactivation from explanted latently infected ganglia. Critically, the mutant was indistinguishable from wild-type virus for the expression of ICP0 and other lytic genes in acutely and latently infected mouse trigeminal ganglia. The latter result may be related to miR-H2 being less effective in inhibiting ICP0 expression in transfection assays than a host microRNA, miR-138, which has previously been shown to inhibit lytic gene expression in infected ganglia by targeting ICP0 mRNA. Additionally, transfected miR-138 reduced lytic gene expression in infected cells more effectively than miR-H2. While this study provides little support for the hypothesis that miR-H2 promotes latency by inhibiting ICP0 expression, the possibility remains that miR-H2 might target other genes during latency.

  16. Establishment of persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in MDBK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopliku, Lela; Relmy, Anthony; Romey, Aurore; Gorna, Kamila; Zientara, Stephan; Bakkali-Kassimi, Labib; Blaise-Boisseau, Sandra

    2015-10-01

    In addition to acute infection and disease, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) can cause persistent infection in ruminants. Such "carrier" animals represent a potential risk for FMDV transmission to susceptible animals. However, the mechanisms and the factors that determine FMDV persistence remain unknown. We describe here the establishment of FMDV type O persistent infection in a bovine epithelial cell line (Madin-Darby bovine kidney; MDBK). Preliminary experiments to assess the permissivity of MDBK cells to FMDV O infection revealed an unusual pattern of infection: after the initial phase of acute cell lysis, new monolayers formed within 48-72 h post-infection. We found that some cells survived cytolytic infection and subsequently regrew, thereby demonstrating that this bovine cell line can be persistently infected with FMDV type O. Further evidence that MDBK cells were persistently infected with FMDV includes: (i) detection of viral RNA in cells as well as in cell culture supernatants, (ii) detection of viral antigens in the cells by immunofluorescence analysis, and (iii) production of infectious viral particles for up to 36 cell passages. Furthermore, preliminary sequence analysis of persistent virus revealed a single nucleotide substitution within the VP1 coding region, resulting in the V50A amino acid substitution. This bovine model of FMDV persistence holds promise for the investigation of the viral and cellular molecular determinants that promote FMDV persistence.

  17. Whole genome characterization of non-tissue culture adapted HRSV strains in severely infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaria Rajni

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is the most important virus causing lower respiratory infection in young children. The complete genetic characterization of RSV clinical strains is a prerequisite for understanding HRSV infection in the clinical context. Current information about the genetic structure of the HRSV genome has largely been obtained using tissue culture adapted viruses. During tissue culture adaptation genetic changes can be introduced into the virus genome, which may obscure subtle variations in the genetic structure of different RSV strains. Methods In this study we describe a novel Sanger sequencing strategy which allowed the complete genetic characterisation of 14 clinical HRSV strains. The viruses were sequenced directly in the nasal washes of severely hospitalized children, and without prior passage of the viruses in tissue culture. Results The analysis of nucleotide sequences suggested that vRNA length is a variable factor among primary strains, while the phylogenetic analysis suggests selective pressure for change. The G gene showed the greatest sequence variation (2-6.4%, while small hydrophobic protein and matrix genes were completely conserved across all clinical strains studied. A number of sequence changes in the F, L, M2-1 and M2-2 genes were observed that have not been described in laboratory isolates. The gene junction regions showed more sequence variability, and in particular the intergenic regions showed a highest level of sequence variation. Although the clinical strains grew slower than the HRSVA2 virus isolate in tissue culture, the HRSVA2 isolate and clinical strains formed similar virus structures such as virus filaments and inclusion bodies in infected cells; supporting the clinical relevance of these virus structures. Conclusion This is the first report to describe the complete genetic characterization of HRSV clinical strains that have been sequenced directly from clinical

  18. Cell Culture Microfluidic Biochips: Experimental Throughput Maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips offer a promising alternative to a conventional biochemical laboratory, integrating all necessary functionalities on-chip in order to perform biochemical applications. Researchers have started to propose computer-aided design tools for the synthesis of such biochips. Our foc...... metaheuristic for experimental design generation for the cell culture microfluidic biochips, and we have evaluated our approach using multiple experimental setups....... in this paper is on the optimization of how a biochemical application is performed on a biochip. In this paper, we consider cell culture biochips, where several cell colonies are exposed to soluble compounds and monitored in real-time to determine the right combination of factors that leads to the desired...

  19. Use of an adaptable cell culture kit for performing lymphocyte and monocyte cell cultures in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, J. P.; Lewis, M. L.; Roquefeuil, S. B.; Chaput, D.; Cazenave, J. P.; Schmitt, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    The results of experiments performed in recent years on board facilities such as the Space Shuttle/Spacelab have demonstrated that many cell systems, ranging from simple bacteria to mammalian cells, are sensitive to the microgravity environment, suggesting gravity affects fundamental cellular processes. However, performing well-controlled experiments aboard spacecraft offers unique challenges to the cell biologist. Although systems such as the European 'Biorack' provide generic experiment facilities including an incubator, on-board 1-g reference centrifuge, and contained area for manipulations, the experimenter must still establish a system for performing cell culture experiments that is compatible with the constraints of spaceflight. Two different cell culture kits developed by the French Space Agency, CNES, were recently used to perform a series of experiments during four flights of the 'Biorack' facility aboard the Space Shuttle. The first unit, Generic Cell Activation Kit 1 (GCAK-1), contains six separate culture units per cassette, each consisting of a culture chamber, activator chamber, filtration system (permitting separation of cells from supernatant in-flight), injection port, and supernatant collection chamber. The second unit (GCAK-2) also contains six separate culture units, including a culture, activator, and fixation chambers. Both hardware units permit relatively complex cell culture manipulations without extensive use of spacecraft resources (crew time, volume, mass, power), or the need for excessive safety measures. Possible operations include stimulation of cultures with activators, separation of cells from supernatant, fixation/lysis, manipulation of radiolabelled reagents, and medium exchange. Investigations performed aboard the Space Shuttle in six different experiments used Jurkat, purified T-cells or U937 cells, the results of which are reported separately. We report here the behaviour of Jurkat and U937 cells in the GCAK hardware in ground

  20. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  1. Cell-to-cell contact of human monocytes with infected arterial smooth-muscle cells enhances growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puolakkainen, Mirja; Campbell, Lee Ann; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Richards, Theresa; Patton, Dorothy L; Kuo, Cho-Chou

    2003-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect arterial cells. It has been shown that coculture of human monocytes (U937) and endothelial cells promotes infection of C. pneumoniae in endothelial cells and that the enhancement was mediated by a soluble factor (insulin-like growth factor 2) secreted by monocytes. In this study, it is shown that coculture of monocytes with C. pneumoniae enhances infection of C. pneumoniae in arterial smooth-muscle cells 5.3-fold at a monocyte-to-smooth-muscle cell ratio of 5. However, unlike endothelial cells, no enhancement was observed if monocytes were placed in cell culture inserts or if conditioned medium from monocyte cultures was used, which suggests that cell-to-cell contact is critical. The addition of mannose 6-phosphate or octyl glucoside, a nonionic detergent containing a sugar group, to cocultures inhibited the enhancement. These findings suggest that the monocyte-smooth-muscle cell interaction may be mediated by mannose 6-phosphate receptors present on monocytes.

  2. Inhibition of apoptosis in neuronal cells infected with Chlamydophila (Chlamydia pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Elizabeth V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydophila (Chlamydia pneumoniae is an intracellular bacterium that has been identified within cells in areas of neuropathology found in Alzheimer disease (AD, including endothelia, glia, and neurons. Depending on the cell type of the host, infection by C. pneumoniae has been shown to influence apoptotic pathways in both pro- and anti-apoptotic fashions. We have hypothesized that persistent chlamydial infection of neurons may be an important mediator of the characteristic neuropathology observed in AD brains. Chronic and/or persistent infection of neuronal cells with C. pneumoniae in the AD brain may affect apoptosis in cells containing chlamydial inclusions. Results SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells were infected with the respiratory strain of C. pneumoniae, AR39 at an MOI of 1. Following infection, the cells were either untreated or treated with staurosporine and then examined for apoptosis by labeling for nuclear fragmentation, caspase activity, and membrane inversion as indicated by annexin V staining. C. pneumoniae infection was maintained through 10 days post-infection. At 3 and 10 days post-infection, the infected cell cultures appeared to inhibit or were resistant to the apoptotic process when induced by staurosporine. This inhibition was demonstrated quantitatively by nuclear profile counts and caspase 3/7 activity measurements. Conclusion These data suggest that C. pneumoniae can sustain a chronic infection in neuronal cells by interfering with apoptosis, which may contribute to chronic inflammation in the AD brain.

  3. Altered T cell surface glycosylation in HIV-1 infection results in increased susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantéri, Marion; Giordanengo, Valérie; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel; Auberger, Patrick; Fukuda, Minoru; Baum, Linda G; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2003-12-01

    The massive T cell death that occurs in HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection contributes profoundly to the pathophysiology associated with AIDS. The mechanisms controlling cell death of both infected and uninfected T cells ("bystander" death) are not completely understood. We have shown that HIV-1 infection of T cells results in altered glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins; specifically, it decreased sialylation and increased expression of core 2 O-glycans. Galectin-1 is an endogenous human lectin that recognizes these types of glycosylation changes and induces cell death of activated lymphocytes. Therefore we studied the possible contribution of galectin-1 in the pathophysiology of AIDS. O-glycan modifications were investigated on peripheral lymphocytes from AIDS patients. Oligosaccharides from CD43 and CD45 of CEM cells latently infected with HIV-1 were chemically analyzed. Consistent with our previous results, we show that HIV-1 infection results in accumulation of exposed lactosamine residues, oligosaccharides recognized by galectin-1 on cell surface glycoproteins. Both latently HIV-1-infected T cell lines and peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells from AIDS patients exhibited exposed lactosamine residues and demonstrated marked susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, in contrast to control cultures or cells from uninfected donors. The fraction of cells that died in response to galectin-1 exceeded the fraction of infected cells, indicating that death of uninfected cells occurred. Altered cell surface glycosylation of T cells during HIV-1 infection increases the susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, and this death pathway can contribute to loss of both infected and uninfected T cells in AIDS.

  4. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Isegawa, Naohisa [Laboratory Animal Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Shirasawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: sirasawa@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  5. Amyloid-beta peptide degradation in cell cultures by mycoplasma contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haitian; Dreses-Werringloer, Ute; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe

    2008-06-30

    Cell cultures have become an indispensable tool in Alzheimer's disease research for studying amyloid-beta (Abeta) metabolism. It is estimated that up to 35% of cell cultures in current use are infected with various mycoplasma species. In contrast with common bacterial and fungal infections, contaminations of cell cultures with mycoplasmas represent a challenging issue in terms of detectability and prevention. Mycoplasmas are the smallest and simplest self-replicating bacteria and the consequences of an infection for the host cells are variable, ranging from no apparent effect to induction of apoptosis. Here we present evidence that mycoplasmas from a cell culture contamination are able to efficiently and rapidly degrade extracellular Abeta. As a result, we observed no accumulation of Abeta in the conditioned medium of mycoplasma-positive cells stably transfected with the amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP). Importantly, eradication of the mycoplasma contaminant - identified as M. hyorhinis - by treatments with a quinolone-based antibiotic, restored extracellular Abeta accumulation in the APP-transfected cells. These data show that mycoplasmas degrade Abeta and thus may represent a significant source of variability when comparing extracellular Abeta levels in different cell lines. On the basis of these results, we recommend assessment of mycoplasma contaminations prior to extracellular Abeta level measurements in cultured cells.

  6. Culturing of retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtink, Monika; Engelmann, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a monolayer of cells adjacent to the photoreceptors of the retina. It plays a crucial role in maintaining photoreceptor health and survival. Degeneration or dysfunction of the RPE can lead to photoreceptor degeneration and as a consequence to visual impairment. The most common diseased state of the RPE becomes manifest in age-related macular degeneration, an increasing cause of blindness in the elderly. RPE cells are therefore of great interest to researchers working in the field of tissue engineering and cell transplantation. In fact, studies in animal models have proven that the transplantation of RPE cells can delay the course of photoreceptor degenerative diseases. Although first attempts to transplant RPE cells into the subretinal space in human individuals suffering from age-related macular degeneration were less successful, RPE cell transplantation is still favored as a future therapeutic option, and much work is done to develop and design cell transplants. Cell banking is a prerequisite to have well-differentiated and characterized cells at hand when needed for research purposes, but also for therapeutic approaches. In this chapter the authors will describe methods to isolate, culture and preserve adult human RPE cells for the purpose of RPE cell banking. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. A bovine cell line that can be infected by natural sheep scrapie prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelschlegel, Anja M; Geissen, Markus; Lenk, Matthias; Riebe, Roland; Angermann, Marlies; Schatzl, Herman; Schaetzl, Hermann; Groschup, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture systems represent a crucial part in basic prion research; yet, cell lines that are susceptible to prions, especially to field isolated prions that were not adapted to rodents, are very rare. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize a cell line that was susceptible to ruminant-derived prions and to establish a stable prion infection within it. Based on species and tissue of origin as well as PrP expression rate, we pre-selected a total of 33 cell lines that were then challenged with natural and with mouse propagated BSE or scrapie inocula. Here, we report the successful infection of a non-transgenic bovine cell line, a sub-line of the bovine kidney cell line MDBK, with natural sheep scrapie prions. This cell line retained the scrapie infection for more than 200 passages. Selective cloning resulted in cell populations with increased accumulation of PrPres, although this treatment was not mandatory for retaining the infection. The infection remained stable, even under suboptimal culture conditions. The resulting infectivity of the cells was confirmed by mouse bioassay (Tgbov mice, Tgshp mice). We believe that PES cells used together with other prion permissive cell lines will prove a valuable tool for ongoing efforts to understand and defeat prions and prion diseases.

  8. A bovine cell line that can be infected by natural sheep scrapie prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja M Oelschlegel

    Full Text Available Cell culture systems represent a crucial part in basic prion research; yet, cell lines that are susceptible to prions, especially to field isolated prions that were not adapted to rodents, are very rare. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize a cell line that was susceptible to ruminant-derived prions and to establish a stable prion infection within it. Based on species and tissue of origin as well as PrP expression rate, we pre-selected a total of 33 cell lines that were then challenged with natural and with mouse propagated BSE or scrapie inocula. Here, we report the successful infection of a non-transgenic bovine cell line, a sub-line of the bovine kidney cell line MDBK, with natural sheep scrapie prions. This cell line retained the scrapie infection for more than 200 passages. Selective cloning resulted in cell populations with increased accumulation of PrPres, although this treatment was not mandatory for retaining the infection. The infection remained stable, even under suboptimal culture conditions. The resulting infectivity of the cells was confirmed by mouse bioassay (Tgbov mice, Tgshp mice. We believe that PES cells used together with other prion permissive cell lines will prove a valuable tool for ongoing efforts to understand and defeat prions and prion diseases.

  9. Organotypic slice cultures from rat brain tissue: a new approach for Naegleria fowleri CNS infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianinazzi, C; Schild, M; Müller, N; Leib, S L; Simon, F; Nuñez, S; Joss, P; Gottstein, B

    2005-12-01

    The free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is the aetiological agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a disease leading to death in the vast majority of cases. In patients suffering from PAM, and in corresponding animal models, the brain undergoes a massive inflammatory response, followed by haemorrhage and severe tissue necrosis. Both, in vivo and in vitro models are currently being used to study PAM infection. However, animal models may pose ethical issues, are dependent upon availability of specific infrastructural facilities, and are time-consuming and costly. Conversely, cell cultures lack the complex organ-specific morphology found in vivo, and thus, findings obtained in vitro do not necessarily reflect the situation in vivo. The present study reports infection of organotypic slice cultures from rat brain with N. fowleri and compares the findings in this culture system with in vivo infection in a rat model of PAM, that proved complementary to that of mice. We found that brain morphology, as present in vivo, is well retained in organotypic slice cultures, and that infection time-course including tissue damage parallels the observations in vivo in the rat. Therefore, organotypic slice cultures from rat brain offer a new in vitro approach to study N. fowleri infection in the context of PAM.

  10. Cells in Dengue Virus Infection In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sansanee Noisakran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue has been recognized as one of the most important vector-borne emerging infectious diseases globally. Though dengue normally causes a self-limiting infection, some patients may develop a life-threatening illness, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF/dengue shock syndrome (DSS. The reason why DHF/DSS occurs in certain individuals is unclear. Studies in the endemic regions suggest that the preexisting antibodies are a risk factor for DHF/DSS. Viremia and thrombocytopenia are the key clinical features of dengue virus infection in patients. The amounts of virus circulating in patients are highly correlated with severe dengue disease, DHF/DSS. Also, the disturbance, mainly a transient depression, of hematological cells is a critical clinical finding in acute dengue patients. However, the cells responsible for the dengue viremia are unresolved in spite of the intensive efforts been made. Dengue virus appears to replicate and proliferate in many adapted cell lines, but these in vitro properties are extremely difficult to be reproduced in primary cells or in vivo. This paper summarizes reports on the permissive cells in vitro and in vivo and suggests a hematological cell lineage for dengue virus infection in vivo, with the hope that a new focus will shed light on further understanding of the complexities of dengue disease.

  11. Susceptibility of human lymphoid tissue cultured ex vivo to xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Curriu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was generated after a recombination event between two endogenous murine leukemia viruses during the production of a prostate cancer cell line. Although the associations of the XMRV infection with human diseases appear unlikely, the XMRV is a retrovirus of undefined pathogenic potential, able to replicate in human cells in vitro. Since recent studies using animal models for infection have yielded conflicting results, we set out an ex vivo model for XMRV infection of human tonsillar tissue to determine whether XMRV produced by 22Rv1 cells is able to replicate in human lymphoid organs. Tonsil blocks were infected and infection kinetics and its pathogenic effects were monitored RESULTS: XMRV, though restricted by APOBEC, enters and integrates into the tissue cells. The infection did not result in changes of T or B-cells, immune activation, nor inflammatory chemokines. Infectious viruses could be recovered from supernatants of infected tonsils by reinfecting DERSE XMRV indicator cell line, although these supernatants could not establish a new infection in fresh tonsil culture, indicating that in our model, the viral replication is controlled by innate antiviral restriction factors. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the replication-competent retrovirus XMRV, present in a high number of laboratories, is able to infect human lymphoid tissue and produce infectious viruses, even though they were unable to establish a new infection in fresh tonsillar tissue. Hereby, laboratories working with cell lines producing XMRV should have knowledge and understanding of the potential biological biohazardous risks of this virus.

  12. Ribavirin Inhibits Parrot Bornavirus 4 Replication in Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Jeffrey M B; Heatley, J Jill; Koinis, Anastasia V; Suchodolski, Paulette F; Guo, Jianhua; Escandon, Paulina; Tizard, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Parrot bornavirus 4 is an etiological agent of proventricular dilatation disease, a fatal neurologic and gastrointestinal disease of psittacines and other birds. We tested the ability of ribavirin, an antiviral nucleoside analog with antiviral activity against a range of RNA and DNA viruses, to inhibit parrot bornavirus 4 replication in duck embryonic fibroblast cells. Two analytical methods that evaluate different products of viral replication, indirect immunocytochemistry for viral specific nucleoprotein and qRT-PCR for viral specific phosphoprotein gene mRNA, were used. Ribavirin at concentrations between 2.5 and 25 μg/mL inhibited parrot bornavirus 4 replication, decreasing viral mRNA and viral protein load, in infected duck embryonic fibroblast cells. The addition of guanosine diminished the antiviral activity of ribavirin suggesting that one possible mechanism of action against parrot bornavirus 4 may likely be through inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibition. This study demonstrates parrot bornavirus 4 susceptibility to ribavirin in cell culture.

  13. Ribavirin Inhibits Parrot Bornavirus 4 Replication in Cell Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M B Musser

    Full Text Available Parrot bornavirus 4 is an etiological agent of proventricular dilatation disease, a fatal neurologic and gastrointestinal disease of psittacines and other birds. We tested the ability of ribavirin, an antiviral nucleoside analog with antiviral activity against a range of RNA and DNA viruses, to inhibit parrot bornavirus 4 replication in duck embryonic fibroblast cells. Two analytical methods that evaluate different products of viral replication, indirect immunocytochemistry for viral specific nucleoprotein and qRT-PCR for viral specific phosphoprotein gene mRNA, were used. Ribavirin at concentrations between 2.5 and 25 μg/mL inhibited parrot bornavirus 4 replication, decreasing viral mRNA and viral protein load, in infected duck embryonic fibroblast cells. The addition of guanosine diminished the antiviral activity of ribavirin suggesting that one possible mechanism of action against parrot bornavirus 4 may likely be through inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibition. This study demonstrates parrot bornavirus 4 susceptibility to ribavirin in cell culture.

  14. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: carolina_sm@hotmail.com; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that {sup 60}Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  15. Adenovirus respiratory infection: significant increase in diagnosis using PCR comparing with antigen detection and culture methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenice Stroparo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (AdV respiratory infections are usually described as being associated with high mortality rates. Laboratory diagnosis is essential for the establishment of the appropriate therapy, and for guiding the implementation of preventive measures in order to prevent the spread of the infection. Aiming to analyze the sensitivity and specificity of the laboratorial diagnosis methods available, we compared antigen detection by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IF, and a specific nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR, to detect AdV in respiratory samples collected from patients admitted to hospital with acute respiratory disease. Positive samples were inoculated into a cell culture to confirm the results. We analyzed 381 samples from the nasopharyngeal aspirates collected during the year 2008; of these, 2.6% tested were positive for adenovirus through IF and 10% through PCR; positive isolation was obtained in 40% and 26% of these cases, respectively. Most infected patients were children under six months of age, and despite of the fact that a significant number of patients required intensive care, the mortality rate was low (5%. In conclusion, molecular methods were found to be useful for rapid diagnosis of adenovirus infections with higher sensitivity than antigen detection; their introduction permitted a significant increase in diagnoses of adenovirus infections.

  16. Inhibition of Interjacent Ribonucleic Acid (26S) Synthesis in Cells Infected by Sindbis Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, Christina M.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1969-01-01

    The interrelationship of viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) and protein synthesis in cells infected by Sindbis virus was investigated. When cultures were treated with puromycin early in the course of infection, the synthesis of interjacent RNA (26S) was preferentially inhibited. A similar result was obtained by shifting cells infected by one temperature-sensitive mutant defective in RNA synthesis from the permissive (29 C) to the nonpermissive (41.5 C) temperature. Under both conditions, the viral RNA produced appeared to be fully active biologically. Once underway, the synthesis of viral RNA in wild-type Sindbis infections did not require concomitant protein synthesis. PMID:5817400

  17. Human ES cells: starting culture from frozen cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trish, Erin; Dimos, John; Eggan, Kevin

    2006-11-09

    Here we demonstrate how our lab begins a HuES human embryonic stem cell line culture from a frozen stock. First, a one to two day old ten cm plate of approximately one (to two) million irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cells is rinsed with HuES media to remove residual serum and cell debris, and then HuES media added and left to equilibrate in the cell culture incubator. A frozen vial of cells from long term liquid nitrogen storage or a -80 C freezer is sourced and quickly submerged in a 37 C water bath for quick thawing. Cells in freezing media are then removed from the vial and placed in a large volume of HuES media. The large volume of HuES media facilitates removal of excess serum and DMSO, which can cause HuES human embryonic stem cells to differentiate. Cells are gently spun out of suspension, and then re-suspended in a small volume of fresh HuES media that is then used to seed the MEF plate. It is considered important to seed the MEF plate by gently adding the HuES cells in a drop wise fashion to evenly disperse them throughout the plate. The newly established HuES culture plate is returned to the incubator for 48 hrs before media is replaced, then is fed every 24 hours thereafter.

  18. Quantitative proteomics of Spodoptera frugiperda cells during growth and baculovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinhas, Nuno; Robitaille, Aaron Mark; Moes, Suzette; Carrondo, Manuel José Teixeira; Jenoe, Paul; Oliveira, Rui; Alves, Paula Marques

    2011-01-01

    Baculovirus infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells is a system of choice to produce a range of recombinant proteins, vaccines and, potentially, gene therapy vectors. While baculovirus genomes are well characterized, the genome of S. frugiperda is not sequenced and the virus-host molecular interplay is sparsely known. Herein, we describe the application of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to obtain the first comparative proteome quantitation of S. frugiperda cells during growth and early baculovirus infection. The proteome coverage was maximized by compiling a search database with protein annotations from insect species. Of interest were differentially proteins related to energy metabolism, endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress, yet not investigated in the scope of baculovirus infection. Further, the reduced expression of key viral-encoded proteins early in the infection cycle is suggested to be related with decreased viral replication at high cell density culture. These findings have implications for virological research and improvement of baculovirus-based bioprocesses.

  19. Mouse cell culture - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The mouse is, out of any doubt, the experimental animal par excellence for many many colleagues within the scientific community, notably for those working in mammalian biology (in a broad sense, from basic genetic to modeling human diseases, starting at least from 1664 Robert Hooke experiments on air’s propertyn. Not surprising then that mouse cell cultures is a well established field of research itself and that there are several handbooks devoted to this discipline. Here, Andrew Ward and David Tosh provide a necessary update of the protocols currently needed. In fact, nearly half of the book is devoted to stem cells culture protocols, mainly embryonic, from a list of several organs (kidney, lung, oesophagus and intestine, pancreas and liver to mention some........

  20. Sequencing technologies for animal cell culture research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremkow, Benjamin G; Lee, Kelvin H

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, 2nd and 3rd generation sequencing technologies have made the use of genomic sequencing within the animal cell culture community increasingly commonplace. Each technology's defining characteristics are unique, including the cost, time, sequence read length, daily throughput, and occurrence of sequence errors. Given each sequencing technology's intrinsic advantages and disadvantages, the optimal technology for a given experiment depends on the particular experiment's objective. This review discusses the current characteristics of six next-generation sequencing technologies, compares the differences between them, and characterizes their relevance to the animal cell culture community. These technologies are continually improving, as evidenced by the recent achievement of the field's benchmark goal: sequencing a human genome for less than $1,000.

  1. B-cell responses to HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, Susan; Fauci, Anthony S

    2017-01-01

    The induction of neutralizing antibodies directed against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has received considerable attention in recent years, in part driven by renewed interest and opportunities for antibody-based strategies for prevention such as passive transfer of antibodies and the development of preventive vaccines, as well as immune-based therapeutic interventions. Advances in the ability to screen, isolate, and characterize HIV-specific antibodies have led to the identification of a new generation of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). The majority of these antibodies have been isolated from B cells of chronically HIV-infected individuals with detectable viremia. In this review, we provide insight into the phenotypic and functional attributes of human B cells, with a focus on HIV-specific memory B cells and plasmablasts/cells that are responsible for sustaining humoral immune responses against HIV. We discuss the abnormalities in B cells that occur in HIV infection both in the peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues, especially in the setting of persisting viremia. Finally, we consider the opportunities and drawbacks of intensively interrogating antibodies isolated from HIV-infected individuals to guide strategies aimed at developing effective antibody-based vaccine and therapeutic interventions for HIV. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Mouse cell culture: methods and protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Elvira M. Guerra Shinohara

    2010-01-01

    The mouse is, out of any doubt, the experimental animal par excellence for many many colleagues within the scientific community, notably for those working in mammalian biology (in a broad sense, from basic genetic to modeling human diseases), starting at least from 1664 Robert Hooke experiments on air’s propertyn. Not surprising then that mouse cell cultures is a well established field of research itself and that there are several handbooks devoted to this discipline. Here, Andrew Ward ...

  3. Embryo forming cells in carrot suspension cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Toonen, M.A.J.

    1997-01-01

    Somatic cells of many plant species can be cultured in vitro and induced to form embryos that are able to develop into mature plants. This process, termed somatic embryogenesis, was originally described in carrot (Daucus carota L.). Somatic embryos develop through the same characteristic morphological stages, i.e. the globular-, heartand torpedo-stage respectively, as their zygotic counterparts. Due to the different cellular origin of somatic embryos, it is less clear to what extent the earli...

  4. PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF CELL CULTURE JATROPHA CURCAS

    OpenAIRE

    KOMAR RUSLAN; ARTRI; ELFAHMI

    2011-01-01

    Jatropha curcas belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family which has potential economically. This plant has been reported to contain toxic compounds such as curcin and phorbol ester and its derivatives. These compounds may become a problem if J. curcas will be explored as a source of biofuel. In order to provide safety plants, the research on the study of phytochemical and initiation of cell and organ culture have been carried out. J curcas which has been collected from different regions in Indonesi...

  5. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus DNA in cultured human glial cells by means of the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjaerg, L L; Hansen, J E; Dalbøge, H;

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of viral genomic sequences in latently infected cells. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus in cultures of human glial cells was demonstrated, using nucleic acid amplification followed by dot blot...

  6. Infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells transmit latent varicella zoster virus infection to the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lin; Wang, Mingli; Chen, Jason J; Gershon, Michael D; Gershon, Anne A

    2014-10-01

    Latent wild-type (WT) and vaccine (vOka) varicella zoster virus (VZV) are found in the human enteric nervous system (ENS). VZV also infects guinea pig enteric neurons in vitro, establishes latency and can be reactivated. We therefore determined whether lymphocytes infected in vitro with VZV secrete infectious virions and can transfer infection in vivo to the ENS of recipient guinea pigs. T lymphocytes (CD3-immunoreactive) were preferentially infected following co-culture of guinea pig or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with VZV-infected HELF. VZV proliferated in the infected T cells and expressed immediate early and late VZV genes. Electron microscopy confirmed that VZV-infected T cells produced encapsulated virions. Extracellular virus, however, was pleomorphic, suggesting degradation occurred prior to release, which was confirmed by the failure of VZV-infected T cells to secrete infectious virions. Intravenous injection of WT- or vOka-infected PBMCs, nevertheless, transmitted VZV to recipient animals (guinea pig > human lymphocytes). Two days post-inoculation, lung and liver, but not gut, contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4, 40, 66 and 67. Twenty-eight days after infection, gut contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4 and 66 but neither DNA nor transcripts could any longer be found in lung or liver. In situ hybridization revealed VZV DNA in enteric neurons, which also expressed ORF63p (but not ORF68p) immunoreactivity. Observations suggest that VZV infects T cells, which can transfer VZV to and establish latency in enteric neurons in vivo. Guinea pigs may be useful for studies of VZV pathogenesis in the ENS.

  7. Parasitic infection improves survival from septic peritonitis by enhancing mast cell responses to bacteria in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E Sutherland

    Full Text Available Mammals are serially infected with a variety of microorganisms, including bacteria and parasites. Each infection reprograms the immune system's responses to re-exposure and potentially alters responses to first-time infection by different microorganisms. To examine whether infection with a metazoan parasite modulates host responses to subsequent bacterial infection, mice were infected with the hookworm-like intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, followed in 2-4 weeks by peritoneal injection of the pathogenic bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae. Survival from Klebsiella peritonitis two weeks after parasite infection was better in Nippostrongylus-infected animals than in unparasitized mice, with Nippostrongylus-infected mice having fewer peritoneal bacteria, more neutrophils, and higher levels of protective interleukin 6. The improved survival of Nippostrongylus-infected mice depends on IL-4 because the survival benefit is lost in mice lacking IL-4. Because mast cells protect mice from Klebsiella peritonitis, we examined responses in mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh/Kit(W-sh mice, in which parasitosis failed to improve survival from Klebsiella peritonitis. However, adoptive transfer of cultured mast cells to Kit(W-sh/Kit(W-sh mice restored survival benefits of parasitosis. These results show that recent infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis protects mice from Klebsiella peritonitis by modulating mast cell contributions to host defense, and suggest more generally that parasitosis can yield survival advantages to a bacterially infected host.

  8. T-705 (favipiravir) inhibition of arenavirus replication in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Michelle; Russell, Andrew; Juelich, Terry; Messina, Emily L; Smee, Donald F; Freiberg, Alexander N; Holbrook, Michael R; Furuta, Yousuke; de la Torre, Juan-Carlos; Nunberg, Jack H; Gowen, Brian B

    2011-02-01

    A number of New World arenaviruses (Junín [JUNV], Machupo [MACV], and Guanarito [GTOV] viruses) can cause human disease ranging from mild febrile illness to a severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever syndrome. These highly pathogenic viruses and the Old World Lassa fever virus pose a significant threat to public health and national security. The only licensed antiviral agent with activity against these viruses, ribavirin, has had mixed success in treating severe arenaviral disease and is associated with significant toxicities. A novel pyrazine derivative currently in clinical trials for the treatment of influenza virus infections, T-705 (favipiravir), has demonstrated broad-spectrum activity against a number of RNA viruses, including arenaviruses. T-705 has also been shown to be effective against Pichinde arenavirus infection in a hamster model. Here, we demonstrate the robust antiviral activity of T-705 against authentic highly pathogenic arenaviruses in cell culture. We show that T-705 disrupts an early or intermediate stage in viral replication, distinct from absorption or release, and that its antiviral activity in cell culture is reversed by the addition of purine bases and nucleosides, but not with pyrimidines. Specific inhibition of viral replication/transcription by T-705 was demonstrated using a lymphocytic choriomeningitis arenavirus replicon system. Our findings indicate that T-705 acts to inhibit arenavirus replication/transcription and may directly target the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

  9. Current and Emerging Cell Culture Manufacturing Technologies for Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Milián

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Annually, influenza virus infects millions of people worldwide. Vaccination programs against seasonal influenza infections require the production of hundreds of million doses within a very short period of time. The influenza vaccine is currently produced using a technology developed in the 1940s that relies on replicating the virus in embryonated hens’ eggs. The monovalent viral preparation is inactivated and purified before being formulated in trivalent or tetravalent influenza vaccines. The production process has depended on a continuous supply of eggs. In the case of pandemic outbreaks, this mode of production might be problematic because of a possible drastic reduction in the egg supply and the low flexibility of the manufacturing process resulting in a lack of supply of the required vaccine doses in a timely fashion. Novel production systems using mammalian or insect cell cultures have emerged to overcome the limitations of the egg-based production system. These industrially well-established production systems have been primarily selected for a faster and more flexible response to pandemic threats. Here, we review the most important cell culture manufacturing processes that have been developed in recent years for mass production of influenza vaccines.

  10. Changes in Natural Killer cell activation and function during primary HIV-1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Naranbhai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent reports suggest that Natural Killer (NK cells may modulate pathogenesis of primary HIV-1 infection. However, HIV dysregulates NK-cell responses. We dissected this bi-directional relationship to understand how HIV impacts NK-cell responses during primary HIV-1 infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Paired samples from 41 high-risk, initially HIV-uninfected CAPRISA004 participants were analysed prior to HIV acquisition, and during viraemic primary HIV-1 infection. At the time of sampling post-infection five women were seronegative, 11 women were serodiscordant, and 25 women were seropositive by HIV-1 rapid immunoassay. Flow cytometry was used to measure NK and T-cell activation, NK-cell receptor expression, cytotoxic and cytokine-secretory functions, and trafficking marker expression (CCR7, α(4β(7. Non-parametric statistical tests were used. Both NK cells and T-cells were significantly activated following HIV acquisition (p = 0.03 and p<0.0001, respectively, but correlation between NK-cell and T-cell activation was uncoupled following infection (pre-infection r = 0.68;p<0.0001; post-infection, during primary infection r = 0.074;p = 0.09. Nonetheless, during primary infection NK-cell and T-cell activation correlated with HIV viral load (r = 0.32'p = 0.04 and r = 0.35;p = 0.02, respectively. The frequency of Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptor-expressing (KIR(pos NK cells increased following HIV acquisition (p = 0.006, and KIR(pos NK cells were less activated than KIR(neg NK cells amongst individuals sampled while seronegative or serodiscordant (p = 0.001;p<0.0001 respectively. During HIV-1 infection, cytotoxic NK cell responses evaluated after IL-2 stimulation alone, or after co-culture with 721 cells, were impaired (p = 0.006 and p = 0.002, respectively. However, NK-cell IFN-y secretory function was not significantly altered. The frequency of CCR7+ NK cells was elevated

  11. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massai, Diana; Isu, Giuseppe; Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A; Falvo D'Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future.

  12. Bone marrow aspiration, biopsy, and culture in the evaluation of HIV-infected patients for invasive mycobacteria and histoplasma infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpek, G; Lee, S M; Gagnon, D R; Cooley, T P; Wright, D G

    2001-06-01

    Bone marrow (BM) aspiration and biopsy are used commonly in clinical practice to diagnose invasive tissue infections caused by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare (MAC), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), and Histoplasma capsulatum (HC) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) infection. However, the value of these invasive procedures relative to other diagnostic approaches has not been clearly defined. To determine the value of BM culture and BM histology in the diagnosis of opportunistic MAC/TB and HC infections in immunosuppressed patients with HIV, we retrospectively reviewed the records of 56 adult patients with HIV who underwent a single BM aspiration, biopsy, and culture because of unexplained fever and/or other clinical features suggestive of MAC/TB or HC infection. Thirty-two patients (57%) were ultimately diagnosed with MAC/TB or HC infection by positive cultures of BM, blood, sputum, or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or by the histologic detection of organisms in biopsies of BM or other tissues. The diagnostic sensitivity of BM cultures was equal to that of blood cultures (20/32, or 63%). Granuloma and/or histologically apparent organisms were seen in BM biopsy specimens in 11 of 32 individuals (34%) ultimately diagnosed with MAC/TB or HC infections. Among these 11 cases, both granuloma and acid-fast staining organisms were found in the BM biopsy specimens of 2 individuals for whom both BM and blood cultures were negative. Certain clinical symptoms and signs at the time of BM examination were found by logistic regression analysis to be significantly associated with a subsequent diagnosis of MAC/TB or HC infections; these included high fever, long duration of febrile days prior to BM examination, and elevated direct bilirubin. In conclusion, while the diagnostic sensitivity of BM cultures was found to be no greater than that of blood cultures in detecting MAC/TB or HC infections in immunosuppressed HIV+ patients, histopathologic examination of BM

  13. A Mathematical Model of Baculovirus Infection on Insect Cells at Low Multiplicity of Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Hong ZHANG; Josée C. MERCHUK

    2004-01-01

    The expression efficiency of the insect cells-baculovirus system used for insecticidal virus production and the expression of medically useful foreign genes is closely related with the dynamics of infection. The present studies develop a model of the dynamic process of insect cell infection with baculovirus at low multiplicity of infection (MOI), which is based on the multi-infection cycles of insect cell infection at low MOI. A mathematical model for the amount of viruses released from primary infected cells and the amount of free viruses before secondary infected cells release viruses has been developed. Comparison of the simulation results with the experimental data confirms qualitatively that this model is highly reasonable before secondary infected cells release viruses. This model is considered as a base for further modeling the entire complicated infection process.

  14. Conversion of primordial germ cells to pluripotent stem cells: methods for cell tracking and culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, Go; Suda, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are unipotent cells committed to germ lineage: PGCs can only differentiate into gametes in vivo. However, upon fertilization, germ cells acquire the capacity to differentiate into all cell types in the body, including germ cells. Therefore, germ cells are thought to have the potential for pluripotency. PGCs can convert to pluripotent stem cells in vitro when cultured under specific conditions that include bFGF, LIF, and the membrane-bound form of SCF (mSCF). Here, the culture conditions which efficiently convert PGCs to pluripotent embryonic germ (EG) cells are described, as well as methods used for identifying pluripotent candidate cells during culture.

  15. An Introductory Undergraduate Course Covering Animal Cell Culture Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdziak, Paul E.; Petitte, James N.; Carson, Susan D.

    2004-01-01

    Animal cell culture is a core laboratory technique in many molecular biology, developmental biology, and biotechnology laboratories. Cell culture is a relatively old technique that has been sparingly taught at the undergraduate level. The traditional methodology for acquiring cell culture training has been through trial and error, instruction when…

  16. An Introductory Undergraduate Course Covering Animal Cell Culture Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdziak, Paul E.; Petitte, James N.; Carson, Susan D.

    2004-01-01

    Animal cell culture is a core laboratory technique in many molecular biology, developmental biology, and biotechnology laboratories. Cell culture is a relatively old technique that has been sparingly taught at the undergraduate level. The traditional methodology for acquiring cell culture training has been through trial and error, instruction when…

  17. Propagation of prions causing synucleinopathies in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerman, Amanda L; Stöhr, Jan; Aoyagi, Atsushi; Rampersaud, Ryan; Krejciova, Zuzana; Watts, Joel C; Ohyama, Takao; Patel, Smita; Widjaja, Kartika; Oehler, Abby; Sanders, David W; Diamond, Marc I; Seeley, William W; Middleton, Lefkos T; Gentleman, Steve M; Mordes, Daniel A; Südhof, Thomas C; Giles, Kurt; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2015-09-01

    Increasingly, evidence argues that many neurodegenerative diseases, including progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), are caused by prions, which are alternatively folded proteins undergoing self-propagation. In earlier studies, PSP prions were detected by infecting human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells expressing a tau fragment [TauRD(LM)] fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Here, we report on an improved bioassay using selective precipitation of tau prions from human PSP brain homogenates before infection of the HEK cells. Tau prions were measured by counting the number of cells with TauRD(LM)-YFP aggregates using confocal fluorescence microscopy. In parallel studies, we fused α-synuclein to YFP to bioassay α-synuclein prions in the brains of patients who died of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Previously, MSA prion detection required ∼120 d for transmission into transgenic mice, whereas our cultured cell assay needed only 4 d. Variation in MSA prion levels in four different brain regions from three patients provided evidence for three different MSA prion strains. Attempts to demonstrate α-synuclein prions in brain homogenates from Parkinson's disease patients were unsuccessful, identifying an important biological difference between the two synucleinopathies. Partial purification of tau and α-synuclein prions facilitated measuring the levels of these protein pathogens in human brains. Our studies should facilitate investigations of the pathogenesis of both tau and α-synuclein prion disorders as well as help decipher the basic biology of those prions that attack the CNS.

  18. Rapamycin increases RSV RNA levels and survival of RSV-infected dendritic cell depending on T cell contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento de Freitas, Deise; Gassen, Rodrigo Benedetti; Fazolo, Tiago; Souza, Ana Paula Duarte de

    2016-10-01

    The macrolide rapamycin inhibits mTOR (mechanist target of rapamycin) function and has been broadly used to unveil the role of mTOR in immune responses. Inhibition of mTOR on dendritic cells (DC) can influence cellular immune response and the survival of DC. RSV is the most common cause of hospitalization in infants and is a high priority candidate to vaccine development. In this study we showed that rapamycin treatment on RSV-infected murine bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) decreases the frequency of CD8(+)CD44(high) T cells. However, inhibition of mTOR on RSV-infected BMDC did not modify the activation phenotype of these cells. RSV-RNA levels increase when infected BMDC were treated with rapamycin. Moreover, we observed that rapamycin diminishes apoptosis cell death of RSV-infected BMDC co-culture with T cells and this effect was abolished when the cells were co-cultured in a transwell system that prevents cell-to-cell contact or migration. Taken together, these data indicate that rapamycin treatment present a toxic effect on RSV-infected BMDC increasing RSV-RNA levels, affecting partially CD8 T cell differentiation and also increasing BMDC survival in a mechanism dependent on T cell contact.

  19. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLESIA O. GRYGORIEVA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Grygorieva OO, Berezovsjka MA, Dacenko OI. 2015. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation. Nusantara Bioscience 7: 38-42. Two cultures of Chlamydomonas actinochloris Deason et Bold in the lag-phase were exposed to the microwave irradiation. One of them (culture 1 was not treated beforehand, whereas the other (culture 2 was irradiated by microwaves 2 years earlier. The measurement of cell quantity as well as measurement of change of intensities and spectra of cultures photoluminescence (PL in the range of chlorophyll a emission was regularly conducted during the cell cultures development. Cell concentration of culture 1 exposed to the microwave irradiation for the first time has quickly restored while cell concentration of culture 2 which was irradiated repeatedly has fallen significantly. The following increasing of cell concentration of culture 2 is negligible. Cell concentration reaches the steady-state level that is about a half of the cell concentration of control culture. Initially the PL efficiency of cells of both cultures decreases noticeable as a result of irradiation. Then there is the monotonic increase to the values which are significantly higher than the corresponding values in the control cultures. The ratio of the intensities at the maxima of the main emission bands of chlorophyll for control samples of both cultures remained approximately at the same level. At the same time effect of irradiation on the cell PL spectrum appears as a temporary reduction of this magnitude.

  20. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of prion-infected neuronal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löwer Johannes

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs are fatal diseases associated with the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC to the abnormal prion protein (PrPSc. Since the molecular mechanisms in pathogenesis are widely unclear, we analyzed the global phospho-proteome and detected a differential pattern of tyrosine- and threonine phosphorylated proteins in PrPSc-replicating and pentosan polysulfate (PPS-rescued N2a cells in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. To quantify phosphorylated proteins, we performed a SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture analysis and identified 105 proteins, which showed a regulated phosphorylation upon PrPSc infection. Among those proteins, we validated the dephosphorylation of stathmin and Cdc2 and the induced phosphorylation of cofilin in PrPSc-infected N2a cells in Western blot analyses. Our analysis showed for the first time a differentially regulated phospho-proteome in PrPSc infection, which could contribute to the establishment of novel protein markers and to the development of novel therapeutic intervention strategies in targeting prion-associated disease.

  1. Depletion of host cell riboflavin reduces Wolbachia levels in cultured mosquito cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Ann M; Baldridge, Gerald D; Carroll, Elissa M; Kurtz, Cassandra M

    2014-09-01

    Wolbachia is an obligate intracellular alphaproteobacterium that occurs in arthropod and nematode hosts. Wolbachia presumably provides a fitness benefit to its hosts, but the basis for its retention and spread in host populations remains unclear. Wolbachia genomes retain biosynthetic pathways for some vitamins, and the possibility that these vitamins benefit host cells provides a potential means of selecting for Wolbachia-infected cell lines. To explore whether riboflavin produced by Wolbachia is available to its host cell, we established that growth of uninfected C7-10 mosquito cells decreases in riboflavin-depleted culture medium. A well-studied inhibitor of riboflavin uptake, lumiflavin, further inhibits growth of uninfected C7-10 cells with an LC50 of approximately 12 μg/ml. Growth of C/wStr1 mosquito cells, infected with Wolbachia from the planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus, was enhanced in medium containing low levels of lumiflavin, but Wolbachia levels decreased. Lumiflavin-enhanced growth thus resembled the improved growth that accompanies treatment with antibiotics that deplete Wolbachia, rather than a metabolic advantage provided by the Wolbachia infection. We used the polymerase chain reaction to validate the decrease in Wolbachia abundance and evaluated our results in the context of a proteomic analysis in which we detected nearly 800 wStr proteins. Our data indicate that Wolbachia converts riboflavin to FMN and FAD for its own metabolic needs, and does not provide a source of riboflavin for its host cell.

  2. Establishment of rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus embryo (RoBE-4) cells with cytolytic infection of red seabream iridovirus (RSIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, So-Young; Nishizawa, Toyohiko

    2016-12-01

    Red seabream iridovirus (RSIV) is a member of genus Megalocytivirus in the family Iridoviridae. RSIV infection causes significant economic losses of marine-fishes in East Asian countries. Grunt fin (GF) cell line has been commonly used for culturing RSIV. However, it is not suitable for definite evaluation of infectivity titer of RSIV because cells infected with RSIV are not completely cytolysed. Thus, we established a new cell line, RoBE-4, from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) eyed-egg embryos in this study. Morphologically, RoBE-4 cells were fibroblastic-like. They have been stably grown over two-years with 60 passages using Leibovitz's L-15 medium containing 10% (v/v) fetal bovine serum. RoBE-4 cells infected with RSIV exhibited cytopathic effects (CPE) with cell rounding. They were cytolysed completely after ≥2 weeks of culture. Numerous RSIV particles with icosahedral morphology of approximately 122nm in diameter were observed in cytoplasmic area of infected RoBE-4 cells. The RSIV-suceptibility and amount of extracellular RSIV released by RoBE-4 cells were 100-fold higher than those by GF cells. RSIV cultured with RoBE-4 cells was highly virulent to rock bream in infection experiments. Therefore, using RoBE-4 cells instead of GF cells will enable accurate and sensitive measurement of RSIV infectivity. In addition, RoBE-4 cells might be used to produce RSIV vaccine in the future with significant reduction in cost.

  3. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus DNA in cultured human glial cells by means of the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjærg, Lars Stubbe; Hansen, J-ES; Dalbøge, H;

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of viral genomic sequences in latently infected cells. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus in cultures of human glial cells was demonstrated, using nucleic acid amplification followed by dot blot...... hybridization. It was not possible to detect any viral antigen production in the cultures, and attempts to recover virus by highly sensitive coculture techniques were unsuccessful, indicating that the infection was latent. The PCR technique provides a simple approach to the study of viral infection in cases...

  4. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus DNA in cultured human glial cells by means of the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjaerg, L L; Hansen, J E; Dalbøge, H

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of viral genomic sequences in latently infected cells. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus in cultures of human glial cells was demonstrated, using nucleic acid amplification followed by dot blot...... hybridization. It was not possible to detect any viral antigen production in the cultures, and attempts to recover virus by highly sensitive coculture techniques were unsuccessful, indicating that the infection was latent. The PCR technique provides a simple approach to the study of viral infection in cases...

  5. Insect cell culture in research: Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudeep, A B; Mourya, D T; Mishra, A C

    2005-06-01

    Insect cell cultures are widely used in viral diagnosis and biotechnology, for the production of recombinant proteins, viral pesticides and vaccines as well as in basic research in genetics, molecular biology, biochemistry, endocrinology and virology. Following KRP Singh's pioneering research in 1967, a large number of cell lines from diptera, hemiptera, and lepidopteran insects were established and characterized in India. With the availability of the modern tools in molecular biology and the advancements made in biotechnology, the indigenous cell lines may prove useful in creating a future without biohazardous chemical pesticides as well as producing life saving pharmaceuticals and vaccines for many diseases. This review summarizes information gathered regarding the insect cell lines established so far in India. It also covers the familiarization of the well characterized continuous cell lines and their potential applications. Special attention is given to virus susceptibility of the cell lines, the yield of virus with a comparative analysis with other conventional systems. The potential applications of dipteran and lepidopteran cell lines in agriculture and biotechnology are also briefly discussed for prospective studies.

  6. HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells do not undergo maturation but can elicit IL-10 production and T cell regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Golebiowska, Angelika; Trumpfheller, Christine; Siegal, Frederick P.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2004-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) undergo maturation during virus infection and thereby become potent stimulators of cell-mediated immunity. HIV-1 replicates in immature DCs, but we now find that infection is not accompanied by many components of maturation in either infected cells or uninfected bystanders. The infected cultures do not develop potent stimulating activity for the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR), and the DCs producing HIV-1 gag p24 do not express CD83 and DC-lysosome-associated membrane protein maturation markers. If different maturation stimuli are applied to DCs infected with HIV-1, the infected cells selectively fail to mature. When DCs from HIV-1-infected patients are infected and cultured with autologous T cells, IL-10 was produced in 6 of 10 patients. These DC-T cell cocultures could suppress another immune response, the MLR. The regulation was partially IL-10-dependent and correlated in extent with the level of IL-10 produced. Suppressor cells only developed from infected patients, rather than healthy controls, and the DCs had to be exposed to live virus rather than HIV-1 gag peptides or protein. These results indicate that HIV-1-infected DCs have two previously unrecognized means to evade immune responses: maturation can be blocked reducing the efficacy of antigen presentation from infected cells, and T cell-dependent suppression can be induced.

  7. Cell culture device using spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Chung-Jen; Shen, Ching-I.; Ou, Chung-Ming

    2009-07-01

    Spatial light modulator is introduced for cell culturing and related illumination experiment. Two kinds of designs were used. The first type put the cell along with the bio-medium directly on top of the analyzer of the microdisplay and set a cover glass on it to retain the medium environment, which turned the microdisplay into a bio-container. The second type introduced an optical lens system placed below the spatial light modulator to focus the light spots on specific position. Details of the advantages and drawbacks for the two different approaches are discussed, and the human melanocyte cell (HMC) is introduced to prove the feasibility of the concept. Results indicate that the second type is much more suitable than the first for precision required application.

  8. Flavonoids modulate the proliferation of Neospora caninum in glial cell primary cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Rosan Barbosa de; Braga-de-Souza, Suzana; Pitanga, Bruno Pena Seara; Silva, Victor Diógenes Amaral da; Jesus, Erica Etelvina Viana de; Pinheiro, Alexandre Morales; Costa, Maria de Fátima Dias; El-Bacha, Ramon dos Santos; Ribeiro, Cátia Suse de Oliveira; Costa, Silvia Lima

    2014-12-01

    Neospora caninum (Apicomplexa; Sarcocystidae) is a protozoan that causes abortion in cattle, horses, sheep, and dogs as well as neurological and dermatological diseases in dogs. In the central nervous system of dogs infected with N. caninum, cysts were detected that exhibited gliosis and meningitis. Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds that exhibit antibacterial, antiparasitic, antifungal, and antiviral properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of flavonoids in a well-established in vitro model of N. caninum infection in glial cell cultures. Glial cells were treated individually with 10 different flavonoids, and a subset of cultures was also infected with the NC-1 strain of N. caninum. All of the flavonoids tested induced an increase in the metabolism of glial cells and many of them increased nitrite levels in cultures infected with NC-1 compared to controls and uninfected cultures. Among the flavonoids tested, 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone, 3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (luteolin), and 3,3',4',5,6-pentahydroxyflavone (quercetin), also inhibited parasitophorous vacuole formation. Taken together, our findings show that flavonoids modulate glial cell responses, increase NO secretion, and interfere with N. caninum infection and proliferation.

  9. Rapid method for culturing embryonic neuron-glial cell cocultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Åsa Fex; Shan, Wei-Song; Colman, David R;

    2003-01-01

    A streamlined, simple technique for primary cell culture from E17 rat tissue is presented. In an attempt to standardize culturing methods for all neuronal cell types in the embryo, we evaluated a commercial medium without serum and used similar times for trypsinization and tested different surfaces...... for plating. In 1 day, using one method and a single medium, it is possible to produce robust E17 cultures of dorsal root ganglia (DRG), cerebellum, and enteric plexi. Allowing the endogenous glial cells to repopulate the cultures saves time compared with existing techniques, in which glial cells are added...... to cultures first treated with antimitotic agents. It also ensures that all the cells present in vivo will be present in the culture. Myelination commences after approximately 2 weeks in culture for dissociated DRG and 3-4 weeks in cerebellar cultures. In enteric cultures, glial wrapping of the enteric...

  10. The additional value of blood cultures in patients with complicated urinary tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, V.; Prins, J.M.; Opmeer, B.C.; Reijke, T.M. de; Hulscher, M.E.; Geerlings, S.E.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated 800 hospitalized patients with a complicated urinary tract infection, from whom both a blood and a urine culture were obtained on the first day of antibiotic treatment. Urine cultures were positive in 70% of patients, and blood cultures were positive in 29%. In 7% of patients, uropathog

  11. PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF CELL CULTURE JATROPHA CURCAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOMAR RUSLAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family which has potential economically. This plant has been reported to contain toxic compounds such as curcin and phorbol ester and its derivatives. These compounds may become a problem if J. curcas will be explored as a source of biofuel. In order to provide safety plants, the research on the study of phytochemical and initiation of cell and organ culture have been carried out. J curcas which has been collected from different regions in Indonesia showed to contain relatively the same profile of chemical contents. Dominant compounds that were detected by GCMS are hidrocarbon such as 2-heptenal, decadienal, hexsadecane, pentadecane, cyclooctane etc, fatty acid such as oktadecanoate acid, etthyl linoleate, ethyl stearate, heksadecanoate acid and steroid such as stigmasterol, fucosterol, sitosterol. No phorbol ester and its derivatives have been detected yet by the GCMS method. Callus and suspension cultures of J. curcas have been established to be used for further investigation.

  12. PARASITIC INFECTIONS IN HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Jarque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However, they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients.

  13. Targeting host syntaxin-5 preferentially blocks Leishmania parasitophorous vacuole development in infected cells and limits experimental Leishmania infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Johnathan; Kima, Peter E

    2012-10-01

    Our previous observations established a role for syntaxin-5 in the development of Leishmania parasitophorous vacuoles (LPVs). In this study, we took advantage of the recent identification of Retro-2, a small organic molecule that can cause the redistribution of syntaxin-5; we show herein that Retro-2 blocks LPV development within 2 hours of adding it to cells infected with Leishmania amazonensis. In infected cells incubated for 48 hours with Retro-2, LPV development was significantly limited; furthermore, infected cells harbored four to five times fewer parasites than infected cells incubated in vehicle alone. In vivo studies revealed that Retro-2 curbed experimental L. amazonensis infections in a dose-dependent manner. Retro-2 did not have any appreciable effect on the host cell physiological characteristics; furthermore, it had no apparent toxicity in experimental animals. An unexpected, but welcome, finding was that Retro-2 inhibited the replication of Leishmania parasites in axenic cultures. This study is significant because it identifies an endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi SNARE as a potential target for the control of Leishmania infections; moreover, it suggests that small organic molecules can be identified that can selectively disrupt the vesicle fusion machinery that promotes the development of pathogen-containing compartments without exerting toxic effects on the host.

  14. [Promoting effect of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection on human laryngeal carcinoma HEp-2 cell adhesion and migration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Jun; Hong, Li; Chen, Ning; Shen, Bing-Ling; Deng, Yan-Qiu; Quan, Wei; Wang, Bei-Bei; Zhang, Li-Jun

    2011-01-01

    To explore the effect of Chlamydia pneumoniae (C.pn) infection on human laryngeal carcinoma cell line HEp-2 cell adhesion and migration, to further clarify the role and mechanism of C.pn infection in tumor metastasis. HEp-2 cells were infected with C.pn after the culture and propagation of C.pn. The cytopathic effect was observed by microscopy. Morphological characteristics of C.pn inclusions in HEp-2 cells were examined by fluorescence microscopy and acridine orange staining. The ultrastructural changes of C.pn inclusions in the HEp-2 cells were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cell adhesion assay was performed to investigate the effect of C.pn infection on the adhesion of HEp-2 cells to collagen I. Wound-healing assay and transwell assay were performed to explore the effect of C.pn infection on HEp-2 cell migration. At 72 h post-infection, C.pn infected-HEp-2 cells were swollen and partially desquamated. Numerous vacuoles (inclusions) were observed and C.pn inclusions occupied almost the whole cytoplasm of the HEp-2 cells. Grape-like C.pn inclusions were observed in the HEp-2 cells stained with acridine orange under a fluorescence microscope at 72 h after infection. Under TEM, there were more mature pear-shaped elementary bodies, but less larger and round reticulate bodies in the HEp-2 cells infected with C.pn for 72 h. In the cell adhesion assay, the A value in C.pn infection group was 0.669 ± 0.011, significantly higher than that in the control group (0.558 ± 0.005) at 2 h after infection (P HEp-2 cells in the wound-healing assay was significantly longer than that of control cells at 24 h after infection (P HEp-2 cells infected with C.pn for 12 h migrated more than the control cells in the transwell assay (23.40 ± 2.41 vs 10.40 ± 1.67) (P HEp-2 cell adhesion to collagen I and migration of HEp-2 cells, indicating that C.pn infection may play an important role in promoting the metastasis of laryngeal cancer.

  15. Theileria parva: effects of irradiation on a culture of parasitized bovine lymphoid cells. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irvin, A.D.; Brown, C.G.D.; Stagg, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    Aliquots of a culture of Theileria parva-infected bovine lymphoid cells were irradiated at 0, 300, 600, 900, and 1200 rads. The short-term effects of irradiation were evaluated on examination of Giemsa-stained smears and on autoradiography of cells labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine. Irradiation inhibited cell division but parasite division did not appear to be inhibited and macroschizont nuclear particles increased in number, frequently to several hundred per schizont. There was no evidence of an increased percentage switch from macro- to microschizont. Apparently viable cells were still present in all cultures 4 days after irradiation.

  16. How do culture media influence in vitro perivascular cell behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra Juliane

    2015-12-01

    Perivascular cells are multilineage cells located around the vessel wall and important for wall stabilization. In this study, we evaluated a stem cell media and a perivascular cell-specific media for the culture of primary perivascular cells regarding their cell morphology, doubling time, stem cell properties, and expression of cell type-specific markers. When the two cell culture media were compared to each other, perivascular cells cultured in the stem cell medium had a more elongated morphology and a faster doubling rate and cells cultured in the pericyte medium had a more typical morphology, with several filopodia, and a slower doubling rate. To evaluate stem cell properties, perivascular cells, CD146(-) cells, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were differentiated into the adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. It was seen that perivascular cells, as well as CD146(-) cells and MSCs, cultured in stem cell medium showed greater differentiation than cells cultured in pericyte-specific medium. The expression of pericyte-specific markers CD146, neural/glial antigen 2 (NG2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), myosin, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) could be found in both pericyte cultures, as well as to varying amounts in CD146(-) cells, MSCs, and endothelial cells. The here presented work shows that perivascular cells can adapt to their in vitro environment and cell culture conditions influence cell functionality, such as doubling rate or differentiation behavior. Pericyte-specific markers were shown to be expressed also from cells other than perivascular cells. We can further conclude that CD146(+) perivascular cells are inhomogeneous cell population probably containing stem cell subpopulations, which are located perivascular around capillaries.

  17. Elicitation Phenolic Compounds in Cell Culture of Vitis vinifera L. by Phaeomoniella chlamydospora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sák Martin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro cell cultures of Vitis vinifera L. cv. St. Laurent were treated with two elicitors - synthetic methyl jasmonate and natural, prepared from grapevine plant infected with the Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, the agent causing the Esca disease of grapevine. Efficiency of phenolic compounds production after elicitation of cell culture was analysed immediately after treatment (15 min, 30 min, 60 min and later (after 24, 48, and 72 hours. The cell growth and content of phenolic compounds (+-catechin, (--epicatechin, p-coumaric acid, syringaldehyde, rutin, vanillic acid, and trans-resveratrol were analysed in cultivated cells as well as in cultivation medium. Pch-treatment increased production of total polyphenols the most significantly 15 min after the elicitation and in optimal time was 2.86 times higher than in nonelicited culture and 1.44 times higher than in MeJa induced cell culture.

  18. Good cell culture practices &in vitro toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskes, Chantra; Boström, Ann-Charlotte; Bowe, Gerhard; Coecke, Sandra; Hartung, Thomas; Hendriks, Giel; Pamies, David; Piton, Alain; Rovida, Costanza

    2017-04-25

    Good Cell Culture Practices (GCCP) is of high relevance to in vitro toxicology. The European Society of Toxicology In Vitro (ESTIV), the Center for Alternatives for Animal Testing (CAAT) and the In Vitro Toxicology Industrial Platform (IVTIP) joined forces to address by means of an ESTIV 2016 pre-congress session the different aspects and applications of GCCP. The covered aspects comprised the current status of the OECD guidance document on Good In Vitro Method Practices, the importance of quality assurance for new technological advances in in vitro toxicology including stem cells, and the optimized implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Laboratory Practices for regulatory testing purposes. General discussions raised the duality related to the difficulties in implementing GCCP in an academic innovative research framework on one hand, and on the other hand, the need for such GCCP principles in order to ensure reproducibility and robustness of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing. Indeed, if good cell culture principles are critical to take into consideration for all uses of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing, the level of application of such principles may depend on the stage of development of the test method as well as on the applications of the test methods, i.e., academic innovative research vs. regulatory standardized test method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hepatitis C virus infection of human hepatoma cell line 7721 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Fei Hao; Feng Min; Qiao-Yu Ma; Guo-Dong Liu

    2001-01-01

    AIM To establish a cell culture system with long-term replication of hepatitis C virus in vitro.``METHODS Human hepatoma cell line 7721 was tested for its susceptibility to HCV by incubating with a serum from a patient with chronic hepatitis C. Cells and supernatant were harvested at various phases during the culturing periods The presence of HCV RNA, the expression of HCV antigens in cells and/or supernatant were examined by RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry respectively.``RESULTS The intracellular HCV RNA was first detected on d 2 after infection and then could be intermittently detected in both cells and supernatant over a period of at least three months. The expression of HCV NS3, CP10antigens could be observed in cells. The fresh cells could be infected by supematant from cultured infected cells and the transmission of viral genome from HCV-infected 7721 cells to PBMCs was also observed.``CONCLUSION The hepatoma line 7721 is not only susceptible to HCV but also supports its long-term replication in vitro.``

  20. Ultrastructural Pathology of Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection in Cultured Mouse Nervous System Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Nicholas J.; Schneider, Joseph F.; Rosen, Moshe; Belisle, Elizabeth H.

    1974-01-01

    Mouse spinal cord-ganglia cultures were innoculated with murine cytomegalo-virus 14 days after explantation. Intranuclear virus was first observed 4 days after infection. The viruses, which occurred in four forms, were observed in increasing numbers during the ensuing 4 days. Differences were noted in the relative prevalence of certain of these forms in older as compared to younger cultures. This suggests that variations in virus form are related to virus maturation. Cytoplasmic viruses were occasionally observed, but their site of origin is not certain. A variety of cytoplasmic inclusions were seen, particularly in the older cultures. It seems likely that they represent specific cell responses to the presence of the virus. They were not observed in the control cultures, even though some of the latter did show severe degenerative changes. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Figs 3-4p[477]-dFig 8Fig 9Fig 10Figs 11-12Fig 13Fig 14Fig 15Fig 16Figs 17-18Fig 19 PMID:4360827

  1. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Fifth People' s Hospital of Shanghai, School of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Zhao, Libo [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Third People' s Hospital of Chongqing, 400014 (China); Yang, Yongtao [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Bornavirus Research Group affiliated to the Free University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Huang, Hua [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Huang, Rongzhong [Department of Rehabilitative Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400010 (China); Zhang, Liang [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  2. Sarcoma derived from cultured mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Jakub; Nauta, Alma J; Osborn, Mark J; Panoskaltsis Mortari, Angela; McElmurry, Ron T; Bell, Scott; Xia, Lily; Zhou, Ning; Riddle, Megan; Schroeder, Tania M; Westendorf, Jennifer J; McIvor, R Scott; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Szuhai, Karoly; Oseth, Leann; Hirsch, Betsy; Yant, Stephen R; Kay, Mark A; Peister, Alexandra; Prockop, Darwin J; Fibbe, Willem E; Blazar, Bruce R

    2007-02-01

    To study the biodistribution of MSCs, we labeled adult murine C57BL/6 MSCs with firefly luciferase and DsRed2 fluorescent protein using nonviral Sleeping Beauty transposons and coinfused labeled MSCs with bone marrow into irradiated allogeneic recipients. Using in vivo whole-body imaging, luciferase signals were shown to be increased between weeks 3 and 12. Unexpectedly, some mice with the highest luciferase signals died and all surviving mice developed foci of sarcoma in their lungs. Two mice also developed sarcomas in their extremities. Common cytogenetic abnormalities were identified in tumor cells isolated from different animals. Original MSC cultures not labeled with transposons, as well as independently isolated cultured MSCs, were found to be cytogenetically abnormal. Moreover, primary MSCs derived from the bone marrow of both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice showed cytogenetic aberrations after several passages in vitro, showing that transformation was not a strain-specific nor rare event. Clonal evolution was observed in vivo, suggesting that the critical transformation event(s) occurred before infusion. Mapping of the transposition insertion sites did not identify an obvious transposon-related genetic abnormality, and p53 was not overexpressed. Infusion of MSC-derived sarcoma cells resulted in malignant lesions in secondary recipients. This new sarcoma cell line, S1, is unique in having a cytogenetic profile similar to human sarcoma and contains bioluminescent and fluorescent genes, making it useful for investigations of cellular biodistribution and tumor response to therapy in vivo. More importantly, our study indicates that sarcoma can evolve from MSC cultures.

  3. Direct infection and replication of naturally occurring hepatitis C virus genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 in normal human hepatocyte cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Buck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection afflicts about 170 million individuals worldwide. However, the HCV life cycle is only partially understood because it has not been possible to infect normal human hepatocytes in culture. The current Huh-7 systems use cloned, synthetic HCV RNA expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cells to produce virions, but these cells cannot be infected with naturally occurring HCV obtained from infected patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we describe a human hepatocyte culture permissible to the direct infection with naturally occurring HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 in the blood of HCV-infected patients. The culture system mimics the biology and kinetics of HCV infection in humans, and produces infectious virions that can infect naïve human hepatocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This culture system should complement the existing systems, and may facilitate the understanding of the HCV life cycle, its effects in the natural host cell, the hepatocyte, as well as the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines.

  4. DNA MUTAGENESIS IN PANAX GINSENG CELL CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiselev K.V.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available At the present time, it is well documented that plant tissue culture induces a number of mutations and chromosome rearrangements termed “somaclonal variations”. However, little is known about the nature and the molecular mechanisms of the tissue culture-induced mutagenesis and the effects of long-term subculturing on the rate and specific features of the mutagenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare DNA mutagenesis in different genes of Panax ginseng callus cultures of different age. It has previously been shown that the nucleotide sequences of the Agrobacterium rhizogenes rolC locus and the selective marker nptII developed mutations during long-term cultivation of transgenic cell cultures of P. ginseng. In the present work, we analyzed nucleotide sequences of selected plant gene families in a 2-year-old and 20-year-old P. ginseng 1c cell culture and in leaves of cultivated P. ginseng plants. We analysed sequence variability between the Actin genes, which are a family of house-keeping genes; the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL and dammarenediol synthase (DDS genes, which actively participate in the biosynthesis of ginsenosides; and the somatic embryogenesis receptor kinase (SERK genes, which control plant development. The frequency of point mutations in the Actin, PAL, DDS, and SERK genes in the 2-year-old callus culture was markedly higher than that in cultivated plants but lower than that in the 20-year-old callus culture of P. ginseng. Most of the mutations in the 2- and 20-year-old P. ginseng calli were A↔G and T↔C transitions. The number of nonsynonymous mutations was higher in the 2- and 20-year-old callus cultures than the number of nonsynonymous mutations in the cultivated plants of P. ginseng. Interestingly, the total number of N→G or N→C substitutions in the analyzed genes was 1.6 times higher than the total number of N→A or N→T substitutions. Using methylation-sensitive DNA fragmentation

  5. HIV integration sites in latently infected cell lines: evidence of ongoing replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Jori; Chopra, Abha; Malatinkova, Eva; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Leary, Shay; Cooper, Don; Abana, Chike O; Rhodes, Ajantha; Rezaei, Simin D; Vandekerckhove, Linos; Mallal, Simon; Lewin, Sharon R; Cameron, Paul U

    2017-01-13

    Assessing the location and frequency of HIV integration sites in latently infected cells can potentially inform our understanding of how HIV persists during combination antiretroviral therapy. We developed a novel high throughput sequencing method to evaluate HIV integration sites in latently infected cell lines to determine whether there was virus replication or clonal expansion in these cell lines observed as multiple integration events at the same position. We modified a previously reported method using random DNA shearing and PCR to allow for high throughput robotic processing to identify the site and frequency of HIV integration in latently infected cell lines. Latently infected cell lines infected with intact virus demonstrated multiple distinct HIV integration sites (28 different sites in U1, 110 in ACH-2 and 117 in J1.1 per 150,000 cells). In contrast, cell lines infected with replication-incompetent viruses (J-Lat cells) demonstrated single integration sites. Following in vitro passaging of the ACH-2 cell line, we observed a significant increase in the frequency of unique HIV integration sites and there were multiple mutations and large deletions in the proviral DNA. When the ACH-2 cell line was cultured with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir, there was a significant decrease in the number of unique HIV integration sites and a transient increase in the frequency of 2-LTR circles consistent with virus replication in these cells. Cell lines latently infected with intact HIV demonstrated multiple unique HIV integration sites indicating that these cell lines are not clonal and in the ACH-2 cell line there was evidence of low level virus replication. These findings have implications for the use of latently infected cell lines as models of HIV latency and for the use of these cells as standards.

  6. Association of suction drain tips culture with postoperative infection in benign thyroid surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ziaeddin Rasihashemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wound infection is a rare complication after thyroid surgery. Because of controversy concerning with routine use of the drain by surgeons and its being considered a foreign body material, we aimed to evaluate the clinical significance and relevance of the drain tip culture and wound infection. Materials and methods: From March 2014 to March 2015, 150 consecutive patients undergoing thyroid surgery were studied. Wound infection was defined as occurring within the first 14 days from surgery. While we were suspicious to wound infection, sterile wound sampling was performed and sent to microbiology laboratory. Results: Postoperative infection developed in 4 patients (2.6% during 2 weeks follow up. The sensitivity and specificity of the drain tip culture were 15% and 82%, respectively with a positive predictive value of 7.6%. Prolonged operative time was an independent risk factor for wound infection. There was no significant relationship between drain tip culture and wound infection. Conclusion: Routine use of the surgical drain can increase the incidence of the wound infection. However, the drain tip culture was not a predictor for wound complications after thyroid surgeries.   Key Words: Thyroid; Wound infection; Drain; Culture;

  7. Growth of cultured porcine retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, A.K.; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nicolini, Jair;

    2003-01-01

    To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation.......To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation....

  8. Equipment for large-scale mammalian cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sadettin S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides information on commonly used equipment in industrial mammalian cell culture, with an emphasis on bioreactors. The actual equipment used in the cell culture process can vary from one company to another, but the main steps remain the same. The process involves expansion of cells in seed train and inoculation train processes followed by cultivation of cells in a production bioreactor. Process and equipment options for each stage of the cell culture process are introduced and examples are provided. Finally, the use of disposables during seed train and cell culture production is discussed.

  9. Introduction of new genetic material into human myeloid leukemic blast stem cells by retroviral infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L.J.; Benchimol, S.

    1988-02-01

    An amphotropic retroviral vector containing the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase gene (neo) was used to infect blast cells from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. The infected cells acquired a G418-resistant phenotype that was stable as measured in a clonogenic assay and in long-term suspension culture. Thus, gene transfer into stem cells was accomplished by this procedure. This approach for manipulating gene expression in blast stem cells provides a means to assess the roles of a variety of genes in self-renewal, differentiation, and leukemogenesis.

  10. Stimulation of Mucosal Mast Cell Growth in Normal and Nude Rat Bone Marrow Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haig, David M.; McMenamin, Christine; Gunneberg, Christian; Woodbury, Richard; Jarrett, Ellen E. E.

    1983-07-01

    Mast cells with the morphological and biochemical properties of mucosal mast cells (MMC) appear and proliferate to form the predominant cell type in rat bone marrow cultures stimulated with factors from antigen- or mitogen-activated lymphocytes. Conditioned media causing a selective proliferation of MMC were derived from mesenteric lymph node cells of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rats restimulated in vitro with specific antigen or from normal or infected rat mesenteric lymph node cells stimulated with concanavalin A. MMC growth factor is not produced by T-cell-depleted mesenteric lymph node cells or by the mesenteric lymph node cells of athymic rats. By contrast, MMC precursors are present in the bone marrow of athymic rats and are normally receptive to the growth factor produced by the lymphocytes of thymus-intact rats. The thymus dependence of MMC hyperplasia is thus based on the requirement of a thymus-independent precursor for a T-cell-derived growth promoter.

  11. Productive hepatitis C virus infection of stem cell-derived hepatocytes reveals a critical transition to viral permissiveness during differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfang Wu

    Full Text Available Primary human hepatocytes isolated from patient biopsies represent the most physiologically relevant cell culture model for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection, but these primary cells are not readily accessible, display individual variability, and are largely refractory to genetic manipulation. Hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from pluripotent stem cells provide an attractive alternative as they not only overcome these shortcomings but can also provide an unlimited source of noncancer cells for both research and cell therapy. Despite its promise, the permissiveness to HCV infection of differentiated human hepatocyte-like cells (DHHs has not been explored. Here we report a novel infection model based on DHHs derived from human embryonic (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. DHHs generated in chemically defined media under feeder-free conditions were subjected to infection by both HCV derived in cell culture (HCVcc and patient-derived virus (HCVser. Pluripotent stem cells and definitive endoderm were not permissive for HCV infection whereas hepatic progenitor cells were persistently infected and secreted infectious particles into culture medium. Permissiveness to infection was correlated with induction of the liver-specific microRNA-122 and modulation of cellular factors that affect HCV replication. RNA interference directed toward essential cellular cofactors in stem cells resulted in HCV-resistant hepatocyte-like cells after differentiation. The ability to infect cultured cells directly with HCV patient serum, to study defined stages of viral permissiveness, and to produce genetically modified cells with desired phenotypes all have broad significance for host-pathogen interactions and cell therapy.

  12. Modelling of Mammalian cells and cell culture processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidoli, F R; Mantalaris, A; Asprey, S P

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian cell cultures represent the major source for a number of very high-value biopharmaceutical products, including monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), viral vaccines, and hormones. These products are produced in relatively small quantities due to the highly specialised culture conditions and their susceptibility to either reduced productivity or cell death as a result of slight deviations in the culture conditions. The use of mathematical relationships to characterise distinct parts of the physiological behaviour of mammalian cells and the systematic integration of this information into a coherent, predictive model, which can be used for simulation, optimisation, and control purposes would contribute to efforts to increase productivity and control product quality. Models can also aid in the understanding and elucidation of underlying mechanisms and highlight the lack of accuracy or descriptive ability in parts of the model where experimental and simulated data cannot be reconciled. This paper reviews developments in the modelling of mammalian cell cultures in the last decade and proposes a future direction - the incorporation of genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data, taking advantage of recent developments in these disciplines and thus improving model fidelity. Furthermore, with mammalian cell technology dependent on experiments for information, model-based experiment design is formally introduced, which when applied can result in the acquisition of more informative data from fewer experiments. This represents only part of a broader framework for model building and validation, which consists of three distinct stages: theoretical model assessment, model discrimination, and model precision, which provides a systematic strategy from assessing the identifiability and distinguishability of a set of competing models to improving the parameter precision of a final validated model.

  13. Effect of interferon on the development of Trypanosoma cruzi in tissue culture "Vero" cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Golgher

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented on the effects of interferon on the intracellular stages of T. cruzi in tissue culture "Vero" cells. Interferon was obtained by infecting monolayers of human amniotic cells with inactivated Newcastle disease virus. Interferon has not affected the cell infection by T. cruzi culture infective stages and neither has it prevented the transformation of amastigote into trypomastigote stages.Interferon obtido através da infecção de células amnióticas humanas por vírus inativado da doença de Newcastle foi incapaz de influir sobre a infectividade de formas de cultura do T. cruzi para células "Vero" de cultura de tecido. A transformação amastigota-tripomastigota também não foi afetada pelo interferon.

  14. [Infection progress of arbuscular mycorrhizae on tissue-cultured plantlets of Pinellia ternata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xuelian; Guo, Qiaosheng; Liu, Zuoyi; Zhu, Guosheng; Liu, Yongxiang

    2011-01-01

    To study the Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) formation progress and infection characteristics between tissue culture plantlets of Pinellia ternata and Glomus mosseae. The tissue culture plantlets of P. ternata were inoculated with G. mosseae, the formation of AM were sampled and observed with microscopy by staining. The hyphae of G. mosseae began to penetrate the root epidermis after 10 days of inoculation. Lots of intracellular hyphae formed in cortex cells at the 15th day. Arbuscules started to form and there were some hyphae on the root at the 20th day. At the 25th day, many arbuscules formed and most as Arum type. Some arbuscles started to disintegrate at the 30th day, and a few of vesicles occurred. Lots of spores formed after 35 days. At the 40th day, some vesicles began to decline. The hand section showed that the intercellular hyphae gradually formed in intercellular space, and the hyphae branched in cortex cells and occupied most cell lumen finally. It is expounded that P. ternata and G. mosseae could recognize each other quickly and form a symbiont system.

  15. Protection of cultured mammalian cells by rebamipide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi; Aramaki, Ryoji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kusumoto, Naotoshi

    1997-06-01

    Rebamipide which is used as a drug for gastritis and stomach ulcer has large capability for OH radical scavenging. It is expected that rebamipide has protective effect against ionizing radiations. The present paper deals with protective effect of rebamipide for cultured mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiations. As rebamipide is insoluble in water, three solvents were used to dissolve. Rebamipide dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl formamide (DMFA) and 0.02 N NaOH was added to the cells in Eagle`s minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and the cells were irradiated with X-rays. After irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, plated in MEM with 10% fetal calf serum and incubated for 7 days in a CO{sub 2} incubator to form colonies. Rebamipide dissolved in 0.02 N NaOH exhibited the protective effect expected its OH radical scavenging capability. However, the protective effect of rebamipide dissolved in DMSO was about half of that expected by its radical scavenging capability and that of rebamipide dissolved in DMFA was not observed. Uptake of rebamipide labeled with {sup 14}C increased with increasing contact time with rebamipide. These rebamipide mainly distributed in nucleus rather than cytoplasm. (author)

  16. Evaluation of glycogen assay,polymerase chain reaction,and cell culture for diagnostic value of chlamydia trachomatis infection%糖原试验、聚合酶链反应和细胞培养对沙眼衣原体感染的诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎玲; 李丹; 冯树异; 周劲松; 王双元

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study on glycogen assay,polymerae chain reaction,and cell culture for diagnostic value of chlamydia infection of vervical smeat.Methods 106 specimens were examined by using glycogen assay,PCR and cell culture.Results Compared with cell culture,the sensitivity and specifity of glycogen assay are 80.0% and 95.8% ,and the sensitivity and specifity of PCR are 90.0% and 97.9% ,respectively.Conclusion The glycogen assay possesses diagnostic value for chlamydia trachomatis infection of vervical smear.%目的探讨糖原试验、聚合酶链反应(PCR)和细胞培养法检测泌尿生殖道沙眼衣原体感染的诊断价值。方法用三种方法分别对106例女性门诊患者宫颈分泌物标本进行平行检测。结果以细胞培养作参比,糖原试验的敏感性为80.0%,特异性为95.8%;PCR敏感性为90.0%,特异性为97.9%。结论糖原试验对泌尿生殖道沙眼衣原体感染有一定诊断价值。

  17. Microfluidics and cancer analysis: cell separation, cell/tissue culture, cell mechanics, and integrated analysis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Dimitri

    2016-01-21

    Among the growing number of tools available for cancer studies, microfluidic systems have emerged as a promising analytical tool to elucidate cancer cell and tumor function. Microfluidic methods to culture cells have created approaches to provide a range of environments from single-cell analysis to complex three-dimensional devices. In this review we discuss recent advances in tumor cell culture, cancer cell analysis, and advanced studies enabled by microfluidic systems.

  18. Growth in agarose of human cells infected with cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, D J; Montagnier, L; Latarjet, R

    1974-08-01

    After infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV), human diploid fibroblasts could grow in agarose medium for several generations. Clones of infected cells grew for weeks, although in every case they ultimately underwent lysis owing to the cytopathic effect of the virus. Virus was inoculated at high dilution and after UV irradiation in an effort to derive cells infected with noninfectious defective particles still capable of inducing cell stimulation. Dilute or irradiated virus occasionally yielded large colonies of replicating cells, although permanent transformation was not observed. One clone derived from UV-CMV-infected cells was passaged four times before undergoing lysis. During these passages the cells exhibited alterations in morphology and orientation.

  19. CD8+ T cells in Leishmania infections: friends or foes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona eStager

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Host protection against several intracellular pathogens requires the induction of CD8+ T cell responses. CD8+ T cells are potent effector cells that can produce high amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines and kill infected target cells efficiently. However, a protective role for CD8+ T cells during Leishmania infections is still controversial and largely depends on the infection model. In this review, we discuss the role of CD8+ T cells during various types Leishmania infections, following vaccination, and as potential immunotherapeutic targets.

  20. Cell-mediated immune response to Leishmania chagasi experimental infection of BALB/c immunosuppressed mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JG Machado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, presents a significant impact on immunosupressed patients. This study aimed to evaluate Leishmania chagasi infection in BALB/c mice immunosuppressed with dexamethasone. Spleen cells stimulated or not with L. chagasi were cultured for cytokine quantification (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 by sandwich ELISA. Parasite loads in the spleen and liver were determined by means of culture microtitration. Immunosuppressed groups showed statistically lower spleen weight and CD4-cell percentage in blood on the day of infection and produced Th1 and Th2 cytokines on other days of the study. The other infected groups, weather immunosupressed or not, also produced Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Parasite loads in the spleen and liver were not statistically different among the groups. It was concluded that L. chagasi infection was not affected by dexamethasone-induced immunosuppression, probably due the reversible effect of the treatment.

  1. Proteolytic Activation of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Coronavirus Spike Fusion Protein by Trypsin in Cell Culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicht, Oliver|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/32291177X; Li, Wentao; Willems, Lione; Meuleman, Tom J; Wubbolts, Richard W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/181688255; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156614723; Rottier, Peter J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068451954; Bosch, Berend Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/273306049

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) from clinical material in cell culture requires supplementation of trypsin. This may relate to the confinement of PEDV natural infection to the protease-rich small intestine of pigs. Our study focused on the role of protease activity on infec

  2. Proteolytic Activation of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Coronavirus Spike Fusion Protein by Trypsin in Cell Culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicht, Oliver; Li, Wentao; Willems, Lione; Meuleman, Tom J; Wubbolts, Richard W; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Rottier, Peter J M; Bosch, Berend Jan

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) from clinical material in cell culture requires supplementation of trypsin. This may relate to the confinement of PEDV natural infection to the protease-rich small intestine of pigs. Our study focused on the role of protease activity on infec

  3. Purification of infectious canine parvovirus from cell culture by affinity chromatography with monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Groen (Jan); N. Juntti; J.S. Teppema; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractImmuno affinity chromatography with virus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, directed to the haemagglutinating protein of canine parvovirus (CPV) was used to purify and concentrate CPV from infected cell culture. The procedure was monitored by testing the respective fractions in an infe

  4. System-level modeling and simulation of the cell culture microfluidic biochip ProCell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    -defined micro-channels using valves and pumps. We present an approach to the system-level modeling and simulation of a cell culture microfluidic biochip called ProCell, Programmable Cell Culture Chip. ProCell contains a cell culture chamber, which is envisioned to run 256 simultaneous experiments (viewed...

  5. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisler, William L; Timm, David M; Gage, Jacob A; Tseng, Hubert; Killian, T C; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-10-01

    Recently, biomedical research has moved toward cell culture in three dimensions to better recapitulate native cellular environments. This protocol describes one method for 3D culture, the magnetic levitation method (MLM), in which cells bind with a magnetic nanoparticle assembly overnight to render them magnetic. When resuspended in medium, an external magnetic field levitates and concentrates cells at the air-liquid interface, where they aggregate to form larger 3D cultures. The resulting cultures are dense, can synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) and can be analyzed similarly to the other culture systems using techniques such as immunohistochemical analysis (IHC), western blotting and other biochemical assays. This protocol details the MLM and other associated techniques (cell culture, imaging and IHC) adapted for the MLM. The MLM requires 45 min of working time over 2 d to create 3D cultures that can be cultured in the long term (>7 d).

  6. HTLV-1-infected thymic epithelial cells convey the virus to CD4(+) T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Barros, Luciana Rodrigues; Linhares-Lacerda, Leandra; Moreira-Ramos, Klaysa; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Machado Motta, Maria Cristina; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Savino, Wilson

    2017-08-14

    The human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). CD4(+)T cells are the main target of HTLV-1, but other cell types are known to be infected, including immature lymphocytes. Developing T cells undergo differentiation in the thymus, through migration and interaction with the thymic microenvironment, in particular with thymic epithelial cells (TEC) the major component of this three dimensional meshwork of non-lymphoid cells. Herein, we show that TEC express the receptors for HTLV-1 and can be infected by this virus through cell-cell contact and by cell-free virus suspensions. The expression of anti-apoptosis, chemokine and adhesion molecules genes are altered in HTLV-1-infected TEC, although gene expression of antigen presentation molecules remained unchanged. Furthermore, HTLV-1-infected TEC transmitted the virus to a CD4(+) T cell line and to CD4(+) T cells from healthy donors, during in vitro cellular co-cultures. Altogether, our data point to the possibility that the human thymic epithelial cells play a role in the establishment and progression of HTLV-1 infection, functioning as a reservoir and transmitting the virus to maturing CD4(+) T lymphocytes, which in turn will cause disease in the periphery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. 293SF metabolic flux analysis during cell growth and infection with an adenoviral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, I; Jacob, D; Perrier, M; Kamen, A

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic flux quantification of cell culture is becoming a crucial means to improve cell growth as well as protein and vector productions. The technique allows rapid determination of cell culture status, thus providing a tool for further feeding improvements. Herein, we report on key results of a metabolic investigation using 293 cells adapted to suspension and serum-free medium (293SF) during growth and infection with an adenoviral vector encoding the green fluorescence protein (GFP). The model developed contains 35 fluxes, which include the main fluxes of glycolysis, glutaminolysis, and amino acids pathways. It requires specific consumption and production rate measurements of amino acids, glucose, lactate, NH(3), and O(2), as well as DNA and total proteins biosynthesis rate measurements. Also, it was found that extracellular protein concentration measurement is important for flux calculation accuracy. With this model, we are able to describe the 293SF cell metabolism, grown under different culture conditions in a 3-L controlled bioreactor for batch and fed-batch with low glucose. The metabolism is also investigated during infection under two different feeding strategies: a fed-batch starting at the end of the growth phase and extending during infection without medium change and a fed-batch after infection following medium renewal. Differences in metabolism are observed between growth and infection, as well as between the different feeding strategies, thus providing a better understanding of the general metabolism.

  8. Primary culture of Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae salivary gland cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda F Rocha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we developed a primary culture of Rhodnius prolixus salivary gland and main salivary canal cells. Cells remained viable in culture for 30 days. Three types of cells were indentified in the salivary gland cultures, with binuclear cells being the most abundant. The supernatants of salivary cultures contained mainly 16-24 kDa proteins and presented anticoagulant and apyrase activities. Secretion vesicles were observed budding from the cellular monolayer of the main salivary canal cells. These results indicate that R. prolixus salivary proteins may be produced in vitro and suggest that the main salivary canal may have a possible secretory role.

  9. Risk of Abnormal Red Blood Cell to Get Malarial Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2008-01-01

    Malarial infection in red blood cell disorder is an interesting topic in tropical medicine. In this work, the author proposes a new idea on the physical property of red blood cell and risk for getting malarial infection. The study on scenario of red blood cell disorders is performed. Conclusively, the author found that physical property of red blood cell is an important determinant for getting malarial infection

  10. Productive homologous and non-homologous recombination of hepatitis C virus in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Galli, Andrea; Li, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    . In addition, recombination is an important regulatory mechanism of cytopathogenicity for the related pestiviruses. Here we describe recombination of HCV RNA in cell culture leading to production of infectious virus. Initially, hepatoma cells were co-transfected with a replicating JFH1ΔE1E2 genome (genotype 2a......) lacking functional envelope genes and strain J6 (2a), which has functional envelope genes but does not replicate in culture. After an initial decrease in the number of HCV positive cells, infection spread after 13-36 days. Sequencing of recovered viruses revealed non-homologous recombinants with J6...

  11. Maximum growth rate of Mycobacterium avium in continuous culture or chronically infected BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C M; Taylor, M A; Dennis, M W

    1987-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a human pathogen which may cause either chronic or disseminated disease and the organism exhibits a slow rate of growth. This study provides information on the growth rate of the organism in chronically infected mice and its maximal growth rate in vitro. M. avium was grown in continuous culture, limited for nitrogen with 0.5 mM ammonium chloride and dilution rates that ranged from 0.054 to 0.153 h-1. The steady-state concentration of ammonia nitrogen and M. avium cells for each dilution rate were determined. The bacterial saturation constant for growth-limiting ammonia was 0.29 mM (4 micrograms nitrogen/ml) and, from this, the maximal growth rate for M. avium was estimated to be 0.206 h-1 or a doubling time of 3.4 h. BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with 3 x 10(6) colony-forming units and a chronic infection resulted, typical of virulent M. avium strains. During a period of 3 months, the number of mycobacteria remained constant in the lungs, but increased 30-fold and 8,900-fold, respectively, in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. The latter increase appeared to be due to proliferation in situ. The generation time of M. avium in the mesenteric lymph nodes was estimated to be 7 days.

  12. Localization of Vibrio vulnificus infection in dendritic cells and its effects on the cytoskeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-gang; XU Shui-ling; SHAO Ping-yang; BAO Yi; CUI Ge; CAI Yu-jie

    2012-01-01

    Background Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) is an estuarine bacterium that can cause primary septicemia as well as serious wound infections.However,little is known about the mechanisms by which Vv infects dendritic cells (DCs) and its effects on cytoskeleton.In this study,we aimed to investigate the invasion,internalization,and the organelles damage of the cultured dendritic cells (a DC 2.4 strain) during Vv infection.Methods The study model was the cultured DCs infected by a Vv 1.758 strain.Electron microscopy was used to observe the localization of bacteria at the different time points of infection,cell morphology,and the process of organelles changes.The cytoskeleton structure including the microfilaments and the microtubules rearrangement was examined under a fluorescence microscope.Results The Vv were pinocytosised into the DC cells through double-sides,and localized at 1-2 μm of the inner side membrane.It took 1.3,1.9,and 3.4 hours to reach the infection ratio of 25%,50%,and 75%,respectively.Using electron microscopy,the DCs had been observed to have developed chromatin aggregation within 4.0 hours,and significant cytoskeleton structure disruption was noted within 6.0 hours.Conclusion The high lethality of Vv infection may be associated with the direct disruption of the DCs cytoskeleton structure.

  13. Liposome-siRNA-peptide complexes cross the blood-brain barrier and significantly decrease PrP on neuronal cells and PrP in infected cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Pulford

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent advances toward an effective therapy for prion diseases employ RNA interference to suppress PrP(C expression and subsequent prion neuropathology, exploiting the phenomenon that disease severity and progression correlate with host PrP(C expression levels. However, delivery of lentivirus encoding PrP shRNA has demonstrated only modest efficacy in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a new siRNA delivery system incorporating a small peptide that binds siRNA and acetylcholine receptors (AchRs, acting as a molecular messenger for delivery to neurons, and cationic liposomes that protect siRNA-peptide complexes from serum degradation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Liposome-siRNA-peptide complexes (LSPCs delivered PrP siRNA specifically to AchR-expressing cells, suppressed PrP(C expression and eliminated PrP(RES formation in vitro. LSPCs injected intravenously into mice resisted serum degradation and delivered PrP siRNA throughout the brain to AchR and PrP(C-expressing neurons. These data promote LSPCs as effective vehicles for delivery of PrP and other siRNAs specifically to neurons to treat prion and other neuropathological diseases.

  14. Modeling malaria infected cells in microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffiee, Amir Hossein; Dabiri, Sadegh; Motavalizadeh Ardekani, Arezoo

    2016-11-01

    Plasmodim (P.) falciparum is one of the deadliest types of malaria species that invades healthy red blood cells (RBC) in human blood flow. This parasite develops through 48-hour intra-RBC process leading to significant morphological and mechanical (e.g., stiffening) changes in RBC membrane. These changes have remarkable effects on blood circulation such as increase in flow resistance and obstruction in microcirculation. In this work a computational framework is developed to model RBC suspension in blood flow using front-tracking technique. The present study focuses on blood flow behavior under normal and infected circumstances and predicts changes in blood rheology for different levels of parasitemia and hematocrit. This model allows better understanding of blood flow circulation up to a single cell level and provides us with realistic and deep insight into hematologic diseases such as malaria.

  15. Baculovirus per os Infectivity Factors Are Involved in HearNPV ODVs Infection of HzAM1 Cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting JIANG; Xiang LI; Jian-hua SONG; Chang-yong LIANG; Xin-wen CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Baculoviruses produce two viral phenotypes, the budded virus (BV) and the occlusion-derived virus (ODV). ODVs are released from occlusion bodies in the midgut where they initiate a primary infection. Due to the lack of an in vitro system, the molecular mechanism of ODV infection is still unclear. Here we present data demonstrating that Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV) ODV infected cultured Hz-AM1 cells in a pH dependent manner. The optimal pH for ODV infection was 8.5, which is same to that in the microvilli of midgut epithelial cells, the ODV native infection sites. Antibodies neutralization analysis indicated that four HearNPV oral infection essential genes p74, pif-1, pif-2 and pif-3 are also essential for HearNPV ODV infection in vitro. Thus, HearNPV-HzAM1 system can be used to analyze the mechanism of ODV entry.

  16. Influenza H5N1 virus infection of polarized human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Kit M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is entrenched in poultry in Asia and Africa and continues to infect humans zoonotically causing acute respiratory disease syndrome and death. There is evidence that the virus may sometimes spread beyond respiratory tract to cause disseminated infection. The primary target cell for HPAI H5N1 virus in human lung is the alveolar epithelial cell. Alveolar epithelium and its adjacent lung microvascular endothelium form host barriers to the initiation of infection and dissemination of influenza H5N1 infection in humans. These are polarized cells and the polarity of influenza virus entry and egress as well as the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from the virus infected cells are likely to be central to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Aim To study influenza A (H5N1 virus replication and host innate immune responses in polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells and its relevance to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Methods We use an in vitro model of polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells grown in transwell culture inserts to compare infection with influenza A subtype H1N1 and H5N1 viruses via the apical or basolateral surfaces. Results We demonstrate that both influenza H1N1 and H5N1 viruses efficiently infect alveolar epithelial cells from both apical and basolateral surface of the epithelium but release of newly formed virus is mainly from the apical side of the epithelium. In contrast, influenza H5N1 virus, but not H1N1 virus, efficiently infected polarized microvascular endothelial cells from both apical and basolateral aspects. This provides a mechanistic explanation for how H5N1 virus may infect the lung from systemic circulation. Epidemiological evidence has implicated ingestion of virus-contaminated foods as the source of infection in some instances and our

  17. In vitro culture of embryonic mouse intestinal epithelium: cell differentiation and introduction of reporter genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hornsey Mark A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Study of the normal development of the intestinal epithelium has been hampered by a lack of suitable model systems, in particular ones that enable the introduction of exogenous genes. Production of such a system would advance our understanding of normal epithelial development and help to shed light on the pathogenesis of intestinal neoplasia. The criteria for a reliable culture system include the ability to perform real time observations and manipulations in vitro, the preparation of wholemounts for immunostaining and the potential for introducing genes. Results The new culture system involves growing mouse embryo intestinal explants on fibronectin-coated coverslips in basal Eagle's medium+20% fetal bovine serum. Initially the cultures maintain expression of the intestinal transcription factor Cdx2 together with columnar epithelial (cytokeratin 8 and mesenchymal (smooth muscle actin markers. Over a few days of culture, differentiation markers appear characteristic of absorptive epithelium (sucrase-isomaltase, goblet cells (Periodic Acid Schiff positive, enteroendocrine cells (chromogranin A and Paneth cells (lysozyme. Three different approaches were tested to express genes in the developing cultures: transfection, electroporation and adenoviral infection. All could introduce genes into the mesenchyme, but only to a small extent into the epithelium. However the efficiency of adenovirus infection can be greatly improved by a limited enzyme digestion, which makes accessible the lateral faces of cells bearing the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor. This enables reliable delivery of genes into epithelial cells. Conclusion We describe a new in vitro culture system for the small intestine of the mouse embryo that recapitulates its normal development. The system both provides a model for studying normal development of the intestinal epithelium and also allows for the manipulation of gene expression. The explants can be cultured for up

  18. Culturing of Human Nasal Epithelial Cells at the Air Liquid Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E.; Carson, Johnny L.; Fischer, William A.; Jaspers, Ilona

    2013-01-01

    In vitro models using human primary epithelial cells are essential in understanding key functions of the respiratory epithelium in the context of microbial infections or inhaled agents. Direct comparisons of cells obtained from diseased populations allow us to characterize different phenotypes and dissect the underlying mechanisms mediating changes in epithelial cell function. Culturing epithelial cells from the human tracheobronchial region has been well documented, but is limited by the availability of human lung tissue or invasiveness associated with obtaining the bronchial brushes biopsies. Nasal epithelial cells are obtained through much less invasive superficial nasal scrape biopsies and subjects can be biopsied multiple times with no significant side effects. Additionally, the nose is the entry point to the respiratory system and therefore one of the first sites to be exposed to any kind of air-borne stressor, such as microbial agents, pollutants, or allergens. Briefly, nasal epithelial cells obtained from human volunteers are expanded on coated tissue culture plates, and then transferred onto cell culture inserts. Upon reaching confluency, cells continue to be cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI), for several weeks, which creates more physiologically relevant conditions. The ALI culture condition uses defined media leading to a differentiated epithelium that exhibits morphological and functional characteristics similar to the human nasal epithelium, with both ciliated and mucus producing cells. Tissue culture inserts with differentiated nasal epithelial cells can be manipulated in a variety of ways depending on the research questions (treatment with pharmacological agents, transduction with lentiviral vectors, exposure to gases, or infection with microbial agents) and analyzed for numerous different endpoints ranging from cellular and molecular pathways, functional changes, morphology, etc. In vitro models of differentiated human nasal epithelial

  19. Culturing of human nasal epithelial cells at the air liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E; Carson, Johnny L; Fischer, William A; Jaspers, Ilona

    2013-10-08

    In vitro models using human primary epithelial cells are essential in understanding key functions of the respiratory epithelium in the context of microbial infections or inhaled agents. Direct comparisons of cells obtained from diseased populations allow us to characterize different phenotypes and dissect the underlying mechanisms mediating changes in epithelial cell function. Culturing epithelial cells from the human tracheobronchial region has been well documented, but is limited by the availability of human lung tissue or invasiveness associated with obtaining the bronchial brushes biopsies. Nasal epithelial cells are obtained through much less invasive superficial nasal scrape biopsies and subjects can be biopsied multiple times with no significant side effects. Additionally, the nose is the entry point to the respiratory system and therefore one of the first sites to be exposed to any kind of air-borne stressor, such as microbial agents, pollutants, or allergens. Briefly, nasal epithelial cells obtained from human volunteers are expanded on coated tissue culture plates, and then transferred onto cell culture inserts. Upon reaching confluency, cells continue to be cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI), for several weeks, which creates more physiologically relevant conditions. The ALI culture condition uses defined media leading to a differentiated epithelium that exhibits morphological and functional characteristics similar to the human nasal epithelium, with both ciliated and mucus producing cells. Tissue culture inserts with differentiated nasal epithelial cells can be manipulated in a variety of ways depending on the research questions (treatment with pharmacological agents, transduction with lentiviral vectors, exposure to gases, or infection with microbial agents) and analyzed for numerous different endpoints ranging from cellular and molecular pathways, functional changes, morphology, etc. In vitro models of differentiated human nasal epithelial

  20. Polydimethylsiloxane SlipChip for mammalian cell culture applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Wen; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2015-11-07

    This paper reports a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SlipChip for in vitro cell culture applications, multiple-treatment assays, cell co-cultures, and cytokine detection assays. The PDMS SlipChip is composed of two PDMS layers with microfluidic channels on each surface that are separated by a thin silicone fluid (Si-fluid) layer. The integration of Si-fluid enables the two PDMS layers to be slid to different positions; therefore, the channel patterns can be re-arranged for various applications. The SlipChip design significantly reduces the complexity of sample handling, transportation, and treatment processes. To apply the developed SlipChip for cell culture applications, human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549) and lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) were cultured to examine the biocompatibility of the developed PDMS SlipChip. Moreover, embryonic pluripotent stem cells (ES-D3) were also cultured in the device to evaluate the retention of their stemness in the device. The experimental results show that cell morphology, viability and proliferation are not affected when the cells are cultured in the SlipChip, indicating that the device is highly compatible with mammalian cell culture. In addition, the stemness of the ES-D3 cells was highly retained after they were cultured in the device, suggesting the feasibility of using the SlipChip for stem cell research. Various cell experiments, such as simultaneous triple staining of cells and co-culture of MRC-5 with A549 cells, were also performed to demonstrate the functionalities of the PDMS SlipChip. Furthermore, we used a cytokine detection assay to evaluate the effect of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) treatment on the cytokine secretion of A549 cells using the SlipChip. The developed PDMS SlipChip provides a straightforward and effective platform for various on-chip in vitro cell cultures and consequent analysis, which is promising for a number of cell biology studies and biomedical applications.

  1. Organ culture-cell culture system for studying multistage carcinogenesis in respiratory epithelium. [Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, Vernon E.; Marchok, Ann C.; Nettesheim, Paul

    1977-01-01

    An organ culture-cell culture system was used to demonstrate carcinogen dose-dependent transformation of tracheal epithelial cells in vitro. Tracheal explants were exposed to MNNG (N-methyl-N/sup 1/-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine) in organ culture. Outgrowths from these explants provided epithelial cell cultures. The numbers of long term epithelial cell cultures and cell lines that were established per explant increased as MNNG exposure concentration increased. At the present time, more cell lines derived from explants exposed to the highest MNNG concentration have produced palpable tumors than cell lines derived from explants exposed to lower MNNG concentrations. No cell lines were established from primaries derived from control explants. TPA (12-0-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate), stimulates DNA synthesis in tracheal epithelium in organ culture in a manner simular to that described for mouse skin. Short exposures to TPA not only stimulated DNA synthesis earlier, but the stimulation was greater than that obtained with continuous exposure. At the present time, exposure of tracheal organ cultures to MNNG followed by TPA has resulted in an enhanced production of morphologically altered cells in primary epithelial cell cultures, than exposure to either agent alone.

  2. Routine Surveillance for Bloodstream Infections in a Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Cohort: Do Patients Benefit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Rigby

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients are at a high risk for late bloodstream infection (BSI. Controversy exists regarding the benefit of surveillance blood cultures in this immunosuppressed population. Despite the common use of this practice, the practical value is not well established in non-neutropenic children following HSCT.

  3. Detection and identification of microbes in prosthetic joint infections by culture and molecular methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yijuan; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Ehrlich, Garth

    Bacterial biofilms have been observed in many device-related infections including orthopedic implants. This mode of growth makes the infection difficult to treat and constitutes a challenge to current sampling procedures and culture practices to obtain a reliable diagnosis. The aim of the study...

  4. Population structure of mixed Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is strain genotype and culture medium dependent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanekom, M.; Streicher, E.M.; Berg, D. Van den; Cox, H.; McDermid, C.; Bosman, M.; Pittius, N.C. Gey van; Victor, T.C.; Kidd, M.; Soolingen, D. van; Helden, P.D. van; Warren, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Molecular genotyping methods have shown infection with more than one Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain genotype in a single sputum culture, indicating mixed infection. AIM: This study aimed to develop a PCR-based genotyping tool to determine the population structure of M. tuberculosis st

  5. High immunogenic enterovirus 71 strain and its production using serum-free microcarrier Vero cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chyi; Lian, Wei-Cheng; Butler, Michael; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2007-01-01

    Developing an effective vaccine against enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection provides the best means to control the disease. We have previously reported that large-scale preparation of a low immunogenic EV71 strain can be achieved using serum free microcarrier Vero cell culture in a 2-l bioreactor [Wu SC, Liu CC, Lian WC. Optimization of microcarrier cell culture process for the inactivated enterovirus type 71 vaccine development. Vaccine 2004;22:3858-64]. This present work further investigated the virus growth and the immunogenicity of two high immunogenic strains (EV71-075 and EV71-117) prepared in serum-free microcarrier cell cultures. Our results showed that serum free culture increased cell death rate after infection, reduced the virus specific productivity, but resulted in elicitation of higher neutralizing titers in immunized mice as compared to that parallel obtained in serum-containing cultures. Therefore, serum-free microcarrier culture is a valuable process for developing inactivated EV71 vaccines.

  6. Inhibition of Fusarium solani Infection in Murine Keratocytes by Lactobacillus salivarius ssp. salivarius JCM1231 Culture Filtrate In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianzhang; Chen, Fang; Kan, Tong; Zhuang, Hua; Zhang, Jingjin; Han, Xiaoli

    2017-06-21

    To explore the inhibitory activity of Lactobacillus salivarius ssp. salivarius JCM1231 (L. salivarius JCM1231) culture filtrate against Fusarium solani (F. solani) and its effects on murine keratocytes (MKs) infected with F. solani. L. salivarius JCM1231 was cultured in an anaerobic incubator for 24 h, and the L. salivarius culture filtrate (LSCF) was prepared .The antifungal activity of L. salivarius JCM1231 against F. solani was determined with a plate overlay assay, agar diffusion assay, and conidial germination inhibition test. The effects of temperature, pH, and proteolytic enzymes on the antifungal activity of LSCF were detected with microtiter plate-well assay and conidial germination inhibition assay. Furthermore, the effects of LSCF on MKs infected with F. solani were detected. Cell activity and apoptosis were measured using methylthiazoletetrazolium assays and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) cytokines were measured using real-time polymerase chain reactions and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), and mycotoxin production was detected with high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Conidial germination and mycelia growth of F. solani were significantly inhibited by LSCF. The antifungal substances produced by L. salivarius JCM1231 were heat unstable, proteinaceous, and sensitive to proteolytic enzymes and were active within a narrow acidic pH range between 2.0 and 4.0. In the presence of 15 µg/ml of LSCF, cell activity was significantly increased, and cell apoptosis, the level of IL-6 and TNF-α expressions, and mycotoxin (zearalenone and fumonisin B1) productions were decreased significantly in MKs infected with F. solani. L. salivarius JCM1231 culture filtrate can effectively inhibit F. solani growth and protect MKs against F. solani infection.

  7. IL-15 induces unspecific effector functions in human peptide-specific CD8+ T-cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrand, S T; Würtzen, P A; Ødum, N

    2002-01-01

    . Secondary IMP-specific CD8+ T cells were generated by the addition of IL-2 during two cycles of restimulation. From the third restimulation, identical CTL cultures were expanded with either IL-2 or IL-15 in parallel. Cell expansion as well as Ag specificity was considerably reduced after a 5 day culture......Antigen (Ag)-specific CD8+ T cells are a major host defence against viral infections. In the present study, we generated human CD8+ T-cell lines specific towards influenza matrix peptide (IMP)-pulsed Ag-presenting cells. We compared the effect of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-15 on the proliferation...... and cytotoxic activity of primary and secondary IMP-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) culture. In primary CTL cultures, IL-15-induced cell expansion was considerably reduced as compared with IL-2-induced cell expansion, and IL-15 favoured the outgrowth of CTLs without peptide specificity in these cultures...

  8. Latent KSHV Infected Endothelial Cells Are Glutamine Addicted and Require Glutaminolysis for Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Sanchez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS. KSHV establishes a predominantly latent infection in the main KS tumor cell type, the spindle cell, which is of endothelial cell origin. KSHV requires the induction of multiple metabolic pathways, including glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis, for the survival of latently infected endothelial cells. Here we demonstrate that latent KSHV infection leads to increased levels of intracellular glutamine and enhanced glutamine uptake. Depletion of glutamine from the culture media leads to a significant increase in apoptotic cell death in latently infected endothelial cells, but not in their mock-infected counterparts. In cancer cells, glutamine is often required for glutaminolysis to provide intermediates for the tri-carboxylic acid (TCA cycle and support for the production of biosynthetic and bioenergetic precursors. In the absence of glutamine, the TCA cycle intermediates alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG and pyruvate prevent the death of latently infected cells. Targeted drug inhibition of glutaminolysis also induces increased cell death in latently infected cells. KSHV infection of endothelial cells induces protein expression of the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5. Chemical inhibition of SLC1A5, or knockdown by siRNA, leads to similar cell death rates as glutamine deprivation and, similarly, can be rescued by αKG. KSHV also induces expression of the heterodimeric transcription factors c-Myc-Max and related heterodimer MondoA-Mlx. Knockdown of MondoA inhibits expression of both Mlx and SLC1A5 and induces a significant increase in cell death of only cells latently infected with KSHV, again, fully rescued by the supplementation of αKG. Therefore, during latent infection of endothelial cells, KSHV activates and requires the Myc/MondoA-network to upregulate the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5, leading to increased glutamine uptake for glutaminolysis. These findings

  9. Growth of the Pittsburgh Pneumonia Agent in Animal Cell Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Rinaldo, Charles R.; Pasculle, A. William; Myerowitz, Richard L.; Gress, Francis M.; Dowling, John N.

    1981-01-01

    Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (Legionella micdadei) grew in monkey, chicken, and human cell cultures. Pittsburgh pneumonia agent grew predominantly in the cytoplasm, resulting in a nonfocal, mild cytopathic effect.

  10. Transforming Growth Factor-β Expression Induced by Rhinovirus Infection in Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amrita DOSANJH

    2006-01-01

    Rhinovirus infection of the lower airways is now a recognized disease, associated with bronchiolitis and asthma. The bronchial epithelial cells are the host cells when rhinovirus infection occurs in the airway. It was hypothesized that a pro-fibrotic growth factor response may occur in these infected cells,leading to production of a key transforming growth factor, TGF-β-1. Bronchial epithelial cells were inoculated with human rhinovirus and compared at day 1, 3 and 5 to control non-infected cells. Cell culture supernatant fluid and cellular RNA were isolated. The amount of released TGF-β protein was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Expression of TGF-β at the level of transcription was measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis. The results show that at all time points studied, TGF-β production is greater in the infected cells, as demonstrated by ELISA (P<0.05) and by semiquantitative PCR analysis. It was concluded that bronchial epithelial cells infected with common cold virus and rhinovirus, showed higher levels of TGF-β. The production of TGF-β may be indicative of a normal repair mechanism to counter inflammation, or in the setting of persistent asthma, could potentially lead to increased fibrosis and collagen deposition.

  11. Particle Trajectories in Rotating Wall Cell Culture Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran N.; Downey, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell cultures are extremely important to the medical community since such cultures provide an opportunity to perform research on human tissue without the concerns inherent in experiments on individual humans. Development of cells in cultures has been found to be greatly influenced by the conditions of the culture. Much work has focused on the effect of the motions of cells in the culture relative to the solution. Recently rotating wall vessels have been used with success in achieving improved cellular cultures. Speculation and limited research have focused on the low shear environment and the ability of rotating vessels to keep cells suspended in solution rather than floating or sedimenting as the primary reasons for the improved cellular cultures using these devices. It is widely believed that the cultures obtained using a rotating wall vessel simulates to some degree the effect of microgravity on cultures. It has also been speculated that the microgravity environment may provide the ideal acceleration environment for culturing of cellular tissues due to the nearly negligible levels of sedimentation and shear possible. This work predicts particle trajectories of cells in rotating wall vessels of cylindrical and annular design consistent with the estimated properties of typical cellular cultures. Estimates of the shear encountered by cells in solution and the interactions with walls are studied. Comparisons of potential experiments in ground and microgravity environments are performed.

  12. Cell culture chip using low-shear mass transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Pitchimani, Rajasekar; Dang, Dana; Bayer, Keith; Harrington, Tyler; Pappas, Dimitri

    2008-06-03

    We have developed a flow cell that allows culturing adherent cells as well as suspended cells in a stable, homogeneous, and low-shear force environment. The device features continuous medium supply and waste exchange. In this paper, a simple and fast protocol for device design, fabrication, and assembly (sealing) based on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PMDS)/glass slide hybrid structure is described. The cell culture system performance was monitored, and the effective shear force inside the culture well was also determined. By manipulating the device dimensions and volumetric flow rate, shear stress was controlled during experiments. Cell adhesion, growth, proliferation, and death over long-term culture periods were observed by microscopy. The growth of both endothelial and suspension cells in this device exhibited comparable characteristics to those of traditional approaches. The low-shear culture device significantly reduced shear stress encountered in microfluidic systems, allowing both adherent and suspended cells to be grown in a simple device.

  13. Three-dimensional Tissue Culture Based on Magnetic Cell Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Glauco R.; Molina, Jennifer R.; Raphael, Robert M.; Ozawa, Michael G.; Stark, Daniel J.; Levin, Carly S.; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A.; Gelovani, Juri G.

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool for drug discovery, tissue engineering, and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional (2D) cell growth with gene expression, signaling, and morphology that can differ from those in vivo and thus compromise clinical relevancy1–5. Here we report a three-dimensional (3D) culture of cells based on magnetic levitation in the presence of hydrogels containing gold and magnetic iron oxide (MIO) nanoparticles plus filamentous bacteriophage. This methodology allows for control of cell mass geometry and guided, multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture through spatial variance of the magnetic field. Moreover, magnetic levitation of human glioblastoma cells demonstrates similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumor xenografts. Taken together, these results suggest levitated 3D culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and allows for long-term multi-cellular studies. PMID:20228788

  14. HAIR CELL-LIKE CELL GENERATION INDUCED BY NATURE CULTURE OF ADULT RAT AUDITORY EPITHELIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hui; Zhu Hongliang; Li Shengli; Yao Xiaobao; Wang Xiaoxia

    2006-01-01

    Objective To establish adult rat auditory epithelial cell culture and try to find precursor cells of auditory hair cells in vitro. Methods With refinement of culture media and techniques, cochlear sensory epithelial cells of adult rat were cultured. Immunocytochemistry and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)labeling were used to detect properties and mitotic status of cultured cells. Results The cultured auditory epithelial cells showed a large, flat epithelial morphotype and expressed F-actin and cytokeratin, a subset of cells generated from auditory epithelium were labeled by calretinin, a specific marker of early hair cell. Conclusion Adult rat auditory epithelium can be induced to generate hair cell-like cells by nature culture, this phenomenon suggests that progenitor cells may exist in rat cochlea and they may give birth to new hair cells. Whether these progenitor cells are tissue specific stem cells is still need more study.

  15. Permissive human cytomegalovirus infection of a first trimester extravillous cytotrophoblast cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaMarca Heather L

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is the leading cause of congenital viral infection in the United States and Europe. Despite the significant morbidity associated with prenatal HCMV infection, little is known about how the virus infects the fetus during pregnancy. To date, primary human cytotrophoblasts (CTBs have been utilized to study placental HCMV infection and replication; however, the minimal mitotic potential of these cells restricts experimentation to a few days, which may be problematic for mechanistic studies of the slow-replicating virus. The aim of this study was to determine whether the human first trimester CTB cell line SGHPL-4 was permissive for HCMV infection and therefore could overcome such limitations. HCMV immediate early (IE protein expression was detected as early as 3 hours post-infection in SGHPL-4 cells and progressively increased as a function of time. HCMV growth assays revealed the presence of infectious virus in both cell lysates and culture supernatants, indicating that viral replication and the release of progeny virus occurred. Compared to human fibroblasts, viral replication was delayed in CTBs, consistent with previous studies reporting delayed viral kinetics in HCMV-infected primary CTBs. These results indicate that SGHPL-4 cells are fully permissive for the complete HCMV replicative cycle. Our findings suggest that these cells may serve as useful tools for future mechanistic studies of HCMV pathogenesis during early pregnancy.

  16. Dissociated neurons of the pupal blowfly antenna in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, A; Iwama, A

    1995-12-01

    Primary cell cultures are useful for studying the function of neurons in a simplified and controlled environment. We established a primary culture of antennal cells from pupal blowflies in order to investigate olfactory receptor neurons. In cultures, neuron-like cells were identified on the basis of morphology and immunocytochemical characterization with anti-HRP staining. Neuron-like cells showed variety in the extension pattern of neurites. Many neuron-like cells extended a single prominent long process, which reached about 200 microm after four days, and several short ones. However, some neuron-like cells differentiated in other ways; some exhibited bipolar or multipolar processes, distinct from intact olfactory receptor neurons. The size of cell bodies of neuron-like cells as divisible into two groups; approx. 7 microm diameter and 10-15 microm diameter. Neuron-like cells in culture will provide a good model for electrophysiological analysis and for developmental studies of olfactory receptor neurons.

  17. Interactions of virulent and avirulent leptospires with primary cultures of renal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballard, S A; Williamson, M; Adler, B

    1986-01-01

    A primary culture system for the cells of mouse renal-tubular epithelium was established and used to observe the adhesion of leptospires. Virulent strains of serovars copenhageni and ballum attached themselves to epithelial cells within 3 h of infection whereas an avirulent variant of serovar...... copenhageni did not adhere to epithelial cells at all within the experimental period of 24 h. The saprophytic Leptospira biflexa serovar patoc became attached non-specifically to inert glass surfaces as well as to the cells. The adhesion of leptospires to epithelial cells was not inhibited by homologous...

  18. Usability and Applicability of Microfluidic Cell Culture Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Mette

    Microfluidic cell culture has been a research area with great attention the last decade due to its potential to mimic the in vivo cellular environment more closely compared to what is possible by conventional cell culture methods. Many exciting and complex devices have been presented providing...... possibilities for, for example, precise control of the chemical environment, 3D cultures, controlled co-culture of different cell types or automated, individual control of up to 96 cell culture chambers in one integrated system. Despite the great new opportunities to perform novel experimental designs......, these devices still lack general implementation into biological research laboratories. In this project, the usability and applicability of microfluidic cell culture systems have been investigated. The tested systems display good properties regarding optics and compatibility with standard laboratory equipment...

  19. Exophiala xenobiotica infection in cultured striped jack, Pseudocaranx dentex (Bloch & Schneider), in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchan, C; Kurata, O; Wada, S; Hatai, K; Sano, A; Kamei, K; Nakaoka, N

    2009-10-01

    This report describes Exophiala infection in cultured striped jack, Pseudocaranx dentex, in Japan in 2005. One hundred out of 35,000 fish died per day and mortalities continued for 1 month. Diseased fish showed swelling of the abdomen and kidney distension. Numerous septate hyphae, pale brown in colour, were seen in kidney in squash preparations. Histology revealed abundant fungal hyphae and conidia in gill, heart and kidney. Fungal hyphae were accompanied by cell necrosis and influx of inflammatory, mainly mononuclear cells. The fungus isolated from the diseased fish had septate hyphae, pale brown in colour and 1.8-3.0 microm in diameter. Conidiogenous cells were conspicuous annellides, short or cylindrical or fusiform in shape. Conidia were one-celled, ellipsoidal with smooth walls, accumulated in balls at the apices of annellides that tended to slide down, 1.5-2.0 microm in width and 3.0-5.0 microm in length. The fungus was classified into the genus Exophiala based on its morphology and as Exophiala xenobiotica based on the sequences of the ITS 1-5.8S-ITS 2 regions of rDNA. This is the first record of this fungus in a marine fish.

  20. Porcine mast cells infected with H1N1 influenza virus release histamine and inflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In Hong; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2017-04-01

    Mast cells reside in many tissues, including the lungs, and might play a role in enhancing influenza virus infections in animals. In this study, we cultured porcine mast cells from porcine bone marrow cells with IL-3 and stem cell factor to study the infectivity and activation of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus of swine origin. Porcine mast cells were infected with H1N1 influenza virus, without the subsequent production of infectious viruses but were activated, as indicated by the release of histamines. Inflammatory cytokine- and chemokine-encoding genes, including IL-1α, IL-6, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, were upregulated in the infected porcine mast cells. Our results suggest that mast cells could be involved in enhancing influenza-virus-mediated disease in infected animals.

  1. Isolation of Exosomes and Microvesicles from Cell Culture Systems to Study Prion Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Pascal; Arellano-Anaya, Zaira E; Bernard, Emilien; Gallay, Laure; Provansal, Monique; Lehmann, Sylvain; Schaeffer, Laurent; Raposo, Graça; Vilette, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are composed of microvesicles and exosomes. Exosomes are small membrane vesicles (40-120 nm sized) of endosomal origin released in the extracellular medium from cells when multivesicular bodies fuse with the plasma membrane, whereas microvesicles (i.e., shedding vesicles, 100 nm to 1 μm sized) bud from the plasma membrane. Exosomes and microvesicles carry functional proteins and nucleic acids (especially mRNAs and microRNAs) that can be transferred to surrounding cells and tissues and can impact multiple dimensions of the cellular life. Most of the cells, if not all, from neuronal to immune cells, release exosomes and microvesicles in the extracellular medium, and all biological fluids including blood (serum/plasma), urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva contain EVs.Prion-infected cultured cells are known to secrete infectivity into their environment. We characterized this cell-free form of prions and showed that infectivity was associated with exosomes. Since exosomes are produced by a variety of cells, including cells that actively accumulate prions, they could be a vehicle for infectivity in body fluids and could participate to the dissemination of prions in the organism. In addition, such infectious exosomes also represent a natural, simple, biological material to get key information on the abnormal PrP forms associated with infectivity.In this chapter, we describe first a method that allows exosomes and microvesicles isolation from prion-infected cell cultures and in a second time the strategies to characterize the prions containing exosomes and their ability to disseminate the prion agent.

  2. Rhesus monkeys kidney cells persistently infected with Simian Virus 40: production of defective interfering virus and acquisition of the transformed phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C

    1976-09-01

    Monolayer cultures of LLC-MK2 rhesus monkey kidney cells became persistently infected with simian virus 40 (SV40) when infected at a multiplicity of infection of 100 plaque-forming units/cell. A stable carrier state developed characterized by extensive viral proliferation without obvious cytopathic effect other than the slow growth of these cultures. By 11 weeks all cells produced the SV40 T antigen. In contrast, less than 5% of the cells produced V antigen. Virus-free clonal isolates were obtained by cloning in SV40 antiserum. Continuous cultivation in antiserum resulted in a temporary cure of unclone cultures. When virus did eventually reappear in the "cured" cultures the titers remained low. The virus produced by the carrier culture was defective at both 31 and 37% c, and it interfered with the growth of standard s40 during mixed infection of CV-1 green monkey kidney cells. All of the interfering activity in carrier culture homogenates could be sedimented by centrifugation at 109,000 x g for 3 h. These cultures were completely susceptible to vesicular stomatitis virus. Extensive viral deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis occurred in CV-1 cells infected with carrier culture virus. Carrier culture homogenates are only slightly less cytopathic to CV-1 cells than standard SV40. The carrier culture express several properties of SV40 transformation.

  3. Methionine deficiency reduces autophagy and accelerates death in intestinal epithelial cells infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yulong; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Li, Fengna; Ren, Wenkai; Kong, Xiangfeng; Qiu, Wei; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2015-10-01

    Infections by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) result in large economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Dietary supplementation with amino acids has been considered as a potential mechanism to improve host defenses against infection. The goal of this study was to determine whether methionine deprivation alters ETEC interactions with porcine intestinal epithelial cells. IPEC-1 cells were cultured in media with or without L-methionine. Methionine deprivation resulted in enhanced ETEC adhesion and increased both the cytotoxicity and apoptotic responses of IPEC-1 cells infected with ETEC. Methionine deprivation inhibited IPEC-1 cell autophagic responses, suggesting that the increased cytotoxicity of ETEC to methionine-deprived IPEC-1 cells might be due to defects in autophagy.

  4. THE ALKALOID CYTISINE IN THE CELL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazaliev A.M.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Alkaloids are vegetative establishments of complex and original structure with nitrous heterocycles in the basis. For a long time they drew researchers’ attention because of their unique and specific physiological effect on alive organisms. Not all the representatives of the globe’s flora contain these unique substances. Alkaloid cytisine is to be found mainly in the plants of the fabaceous family - Fabaceae. For the cytisine production the seeds of Thermopsis lanceolata R.Br (T. lanceolata R.Br and Cytisus laburnum (C. laburnum are used as a raw material. The object of the research is T. lanceolata cell culture. Sterile sprouts are used at the first stage of the experiment. Callus genesis is accompanied with dedifferentiation. It leads to the cellular organization simplification. Based on an important property of a plant cell, such as totipotency, there appears the formation of the “de novo” biosynthetic device. The cultivation algorithm consists of two basic stages: (i the cultivation conditions optimization of callus with a high level of the primary metabolites biosynthesis (Aspartat – lysine; (ii the research of cultivation chemical and physical factors influence on the secondary metabolite (cytisine biosynthesis and accumulation. During the cultivation the Murashige and Skoog classical recipe of nutrient medium will be used. Optimization of the cultivation conditions will concern the phytohormones, macro- and micronutrients content, as the purpose of optimization is the production of the determined high-level competence embriogenical callus. The main problem is genetic heterogeneity of a cellular population and instability of morpho-physiological processes. The correct management of higher plants cells population is possible at the synchronization of a cellular cycle phases. The references analysis has shown that it is almost impossible to synchronize cellular cycles in the culture of plant tissue. The application of chemical

  5. An Optically Controlled 3D Cell Culturing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly S. Ishii

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel 3D cell culture system was developed and tested. The cell culture device consists of a microfluidic chamber on an optically absorbing substrate. Cells are suspended in a thermoresponsive hydrogel solution, and optical patterns are utilized to heat the solution, producing localized hydrogel formation around cells of interest. The hydrogel traps only the desired cells in place while also serving as a biocompatible scaffold for supporting the cultivation of cells in 3D. This is demonstrated with the trapping of MDCK II and HeLa cells. The light intensity from the optically induced hydrogel formation does not significantly affect cell viability.

  6. Infection of Dendritic Cells by the Maedi-Visna Lentivirus

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Susanna; Tiley, Laurence; McConnell, Ian; Blacklaws, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    The early stages of lentivirus infection of dendritic cells have been studied in an in vivo model. Maedi-visna virus (MVV) is a natural pathogen of sheep with a tropism for macrophages, but the infection of dendritic cells has not been proven, largely because of the difficulties of definitively distinguishing the two cell types. Afferent lymphatic dendritic cells from sheep have been phenotypically characterized and separated from macrophages. Dendritic cells purified from experimentally infe...

  7. Aeroponics for the culture of organisms, tissues and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, P J; Zobel, R W

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of aeroponics are discussed. Contrast is made, where appropriate, with hydroponics and aero-hydroponics as applies to research and commercial applications of nutrient mist technology. Topics include whole plants, plant tissue cultures, cell and microbial cultures, and animal tissue cultures with regard to operational considerations (moisture, temperature, minerals, gaseous atmosphere) and design of apparati.

  8. Polypeptide synthesis in alphavirus-infected Aedes albopictus cells during the establishment of persistent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M A; Boulton, R W; Raghow, R S; Dalgarno, L

    1980-01-01

    Polypeptide synthesis was examined in mosquito cells during the establishment of a persistent infection with two alphaviruses, Ross River virus (RRV) and Semliki Forest virus (SFV), and in vertebrate cells cytopathically-infected with the same viruses. In Aedes albopictus cell, RRV reached peak titres at 34--48 hours p.i. At 12 hours 85 per cent of cells assayed as infected by infective centre assay; by 48 hours when persistence was established, virus production was reduced and less than 5 per cent of cells assayed as infected. There was no shut-down of host polypeptide synthesis during infection. Viral polypeptide synthesis was maximal between 10 and 24 hours p.i. The major viral polypeptides labelled were nucleocapsid protein and envelope protein(s). The precursor polypeptide p95 which was prominent in infected BHK cells was not detected in mosquito cells. Similar results were obtained on SFV infection. During the establishment of persistence there was a coordinate decline in the synthesis of RRV polypeptides, reaching undetectable levels by 72 hours p.i. Subculturing persitently-infected cells led to a small increase in viral polypeptide synthesis and virus titre. In contrast, during RRV growth in BHK celos host protein synthesis was severly inhibited and by 9--11 hours p.i. virus-specific polypeptide synthesis represented more than 90 per cent of total protein synthetic activity.

  9. Systems Biology for Organotypic Cell Cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grego, Sonia [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Dougherty, Edward R. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Alexander, Francis J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Auerbach, Scott S. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Berridge, Brian R. [GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Bittner, Michael L. [Translational Genomics Research Inst., Phoenix, AZ (United States); Casey, Warren [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Cooley, Philip C. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Dash, Ajit [HemoShear Therapeutics, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Ferguson, Stephen S. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Fennell, Timothy R. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Hawkins, Brian T. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Hickey, Anthony J. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kleensang, Andre [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing; Liebman, Michael N. [IPQ Analytics, Kennett Square, PA (United States); Martin, Florian [Phillip Morris International, Neuchatel (Switzerland); Maull, Elizabeth A. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Paragas, Jason [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Qiao, Guilin [Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Ft. Belvoir, VA (United States); Ramaiahgari, Sreenivasa [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Sumner, Susan J. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Yoon, Miyoung [The Hamner Inst. for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); ScitoVation, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2016-08-04

    Translating in vitro biological data into actionable information related to human health holds the potential to improve disease treatment and risk assessment of chemical exposures. While genomics has identified regulatory pathways at the cellular level, translation to the organism level requires a multiscale approach accounting for intra-cellular regulation, inter-cellular interaction, and tissue/organ-level effects. Tissue-level effects can now be probed in vitro thanks to recently developed systems of three-dimensional (3D), multicellular, “organotypic” cell cultures, which mimic functional responses of living tissue. However, there remains a knowledge gap regarding interactions across different biological scales, complicating accurate prediction of health outcomes from molecular/genomic data and tissue responses. Systems biology aims at mathematical modeling of complex, non-linear biological systems. We propose to apply a systems biology approach to achieve a computational representation of tissue-level physiological responses by integrating empirical data derived from organotypic culture systems with computational models of intracellular pathways to better predict human responses. Successful implementation of this integrated approach will provide a powerful tool for faster, more accurate and cost-effective screening of potential toxicants and therapeutics. On September 11, 2015, an interdisciplinary group of scientists, engineers, and clinicians gathered for a workshop in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, to discuss this ambitious goal. Participants represented laboratory-based and computational modeling approaches to pharmacology and toxicology, as well as the pharmaceutical industry, government, non-profits, and academia. Discussions focused on identifying critical system perturbations to model, the computational tools required, and the experimental approaches best suited to generating key data. This consensus report summarizes the discussions held.

  10. The Differentiation and Protective Function of Cytolytic CD4 T Cells in Influenza Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah M. Brown

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of Class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity (CD4 CTL play a role in chronic, as well as, acute infections such as influenza A virus (IAV infection. In the last couple of decades, techniques to measure the frequency and activity of these cytolytic cells has demonstrated their abundance in infections such as HIV, mouse pox, murine gamma herpes virus, CMV, EBV and influenza among others. We now appreciate a greater role for CD4 CTL as direct effectors in viral infections and anti-tumor immunity through their ability to acquire perforin mediated cytolytic activity and contribution to lysis of virally infected targets or tumors. As early as the 1980s, CD4 T cell clones with cytolytic potential were identified after influenza virus infection, yet much of this early work was dependent on in vitro culture and little was known about the physiological relevance of CD4 CTL. Here, we discuss the direct role CD4 CTL play in protection against lethal IAV infection and the factors that drive the generation of perforin mediated lytic activity in CD4 cells in vivo during IAV infection. While focusing on CD4 CTL generated during IAV infection, we pull comparisons from the literature in other anti-viral and anti-tumor systems. Further, we highlight what is currently known about CD4 CTL secondary and memory responses, as well as vaccination strategies to induce these potent killer cells that provide an extra layer of cell mediated immune protection against heterosubtypic IAV infection.

  11. Optimization of Betanodavirus culture and enumeration in striped snakehead fish cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hick, Paul; Tweedie, Alison; Whittington, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    An optimized culture method for detection of infection of fish with the Red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) genotype of betanodavirus in striped snakehead (SSN-1, Channa striatus) cells is described. Inoculation of fish tissue homogenates at the same time or within 4 hr of seeding the SSN-1 cells was as sensitive as the method recommended by the World Organization for Animal Health, where homogenates were adsorbed onto an established cell monolayer. Such modification halved the time required and the costs of consumables, and reduced the potential for error when processing large numbers of samples. Positive culture results were obtained from 88.3% of 392 fish tissue homogenates in which RGNNV was detected using a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay; 99.7% of 943 tissue homogenates, which were qRT-PCR negative, were cell culture negative. Cytopathic effect (CPE) was characterized by large intracytoplasmic vacuoles in 0.1-60% of cells. Detachment of affected cells from the culture surface resulting in progressive disruption of the monolayer occurred in 46.4% of primary cultures and 96.0% of subcultures of positive samples. Identification of CPE that did not disrupt the cell monolayer increased estimates of the 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID(50)) by 1.07-2.79 logs (95% confidence interval). The predicted mean TCID(50)/ml was 3.3 logs higher when cells were inoculated less than 36 hr after subculture at less than 80% confluence compared to cells inoculated at greater than 80% confluence and more than 36 hr after subculture (P < 0.05).

  12. Active Epstein-Barr virus infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation : re-infection or reactivation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E; Spijkers, S; Moschatsis, S; Boland, GJ; Thijsen, SFT; van Loon, AM; Verdonck, LF

    2005-01-01

    Recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplants (SCT) often show active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, which may progress to EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. It is not known whether these EBV infections are true reactivations of the endogenous EBV strain or re-infections with an exo

  13. Isolation and culture of larval cells from C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sihui Zhang

    Full Text Available Cell culture is an essential tool to study cell function. In C. elegans the ability to isolate and culture cells has been limited to embryonically derived cells. However, cells or blastomeres isolated from mixed stage embryos terminally differentiate within 24 hours of culture, thus precluding post-embryonic stage cell culture. We have developed an efficient and technically simple method for large-scale isolation and primary culture of larval-stage cells. We have optimized the treatment to maximize cell number and minimize cell death for each of the four larval stages. We obtained up to 7.8×10(4 cells per microliter of packed larvae, and up to 97% of adherent cells isolated by this method were viable for at least 16 hours. Cultured larval cells showed stage-specific increases in both cell size and multinuclearity and expressed lineage- and cell type-specific reporters. The majority (81% of larval cells isolated by our method were muscle cells that exhibited stage-specific phenotypes. L1 muscle cells developed 1 to 2 wide cytoplasmic processes, while L4 muscle cells developed 4 to 14 processes of various thicknesses. L4 muscle cells developed bands of myosin heavy chain A thick filaments at the cell center and spontaneously contracted ex vivo. Neurons constituted less than 10% of the isolated cells and the majority of neurons developed one or more long, microtubule-rich protrusions that terminated in actin-rich growth cones. In addition to cells such as muscle and neuron that are high abundance in vivo, we were also able to isolate M-lineage cells that constitute less than 0.2% of cells in vivo. Our novel method of cell isolation extends C. elegans cell culture to larval developmental stages, and allows use of the wealth of cell culture tools, such as cell sorting, electrophysiology, co-culture, and high-resolution imaging of subcellular dynamics, in investigation of post-embryonic development and physiology.

  14. Using Tissue Culture To Investigate Plant Cell Differentiation and Dedifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experimental project that uses plant tissue culture techniques to examine cell differentiation in the carrot. Allows students to gain experience in some important techniques and to explore fundamental questions about cell differentiation. (DDR)

  15. Using Tissue Culture To Investigate Plant Cell Differentiation and Dedifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experimental project that uses plant tissue culture techniques to examine cell differentiation in the carrot. Allows students to gain experience in some important techniques and to explore fundamental questions about cell differentiation. (DDR)

  16. HIV-1 infection ex vivo accelerates measles virus infection by upregulating signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) in CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuki, Yu-ya; Terahara, Kazutaka; Shibusawa, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuya; Tsuchiya, Takatsugu; Mizukoshi, Fuminori; Ishige, Masayuki; Okada, Seiji; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Morikawa, Yuko; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Takeda, Makoto; Yanagi, Yusuke; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2012-07-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection in children harboring human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is often fatal, even in the presence of neutralizing antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the interaction between HIV-1 and wild-type MV (MVwt) or an MV vaccine strain (MVvac) during dual infection. The results showed that the frequencies of MVwt- and MVvac-infected CD4(+) T cells within the resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were increased 3- to 4-fold after HIV-1 infection, and this was associated with a marked upregulation of signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) expression on CD4(+) T cells but not on CD8(+) T cells. SLAM upregulation was induced by infection with a replication-competent HIV-1 isolate comprising both the X4 and R5 types and to a lesser extent by a pseudotyped HIV-1 infection. Notably, SLAM upregulation was observed in HIV-infected as well as -uninfected CD4(+) T cells and was abrogated by the removal of HLA-DR(+) cells from the PBMC culture. Furthermore, SLAM upregulation did not occur in uninfected PBMCs cultured together with HIV-infected PBMCs in compartments separated by a permeable membrane, indicating that no soluble factors were involved. Rather, CD4(+) T cell activation mediated through direct contact with dendritic cells via leukocyte function-associated molecule 1 (LFA-1)/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and LFA-3/CD2 was critical. Thus, HIV-1 infection induces a high level of SLAM expression on CD4(+) T cells, which may enhance their susceptibility to MV and exacerbate measles in coinfected individuals.

  17. Competition between Plasmodium falciparum strains in clinical infections during in vitro culture adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kexuan; Sun, Ling; Lin, Yingxue; Fan, Qi; Zhao, Zhenjun; Hao, Mingming; Feng, Guohua; Wu, Yanrui; Cui, Liwang; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the dynamics of parasite populations during in vitro culture adaptation in 15 mixed Plasmodium falciparum infections, which were collected from a hypoendemic area near the China-Myanmar border. Allele types at the msp1 block 2 in the initial clinical samples and during subsequent culture were quantified weekly using a quantitative PCR method. All mixed infections carried two allele types based on the msp1 genotyping result. We also genotyped several polymorphic sites in the dhfr, dhps and mdr1 genes on day 0 and day 28, which showed that most of the common sites analyzed were monomorphic. Two of the three clinical samples mixed at dhps 581 remained stable while one changed to wild-type during the culture. During in vitro culture, we observed a gradual loss of parasite populations with 10 of the 15 mixed infections becoming monoclonal by day 28 based on the msp1 allele type. In most cases, the more abundant msp1 allele types in the clinical blood samples at the beginning of culture became the sole or predominant allele types on day 28. These results suggest that some parasites may have growth advantages and the loss of parasite populations during culture adaptation of mixed infections may lead to biased results when comparing the phenotypes such as drug sensitivity of the culture-adapted parasites.

  18. Transient Oral Human Cytomegalovirus Infections Indicate Inefficient Viral Spread from Very Few Initially Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Bryan T; Krantz, Elizabeth M; Swan, David; Ferrenberg, James; Simmons, Karen; Selke, Stacy; Huang, Meei-Li; Casper, Corey; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Schiffer, Joshua T; Gantt, Soren

    2017-06-15

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is acquired by the oral route in children, and primary infection is associated with abundant mucosal replication, as well as the establishment of latency in myeloid cells that results in lifelong infection. The efficiency of primary CMV infection in humans following oral exposure, however, is unknown. We consistently detected self-limited, low-level oral CMV shedding events, which we termed transient CMV infections, in a prospective birth cohort of 30 highly exposed CMV-uninfected infants. We estimated the likelihood of transient oral CMV infections by comparing their observed frequency to that of established primary infections, characterized by persistent high-level shedding, viremia, and seroconversion. We developed mathematical models of viral dynamics upon initial oral CMV infection and validated them using clinical shedding data. Transient infections comprised 76 to 88% of oral CMV shedding events. For this high percentage of transient infections to occur, we identified two mathematical prerequisites: a very small number of initially infected oral cells (1 to 4) and low viral infectivity (<1.5 new cells infected/cell). These observations indicate that oral CMV infection in infants typically begins with a single virus that spreads inefficiently to neighboring cells. Thus, although the incidence of CMV infection is high during infancy, our data provide a mechanistic framework to explain why multiple CMV exposures are typically required before infection is successfully established. These findings imply that a sufficiently primed immune response could prevent CMV from establishing latent infection in humans and support the achievability of a prophylactic CMV vaccine.IMPORTANCE CMV infects the majority of the world's population and is a major cause of birth defects. Developing a vaccine to prevent CMV infection would be extremely valuable but would be facilitated by a better understanding of how natural human CMV infection is acquired. We

  19. Differentiation-Dependent KLF4 Expression Promotes Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay M Nawandar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with B-cell and epithelial cell malignancies. EBV lytically infects normal differentiated oral epithelial cells, where it causes a tongue lesion known as oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL in immunosuppressed patients. However, the cellular mechanism(s that enable EBV to establish exclusively lytic infection in normal differentiated oral epithelial cells are not currently understood. Here we show that a cellular transcription factor known to promote epithelial cell differentiation, KLF4, induces differentiation-dependent lytic EBV infection by binding to and activating the two EBV immediate-early gene (BZLF1 and BRLF1 promoters. We demonstrate that latently EBV-infected, telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs cells undergo lytic viral reactivation confined to the more differentiated cell layers in organotypic raft culture. Furthermore, we show that endogenous KLF4 expression is required for efficient lytic viral reactivation in response to phorbol ester and sodium butyrate treatment in several different EBV-infected epithelial cell lines, and that the combination of KLF4 and another differentiation-dependent cellular transcription factor, BLIMP1, is highly synergistic for inducing lytic EBV infection. We confirm that both KLF4 and BLIMP1 are expressed in differentiated, but not undifferentiated, epithelial cells in normal tongue tissue, and show that KLF4 and BLIMP1 are both expressed in a patient-derived OHL lesion. In contrast, KLF4 protein is not detectably expressed in B cells, where EBV normally enters latent infection, although KLF4 over-expression is sufficient to induce lytic EBV reactivation in Burkitt lymphoma cells. Thus, KLF4, together with BLIMP1, plays a critical role in mediating lytic EBV reactivation in epithelial cells.

  20. Lymphokine production by mesenteric lymph node cells from BALB/C mice during Hymenolepis nana infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, K; Muramatsu, K; Okamoto, K

    1993-02-01

    Mesenteric lymph node cells (MLNC) prepared from BALB/c mice during infection with Hymenolepis nana proliferated extensively when cultured in the presence of soluble egg antigen, as assessed by measuring 3H-thymidine incorporation. Analysis of Hymenolepis-specific proliferative cells in MLNC by using monoclonal antibody specific for mouse T lymphocyte surface antigens revealed that the proliferative response of MLNC was mediated by Thy-1.2+, L3T4+ cells, that is, helper T cells. Supernatant of MLNC cultured with egg antigen contained large amounts of interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma, but only low levels of interleukin-5. The titer of these cytokines did not correlate with the interval between oral infection and collection of MLNC. These results strongly indicate that the Th1 subtype of helper T lymphocytes respond well to stimulation of H. nana egg antigen and suggest that acute inflammatory responses are involved in host-protective immunity to H. nana.

  1. Activation of type III interferon genes by pathogenic bacteria in infected epithelial cells and mouse placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Bierne

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections trigger the expression of type I and II interferon genes but little is known about their effect on type III interferon (IFN-λ genes, whose products play important roles in epithelial innate immunity against viruses. Here, we studied the expression of IFN-λ genes in cultured human epithelial cells infected with different pathogenic bacteria and in the mouse placenta infected with Listeria monocytogenes. We first showed that in intestinal LoVo cells, induction of IFN-λ genes by L. monocytogenes required bacterial entry and increased further during the bacterial intracellular phase of infection. Other Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis, also induced IFN-λ genes when internalized by LoVo cells. In contrast, Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Shigella flexneri and Chlamydia trachomatis did not substantially induce IFN-λ. We also found that IFN-λ genes were up-regulated in A549 lung epithelial cells infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and in HepG2 hepatocytes and BeWo trophoblastic cells infected with L. monocytogenes. In a humanized mouse line permissive to fetoplacental listeriosis, IFN-λ2/λ3 mRNA levels were enhanced in placentas infected with L. monocytogenes. In addition, the feto-placental tissue was responsive to IFN-λ2. Together, these results suggest that IFN-λ may be an important modulator of the immune response to Gram-positive intracellular bacteria in epithelial tissues.

  2. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  3. Establishment of forskolin yielding transformed cell suspension cultures of Coleus forskohlii as controlled by different factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S; Ghosh, B; Jha, S

    2000-01-07

    Suspension cultures derived from gall calli which were obtained following infection with Agrobacterium tumefaciens (C58) were established in Coleus forskohlii. Cell line selection following single cell cloning or cell aggregate cloning was carried out to select cell lines capable of fast growth and for producing high level of forskolin. A fast growing cell line (GSO-5/7) thus selected was found to accumulate 0.021% forskolin in 42 days. The effect of cultural conditions on cell growth was studied to identify factors influencing biomass yield. Cell growth in suspension was found to be influenced significantly by carbon source, initial cell density and light or dark condition. Optimal cell growth (20 fold increase in biomass in a 42 day period) was obtained when the cells were grown in dark condition in B5O media containing 3% sucrose as sole carbon source with an initial cell density of 1.5 x 10(5) cells per ml. Forskolin accumulation was maximum (0.021%) in the stationary phase of cell growth. These suspension cultures showed continuous and stable production of forskolin.

  4. Culture-and nonculture-based antibiotics for complicated soft tissue infections are comparable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Irwanto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Data collected in 2010 from Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital indicate that complicated skin and soft tissue infections accounted for more than 10% of cases. Etiological diagnoses are based on the findings on bacterial culture and thus evaluation of the effectiveness of bacterial culture becomes a necessity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the operational effectiveness of bacterial culture for etiological diagnosis of complicated skin and soft tissue infections. Methods This was a historical cohort study using secondary data of patients with complicated skin and soft tissue infections admitted for hospitalization to Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta from July 2011 to July 2012. The 90 subjects meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria were divided into 2 groups of 45 patients each. Group 1 comprised patients who received initial antibiotic therapy according to cultural results, while the patients in group 2 received initial antibiotic therapy without reference to cultural results. Successful diagnostic culture was assessed by the absence of therapeutic failure. Therapeutic failure was determined using 3 parameters that had to be fulfilled, viz. absence of antibiotic escalation, repeat operations, and clinical deterioration. The latter parameter was assessed by clinical judgement of the attending physician. Results After controlling for confounding variables (age, severity of infection, comorbidity, there was no statistical difference in therapeutic success between culture-based and non-culture based initial antibiotic therapies (OR=0.45, p=0.085. Conclusion This study demonstrates the ineffectiveness of bacterial culture as a diagnostic criterion for appropriate antibiotic therapy of complicated skin and soft tissue infections.

  5. Wolbachia infections in Anopheles gambiae cells: transcriptomic characterization of a novel host-symbiont interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant L Hughes

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia is being investigated as a potential control agent in several important vector insect species. Recent studies have shown that Wolbachia can protect the insect host against a wide variety of pathogens, resulting in reduced transmission of parasites and viruses. It has been proposed that compromised vector competence of Wolbachia-infected insects is due to up-regulation of the host innate immune system or metabolic competition. Anopheles mosquitoes, which transmit human malaria parasites, have never been found to harbor Wolbachia in nature. While transient somatic infections can be established in Anopheles, no stable artificially-transinfected Anopheles line has been developed despite numerous attempts. However, cultured Anopheles cells can be stably infected with multiple Wolbachia strains such as wAlbB from Aedes albopictus, wRi from Drosophila simulans and wMelPop from Drosophila melanogaster. Infected cell lines provide an amenable system to investigate Wolbachia-Anopheles interactions in the absence of an infected mosquito strain. We used Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to investigate the effect of wAlbB and wRi infection on the transcriptome of cultured Anopheles Sua5B cells, and for a subset of genes used quantitative PCR to validate results in somatically-infected Anopheles mosquitoes. Wolbachia infection had a dramatic strain-specific effect on gene expression in this cell line, with almost 700 genes in total regulated representing a diverse array of functional classes. Very strikingly, infection resulted in a significant down-regulation of many immune, stress and detoxification-related transcripts. This is in stark contrast to the induction of immune genes observed in other insect hosts. We also identified genes that may be potentially involved in Wolbachia-induced reproductive and pathogenic phenotypes. Somatically-infected mosquitoes had similar responses to cultured cells. The data show that

  6. Co-culture: A quick approach for isolation of street rabies virus in murine neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sasikalaveni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laboratory detection of rabies in most cases is based on detection of the antigen by fluorescent antibody test, however, in weak positive cases confirmative laboratory diagnosis depends on widely accepted mouse inoculation test. Cell lines like neuroblastoma have been used to isolate the virus with greater success not only to target for diagnosis, but also for molecular studies that determine the epidemiology of the circulating street rabies strains and in studies that look at the efficiency of the developed monoclonal antibodies to neutralize the different rabies strains. Due to the recent issues in obtaining ethical permission for mouse experimentation, and also the passages required in the cell lines to isolate the virus, we report herewith a co-culture protocol using the murine neuroblastoma (MNA cells, which enable quicker isolation of street rabies virus with minimum passages. Objective: This study is not to have an alternative diagnostic assay, but an approach to produce sufficient amount of rabies virus in minimum passages by a co-culture approach in MNA cells. Materials and Methods: The MNA cells are co-cultured by topping the normal cells with infected cells every 48 h and the infectivity was followed up by performing direct fluorescent-antibody test. Results: The co-culture approach results in 100% infectivity and hence the use of live mouse for experimentation could be avoided. Conclusion: Co-culture method provides an alternative for the situations with limited sample volume and for the quicker isolation of virus which warrants the wild type strains without much modification.

  7. A 3D cell culture system: separation distance between INS-1 cell and endothelial cell monolayers co-cultured in fibrin influences INS-1 cells insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabra, Georges; Vermette, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro cell culture system allowing studying the effect of separation distance between monolayers of rat insulinoma cells (INS-1) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) co-cultured in fibrin over INS-1 cell insulin secretion. For this purpose, a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture chamber was designed, built using micro-fabrication techniques and validated. The co-culture was successfully carried out and the effect on INS-1 cell insulin secretion was investigated. After 48 and 72 h, INS-1 cells co-cultured with HUVEC separated by a distance of 100 µm revealed enhanced insulin secretion compared to INS-1 cells cultured alone or co-cultured with HUVEC monolayers separated by a distance of 200 µm. These results illustrate the importance of the separation distance between two cell niches for cell culture design and the possibility to further enhance the endocrine function of beta cells when this factor is considered.

  8. Effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the adherence of pathogenic bacteria to human epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faden, H.; Hong, J.J.; Ogra, P.L.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of RSV infection on the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae (HI) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) to human epithelial cells was determined. RSV-infected Hep-2 cell cultures at different stages of expression of surface viral antigens and bacteria labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine were employed to examine the kinetics of bacterial adherence to virus-infected cells. RSV infection did not alter the magnitude of adherence of HI or SA to HEp-2 cells. However, adherence of SP to HEp-2 cells was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced by prior RSV infection. The degree of adherence was directly related to the amount of viral antigen expressed on the cell surface. The adherence was temperature dependent, with maximal adherence observed at 37/sup 0/C. Heat-inactivation of SP did not alter adherence characteristics. These data suggest that RSV infection increases adherence of SP to the surface of epithelial cells in vitro. Since attachment of bacteria to mucosal surfaces is the first step in many infections, it is suggested that viral infections of epithelial cells render them more susceptible to bacterial adherence. Thus, RSV infection in vivo may predispose children to SP infections, such as in otitis media, by increasing colonization with SP.

  9. Brucella abortus-infected B cells induce osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Delpino, María Victoria

    2016-09-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular bacterium that establishes lifelong infections in livestock and humans although the mechanisms of its chronicity are poorly understood. Activated B cells have long lifespan and B. abortus infection activates B cells. Our results indicate that the direct infection of B cells with B. abortus induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), receptor activator for NF κB ligand (RANKL), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In addition, supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells induced bone marrow-derived monocytes to undergo osteoclastogenesis. Using osteoprotegerin, RANKL's decoy receptor, we determined that RANKL is involved in osteoclastogenesis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells. The results presented here shed light on how the interactions of B. abortus with B cells may have a role in the pathogenesis of brucellar osteoarticular disease.

  10. Natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-fei; Wang, Wen-jing; Gao, Yue-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a unique type of lymphocytes with cytotoxic capacity, and play important roles against tumors and infections. Recently, natural killer cells have been increasingly valued in their effects in hepatitis B virus infection. Since hepatitis B virus is not cytopathic, the subsequent antiviral immune responses of the host are responsible for sustaining the liver injury, which may result in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies have confirmed that natural killer cells participate in anti-hepatitis B virus responses both in the early phase after infection and in the chronic phase via cytolysis, degranulation, and cytokine secretion. However, natural killer cells play dichotomic roles: they exert antiviral and immunoregulatory functions whilst contribute to the pathogenesis of liver injury. Here, we review the roles of natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection, introducing novel therapeutic strategies for controlling hepatitis B virus infection via the modulation of natural killer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Porcine sapovirus replication is restricted by the type I interferon response in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmillo, Myra; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Hiraide, Rintaro; Lu, Jia; Goodfellow, Ian; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2015-01-01

    Porcine sapovirus (PSaV) of the family Caliciviridae, is the only member of the genus Sapovirus with cell culture and reverse genetics systems. When combined with the piglet model, these approaches provide a system to understand the molecular basis of sapovirus pathogenesis. The replication of PSaV in cell culture is, however, restricted, displaying an absolute requirement for bile acids and producing lower levels of infectious virus than other caliciviruses. The effect of bile acids has previously been linked to a reduction in the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1)-mediated signalling pathway. In the current study, we observed that even in the presence of bile acids, PSaV replication in cell culture was restricted by soluble factors produced from infected cells. This effect was at least partially due to secreted IFN because treatment of cells with recombinant porcine IFN-β resulted in significantly reduced viral replication. Moreover, IFN-mediated signalling pathways (IFN, STAT1 and the 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase) were activated during PSaV infection. Characterization of PSaV growth in cell lines deficient in their ability to induce or respond to IFN showed a 100-150-fold increase in infectious virus production, indicating that the primary role of bile acids was not the inactivation of the innate immune response. Furthermore, the use of IFN-deficient cell lines enabled more efficient recovery of PSaV from cDNA constructs. Overall, the highly efficient cell culture and reverse genetics system established here for PSaV highlighted the key role of the innate immune response in the restriction of PSaV infection and should greatly facilitate further molecular studies on sapovirus host-cell interactions. © 2015 The Authors.

  12. Callus production from photoautotrophic soybean cell culture protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowhury, V K; Widholm, J M

    1985-10-01

    Protoplasts were prepared from a photoautotrophic (PA) cell line of Glycine max (soybean). A yield of 75 to 90% after two to three hours digestion in a mixture of 1% Cellulase R10, 0.2% Pectolyase Y23 and 2% Driselase was obtained. Cell division and colony formation occurred from approximately 18% of the plated protoplasts. The cultured protoplasts were as sensitive to the herbicide atrazine, a photosynthetic inhibitor, as the original PA cells under the same conditions. Protoplasts and cells of a heterotrophic (HT) soybean culture were not as sensitive to atrazine. The isolated protoplasts retained the PA characteristics of the parental culture in the callus and cell suspension cultures obtained from the protoplasts. The chromosome numbers in the parental cell line and in cells derived from the isolated protoplasts (both PA and HT) were found to be largely (99%) the normal diploid number of 40.

  13. Horizontally rotated cell culture system with a coaxial tubular oxygenator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Trinh, Tinh T. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a horizontally rotating bioreactor useful for carrying out cell and tissue culture. For processing of mammalian cells, the system is sterilized and fresh fluid medium, microcarrier beads, and cells are admitted to completely fill the cell culture vessel. An oxygen containing gas is admitted to the interior of the permeable membrane which prevents air bubbles from being introduced into the medium. The cylinder is rotated at a low speed within an incubator so that the circular motion of the fluid medium uniformly suspends the microbeads throughout the cylinder during the cell growth period. The unique design of this cell and tissue culture device was initially driven by two requirements imposed by its intended use for feasibility studies for three dimensional culture of living cells and tissues in space by JSC. They were compatible with microgravity and simulation of microgravity in one G. The vessels are designed to approximate the extremely quiescent low shear environment obtainable in space.

  14. Rickettsia-like organism infection in a freshwater cultured fish Ophiocephalus argus C.in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Qionglin; JIA Weizhang; HAN Xianpu; CAI Taozhen; GONG Xiaoning; SUN Xiaofeng

    2004-01-01

    From 2001 to 2002,a new and emergent infectious disease of Ophiocephalus argus occurred in a fishery in Hubei Province,China,with an incidence of 60%~70% and a mortality as high as 100%.The diseased fish showed an enlarged abdomen,the millet-like nodules in internal organs,and the swollen kidney which was composed of 5~10 sarcoma-like bodies in cream or gray-white colour or ulcerated into beandregs-like substance.Light microscopic observation revealed the basophilic or acidphilic inclusions in cytoplasm of the cells and the granulomas,a diffusive chronic inflammation in internal organs.Further analysis under an electron microscope indicated that the intracytoplasmic inclusions were rickettsia-like organisms (RLOs) that are either spherical or coccoid,with variable size,ranging from 0.5~1.5 μm in diameter,and enclosed within membrane-bound cytoplasmic vacuoles.RLO had a central nucleoid region with some fine filamentous structures and an electron-dense granule.Its cytoplasm contained abundant ribosomal bodies.Occasionally,RLO appeared to be divided by binary fission.RLOs were also observed in the homogenized tissue of infected fish.The results suggested that the death of cultured O.Argus was caused by RLO infection.

  15. Metabolic and Kinetic analyses of influenza production in perfusion HEK293 cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohr Verena

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell culture-based production of influenza vaccine remains an attractive alternative to egg-based production. Short response time and high production yields are the key success factors for the broader adoption of cell culture technology for industrial manufacturing of pandemic and seasonal influenza vaccines. Recently, HEK293SF cells have been successfully used to produce influenza viruses, achieving hemagglutinin (HA and infectious viral particle (IVP titers in the highest ranges reported to date. In the same study, it was suggested that beyond 4 × 106 cells/mL, viral production was limited by a lack of nutrients or an accumulation of toxic products. Results To further improve viral titers at high cell densities, perfusion culture mode was evaluated. Productivities of both perfusion and batch culture modes were compared at an infection cell density of 6 × 106 cells/mL. The metabolism, including glycolysis, glutaminolysis and amino acids utilization as well as physiological indicators such as viability and apoptosis were extensively documented for the two modes of culture before and after viral infection to identify potential metabolic limitations. A 3 L bioreactor with a perfusion rate of 0.5 vol/day allowed us to reach maximal titers of 3.3 × 1011 IVP/mL and 4.0 logHA units/mL, corresponding to a total production of 1.0 × 1015 IVP and 7.8 logHA units after 3 days post-infection. Overall, perfusion mode titers were higher by almost one order of magnitude over the batch culture mode of production. This improvement was associated with an activation of the cell metabolism as seen by a 1.5-fold and 4-fold higher consumption rates of glucose and glutamine respectively. A shift in the viral production kinetics was also observed leading to an accumulation of more viable cells with a higher specific production and causing an increase in the total volumetric production of infectious influenza particles. Conclusions These results

  16. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  17. Hepatitis E Virus Produced from Cell Culture Has a Lipid Envelope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qi

    Full Text Available The absence of a productive cell culture system hampered detailed analysis of the structure and protein composition of the hepatitis E virion. In this study, hepatitis E virus from a robust HEV cell culture system and from the feces of infected monkeys at the peak of virus excretion was purified by ultra-centrifugation. The common feature of the two samples after ultracentrifugation was that the ORF2 protein mainly remained in the top fractions. The ORF2 protein from cell culture system was glycosylated, with an apparent molecular weight of 88 kDa, and was not infectious in PLC/PRF/5 cells. The ORF2 protein in this fraction can bind to and protect HEV RNA from digestion by RNase A. The RNA-ORF2 product has a similar sedimentation coefficient to the virus from feces. The viral RNA in the cell culture supernatant was mainly in the fraction of 1.15 g/cm3 but that from the feces was mainly in the fraction of 1.21 g/cm3. Both were infectious in PLC/PRF/5 cells. And the fraction in the middle of the gradient (1.06 g/cm3 from the cell culture supernatant,but not that from the feces, also has ORF2 protein and HEV RNA but was not infectious in PLC/PRF/5.The infectious RNA-rich fraction from the cell culture contained ORF3 protein and lipid but the corresponding fraction from feces had no lipid and little ORF3 protein. The lipid on the surface of the virus has no effect on its binding to cells but the ORF3 protein interferes with binding. The result suggests that most of the secreted ORF2 protein is not associated with HEV RNA and that hepatitis E virus produced in cell culture differs in structure from the virus found in feces in that it has a lipid envelope.

  18. PECULIARITIES OF SECONDARY METABOLITES BIOSYNTHESIS IN PLANT CELL CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. NOSOV

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available metabolites formation in plant cell cultures of Panax spp., (ginsenosides; Dioscorea deltoidea (steroid glycosides; Ajuga reptans, Serratula coronata, Rhaponticum carthamoides (ecdisteroids; Polyscias spp., (triterpene glycosides, Taxus spp. (taxoids, Stevia rebaudiana (diterpene steviol-glycosides, Stephania glabra (alkaloids. They are some regular trends of secondary metabolites synthesis in the plant cell culture:It can be noted the stable synthesis of the compound promoting cell proliferation. Indeed, cell cultures of Dioscorea deltoidea were demonstrated to accumulate only furostanol glycosides, which promoted cell division. Furostanol glycoside content of Dioscorea strain DM-0.5 was up to 6 - 12% by dry biomass.Panax ginseng and P. japonicus plant cell cultures synthesize as minimum seven triterpene glycosides (ginsenosides, the productivity of these compounds was up to 6.0 - 8.0% on dry biomass.By contrast, the detectable synthesis of diterpene steviol-glycosides in cultivated cells of Stevia rebaudiana initiated in the mixotrophic cultures during chloroplast formation only.Despite these differences, or mainly due to them, plant cell cultures have become an attractive source of phytochemicals in alternative to collecting wild plants. It provides a guideline to bioreactor-based production of isoprenoids using undifferentiated plant cell cultures

  19. Primary cell culture of human adenocarcinomas--practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerescu, Lucian; Tucureanu, Cătălin; Caraş, Iuliana; Neagu, Stefan; Melinceanu, Laura; Sălăgeanu, Aurora

    2008-01-01

    Cell culture is one of the major tools for oncology research, being an excellent system in which to study the biochemistry and molecular biology associated with individual cancer types and to understand cancer cell physiology. Progress in understanding the biology of any type of carcinoma has been impeded by the inability to culture adequately malignant cells from most epithelial tissues. The ultimate in vitro tumor model would completely reflect the in vivo tumor microenvironment in function and mechanism. Unfortunately, such a model does not currently exist. Homogeneous cell lines that can be continuously propagated on plastic surfaces have been extensively used as a surrogate for tumor environment; however they are very different from the in vivo tumor cells. Model systems involving primary culture represent the situation most closely related to the original tissue although they have a number of disadvantages over cell lines, such as the limited ability to repeat studies with a well characterized culture system that can be used in multiple laboratories. The primary culture may contain many types of stromal and infiltrating cell types potentially complicating the interpretation of data. Yet, their properties better reflect the cellular interactions present in intact tissue. The present article reviews the critical steps in obtaining, routine maintenance and cryopreservation of primary tumor cell cultures, based on information from literature and personal experience on the subject. The article also includes an updated protocol for primary tumor cell isolation and culture.

  20. Optical Oxygen Sensors for Applications in Microfluidic Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha M. Grist

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The presence and concentration of oxygen in biological systems has a large impact on the behavior and viability of many types of cells, including the differentiation of stem cells or the growth of tumor cells. As a result, the integration of oxygen sensors within cell culture environments presents a powerful tool for quantifying the effects of oxygen concentrations on cell behavior, cell viability, and drug effectiveness. Because microfluidic cell culture environments are a promising alternative to traditional cell culture platforms, there is recent interest in integrating oxygen-sensing mechanisms with microfluidics for cell culture applications. Optical, luminescence-based oxygen sensors, in particular, show great promise in their ability to be integrated with microfluidics and cell culture systems. These sensors can be highly sensitive and do not consume oxygen or generate toxic byproducts in their sensing process. This paper presents a review of previously proposed optical oxygen sensor types, materials and formats most applicable to microfluidic cell culture, and analyzes their suitability for this and other in vitro applications.

  1. An automated method for determining the cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to immobilized cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Boisen, Ida M; Efunshile, Akinwale;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasmodium falciparum exports antigens to the surface of infected erythrocytes causing cytoadhesion to the host vasculature. This is central in malaria pathogenesis but in vitro studies of cytoadhesion rely mainly on manual counting methods. The current study aimed at developing...... an automated high-throughput method for this purpose utilizing the pseudoperoxidase activity of intra-erythrocytic haemoglobin. METHODS: Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were grown to confluence in chamber slides and microtiter plates. Cytoadhesion of co-cultured P. falciparum, selected for binding to CHO...... using: i) binding of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes to CHO cells over-expressing chondroitin sulfate A and ii) CHO cells transfected with CD36. Binding of infected erythrocytes including field isolates to primary endothelial cells was also performed. Data was analysed using linear regression...

  2. Diagnosing herpesvirus infections by real time amplification and rapid culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Guldemeester; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); G.J.J. van Doornum (Gerard)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractProcedures using real-time technique were developed to demonstrate the presence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2, varicella zoster virus (VZV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) in miscellaneous clinical specimens. The assays were compared to rapid culture using centrifugation fo

  3. Coculture of osteoblasts and endothelial cells: optimization of culture medium and cell ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, J.; Beucken, J.J. van den; Yang, F.; Both, S.K.; Cui, F.Z.; Pan, J.; Jansen, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Vascularization strategies in cell-based bone tissue engineering depend on optimal culture conditions. The present study aimed to determine optimal cell culture medium and cell ratio for cocultures of human marrow stromal cells (HMSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in view of

  4. Biologic characteristics of fibroblast cells cultured from the knee ligaments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鸿辉; 唐毅; 李斯明; 沈雁; 刘向荣; 钟灿灿

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To culture fibroblast cells from the kneeligaments and to study the biological characteristics of thesecells.Methods: Cells of the anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) fromNew Zealand white rabbit were cultured in vitro. Cellulargrowth and expression of the collagen were analyzed.Moreover, an in vitro wound closure model was establishedand the healing of the ACL and the MCL cells wascompared.Results: Maximal growth for all these cells wereobtained with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's mediumsupplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, but RPMI 1640and Ham's F12 media were not suitable to maintain thesecells. Morphology of both ACL and MCL cells from NewZealand white rabbit was alike in vitro, but the MCL cellsgrew faster than the ACL cells. Both cell types producedsimilar amount of collagen in culture, but the ratio ofcollage type I to type III produced by ACL cells was higherthan that produced by MCL cells. Wound closure assayshowed that at 36 hours after injury, cell-free zones createdin the ACL cultures were occupied partially by the ACLcells; in contrast, the wounded zone in the MCL cultureswas almost completely covered by the cells.Conclusions: Although the ACL cells and the MCLcells from New Zealand white rabbit show similarappearance in morphology in culture, the cellular growthand the biochemical synthesis of collagen as well as thehealing in vitro were significantly different. Thesedifferences in intrinsic properties of the two types of cells invitro might contribute to the differential healing potentialsof these ligaments in vivo.

  5. HIV Type 1 Nef Is Released from Infected Cells in CD45+ Microvesicles and Is Present in the Plasma of HIV-Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, A.D.; Campbell-Sims, T.C.; Khan, M.; Lang, M.; Huang, M.B.; Bond, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 Nef has been demonstrated to be integral for viral persistence, infectivity, and the acceleration of disease pathogenesis (AIDS) in humans. Nef has also been detected in the plasma of HIV-infected individuals and is released from infected cells. The form in which Nef is released from infected cells is unknown. However, Nef is a myristoylated protein and has been shown to interact with the intracellular vesicular trafficking network. Here we show that Nef is released in CD45-containing microvesicles. This microvesicular Nef (mvNef) is detected in the plasma of HIV-infected individuals at relatively high concentrations (10 ng/ml). It is also present in tissue culture supernatants of Jurkat cells infected with HIVMN. Interestingly, plasma mvNef levels in HIV+ patients did not significantly correlate with viral load or CD4 count. Microvesicular Nef levels persisted in the plasma of HIV-infected individuals despite the use of antiretroviral therapy, even in individuals with undetectable viral loads. Using cell lines, we found Nef microvesicles induce apoptosis in Jurkat T-lymphocytes but had no observed effect on the U937 monocytic cell line. Given the large amount of mvNef present in the plasma of HIV-infected individuals, the apoptotic effect of mvNef on T cells, and the observed functions of extracellular soluble Nef in vitro, it seems likely that in vivo mvNef may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of AIDS. PMID:20964480

  6. α1-Antitrypsin reduces rhinovirus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berman R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Reena Berman, Di Jiang, Qun Wu, Hong Wei Chu Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA Abstract: Human rhinovirus (HRV infections target airway epithelium and are the leading cause of acute exacerbations of COPD. Cigarette smoke (CS increases the severity of viral infections, but there is no effective therapy for HRV infection. We determined whether α1-antitrypsin (A1AT reduces HRV-16 infection in CS-exposed primary human airway epithelial cells. Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from normal subjects and patients diagnosed with COPD were cultured at air–liquid interface to induce mucociliary differentiation. These cells were treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin for 2 hours and then exposed to air or whole cigarette smoke (WCS with or without HRV-16 (5×104 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose [TCID50]/transwell infection for 24 hours. WCS exposure significantly increased viral load by an average of fivefold and decreased the expression of antiviral genes interferon-λ1, OAS1, and MX1. When A1AT was added to WCS-exposed cells, viral load significantly decreased by an average of 29-fold. HRV-16 infection significantly increased HRV-16 receptor intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expression in air-exposed cells, which was decreased by A1AT. A1AT-mediated reduction of viral load was not accompanied by increased epithelial antiviral gene expression or by inhibiting the activity of 3C protease involved in viral replication or maturation. Our findings demonstrate that A1AT treatment prevents a WCS-induced increase in viral load and for the first time suggest a therapeutic effect of A1AT on HRV infection. Keywords: α1-antitrypsin, rhinovirus, COPD, cigarette smoke, ICAM-1

  7. LIF-free embryonic stem cell culture in simulated microgravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Kawahara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF is an indispensable factor for maintaining mouse embryonic stem (ES cell pluripotency. A feeder layer and serum are also needed to maintain an undifferentiated state, however, such animal derived materials need to be eliminated for clinical applications. Therefore, a more reliable ES cell culture technique is required. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We cultured mouse ES cells in simulated microgravity using a 3D-clinostat. We used feeder-free and serum-free media without LIF. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we show that simulated microgravity allows novel LIF-free and animal derived material-free culture methods for mouse ES cells.

  8. Long-term maintenance of human induced pluripotent stem cells by automated cell culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konagaya, Shuhei; Ando, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Toshiaki; Suemori, Hirofumi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-11-17

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are regarded as new sources for cell replacement therapy. These cells can unlimitedly expand under undifferentiated conditions and be differentiated into multiple cell types. Automated culture systems enable the large-scale production of cells. In addition to reducing the time and effort of researchers, an automated culture system improves the reproducibility of cell cultures. In the present study, we newly designed a fully automated cell culture system for human iPS maintenance. Using an automated culture system, hiPS cells maintained their undifferentiated state for 60 days. Automatically prepared hiPS cells had a potency of differentiation into three germ layer cells including dopaminergic neurons and pancreatic cells.

  9. Modulation of host-cell MAPkinase signaling during fungal infection

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections contribute substantially to human suffering and mortality. The interaction between fungal pathogens and their host involves the invasion and penetration of the surface epithelium, activation of cells of the innate immune system and the generation of an effective response to block infection. Numerous host-cell signaling pathways are activated during fungal infection. This review will focus on the main fungal pathogens Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus n...

  10. Pathogenesis of Human Enterovirulent Bacteria: Lessons from Cultured, Fully Differentiated Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hosts are protected from attack by potentially harmful enteric microorganisms, viruses, and parasites by the polarized fully differentiated epithelial cells that make up the epithelium, providing a physical and functional barrier. Enterovirulent bacteria interact with the epithelial polarized cells lining the intestinal barrier, and some invade the cells. A better understanding of the cross talk between enterovirulent bacteria and the polarized intestinal cells has resulted in the identification of essential enterovirulent bacterial structures and virulence gene products playing pivotal roles in pathogenesis. Cultured animal cell lines and cultured human nonintestinal, undifferentiated epithelial cells have been extensively used for understanding the mechanisms by which some human enterovirulent bacteria induce intestinal disorders. Human colon carcinoma cell lines which are able to express in culture the functional and structural characteristics of mature enterocytes and goblet cells have been established, mimicking structurally and functionally an intestinal epithelial barrier. Moreover, Caco-2-derived M-like cells have been established, mimicking the bacterial capture property of M cells of Peyer's patches. This review intends to analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of human enterovirulent bacteria observed in infected cultured human colon carcinoma enterocyte-like HT-29 subpopulations, enterocyte-like Caco-2 and clone cells, the colonic T84 cell line, HT-29 mucus-secreting cell subpopulations, and Caco-2-derived M-like cells, including cell association, cell entry, intracellular lifestyle, structural lesions at the brush border, functional lesions in enterocytes and goblet cells, functional and structural lesions at the junctional domain, and host cellular defense responses. PMID:24006470

  11. Murine and bovine γδ T cells enhance innate immunity against Brucella abortus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerod A Skyberg

    Full Text Available γδ T cells have been postulated to act as a first line of defense against infectious agents, particularly intracellular pathogens, representing an important link between the innate and adaptive immune responses. Human γδ T cells expand in the blood of brucellosis patients and are active against Brucella in vitro. However, the role of γδ T cells in vivo during experimental brucellosis has not been studied. Here we report TCRδ(-/- mice are more susceptible to B. abortus infection than C57BL/6 mice at one week post-infection as measured by splenic colonization and splenomegaly. An increase in TCRγδ cells was observed in the spleens of B. abortus-infected C57BL/6 mice, which peaked at two weeks post-infection and occurred concomitantly with diminished brucellae. γδ T cells were the major source of IL-17 following infection and also produced IFN-γ. Depletion of γδ T cells from C57BL/6, IL-17Rα(-/-, and GMCSF(-/- mice enhanced susceptibility to B. abortus infection although this susceptibility was unaltered in the mutant mice; however, when γδ T cells were depleted from IFN-γ(-/- mice, enhanced susceptibility was observed. Neutralization of γδ T cells in the absence of TNF-α did not further impair immunity. In the absence of TNF-α or γδ T cells, B. abortus-infected mice showed enhanced IFN-γ, suggesting that they augmented production to compensate for the loss of γδ T cells and/or TNF-α. While the protective role of γδ T cells was TNF-α-dependent, γδ T cells were not the major source of TNF-α and activation of γδ T cells following B. abortus infection was TNF-α-independent. Additionally, bovine TCRγδ cells were found to respond rapidly to B. abortus infection upon co-culture with autologous macrophages and could impair the intramacrophage replication of B. abortus via IFN-γ. Collectively, these results demonstrate γδ T cells are important for early protection to B. abortus infections.

  12. Extracellular vesicles from infected cells: potential for direct pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Schwab

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Infections that result in natural or manmade spread of lethal biological agents are a concern and require national and focused preparedness. In this manuscript, as part of an early diagnostics and pathogen treatment strategy, we have focused on extracellular vesicles (EVs that arise following infections. Although the field of biodefense does not currently have a rich resource in EVs literature, none the less, similar pathogens belonging to the more classical emerging and non-emerging diseases have been studied in their EV/exosomal contents and function. These exosomes are formed in late endosomes and released from the cell membrane in almost every cell type in vivo. These vesicles contain proteins, RNA, and lipids from the cells they originate from and function in development, signal transduction, cell survival, and transfer of infectious material. The current review focuses on how different forms of infection exploit the exosomal pathway and how exosomes can be exploited artificially to treat infection and disease and potentially also be used as a source of vaccine. Virally-infected cells can secrete viral as well as cellular proteins and RNA in exosomes, allowing viruses to cause latent infection and spread of miRNA to nearby cells prior to a subsequent infection. In addition to virally-infected host cells, bacteria, protozoa, and fungi can all release small vesicles that contain Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs, regulating the neighboring uninfected cells. Examples of exosomes from both virally and bacterially infected cells point toward a re-programming network of pathways in the recipient cells. Finally, many of these exosomes contain cytokines and miRNAs that in turn can effect gene expression in the recipient cells through the classical TLR and NFkB pathway. Therefore, although exosomes do not replicate as an independent entity, they however facilitate movement of infectious material through tissues and may be the cause of

  13. The cell biology of cryptosporidium infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Steven P; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2011-08-01

    Cryptosporidiosis remains a significant cause of enteric disease worldwide. Basic investigations of host: pathogen interactions have revealed the intricate processes mediating infection. The following summarizes the interactions that mediate infection and the host responses that both permit and ultimately clear the infection.

  14. Colorimetric pH measurement of animal cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Juno; Moon, Soo-Jin; Hong, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ik-Hwan

    2010-11-01

    Most animal cell culture media can be buffered using bicarbonate and high pressure CO(2) in a closed system. However, in an open system, the pH of the culture media increases continuously due to the marked difference in CO(2) pressure between the culture media and the atmosphere. Therefore, it is important to measure the exact pH of the culture media in an intact closed system. In this study, a pH measurement method was developed using visible light. The pH was calculated from light absorbance by the cells and by the culture media. This method was successfully applied to both suspension and anchorage-dependent cell cultures.

  15. Novel culturing platform for brain slices and neuronal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Al Atraktchi, Fatima Al-Zahraa; Bakmand, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a novel culturing system for brain slices and neuronal cells, which can control the concentration of nutrients and the waste removal from the culture by adjusting the fluid flow within the device. The entire system can be placed in an incubator. The system has been te...... tested successfully with brain slices and PC12 cells. The culture substrate can be modified using metal electrodes and/or nanostructures for conducting electrical measurements while culturing and for better mimicking the in vivo conditions.......In this paper we demonstrate a novel culturing system for brain slices and neuronal cells, which can control the concentration of nutrients and the waste removal from the culture by adjusting the fluid flow within the device. The entire system can be placed in an incubator. The system has been...

  16. EVALUATING VIRULENCE OF WATERBORNE AND CLINCIAL AEROMONAS ISOLATES USING GENE EXPRESSION AND MORTALITY IN NEONATAL MICE FOLLOWED BY ASSESSING CELL CULTURE'S ABILITY TO PREDICT VIRULENCE BASED ON TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The virulence of multiple Aeromonas spp. were assessed using two models, a neonatal mouse assay and a mouse intestinal cell culture. Transcriptional responses to both infection models were assessed using microarrays. After artificial infection with a variety of Aeromonas spp., ...

  17. Safe sorting of GFP-transduced live cells for subsequent culture using a modified FACS vantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T U; Gram, G J; Nielsen, S D

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A stream-in-air cell sorter enables rapid sorting to a high purity, but it is not well suited for sorting of infectious material due to the risk of airborne spread to the surroundings. METHODS: A FACS Vantage cell sorter was modified for safe use with potentially HIV infected cells. S...... culture. CONCLUSIONS: Sorting of live infected cells can be performed safely and with no deleterious effects on vector expression using the modified FACS Vantage instrument.......BACKGROUND: A stream-in-air cell sorter enables rapid sorting to a high purity, but it is not well suited for sorting of infectious material due to the risk of airborne spread to the surroundings. METHODS: A FACS Vantage cell sorter was modified for safe use with potentially HIV infected cells...... culture. RESULTS: The bacteriophage sorting showed that the biologically active material was confined to the sorting chamber. A failure mode simulating a nozzle blockage resulted in detectable droplets inside the sorting chamber, but no droplets could be detected when an additional air suction from...

  18. [Application of cell co-culture techniques in medical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yun; Sun, Gui-Bo; Qin, Meng; Yao, Fan; Sun, Xiao-Bo

    2012-11-01

    As the cell co-culture techniques can better imitate an in vivo environment, it is helpful in observing the interactions among cells and between cells and the culture environment, exploring the effect mechanisms of drugs and their possible targets and filling the gaps between the mono-layer cell culture and the whole animal experiments. In recently years, they has attracted much more attention from the medical sector, and thus becoming one of research hotspots in drug research and development and bio-pharmaceutical fields. The cell co-culture techniques, including direct and indirect methods, are mainly used for studying pathological basis, new-type treatment methods and drug activity screening. Existing cell co-culture techniques are used for more pharmacological studies on single drug and less studies on interaction of combined drugs, such as collaborative compatibility and attenuation and synergistic effect among traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). In line with the action characteristics of multi-component and multi-target, the cell co-culture techniques provide certain reference value for future studies on the effect and mechanism of combined TCMs on organisms as well as new methods for studies on TCMs and their compounds. This essay summarizes cell co-culture methods and their application and look into the future of their application in studies on TCMs and compounds.

  19. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE EVIDENCE OF VIRUS INFECTION IN CULTURED MARINE FISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Electron microscope investigation on the red sea bream (Pagrosomus major), bastard halibut (Paralichthys olivaceus) and stone flounder (Kareius bicoloratus) in North China revealed virus infection in the bodies of the dead and diseased fish. These viruses included the lymphocystis disease virus (LDV), parvovirus, globular virus, and a kind of baculavirus which was not discovered and reported before and is now tentatively named baculavirus of stone flounder (Kareius bicoloratus).

  20. Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma marginale Elicit Different Gene Expression Responses in Cultured Tick Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Zivkovic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Anaplasma (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae includes obligate tick-transmitted intracellular organisms, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma marginale that multiply in both vertebrate and tick host cells. Recently, we showed that A. marginale affects the expression of tick genes that are involved in tick survival and pathogen infection and multiplication. However, the gene expression profile in A. phagocytophilum-infected tick cells is currently poorly characterized. The objectives of this study were to characterize tick gene expression profile in Ixodes scapularis ticks and cultured ISE6 cells in response to infection with A. phagocypthilum and to compare tick gene expression responses in A. phagocytophilum- and A. marginale-infected tick cells by microarray and real-time RT-PCR analyses. The results of these studies demonstrated modulation of tick gene expression by A. phagocytophilum and provided evidence of different gene expression responses in tick cells infected with A. phagocytophilum and A. marginale. These differences in Anaplasma-tick interactions may reflect differences in pathogen life cycle in the tick cells.

  1. Diagnosis of Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus infection in dairy goats by ELISA, PCR and Viral Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneum, S; Rukkwamsuk, T

    2017-03-01

    For preventive and control strategies of Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus (CAEV) infection in dairy goats, performance of the available diagnostic tests was described as one of the most important and necessary aspects. The study aimed at evaluating the diagnostic test performance, including PCR, ELISA and viral culture, for CAEV infection in dairy goats in Thailand. Blood samples of 29 dairy goats from five low- to medium-prevalence herds and one very low-prevalence herd were collected for PCR and ELISA methods. The performance of these two diagnostic methods was evaluated by comparing with cytopathic effects (CPE) in the co-cultivation of CAEV and primary synovial cells. Results indicated that sensitivity, specificity were, respectively, 69.6%, 100%, for PCR; and 95.7%, 83.3% for ELISA. The PCR assay tended to have lower sensitivity and higher specificity than ELISA. When multiple tests were applied, parallel testing provided sensitivity and specificity of 98.7% and 83.3%, while series testing showed sensitivity and specificity of 66.6% and 100% respectively. These results indicated that combination of ELISA and PCR provided some advantages and possibly offered optimal methods to detect CAEV-infected goats. Kappa value of the agreement between PCR and ELISA test was 0.34, indicating fair agreement. Regarding the possibility of antigenic variation between CAEV strains used in both PCR and ELISA assays, the actual circulating CAEV strain should be reviewed in order to develop and enhance the diagnostic tests using the CAE viral antigens derived from specific local strains of Thailand.

  2. Intracellular Events and Cell Fate in Filovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ryabchikova

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Marburg and Ebola viruses cause a severe hemorrhagic disease in humans with high fatality rates. Early target cells of filoviruses are monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. The infection spreads to the liver, spleen and later other organs by blood and lymph flow. A hallmark of filovirus infection is the depletion of non-infected lymphocytes; however, the molecular mechanisms leading to the observed bystander lymphocyte apoptosis are poorly understood. Also, there is limited knowledge about the fate of infected cells in filovirus disease. In this review we will explore what is known about the intracellular events leading to virus amplification and cell damage in filovirus infection. Furthermore, we will discuss how cellular dysfunction and cell death may correlate with disease pathogenesis.

  3. White blood cell-based detection of asymptomatic scrapie infection by ex vivo assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Halliez

    Full Text Available Prion transmission can occur by blood transfusion in human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and in experimental animal models, including sheep. Screening of blood and its derivatives for the presence of prions became therefore a major public health issue. As infectious titer in blood is reportedly low, highly sensitive and robust methods are required to detect prions in blood and blood derived products. The objectives of this study were to compare different methods--in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo assays--to detect prion infectivity in cells prepared from blood samples obtained from scrapie infected sheep at different time points of the disease. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA and bioassays in transgenic mice expressing the ovine prion protein were the most efficient methods to identify infected animals at any time of the disease (asymptomatic to terminally-ill stages. However scrapie cell and cerebellar organotypic slice culture assays designed to replicate ovine prions in culture also allowed detection of prion infectivity in blood cells from asymptomatic sheep. These findings confirm that white blood cells are appropriate targets for preclinical detection and introduce ex vivo tools to detect blood infectivity during the asymptomatic stage of the disease.

  4. Culture materials affect ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaIuppa, J A; McAdams, T A; Papoutsakis, E T; Miller, W M

    1997-09-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is important for applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, and transfusion medicine. While cell culture systems are widely used to evaluate the biocompatibility of materials for implantation, the ability of materials to support proliferation of primary human cells in cultures for reinfusion into patients has not been addressed. We screened a variety of commercially available polymer (15 types), metal (four types), and glass substrates for their ability to support expansion of hematopoietic cells when cultured under conditions that would be encountered in a clinical setting. Cultures of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for expansion of total cells and colony-forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM; progenitors committed to the granulocyte and/or monocyte lineage). Human hematopoietic cultures in serum-free medium were found to be extremely sensitive to the substrate material. The only materials tested that supported expansion at or near the levels of polystyrene were tissue culture polystyrene, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy, Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene, cellulose acetate, titanium, new polycarbonate, and new polymethylpentene. MNC were less sensitive to the substrate materials than the primitive CD34+ progenitors, although similar trends were seen for expansion of the two cell populations on the substrates tested. CFU-GM expansion was more sensitive to substrate materials than was total cell expansion. The detrimental effects of a number of the materials on hematopoietic cultures appear to be caused by protein adsorption and/or leaching of toxins. Factors such as cleaning, sterilization, and reuse significantly affected the performance of some materials as culture substrates. We also used PB CD34+ cell cultures to examine the biocompatibility of gas-permeable cell culture and blood storage bags and several types of tubing commonly used with biomedical equipment

  5. Culturing Schwann Cells from Neonatal Rats by Improved Enzyme Digestion Combined with Explants-culture Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di; Liang, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Objective To develop an improved method for culturing Schwann cells(SCs) by using both enzyme digestion and explants-culture approaches and compared with traditional explants-culture method and general hemi-explants-culture method. Methods Bilaterally sciatic nerves and brachial plexus nerves were dissected from 3 to 5-day-old neonatal SD rats and explants-culture method,general hemi-explants-culture method,and improved enzyme digestion combined with explants-culture method were adopted to culture SCs,respectively. SCs were digested and passaged after 7 days in culture and counted under the microscope. The purity of SCs was identified by S-100 immunofluorescence staining. Results The SCs of improved method group grew fastest and the total number of cells obtained was(1.85±0.13)×10(6);the SCs of the hemi-explants-culture method group grew slower than the improved method group and the total number of cells obtained was (1.10±0.10)×10(6);the SCs of the explants-culture method group grew slowest and the total number of cells obtained was (0.77±0.03)×10(6).The total number of cells obtained showed significant difference among the three groups(Pculture method group,and (74.50±4.23)% in the explants-culture method group(Pculture method can obtain sufficient amount of high-purity SCs in a short time and thus may be applied in further research on peripheral nerve regeneration.

  6. Cell cycle regulation in human embryonic stem cells: links to adaptation to cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Tomas; Dolezalova, Dasa; Holubcova, Zuzana; Hampl, Ales

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle represents not only a tightly orchestrated mechanism of cell replication and cell division but it also plays an important role in regulation of cell fate decision. Particularly in the context of pluripotent stem cells or multipotent progenitor cells, regulation of cell fate decision is of paramount importance. It has been shown that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) show unique cell cycle characteristics, such as short doubling time due to abbreviated G1 phase; these properties change with the onset of differentiation. This review summarizes the current understanding of cell cycle regulation in hESCs. We discuss cell cycle properties as well as regulatory machinery governing cell cycle progression of undifferentiated hESCs. Additionally, we provide evidence that long-term culture of hESCs is accompanied by changes in cell cycle properties as well as configuration of several cell cycle regulatory molecules.

  7. Susceptibility of naïve and differentiated PC12 cells to Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Lin, Shih-Yi; Wang, Ya-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ying; Raung, Shue-Ling; Liao, Su-Lan; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2017-02-01

    Japanese encephalitis is a mosquito-borne disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection. Although JEV infects and replicates in cells with multiple tissue origins, neurons are the preferential cells for JEV infection. Currently, the identities of JEV cell tropism are largely unclear. To gain better insight into the underlying identities of JEV cell tropism, this study was designed to compare the JEV cell tropism with naïve or differentiated PC12 cells. Through nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells, we discovered that JEV efficiently replicated in differentiated PC12 cells rather than naïve cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that viral adsorption/attachment seemed not to be a crucial factor. Supporting data showed that antagonizing postreceptor intracellular signaling of interferons, along with the activation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) expression and protein tyrosine phosphatase activity, were apparent in differentiated PC12 cells after JEV infection. Independent of differentiating inducing agents, the upregulation of SOCS3 expression and protein tyrosine phosphatase activity, as well as preferential JEV tropism, were common in JEV-infected differentiated PC12 cells. Using cultured primary neurons, JEV efficiently replicated in embryonic neurons rather than adult neurons, and the preference was accompanied by higher SOCS3 expression and protein tyrosine phosphatase activity. Given that both SOCS3 and protein tyrosine phosphatases have been implicated in the process of neuronal differentiation, JEV infection seems to not only create an antagonizing strategy to escape host's interferon antiviral response but also takes advantage of cellular machinery to favor its replication. Taken together, current findings imply that dynamic changes within cellular regulators of antiviral machinery could be accompanied by events of neuronal differentiation, thus concurrently playing roles in the control of JEV cell tropism and

  8. Oral keratinocytes support non-replicative infection and transfer of harbored HIV-1 to permissive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacaman Rodrigo A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral keratinocytes on the mucosal surface are frequently exposed to HIV-1 through contact with infected sexual partners or nursing mothers. To determine the plausibility that oral keratinocytes are primary targets of HIV-1, we tested the hypothesis that HIV-1 infects oral keratinocytes in a restricted manner. Results To study the fate of HIV-1, immortalized oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT-2; TERT-2 cells were characterized for the fate of HIV-specific RNA and DNA. At 6 h post inoculation with X4 or R5-tropic HIV-1, HIV-1gag RNA was detected maximally within TERT-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase activity in TERT-2 cells was confirmed by VSV-G-mediated infection with HIV-NL4-3Δenv-EGFP. AZT inhibited EGFP expression in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that viral replication can be supported if receptors are bypassed. Within 3 h post inoculation, integrated HIV-1 DNA was detected in TERT-2 cell nuclei and persisted after subculture. Multiply spliced and unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs were not detectable up to 72 h post inoculation, suggesting that HIV replication may abort and that infection is non-productive. Within 48 h post inoculation, however, virus harbored by CD4 negative TERT-2 cells trans infected co-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or MOLT4 cells (CD4+ CCR5+ by direct cell-to-cell transfer or by releasing low levels of infectious virions. Primary tonsil epithelial cells also trans infected HIV-1 to permissive cells in a donor-specific manner. Conclusion Oral keratinocytes appear, therefore, to support stable non-replicative integration, while harboring and transmitting infectious X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 to permissive cells for up to 48 h.

  9. LIF-Free Embryonic Stem Cell Culture in Simulated Microgravity

    OpenAIRE

    Yumi Kawahara; Tomotaka Manabe; Masaya Matsumoto; Teruyuki Kajiume; Masayasu Matsumoto; Louis Yuge

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is an indispensable factor for maintaining mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency. A feeder layer and serum are also needed to maintain an undifferentiated state, however, such animal derived materials need to be eliminated for clinical applications. Therefore, a more reliable ES cell culture technique is required. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We cultured mouse ES cells in simulated microgravity using a 3D-clinostat. We used feeder-free and...

  10. Campylobacter infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the small intestine from a bacteria called Campylobacter jejuni . It is a type of food poisoning. Causes ... testing for white blood cells Stool culture for Campylobacter jejuni Treatment The infection almost always goes away on ...

  11. Therapeutical trials with antimicrobial agents and cultured cecal microflora in Salmonella infantis infections in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuna, E; Nurmi, E

    1979-09-01

    The efficacy of short antimicrobial therapy was examined in chicks infected with S. infantis on the day of hatching. An attempt was made to prevent the reappearance of salmonellae by treating the chicks with a culture of cecal microflora to re-establish the normal intestinal flora. The following drugs were used: neomycin/polymyxin, oxytetracyline/neomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, furazolidone, and trimethoprim/sulphadiazine. The oxytetracycline/neomycin therapy was most effective, but reappearance of the infection was not avoided. Combined therapy with other antimicrobials and the culture reduced the number of infected chicks compared with the respective control groups. A slight reduction was also found when the culture was used alone without any preceding antimicrobial treatment.

  12. Multizone Paper Platform for 3D Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derda, Ratmir; Hong, Estrella; Mwangi, Martin; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc). The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” or CiGiP), this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers) containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, “sections” all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of