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Sample records for cell compartmentation

  1. Regulatory T-cell compartmentalization and trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Shuang; Kryczek, Ilona; Zou, Weiping

    2006-01-01

    CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (CD4+ Treg cells) are thought to differentiate in the thymus and immigrate from the thymus to the periphery. Treg cells can regulate both acquired and innate immunity through multiple modes of suppression. The cross-talk between Treg cells and targeted cells, such as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and T cells, is crucial for ensuring suppression by Treg cells in the appropriate microenvironment. Emerging evidence suggests that Treg compartmentalization and ...

  2. Human memory T cells: generation, compartmentalization and homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Donna L.; Yudanin, Naomi A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Memory T cells comprise the most abundant lymphocyte population in the body for the majority of one’s lifetime; however, our understanding of memory T cell generation, function and maintenance mainly derives from mouse studies, which cannot recapitulate the decades-long exposure to multiple pathogens that occurs in humans. Here, we review studies focused on human memory T cells that reveal key properties including subset heterogeneity and diverse tissue residence in multiple mucosal and lymphoid tissue sites. We also discuss how the function and adaptability of human memory T cells depend on spatial and temporal compartmentalization. PMID:24336101

  3. Compartmentation and equilibration of abscisic acid in isolated Xanthium cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, E.A.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The compartmentation of endogenous abscisic acid (ABA), applied (+/-)-(/sup 3/H)ABA, and (+/-)-trans-ABA was measured in isolated mesophyll cells of the Chicago strain of Xanthium strumarium L. The release of ABA to the medium in the presence or absence of DMSO was used to determine the equilibration of ABA in the cells. It was found that a greater percentage of the (+/-)-(/sup 3/H)ABA and the (+/-)-trans-ABA was released into the medium than of the endogenous ABA, indicating that applied ABA did not equilibrate with the endogenous material. Therefore, in further investigations only the compartmentation of endogenous ABA was studied. Endogenous ABA was released from Xanthium cells according to the pH gradients among the various cellular compartments. Thus, darkness, high external pH, KNO/sub 2/, and drought-stress all increased the efflux of ABA from the cells. Efflux of ABA from the cells in the presence of 0.6 M mannitol occurred within 30 seconds, but only 8% of the endogenous material was released during the 20 minute treatment.

  4. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M; Nguyen, Nguyen H P; Bishop, Kyle J M; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-08-25

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core-shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble-crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier-Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  5. The compartmentation of phosphorylated thiamine derivatives in cultured neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettendorff, L

    1994-05-26

    Thiamine transport in cultured neuroblastoma cells is mediated by a high-affinity carrier (KM = 40 nM). In contrast, the uptake of the more hydrophobic sulbutiamine (isobutyrylthiamine disulfide) is unsaturable and its initial transport rate is 20-times faster than for thiamine. In the cytoplasm, sulbutiamine is rapidly hydrolyzed and reduced to free thiamine, the overall process resulting in a rapid and concentrative thiamine accumulation. Incorporation of radioactivity from [14C]thiamine or [14C]sulbutiamine into intracellular thiamine diphosphate is slow in both cases. Despite the fact that the diphosphate is probably the direct precursor for both thiamine monophosphate and triphosphate, the specific radioactivity increased much faster for the latter two compounds than for thiamine diphosphate. This suggests the existence of two pools of thiamine diphosphate, the larger one having a very slow turnover (about 17 h); a much smaller, rapidly turning over pool would be the precursor of thiamine mono- and triphosphate. The turnover time for thiamine triphosphate could be estimated to be 1-2 h. When preloading the cells with [14C]sulbutiamine was followed by a chase with the same concentration of the unlabeled compound, the specific radioactivities of thiamine and thiamine monophosphate decreased exponentially as expected, but labeling of the diphosphate continued to increase slowly. Specific radioactivity of thiamine triphosphate increased first, but after 30 min it began to slowly decrease. These results show for the first time the existence of distinct thiamine diphosphate pools in the same homogeneous cell population. They also suggest a complex compartmentation of thiamine metabolism. PMID:8186267

  6. An actomyosin-based barrier inhibits cell mixing at compartmental boundaries in Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Bruno; Pélissier-Monier, Anne; Brand, Andrea H; Sanson, Bénédicte

    2010-01-01

    Partitioning tissues into compartments that do not intermix is essential for the correct morphogenesis of animal embryos and organs. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain compartmental cell sorting, mainly differential adhesion, but also regulation of the cytoskeleton or of cell proliferation. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that keep cells apart at boundaries remain unclear. Here we demonstrate, in early Drosophila melanogaster embryos, that actomyosin-based barriers stop cells from invading neighbouring compartments. Our analysis shows that cells can transiently invade neighbouring compartments, especially when they divide, but are then pushed back into their compartment of origin. Actomyosin cytoskeletal components are enriched at compartmental boundaries, forming cable-like structures when the epidermis is mitotically active. When MyoII (non-muscle myosin II) function is inhibited, including locally at the cable by chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI), in live embryos, dividing cells are no longer pushed back, leading to compartmental cell mixing. We propose that local regulation of actomyosin contractibility, rather than differential adhesion, is the primary mechanism sorting cells at compartmental boundaries. PMID:19966783

  7. Human memory T cells: generation, compartmentalization and homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Farber, Donna L.; Yudanin, Naomi A.; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2013-01-01

    Memory T cells comprise the most abundant lymphocyte population in the body for the majority of one’s lifetime; however, our understanding of memory T cell generation, function and maintenance mainly derives from mouse studies, which cannot recapitulate the decades-long exposure to multiple pathogens that occurs in humans. Here, we review studies focused on human memory T cells that reveal key properties including subset heterogeneity and diverse tissue residence in multiple mucosal and lymph...

  8. The cell cycle of the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus with respect to cell compartmentalization

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    Fuerst John A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gemmata obscuriglobus is a distinctive member of the divergent phylum Planctomycetes, all known members of which are peptidoglycan-less bacteria with a shared compartmentalized cell structure and divide by a budding process. G. obscuriglobus in addition shares the unique feature that its nucleoid DNA is surrounded by an envelope consisting of two membranes forming an analogous structure to the membrane-bounded nucleoid of eukaryotes and therefore G. obscuriglobus forms a special model for cell biology. Draft genome data for G. obscuriglobus as well as complete genome sequences available so far for other planctomycetes indicate that the key bacterial cell division protein FtsZ is not present in these planctomycetes, so the cell division process in planctomycetes is of special comparative interest. The membrane-bounded nature of the nucleoid in G. obscuriglobus also suggests that special mechanisms for the distribution of this nuclear body to the bud and for distribution of chromosomal DNA might exist during division. It was therefore of interest to examine the cell division cycle in G. obscuriglobus and the process of nucleoid distribution and nuclear body formation during division in this planctomycete bacterium via light and electron microscopy. Results Using phase contrast and fluorescence light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, the cell division cycle of G. obscuriglobus was determined. During the budding process, the bud was formed and developed in size from one point of the mother cell perimeter until separation. The matured daughter cell acted as a new mother cell and started its own budding cycle while the mother cell can itself initiate budding repeatedly. Fluorescence microscopy of DAPI-stained cells of G. obscuriglobus suggested that translocation of the nucleoid and formation of the bud did not occur at the same time. Confocal laser scanning light microscopy applied to cells stained for membranes as

  9. The role of the bi-compartmental stem cell niche in delaying cancer

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    Shahriyari, Leili; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, by using modern imaging techniques, scientists have found evidence of collaboration between different types of stem cells (SCs), and proposed a bi-compartmental organization of the SC niche. Here we create a class of stochastic models to simulate the dynamics of such a heterogeneous SC niche. We consider two SC groups: the border compartment, S1, is in direct contact with transit-amplifying (TA) cells, and the central compartment, S2, is hierarchically upstream from S1. The S1 SCs differentiate or divide asymmetrically when the tissue needs TA cells. Both groups proliferate when the tissue requires SCs (thus maintaining homeostasis). There is an influx of S2 cells into the border compartment, either by migration, or by proliferation. We examine this model in the context of double-hit mutant generation, which is a rate-limiting step in the development of many cancers. We discover that this type of a cooperative pattern in the stem niche with two compartments leads to a significantly smaller rate of double-hit mutant production compared with a homogeneous, one-compartmental SC niche. Furthermore, the minimum probability of double-hit mutant generation corresponds to purely symmetric division of SCs, consistent with the literature. Finally, the optimal architecture (which minimizes the rate of double-hit mutant production) requires a large proliferation rate of S1 cells along with a small, but non-zero, proliferation rate of S2 cells. This result is remarkably similar to the niche structure described recently by several authors, where one of the two SC compartments was found more actively engaged in tissue homeostasis and turnover, while the other was characterized by higher levels of quiescence (but contributed strongly to injury recovery). Both numerical and analytical results are presented.

  10. Modulation of cytokine release by differentiated CACO-2 cells in a compartmentalized coculture model with mononuclear leucocytes and nonpathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Haller, D.; Brinz, S.;

    2004-01-01

    To further investigate the interaction between human mononuclear leucocytes [peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)] and enterocytes, the effect of a confluent layer of differentiated CACO-2 cells on cytokine kinetics during challenge with bacteria in a compartmentalized coculture model was in...

  11. Subcellular compartmentalization in protoplasts from Artemisia annua cell cultures: engineering attempts using a modified SNARE protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro; Rizzello, Francesca; Durante, Miriana; Caretto, Sofia; Nisi, Rossella; De Paolis, Angelo; Faraco, Marianna; Montefusco, Anna; Piro, Gabriella; Mita, Giovanni

    2015-05-20

    Plants are ideal bioreactors for the production of macromolecules but transport mechanisms are not fully understood and cannot be easily manipulated. Several attempts to overproduce recombinant proteins or secondary metabolites failed. Because of an independent regulation of the storage compartment, the product may be rapidly degraded or cause self-intoxication. The case of the anti-malarial compound artemisinin produced by Artemisia annua plants is emblematic. The accumulation of artemisinin naturally occurs in the apoplast of glandular trichomes probably involving autophagy and unconventional secretion thus its production by undifferentiated tissues such as cell suspension cultures can be challenging. Here we characterize the subcellular compartmentalization of several known fluorescent markers in protoplasts derived from Artemisia suspension cultures and explore the possibility to modify compartmentalization using a modified SNARE protein as molecular tool to be used in future biotechnological applications. We focused on the observation of the vacuolar organization in vivo and the truncated form of AtSYP51, 51H3, was used to induce a compartment generated by the contribution of membrane from endocytosis and from endoplasmic reticulum to vacuole trafficking. The artificial compartment crossing exocytosis and endocytosis may trap artemisinin stabilizing it until extraction; indeed, it is able to increase total enzymatic activity of a vacuolar marker (RGUSChi), probably increasing its stability. Exploring the 51H3-induced compartment we gained new insights on the function of the SNARE SYP51, recently shown to be an interfering-SNARE, and new hints to engineer eukaryote endomembranes for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25451863

  12. Local Microenvironment Controls the Compartmentalization of NK Cell Responses during Systemic Inflammation in Mice.

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    Rasid, Orhan; Ciulean, Ioana Sonya; Fitting, Catherine; Doyen, Noelle; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc

    2016-09-15

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a whole-body reaction to a triggering insult that often results in life-threatening illness. Contributing to the development of this inflammatory cascade are numerous cellular partners, among which NK cells were shown to play a key role. Accumulating evidence points to organ-specific properties of systemic inflammation and NK cells. However, little is known about compartment-specific activation of NK cells during systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the relative contribution of NK cell-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental cues. In this study, we undertook a sequential characterization of NK responses in the spleen, lungs, bone marrow, peritoneum, and blood using a mouse model of endotoxemia. We report that, despite similar systemic dynamics of NK cell responses, expression of activation markers (CD69 and CD25) and effector molecules (IFN-γ, granzyme B, and IL-10) display organ-specific thresholds of maximum activation. Using adoptive transfers of spleen and lung NK cells, we found that these cells have the capacity to quickly adapt to a new environment and adjust their response levels to that of resident NK cells. This functional adaptation occurs without significant alterations in phenotype and independently of subpopulation-specific trafficking. Thus, using a dynamic in vivo-transfer system, to our knowledge our study is the first to report the compartmentalization of NK cells responses during systemic inflammation and to show that NK cell-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental cues are involved in this process, in a sequential manner. PMID:27521338

  13. Bystander effects and compartmental stress response to X-ray irradiation in L929 cells.

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    Temelie, Mihaela; Stroe, Daniela; Petcu, Ileana; Mustaciosu, Cosmin; Moisoi, Nicoleta; Savu, Diana

    2016-08-01

    Bystander effects are indirect consequences of radiation and many other stress factors. They occur in cells that are not directly exposed to these factors, but receive signals from affected cells either by gap junctions or by molecules released in the medium. Characterizing these effects and deciphering the underlying mechanisms involved in radiation-induced bystander effects are relevant for cancer radiotherapy and radioprotection. At doses of X-ray radiation 0.5 and 1 Gy, we detected bystander effects as increased numbers of micronuclei shortly after the treatment, through medium transfer and by co-cultures. Interestingly, bystander cells did not exhibit long-term adverse changes in viability. Evaluation of several compartmental stress markers (CHOP, BiP, mtHsp60, cytHsp70) by qRT-PCR did not reveal expression changes at transcriptional level. We investigated the involvement of ROS and NO in this process by addition of specific scavengers of these molecules, DMSO or c-PTIO in the transferred medium. This approach proved that ROS but not NO is involved in the induction of lesions in the acceptor cells. These results indicate that L929 cells are susceptible to stress effects of radiation-induced bystander signaling. PMID:27025606

  14. Pathways and Subcellular Compartmentation of NAD Biosynthesis in Human Cells: FROM ENTRY OF EXTRACELLULAR PRECURSORS TO MITOCHONDRIAL NAD GENERATION*

    OpenAIRE

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Ziegler, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    NAD is a vital redox carrier, and its degradation is a key element of important regulatory pathways. NAD-mediated functions are compartmentalized and have to be fueled by specific biosynthetic routes. However, little is known about the different pathways, their subcellular distribution, and regulation in human cells. In particular, the route(s) to generate mitochondrial NAD, the largest subcellular pool, is still unknown. To visualize organellar NAD changes in cells, we targeted poly(ADP-ribo...

  15. Effects of reserpine on ECL-cell ultrastructure and histamine compartmentalization in the rat stomach.

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    Zhao, C M; Chen, D; Lintunen, M; Panula, P; Håkanson, R

    1999-01-01

    The histamine-storing ECL cells in the stomach play a key role in the control of acid secretion. They contain granules, secretory vesicles and microvesicles, and sustained gastrin stimulation results in the additional formation of vacuoles and lipofuscin bodies. The cells are rich in the vesicle monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT-2), which can be inhibited by reserpine. The present study examines the effect of reserpine on ECL-cell ultrastructure and histamine compartmentalization. Rats received reserpine and/or gastrin. Reserpine was given twice by the intraperitoneal route (25 mg/kg once daily). Gastrin-17 was given by subcutaneous infusion (5 nmol/kg/h), starting at the time of the first reserpine injection and continuing for 4 days when the rats were killed. At this stage, histamine in the oxyntic mucosa was unaffected by reserpine but elevated by gastrin. Immunocytochemical analysis (confocal microscopy) showed ECL-cell histamine in control and gastrin-treated rats to be localized in cytoplasmic organelles (e.g., secretory vesicles). After treatment with reserpine alone or reserpine+gastrin, ECL-cell histamine occurred mainly in the cytosol. Planimetric analysis (electron microscopy) of ECL cells showed reserpine to increase the number, size and volume density of the granules and to reduce the size and volume density of the secretory vesicles. Gastrin reduced the number and volume density of granules and secretory vesicles, increased the number and volume density of microvesicles and caused vacuoles and lipofuscin bodies to appear. Reserpine+gastrin increased the number, volume density and size of the granules. Reserpine prevented the effects of gastrin on secretory vesicles, vacuoles and microvesicles, but did not prevent the development of lipofuscin. Our findings are in line with the views: (1) that preformed cytosolic histamine is taken up by granules/secretory vesicles via VMAT-2, that histamine is instrumental in the transformation of granules into

  16. Transport, compartmentation, and metabolism of homoserine in higher plant cells. Carbon-13- and phosphorus-31-nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport, compartmentation, and metabolism of homoserine was characterized in two strains of meristematic higher plant cells, the dicotyledonous sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) and the monocotyledonous weed Echinochloa colonum. Homoserine is an intermediate in the synthesis of the aspartate-derived amino acids methionine, threonine (Thr), and isoleucine. Using 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, we showed that homoserine actively entered the cells via a high-affinity proton-symport carrier (K(m) approximately 50-60 micromolar) at the maximum rate of 8 +/- 0.5 micromol h-1 g-1 cell wet weight, and in competition with serine or Thr. We could visualize the compartmentation of homoserine, and observed that it accumulated at a concentration 4 to 5 times higher in the cytoplasm than in the large vacuolar compartment. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance permitted us to analyze the phosphorylation of homoserine. When sycamore cells were incubated with 100 micromolar homoserine, phosphohomoserine steadily accumulated in the cytoplasmic compartment over 24 h at the constant rate of 0.7 micromol h-1 g-1 cell wet weight, indicating that homoserine kinase was not inhibited in vivo by its product, phosphohomoserine. The rate of metabolism of phosphohomoserine was much lower (0.06 micromol h-1 g-1 cell wet weight) and essentially sustained Thr accumulation. Similarly, homoserine was actively incorporated by E. colonum cells. However, in contrast to what was seen in sycamore cells, large accumulations of Thr were observed, whereas the intracellular concentration of homoserine remained low, and phosphohomoserine did not accumulate. These differences with sycamore cells were attributed to the presence of a higher Thr synthase activity in this strain of monocot cells

  17. Early-life compartmentalization of human T cell differentiation and regulatory function in mucosal and lymphoid tissues.

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    Thome, Joseph J C; Bickham, Kara L; Ohmura, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Masaru; Matsuoka, Nobuhide; Gordon, Claire; Granot, Tomer; Griesemer, Adam; Lerner, Harvey; Kato, Tomoaki; Farber, Donna L

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear how the immune response in early life becomes appropriately stimulated to provide protection while also avoiding excessive activation as a result of diverse new antigens. T cells are integral to adaptive immunity; mouse studies indicate that tissue localization of T cell subsets is important for both protective immunity and immunoregulation. In humans, however, the early development and function of T cells in tissues remain unexplored. We present here an analysis of lymphoid and mucosal tissue T cells derived from pediatric organ donors in the first two years of life, as compared to adult organ donors, revealing early compartmentalization of T cell differentiation and regulation. Whereas adult tissues contain a predominance of memory T cells, in pediatric blood and tissues the main subset consists of naive recent thymic emigrants, with effector memory T cells (T(EM)) found only in the lungs and small intestine. Additionally, regulatory T (T(reg)) cells comprise a high proportion (30-40%) of CD4(+) T cells in pediatric tissues but are present at much lower frequencies (1-10%) in adult tissues. Pediatric tissue T(reg) cells suppress endogenous T cell activation, and early T cell functionality is confined to the mucosal sites that have the lowest T(reg):T(EM) cell ratios, which suggests control in situ of immune responses in early life. PMID:26657141

  18. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

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    H. Corby eKistler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g. amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH, enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported.

  19. Direct and Differential Suppression of Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cell Subsets by Sunitinib is Compartmentally Constrained

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Jennifer S.; Rayman, Patricia; Ireland, Joanna; Swaidani, Shadi; Li, Geqiang; Bunting, Kevin D.; Rini, Brian; Finke, James H.; Cohen, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    The anti-angiogenic drug sunitinib is a receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibitor with significant, yet not curative, therapeutic impacts in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Sunitinib is also an immunomodulator, potently reversing myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) accumulation and T-cell inhibition in the blood even of non-responder RCC patients. We observed that sunitinib similarly prevented MDSC accumulation and restored normal T-cell function to spleens of tumor-bearing mice, independ...

  20. Compartmentalization of GABA synthesis by GAD67 differs between pancreatic beta cells and neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanaani, Jamil; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Phelps, Edward A; Pasquier, Miriella; Brioudes, Estelle; Baekkeskov, Steinunn; Billestrup, Nils

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is synthesized by the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in neurons and in pancreatic β-cells in islets of Langerhans where it functions as a paracrine and autocrine signaling molecule regulating the function of islet endocrine cells. The localization of...

  1. Communication Between the Cell Membrane and the Nucleus: Role of Protein Compartmentalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelievre, Sophie A; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-10-21

    Understanding how the information is conveyed from outside to inside the cell is a critical challenge for all biologists involved in signal transduction. The flow of information initiated by cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix contacts is mediated by the formation of adhesion complexes involving multiple proteins. Inside adhesion complexes, connective membrane skeleton (CMS) proteins are signal transducers that bind to adhesion molecules, organize the cytoskeleton, and initiate biochemical cascades. Adhesion complex-mediated signal transduction ultimately directs the formation of supramolecular structures in the cell nucleus, as illustrated by the establishment of multi complexes of DNA-bound transcription factors, and the redistribution of nuclear structural proteins to form nuclear subdomains. Recently, several CMS proteins have been observed to travel to the cell nucleus, suggesting a distinctive role for these proteins in signal transduction. This review focuses on the nuclear translocation of structural signal transducers of the membrane skeleton and also extends our analysis to possible translocation of resident nuclear proteins to the membrane skeleton. This leads us to envision the communication between spatially distant cellular compartments (i.e., membrane skeleton and cell nucleus) as a bidirectional flow of information (a dynamic reciprocity) based on subtle multilevel structural and biochemical equilibria. At one level, it is mediated by the interaction between structural signal transducers and their binding partners, at another level it may be mediated by the balance and integration of signal transducers in different cellular compartments.

  2. DNA precursor compartmentation in mammalian cells: metabolic and antimetabolic studies of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HeLa cells were used for the quantitation of cellular and mitochondrial deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) and ribonucleoside triphosphate (rNTP) pools and of changes in pools in response to treatment with the antimetabolites methotrexate (mtx) and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR). Use of an enzymatic assay of dNTPs and of improved nucleotide extraction methods allowed quantitation of mitochondrial dNTP pools. All four mitochondrial dNTP pools expand following treatment with mtx or FUdR whereas cellular dTTP and dGTP pools are depleted. Mitochrondrial rNTP pools were also found to expand in response to these antimetabolites. Mouse L-cells were used to determine the relative contributions of an exogenously supplied precursor to nuclear and mitochrondrial DNA replication. Cells were labeled to near steady state specific activities with 32P-orthophosphate and subsequently labeled with [3H]uridine, a general pyrimidine precursor, in the continuing presence of 32P. Deoxyribonucleoside monophosphates derived from these DNAs were separated by HPLC and the 3H/32P ratio in each pyrimidine determined. The dCMP residues in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were found to be derived exclusively from the exogenous supplied uridine. The dTMP residues from nuclear and mtDNA and the dCMP residues from nuclear DNA were seen to be synthesized partly from exogenous sources and partly from other sources, presumably de novo pyrimidine synthesis

  3. In Vivo HIV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission Promotes Multicopy Micro-compartmentalized Infection

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    Kenneth M. Law

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection is enhanced by adhesive structures that form between infected and uninfected T cells called virological synapses (VSs. This mode of transmission results in the frequent co-transmission of multiple copies of HIV-1 across the VS, which can reduce sensitivity to antiretroviral drugs. Studying HIV-1 infection of humanized mice, we measured the frequency of co-transmission and the spatiotemporal organization of infected cells as indicators of cell-to-cell transmission in vivo. When inoculating mice with cells co-infected with two viral genotypes, we observed high levels of co-transmission to target cells. Additionally, micro-anatomical clustering of viral genotypes within lymphoid tissue indicates that viral spread is driven by local processes and not a diffuse viral cloud. Intravital splenic imaging reveals that anchored HIV-infected cells induce arrest of interacting, uninfected CD4+ T cells to form Env-dependent cell-cell conjugates. These findings suggest that HIV-1 spread between immune cells can be anatomically localized into infectious clusters.

  4. Current Ideas about Prebiological Compartmentalization

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    Pierre-Alain Monnard

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary biological cells are highly sophisticated dynamic compartment systems which separate an internal volume from the external medium through a boundary, which controls, in complex ways, the exchange of matter and energy between the cell’s interior and the environment. Since such compartmentalization is a fundamental principle of all forms of life, scenarios have been elaborated about the emergence of prebiological compartments on early Earth, in particular about their likely structural characteristics and dynamic features. Chemical systems that consist of potentially prebiological compartments and chemical reaction networks have been designed to model pre-cellular systems. These systems are often referred to as “protocells”. Past and current protocell model systems are presented and compared. Since the prebiotic formation of cell-like compartments is directly linked to the prebiotic availability of compartment building blocks, a few aspects on the likely chemical inventory on the early Earth are also summarized.

  5. Compartmental Model Approaches to Groundwater Flow Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compartmental or mixing-cell models have been applied to groundwater flow systems by a number of investigators. Note that the expressions 'compartment', 'cell' and 'mixing cell' are synonymous and used interchangeably in this paper. The compartmental model represents the groundwater system as a network of interconnected cells or compartments through which water and one or more dissolved constituents (tracers) are transported. Within a given cell, perfect or complete mixing of the tracer occurs, although some models relax this constraint. Flow rates of water and tracer between cells can be calculated by: 1) use of a flow model that solves the partial differential equations of groundwater flow 2) calibration with observed tracer data 3) a flow algorithm based on linear or non-linear reservoir theory, or 4) some combination of the preceding. Each cell in the model depicts a region of the hydrogeological system; regions are differentiated based upon their hydrogeological uniformity, the availability of data, the degree of resolution desired, and constraints imposed by numerical solutions. Compartmental models have been used to solve the inverse problem (estimating aquifer properties and recharge boundary conditions) (Adar and Neuman 1986; 1988; Adar et al. 1988; Adar and Sorek 1989; 1990). Other applications have sought to determine groundwater ages and residence times (Campana 1975; 1987; Campana and Simpson 1984; Campana and Mahin 1985; Kirk and Campana 1990), or analyze tracer data and delineate groundwater dynamics (Yurtsever and Payne 1978; 1985; 1986). Other investigators have used them as transport models (Van Ommen 1985; Rao and Hathaway 1989). A recent pioneering approach uses a compartmental model to constrain a finite-difference regional groundwater flow model (Harrington et al. 1999). The three compartmental models described herein represent different approaches and levels of sophistication. The first, a relatively simple model by Campana, is calibrated

  6. Lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) is compartmentalized at nuclear chromocenters in early post-mitotic cells of the olfactory sensory neuronal lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Seda; Savarino, Alyssa; Coleman, Julie H; Schwob, James E; Lane, Robert P

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian olfaction depends on the development of specialized olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that each express one odorant receptor (OR) protein from a large family of OR genes encoded in the genome. The lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) protein removes activating H3K4 or silencing H3K9 methylation marks at gene promoters and is required for proper OR regulation. We show that LSD1 protein exhibits variable organization within nuclei of developing OSNs, and tends to consolidate into a single dominant compartment at the edges of chromocenters within nuclei of early post-mitotic cells of the mouse olfactory epithelium (MOE). Using an immortalized cell line derived from developing olfactory placode, we show that consolidation of LSD1 appears to be cell-cycle regulated, with a peak occurrence in early G1. LSD1 co-compartmentalizes with CoREST, a protein known to collaborate with LSD1 to carry out a variety of chromatin-modifying functions. We show that LSD1 compartments co-localize with 1-3 OR loci at the exclusion of most OR genes, and commonly associate with Lhx2, a transcription factor involved in OR regulation. Together, our data suggests that LSD1 is sequestered into a distinct nuclear space that might restrict a histone-modifying function to a narrow developmental time window and/or range of OR gene targets. PMID:26947098

  7. Cell- and ligand-specific dephosphorylation of acid hydrolases: Evidence that the mannose 6-phosphatase is controlled by compartmentalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einstein, R.; Gabel, C.A. (Columbia Univ. College of Physicians and Surgeons, NY (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Mouse L cells that possess the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate (Man 6-P)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II receptor change the extent to which they dephosphorylate endocytosed acid hydrolases in response to serum. To investigate the mechanism by which dephosphorylation competence is regulated, the dephosphorylation of individual acid hydrolases was studied in Man 6-P/IGF II receptor-positive and -deficient cell lines. 125I-labeled Man 6-P-containing acid hydrolases were proteolytically processed but remained phosphorylated when endocytosed by receptor-positive L cells maintained in the absence of serum; after the addition of serum, however, the cell-associated hydrolases were dephosphorylated. Individual hydrolases were dephosphorylated at distinct rates and to different extents. In contrast, the same hydrolases were dephosphorylated equally and completely after entry into Man 6-P/IGF II receptor-positive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The dephosphorylation competence of Man 6-P/IGF II receptor-deficient mouse J774 cells was more limited. beta-Glucuronidase produced by these cells underwent a limited dephosphorylation in transit to lysosomes such that diphosphorylated oligosaccharides were converted to monophosphorylated species. The overall quantity of phosphorylated oligosaccharides associated with the enzyme, however, did not decrease within the lysosomal compartment. Likewise, beta-glucuronidase was not dephosphorylated when introduced into J774 cells via Fc receptor-mediated endocytosis. The CHO and J774 cell lysosomes, therefore, display opposite extremes with respect to their capacity to dephosphorylate acid hydrolases; within CHO cell lysosomes acid hydrolases are rapidly and efficiently dephosphorylated, but within J774 cell lysosomes the same acid hydrolases remain phosphorylated.

  8. Cell- and ligand-specific dephosphorylation of acid hydrolases: Evidence that the mannose 6-phosphatase is controlled by compartmentalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouse L cells that possess the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate (Man 6-P)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II receptor change the extent to which they dephosphorylate endocytosed acid hydrolases in response to serum. To investigate the mechanism by which dephosphorylation competence is regulated, the dephosphorylation of individual acid hydrolases was studied in Man 6-P/IGF II receptor-positive and -deficient cell lines. 125I-labeled Man 6-P-containing acid hydrolases were proteolytically processed but remained phosphorylated when endocytosed by receptor-positive L cells maintained in the absence of serum; after the addition of serum, however, the cell-associated hydrolases were dephosphorylated. Individual hydrolases were dephosphorylated at distinct rates and to different extents. In contrast, the same hydrolases were dephosphorylated equally and completely after entry into Man 6-P/IGF II receptor-positive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The dephosphorylation competence of Man 6-P/IGF II receptor-deficient mouse J774 cells was more limited. beta-Glucuronidase produced by these cells underwent a limited dephosphorylation in transit to lysosomes such that diphosphorylated oligosaccharides were converted to monophosphorylated species. The overall quantity of phosphorylated oligosaccharides associated with the enzyme, however, did not decrease within the lysosomal compartment. Likewise, beta-glucuronidase was not dephosphorylated when introduced into J774 cells via Fc receptor-mediated endocytosis. The CHO and J774 cell lysosomes, therefore, display opposite extremes with respect to their capacity to dephosphorylate acid hydrolases; within CHO cell lysosomes acid hydrolases are rapidly and efficiently dephosphorylated, but within J774 cell lysosomes the same acid hydrolases remain phosphorylated

  9. Expression and compartmentalization of caveolin in adipose cells: coordinate regulation with and structural segregation from GLUT4

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Native rat adipocytes and the mouse adipocyte cell line, 3T3-L1, possess transport vesicles of apparently uniform composition and size which translocate the tissue-specific glucose transporter isoform, GLUT4, from an intracellular pool to the cell surface in an insulin- sensitive fashion. Caveolin, the presumed structural protein of caveolae, has also been proposed to function in vesicular transport. Thus, we studied the expression and subcellular distribution of caveolin in adipocytes. We fo...

  10. Subcellular compartmentation of ascorbate and its variation in disease states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánhegyi, Gábor; Benedetti, Angelo; Margittai, Eva; Marcolongo, Paola; Fulceri, Rosella; Németh, Csilla E; Szarka, András

    2014-09-01

    Beyond its general role as antioxidant, specific functions of ascorbate are compartmentalized within the eukaryotic cell. The list of organelle-specific functions of ascorbate has been recently expanded with the epigenetic role exerted as a cofactor for DNA and histone demethylases in the nucleus. Compartmentation necessitates the transport through intracellular membranes; members of the GLUT family and sodium-vitamin C cotransporters mediate the permeation of dehydroascorbic acid and ascorbate, respectively. Recent observations show that increased consumption and/or hindered entrance of ascorbate in/to a compartment results in pathological alterations partially resembling to scurvy, thus diseases of ascorbate compartmentation can exist. The review focuses on the reactions and transporters that can modulate ascorbate concentration and redox state in three compartments: endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nucleus. By introducing the relevant experimental and clinical findings we make an attempt to coin the term of ascorbate compartmentation disease. PMID:24907663

  11. Compartmentalized production of CCL17 in vivo: strong inducibility in peripheral dendritic cells contrasts selective absence from the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alferink, Judith; Lieberam, Ivo; Reindl, Wolfgang; Behrens, Andrea; Weiss, Susanne; Hüser, Norbert; Gerauer, Klaus; Ross, Ralf; Reske-Kunz, Angelika B; Ahmad-Nejad, Parviz; Wagner, Hermann; Förster, Irmgard

    2003-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs)(*) fulfill an important regulatory function at the interface of the innate and adaptive immune system. The thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) is produced by DCs and facilitates the attraction of activated T cells. Using a fluorescence-based in vivo reporter system, we show that CCL17 expression in mice is found in activated Langerhans cells and mature DCs located in various lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs, and is up-regulated after stimulation with Toll-like receptor ligands. DCs expressing CCL17 belong to the CD11b(+)CD8(-)Dec205(+) DC subset, including the myeloid-related DCs located in the subepithelial dome of Peyer's patches. CCL17-deficient mice mount diminished T cell-dependent contact hypersensitivity responses and display a deficiency in rejection of allogeneic organ transplants. In contrast to lymphoid organs located at external barriers of the skin and mucosa, CCL17 is not expressed in the spleen, even after systemic microbial challenge or after in vitro stimulation. These findings indicate that CCL17 production is a hallmark of local DC stimulation in peripheral organs but is absent from the spleen as a filter of blood-borne antigens. PMID:12615900

  12. Performance of non-compartmentalized enzymatic biofuel cell based on buckypaper cathode and ferrocene-containing redox polymer anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunte, Christine; Hussein, Laith; Urban, Gerald A.

    2014-02-01

    Novel single compartment Glucose/O2 biofuel cells (BFCs) were developed using immobilized enzymes and the mediated electron transfer (MET) approach. The bioanode was prepared through a ferrocene-containing redox polymer crosslinked in the presence of a biocatalyst on a glassy carbon support. Here, the redox polymer can physically entrap the enzyme and prevent it from leaching. Additionally it provides a biocompatible microenvironment and thus could extend the life time of enzyme. On the other side, the mediated biocathode was prepared based on bilirubin oxidase and 2,2‧-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) diammonium salt (ABTS2-) system which has been physically entrapped in Nafion matrix and then adsorbed directly on a highly porous, conductive and functionalized buckypaper (fBP). Both electrodes were characterized physically and electrochemically. Employing these electrodes, the resulting BFC generates an open circuit voltage (Voc) of approximately 0.550 V and a peak power density of 26 μW cm-2 at 0.2 V at 37 °C in quiescent O2-saturated physiological buffer containing 5 mM glucose. The cell sustains a load up to 225 μA cm-2. Moreover, a high short circuit current (Isc) of 300 μA cm-2 is approached. This BFC can operate in mild conditions without using any toxic materials which makes it attractive for implantable devices.

  13. Studies in the compartmentalization of trace elements in the blood of patients with sickle cell anaemia using PIXE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojo, J.O. (Dept. of Physics, Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (Nigeria)); Oluwole, A.F. (Dept. of Physics, Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (Nigeria)); Durosinmi, M.A. (Dept. of Haematology and Immunology, Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (Nigeria)); Arsed, W. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)); Akanle, O.A. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)); Spyrou, N.M. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom))

    1993-06-01

    Concentrations of trace elements in the whole blood, plasma and erythrocytes of 77 individuals (20 carrying the HbSS genotype, 21 with HbAS and 36 with HbAA) were determined using a PIXE facility employing a 2 MeV proton beam. Up to 16 elements were detected in some or all of the samples. The skewness of elemental distribution was measured for each element in the three bloodflow compartments. Most of the essential elements, apart from selenium were distinctly packed in either the erythrocytes or the plasma. Results of the t-test employed to compare elemental values between sickle cell subjects and matched controls show similar patterns in the three compartments for some of the elements. The results are compared with previous work using INAA. (orig.)

  14. Studies in the compartmentalization of trace elements in the blood of patients with sickle cell anaemia using PIXE technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of trace elements in the whole blood, plasma and erythrocytes of 77 individuals (20 carrying the HbSS genotype, 21 with HbAS and 36 with HbAA) were determined using a PIXE facility employing a 2 MeV proton beam. Up to 16 elements were detected in some or all of the samples. The skewness of elemental distribution was measured for each element in the three bloodflow compartments. Most of the essential elements, apart from selenium were distinctly packed in either the erythrocytes or the plasma. Results of the t-test employed to compare elemental values between sickle cell subjects and matched controls show similar patterns in the three compartments for some of the elements. The results are compared with previous work using INAA. (orig.)

  15. Nonnegative and Compartmental Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Haddad, Wassim M; Hui, Qing

    2010-01-01

    This comprehensive book provides the first unified framework for stability and dissipativity analysis and control design for nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems, which play a key role in a wide range of fields, including engineering, thermal sciences, biology, ecology, economics, genetics, chemistry, medicine, and sociology. Using the highest standards of exposition and rigor, the authors explain these systems and advance the state of the art in their analysis and active control design. Nonnegative and Compartmental Dynamical Systems presents the most complete treatment available o

  16. A mathematical analysis of second messenger compartmentalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular compartmentalization of second messengers can lead to microdomains of elevated concentration that are thought to be involved in ensuring signaling specificity. Most experimental evidence for this compartmentalization involves the second messenger adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which is degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). One possible way of creating these compartments, supported by recent experiments, is to spatially separate the source of cAMP from regions of elevated PDE concentration. To quantify this possibility, we study here a simplified geometry in two dimensions (2D) and in three dimensions (3D), containing a cAMP point source and regions with different degradation constants. Using the symmetry of our geometry, we are able to derive steady state solutions for the cAMP concentration as a function of the system parameters. Furthermore, we show, using analytics as well as direct numerical simulations, that for physiologically relevant time scales the steady state solution has been reached. Our results indicate that elevating the degradation constant throughout the cell, except for a small microdomain surrounding the source, requires an unphysiologically high cellular PDE concentration. On the other hand, a tight spatial relationship of localized PDEs with the cAMP source can result in functional microdomains while maintaining a physiologically plausible cellular PDE concentration

  17. Compartmentation of metals in foliage of Populus tremula grown on soils with mixed contamination. II. Zinc binding inside leaf cell organelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phytoextraction potential of plants for removing heavy metals from polluted soils is determined by their capacity to store contaminants in aboveground organs and complex them safely. In this study, the metal compartmentation, elemental composition of zinc deposits and zinc complexation within leaves from poplars grown on soil with mixed metal contamination was analysed combining several histochemical and microanalytical approaches. Zinc was the only heavy metal detected and was stored in several organelles in the form of globoid deposits showing β-metachromasy. It was associated to oxygen anions and different cations, noteworthy phosphorous. The deposit structure, elemental composition and element ratios indicated that zinc was chelated by phytic acid ligands. Maturation processes in vacuolar vs. cytoplasmic deposits were suggested by differences in size and amounts of complexed zinc. Hence, zinc complexation by phytate contributed to metal detoxification and accumulation in foliage but could not prevent toxicity reactions therein. - Zinc contaminants translocated to symplast of aged leaves were detoxified by phytic acid ligands.

  18. Compartmentation of metals in foliage of Populus tremula grown on soils with mixed contamination. II. Zinc binding inside leaf cell organelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollenweider, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.vollenweider@wsl.c [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL), Zuercherstrasse 111, 8903 Birmensdorf (Switzerland); Bernasconi, Petra [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL), Zuercherstrasse 111, 8903 Birmensdorf (Switzerland); Environmental Protection Office (AfU), Aabachstrasse 5, 6300 Zug (Switzerland); Gautschi, Hans-Peter [Centre for Microscopy and Image Analysis (CMI), University of Zurich, Gloriastrasse 30, 8006 Zuerich (Switzerland); Menard, Terry; Frey, Beat; Guenthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S. [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL), Zuercherstrasse 111, 8903 Birmensdorf (Switzerland)

    2011-01-15

    The phytoextraction potential of plants for removing heavy metals from polluted soils is determined by their capacity to store contaminants in aboveground organs and complex them safely. In this study, the metal compartmentation, elemental composition of zinc deposits and zinc complexation within leaves from poplars grown on soil with mixed metal contamination was analysed combining several histochemical and microanalytical approaches. Zinc was the only heavy metal detected and was stored in several organelles in the form of globoid deposits showing {beta}-metachromasy. It was associated to oxygen anions and different cations, noteworthy phosphorous. The deposit structure, elemental composition and element ratios indicated that zinc was chelated by phytic acid ligands. Maturation processes in vacuolar vs. cytoplasmic deposits were suggested by differences in size and amounts of complexed zinc. Hence, zinc complexation by phytate contributed to metal detoxification and accumulation in foliage but could not prevent toxicity reactions therein. - Zinc contaminants translocated to symplast of aged leaves were detoxified by phytic acid ligands.

  19. 免疫系统区室化与上皮细胞局部微环境中的免疫调节作用%Compartmentalization of immune system and regulatory effects of epithelial cells in local microenvironment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彦洁; 钟文伟; 刘伟; 许春娣; 夏振炜; 周同

    2011-01-01

    近年来,免疫系统区室化(compartmentalization of immune system)的概念逐渐引起了人们的重视.对各类免疫及非免疫器官中的免疫区室化现象进行深入研究,有助于进一步了解机体免疫系统、免疫应答以及免疫相关疾病的发病机制,并可提供新的应对策略.上皮细胞体内广泛分布,承载机体多种重要生理功能.它作为免疫防御首道防线参与免疫系统区室化形成,并在免疫反应局部微环境中,既可与免疫细胞相互作用发挥固有免疫调节作用,亦可通过自身转分化调节后续适应性免疫应答,在抵御及清除病原体入侵、调控局部炎症免疫反应以及促进组织损伤修复中,发挥了不可或缺的重要作用.病理状态下,上皮细胞又可能是免疫稳态失衡甚或肿瘤发生发展的关键因素.结合免疫系统区室化,对上皮细胞在局部微环境中的免疫调节作用作一综述,为免疫相关疾病的研究以及临床诊疗提供新的思路和策略.%Recently, compartmentalization of immune system has emerged as a new concept that attracts much attention. Further study and research in the phenomenon of immune compartmentalizaton in lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs will contribute to understand the human immune system, immunologic responses and pathogenesis of immune-related diseases, as well as provide new therapeutic strategies. The epithelial cells exist in a wide variety of tissues with multiple physiological functions. In the microenvironment where the immunologic responses take place, the epithelial cells not only act as the first barriers involed in formation of compartmentalization of immune system, but also play a role in innate immune regulation by cell-cell interation and regulate the subsequent adaptive immunity after transdifferentiation process. Thus, they have indispensable effects on eliminating pathogens, regulating local inflammatory reactions and promoting tissue regeneration. In

  20. Hyperthermia-induced increase in potassium transport in Chinese hamster cells. Appendix: application of compartmental analysis to the determination of ion fluxes in Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of hyperthermia (420C) on K+ transport has been examined by monitoring the uptake of 42KCl by Chinese hamster (line CHO) cells at both 370 and 420C as well as 370C following a 30-min treatment at 420C. Early studies showed that CHO cells exhibit two components of uptake at both 370 and 420C. Consequently, it was necessary to determine rate equations describing a three-compartment system (i.e., the bathing medium and two cell-associated compartments) and apply them to this system. Using the equations describing the behavior of the tracer in each compartment as well as the general solutions given by Robertson et al, a method was developed for obtaining the two components of influx. The two transport rates were determined from equations arising from mathematical analysis and requiring only measurable quantities for their solutions. The results of this study showed that (1) both components of influx at 420C are increased over influx at 370C; (2) the increase is significant (by an average 68% for the rapid component and 55% for the slow component); and (3) the increase is due entirely to an increase in active transport. The increased active transport is both immediate and quickly reversible when cells are returned to 370C; resumption of cell division is delayed for several additional hours, indicating that changes in potassium transport are not directly responsible for the prolonged delay in cell division. Rather, the results suggest that increased activity of the membrane pump may be the initial event in a series of events resulting from heat treatment

  1. Compartmental modeling and tracer kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, David H

    1983-01-01

    This monograph is concerned with mathematical aspects of compartmental an­ alysis. In particular, linear models are closely analyzed since they are fully justifiable as an investigative tool in tracer experiments. The objective of the monograph is to bring the reader up to date on some of the current mathematical prob­ lems of interest in compartmental analysis. This is accomplished by reviewing mathematical developments in the literature, especially over the last 10-15 years, and by presenting some new thoughts and directions for future mathematical research. These notes started as a series of lectures that I gave while visiting with the Division of Applied ~1athematics, Brown University, 1979, and have developed in­ to this collection of articles aimed at the reader with a beginning graduate level background in mathematics. The text can be used as a self-paced reading course. With this in mind, exercises have been appropriately placed throughout the notes. As an aid in reading the material, the e~d of a ...

  2. Bidirectionality and Compartmentation of Metabolic Fluxes Are Revealed in the Dynamics of Isotopomer Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Marko Vendelin; Pearu Peterson; Toomas Paalme; Schryer, David W

    2009-01-01

    Isotope labeling is one of the few methods of revealing the in vivo bidirectionality and compartmentalization of metabolic fluxes within metabolic networks. We argue that a shift from steady state to dynamic isotopomer analysis is required to deal with these cellular complexities and provide a review of dynamic studies of compartmentalized energy fluxes in eukaryotic cells including cardiac muscle, plants, and astrocytes. Knowledge of complex metabolic behaviour on a molecular level is prereq...

  3. Cross-membranes orchestrate compartmentalization and morphogenesis in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celler, Katherine; Koning, Roman I; Willemse, Joost; Koster, Abraham J; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-01-01

    Far from being simple unicellular entities, bacteria have complex social behaviour and organization, living in large populations, and some even as coherent, multicellular entities. The filamentous streptomycetes epitomize such multicellularity, growing as a syncytial mycelium with physiologically distinct hyphal compartments separated by infrequent cross-walls. The viability of mutants devoid of cell division, which can be propagated from fragments, suggests the presence of a different form of compartmentalization in the mycelium. Here we show that complex membranes, visualized by cryo-correlative light microscopy and electron tomography, fulfil this role. Membranes form small assemblies between the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, or, as evidenced by FRAP experiments, large protein-impermeable cross-membrane structures, which compartmentalize the multinucleoid mycelium. All areas containing cross-membrane structures are nucleoid-restricted zones, suggesting that the membrane assemblies may also act to protect nucleoids from cell-wall restructuring events. Our work reveals a novel mechanism of controlling compartmentalization and development in multicellular bacteria. PMID:27291257

  4. Compartmentation of glycogen metabolism revealed from 13C isotopologue distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin de Mas Igor

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stable isotope tracers are used to assess metabolic flux profiles in living cells. The existing methods of measurement average out the isotopic isomer distribution in metabolites throughout the cell, whereas the knowledge of compartmental organization of analyzed pathways is crucial for the evaluation of true fluxes. That is why we accepted a challenge to create a software tool that allows deciphering the compartmentation of metabolites based on the analysis of average isotopic isomer distribution. Results The software Isodyn, which simulates the dynamics of isotopic isomer distribution in central metabolic pathways, was supplemented by algorithms facilitating the transition between various analyzed metabolic schemes, and by the tools for model discrimination. It simulated 13C isotope distributions in glucose, lactate, glutamate and glycogen, measured by mass spectrometry after incubation of hepatocytes in the presence of only labeled glucose or glucose and lactate together (with label either in glucose or lactate. The simulations assumed either a single intracellular hexose phosphate pool, or also channeling of hexose phosphates resulting in a different isotopic composition of glycogen. Model discrimination test was applied to check the consistency of both models with experimental data. Metabolic flux profiles, evaluated with the accepted model that assumes channeling, revealed the range of changes in metabolic fluxes in liver cells. Conclusions The analysis of compartmentation of metabolic networks based on the measured 13C distribution was included in Isodyn as a routine procedure. The advantage of this implementation is that, being a part of evaluation of metabolic fluxes, it does not require additional experiments to study metabolic compartmentation. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the distribution of measured 13C-labeled glucose metabolites is inconsistent with the idea of perfect mixing of hexose

  5. Bidirectionality and compartmentation of metabolic fluxes are revealed in the dynamics of isotopomer networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryer, David W; Peterson, Pearu; Paalme, Toomas; Vendelin, Marko

    2009-04-01

    Isotope labeling is one of the few methods of revealing the in vivo bidirectionality and compartmentalization of metabolic fluxes within metabolic networks. We argue that a shift from steady state to dynamic isotopomer analysis is required to deal with these cellular complexities and provide a review of dynamic studies of compartmentalized energy fluxes in eukaryotic cells including cardiac muscle, plants, and astrocytes. Knowledge of complex metabolic behaviour on a molecular level is prerequisite for the intelligent design of genetically modified organisms able to realize their potential of revolutionizing food, energy, and pharmaceutical production. We describe techniques to explore the bidirectionality and compartmentalization of metabolic fluxes using information contained in the isotopic transient, and discuss the integration of kinetic models with MFA. The flux parameters of an example metabolic network were optimized to examine the compartmentalization of metabolites and and the bidirectionality of fluxes in the TCA cycle of Saccharomyces uvarum for steady-state respiratory growth. PMID:19468334

  6. Bidirectionality and Compartmentation of Metabolic Fluxes Are Revealed in the Dynamics of Isotopomer Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Vendelin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Isotope labeling is one of the few methods of revealing the in vivo bidirectionality and compartmentalization of metabolic fluxes within metabolic networks. We argue that a shift from steady state to dynamic isotopomer analysis is required to deal with these cellular complexities and provide a review of dynamic studies of compartmentalized energy fluxes in eukaryotic cells including cardiac muscle, plants, and astrocytes. Knowledge of complex metabolic behaviour on a molecular level is prerequisite for the intelligent design of genetically modified organisms able to realize their potential of revolutionizing food, energy, and pharmaceutical production. We describe techniques to explore the bidirectionality and compartmentalization of metabolic fluxes using information contained in the isotopic transient, and discuss the integration of kinetic models with MFA. The flux parameters of an example metabolic network were optimized to examine the compartmentalization of metabolites and and the bidirectionality of fluxes in the TCA cycle of Saccharomyces uvarum for steady-state respiratory growth.

  7. Compartmentalization of Aquaporins in the Human Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendram V. Rajnarayanan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Improper localization of water channel proteins called aquaporins (AQP induce mucosal injury which is implicated in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The amino acid sequences of AQP3 and AQP10 are 79% similar and belong to the mammalian aquaglyceroporin subfamily. AQP10 is localized on the apical compartment of the intestinal epithelium called the glycocalyx while AQP3 is selectively targeted to the basolateral membrane. Despite the high sequence similarity and evolutionary relatedness, the molecular mechanism involved in the polarity, selective targeting and function of AQP3 and AQP10 in the intestine is largely unknown. Our hypothesis is that the differential polarity and selective targeting of AQP3 and AQP10 in the intestinal epithelial cells is influenced by amino acid signal motifs. We performed sequence and structural alignments to determine differences in signals for localization and posttranslational glycosylation. The basolateral sorting motif “YRLL” is present in AQP3 but absent in AQP10; while Nglycosylation signals are present in AQP10 but absent in AQP3. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of AQP3 is longer compared to AQP10. The sequence and structural differences between AQP3 and AQP10 provide insights into the differential compartmentalization and function of these two aquaporins commonly expressed in human intestines.

  8. Accelerating compartmental modeling on a graphical processing unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Korngreen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Compartmental modeling is a widely used tool in neurophysiology but the detail and scope of such models is frequently limited by lack of computational resources. Here we implement compartmental modeling on low cost Graphical Processing Units (GPUs. We use NVIDIA’s CUDA, which significantly increases simulation speed compared to NEURON. Testing two methods for solving the current diffusion equation system revealed which method is more useful for specific neuron morphologies. Regions of applicability were investigated using a range of simulations from a single membrane potential trace simulated in a simple fork morphology to multiple traces on multiple realistic cells. A runtime peak 150-fold faster than NEURON was achieved. This application can be used for statistical analysis and data fitting optimizations of compartmental models and may be used for simultaneously simulating large populations of neurons. Since GPUs are forging ahead and proving to be more cost effective than CPUs, this may significantly decrease the cost of computation power and open new computational possibilities for laboratories with limited budgets.

  9. Accelerating compartmental modeling on a graphical processing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shalom, Roy; Liberman, Gilad; Korngreen, Alon

    2013-01-01

    Compartmental modeling is a widely used tool in neurophysiology but the detail and scope of such models is frequently limited by lack of computational resources. Here we implement compartmental modeling on low cost Graphical Processing Units (GPUs), which significantly increases simulation speed compared to NEURON. Testing two methods for solving the current diffusion equation system revealed which method is more useful for specific neuron morphologies. Regions of applicability were investigated using a range of simulations from a single membrane potential trace simulated in a simple fork morphology to multiple traces on multiple realistic cells. A runtime peak 150-fold faster than the CPU was achieved. This application can be used for statistical analysis and data fitting optimizations of compartmental models and may be used for simultaneously simulating large populations of neurons. Since GPUs are forging ahead and proving to be more cost-effective than CPUs, this may significantly decrease the cost of computation power and open new computational possibilities for laboratories with limited budgets. PMID:23508232

  10. Establishment and maintenance of compartmental boundaries: role of contractile actomyosin barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Bruno; Pélissier-Monier, Anne; Sanson, Bénédicte

    2011-06-01

    During animal development, tissues and organs are partitioned into compartments that do not intermix. This organizing principle is essential for correct tissue morphogenesis. Given that cell sorting defects during compartmentalization in humans are thought to cause malignant invasion and congenital defects such as cranio-fronto-nasal syndrome, identifying the molecular and cellular mechanisms that keep cells apart at boundaries between compartments is important. In both vertebrates and invertebrates, transcription factors and short-range signalling pathways, such as EPH/Ephrin, Hedgehog, or Notch signalling, govern compartmental cell sorting. However, the mechanisms that mediate cell sorting downstream of these factors have remained elusive for decades. Here, we review recent data gathered in Drosophila that suggest that the generation of cortical tensile forces at compartmental boundaries by the actomyosin cytoskeleton could be a general mechanism that inhibits cell mixing between compartments. PMID:21437644

  11. Enhanced detection with spectral imaging fluorescence microscopy reveals tissue- and cell-type-specific compartmentalization of surface-modified polystyrene nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Kenesei, Kata; Murali, Kumarasamy; Czéh, Árpád; Piella, Jordi; Puntes, Victor; Madarász, Emília

    2016-01-01

    Background Precisely targeted nanoparticle delivery is critically important for therapeutic applications. However, our knowledge on how the distinct physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles determine tissue penetration through physiological barriers, accumulation in specific cells and tissues, and clearance from selected organs has remained rather limited. In the recent study, spectral imaging fluorescence microscopy was exploited for precise and rapid monitoring of tissue- and cell-...

  12. Reservoir compartmentalization assessment by using FTIR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Permanyer, A. [Dept. Geoquimica, Petrologia i Prospeccio Geologica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, s/n, 08028 - Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Rebufa, C.; Kister, J. [Universite d' Aix - Marseille III, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques de St. Jerome, CNRS UMR 6171, Laboratoire de Geochimie Organique Analytique et Environnement (GOAE), Case 561, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2007-09-15

    Reservoir geochemistry has traditionally used the gas chromatographic fingerprinting method and star diagrams to provide evidence of petroleum reservoir compartmentalization. Recently alternative techniques such as Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy have been postulated to aid the evaluation of reservoir compartmentalization, and to characterize the geochemical evolution of oils from individual reservoirs. FTIR spectroscopy was applied successfully in the Tarragona Basin, Offshore N.E. Spain, validating the method to identify oils from different reservoirs. Moreover the method was successfully applied to provide evidence of compositional differences in oils from a faulted reservoir (El Furrial field, Venezuela), in which GC fingerprints failed to differentiate the oils. FTIR spectroscopy therefore, proves to be a complementary tool for reservoir compartmentalization studies. (author)

  13. Intracellular compartmentalization of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats Gavalda, Clara; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The interest in skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signalling has increased exponentially in recent years as a consequence of their role in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite this, the exact mechanisms involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism...... compartmentalization in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling. As a result, a hypothetical regulatory mechanism is proposed by which cells could direct glycogen resynthesis towards different pools of glycogen particles depending on the metabolic needs. Furthermore, we discuss...... the role of skeletal muscle transverse tubules as potential modulators of tissue insulin responsiveness....

  14. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  15. Maximin optimal designs for the compartmental model

    OpenAIRE

    Biedermann, Stefanie; Dette, Holger; Pepelyshev, Andrey

    2003-01-01

    For the compartmental model we determine optimal designs, which are robust against misspecifications of the unknown model parameters. We propose a maximin approach based on D-efficiencies and provide designs that are optimal with respect to the particular choice of various parameter regions.

  16. Maximin optimal designs for a compartmental model

    OpenAIRE

    Biedermann, Stefanie; Dette, Holger; Pepelyshev, Andrey

    2004-01-01

    For an important example from the class of compartmental models we determine optimal designs, which are robust against misspecifications of the unknown model parameters. We propose a maximin approach based on D-efficiencies and provide designs that are optimal with respect to the particular choice of various parameter regions.

  17. Compartmentalization of TNT degradation products in plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nepovím, Aleš; Podlipná, Radka; Soudek, Petr; Gerth, A.; Smrček, S.; Vaněk, Tomáš

    Greenwich: University of Greenwich, 2004, s. 30. [COST Action 859. Phytotechnologies to promote sustainable land use and improve food safety . Greenwich (GB), 11.11.2004-13.11.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/02/P065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : TNT degradation products * compartmentalization * plants Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  18. Compartmentation of metals in foliage of Populus tremula grown on soils with mixed contamination. I. From the tree crown to leaf cell level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollenweider, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.vollenweider@wsl.c [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL), Zuercherstrasse 111, 8903 Birmensdorf (Switzerland); Menard, Terry; Guenthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S. [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL), Zuercherstrasse 111, 8903 Birmensdorf (Switzerland)

    2011-01-15

    In order to achieve efficient phytoextraction of heavy metals using trees, the metal allocation to aboveground tissues needs to be characterised. In his study, the distribution of heavy metals, macro- and micronutrients and the metal micro-localisation as a function of the leaf position and heavy metal treatment were analysed in poplars grown on soil with mixed metal contamination. Zinc was the most abundant contaminant in both soil and foliage and, together with cadmium, was preferentially accumulated in older foliage whereas excess copper and lead were not translocated. Changes in other element concentrations indicated an acceleration in aging as a consequence of the metal treatment. Excess zinc was irregularly accumulated inside leaf tissues, tended to saturate the veins and was more frequently stored in cell symplast than apoplast. Storage compartments including metabolically safe and sensitive subcellular sites resulted in sizable metal accumulation as well as stress reactions. - Within foliage of poplars growing on contaminated soils, Zinc was stored at metabolically safe as well as sensitive subcellular sites, ensuring sizable bioaccumulation but also causing injuries.

  19. Lipid Metabolism, Compartmentalization and Signalling in the Regulation of Pollen Tube Growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žárský, Viktor; Potocký, Martin; Baluška, F.; Cvrčková, F.

    Volume 3. Heidelberg: Springer Verlag, 2006 - (Malho, R.), s. 117-138. (Plant Cell Monographs). ISBN 3-540-31121-1 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6038410; GA ČR GA204/05/0268 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Pollen Tube Growth * Lipid Metabolism * Compartmentalization Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  20. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P.; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future. PMID:27311714

  1. The mechanics of cellular compartmentalization as a model for tumor spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Pawlizak, Steve; Zink, Mareike; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    Based on a recently developed surgical method of Michael H"ockel, which makes use of cellular confinement to compartments in the human body, we study the mechanics of the process of cell segregation. Compartmentalization is a fundamental process of cellular organization and occurs during embryonic development. A simple model system can demonstrate the process of compartmentalization: When two populations of suspended cells are mixed, this mixture will eventually segregate into two phases, whereas mixtures of the same cell type will not. In the 1960s, Malcolm S. Steinberg formulated the so-called differential adhesion hypothesis which explains the segregation in the model system and the process of compartmentalization by differences in surface tension and adhesiveness of the interacting cells. We are interested in to which extend the same physical principles affect tumor growth and spreading between compartments. For our studies, we use healthy and cancerous breast cell lines of different malignancy as well as primary cells from human cervix carcinoma. We apply a set of techniques to study their mechanical properties and interactions. The Optical Stretcher is used for whole cell rheology, while Cell-cell-adhesion forces are directly measured with a modified AFM. In combination with 3D segregation experiments in droplet cultures we try to clarify the role of surface tension in tumor spreading.

  2. Compartmentalized ATP synthesis in skeletal muscle triads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J W; Thieleczek, R; Varsányi, M; Heilmeyer, L M

    1992-01-21

    Isolated skeletal muscle triads contain a compartmentalized glycolytic reaction sequence catalyzed by aldolase, triosephosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglycerate kinase. These enzymes express activity in the structure-associated state leading to synthesis of ATP in the triadic junction upon supply of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate or fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. ATP formation occurs transiently and appears to be kinetically compartmentalized, i.e., the synthesized ATP is not in equilibrium with the bulk ATP. The apparent rate constants of the aldolase and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/phosphoglycerate kinase reaction are significantly increased when fructose 1,6-bisphosphate instead of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate is employed as substrate. The observations suggest that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is especially effectively channelled into the junctional gap. The amplitude of the ATP transient is decreasing with increasing free [Ca2+] in the range of 1 nM to 30 microM. In the presence of fluoride, the ATP transient is significantly enhanced and its declining phase is substantially retarded. This observation suggests utilization of endogenously synthesized ATP in part by structure associated protein kinases and phosphatases which is confirmed by the detection of phosphorylated triadic proteins after gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Endogenous protein kinases phosphorylate proteins of apparent Mr 450,000, 180,000, 160,000, 145,000, 135,000, 90,000, 54,000, 51,000, and 20,000, respectively. Some of these phosphorylated polypeptides are in the Mr range of known phosphoproteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal muscle, which might give a first hint at the functional importance of the sequential glycolytic reactions compartmentalized in triads. PMID:1731894

  3. Partitioning Variability of a Compartmentalized In Vitro Transcriptional Thresholding Circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsner, Korbinian; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2015-10-16

    Encapsulation of in vitro biochemical reaction circuits into small, cell-sized compartments can result in considerable variations in the dynamical properties of the circuits. As a model system, we here investigate a simple in vitro transcriptional reaction circuit, which generates an ultrasensitive fluorescence response when the concentration of an RNA transcript reaches a preset threshold. The reaction circuit is compartmentalized into spherical water-in-oil microemulsion droplets, and the reaction progress is monitored by fluorescence microscopy. A quantitative statistical analysis of thousands of individual droplets ranging in size from a few up to 20 μm reveals a strong variability in effective RNA production rates, which by computational modeling is traced back to a larger-than-Poisson variability in RNAP activities in the droplets. The noise level in terms of the noise strength (the Fano factor) is strongly dependent on the ratio between transcription templates and polymerases, and increases for higher template concentrations. PMID:25974035

  4. Approximating the stabilization of cellular metabolism by compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürtauer, Lisa; Nägele, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical regulation in compartmentalized metabolic networks is highly complex and non-intuitive. This is particularly true for cells of higher plants showing one of the most compartmentalized cellular structures across all kingdoms of life. The interpretation and testable hypothesis generation from experimental data on such complex systems is a challenging step in biological research and biotechnological applications. While it is known that subcellular compartments provide defined reaction spaces within a cell allowing for the tight coordination of complex biochemical reaction sequences, its role in the coordination of metabolic signals during metabolic reprogramming due to environmental fluctuations is less clear. In the present study, we numerically analysed the effects of environmental fluctuations in a subcellular metabolic network with regard to the stability of an experimentally observed steady state in the genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Applying a method for kinetic parameter normalization, several millions of probable enzyme kinetic parameter constellations were simulated and evaluated with regard to the stability information of the metabolic homeostasis. Information about the stability of the metabolic steady state was derived from real parts of eigenvalues of Jacobian matrices. Our results provide evidence for a differential stabilizing contribution of different subcellular compartments. We could identify stabilizing and destabilizing network components which we could classify according to their subcellular localization. The findings prove that a highly dynamic interplay between intracellular compartments is preliminary for an efficient stabilization of a metabolic homeostasis after environmental perturbation. Further, our results provide evidence that feedback-inhibition originating from the cytosol and plastid seem to stabilize the sucrose homeostasis more efficiently than vacuolar control. In summary, our results indicate stabilizing and

  5. Compartmental model of 18F-choline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, T.; Tavola, F.; Giussani, A.; Cantone, M. C.; Uusijärvi, H.; Mattsson, S.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi-Henß, N.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-03-01

    The MADEIRA Project (Minimizing Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations), aims to improve the efficacy and safety of 3D functional imaging by optimizing, among others, the knowledge of the temporal variation of the radiopharmaceuticals' uptake in and clearance from tumor and healthy tissues. With the help of compartmental modeling it is intended to optimize the time schedule for data collection and improve the evaluation of the organ doses to the patients. Administration of 18F-choline to screen for recurrence or the occurrence of metastases in prostate cancer patients is one of the diagnostic applications under consideration in the frame of the project. PET and CT images have been acquired up to four hours after injection of 18F-choline. Additionally blood and urine samples have been collected and measured in a gamma counter. The radioactivity concentration in different organs and data of plasma clearance and elimination into urine were used to set-up a compartmental model of the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. It features a central compartment (blood) exchanging with organs. The structure describes explicitly liver, kidneys, spleen, plasma and bladder as separate units with a forcing function approach. The model is presented together with an evaluation of the individual and population kinetic parameters, and a revised time schedule for data collection is proposed. This optimized time schedule will be validated in a further set of patient studies.

  6. Compartmentalization and transport in β-lactam antibiotic biosynthesis by filamentous fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Kamp, Mart van de; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1999-01-01

    A proper description of the biosynthesis of fungal β-lactam antibiotics requires detailed knowledge of the cell biology of the producing organisms. This involves a delineation of the compartmentalization of the biosynthetic pathways, and of the consequential transport steps across the cell-boundary plasma membrane and across organellar membranes. Of the enzymes of the penicillin biosynthetic pathway in Penicillium chrysogenum and Aspergillus nidulans, δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine ...

  7. Human Lsg1 defines a family of essential GTPases that correlates with the evolution of compartmentalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffzek Klaus

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compartmentalization is a key feature of eukaryotic cells, but its evolution remains poorly understood. GTPases are the oldest enzymes that use nucleotides as substrates and they participate in a wide range of cellular processes. Therefore, they are ideal tools for comparative genomic studies aimed at understanding how aspects of biological complexity such as cellular compartmentalization evolved. Results We describe the identification and characterization of a unique family of circularly permuted GTPases represented by the human orthologue of yeast Lsg1p. We placed the members of this family in the phylogenetic context of the YlqF Related GTPase (YRG family, which are present in Eukarya, Bacteria and Archea and include the stem cell regulator Nucleostemin. To extend the computational analysis, we showed that hLsg1 is an essential GTPase predominantly located in the endoplasmic reticulum and, in some cells, in Cajal bodies in the nucleus. Comparison of localization and siRNA datasets suggests that all members of the family are essential GTPases that have increased in number as the compartmentalization of the eukaryotic cell and the ribosome biogenesis pathway have evolved. Conclusion We propose a scenario, consistent with our data, for the evolution of this family: cytoplasmic components were first acquired, followed by nuclear components, and finally the mitochondrial and chloroplast elements were derived from different bacterial species, in parallel with the formation of the nucleolus and the specialization of nuclear components.

  8. p53 gene mutations, p53 protein accumulation and compartmentalization in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Bosari, S.; Viale, G.; Roncalli, M; Graziani, D.; Borsani, G; Lee, A. K.; Coggi, G.

    1995-01-01

    p53 accumulation may occur in the nucleus and/or cytoplasm of neoplastic cells. Cytoplasmic accumulation has been reported to be an unfavorable, but not established, prognostic indicator in colorectal cancer. Different types of p53 intracellular compartmentalization could depend either on p53 gene mutations or on the interaction with p53 protein ligands. The purposes of our study were (1) to assess whether the different patterns of p53 accumulation are selectively associated with p53 mutation...

  9. Development of methods for the directed evolution of penicillin G acylase by in vitro compartmentalization

    OpenAIRE

    Woronoff, Gabrielle

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic catalysts have been finely tuned for their specific function though natural evolution, by iterative mutations and selections cycles. Directed evolution mimics natural evolution at the laboratory scale and allows the selection, in large collections of variants, of enzymes bearing new properties. In vitro compartmentalization (IVC) is the directed evolution technique used in this work, and consists of aqueous microdroplets dispersed in oil acting as artificial cells. Single genes can ...

  10. Bioinspired genotype–phenotype linkages: mimicking cellular compartmentalization for the engineering of functional proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Van Vliet, Liisa D.; Colin, Pierre-Yves; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The idea of compartmentalization of genotype and phenotype in cells is key for enabling Darwinian evolution. This contribution describes bioinspired systems that use in vitro compartments—water-in-oil droplets and gel-shell beads—for the directed evolution of functional proteins. Technologies based on these principles promise to provide easier access to protein-based therapeutics, reagents for processes involving enzyme catalysis, parts for synthetic biology and materials with biological comp...

  11. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. W. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure (3 ACH50) for single-family and multifamily construction (in climate zones 3–8). The Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design certification program and ASHRAE Standard 189 have comparable compartmentalization requirements. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 will soon be responsible for all multifamily ventilation requirements (low rise and high rise); it has an exceptionally stringent compartmentalization requirement. These code and program requirements are driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  12. Potassium fluxes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. II. Compartmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    42K+ and 86Rb+ were used to determine the subcellular distribution of potassium in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by compartmental analysis. In both wild type and a mutant strain, three distinct compartments (referred to as I, II, and III) were apparent. Using 42K+, we found that these had half-lives for K+ exchange of 1.07 min, 12.8 min, and 2.9 h, respectively, in wild-type cells and 0.93 min, 14.7 min, and 9.8 h, respectively, for the mutants. Half-lives were not significantly different when 86Rb+ was used to trace K+. Compartments I and II probably correspond to the cell wall and cytoplasm, respectively. Based on the lack of a large central vacuole in Chlamydomonas, the effect of a dark pretreatment on the kinetic properties of compartment III and the similarity between the [K+] of compartment III and that of isolated chloroplasts, this slowly exchanging compartment was identified as the chloroplast. Growth of wild-type cells at 100 micromolars (instead of 10 mM K+) caused no change of cytoplasmic [K+] but reduced chloroplast [K+] very substantially. The mutants failed to grow at 100 micromolars K+

  13. Directed evolution of polymerase function by compartmentalized self-replication

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadessy, Farid J; Ong, Jennifer L; Holliger, Philipp

    2001-01-01

    We describe compartmentalized self-replication (CSR), a strategy for the directed evolution of enzymes, especially polymerases. CSR is based on a simple feedback loop consisting of a polymerase that replicates only its own encoding gene. Compartmentalization serves to isolate individual self-replication reactions from each other. In such a system, adaptive gains directly (and proportionally) translate into genetic amplification of the encoding gene. CSR has applications in t...

  14. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Christine; Lippert, Anna H; Bonakdar, Navid; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Voll, Lars M

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, such as permeability, stability, or chemical reactivity. In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in synthetic biology. First, we provide an introduction into the utilization of multicompartmented vesosomes as compartmentalized nanoscale bioreactors. In the bottom-up development of protocells from vesicular nanoreactors, the specific exchange of pathway intermediates across compartment boundaries represents a bottleneck for future studies. To date, most compartmented bioreactors rely on unspecific exchange of substrates and products. This is either based on changes in permeability of the coblock polymer shell by physicochemical triggers or by the incorporation of unspecific porin proteins into the vesicle membrane. Since the incorporation of membrane transport proteins into simple and nested artificial vesicles offers the potential for specific exchange of substances between subcompartments, it opens new vistas in the design of protocells. Therefore, we devote the main part of the review to summarize the technical advances in the use of phospholipids and block copolymers for the reconstitution of membrane proteins. PMID:26973834

  15. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eSchmitt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nano-scale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, like permeability, stability or chemical reactivity.In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in synthetic biology. First, we provide an introduction into the utilization of multi-compartmented vesosomes as compartmentalized nano-scale bioreactors. In the bottom-up development of protocells from vesicular nano-reactors, the specific exchange of pathway intermediates across compartment boundaries represents a bottleneck for future studies. To date, most compartmented bioreactors rely on unspecific exchange of substrates and products. This is either based on changes in permeability of the coblock polymer shell by physicochemical triggers or by the incorporation of unspecific porin proteins into the vesicle membrane. Since the incorporation of membrane transport proteins into simple and nested artificial vesicles offers the potential for specific exchange of substances between subcompartments, it opens new vistas in the design of protocells. Therefore we devote the main part of the review to summarize the technical advances in the use of phospholipids and block copolymers for the reconstitution of membrane proteins.

  16. Blind estimation of compartmental model parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computation of physiologically relevant kinetic parameters from dynamic PET or SPECT imaging requires knowledge of the blood input function. This work is concerned with developing methods to accurately estimate these kinetic parameters blindly; that is, without use of a directly measured blood input function. Instead, only measurements of the output functions - the tissue time-activity curves - are used. The blind estimation method employed here minimizes a set of cross-relation equations, from which the blood term has been factored out, to determine compartmental model parameters. The method was tested with simulated data appropriate for dynamic SPECT cardiac perfusion imaging with 99mTc-teboroxime and for dynamic PET cerebral blood flow imaging with 15O water. The simulations did not model the tomographic process. Noise levels typical of the respective modalities were employed. From three to eight different regions were simulated, each with different time-activity curves. The time-activity curve (24 or 70 time points) for each region was simulated with a compartment model. The simulation used a biexponential blood input function and washin rates between 0.2 and 1.3 min-1 and washout rates between 0.2 and 1.0 min-1. The system of equations was solved numerically and included constraints to bound the range of possible solutions. From the cardiac simulations, washin was determined to within a scale factor of the true washin parameters with less than 6% bias and 12% variability. 99mTc-teboroxime washout results had less than 5% bias, but variability ranged from 14% to 43%. The cerebral blood flow washin parameters were determined with less than 5% bias and 4% variability. The washout parameters were determined with less than 4% bias, but had 15-30% variability. Since washin is often the parameter of most use in clinical studies, the blind estimation approach may eliminate the current necessity of measuring the input function when performing certain dynamic studies

  17. Blind estimation of compartmental model parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, E V; Clackdoyle, R; Gullberg, G T

    1999-03-01

    Computation of physiologically relevant kinetic parameters from dynamic PET or SPECT imaging requires knowledge of the blood input function. This work is concerned with developing methods to accurately estimate these kinetic parameters blindly; that is, without use of a directly measured blood input function. Instead, only measurements of the output functions--the tissue time-activity curves--are used. The blind estimation method employed here minimizes a set of cross-relation equations, from which the blood term has been factored out, to determine compartmental model parameters. The method was tested with simulated data appropriate for dynamic SPECT cardiac perfusion imaging with 99mTc-teboroxime and for dynamic PET cerebral blood flow imaging with 15O water. The simulations did not model the tomographic process. Noise levels typical of the respective modalities were employed. From three to eight different regions were simulated, each with different time-activity curves. The time-activity curve (24 or 70 time points) for each region was simulated with a compartment model. The simulation used a biexponential blood input function and washin rates between 0.2 and 1.3 min(-1) and washout rates between 0.2 and 1.0 min(-1). The system of equations was solved numerically and included constraints to bound the range of possible solutions. From the cardiac simulations, washin was determined to within a scale factor of the true washin parameters with less than 6% bias and 12% variability. 99mTc-teboroxime washout results had less than 5% bias, but variability ranged from 14% to 43%. The cerebral blood flow washin parameters were determined with less than 5% bias and 4% variability. The washout parameters were determined with less than 4% bias, but had 15-30% variability. Since washin is often the parameter of most use in clinical studies, the blind estimation approach may eliminate the current necessity of measuring the input function when performing certain dynamic studies

  18. Compartmentalization of prostaglandins in the canine kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kidney has been shown to synthesize all of the naturally occurring major prostaglandins which may be restricted to a discrete part of the kidney where their actions are physiologically important, such as the vascular compartment and the tubular compartment. In order to examine this concept of compartmentalization, the authors conducted a series of experiments to determine whether PGl2, measured as 6-keto-pGF/sub 1α/, produced in the kidney is restricted to the renal vascular compartment or whether it also has access to the tubular compartment. Experiments were performed in the pentobarbital-anesthetized dog. Increasing pre-glomerular levels of 6-keto-PFG/sub 1α/ caused marked increases in both the urinary excretion and the renal venous outflow to 6-keto-PGF/sub 1α/. When 3H-6-keto-PGF/sub 1α/ was co-infused with inulin into the renal artery, 33% of the radioactivity and 23% of the inulin was recovered on first pass. With infusion of 3H-PGl2 and inulin, 20% of the radioactivity and 28% of the inulin reached the urine on first pass. Radioactive PGl2 appeared to be less filterable at the glomeruli than either 3H-6-keto-PGF/sub 1α/ or inulin. In the final set of experiments, in which dogs were prepared for a ureteral stopped-flow study, the PGE2/U/P/sub In/ ratio a peak was observed proximal to the Na+ plateau but distal to the Na+ nadir. In light of the results from the stopped-flow study and the intrarenal infusion studies, they conclude that PGE2 synthesized in the kidney enters both the renal and tubular compartments. In contrast, they find that 6-keto-PGF/sub 1α/ of renal origin enters only the renal origin enters only the renal vascular compartment and not the tubular compartment

  19. A development-based compartmentalization of the Drosophila central brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereanu, Wayne; Kumar, Abilasha; Jennett, Arnim; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The neuropile of the Drosophila brain is subdivided into anatomically discrete compartments. Compartments are rich in terminal neurite branching and synapses; they are the neuropile domains in which signal processing takes place. Compartment boundaries are defined by more or less dense layers of glial cells, as well as long neurite fascicles. These fascicles are formed during the larval period when the approximately 100 neuronal lineages that constitute the Drosophila central brain differentiate. Each lineage forms an axon tract with a characteristic trajectory in the neuropile; groups of spatially related tracts congregate into the brain fascicles that can be followed from the larva throughout metamorphosis into the adult stage. In this paper we provide a map of the adult brain compartments and the relevant fascicles defining compartmental boundaries. We have identified the neuronal lineages contributing to each fascicle, which allowed us to directly compare compartments of the larval and adult brain. Most adult compartments can be recognized already in the early larval brain where they form a “protomap” of the later adult compartments. Our analysis highlights the morphogenetic changes shaping the Drosophila brain; the data will be important for studies that link early acting genetic mechanisms to the adult neuronal structures and circuits controlled by these mechanisms. PMID:20533357

  20. Development-based compartmentalization of the Drosophila central brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereanu, Wayne; Kumar, Abilasha; Jennett, Arnim; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-08-01

    The neuropile of the Drosophila brain is subdivided into anatomically discrete compartments. Compartments are rich in terminal neurite branching and synapses; they are the neuropile domains in which signal processing takes place. Compartment boundaries are defined by more or less dense layers of glial cells as well as long neurite fascicles. These fascicles are formed during the larval period, when the approximately 100 neuronal lineages that constitute the Drosophila central brain differentiate. Each lineage forms an axon tract with a characteristic trajectory in the neuropile; groups of spatially related tracts congregate into the brain fascicles that can be followed from the larva throughout metamorphosis into the adult stage. Here we provide a map of the adult brain compartments and the relevant fascicles defining compartmental boundaries. We have identified the neuronal lineages contributing to each fascicle, which allowed us to compare compartments of the larval and adult brain directly. Most adult compartments can be recognized already in the early larval brain, where they form a "protomap" of the later adult compartments. Our analysis highlights the morphogenetic changes shaping the Drosophila brain; the data will be important for studies that link early-acting genetic mechanisms to the adult neuronal structures and circuits controlled by these mechanisms. PMID:20533357

  1. Micro-compartmentalized cultivation of cyanobacteria for mutant screening using glass slides with highly water-repellent mark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayuri Arai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria have attracted attention for their potential to produce biofuels and biochemicals directly from CO2. Cell isolation by colony has conventionally been used for selecting target cells. Colony isolation methods require a significant amount of time for cultivation, and the colony-forming ratio is potentially low for cyanobacteria. Here, we overcome such limitations by encapsulating and culturing cells in droplets with an overlay of dodecane using glass slides printed with highly water-repellent mark. In the compartmentalized culture, the oil phase protects the small volume of culture medium from drying and increases the CO2 supply. Since a difference in cell growth was observed with and without the addition of antibiotics, this compartmentalized culture method could be a powerful tool for mutant selection.

  2. Drivers of compartmentalization in a Mediterranean pollination network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Ana M. Martin; Allesina, Stefano; Rodrigo, Anselm;

    2012-01-01

    We study compartmentalization in a Mediterranean pollination network using three different analytical approaches: unipartite modularity (UM), bipartite modularity (BM) and the group model (GM). Our objectives are to compare compartments obtained with these three approaches and to explore the role...... of several species attributes related to pollination syndromes, species phenology, abundance and connectivity in structuring compartmentalization. BM could not identify compartments in our network. By contrast, UM revealed four modules composed of plants and pollinators, and GM four groups of plants...... and five of pollinators. Phenology had a major influence on compartmentalization, and compartments (both UM and GM) had distinct phenophases. Compartments were also strongly characterized by species degree (number of connections) and betweenness centrality. These two attributes were highly related to...

  3. Upper extremity compartmental anatomy: clinical relevance to radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toomayan, Glen A.; Robertson, Fabienne; Major, Nancy M. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC (United States); Brigman, Brian E. [Duke University Medical Center, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Malignant tumors of the upper extremity are uncommon, and their care should be referred to specialized facilities with experience treating these lesions. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) staging system is used by the surgeon to determine appropriate surgical management, assess prognosis, and communicate with other healthcare providers. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is employed pre-operatively to identify a lesion's compartment of origin, determine extent of spread, and plan biopsy and resection approaches. Involvement of neurovascular structures may result in devastating loss of upper extremity function, requiring amputation. Violation of high-resistance compartmental barriers necessitates more extensive surgical resection. Biopsy may be performed by the radiologist using imaging guidance. Knowledge of compartmental anatomy allows the radiologist or surgeon to use an easily excisable biopsy approach and prevent iatrogenic spread to unaffected compartments. Case examples are presented to illustrate the importance of compartmental anatomy in the management of benign and malignant upper extremity tumors. (orig.)

  4. Application of computers for obtaining numerical solutions to compartmental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of compartmental analysis to the interpretation of metabolic studies has contributed to the advanced state of fundamental research. However, mathematical models usually require a large number of calculations to be performed. Fortunately, machines have become available to assist with the calculations, record keeping, and drawing graphs illustrating results. This paper describes some of the applications of computer hardware and software to the analysis of compartmental kinetics and the associated problems which the user may encounter. Computers speed up the fitting of models to data, trying new models, comparing the results of competing results. they make such work cheaper, less tedious, and much more convenient

  5. Compartmentation and complexation of metals in hyperaccumulator plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitenmaier, Barbara; Küpper, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaccumulators are being intensely investigated. They are not only interesting in scientific context due to their “strange” behavior in terms of dealing with high concentrations of metals, but also because of their use in phytoremediation and phytomining, for which understanding the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation is crucial. Hyperaccumulators naturally use metal accumulation as a defense against herbivores and pathogens, and therefore deal with accumulated metals in very specific ways of complexation and compartmentation, different from non-hyperaccumulator plants and also non-hyperaccumulated metals. For example, in contrast to non-hyperaccumulators, in hyperaccumulators even the classical phytochelatin-inducing metal, cadmium, is predominantly not bound by such sulfur ligands, but only by weak oxygen ligands. This applies to all hyperaccumulated metals investigated so far, as well as hyperaccumulation of the metalloid arsenic. Stronger ligands, as they have been shown to complex metals in non-hyperaccumulators, are in hyperaccumulators used for transient binding during transport to the storage sites (e.g., nicotianamine) and possibly for export of Cu in Cd/Zn hyperaccumulators [metallothioneins (MTs)]. This confirmed that enhanced active metal transport, and not metal complexation, is the key mechanism of hyperaccumulation. Hyperaccumulators tolerate the high amount of accumulated heavy metals by sequestering them into vacuoles, usually in large storage cells of the epidermis. This is mediated by strongly elevated expression of specific transport proteins in various tissues from metal uptake in the shoots up to the storage sites in the leaf epidermis. However, this mechanism seems to be very metal specific. Non-hyperaccumulated metals in hyperaccumulators seem to be dealt with like in non-hyperaccumulator plants, i.e., detoxified by binding to strong ligands such as MTs. PMID:24065978

  6. Compartmentation and complexation of metals in hyperaccumulator plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eLeitenmaier

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyperaccumulators are being intensely investigated. They are not only interesting in scientific context due to their strange behaviour in terms of dealing with high concentrations of metals, but also because of their use in phytoremediation and phytomining, for which understanding the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation is crucial. Hyperaccumulators naturally use metal accumulation as a defence against herbivores and pathogens, and therefore deal with accumulated metals in very specific ways of complexation and compartmentation, different from non-hyperaccumulator plants and also non-hyperaccumulated metals. For example, in contrast to non-hyperaccumulators, in hyperaccumulators even the classical phytochelatin-inducing metal, cadmium, is predominantly not bound by such sulfur ligands, but only by weak oxygen ligands. This applies to all hyperaccumulated metals investigated so far, as well as hyperaccumulation of the metalloid arsenic. Stronger ligands, as they have been shown to complex metals in non-hyperaccumulators, are in hyperaccumulators used for transient binding during transport to the storage sites. This confirmed that enhanced active metal transport, and not metal complexation, is the key mechanism of hyperaccumulation. Hyperaccumulators tolerate the high amount of accumulated heavy metals by sequestering them into vacuoles, usually in large storage cells of the epidermis. This is mediated by strongly elevated expression of specific transport proteins in various tissues from metal uptake in the shoots up to the storage sites in the leaf epidermis. However, this mechanism seems to be very metal specific. Non-hyperaccumulated metals in hyperaccumulators seem to be dealt with like in non-hyperaccumulator plants, i.e. detoxified by binding to strong ligands such as metallothioneins.

  7. A Calculus for Modelling, Simulating and Analysing Compartmentalized Biological Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardare, Radu Iulian; Ihekwaba, Adoha

    2007-01-01

    A. Ihekwaba, R. Mardare. A Calculus for Modelling, Simulating and Analysing Compartmentalized Biological Systems. Case study: NFkB system. In Proc. of International Conference of Computational Methods in Sciences and Engineering (ICCMSE), American Institute of Physics, AIP Proceedings, N 2...

  8. Compartmentalized Production of CCL17 In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Alferink, Judith; Lieberam, Ivo; Reindl, Wolfgang; Behrens, Andrea; Weiß, Susanne; Hüser, Norbert; Gerauer, Klaus; Ross, Ralf; Reske-Kunz, Angelika B.; Ahmad-Nejad, Parviz; Wagner, Hermann; Förster, Irmgard

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs)* fulfill an important regulatory function at the interface of the innate and adaptive immune system. The thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) is produced by DCs and facilitates the attraction of activated T cells. Using a fluorescence-based in vivo reporter system, we show that CCL17 expression in mice is found in activated Langerhans cells and mature DCs located in various lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs, and is up-regulated after stimulation with Toll...

  9. Kinetic compartmental analysis of carnitine metabolism in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to quantitate the dynamic parameters of carnitine metabolism in the dog. Six mongrel dogs were given intravenous injections of L-[methyl-3H]carnitine and the specific radioactivity of carnitine was followed in plasma and urine for 19-28 days. The data were analyzed by kinetic compartmental analysis. A three-compartment, open-system model [(a) extracellular fluid, (b) cardiac and skeletal muscle, (c) other tissues, particularly liver and kidney] was adopted and kinetic parameters (carnitine flux, pool sizes, kinetic constants) were derived. In four of six dogs the size of the muscle carnitine pool obtained by kinetic compartmental analysis agreed (+/- 5%) with estimates based on measurement of carnitine concentrations in different muscles. In three of six dogs carnitine excretion rates derived from kinetic compartmental analysis agreed (+/- 9%) with experimentally measured values, but in three dogs the rates by kinetic compartmental analysis were significantly higher than the corresponding rates measured directly. Appropriate chromatographic analyses revealed no radioactive metabolites in muscle or urine of any of the dogs. Turnover times for carnitine were (mean +/- SEM): 0.44 +/- 0.05 h for extracellular fluid, 232 +/- 22 h for muscle, and 7.9 +/- 1.1 h for other tissues. The estimated flux of carnitine in muscle was 210 pmol/min/g of tissue. Whole-body turnover time for carnitine was 62.9 +/- 5.6 days (mean +/- SEM). Estimated carnitine biosynthesis ranged from 2.9 to 28 mumol/kg body wt/day. Results of this study indicate that kinetic compartmental analysis may be applicable to study of human carnitine metabolism

  10. Modulation in Wistar Rats of Blood Corticosterone Compartmentation by Sex and a Cafeteria Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, María del Mar; Holmgren-Holm, Fredrik; Grasa, Maria del Mar; Esteve, Montserrat; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2013-01-01

    In the metabolic syndrome, glucocorticoid activity is increased, but circulating levels show little change. Most of blood glucocorticoids are bound to corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), which liver expression and circulating levels are higher in females than in males. Since blood hormones are also bound to blood cells, and the size of this compartment is considerable for androgens and estrogens, we analyzed whether sex or eating a cafeteria diet altered the compartmentation of corticosterone in rat blood. The main corticosterone compartment in rat blood is that specifically bound to plasma proteins, with smaller compartments bound to blood cells or free. Cafeteria diet increased the expression of liver CBG gene, binding plasma capacity and the proportion of blood cell-bound corticosterone. There were marked sex differences in blood corticosterone compartmentation in rats, which were unrelated to testosterone. The use of a monoclonal antibody ELISA and a polyclonal Western blot for plasma CBG compared with both specific plasma binding of corticosterone and CBG gene expression suggested the existence of different forms of CBG, with varying affinities for corticosterone in males and females, since ELISA data showed higher plasma CBG for males, but binding and Western blot analyses (plus liver gene expression) and higher physiological effectiveness for females. Good cross- reactivity to the antigen for polyclonal CBG antibody suggests that in all cases we were measuring CBG.The different immunoreactivity and binding affinity may help explain the marked sex-related differences in plasma hormone binding as sex-linked different proportions of CBG forms. PMID:23451210

  11. Subcellular compartmentalization of docking protein-1 contributes to progression in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Teresa; Söhn, Michaela; Gutting, Tobias; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Behrens, Hans-Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Ebert, Matthias P A; Burgermeister, Elke

    2016-06-01

    Full-length (FL) docking protein-1 (DOK1) is an adapter protein which inhibits growth factor and immune response pathways in normal tissues, but is frequently lost in human cancers. Small DOK1 variants remain in cells of solid tumors and leukemias, albeit, their functions are elusive. To assess the so far unknown role of DOK1 in colorectal cancer (CRC), we generated DOK1 mutants which mimic the domain structure and subcellular distribution of DOK1 protein variants in leukemia patients. We found that cytoplasmic DOK1 activated peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma (PPARγ) resulting in inhibition of the c-FOS promoter and cell proliferation, whereas nuclear DOK1 was inactive. PPARγ-agonist increased expression of endogenous DOK1 and interaction with PPARγ. Forward translation of this cell-based signaling model predicted compartmentalization of DOK1 in patients. In a large series of CRC patients, loss of DOK1 protein was associated with poor prognosis at early tumor stages (*p=0.001; n=1492). In tumors with cytoplasmic expression of DOK1, survival was improved, whereas nuclear localization of DOK1 correlated with poor outcome, indicating that compartmentalization of DOK1 is critical for CRC progression. Thus, DOK1 was identified as a prognostic factor for non-metastatic CRC, and, via its drugability by PPARγ-agonist, may constitute a potential target for future cancer treatments. PMID:27428427

  12. Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology investigates the organization, compartmentalization, and biochemistry of eukaryotic cells and the pathology associated...

  13. A compartmental model to quantitate in vivo glucose transport in the human forearm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glucose transport is a critical step in the control of glucose disposal that, until presently, has not been quantitated in vivo in humans. We have employed the perfused forearm and euglycemic insulin-clamp techniques in combination with a dual-tracer injection to measure basal and insulin-mediated glucose transport in six normal subjects. L-[3H]glucose, which is not transported, was used to trace extracellular glucose kinetics; 3-O-[14C]-methyl-D-glucose, transportable but not metabolizable, was used to monitor glucose movement across the cell membrane. After bolus intra-arterial injection of the two tracers, plasma samples were obtained every 15-30 s for 10 min from a deep forearm vein to determine the washout curves. A linear compartmental model was developed that accounts for blood flow heterogeneity. It consists of three parallel, two-compartment chains merging into the sampling compartment to which cellular compartments are appended. A priori identifiability analysis was performed. The uniquely identifiable parameterization includes the transport rate constants of glucose into and out of the cell. The model was identified using nonlinear least-squares parameter estimation. Transport parameters are estimated with very good precision, and their reproducibility is satisfactory. The model also allows the estimation of the mean arteriovenous transit times of both the extracellular and the transported tracer. The compartmental model provides a novel approach to investigate glucose transport in vivo in humans

  14. Vacuolar compartmentalization as indispensable component of heavy metal detoxification in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shanti S; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Mimura, Tetsuro

    2016-05-01

    Plant cells orchestrate an array of molecular mechanisms for maintaining plasmatic concentrations of essential heavy metal (HM) ions, for example, iron, zinc and copper, within the optimal functional range. In parallel, concentrations of non-essential HMs and metalloids, for example, cadmium, mercury and arsenic, should be kept below their toxicity threshold levels. Vacuolar compartmentalization is central to HM homeostasis. It depends on two vacuolar pumps (V-ATPase and V-PPase) and a set of tonoplast transporters, which are directly driven by proton motive force, and primary ATP-dependent pumps. While HM non-hyperaccumulator plants largely sequester toxic HMs in root vacuoles, HM hyperaccumulators usually sequester them in leaf cell vacuoles following efficient long-distance translocation. The distinct strategies evolved as a consequence of organ-specific differences particularly in vacuolar transporters and in addition to distinct features in long-distance transport. Recent molecular and functional characterization of tonoplast HM transporters has advanced our understanding of their contribution to HM homeostasis, tolerance and hyperaccumulation. Another important part of the dynamic vacuolar sequestration syndrome involves enhanced vacuolation. It involves vesicular trafficking in HM detoxification. The present review provides an updated account of molecular aspects that contribute to the vacuolar compartmentalization of HMs. PMID:26729300

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Compartmentalization and Biomineralization in Magnetotactic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Komeili, Arash

    2012-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are remarkable organisms with the ability to exploit the earth’s magnetic field for navigational purposes. To do this, they build specialized compartments called magnetosomes that consist of a lipid membrane and a crystalline magnetic mineral. These organisms have the potential to serve as models for the study of compartmentalization as well as biomineralization in bacteria. Additionally, they offer the opportunity to design applications that take advantage of the parti...

  16. A Novel Method for Performance Analysis of Compartmentalized Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahamat Mohammad Sadeq

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple analytical model for performance analysis of compartmentalized reservoirs producing under Constant Terminal Rate (CTR and Constant Terminal Pressure (CTP. The model is based on the well-known material balance and boundary dominated flow equations and is written in terms of capacitance and resistance of a production and a support compartment. These capacitance and resistance terms account for a combination of reservoir parameters which enable the developed model to be used for characterizing such systems. In addition to considering the properties contrast between the two reservoir compartments, the model takes into account existence of transmissibility barriers with the use of resistance terms. The model is used to analyze production performance of unconventional reservoirs, where the multistage fracturing of horizontal wells effectively creates a Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV with an enhanced permeability surrounded by a non-stimulated region. It can also be used for analysis of compartmentalized conventional reservoirs. The analytical solutions provide type curves through which the controlling reservoirs parameters of a compartmentalized system can be estimated. The contribution of the supporting compartment is modeled based on a boundary dominated flow assumption. The transient behaviour of the support compartment is captured by application of “distance of investigation” concept. The model shows that depletion of the production and support compartments exhibit two unit slopes on a log-log plot of pressure versus time for CTR. For CTP, however, the depletions display two exponential declines. The depletion signatures are separated by transition periods, which depend on the contribution of the support compartment (i.e. transient or boundary dominated flow. The developed equations can be implemented easily in a spreadsheet application, and are corroborated with the use of a numerical simulation. The study

  17. Compartmentalized Droplets for Continuous Flow Liquid-Liquid Interface Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Wei, Lijuan; Chen, Huan; Du, Zhiping; Binks, Bernard P; Yang, Hengquan

    2016-08-17

    To address the limitations of batch organic-aqueous biphasic catalysis, we develop a conceptually novel method termed Flow Pickering Emulsion, or FPE, to process biphasic reactions in a continuous flow fashion. This method involves the compartmentalization of bulk water into micron-sized droplets based on a water-in-oil Pickering emulsion, which are packed into a column reactor. The compartmentalized water droplets can confine water-soluble catalysts, thus "immobilizing" the catalyst in the column reactor, while the interstices between the droplets allow the organic (oil) phase to flow. Key fundamental principles underpinning this method such as the oil phase flow behavior, the stability of compartmentalized droplets and the confinement capability of these droplets toward water-soluble catalysts are experimentally and theoretically investigated. As a proof of this concept, case studies including a sulfuric acid-catalyzed addition reaction, a heteropolyacid-catalyzed ring opening reaction and an enzyme-catalyzed chiral reaction demonstrate the generality and versatility of the FPE method. Impressively, in addition to the excellent durability, the developed FPE reactions exhibit up to 10-fold reaction efficiency enhancement in comparison to the existing batch reactions, indicating a unique flow interface catalysis effect. This study opens up a new avenue to allow conventional biphasic catalysis reactions to access more sustainable and efficient flow chemistry using an innovative liquid-liquid interface protocol. PMID:27429173

  18. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single-family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings. Builders and practitioners have found that fire-resistance rated wall assemblies are a major source of difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. This problem is exacerbated when garages are “tucked in” to the units and living space is located over the garages. In this project, Building Science Corporation examined the taping of exterior sheathing details to improve air sealing results in townhouse and multifamily construction, when coupled with a better understanding of air leakage pathways. Current approaches are cumbersome, expensive, time consuming, and ineffective; these details were proposed as a more effective and efficient method. The effectiveness of these air sealing methods was tested with blower door testing, including “nulled” or “guarded” testing (adjacent units run at equal test pressure to null out inter-unit air leakage, or “pressure neutralization”). Pressure diagnostics were used to evaluate unit-to-unit connections and series leakage pathways (i.e., air leakage from exterior, into the fire-resistance rated wall assembly, and to the interior).

  19. Evidence of vacuolar compartmentalization of arsenic in the hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XueXi; CHEN Hui; DAI XiaoJing; XU WenZhong; HE ZhenYan; MA Mi

    2009-01-01

    Pteris vittata can hyperaccumulate arsenic (As) to>1% of its dry weight without showing any signs of toxicity,indicating the existence of effective plant-internal detoxification mechanisms.Although vacuolar compartmentalization is known to play an important role in heavy metal detoxification and tolerance,direct evidence of arsenic compartmentalization in this hyperaccumulator was lacking.Here we report the subcellular localization of As in the callus of P.vittata.The callus induced from gametophytes of P.vittata exposed to 0.2 mmol/L arsenate for 20 days were examined by directly isolating cell walls,protoplasts and vacuoles,and determining arsenic concentrations.Of the total As in the callus,about 94% was in the protoplast,and of that,91% was present in the vacuoles,indicating that vacuoles are a major storage site for As in P.vittata.In addition,the changes in the chemical components of vacuoles were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  20. Lipid compartmentalization in the endosome system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullin-Matsuda, Françoise; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Greimel, Peter; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2014-07-01

    Lipids play an essential role in the structure of the endosomal membranes as well as in their dynamic rearrangement during the transport of internalized cargoes along the endocytic pathway. In this review, we discuss the function of endosomal lipids mainly in mammalian cells, focusing on two well-known components of the lipid rafts, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, as well as on three anionic phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, polyphosphoinositides and the atypical phospholipid, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate/lysobisphosphatidic acid. We detail the structure, metabolism, distribution and role of these lipids in the endosome system as well as their importance in pathological conditions where modification of the endosomal membrane flow can lead to various diseases such as lipid-storage diseases, myopathies and neuropathies. PMID:24747366

  1. The adjuvancy of silicones: dependency on compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klykken, P C; White, K L

    1996-01-01

    Studies have been conducted in mice (B6C3F1) and rats (Sprague Dawley, Fischer 344) to investigate the adjuvancy potential of silicone mammary gel and the low molecular weight silicone fluid, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4). Dependent on the experimental conditions employed, a divergent data profile emerges. If the antigen (bovine serum albumin, BSA) is emulsified with either the gel or the D4 prior to intramuscular immunization, an amplified anti-BSA IgG antibody response, as measured by multipoint ELISA methodology, is noted over the 8 week measurement period. In parallel studies, a variety of non-silicone personal care ingredients (lanolin, white mineral oil, isopropyl palmitate) were also capable of amplifying this humoral response relative to the non-adjuvant phosphate buffered saline control. These observations are consistent with the empirical knowledge that hydrophobic substances tend to augment immune responses. However, under conditions in which the antigen is not blended with the silicone prior to immunization, normal immune responses are noted. In short (10 day) and long (180 day) term gel implant studies, the optimal IgM and IgG antibody responses, as determined in the antibody forming cell assay, were equivalent between the gel implanted and control animals. Moreover, under similar exposure conditions, no adjuvancy was noted in the three Host Resistance models (B16F10 Melanoma, Listeria monocytogenes, and Streptococcus pneumoniae) tested. Antibody forming cell studies conducted after 28 days of oral or inhalation exposure to D4 have also yielded responses similar to the non-silicone exposed vehicle controls. Collectively, these data suggest that in the absence of premixing the antigen with the silicone test material, there does not appear to be any silicone induced adjuvant response. PMID:8565549

  2. Cellular compartmentation of cadmium and zinc in relation to other elements in the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küpper, H; Lombi, E; Zhao, F J; McGrath, S P

    2000-12-01

    The cellular compartmentation of elements was analysed in the Zn hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri (L.) O'Kane & Al-Shehbaz (=Cardaminopsis halleri) using energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of frozen-hydrated tissues. Quantitative data were obtained using oxygen as an internal standard in the analyses of vacuoles, whereas a peak/background ratio method was used for quantification of elements in pollen and dehydrated trichomes. Arabidopsis halleri was found to hyperaccumulate not only Zn but also Cd in the shoot biomass. While large concentrations of Zn and Cd were found in the leaves and roots, flowers contained very little. In roots grown hydroponically, Zn and Cd accumulated in the cell wall of the rhizodermis (root epidermis), mainly due to precipitation of Zn/Cd phosphates. In leaves, the trichomes had by far the largest concentrations of Zn and Cd. Inside the trichomes there was a striking sub-cellular compartmentation, with almost all the Zn and Cd being accumulated in a narrow ring in the trichome base. This distribution pattern was very different from that for Ca and P. The epidermal cells other than trichomes were very small and contained lower concentrations of Zn and Cd than mesophyll cells. In particular, the concentrations of Cd and Zn in the mesophyll cells increased markedly in response to increasing Zn and Cd concentrations in the nutrient solution. This indicates that the mesophyll cells in the leaves of A. halleri are the major storage site for Zn and Cd, and play an important role in their hyperaccumulation. PMID:11219586

  3. Polarity and intracellular compartmentalization of Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henner Astra L

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper neuronal function depends on forming three primary subcellular compartments: axons, dendrites, and soma. Each compartment has a specialized function (the axon to send information, dendrites to receive information, and the soma is where most cellular components are produced. In mammalian neurons, each primary compartment has distinctive molecular and morphological features, as well as smaller domains, such as the axon initial segment, that have more specialized functions. How neuronal subcellular compartments are established and maintained is not well understood. Genetic studies in Drosophila have provided insight into other areas of neurobiology, but it is not known whether flies are a good system in which to study neuronal polarity as a comprehensive analysis of Drosophila neuronal subcellular organization has not been performed. Results Here we use new and previously characterized markers to examine Drosophila neuronal compartments. We find that: axons and dendrites can accumulate different microtubule-binding proteins; protein synthesis machinery is concentrated in the cell body; pre- and post-synaptic sites localize to distinct regions of the neuron; and specializations similar to the initial segment are present. In addition, we track EB1-GFP dynamics and determine microtubules in axons and dendrites have opposite polarity. Conclusion We conclude that Drosophila will be a powerful system to study the establishment and maintenance of neuronal compartments.

  4. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping; Lowry, David; Jackson, Jennifer C; Roberson, Robert W; Lin, Xiaorong

    2016-03-22

    Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes. PMID:26972005

  5. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srijana Upadhyay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes.

  6. Analytical properties of a three-compartmental dynamical demographic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnikov, E. B.

    2015-07-01

    The three-compartmental demographic model by Korotaeyv-Malkov-Khaltourina, connecting population size, economic surplus, and education level, is considered from the point of view of dynamical systems theory. It is shown that there exist two integrals of motion, which enables the system to be reduced to one nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The study of its structure provides analytical criteria for the dominance ranges of the dynamics of Malthus and Kremer. Additionally, the particular ranges of parameters enable the derived general ordinary differential equations to be reduced to the models of Gompertz and Thoularis-Wallace.

  7. Intracellular compartmentation of isozymes of sugar phosphate metabolism in green leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnarrenberger, C; Herbert, M; Krüger, I

    1983-01-01

    The present paper has summarized evidence for the presence of two isozymes for many enzyme activities of sugar phosphate metabolism in plant leaves. These two isozymes are clearly compartmentalized in the chloroplasts and in the cytosol of plant leaf cells. In C4 plants there exists an additional isozyme in the mesophyll cells of these leaves in addition to the two isozymes in the bundle sheath cells. Such cell-compartment-specific and cell-specific isozymes provide duplicate (and possibly triplicate) enzyme systems for complete or almost complete pathways (ie, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway). They provide a basis for the understanding as to how many isozymes one may expect in plants. They also provide a challenge to determine what their function is particularly in the differential regulation of metabolic pathways in different cell compartments. Based on his genetic analyses Weeden [1981] has recently proposed a model for the evolution of chloroplast-specific isozymes of sugar phosphate metabolism. This model rests on the endosymbiotic theory for the origin of chloroplasts. It still is highly speculative. However, cell-compartment specific isozymes may eventually provide a means of studying plant evolution, especially if we succeed in analyzing their primary structure. PMID:6629713

  8. Segregation of fluorescent membrane lipids into distinct micrometric domains: evidence for phase compartmentation of natural lipids?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic D'auria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We recently reported that sphingomyelin (SM analogs substituted on the alkyl chain by various fluorophores (e.g. BODIPY readily inserted at trace levels into the plasma membrane of living erythrocytes or CHO cells and spontaneously concentrated into micrometric domains. Despite sharing the same fluorescent ceramide backbone, BODIPY-SM domains segregated from similar domains labelled by BODIPY-D-e-lactosylceramide (D-e-LacCer and depended on endogenous SM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show here that BODIPY-SM further differed from BODIPY-D-e-LacCer or -glucosylceramide (GlcCer domains in temperature dependence, propensity to excimer formation, association with a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored fluorescent protein reporter, and lateral diffusion by FRAP, thus demonstrating different lipid phases and boundaries. Whereas BODIPY-D-e-LacCer behaved like BODIPY-GlcCer, its artificial stereoisomer, BODIPY-L-t-LacCer, behaved like BODIPY- and NBD-phosphatidylcholine (PC. Surprisingly, these two PC analogs also formed micrometric patches yet preferably at low temperature, did not show excimer, never associated with the GPI reporter and showed major restriction to lateral diffusion when photobleached in large fields. This functional comparison supported a three-phase micrometric compartmentation, of decreasing order: BODIPY-GSLs > -SM > -PC (or artificial L-t-LacCer. Co-existence of three segregated compartments was further supported by double labelling experiments and was confirmed by additive occupancy, up to ∼70% cell surface coverage. Specific alterations of BODIPY-analogs domains by manipulation of corresponding endogenous sphingolipids suggested that distinct fluorescent lipid partition might reflect differential intrinsic propensity of endogenous membrane lipids to form large assemblies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that fluorescent membrane lipids spontaneously concentrate into distinct micrometric assemblies

  9. Directed evolution of polymerase function by compartmentalized self-replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadessy, F J; Ong, J L; Holliger, P

    2001-04-10

    We describe compartmentalized self-replication (CSR), a strategy for the directed evolution of enzymes, especially polymerases. CSR is based on a simple feedback loop consisting of a polymerase that replicates only its own encoding gene. Compartmentalization serves to isolate individual self-replication reactions from each other. In such a system, adaptive gains directly (and proportionally) translate into genetic amplification of the encoding gene. CSR has applications in the evolution of polymerases with novel and useful properties. By using three cycles of CSR, we obtained variants of Taq DNA polymerase with 11-fold higher thermostability than the wild-type enzyme or with a >130-fold increased resistance to the potent inhibitor heparin. Insertion of an extra stage into the CSR cycle before the polymerase reaction allows its application to enzymes other than polymerases. We show that nucleoside diphosphate kinase and Taq polymerase can form such a cooperative CSR cycle based on reciprocal catalysis, whereby nucleoside diphosphate kinase produces the substrates required for the replication of its own gene. We also find that in CSR the polymerase genes themselves evolve toward more efficient replication. Thus, polymerase genes and their encoded polypeptides cooperate to maximize postselection copy number. CSR should prove useful for the directed evolution of enzymes, particularly DNA or RNA polymerases, as well as for the design and study of in vitro self-replicating systems mimicking prebiotic evolution and viral replication. PMID:11274352

  10. The monitoring of relative changes in compartmental compliances of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study aimed to develop a computational method for assessing relative changes in compartmental compliances within the brain: the arterial bed and the cerebrospinal space. The method utilizes the relationship between pulsatile components in the arterial blood volume, arterial blood pressure (ABP) and intracranial pressure (ICP). It was verified by using clinical recordings of intracranial pressure plateau waves, when massive vasodilatation accompanying plateau waves produces changes in brain compliances of the arterial bed (Ca) and compliance of the cerebrospinal space (Ci). Ten patients admitted after head injury with a median Glasgow Coma Score of 6 were studied retrospectively. ABP was directly monitored from the radial artery. Changes in the cerebral arterial blood volume were assessed using Transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography by digital integration of inflow blood velocity. During plateau waves, ICP increased (P = 0.001), CPP decreased (P = 0.001), ABP remained constant (P = 0.532), blood flow velocity decreased (P = 0.001). Calculated compliance of the arterial bed Ca increased significantly (P = 0.001); compliance of the CSF space Ci decreased (P = 0.001). We concluded that the method allows for continuous monitoring of relative changes in brain compartmental compliances. Plateau waves affect the balance between vascular and CSF compartments, which is reflected by the inverse change of compliance of the cerebral arterial bed and global compliance of the CSF space

  11. Multiple Facets of cAMP Signalling and Physiological Impact: cAMP Compartmentalization in the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Schmidt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Therapies involving elevation of the endogenous suppressor cyclic AMP (cAMP are currently used in the treatment of several chronic inflammatory disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Characteristics of COPD are airway obstruction, airway inflammation and airway remodelling, processes encompassed by increased airway smooth muscle mass, epithelial changes, goblet cell and submucosal gland hyperplasia. In addition to inflammatory cells, airway smooth muscle cells and (myofibroblasts, epithelial cells underpin a variety of key responses in the airways such as inflammatory cytokine release, airway remodelling, mucus hypersecretion and airway barrier function. Cigarette smoke, being next to environmental pollution the main cause of COPD, is believed to cause epithelial hyperpermeability by disrupting the barrier function. Here we will focus on the most recent progress on compartmentalized signalling by cAMP. In addition to G protein-coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, cAMP-specific phospho-diesterases (PDEs maintain compartmentalized cAMP signalling. Intriguingly, spatially discrete cAMP-sensing signalling complexes seem also to involve distinct members of the A-kinase anchoring (AKAP superfamily and IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein (IQGAPs. In this review, we will highlight the interaction between cAMP and the epithelial barrier to retain proper lung function and to alleviate COPD symptoms and focus on the possible molecular mechanisms involved in this process. Future studies should include the development of cAMP-sensing multiprotein complex specific disruptors and/or stabilizers to orchestrate cellular functions. Compartmentalized cAMP signalling regulates important cellular processes in the lung and may serve as a therapeutic target.

  12. Building America Case Study: Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, thus driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  13. Cs-137 accumulation and elimination by Gracilaria caudata alga and Abudefduf saxatilis fish. Compartmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the ecological point of view, 137Cs is a critical radionuclide because its physical half-life is long (30 years), and it has a high fission yield. Besides, it presents similar characteristics to sodium and potassium, fundamental elements for the living organisms, in great concentration in all cells. This work has as aim to study the 137Cs accumulation and elimination by the alga Gracilaria caudata and by the fish Abudefduf saxatilis as well as to obtain the transfer constants of the137Cs from the water into the organisms. The concentration factor found for the fish was 5.6 +- 0.2 and for the alga, 13.0 +- 0,6. With 7 and 22 days, the fish and alga respectively had already eliminated half of the accumulated radionuclide. The 137Cs ingestion efficiency by the fish was also studied and it was verified that the fish assimilated only 47.6 % of the cesium content in the food; and within of 4 days it had eliminated more than half of ingested cesium. A compartmental model was proposed to explain the distribution of cesium in the compartments (water - alga and water - fish). Data obtained from the experiments of 137Cs accumulation and elimination were applied in the Ana Comp Program. This program permits the compartmental analysis, and quantifies the cesium distribution from the sea-water to the organisms, and vice versa, through the transfer constants (k). The Ana Comp Program also allowed to calculate the dose that one would receive by the consumption of fish contaminated by cesium. Levels of 137Cs from the global fallout in environmental samples, from Sao Sebastiao, northern coast of Sao Paulo, (where the 'Centro de Biologia Marinha da Universidade de Sao Paulo - CEBIMar - USP' is located), were verified. (author)

  14. A Self-compartmentalizing Hexamer Serine Protease from Pyrococcus Horikoshii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menyhárd, Dóra K.; Kiss-Szemán, Anna; Tichy-Rács, Éva; Hornung, Balázs; Rádi, Krisztina; Szeltner, Zoltán; Domokos, Klarissza; Szamosi, Ilona; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Polgár, László; Harmat, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Oligopeptidases impose a size limitation on their substrates, the mechanism of which has long been under debate. Here we present the structure of a hexameric serine protease, an oligopeptidase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhAAP), revealing a complex, self-compartmentalized inner space, where substrates may access the monomer active sites passing through a double-gated “check-in” system, first passing through a pore on the hexamer surface and then turning to enter through an even smaller opening at the monomers' domain interface. This substrate screening strategy is unique within the family. We found that among oligopeptidases, a residue of the catalytic apparatus is positioned near an amylogenic β-edge, which needs to be protected to prevent aggregation, and we found that different oligopeptidases use different strategies to achieve such an end. We propose that self-assembly within the family results in characteristically different substrate selection mechanisms coupled to different multimerization states. PMID:23632025

  15. Apartment Compartmentalization With an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Berger, D. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Harrington, C. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing.

  16. Compartmental analysis, imaging techniques and population pharmacokinetic. Experiences at CENTIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: In pharmacokinetic evaluation small rodents are used in a large extend. Traditional pharmacokinetic evaluations by the two steps approach can be replaced by the sparse data design which may also represent a complicated situation to evaluate satisfactorily from the statistical point of view. In this presentation different situations of sparse data sampling are analyzed based on practical consideration. Non linear mixed effect model was selected in order to estimate pharmacokinetic parameters in simulated data from real experimental results using blood sampling and imaging procedures. Materials and methods: Different scenarios representing several experimental designs of incomplete individual profiles were evaluated. Data sets were simulated based on real data from previous experiments. In all cases three to five blood samples were considered per time point. A combination of compartmental analysis with tumor uptake obtained by gammagraphy of radiolabeled drugs is also evaluated.All pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed by means of MONOLIX software version 4.2.3. Results: All sampling schedules yield the same results when computed using the MONOLIX software and the SAEM algorithm. Population and individual pharmacokinetic parameters were accurately estimated with three or five determination per sampling point. According with the used methodology and software tool, it can be an expected result, but demonstrating the method performance in such situations, allow us to select a more flexible design using a very small number of animals in preclinical research. The combination with imaging procedures also allows us to construct a completely structured compartmental analysis. Results of real experiments are presented demonstrating the versatility of used methodology in different evaluations. The same sampling approach can be considered in phase I or II clinical trials. (author)

  17. Compartmentalization of algal bioluminescence: autofluorescence of bioluminescent particles in the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax as studied with image-intensified video microscopy and flow cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Compartmentalization of specialized functions to discrete locales is a fundamental theme of eucaryotic organization in cells. We report here that bioluminescence of the dinoflagellate alga Gonyaulax originates in vivo from discrete subcellular loci that are intrinsically fluorescent. We demonstrate this localization by comparing the loci of fluorescence and bioluminescence as visualized by image-intensified video microscopy. These fluorescent particles appeared to be the same as the previousl...

  18. Vacuolar compartmentation of the cadmium-glutathione complex protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae from mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamis, Paula D B; Panek, Anita D; Eleutherio, Elis C A

    2007-08-30

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT; EC 2.3.2.2) is a vacuolar-membrane bound enzyme. In this work we verified that S. cerevisiae cells deficient in gamma-GT absorbed almost 2.5-fold as much cadmium as the wild-type (wt) cells, suggesting that this enzyme might be responsible for the recycle of cadmium-glutathione complex stored in the vacuole. The mutant strain showed difficulty in keeping constant levels of glutathione (GSH) during the stress, although the GSH-reductase activity was practically the same in both wt and mutant strains, before and after metal stress. This difficulty to maintain the GSH levels in the gamma-GT mutant strain led to high levels of lipid peroxidation and carbonyl proteins in response to cadmium, higher than in the wt, but lower than in a mutant deficient in GSH synthesis. Although the increased levels of oxidative stress, gamma-GT mutant strain showed to be tolerant to cadmium and showed similar mutation rates to the wt, indicating that the compartmentation of the GSH-cadmium complex in vacuole protects cells against the mutagenic action of the metal. Confirming this hypothesis, a mutant strain deficient in Ycf1, which present high concentrations of GSH-cadmium in cytoplasm due to its deficiency in transport the complex to vacuole, showed increased mutation rates. PMID:17644279

  19. Microfluidic device for the formation of optically excitable, three-dimensional, compartmentalized motor units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzel, Sebastien G M; Platt, Randall J; Subramanian, Vidya; Pearl, Taylor M; Rowlands, Christopher J; Chan, Vincent; Boyer, Laurie A; So, Peter T C; Kamm, Roger D

    2016-08-01

    Motor units are the fundamental elements responsible for muscle movement. They are formed by lower motor neurons and their muscle targets, synapsed via neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The loss of NMJs in neurodegenerative disorders (such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or spinal muscle atrophy) or as a result of traumatic injuries affects millions of lives each year. Developing in vitro assays that closely recapitulate the physiology of neuromuscular tissues is crucial to understand the formation and maturation of NMJs, as well as to help unravel the mechanisms leading to their degeneration and repair. We present a microfluidic platform designed to coculture myoblast-derived muscle strips and motor neurons differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) within a three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel. The device geometry mimics the spinal cord-limb physical separation by compartmentalizing the two cell types, which also facilitates the observation of 3D neurite outgrowth and remote muscle innervation. Moreover, the use of compliant pillars as anchors for muscle strips provides a quantitative functional readout of force generation. Finally, photosensitizing the ESC provides a pool of source cells that can be differentiated into optically excitable motor neurons, allowing for spatiodynamic, versatile, and noninvasive in vitro control of the motor units. PMID:27493991

  20. Compartmentation of sucrose during radial transfer in mature sorghum culm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vietor Donald M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sucrose that accumulates in the culm of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench and other large tropical andropogonoid grasses can be of commercial value, and can buffer assimilate supply during development. Previous study conducted with intact plants showed that sucrose can be radially transferred to the intracellular compartment of mature ripening sorghum internode without being hydrolysed. In this study, culm-infused radiolabelled sucrose was traced between cellular compartments and among related metabolites to determine if the compartmental path of sucrose during radial transfer in culm tissue was symplasmic or included an apoplasmic step. This transfer path was evaluated for elongating and ripening culm tissue of intact plants of two semidwarf grain sorghums. The metabolic path in elongating internode tissue was also evaluated. Results On the day after culm infusion of the tracer sucrose, the specific radioactivity of sucrose recovered from the intracellular compartment of growing axillary-branch tissue was greater (nearly twice than that in the free space, indicating that sucrose was preferentially transferred through symplasmic routes. In contrast, the sucrose specific radioactivity in the intracellular compartment of the mature (ripening culm tissue was probably less (about 3/4's than that in free space indicating that sucrose was preferentially transferred through routes that included an apoplasmic step. In growing internodes of the axillary branch of sorghum, the tritium label initially provided in the fructose moiety of sucrose molecules was largely (81% recovered in the fructose moiety, indicating that a large portion of sucrose molecules is not hydrolysed and resynthesized during radial transfer. Conclusion During radial transfer of sucrose in ripening internodes of intact sorghum plants, much of the sucrose is transferred intact (without hydrolysis and resynthesis and primarily through a path that includes an

  1. Compartmental models for assessing the fishery production in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dalal, S.G.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Compartmental models for assessing the fishery production in the Indian Ocean is discussed. The article examines the theoretical basis on which modern fishery sciences is built. The model shows that, large changes in energy flux from one pathway...

  2. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalization of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Jurgen R.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Michels, Paul A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucel. The recent finding of pore-forming activitie

  3. A clickable neurosteroid photolabel reveals selective Golgi compartmentalization with preferential impact on proximal inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoping; Shu, Hong-Jin; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Qian, Mingxing; Taylor, Amanda A; Covey, Douglas F; Zorumski, Charles F; Mennerick, Steven

    2016-09-01

    Anesthetic, GABA-active neurosteroids potently augment GABAA receptor function, leading to important behavioral consequences. Neurosteroids and their synthetic analogues are also models for a wide variety of cell-permeant neuroactive compounds. Cell permeation and compartmentalization raise the possibility that these compounds' actions are influenced by their cellular partitioning, but these contributions are not typically considered experimentally or therapeutically. To examine the interplay between cellular accumulation and pharmacodynamics of neurosteroids, we synthesized a novel chemical biology analogue (bio-active, clickable photolabel) of GABA-active neurosteroids. We discovered that the analogue selectively photo-labels neuronal Golgi in rat hippocampal neurons. The active analogue's selective distribution was distinct from endogenous cholesterol and not completely shared by some non-GABA active, neurosteroid-like analogues. On the other hand, the distribution was not enantioselective and did not require energy, in contrast to other recent precedents from the literature. We demonstrate that the soma-selective accumulation can act as a sink or source for steroid actions at plasma-membrane GABA receptors, altering steady-state and time course of effects at somatic GABAA receptors relative to dendritic receptors. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for compartment-selective drug actions at plasma-membrane receptors. PMID:27114255

  4. Compartmental analysis of results of (radio) tracer experiments in non-living systems in steady state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compartmental analysis has for many decades been used for evaluation of the results of mainly in vivo (radio)tracer experiments. However, its potential for working-out similar experiments but in living systems has as yet been rather overlooked. This paper aims at resulting this situation. To this end same basic principles of compartmental analysis are given following by examples of its use in chemistry related laboratory radiotracer studies. (author)

  5. Adaptive and neuroadaptive control for nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volyanskyy, Kostyantyn Y.

    Neural networks have been extensively used for adaptive system identification as well as adaptive and neuroadaptive control of highly uncertain systems. The goal of adaptive and neuroadaptive control is to achieve system performance without excessive reliance on system models. To improve robustness and the speed of adaptation of adaptive and neuroadaptive controllers several controller architectures have been proposed in the literature. In this dissertation, we develop a new neuroadaptive control architecture for nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems. The proposed framework involves a novel controller architecture with additional terms in the update laws that are constructed using a moving window of the integrated system uncertainty. These terms can be used to identify the ideal system weights of the neural network as well as effectively suppress system uncertainty. Linear and nonlinear parameterizations of the system uncertainty are considered and state and output feedback neuroadaptive controllers are developed. Furthermore, we extend the developed framework to discrete-time dynamical systems. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed approach we apply our results to an aircraft model with wing rock dynamics, a spacecraft model with unknown moment of inertia, and an unmanned combat aerial vehicle undergoing actuator failures, and compare our results with standard neuroadaptive control methods. Nonnegative systems are essential in capturing the behavior of a wide range of dynamical systems involving dynamic states whose values are nonnegative. A sub-class of nonnegative dynamical systems are compartmental systems. These systems are derived from mass and energy balance considerations and are comprised of homogeneous interconnected microscopic subsystems or compartments which exchange variable quantities of material via intercompartmental flow laws. In this dissertation, we develop direct adaptive and neuroadaptive control framework for stabilization, disturbance

  6. Molecular System Bioenergics of the Heart: Experimental Studies of Metabolic Compartmentation and Energy Fluxes versus Computer Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdur Saks

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review we analyze the recent important and remarkable advancements in studies of compartmentation of adenine nucleotides in muscle cells due to their binding to macromolecular complexes and cellular structures, which results in non-equilibrium steady state of the creatine kinase reaction. We discuss the problems of measuring the energy fluxes between different cellular compartments and their simulation by using different computer models. Energy flux determinations by 18O transfer method have shown that in heart about 80% of energy is carried out of mitochondrial intermembrane space into cytoplasm by phosphocreatine fluxes generated by mitochondrial creatine kinase from adenosine triphosphate (ATP, produced by ATP Synthasome. We have applied the mathematical model of compartmentalized energy transfer for analysis of experimental data on the dependence of oxygen consumption rate on heart workload in isolated working heart reported by Williamson et al. The analysis of these data show that even at the maximal workloads and respiration rates, equal to 174 µmol O2 per min per g dry weight, phosphocreatine flux, and not ATP, carries about 80–85% percent of energy needed out of mitochondria into the cytosol. We analyze also the reasons of failures of several computer models published in the literature to correctly describe the experimental data.

  7. TspanC8 tetraspanins differentially regulate the cleavage of ADAM10 substrates, Notch activation and ADAM10 membrane compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouannet, Stéphanie; Saint-Pol, Julien; Fernandez, Laurent; Nguyen, Viet; Charrin, Stéphanie; Boucheix, Claude; Brou, Christel; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Rubinstein, Eric

    2016-05-01

    The metalloprotease ADAM10 mediates the shedding of the ectodomain of various cell membrane proteins, including APP, the precursor of the amyloid peptide Aβ, and Notch receptors following ligand binding. ADAM10 associates with the members of an evolutionary conserved subgroup of tetraspanins, referred to as TspanC8, which regulate its exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we show that 4 of these TspanC8 (Tspan5, Tspan14, Tspan15 and Tspan33) which positively regulate ADAM10 surface expression levels differentially impact ADAM10-dependent Notch activation and the cleavage of several ADAM10 substrates, including APP, N-cadherin and CD44. Sucrose gradient fractionation, single molecule tracking and quantitative mass-spectrometry analysis of the repertoire of molecules co-immunoprecipitated with Tspan5, Tspan15 and ADAM10 show that these two tetraspanins differentially regulate ADAM10 membrane compartmentalization. These data represent a unique example where several tetraspanins differentially regulate the function of a common partner protein through a distinct membrane compartmentalization. PMID:26686862

  8. The subcellular compartmentalization of arginine metabolizing enzymes and their role in endothelial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng eChen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO mediates endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and restrains vascular inflammation, smooth muscle proliferation and platelet aggregation. Impaired production of NO is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction and promotes the development of cardiovascular disease. In endothelial cells, NO is generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS through the conversion of its substrate, L-arginine to L-citrulline. Reduced access to L-arginine has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying reduced eNOS activity and NO production in cardiovascular disease. The arginases (Arg1 and Arg2 metabolize L-arginine to generate L-ornithine and urea and increased expression of arginase has been proposed as a mechanism of reduced eNOS activity secondary to the depletion of L-arginine. Indeed, supplemental L-arginine and suppression of arginase activity has been shown to improve endothelium-dependent relaxation and ameliorate cardiovascular disease. However, L-arginine concentrations in endothelial cells remain sufficiently high to support NO synthesis suggesting additional mechanisms. The compartmentalization of intracellular L-arginine into poorly interchangeable pools has been proposed to allow for the local depletion of L-arginine. Indeed the subcellular location of L-arginine metabolizing enzymes plays important functional roles. In endothelial cells, eNOS is found in discrete intracellular locations and the capacity to generate NO is heavily influenced by its localtion. Arg1 and Arg2 also reside in different subcellular environments and are thought to differentially influence endothelial function. The plasma membrane solute transporter, CAT-1 and the arginine recycling enzyme, ASL, co-localize with eNOS and facilitate NO release. This review highlights the importance of the subcellular location of eNOS and arginine transporting and metabolizing enzymes to NO release and cardiovascular disease.

  9. Distribution and compartmental organization of GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons in the mouse Nucleus Accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe eGangarossa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus accumbens (NAc is a critical brain region involved in many reward-related behaviors. The NAc comprises major compartments the core and the shell, which encompass several subterritories. GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs constitute the output neurons of the NAc core and shell. While the functional organization of the NAc core outputs resembles the one described for the dorsal striatum, a simple classification of the NAc shell neurons has been difficult to define due to the complexity of the compartmental segregation of cells. We used a variety of BAC transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescence (EGFP or the Cre-recombinase (Cre under the control of the promoter of dopamine D1, D2, and D3 receptors and of adenosine A2a receptor to dissect the microanatomy of the NAc. Moreover, using various immunological markers we characterized in detail the distribution of MSNs in the mouse NAc. In addition, cell-type specific ERK phosphorylation in the NAc subterritories was analyzed following acute administration of SKF81297 (a D1R-like agonist, quinpirole (a D2R-like agonist, apomorphine (a non-selective DA receptor agonist, raclopride (a D2R-like antagonist, and psychostimulant drugs, including cocaine and d-amphetamine. Each drug generated a unique topography and cell-type specific activation of ERK in the NAc. Our results show the existence of marked differences in the receptor expression pattern and functional activation of MSNs within the shell subterritories. This study emphasizes the anatomical and functional heterogeneity of the NAc, which will have to be considered in its further study.

  10. Distribution and compartmental organization of GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons in the mouse nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Espallergues, Julie; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, Alban; El Mestikawy, Salah; Gerfen, Charles R; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is a critical brain region involved in many reward-related behaviors. The NAc comprises major compartments the core and the shell, which encompass several subterritories. GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) constitute the output neurons of the NAc core and shell. While the functional organization of the NAc core outputs resembles the one described for the dorsal striatum, a simple classification of the NAc shell neurons has been difficult to define due to the complexity of the compartmental segregation of cells. We used a variety of BAC transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescence (EGFP) or the Cre-recombinase (Cre) under the control of the promoter of dopamine D1, D2, and D3 receptors and of adenosine A2a receptor to dissect the microanatomy of the NAc. Moreover, using various immunological markers we characterized in detail the distribution of MSNs in the mouse NAc. In addition, cell-type specific extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in the NAc subterritories was analyzed following acute administration of SKF81297 (a D1R-like agonist), quinpirole (a D2 receptors (D2R)-like agonist), apomorphine (a non-selective DA receptor agonist), raclopride (a D2R-like antagonist), and psychostimulant drugs, including cocaine and d-amphetamine. Each drug generated a unique topography and cell-type specific activation of ERK in the NAc. Our results show the existence of marked differences in the receptor expression pattern and functional activation of MSNs within the shell subterritories. This study emphasizes the anatomical and functional heterogeneity of the NAc, which will have to be considered in its further study. PMID:23423476

  11. The R-Operon: A Model of Repetitive DNA-Organized Transcriptional Compartmentation of Eukaryotic Chromosomes for Coordinated Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to coordinate the activity of genes that function together to fulfill the same biological processes. Genomic organization likely plays a key role in coordinating transcription of different genes. However, little is known about how co-regulated genes are organized in the cell nucleus and how the chromosomal organization facilitates the co-regulation of different genes. I propose that eukaryotic genomes are organized into repeat assembly (RA)-based structural domains (“R-operons”) in the nuclear space. R-operons result from the interaction of homologous DNA repeats. In an R-operon, genes in different loci of the linear genome are brought into spatial vicinity and co-regulated by the same pool of transcription factors. This type of large-scale chromosomal organization may provide a mechanism for functional compartmentation of chromosomes to facilitate the transcriptional coordination of gene expression. PMID:27110825

  12. Heterogeneity and compartmental properties of insulin storage and secretion in rat islets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, G.; Landahl, H.D.; Gishizky, M.L.; Grodsky, G.M.

    1982-03-01

    To investigate compartmental properties of insulin storage and secretion, isolated rat islets were used for pulse-labeling experiments, after which proinsulin and insulin were purified rigorously. Processing of proinsulin to insulin neared completion by 3 h without additional loss of either radioactive peptide by cellular or extracellular proteolysis. The amount of labeled hormone rapidly diminished in islets; it was secreted at a higher fractional rate than immunoreactive insulin, resulting in secreted insulin's having a higher specific activity than the average cellular insulin. Newly synthesized insulin, therefore, was secreted preferentially. Changes in the specific activity of secreted and cellular insulin with time were consistent with changes predicted for islets containing 33% of their total insulin in a glucose-labile compartment. Predictions were based on steady-state analysis of a simple storage-limited representation of B cell function. Islets from either the dorsal or ventral part of the pancreas also contained 33% of their total insulin in a glucose-labile compartment. The same compartment was mobilized by 20 mM glucose, 50 mM potassium + 2 mM glucose, or 20 MM glucose + 1 mM 3-isobutylmethylxanthine as indicated by the specific activity ratio of secreted vs. cellular insulin, even though average secretion rates with these stimuli differed by more than threefold. In the absence of calcium, the effectiveness of 20 mM glucose as a secretagogue declined markedly, and the older stored insulin was preferentially mobilized because secreted insulin had a lower rather than a higher specific activity than cellular insulin. Results provide insight into the mechanisms of nonrandom mobilization and secretion of insulin form the B cell.

  13. Heterogeneity and compartmental properties of insulin storage and secretion in rat islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate compartmental properties of insulin storage and secretion, isolated rat islets were used for pulse-labeling experiments, after which proinsulin and insulin were purified rigorously. Processing of proinsulin to insulin neared completion by 3 h without additional loss of either radioactive peptide by cellular or extracellular proteolysis. The amount of labeled hormone rapidly diminished in islets; it was secreted at a higher fractional rate than immunoreactive insulin, resulting in secreted insulin's having a higher specific activity than the average cellular insulin. Newly synthesized insulin, therefore, was secreted preferentially. Changes in the specific activity of secreted and cellular insulin with time were consistent with changes predicted for islets containing 33% of their total insulin in a glucose-labile compartment. Predictions were based on steady-state analysis of a simple storage-limited representation of B cell function. Islets from either the dorsal or ventral part of the pancreas also contained 33% of their total insulin in a glucose-labile compartment. The same compartment was mobilized by 20 mM glucose, 50 mM potassium + 2 mM glucose, or 20 MM glucose + 1 mM 3-isobutylmethylxanthine as indicated by the specific activity ratio of secreted vs. cellular insulin, even though average secretion rates with these stimuli differed by more than threefold. In the absence of calcium, the effectiveness of 20 mM glucose as a secretagogue declined markedly, and the older stored insulin was preferentially mobilized because secreted insulin had a lower rather than a higher specific activity than cellular insulin. Results provide insight into the mechanisms of nonrandom mobilization and secretion of insulin form the B cell

  14. The architecture of antagonistic networks: Node degree distribution, compartmentalization and nestedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah Nuwagaba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Describing complex ecosystems as networks of interacting components has proved fruitful - revealing many distinctive patterns and dynamics of ecological systems. Of these patterns, three have often been brought up in literature, including species degree distribution, compartmentalization and nestedness, due largely to their implications for the functionality and stability of communities. Here, using 61 empirical antagonistic networks, we aim to settle the inconsistency in literature by (i fitting their node degree distributions to five different parametric models and identifying the one fits the best, (ii measuring the levels of nestedness and compartmentalization of these 61 networks and testing their significance using different null models, and (iii exploring how network connectance affects these three network architecture metrics. This research showed that most antagonistic networks do not display power law degree distributions and that resource species are generally uniformly distributed. We also clearly showed that the conclusion of whether a network is significantly compartmentalized or nested depends largely on the null model used.

  15. Compartmental analysis of dynamic nuclear medicine data: regularization procedure and application to physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Fabrice, Delbary

    2016-01-01

    Compartmental models based on tracer mass balance are extensively used in clinical and pre-clinical nuclear medicine in order to obtain quantitative information on tracer metabolism in the biological tissue. This paper is the second of a series of two that deal with the problem of tracer coefficient estimation via compartmental modelling in an inverse problem framework. While the previous work was devoted to the discussion of identifiability issues for 2, 3 and n-dimension compartmental systems, here we discuss the problem of numerically determining the tracer coefficients by means of a general regularized Multivariate Gauss Newton scheme. In this paper, applications concerning cerebral, hepatic and renal functions are considered, involving experimental measurements on FDG-PET data on different set of murine models.

  16. Subcellular compartmentation of sugar signalling: Links among carbon cellular status, route of sucrolysis, sink-source allocation, and metabolic partitioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel eTiessen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that both subcellular compartmentation and route of sucrolysis are important for plant development, growth, and yield. Signalling effects are dependent on the tissue, cell type and stage of development. Downstream effects also depend on the amount and localisation of hexoses and disaccharides. All enzymes of sucrose metabolism (e.g. invertase, hexokinase, fructokinase, sucrose synthase, and sucrose 6-phosphate synthase are not produced from single genes, but from paralogue families in plant genomes. Each paralogue has unique expression across plant organs and developmental stages. Multiple isoforms can be targeted to different cellular compartments (e.g. plastids, mitochondria, nuclei, and cytosol. Many of the key enzymes are regulated by post-transcriptional modifications and associate in multimeric protein complexes. Some isoforms have regulatory functions, either in addition to or in replacement of their catalytic activity. This explains why some isozymes are not redundant, but also complicates elucidation of their specific involvement in sugar signalling. The subcellular compartmentation of sucrose metabolism forces refinement of some of the paradigms of sugar signalling during physiological processes. For example, the catalytic and signalling functions of diverse paralogues needs to be more carefully analysed in the context of post-genomic biology. It is important to note that it is the differential localization of both the sugars themselves as well as the sugar-metabolizing enzymes that ultimately led to sugar signalling. We conclude that a combination of subcellular complexity and gene duplication/subfunctionalization gave rise to sugar signalling as a regulatory mechanism in plant cells.

  17. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chi Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and

  18. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Docken, Steffen S; Lewis, Timothy J; McCulloch, Andrew D; Harvey, Robert D; Clancy, Colleen E

    2016-07-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  19. Branching patterns of olivocerebellar axons in relation to the compartmental organization of the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi eFujita

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A single olivocerebellar (OC axon gives rise to about seven branches that terminate as climbing fibers (CFs. Branching patterns of an OC axon, which are classified into local, transverse and longitudinal types, are highly organized, in relation to the longitudinal molecular (aldolase C or zebrin II compartmentalization and the transverse lobulation of the cerebellum. Local branching is involved in forming a narrow band-shaped functional subarea within a molecular compartment. On the other hand, transverse and longitudinal branchings appear to be involved in linking mediolaterally separated molecular compartments and rostrocaudally separated lobular areas, respectively. Longitudinal branching occurs frequently between equivalent molecular compartments of specific combinations of lobules. These combinations include lobule V-simple lobule and crus II-paramedian lobule in the pars intermedia and hemisphere, and lobules I-V and lobule VIII in the vermis. The longitudinal branching pattern not only fits with mirror-imaged somatosensory double representation of the body in the pars intermedia, but it also suggests a general rostrocaudal link exists for the whole cerebellum across the putative rostrocaudal boundary in lobule VIc-crus I. Molecular compartments of the cerebellar cortex originate from the Purkinje cell (PC clusters that appear in the late embryonic stage, when the immature OC projection is formed. Some clusters split rostrocaudally across crus I during the development of cortical compartments, which would result in longitudinal branching of OC projection across crus I. Supposing that the branching pattern of OC axons represents an essential organization of the cerebellum, longitudinal branching suggests a functional and developmental links between the rostral and caudal cerebellum across lobule VIc-crus I throughout the cerebellar cortex.

  20. Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-01-01

    Fire-resistance rated (or area separation) wall assemblies present a great difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. To address this challenge, Building Science Corporation partnered with builder K. Hovnanian Homes to determine whether taping exterior sheathing details improves air sealing in townhouse and multifamily construction, and to better understand air leakage pathways.

  1. A new method to estimate parameters of linear compartmental models using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, the preferred tool for parameter estimation in compartmental analysis is an iterative procedure; weighted nonlinear regression. For a large number of applications, observed data can be fitted to sums of exponentials whose parameters are directly related to the rate constants/coefficients of the compartmental models. Since weighted nonlinear regression often has to be repeated for many different data sets, the process of fitting data from compartmental systems can be very time consuming. Furthermore the minimization routine often converges to a local (as opposed to global) minimum. In this paper, we examine the possibility of using artificial neural networks instead of weighted nonlinear regression in order to estimate model parameters. We train simple feed-forward neural networks to produce as outputs the parameter values of a given model when kinetic data are fed to the networks' input layer. The artificial neural networks produce unbiased estimates and are orders of magnitude faster than regression algorithms. At noise levels typical of many real applications, the neural networks are found to produce lower variance estimates than weighted nonlinear regression in the estimation of parameters from mono- and biexponential models. These results are primarily due to the inability of weighted nonlinear regression to converge. These results establish that artificial neural networks are powerful tools for estimating parameters for simple compartmental models. (author)

  2. Effects of silicon on the distribution of cadmium compartmentation in root tips of Kandelia obovata (S., L.) Yong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Effects of silicon (Si) on the distribution of cadmium (Cd) compartmentation in root tips of Kandelia obovata (S., L.) Yong were investigated by pot experiments. Cd concentrations in the apoplastic saps and symplastic fractions of the root tips of K. obovata seedlings were decreased at both Si-supplied treatments. Si addition reduced the concentrations of BaCl2-extractable cell-wall-Cd in root tips, but increased the concentrations of Na3citrate-extractable cell-wall-Cd and HCl-extractable cell-wall-Cd in root tips. The total root-tip contents of Cd were mainly distributed in the apoplast and most of the Cd in the apoplast was bound to the cell wall. Our experiment found that Si increased the ratio of apoplast Cd (>87.08%) and reduced the ratio of Cd in the symplast (2-extractable cell-wall-Cd in root tips, but increased the concentrations of Na3citrate-extractable cell-wall-Cd and HCl-extractable cell-wall-Cd in root tips. Highlights: ► Filtration of centrifugal forces to extract apoplastic saps from root segments. ► Si addition reduced the concentrations of BaCl2-extractable cell-wall-Cd. ► Si addition increased the concentrations of Na3citrate-extractable cell-wall-Cd. ► Si addition increased the concentrations of HCl-extractable cell-wall-Cd. ► Si increased the ratio of apoplast Cd and reduced the ratio of Cd in the symplast. - The present study indicates that Si plays an important role in alleviating the toxicity of Cd in K. obovata seedlings.

  3. Foliar or root exposures to smelter particles: Consequences for lead compartmentalization and speciation in plant leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreck, Eva [Université de Toulouse, INP, UPS, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), ENSAT, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); CNRS, EcoLab, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); Géosciences Environnement Toulouse (GET), Observatoire Midi Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, IRD, 14 Avenue E. Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Dappe, Vincent [LASIR (UMR CNRS 8516), Université de Lille 1, Bât. C5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Sarret, Géraldine [ISTerre, UMR 5275, Université Grenoble I, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Sobanska, Sophie [LASIR (UMR CNRS 8516), Université de Lille 1, Bât. C5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Nowak, Dorota; Nowak, Jakub; Stefaniak, Elżbieta Anna [Department of Chemistry, John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Al. Kraśnicka 102, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); Magnin, Valérie [ISTerre, UMR 5275, Université Grenoble I, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Ranieri, Vincent [CEA-INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Dumat, Camille, E-mail: camille.dumat@ensat.fr [Université de Toulouse, INP, UPS, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), ENSAT, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); CNRS, EcoLab, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France)

    2014-04-01

    In urban areas with high fallout of airborne particles, metal uptake by plants mainly occurs by foliar pathways and can strongly impact crop quality. However, there is a lack of knowledge on metal localization and speciation in plants after pollution exposure, especially in the case of foliar uptake. In this study, two contrasting crops, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and rye-grass (Lolium perenne L.), were exposed to Pb-rich particles emitted by a Pb-recycling factory via either atmospheric or soil application. Pb accumulation in plant leaves was observed for both ways of exposure. The mechanisms involved in Pb uptake were investigated using a combination of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques (electron microscopy, laser ablation, Raman microspectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy). The results show that Pb localization and speciation are strongly influenced by the type of exposure (root or shoot pathway) and the plant species. Foliar exposure is the main pathway of uptake, involving the highest concentrations in plant tissues. Under atmospheric fallouts, Pb-rich particles were strongly adsorbed on the leaf surface of both plant species. In lettuce, stomata contained Pb-rich particles in their apertures, with some deformations of guard cells. In addition to PbO and PbSO{sub 4}, chemical forms that were also observed in pristine particles, new species were identified: organic compounds (minimum 20%) and hexagonal platy crystals of PbCO{sub 3}. In rye-grass, the changes in Pb speciation were even more egregious: Pb–cell wall and Pb–organic acid complexes were the major species observed. For root exposure, identified here as a minor pathway of Pb transfer compared to foliar uptake, another secondary species, pyromorphite, was identified in rye-grass leaves. Finally, combining bulk and spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques permitted both the overall speciation and the minor but possibly highly reactive lead species to be determined in order to

  4. Foliar or root exposures to smelter particles: Consequences for lead compartmentalization and speciation in plant leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In urban areas with high fallout of airborne particles, metal uptake by plants mainly occurs by foliar pathways and can strongly impact crop quality. However, there is a lack of knowledge on metal localization and speciation in plants after pollution exposure, especially in the case of foliar uptake. In this study, two contrasting crops, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and rye-grass (Lolium perenne L.), were exposed to Pb-rich particles emitted by a Pb-recycling factory via either atmospheric or soil application. Pb accumulation in plant leaves was observed for both ways of exposure. The mechanisms involved in Pb uptake were investigated using a combination of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques (electron microscopy, laser ablation, Raman microspectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy). The results show that Pb localization and speciation are strongly influenced by the type of exposure (root or shoot pathway) and the plant species. Foliar exposure is the main pathway of uptake, involving the highest concentrations in plant tissues. Under atmospheric fallouts, Pb-rich particles were strongly adsorbed on the leaf surface of both plant species. In lettuce, stomata contained Pb-rich particles in their apertures, with some deformations of guard cells. In addition to PbO and PbSO4, chemical forms that were also observed in pristine particles, new species were identified: organic compounds (minimum 20%) and hexagonal platy crystals of PbCO3. In rye-grass, the changes in Pb speciation were even more egregious: Pb–cell wall and Pb–organic acid complexes were the major species observed. For root exposure, identified here as a minor pathway of Pb transfer compared to foliar uptake, another secondary species, pyromorphite, was identified in rye-grass leaves. Finally, combining bulk and spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques permitted both the overall speciation and the minor but possibly highly reactive lead species to be determined in order to better assess

  5. A development-based compartmentalization of the Drosophila central brain

    OpenAIRE

    Pereanu, Wayne; Kumar, Abilasha; Jennett, Arnim; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The neuropile of the Drosophila brain is subdivided into anatomically discrete compartments. Compartments are rich in terminal neurite branching and synapses; they are the neuropile domains in which signal processing takes place. Compartment boundaries are defined by more or less dense layers of glial cells, as well as long neurite fascicles. These fascicles are formed during the larval period when the approximately 100 neuronal lineages that constitute the Drosophila central brain differenti...

  6. The lateral compartmentation of the yeast plasma membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malínský, Jan; Opekarová, Miroslava; Tanner, W.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 8 (2010), s. 473-478. ISSN 0749-503X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/0133 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) KAN200520801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : membrane microdomains * membrane structure * Can1 Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.626, year: 2010

  7. Embryonic origin and compartmental organization of the external genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Ana M; Cohn, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Genital malformations occur at a high frequency in humans, affecting ~1:250 live births. The molecular mechanisms of external genital development are beginning to be identified; however, the origin of cells that give rise to external genitalia is unknown. Here we use cell lineage analysis to show that the genital tubercle, the precursor of the penis and clitoris, arises from two populations of progenitor cells that originate at the lateral edges of the embryo, at the level of the posterior hindlimb buds and anterior tail. During body wall closure, the left and right external genital progenitor pools are brought together at the ventral midline, where they form the paired genital swellings that give rise to the genital tubercle. Unexpectedly, the left and right external genital progenitor pools form two lineage-restricted compartments in the phallus. Together with previous lineage studies of limb buds, our results indicate that, at the pelvic level, the early lateral mesoderm is regionalized from medial to lateral into dorsal limb, ventral limb, and external genital progenitor fields. These findings have implications for the evolutionary diversification of external genitalia and for the association between external genital defects and disruption of body wall closure, as seen in the epispadias-extrophy complex. PMID:25372631

  8. Use of a simulated annealing algorithm to fit compartmental models with an application to fractal pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Rebeccah E; Riauka, Terence A; McQuarrie, Steve A

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, fractals are being incorporated into pharmacokinetic models to describe transport and chemical kinetic processes occurring in confined and heterogeneous spaces. However, fractal compartmental models lead to differential equations with power-law time-dependent kinetic rate coefficients that currently are not accommodated by common commercial software programs. This paper describes a parameter optimization method for fitting individual pharmacokinetic curves based on a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, which always converged towards the global minimum and was independent of the initial parameter values and parameter bounds. In a comparison using a classical compartmental model, similar fits by the Gauss-Newton and Nelder-Mead simplex algorithms required stringent initial estimates and ranges for the model parameters. The SA algorithm is ideal for fitting a wide variety of pharmacokinetic models to clinical data, especially those for which there is weak prior knowledge of the parameter values, such as the fractal models. PMID:17706176

  9. Structurally controlled and aligned tight gas reservoir compartmentalization in the San Juan and Piceance Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, A.D.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Klawitter, A.L.

    1995-10-01

    Recurrent basement faulting is the primary controlling mechanism for aligning and compartmentalizing upper Cretaceous aged tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan and Piceance Basins. Northwest trending structural lineaments that formed in conjunction with the Uncompahgre Highlands have profoundly influenced sedimentation trends and created boundaries for gas migration; sealing and compartmentalizing sedimentary packages in both basins. Fractures which formed over the structural lineaments provide permeability pathways which allowing gas recovery from otherwise tight gas reservoirs. Structural alignments and associated reservoir compartments have been accurately targeted by integrating advanced remote sensing imagery, high resolution aeromagnetics, seismic interpretation, stratigraphic mapping and dynamic structural modelling. This unifying methodology is a powerful tool for exploration geologists and is also a systematic approach to tight gas resource assessment in frontier basins.

  10. Compartmental and Factorial Analysis in the Study of Iron Kinetics: Application to Myeloid Splenomegaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using structural hypothesis certain mechanisms of the pathology of iron kinetics in patients have been demonstrated by compartmental analysis, particularly in a group of 10 subjects suffering from myeloid splenomegaly on whom iron metabolism studies were carried out before and after radiotherapy or splenectomy. By repeating these tests before and after treatment an attempt was made to determine the weight that should be attributed to medullary aplasia and ineffective erythropoiesis, respectively, in the therapeutic indications. The calculations were carried out by means of an original program based on the Monte Carlo method. In view of the inherent limitations of compartmental analysis, recourse was also had to factorial analysis. Basic analysis of the plasma and blood curves as well as of the external counts gave results of value in the following areas: description of data and approximation of a physio- pathologic classification; calculation of discriminating axes and planes as an aid to diagnosis; interpretation of the classification of pathologies (significance of factors). (author)

  11. A compartmental model of the cAMP/PKA/MAPK pathway in Bio-PEPA

    CERN Document Server

    Ciocchetta, Federica; Guerriero, Maria Luisa; 10.4204/EPTCS.11.5

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of biochemical systems involve the exchange of information between different compartments, either in the form of transportation or via the intervention of membrane proteins which are able to transmit stimuli between bordering compartments. The correct quantitative handling of compartments is, therefore, extremely important when modelling real biochemical systems. The Bio-PEPA process algebra is equipped with the capability of explicitly defining quantitative information such as compartment volumes and membrane surface areas. Furthermore, the recent development of the Bio-PEPA Eclipse Plug-in allows us to perform a correct stochastic simulation of multi-compartmental models. Here we present a Bio-PEPA compartmental model of the cAMP/PKA/MAPK pathway. We analyse the system using the Bio-PEPA Eclipse Plug-in and we show the correctness of our model by comparison with an existing ODE model. Furthermore, we perform computational experiments in order to investigate certain properties of the pathwa...

  12. Compartmentalization of metabolic pathways in yeast mitochondria improves the production of branched-chain alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, José L; Fink, Gerald R; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-04-01

    Efforts to improve the production of a compound of interest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have mainly involved engineering or overexpression of cytoplasmic enzymes. We show that targeting metabolic pathways to mitochondria can increase production compared with overexpression of the enzymes involved in the same pathways in the cytoplasm. Compartmentalization of the Ehrlich pathway into mitochondria increased isobutanol production by 260%, whereas overexpression of the same pathway in the cytoplasm only improved yields by 10%, compared with a strain overproducing enzymes involved in only the first three steps of the biosynthetic pathway. Subcellular fractionation of engineered strains revealed that targeting the enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway to the mitochondria achieves greater local enzyme concentrations. Other benefits of compartmentalization may include increased availability of intermediates, removing the need to transport intermediates out of the mitochondrion and reducing the loss of intermediates to competing pathways. PMID:23417095

  13. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Marko Kreft; Bak, Lasse K.; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Arne Schousboe

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation.

  14. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Kreft

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation.

  15. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S;

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pat......-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation....

  16. A simple ordering of neocortical areas established by the compartmental organization of their striatal projections.

    OpenAIRE

    Ragsdale, C W; Graybiel, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The compartmental organization of corticostriatal projections from the fronto-orbito-insular cortex was studied in the cat. Cortical areas in this field were found to have a highly organized projection to the striatum, selectively innervating striosomes dorsally and predominantly avoiding them ventrally within their striatal fields of termination. These observations have two important implications for striatal processing. First, some cortical areas preferentially terminate in different compar...

  17. An in vitro compartmentalization-based method for the selection of bond-forming enzymes from large libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianella, Paul; Snapp, Erik L; Levy, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a generalized in vitro compartmentalization-based bead display selection strategy that allows for the identification of enzymes that can perform ligation reactions. Although a number of methods have been developed to evolve such enzymes, many of them are limited in library size (10(6) -10(7) ), do not select for enzymes using a scheme that allows for multiple turnover, or only work on enzymes specific to nucleic acids. This approach is amenable to screening libraries of up to 10(12) protein variants by allowing beads to be overloaded with up to 10(4) unique mutants. Using this approach we isolated a variant of sortase A from Staphylococcus aureus that shows a 114-fold enhancement in kcat /KM in the absence of calcium compared to the wild-type and improved resistance to the inhibitory effects of cell lysates. Unlike the wild-type protein, the newly selected variant shows intracellular activity in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells where it may prove useful for intracellular labeling or synthetic biological applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1647-1657. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26806853

  18. Compartmentalized gene regulatory network of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Zhao, Guoyi; Xu, Jin-Rong; Kistler, H Corby; Gao, Lixin; Ma, Li-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Head blight caused by Fusarium graminearum threatens world-wide wheat production, resulting in both yield loss and mycotoxin contamination. We reconstructed the global F. graminearum gene regulatory network (GRN) from a large collection of transcriptomic data using Bayesian network inference, a machine-learning algorithm. This GRN reveals connectivity between key regulators and their target genes. Focusing on key regulators, this network contains eight distinct but interwoven modules. Enriched for unique functions, such as cell cycle, DNA replication, transcription, translation and stress responses, each module exhibits distinct expression profiles. Evolutionarily, the F. graminearum genome can be divided into core regions shared with closely related species and variable regions harboring genes that are unique to F. graminearum and perform species-specific functions. Interestingly, the inferred top regulators regulate genes that are significantly enriched from the same genomic regions (P control strategies involving the targeting of master regulators in pathogens. The program can be used to construct GRNs of other plant pathogens. PMID:26990214

  19. Metabolic hormones, apolipoproteins, adipokines, and cytokines in the alveolar lining fluid of healthy adults: compartmentalization and physiological correlates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos O Mendivil

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of hormone regulation in lung parenchyma is quite limited. We aimed to quantify a diverse array of biologically relevant protein mediators in alveolar lining fluid (ALF, compared to serum concentrations, and explore factors associated with protein compartmentalization on either side of the air-blood barrier.Participants were 24 healthy adult non-smoker volunteers without respiratory symptoms or significant medical conditions, with normal lung exams and office spirometry. Cell-free bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum were analyzed for 24 proteins (including enteric and metabolic hormones, apolipoproteins, adipokines, and cytokines using a highly sensitive multiplex ELISA. Measurements were normalized to ALF concentrations. The ALF:serum concentration ratios were examined in relation to measures of protein size, hydrophobicity, charge, and to participant clinical and spirometric values.ALF measurements from 24 individuals detected 19 proteins, including adiponectin, adipsin, apoA-I, apoA-II, apoB, apoC-II, apoC-III, apoE, C-reactive protein, ghrelin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, glucagon, insulin, leptin, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, resistin, and visfatin. C-peptide and serpin E1 were not detected in ALF for any individual, and IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-alpha were not detected in either ALF or serum for any individual. In general, ALF levels were similar or lower in concentration for most proteins compared to serum. However, ghrelin, resistin, insulin, visfatin and GLP-1 had ALF concentrations significantly higher compared to serum. Importantly, elevated ALF:serum ratios of ghrelin, visfatin and resistin correlated with protein net charge and isoelectric point, but not with molecular weight or hydrophobicity.Biologically relevant enteric and metabolic hormones, apolipoproteins, adipokines, and cytokines can be detected in the ALF of

  20. Assessing compartmentalized flux in lipid metabolism with isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Doug K

    2016-09-01

    Metabolism in plants takes place across multiple cell types and within distinct organelles. The distributions equate to spatial heterogeneity; though the limited means to experimentally assess metabolism frequently involve homogenizing tissues and mixing metabolites from different locations. Most current isotope investigations of metabolism therefore lack the ability to resolve spatially distinct events. Recognition of this limitation has resulted in inspired efforts to advance metabolic flux analysis and isotopic labeling techniques. Though a number of these efforts have been applied to studies in central metabolism; recent advances in instrumentation and techniques present an untapped opportunity to make similar progress in lipid metabolism where the use of stable isotopes has been more limited. These efforts will benefit from sophisticated radiolabeling reports that continue to enrich our knowledge on lipid biosynthetic pathways and provide some direction for stable isotope experimental design and extension of MFA. Evidence for this assertion is presented through the review of several elegant stable isotope studies and by taking stock of what has been learned from radioisotope investigations when spatial aspects of metabolism were considered. The studies emphasize that glycerolipid production occurs across several locations with assembly of lipids in the ER or plastid, fatty acid biosynthesis occurring in the plastid, and the generation of acetyl-CoA and glycerol-3-phosphate taking place at multiple sites. Considering metabolism in this context underscores the cellular and subcellular organization that is important to enhanced production of glycerolipids in plants. An attempt is made to unify salient features from a number of reports into a diagrammatic model of lipid metabolism and propose where stable isotope labeling experiments and further flux analysis may help address questions in the field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid

  1. Estimate of FDG excretion by means of compartmental analysis and ant colony optimization of nuclear medicine data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, Sara; Caviglia, Giacomo; Brignone, Massimo; Massollo, Michela; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Piana, Michele

    2013-01-01

    [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is one of the most utilized tracers for positron emission tomography (PET) applications in oncology. FDG-PET relies on higher glycolytic activity in tumors compared to normal structures as the basis of image contrast. As a glucose analog, FDG is transported into malignant cells which typically exhibit an increased radioactivity. However, different from glucose, FDG is not reabsorbed by the renal system and is excreted to the bladder. The present paper describes a novel computational method for the quantitative assessment of this excretion process. The method is based on a compartmental analysis of FDG-PET data in which the excretion process is explicitly accounted for by the bladder compartment and on the application of an ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm for the determination of the tracer coefficients describing the FDG transport effectiveness. The validation of this approach is performed by means of both synthetic data and real measurements acquired by a PET device for small animals (micro-PET). Possible oncological applications of the results are discussed in the final section. PMID:24191175

  2. Development of an in vitro compartmentalization screen for high-throughput directed evolution of [FeFe] hydrogenases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Stapleton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: [FeFe] hydrogenase enzymes catalyze the formation and dissociation of molecular hydrogen with the help of a complex prosthetic group composed of common elements. The development of energy conversion technologies based on these renewable catalysts has been hindered by their extreme oxygen sensitivity. Attempts to improve the enzymes by directed evolution have failed for want of a screening platform capable of throughputs high enough to adequately sample heavily mutated DNA libraries. In vitro compartmentalization (IVC is a powerful method capable of screening for multiple-turnover enzymatic activity at very high throughputs. Recent advances have allowed [FeFe] hydrogenases to be expressed and activated in the cell-free protein synthesis reactions on which IVC is based; however, IVC is a demanding technique with which many enzymes have proven incompatible. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe an extremely high-throughput IVC screen for oxygen-tolerant [FeFe] hydrogenases. We demonstrate that the [FeFe] hydrogenase CpI can be expressed and activated within emulsion droplets, and identify a fluorogenic substrate that links activity after oxygen exposure to the generation of a fluorescent signal. We present a screening protocol in which attachment of mutant genes and the proteins they encode to the surfaces of microbeads is followed by three separate emulsion steps for amplification, expression, and evaluation of hydrogenase mutants. We show that beads displaying active hydrogenase can be isolated by fluorescence-activated cell-sorting, and we use the method to enrich such beads from a mock library. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: [FeFe] hydrogenases are the most complex enzymes to be produced by cell-free protein synthesis, and the most challenging targets to which IVC has yet been applied. The technique described here is an enabling step towards the development of biocatalysts for a biological hydrogen economy.

  3. Dual regulation of muscle glycogen synthase during exercise by activation and compartmentalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats, Clara; Helge, Jørn W; Nordby, Pernille; Qvortrup, Klaus; Ploug, Thorkil; Dela, Flemming; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    dephosphorylation at sites 2+2a, 3a, and 3a + 3b. Furthermore, we report the existence of several glycogen metabolism regulatory mechanisms based on GS intracellular compartmentalization. After exhausting exercise, epinephrine-induced protein kinase A activation leads to GS site 1b phosphorylation targeting the...... lateralis muscle of the previously reported mechanism of glycogen metabolism regulation in rabbit tibialis anterior muscle. After overnight low muscle glycogen level and/or in response to exhausting exercise-induced glycogenolysis, GS is associated with spherical structures at the I-band of sarcomeres....

  4. Photosynthetic Characteristics of Portulaca grandiflora, a Succulent C(4) Dicot : CELLULAR COMPARTMENTATION OF ENZYMES AND ACID METABOLISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, S B; Shieh, Y J; Reger, B J; Black, C C

    1981-11-01

    The succulent, cylindrical leaves of the C(4) dicot Portulaca grandiflora possess three distinct green cell types: bundle sheath cells (BSC) in radial arrangement around the vascular bundles; mesophyll cells (MC) in an outer layer adjacent to the BSC; and water storage cells (WSC) in the leaf center. Unlike typical Kranz leaf anatomy, the MC do not surround the bundle sheath tissue but occur only in the area between the bundle sheath and the epidermis. Intercellular localization of photosynthetic enzymes was characterized using protoplasts isolated enzymatically from all three green cell types.Like other C(4) plants, P. grandiflora has ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and the decarboxylating enzyme, NADP(+)-malic enzyme, in the BSC. Unlike other C(4) plants, however, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, pyruvate, Pi dikinase, and NADP(+)-malate dehydrogenase of the C(4) pathway were present in all three green cell types, indicating that all are capable of fixing CO(2) via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and regenerating phosphoenolpyruvate. Other enzymes were about equally distributed between MC and BSC similar to other C(4) plants. The enzyme profile of the WSC was similar to that of the MC but with reduced activity in most enzymes, except mitochondrion-associated enzymes.Intracellular localization of enzymes was studied in organelles partitioned by differential centrifugation using mechanically ruptured mesophyll and bundle sheath protoplasts. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was a cytosolic enzyme in both cells; whereas, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and NADP(+)-malic enzyme were exclusively compartmentalized in the bundle sheath chloroplasts. NADP(+)-malate dehydrogenase, pyruvate, Pi dikinase, aspartate aminotransferase, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, and NADP(+)-triose-P dehydrogenase were predominantly localized in the chloroplasts while alanine aminotransferase and NAD(+)-malate dehydrogenase were mainly present in the cytosol of both cell types. Based

  5. Compartmentalized self-replication: a novel method for the directed evolution of polymerases and other enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadessy, Farid J; Holliger, Philipp

    2007-01-01

    Compartmentalized self-replication (CSR) is a novel method for the directed evolution of enzymes and, in particular, polymerases. In its simplest form, CSR consists of a simple feedback loop involving a polymerase that replicates only its own encoding gene (self-replication). Self-replication occurs in discrete, spatially separate, noncommunicating compartments formed by a heat-stable water-in-oil emulsion. Compartmentalization ensures the linkage of phenotype and genotype (i.e., it ensures that each polymerase replicates only its own encoding gene to the exclusion of those in the other compartments). As a result, adaptive gains by the polymerase directly (and proportionally) translate into genetic amplification of the encoding polymerase gene. CSR has proven to be a useful strategy for the directed evolution of polymerases directly from diverse repertoires of polymerase genes. In this chapter, we describe some of the CSR protocols used successfully to evolve variants of T. aquaticus Pol I (Taq) polymerase with novel and useful properties, such as increased thermostability or resistance to the potent inhibitor, heparin, from a repertoire of randomly mutated Taq polymerase genes. PMID:17041269

  6. Synaptic compartmentalization by micropatterned masking of a surface adhesive cue in cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jae Ryun; Jang, Min Jee; Jo, Youhwa; Joo, Sunghoon; Lee, Do Hoon; Lee, Byung Yang; Nam, Yoonkey; Sun, Woong

    2016-06-01

    Functions of neuronal circuit are fundamentally modulated by its quality and quantity of connections. Assessment of synapse, the basic unit for a neuronal connection, is labor-intensive and time-consuming in conventional culture systems, due to the small size and the spatially random distribution. In the present study, we propose a novel 'synapse compartmentalization' culture system, in which synapses are concentrated at controlled locations. We fabricated a negative dot array pattern by coating the entire surface with poly-l-lysine (PLL) and subsequent microcontact printing of 1) substrates which mask positive charge of PLL (Fc, BSA and laminin), or 2) a chemorepulsive protein (Semaphorin 3F-Fc). By combination of physical and biological features of these repulsive substrates, functional synapses were robustly concentrated in the PLL-coated dots. This synapse compartmentalization chip can be combined with the various high-throughput assay formats based on the synaptic morphology and function. Therefore, this quantifiable and controllable dot array pattern by microcontact printing will be potential useful for bio-chip platforms for the high-density assays used in synapse-related neurobiological studies. PMID:27035488

  7. A lipid based multi-compartmental system: Liposomes-in-double emulsion for oral vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liau, Jin Jau; Hook, Sarah; Prestidge, Clive A; Barnes, Timothy J

    2015-11-01

    The gastric mucosa provides the entry point for the majority of pathogens, as well as being the induction site for protective immunity; however, there remain few examples of oral vaccines due to the challenges presented by the gastrointestinal route. In this study, we develop a lipid-based multi-compartmental system for oral vaccine delivery. Specifically, we have optimised the formulation of a water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion prepared from a triglyceride - soya bean oil, using surfactants Span 80/Tween 80 and Pluronic F127 to stabilise the internal and external water phases, respectively. Into the internal water phase, we also incorporated a PEGylated liposome, prepared using hydrogenated phosphatidyl choline as a carrier for our model protein, FITC-labelled ovalbumin. We demonstrated the successful incorporation of intact liposomes into the internal water phase of the double emulsion using imaging techniques including cryo-SEM and confocal microscopy. Finally, we use in vitro release studies of FITC-ovalbumin, to provide further confirmation of the multi-compartmental structure of the double emulsion system and demonstrate significant extended release of the entrapped model antigen compared with PEG-liposomes; these characteristics are attractive for oral vaccine delivery. PMID:26455337

  8. Proline accumulation, ions dynamics and sodium root-shoot partition and compartmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Emanuel eBojorquez Quintal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite its economic relevance, little is known about salt tolerance mechanisms in pepper plants. To address this question, we compared differences in responses to NaCl in two Capsicum chinense varieties: Rex (tolerant and Chichen-Itza (sensitive. Under salt stress (150 mM NaCl over 7 days roots of Rex variety accumulated 50 times more compatible solutes such as proline compared to Chichen-Itza. Mineral analysis indicated that Na+ is restricted to roots by preventing its transport to leaves. Fluorescence analysis suggested an efficient Na+ compartmentalization in vacuole-like structures and in small intracellular compartments in roots of Rex variety. At the same time, Na+ in Chichen-Itza plants was compartmentalized in the apoplast, suggesting substantial Na+ extrusion. Rex variety was found to retain more K+ in its roots under salt stress according to a mineral analysis and microelectrode ion flux estimation (MIFE. Vanadate-sensitive H+ efflux was higher in Chichen-Itza variety plants, suggesting a higher activity of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase, which fuels the extrusion of Na+, and, possibly, also the re-uptake of K+. Our results suggest a combination of stress tolerance mechanisms, in order to alleviate the salt-induced injury. Furthermore, Na+ extrusion to apoplast does not appear to be an efficient strategy for salt tolerance in pepper plants.

  9. Metabolism of monoterpenes: evidence for compartmentation of l-menthone metabolism in peppermint (Mentha piperita) leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinkus, C.; Croteau, R.

    1981-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the monoterpene ketone l-(G-/sup 3/H)-menthone is reduced to the epimeric alcohols l-menthol and d-neomenthol in leaf discs of flowering peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), and that a portion of the menthol is converted to menthyl acetate while the bulk of the neomenthol is transformed to neomenthyl-..beta..-D-glucoside. When l-(3-/sup 3/H)menthol and d-(3-/sup 3/H)neomenthol are separately administered to leaf discs, both menthyl and neomenthyl acetates and menthyl and neomenthyl glucosides are formed with nearly equal facility, suggesting that the metabolic specificity observed with the ketone precursor was not a function of the specificity of the transglucosylase or transacetylase but rather a result of compartmentation of each stereospecific dehydrogenase with the appropriate transferase. Co-purification of the acceptor-mediated activities, and differential activation and inhibition studies, provided strong evidence that the same UDP-glucose-dependent enzyme could transfer glucose to either l-menthol or d-neometnthol. These results demonstrate that the specific in vivo conversion of l-menthone to l-menthyl acetate and d-neomenthyl-..beta..-D-glucoside cannot be attributed to the selectivity of the transferases, and they clearly indicate that the metabolic specificity observed is a result of compartmentation effects.

  10. 4D maximum a posteriori reconstruction in dynamic SPECT using a compartmental model-based prior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 4D ordered-subsets maximum a posteriori (OSMAP) algorithm for dynamic SPECT is described which uses a temporal prior that constrains each voxel's behaviour in time to conform to a compartmental model. No a priori limitations on kinetic parameters are applied; rather, the parameter estimates evolve as the algorithm iterates to a solution. The estimated parameters and time-activity curves are used within the reconstruction algorithm to model changes in the activity distribution as the camera rotates, avoiding artefacts due to inconsistencies of data between projection views. This potentially allows for fewer, longer-duration scans to be used and may have implications for noise reduction. The algorithm was evaluated qualitatively using dynamic 99mTc-teboroxime SPECT scans in two patients, and quantitatively using a series of simulated phantom experiments. The OSMAP algorithm resulted in images with better myocardial uniformity and definition, gave time-activity curves with reduced noise variations, and provided wash-in parameter estimates with better accuracy and lower statistical uncertainty than those obtained from conventional ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) processing followed by compartmental modelling. The new algorithm effectively removed the bias in k21 estimates due to inconsistent projections for sampling schedules as slow as 60 s per timeframe, but no improvement in wash-out parameter estimates was observed in this work. The proposed dynamic OSMAP algorithm provides a flexible framework which may benefit a variety of dynamic tomographic imaging applications. (author)

  11. Dynamics of the risk of smoking-induced lung cancer : A compartmental hidden markov model for longitudinal analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Guihenneuc-Jouyaux, Chantal; Campanella, Gianluca; Richardson, Sylvia; Vermeulen, Roel; De Iorio, Maria; Galea, Sandro; Vineis, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: To account for the dynamic aspects of carcinogenesis, we propose a compartmental hidden Markov model in which each person is healthy, asymptomatically affected, diagnosed, or deceased. Our model is illustrated using the example of smoking-induced lung cancer. METHODS:: The model was fit

  12. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varney, Peter J.

    2002-04-23

    This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development.

  13. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .../polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. 888.3535 Section 888.3535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace part of a knee joint. The device...

  14. A self-compartmentalizing hexamer serine protease from Pyrococcus horikoshii: substrate selection achieved through multimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menyhárd, Dóra K; Kiss-Szemán, Anna; Tichy-Rács, Éva; Hornung, Balázs; Rádi, Krisztina; Szeltner, Zoltán; Domokos, Klarissza; Szamosi, Ilona; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Polgár, László; Harmat, Veronika

    2013-06-14

    Oligopeptidases impose a size limitation on their substrates, the mechanism of which has long been under debate. Here we present the structure of a hexameric serine protease, an oligopeptidase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhAAP), revealing a complex, self-compartmentalized inner space, where substrates may access the monomer active sites passing through a double-gated "check-in" system, first passing through a pore on the hexamer surface and then turning to enter through an even smaller opening at the monomers' domain interface. This substrate screening strategy is unique within the family. We found that among oligopeptidases, a residue of the catalytic apparatus is positioned near an amylogenic β-edge, which needs to be protected to prevent aggregation, and we found that different oligopeptidases use different strategies to achieve such an end. We propose that self-assembly within the family results in characteristically different substrate selection mechanisms coupled to different multimerization states. PMID:23632025

  15. Modeling non-stationary conditions for carbohydrate compartmentation and export in maize leaf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution of photosynthetic carbon, in an exporting maize leaf (Zea mays), was modeled from the analysis of radioactivity chase experiments after a 14CO2 pulse labeling. A model taking into account four compartments -precursor pool, starch pool and two exchangeable sucrose pools- was proposed. It brought significant improvements compared to earlier attempts in that it allowed direct calculation for all of the compartment sizes and transfer coefficients, without any additional simplifying hypothesis. This more comprehensive version was used to test the influence of various procedures or assumptions frequently chosen when performing compartmental analysis with an exporting leaf. Most of the calculations appeared to be dependent on a good estimate of the asymptote value, so a critical point appeared to be the length of the chase period

  16. Measurement of renal glomerular filtration rate using labelled substances with compartmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a model for the two-compartmental open system and experiments on animals (rabbits and dogs) as well as on human healthy volunteers, an attempt was made to study the advantages and limitations of different radionuclide methods for glomerular filtration rate determination. Labelled compounds used in different combinations were: 3H-inulin, sup(113m)In-EDTA, 131I-iothalamate, sup(99m)Tc-DTPA and 14C-creatinine. The results of the study lead to some working hypotheses concerning the value of creatinine and other labelled substances in the measurement of glomerular filtration rate in clinical practice. The advantages and disadvantages of individual methods summarized in the final report are generally in agreement with the present views of many research workers. Also the hypothesis can be justified that the different labelled compounds which have been studied might be handled independently by the membranes involved but at the long run produce similar homeostatic balance

  17. A comprehensive compartmental model of blood glucose regulation for healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahidi, O; Kwok, K E; Gopaluni, R B;

    2016-01-01

    We have expanded a former compartmental model of blood glucose regulation for healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects. The former model was a detailed physiological model which considered the interactions of three substances, glucose, insulin and glucagon on regulating the blood sugar. The main...... drawback of the former model was its restriction on the route of glucose entrance to the body which was limited to the intravenous glucose injection. To handle the oral glucose intake, we have added a model of glucose absorption in the gastrointestinal tract to the former model to address the resultant...... variations of blood glucose concentrations following an oral glucose intake. Another model representing the incretins production in the gastrointestinal tract along with their hormonal effects on boosting pancreatic insulin production is also added to the former model. We have used two sets of clinical data...

  18. A dynamic compartmental food chain model of radiocaesium transfer to Apodemus sylvaticus in woodland ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was undertaken to quantify the activity concentrations of 137Cs in Apodemus sylvaticus (the woodmouse) in two woodland sites, Lady Wood and Longrigg Wood, adjacent to British Nuclear Fuels Ltd. (BNFL) Sellafield, Cumbria, UK. A deterministic dynamic compartmental food chain model was also constructed to predict 137Cs activity concentration [Bq kg-1 dry weight (dw)] in A. sylvaticus on a seasonal basis given the activity concentrations in its diet. Within the coniferous woodland site (Lady Wood), significant differences were found between seasons (Px/2.3 Bq kg-1 dw) being attributed to mycophagy. Fungal concentrations ranged from 2-3213 Bq kg-1 dw. The modelled activity concentrations fell between the confidence intervals of the observed data in four of the six seasonal cohorts sampled. Disparities between predicted and observed activity concentrations are attributed to uncertainties surrounding the fundamental feeding ecology of small mammals

  19. [Digital PCR compartmentalization I. Single-molecule detection of rare mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Toralla, Karla; Pekin, Deniz; Bartolo, Jean-François; Garlan, Fanny; Nizard, Philippe; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Taly, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction based techniques have been widely used in laboratory settings. Several applications in oncology, virology or prenatal diagnosis require highly sensitive detection methods, which cannot be achieved with conventional techniques. Digital PCR (dPCR) was developed from the association of PCR and limiting dilution procedures. It is based on the compartmentalization of DNA molecules in small volumes. Controlling the size and the content of each compartment is crucial to obtain a high sensitivity with a single molecule resolution. Microfluidics offers promising tools to isolate DNA fragments such as microdroplets, microchambers or microwells with volumes ranging from few picoliters to nanoliters. The review provides an overview of recent developments of microfluidics dPCR platforms and how this technology can influence the management of cancer patients. PMID:25658735

  20. Pathway Compartmentalization in Peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Produce Versatile Medium Chain Fatty Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Stevens, Joseph; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-01-01

    Fatty alcohols are value-added chemicals and important components of a variety of industries, which have a >3 billion-dollar global market annually. Long chain fatty alcohols (>C12) are mainly used in surfactants, lubricants, detergents, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics while medium chain fatty alcohols (C6-C12) could be used as diesel-like biofuels. Microbial production of fatty alcohols from renewable feedstock stands as a promising strategy to enable sustainable supply of fatty alcohols. In this study, we report, for the first time, that medium chain fatty alcohols could be produced in yeast via targeted expression of a fatty acyl-CoA reductase (TaFAR) in the peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By tagging TaFAR enzyme with peroxisomal targeting signal peptides, the TaFAR could be compartmentalized into the matrix of the peroxisome to hijack the medium chain fatty acyl-CoA generated from the beta-oxidation pathway and convert them to versatile medium chain fatty alcohols (C10 &C12). The overexpression of genes encoding PEX7 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase further improved fatty alcohol production by 1.4-fold. After medium optimization in fed-batch fermentation using glucose as the sole carbon source, fatty alcohols were produced at 1.3 g/L, including 6.9% 1-decanol, 27.5% 1-dodecanol, 2.9% 1-tetradecanol and 62.7% 1-hexadecanol. This work revealed that peroxisome could be engineered as a compartmentalized organelle for producing fatty acid-derived chemicals in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27230732

  1. Bioaccessibility of selenium after human ingestion in relation to its chemical species and compartmentalization in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombo, Stéphane; Schreck, Eva; Dumat, Camille; Laplanche, Christophe; Pierart, Antoine; Longchamp, Mélanie; Besson, Philippe; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse

    2016-06-01

    Selenium is a micronutrient needed by all living organisms including humans, but often present in low concentration in food with possible deficiency. From another side, at higher concentrations in soils as observed in seleniferous regions of the world, and in function of its chemical species, Se can also induce (eco)toxicity. Root Se uptake was therefore studied in function of its initial form for maize (Zea mays L.), a plant widely cultivated for human and animal food over the world. Se phytotoxicity and compartmentalization were studied in different aerial plant tissues. For the first time, Se oral human bioaccessibility after ingestion was assessed for the main Se species (Se(IV) and Se(VI)) with the BARGE ex vivo test in maize seeds (consumed by humans), and in stems and leaves consumed by animals. Corn seedlings were cultivated in hydroponic conditions supplemented with 1 mg L(-1) of selenium (Se(IV), Se(VI), Control) for 4 months. Biomass, Se concentration, and bioaccessibility were measured on harvested plants. A reduction in plant biomass was observed under Se treatments compared to control, suggesting its phytotoxicity. This plant biomass reduction was higher for selenite species than selenate, and seed was the main affected compartment compared to control. Selenium compartmentalization study showed that for selenate species, a preferential accumulation was observed in leaves, whereas selenite translocation was very limited toward maize aerial parts, except in the seeds where selenite concentrations are generally high. Selenium oral bioaccessibility after ingestion fluctuated from 49 to 89 % according to the considered plant tissue and Se species. Whatever the tissue, selenate appeared as the most human bioaccessible form. A potential Se toxicity was highlighted for people living in seleniferous regions, this risk being enhanced by the high Se bioaccessibility. PMID:26387097

  2. The Early Expression of HLA-DR and CD64 Myeloid Markers Is Specifically Compartmentalized in the Blood and Lungs of Patients with Septic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Skirecki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of reliable biomarkers is key to guide targeted therapies in septic patients. Expression monitoring of monocyte HLA-DR and neutrophil CD64 could fulfill the above need. However, it is unknown whether their expression on circulating cells reflects the status of tissue resident cells. We compared expressions of HLA-DR and CD64 markers in the circulation and airways of septic shock patients and evaluated their outcome prognostic value. The expression of CD64 on neutrophils and HLA-DR on monocytes was analyzed in the peripheral blood and mini-bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells by flow cytometry. Twenty-seven patients with septic shock were enrolled into the study. The fluorescence intensity of HLA-DR on circulating monocytes was 3.5-fold lower than on the pulmonary monocytes (p=0.01. The expression of CD64 on circulating and airway neutrophils was similar (p=0.47. Only the expression of CD64 on circulating neutrophils was higher in nonsurvivors versus survivors (2.8-fold; p=0.031. Pulmonary monocytes display a higher level of HLA-DR activation compared to peripheral blood monocytes but the expression of neutrophil CD64 is similar on lung and circulating cells. Death in septic patients was effectively predicted by neutrophil CD64 but not monocytic HLA-DR. Prognostic value of cellular activation markers in septic shock appears to strongly depend on their level of compartmentalization.

  3. The Early Expression of HLA-DR and CD64 Myeloid Markers Is Specifically Compartmentalized in the Blood and Lungs of Patients with Septic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Małgorzata; Hoser, Grażyna; Zielińska-Borkowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Identification of reliable biomarkers is key to guide targeted therapies in septic patients. Expression monitoring of monocyte HLA-DR and neutrophil CD64 could fulfill the above need. However, it is unknown whether their expression on circulating cells reflects the status of tissue resident cells. We compared expressions of HLA-DR and CD64 markers in the circulation and airways of septic shock patients and evaluated their outcome prognostic value. The expression of CD64 on neutrophils and HLA-DR on monocytes was analyzed in the peripheral blood and mini-bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells by flow cytometry. Twenty-seven patients with septic shock were enrolled into the study. The fluorescence intensity of HLA-DR on circulating monocytes was 3.5-fold lower than on the pulmonary monocytes (p = 0.01). The expression of CD64 on circulating and airway neutrophils was similar (p = 0.47). Only the expression of CD64 on circulating neutrophils was higher in nonsurvivors versus survivors (2.8-fold; p = 0.031). Pulmonary monocytes display a higher level of HLA-DR activation compared to peripheral blood monocytes but the expression of neutrophil CD64 is similar on lung and circulating cells. Death in septic patients was effectively predicted by neutrophil CD64 but not monocytic HLA-DR. Prognostic value of cellular activation markers in septic shock appears to strongly depend on their level of compartmentalization.

  4. Compartmentalization and Cell Division through Molecular Discreteness and Crowding in a Catalytic Reaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kamimura

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Explanation of the emergence of primitive cellular structures from a set of chemical reactions is necessary to unveil the origin of life and to experimentally synthesize protocells. By simulating a cellular automaton model with a two-species hypercycle, we demonstrate the reproduction of a localized cluster; that is, a protocell with a growth-division process emerges when the replication and degradation speeds of one species are respectively slower than those of the other species, because of overcrowding of molecules as a natural outcome of the replication. The protocell exhibits synchrony between its division process and replication of the minority molecule. We discuss the effects of the crowding molecule on the formation of primitive structures. The generality of this result is demonstrated through the extension of our model to a hypercycle with three molecular species, where a localized layered structure of molecules continues to divide, triggered by the replication of a minority molecule at the center.

  5. Compartmentalization and Cell Division through Molecular Discreteness and Crowding in a Catalytic Reaction Network

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi Kamimura; Kunihiko Kaneko

    2014-01-01

    Explanation of the emergence of primitive cellular structures from a set of chemical reactions is necessary to unveil the origin of life and to experimentally synthesize protocells. By simulating a cellular automaton model with a two-species hypercycle, we demonstrate the reproduction of a localized cluster; that is, a protocell with a growth-division process emerges when the replication and degradation speeds of one species are respectively slower than those of the other species, because of ...

  6. Cytoplasmic localization of Hug1p, a negative regulator of the MEC1 pathway, coincides with the compartmentalization of Rnr2p–Rnr4p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, William B. [Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Hughes, Bridget Todd; Au, Wei Chun; Sakelaris, Sally [Genetics Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Kerscher, Oliver [Biology Department, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Benton, Michael G., E-mail: benton@lsu.edu [Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Basrai, Munira A., E-mail: basraim@mail.nih.gov [Genetics Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Hug1p overexpression sensitizes wild-type cells to DNA damage and hydroxyurea (HU). •Expression of Hug1p in response to HU treatment is delayed relative to Rnr3p. •MEC1 pathway genes are required for cytoplasmic localization of Hug1p. •Hug1p subcellular compartmentalization to the cytoplasm coincides with Rnr2p–Rnr4p. -- Abstract: The evolutionarily conserved MEC1 checkpoint pathway mediates cell cycle arrest and induction of genes including the RNR (Ribonucleotide reductase) genes and HUG1 (Hydroxyurea, ultraviolet, and gamma radiation) in response to DNA damage and replication arrest. Rnr complex activity is in part controlled by cytoplasmic localization of the Rnr2p–Rnr4p subunits and inactivation of negative regulators Sml1p and Dif1p upon DNA damage and hydroxyurea (HU) treatment. We previously showed that a deletion of HUG1 rescues lethality of mec1Δ and suppresses dun1Δ strains. In this study, multiple approaches demonstrate the regulatory response of Hug1p to DNA damage and HU treatment and support its role as a negative effector of the MEC1 pathway. Consistent with our hypothesis, wild-type cells are sensitive to DNA damage and HU when HUG1 is overexpressed. A Hug1 polyclonal antiserum reveals that HUG1 encodes a protein in budding yeast and its MEC1-dependent expression is delayed compared to the rapid induction of Rnr3p in response to HU treatment. Cell biology and subcellular fractionation experiments show localization of Hug1p-GFP to the cytoplasm upon HU treatment. The cytoplasmic localization of Hug1p-GFP is dependent on MEC1 pathway genes and coincides with the cytoplasmic localization of Rnr2p–Rnr4p. Taken together, the genetic interactions, gene expression, and localization studies support a novel role for Hug1p as a negative regulator of the MEC1 checkpoint response through its compartmentalization with Rnr2p–Rnr4p.

  7. Cytoplasmic localization of Hug1p, a negative regulator of the MEC1 pathway, coincides with the compartmentalization of Rnr2p–Rnr4p

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Hug1p overexpression sensitizes wild-type cells to DNA damage and hydroxyurea (HU). •Expression of Hug1p in response to HU treatment is delayed relative to Rnr3p. •MEC1 pathway genes are required for cytoplasmic localization of Hug1p. •Hug1p subcellular compartmentalization to the cytoplasm coincides with Rnr2p–Rnr4p. -- Abstract: The evolutionarily conserved MEC1 checkpoint pathway mediates cell cycle arrest and induction of genes including the RNR (Ribonucleotide reductase) genes and HUG1 (Hydroxyurea, ultraviolet, and gamma radiation) in response to DNA damage and replication arrest. Rnr complex activity is in part controlled by cytoplasmic localization of the Rnr2p–Rnr4p subunits and inactivation of negative regulators Sml1p and Dif1p upon DNA damage and hydroxyurea (HU) treatment. We previously showed that a deletion of HUG1 rescues lethality of mec1Δ and suppresses dun1Δ strains. In this study, multiple approaches demonstrate the regulatory response of Hug1p to DNA damage and HU treatment and support its role as a negative effector of the MEC1 pathway. Consistent with our hypothesis, wild-type cells are sensitive to DNA damage and HU when HUG1 is overexpressed. A Hug1 polyclonal antiserum reveals that HUG1 encodes a protein in budding yeast and its MEC1-dependent expression is delayed compared to the rapid induction of Rnr3p in response to HU treatment. Cell biology and subcellular fractionation experiments show localization of Hug1p-GFP to the cytoplasm upon HU treatment. The cytoplasmic localization of Hug1p-GFP is dependent on MEC1 pathway genes and coincides with the cytoplasmic localization of Rnr2p–Rnr4p. Taken together, the genetic interactions, gene expression, and localization studies support a novel role for Hug1p as a negative regulator of the MEC1 checkpoint response through its compartmentalization with Rnr2p–Rnr4p

  8. Compartmental modeling of PAH transport in soil column experiments under variably-saturated flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, F.; Sericano, J. L.; Wade, T. L.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge about the mobilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from PAH-laden soils or sediments is important to understand their bioavailability, and ultimately assess the environmental risk of PAH transport from surface soils into the groundwater. The transport and kinetics of three PAH from a spiked soil layer (2-3 cm soil depth), Phenanthrene-d10 (1900 ng/g), Naphthalene-d8 (1500 ng/g), and Pyrene-d10 (1800 ng/g), were investigated by performing a series of 8 rainfall events during 25 days in two large, replicate soil columns (length: 35 cm; diameter: 14.5 cm; 1 Pore Volume [PV]=2.29 L) under variably-saturated flow conditions. The water-methanol displacing solutions were at volumetric fractions of 0.3 and 0.6 during day 1 (E1) through E8 and E12-E22, respectively. Soil matric potential (h) was monitored at 5-cm and 20-cm depth and volumetric water content (θ) at 12.5-cm and 27.5-cm depth. Soil solution was sampled at 5 cm- (n=46) and 27.5-cm depth (n=46), and the effluent at the bottom of the column (n=163). HYDRUS-1D was used for inverse modeling of h and θ data and to predict θ at specific times and soil depth increments. First-order kinetics, compartmental models describing the transfer of PAH from the soil compartment to the soil solution compartment (desorption) and vice versa (sorption), were used to estimate mass transfer rates (φs, sorption; φd, desorption; φe, elimination), PAH mass in each compartment, and partition coefficients (Kd). Phenanthrene breakthrough curve could be interpreted through a two-parameter, two-compartment model corresponding to the common two-site sorption model, whose parameter estimates (and 95% confidence intervals) were φd=2.72 (2.31, 3.19) PV-1 and φe=4.67 (3.82, 5.7 ) PV-1. Naphthalene breakthrough curve followed a simple one-compartment elimination model, φe=2.0 (1.9, 2.1) PV-1, and that of Pyrene a three-parameter, two-compartment model, φs=0.0454 (0.00853, 0.0603) PV-1, φd=0.165 (0.0319, 0.855) PV

  9. A Compartmental Comparison of Major Lipid Species in a Coral-Symbiodinium Endosymbiosis: Evidence that the Coral Host Regulates Lipogenesis of Its Cytosolic Lipid Bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Kai Chen

    Full Text Available The lipid body (LB formation in the host coral gastrodermal cell cytoplasm is a hallmark of the coral-Symbiodinium endosymbiosis, and such lipid-based entities are not found in endosymbiont-free cnidarian cells. Therefore, the elucidation of lipogenesis regulation in LBs and how it is related to the lipid metabolism of the host and endosymbiont could provide direct insight to understand the symbiosis mechanism. Herein, the lipid composition of host cells of the stony coral Euphyllia glabrescens, as well as that of their cytoplasmic LBs and in hospite Symbiodinium populations, was examined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS, and six major lipid species were identified: wax esters, sterol esters, triacylglycerols, cholesterols, free fatty acids, and phospholipids. Their concentrations differed significantly between host coral cells, LBs, and Symbiodinium, suggesting compartmental regulation. WE were only present in the host coral and were particularly highly concentrated in LBs. Amongst the four species of WE, the monoene R = C18:1/R = C16 was found to be LB-specific and was not present in the host gastrodermal cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, the acyl pool profiles of the individual LB lipid species were more similar, but not equal to, those of the host gastrodermal cells in which they were located, indicating partially autonomous lipid metabolism in these LBs. Nevertheless, given the overall similarity in the host gastrodermal cell and LB lipid profiles, these data suggest that a significant portion of the LB lipids may be of host coral origin. Finally, lipid profiles of the in hospite Symbiodinium populations were significantly distinct from those of the cultured Symbiodinium, potentially suggesting a host regulation effect that may be fundamental to lipid metabolism in endosymbiotic associations involving clade C Symbiodinium.

  10. A Compartmental Comparison of Major Lipid Species in a Coral-Symbiodinium Endosymbiosis: Evidence that the Coral Host Regulates Lipogenesis of Its Cytosolic Lipid Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Kai; Song, Shin-Ni; Wang, Li-Hsueh; Mayfield, Anderson B; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Chen, Wan-Nan U; Chen, Chii-Shiarng

    2015-01-01

    The lipid body (LB) formation in the host coral gastrodermal cell cytoplasm is a hallmark of the coral-Symbiodinium endosymbiosis, and such lipid-based entities are not found in endosymbiont-free cnidarian cells. Therefore, the elucidation of lipogenesis regulation in LBs and how it is related to the lipid metabolism of the host and endosymbiont could provide direct insight to understand the symbiosis mechanism. Herein, the lipid composition of host cells of the stony coral Euphyllia glabrescens, as well as that of their cytoplasmic LBs and in hospite Symbiodinium populations, was examined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and six major lipid species were identified: wax esters, sterol esters, triacylglycerols, cholesterols, free fatty acids, and phospholipids. Their concentrations differed significantly between host coral cells, LBs, and Symbiodinium, suggesting compartmental regulation. WE were only present in the host coral and were particularly highly concentrated in LBs. Amongst the four species of WE, the monoene R = C18:1/R = C16 was found to be LB-specific and was not present in the host gastrodermal cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, the acyl pool profiles of the individual LB lipid species were more similar, but not equal to, those of the host gastrodermal cells in which they were located, indicating partially autonomous lipid metabolism in these LBs. Nevertheless, given the overall similarity in the host gastrodermal cell and LB lipid profiles, these data suggest that a significant portion of the LB lipids may be of host coral origin. Finally, lipid profiles of the in hospite Symbiodinium populations were significantly distinct from those of the cultured Symbiodinium, potentially suggesting a host regulation effect that may be fundamental to lipid metabolism in endosymbiotic associations involving clade C Symbiodinium. PMID:26218797

  11. Kinetic compartmental analysis of carnitine metabolism in the human carnitine deficiency syndromes. Evidence for alterations in tissue carnitine transport.

    OpenAIRE

    Rebouche, C J; Engel, A G

    1984-01-01

    The human primary carnitine deficiency syndromes are potentially fatal disorders affecting children and adults. The molecular etiologies of these syndromes have not been determined. In this investigation, we considered the hypothesis that these syndromes result from defective transport of carnitine into tissues, particularly skeletal muscle. The problem was approached by mathematical modeling, by using the technique of kinetic compartmental analysis. A tracer dose of L-[methyl-3H]carnitine wa...

  12. Linear least squares compartmental-model-independent parameter identification in PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified approach involving linear-regression straight-line parameter fitting of dynamic scan data is developed for both specific and nonspecific models. Where compartmental-model topologies apply, the measured activity may be expressed in terms of: its integrals, plasma activity and plasma integrals -- all in a linear expression with macroparameters as coefficients. Multiple linear regression, as in spreadsheet software, determines parameters for best data fits. Positron emission tomography (PET)-acquired gray-matter images in a dynamic scan are analyzed: both by this method and by traditional iterative nonlinear least squares. Both patient and simulated data were used. Regression and traditional methods are in expected agreement. Monte-Carlo simulations evaluate parameter standard deviations, due to data noise, and much smaller noise-induced biases. Unique straight-line graphical displays permit visualizing data influences on various macroparameters as changes in slopes. Advantages of regression fitting are: simplicity, speed, ease of implementation in spreadsheet software, avoiding risks of convergence failures or false solutions in iterative least squares, and providing various visualizations of the uptake process by straight line graphical displays. Multiparameter model-independent analyses on lesser understood systems is also made possible

  13. Interaction between astrocytes and neurons studied using a mathematical model of compartmentalized energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Agnès; Costalat, Robert

    2005-11-01

    Understanding cerebral energy metabolism in neurons and astrocytes is necessary for the interpretation of functional brain imaging data. It has been suggested that astrocytes can provide lactate as an energy fuel to neurons, a process referred to as astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS). Some authors challenged this hypothesis, defending the classical view that glucose is the major energy substrate of neurons, at rest as well as in response to a stimulation. To test the ANLS hypothesis from a theoretical point of view, we developed a mathematical model of compartmentalized energy metabolism between neurons and astrocytes, adopting hypotheses highly unfavorable to ANLS. Simulation results can be divided between two groups, depending on the relative neuron versus astrocyte stimulation. If this ratio is low, ANLS is observed during all the stimulus and poststimulus periods (continuous ANLS), but a high ratio induces ANLS only at the beginning of the stimulus and during the poststimulus period (triphasic behavior). Finally, our results show that current experimental data on lactate kinetics are compatible with the ANLS hypothesis, and that it is essential to assess the neuronal and astrocytic NADH/NAD+ ratio changes to test the ANLS hypothesis. PMID:15931164

  14. The Arab Spring: A Simple Compartmental Model for the Dynamics of a Revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, John

    2012-01-01

    The self-immolation of Mohamed Bouazizi on December 17, 2011 in the small Tunisian city of Sidi Bouzid, set off a sequence of events culminating in the revolutions of the Arab Spring. It is widely believed that the Internet and social media played a critical role in the growth and success of protests that led to the downfall of the regimes in Egypt and Tunisia. However, the precise mechanisms by which these new media affected the course of events remain unclear. We introduce a simple compartmental model for the dynamics of a revolution in a dictatorial regime such as Tunisia or Egypt which takes into account the role of the Internet and social media. An elementary mathematical analysis of the model identifies four main parameter regions: stable police state, meta-stable police state, unstable police state, and failed state. We illustrate how these regions capture, at least qualitatively, a wide range of scenarios observed in the context of revolutionary movements by considering the revolutions in Tunisia and ...

  15. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca eLizarbe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI, Blood oxygenation level dependent contrast (BOLD and Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI have revealed Mn2+accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks, becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable.

  16. Modeling Heterogeneity in Direct Infectious Disease Transmission in a Compartmental Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingcai; Wang, Jinfeng; Han, Weiguo; Cao, Zhidong

    2016-03-01

    Mathematical models have been used to understand the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases and to assess the impact of intervention strategies. Traditional mathematical models usually assume a homogeneous mixing in the population, which is rarely the case in reality. Here, we construct a new transmission function by using as the probability density function a negative binomial distribution, and we develop a compartmental model using it to model the heterogeneity of contact rates in the population. We explore the transmission dynamics of the developed model using numerical simulations with different parameter settings, which characterize different levels of heterogeneity. The results show that when the reproductive number, R₀, is larger than one, a low level of heterogeneity results in dynamics similar to those predicted by the homogeneous mixing model. As the level of heterogeneity increases, the dynamics become more different. As a test case, we calibrated the model with the case incidence data for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Beijing in 2003, and the estimated parameters demonstrated the effectiveness of the control measures taken during that period. PMID:26927140

  17. Modeling Heterogeneity in Direct Infectious Disease Transmission in a Compartmental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingcai Kong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models have been used to understand the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases and to assess the impact of intervention strategies. Traditional mathematical models usually assume a homogeneous mixing in the population, which is rarely the case in reality. Here, we construct a new transmission function by using as the probability density function a negative binomial distribution, and we develop a compartmental model using it to model the heterogeneity of contact rates in the population. We explore the transmission dynamics of the developed model using numerical simulations with different parameter settings, which characterize different levels of heterogeneity. The results show that when the reproductive number, R0, is larger than one, a low level of heterogeneity results in dynamics similar to those predicted by the homogeneous mixing model. As the level of heterogeneity increases, the dynamics become more different. As a test case, we calibrated the model with the case incidence data for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS in Beijing in 2003, and the estimated parameters demonstrated the effectiveness of the control measures taken during that period.

  18. PGI2 synthesis and excretion in dog kidney: evidence for renal PG compartmentalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the concept of compartmentalization of renal prostaglandins (PG), we compared entry of PGE2 and the PGI2 metabolite 6-keto-PGF1 alpha into the renal vascular and tubular compartments, in sodium pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. Renal arterial 6-keto-PGF1 alpha infusion increased both renal venous and urinary 6-keto-PGF1 alpha outflow. In contrast, renal arterial infusion of arachidonic acid (AA) or bradykinin (BK) increased renal venous 6-keto-PGF1 alpha outflow but had no effect on its urinary outflow. Both urinary and renal venous PGE2 outflows increased during AA or BK infusion. Ureteral stopped-flow studies revealed no postglomerular 6-keto-PGF1 alpha entry into tubular fluid. During renal arterial infusion of [3H]PGI2 and inulin, first-pass 3H clearance was 40% of inulin clearance; 35% of urinary 3H was 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, and two other urinary metabolites were found. During renal arterial infusion of [3H]6-keto-PGF1 alpha and inulin, first-pass 3H clearance was 150% of inulin clearance; 75% of urinary 3H was 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, and only one other metabolite was found. We conclude that in the dog PGE2 synthesized in the kidney enters directly into both the renal vascular and tubular compartments, but 6-keto-PGF1 alpha of renal origin enters directly into only the renal vascular compartment

  19. Technology Solutions Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. This research study by Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings demonstrated the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB demonstrated this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  20. The Use of Metaphors in Poetry and Organization Theory: Toward De-Compartmentalization of Organizational Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Yazdani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the time of Western modernity, knowledge is compartmentalized into differentiated fields. This has however not mitigated the influence of natural science model of theorizing on social sciences. As a result, the discipline of organization theory has grown without the influence of abstract, ephemeral and metaphysical fields such as religion, history, mystic philosophy, arts and literature. With the rise of organizational cultural studies and the emergence of symbolic-interpretive view of organizing during the last three or four decades, the trend is however gradually shifting. Corporate aesthetics is a field within organization theory which places value on the aesthetical aspects of managing and organizing. Taking the lead from corporate aesthetics, this paper highlights the link between Organization theory and literature (poetry, both English and Urdu. The linguistic and conceptual instrument of metaphors is isolated as the underpinning tool of this link. The role of metaphors in organization theory seems to have further importance because of the emergence of „social construction‟ and „sense making‟ views of organizations. The paper reinforces the views of contemporary writers of organization theory that the field draws from multiple and diverse disciplines by highlighting the link between organization theory and poetry through employing metaphoricity.

  1. Reservoir compartmentalization and management strategies: Lessons learned in the Illinois basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grube, J.P.; Crockett, J.E.; Huff, B.G. [and others

    1997-08-01

    A research project jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Illinois State Geological Survey focused on the Cypress and Aux Vases Formations (Mississippian), major clastic reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from the research showed that understanding the nature and distribution of reservoir compartments, and using effective reservoir management strategies, can significantly improve recovery efficiencies from oil fields in this mature basin. Compartments can be most effectively drained where they are geologically well defined and reservoir management practices are coordinated through unified, compartment-wide, development programs. Our studies showed that the Cypress and Aux Vases reservoirs contain lateral and vertical permeability barriers forming compartments that range in size from isolated, interlaminated sandstone and shale beds to sandstone bodies tens of feet in thickness and more than a mile in length. Stacked or shingled, genetically similar sandstone bodies are commonly separated by thin impermeable intervals that can be difficult to distinguish on logs and can, therefore, cause correlation problems, even between wells drilled on spacing of less than ten acres. Lateral separation of sandstone bodies causes similar problems. Reservoir compartmentalization reduces primary and particularly secondary recovery by trapping pockets of by-passed or banked oil. Compartments can be detected by comparing recovery factors of genetically similar sandstone bodies within a field; using packers to separate commingled intervals and analyzing fluid recoveries and pressures; making detailed core-to-log calibrations that identify compartment boundaries; and analyzing pressure data from waterflood programs.

  2. Compartmental analysis and dosimetric aspects applied to cholesterol with 3H labeled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are one of the major reasons of death around the world according to the World Health Organization (WHO). It is well known that changes in levels of plasma lipoproteins, which are responsible for the transport of cholesterol into the bloodstream, are associated with cardiovascular diseases. For this reason to know the biokinetic parameters of plasma lipoproteins and quantifies them is important to correct and deep understanding about the diseases associated with these disorders. The main aim of this study is to provide a biokinetic model and estimate the radiometric doses for 3H-Cholesterol, a radioactive tracer widely used in physiological and metabolic studies. The model was based on [Schwartz et al. 2004] about the distribution of cholesterol by the lipoprotein and gastrointestinal model [ICRP 30, 1979]. The doses distribution in compartments of the model and other organs and tissues of a standard adult described in [ICRP 106, 2008] was calculated using MIRD method (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) and compartmental analysis using the computer program Matlab®. The dose coefficients were estimated for a standard phantom man (73 kg) described in [ICRP 60, 1991]. The estimated doses for both model and for other organs were low and did not exceed the highest dose obtained that was in the upper large intestine, as 44,8 μGy these parameters will assist in ethics committee's opinions on the use of works that use the 3H-cholesterol which radioactive tracer. (author)

  3. Compartmental analysis of 99mTc-MDP metabolism (initial results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. Metabolic models describe organisms as compartments. An organ or tissue may be constituted of one or more compartments, from where a tracer (T) is eliminated or transferred to other organs. A compartmental model must follow the metabolic of T and still be simple enough to allow easy interpretation of results. 99 m T C-M D P is largely used in nuclear medicine routine for bone scintigraphy (B S). The objective of this work is to evaluate the biokinetic model of 99 m Tc-M D P (which is eliminated by the urinary tract) in patients (pts) of both sexes submitted to routine B S. Urine samples of 10 pts were collected at different times of incorporation for 'in vitro' measurements, which were performed by means of a collimated Nal-Tl crystal counter, calibrated with a standard solution. Pts suffering from systemic bone disease were not included in this study. The results obtained are presented as specific activity/time curves 39-75 pts 16-18 years and a 16 month old child. All curves are characterized by two terms: a faster one and a slower one.A very fast initial term, which is present in the first half hour cannot be easily seen in the curves because data were not appropriately collected. such measurements will be done 'in vivo'. The shape of all curves indicate that it is possible to establish normality patterns for 99mTc-MDP metabolism

  4. Effects of hypoxia on 13NH4+ fluxes in rice roots: kinetics and compartmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques of compartmental (efflux) and kinetic influx analyses with the radiotracer 13NH4+ were used to examine the adaptation to hypoxia (15, 35, and 50% O2 saturation) of root N uptake and metabolism in 3-week-old hydroponically grown rice (Oryza sativa L., cv IR72) seedlings. A time-dependence study of NH4+ influx into rice roots after onset of hypoxia (15% O2) revealed an initial increase in the first 1 to 2.5 h after treatment imposition, followed by a decline to less than 50% of influx in control plants by 4 d. Efflux analyses conducted 0, 1, 3, and 5 d after the treatment confirmed this adaptation pattern of NH4+ uptake. Half-lives for NH4+ exchange with subcellular compartments, cytoplasmic NH4+ concentrations, and efflux (as percentage of influx) were unaffected by hypoxia. However, significant differences were observed in the relative amounts of N allocated to NH4+ assimilation and the vacuole versus translocation to the shoot. Kinetic experiments conducted at 100, 50, 35, and 15% O2 saturation showed no significant change in the K(m) value for NH4+ uptake with varying O2 supply. However, V(max) was 42% higher than controls at 50% O2 saturation, unchanged at 35%, and 10% lower than controls at 15% O2. The significance of these flux adaptations is discussed

  5. A Tale of Genome Compartmentalization: The Evolution of Virulence Clusters in Smut Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutheil, Julien Y; Mannhaupt, Gertrud; Schweizer, Gabriel; M K Sieber, Christian; Münsterkötter, Martin; Güldener, Ulrich; Schirawski, Jan; Kahmann, Regine

    2016-03-01

    Smut fungi are plant pathogens mostly parasitizing wild species of grasses as well as domesticated cereal crops. Genome analysis of several smut fungi including Ustilago maydis revealed a singular clustered organization of genes encoding secreted effectors. In U. maydis, many of these clusters have a role in virulence. Reconstructing the evolutionary history of clusters of effector genes is difficult because of their intrinsically fast evolution, which erodes the phylogenetic signal and homology relationships. Here, we describe the use of comparative evolutionary analyses of quality draft assemblies of genomes to study the mechanisms of this evolution. We report the genome sequence of a South African isolate of Sporisorium scitamineum, a smut fungus parasitizing sugar cane with a phylogenetic position intermediate to the two previously sequenced species U. maydis and Sporisorium reilianum. We show that the genome of S. scitamineum contains more and larger gene clusters encoding secreted effectors than any previously described species in this group. We trace back the origin of the clusters and find that their evolution is mainly driven by tandem gene duplication. In addition, transposable elements play a major role in the evolution of the clustered genes. Transposable elements are significantly associated with clusters of genes encoding fast evolving secreted effectors. This suggests that such clusters represent a case of genome compartmentalization that restrains the activity of transposable elements on genes under diversifying selection for which this activity is potentially beneficial, while protecting the rest of the genome from its deleterious effect. PMID:26872771

  6. Integrated compartmental model for describing the transport of solute in a fractured porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents a model, FRACPORT, that simulates the transport of a solute through a fractured porous matrix. The model should be useful in analyzing the possible transport of radionuclides from shallow-land burial sites in humid environments. The use of the model is restricted to transport through saturated zones. The report first discusses the general modeling approach used, which is based on the Integrated Compartmental Method. The basic equations of solute transport are then presented. The model, which assumes a known water velocity field, solves these equations on two different time scales; one related to rapid transport of solute along fractures and the other related to slower transport through the porous matrix. FRACPORT is validated by application to a simple example of fractured porous medium transport that has previously been analyzed by other methods. Then its utility is demonstrated in analyzing more complex cases of pulses of solute into a fractured matrix. The report serves as a user's guide to FRACPORT. A detailed description of data input, along with a listing of input for a sample problem, is provided. 16 references, 18 figures, 3 tables

  7. A compartmental model to describe hydraulics in a full-scale waste stabilization pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Andres; Vedantam, Sreepriya; Goethals, Peter; Nopens, Ingmar

    2012-02-01

    The advancement of experimental and computational resources has facilitated the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models as a predictive tool for mixing behaviour in full-scale waste stabilization pond systems. However, in view of combining hydraulic behaviour with a biokinetic process model, the computational load is still too high for practical use. This contribution presents a method that uses a validated CFD model with tracer experiments as a platform for the development of a simpler compartmental model (CM) to describe the hydraulics in a full-scale maturation pond (7 ha) of a waste stabilization ponds complex in Cuenca (Ecuador). 3D CFD models were validated with experimental data from pulse tracer experiments, showing a sufficient agreement. Based on the CFD model results, a number of compartments were selected considering the turbulence characteristics of the flow, the residence time distribution (RTD) curves and the dominant velocity component at different pond locations. The arrangement of compartments based on the introduction of recirculation flow rate between adjacent compartments, which in turn is dependent on the turbulence diffusion coefficient, is illustrated. Simulated RTD's from a systemic tanks-in-series (TIS) model and the developed CM were compared. The TIS was unable to capture the measured RTD, whereas the CM predicted convincingly the peaks and lags of the tracer experiment using only a minimal fraction of the computational demand of the CFD model. Finally, a biokinetic model was coupled to both approaches demonstrating the impact an insufficient hydraulic model can have on the outcome of a modelling exercise. TIS and CM showed drastic differences in the output loads implying that the CM approach is to be used when modelling the biological performance of the full-scale system. PMID:22137448

  8. Subsurface fluid data from Longyearbyen CO2 storage site: Basin history and compartmentalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, Farhana; Mueller, Kristin; Tore Mørkved, Pål; Johansen, Ingar; Johansen, Harald

    2015-04-01

    The Longyearbyen CO2 storage site, located on the main island of Svalbard at the northwestern margin of the Barents Sea Shelf, is a demonstration project for a "green showcase", which aims to make a full value chain of power generation, CO2 capture and storage by achieving a net zero carbon footprint. The key objective of this study was to assess the local geological conditions for CO2 storage by defining a seal sequence stratigraphy above and within the reservoir from gas and fluid geochemical data. Seven wells were drilled at two sites to collect core material and gas samples at various defined depths. Gas composition (C1-5, CO2) and stable isotope (δ13C) analyses were performed on gas samples obtained from both core material and well heads. In addition, Sr isotope data from residual salts extracted from core material were used to look at compartmentalization. The combined analysis of trends in isotope and gas composition data as a function of depth revealed three major breaks and permitted the identification of three major fluid compartments. These compartments are suggested to be associated with impervious caprock and reservoir barriers. The first break in the data trends occurs at approximately 250-300 m depth, which is interpreted as the depth limit of the meteoric water system. A second hydrologic barrier, most likely produced by reservoir uplift was identified. Finally, a very distinct change in trend around 800 m depth may be associated with an observed significant change in reservoir pressure. Three clear breaks in the geochemical data as a function of depth all point towards an efficient seal sequence and demonstrate the potential for CO2 storage at the Longyearbyen site.

  9. Convex-Optimization-Based Compartmental Pharmacokinetic Analysis for Prostate Tumor Characterization Using DCE-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambikapathi, ArulMurugan; Chan, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Hsiang; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chi, Chong-Yung; Wang, Yue

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a powerful imaging modality to study the pharmacokinetics in a suspected cancer/tumor tissue. The pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of prostate cancer includes the estimation of time activity curves (TACs), and thereby, the corresponding kinetic parameters (KPs), and plays a pivotal role in diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. In this paper, we endeavor to develop a blind source separation algorithm, namely convex-optimization-based KPs estimation (COKE) algorithm for PK analysis based on compartmental modeling of DCE-MRI data, for effective prostate tumor detection and its quantification. The COKE algorithm first identifies the best three representative pixels in the DCE-MRI data, corresponding to the plasma, fast-flow, and slow-flow TACs, respectively. The estimation accuracy of the flux rate constants (FRCs) of the fast-flow and slow-flow TACs directly affects the estimation accuracy of the KPs that provide the cancer and normal tissue distribution maps in the prostate region. The COKE algorithm wisely exploits the matrix structure (Toeplitz, lower triangular, and exponential decay) of the original nonconvex FRCs estimation problem, and reformulates it into two convex optimization problems that can reliably estimate the FRCs. After estimation of the FRCs, the KPs can be effectively estimated by solving a pixel-wise constrained curve-fitting (convex) problem. Simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed COKE algorithm. The COKE algorithm is also evaluated with DCE-MRI data of four different patients with prostate cancer and the obtained results are consistent with clinical observations. PMID:26292336

  10. Comparison of total and compartmental gastric emptying and antral motility between healthy men and women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennink, R.; Van den Maegdenbergh, V.; Roo, M. de; Mortelmans, L. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, UZ KU Leuven (Belgium); Peeters, M.; Geypens, B.; Rutgeerts, P. [Department of Gastroenterology, UZ KU Leuven (Belgium)

    1998-09-01

    There is increasing evidence of gender-related differences in gastric emptying. The purpose of this study was first, to confirm the difference in gastric emptying for both solid and liquid test meals between healthy men and women, and secondly, to investigate the origin of this difference by studying regional gastric emptying and antral motility. A standard gastric emptying test with additional compartmental (proximal and distal) evaluation and dynamic imaging of the antrum was performed in 20 healthy women studied during the first 10 days of the menstrual cycle, and in 31 healthy age-matched men. In concordance with previous reports, women had a longer half-emptying time for solids as compared to men (86.2{+-}5.1 vs 52.2{+-}2.9 min, P<0.05). In our observations this seemed to be related to a significantly prolonged lag phase and a significant decrease in terminal slope. Dynamical antral scintigraphy did not show a significant difference. The distribution of the test meal within the stomach (proximal vs distal) showed more early proximal retention in women as compared to men. The terminal slope of the distal somach was significantly lower in women. We did not observe a significant difference in gastric emptying of the liquid test meal between men and women. Gastric emptying of solids is significantly slower in healthy women as compared to men. These findings emphasise the importance of using different normal values for clinical and research purposes in gastric emptying scintigraphy in men and women. The difference could not be explained by antral motility alone. Increased proximal retention and a lower terminal emptying rate in women are observations to be further investigated. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 36 refs.

  11. Biodistribution and biological characteristics of p-[(bis-carboxymethyl) aminomethyl carboxyamino] hippuric acid (Pahida) labelled with technetium-99m. Establishment of pharmacokinetics parameters through compartmental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biologic distribution of p- [(bis-carboxymethylaminomethyl carboxyamino)] hippuric acid (PAHIDA) labeled with sup(99m)Tc in Wistar rats, showed a selective renal uptake among the other organs and tissues. The compound is predominantly eliminated by urinary tract, with small enterohepatic percent of excretion Chromatographic analysis of urine showed the product and possible metabolites. PAHIDA- sup(99m)Tc blood clearance is relatively rapid and a good percent is transported by plasmatic proteins. The percent binding to the erythrocytes is significant after one hour, this is due probably to hydrolysed technetium. The extrapolation of the plasmatic curve denoted the existence of three exponentials, suggesting a model with three compartments: central or intravascular and two peripherics or extravasculars - rapid and slow exchange (retention). Exponential's half life and the transfer constant (k) among the compartments were determined. The compound retention was reaffirmed by whole body determination. The decomposition of the curve in two exponentials allowed to assess the component's half-life. The compartmental model proposed in agreement with the experimental results, showed the complex retention that may be related the binding with the blood components, the possibility of renal metabolization or a structural impediment in the interaction with the tubular cells receptors. (author)

  12. Multilevel selection in models of prebiotic evolution II: a direct comparison of compartmentalization and spatial self-organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuto Takeuchi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Multilevel selection has been indicated as an essential factor for the evolution of complexity in interacting RNA-like replicator systems. There are two types of multilevel selection mechanisms: implicit and explicit. For implicit multilevel selection, spatial self-organization of replicator populations has been suggested, which leads to higher level selection among emergent mesoscopic spatial patterns (traveling waves. For explicit multilevel selection, compartmentalization of replicators by vesicles has been suggested, which leads to higher level evolutionary dynamics among explicitly imposed mesoscopic entities (protocells. Historically, these mechanisms have been given separate consideration for the interests on its own. Here, we make a direct comparison between spatial self-organization and compartmentalization in simulated RNA-like replicator systems. Firstly, we show that both mechanisms achieve the macroscopic stability of a replicator system through the evolutionary dynamics on mesoscopic entities that counteract that of microscopic entities. Secondly, we show that a striking difference exists between the two mechanisms regarding their possible influence on the long-term evolutionary dynamics, which happens under an emergent trade-off situation arising from the multilevel selection. The difference is explained in terms of the difference in the stability between self-organized mesoscopic entities and externally imposed mesoscopic entities. Thirdly, we show that a sharp transition happens in the long-term evolutionary dynamics of the compartmentalized system as a function of replicator mutation rate. Fourthly, the results imply that spatial self-organization can allow the evolution of stable folding in parasitic replicators without any specific functionality in the folding itself. Finally, the results are discussed in relation to the experimental synthesis of chemical Darwinian systems and to the multilevel selection theory of

  13. The Architectural Organization of Human Stem Cell Cycle Regulatory Machinery

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Gary S.; Stein, Janet L.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Lian, Jane B.; Montecino, Martin; Medina, Ricardo(Instituto de Matemática e Computação, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Itajubá, Minas Gerais, Brazil); Kapinas, Kristie; Ghule, Prachi; Grandy, Rodrigo; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Becker, Klaus A.

    2012-01-01

    Two striking features of human embryonic stem cells that support biological activity are an abbreviated cell cycle and reduced complexity to nuclear organization. The potential implications for rapid proliferation of human embryonic stem cells within the context of sustaining pluripotency, suppressing phenotypic gene expression and linkage to simplicity in the architectural compartmentalization of regulatory machinery in nuclear microenvironments is explored. Characterization of the molecular...

  14. A simplified computer method incorporating compartmental analysis with recycling for biokinetic studies of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In past few years ICRP has made major revisions in its recommendations regarding protection from ionizing radiations. It has developed a series of biokinetic and dosimetric models for calculating radiation doses from intake of radionuclides in the body. It has also developed a new Human Respiratory Tract (HRT) model for this purpose. The new models have been developed to enable dose estimates for radiation workers as well as the general public including the children of all age groups. The new HRT model has been incorporated for dose estimations only in a few standard codes like LUDEP and GENMOD where as the new biokinetic models have not been employed in any of the available codes, except the InDose. ICRP has presented retention and excretion data for some selected radionuclides using these new models in its Publication 78, and dose coefficients for most radionuclides for 1 and 5 μm AMAD size in ICRP Publications 72 and 68 respectively. These data have been provided to ICRP by some leading laboratories and the codes used for these data are generally not available to other laboratories. In this paper we describe a simplified computer method which incorporates compartmental analysis with recycling and can be used for biokinetic studies of various radionuclides for any plant specific/non standard input parameters, data for which can not be obtained from any of the ICRP publications. The method incorporates the compartmentalised form of the new HRT model, GI tract model and the new biokinetic model of 125Sb. It can calculate the amount of radioactivity at any future time t after the inhalation intake and the total number of disintegration (Us) over any time interval of interest in any organ. By operating SEE matrix it can calculate the equivalent dose and the effective dose along with the amount in excretion compartments for any given aerosol size. The method can be used for any radionuclide by incorporating its biokinetic model in compartmentalised form along with

  15. Structural localization and origin of compartmentalized fluid flow, Comstock lode, Virginia City, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, B.R.; Tingley, J.V.; Drew, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    Bonanza-grade orebodies in epithermal-style mineral deposits characteristically occur as discrete zones within spatially more extensive fault and/or fracture systems. Empirically, the segregation of such systems into compartments of higher and lower permeability appears to be a key process necessary for high-grade ore formation and, most commonly, it is such concentrations of metals that make an epithermal vein district world class. In the world-class silver- and gold-producing Comstock mining district, Nevada, several lines of evidence lead to the conclusion that the Comstock lode is localized in an extensional stepover between right-lateral fault zones. This evidence includes fault geometries, kinematic indicators of slip, the hydraulic connectivity of faults as demonstrated by veins and dikes along faults, and the opening of a normal-fault-bounded, asymmetric basin between two parallel and overlapping northwest-striking, lateral- to lateral-oblique-slip fault zones. During basin opening, thick, generally subeconomic, banded quartz-adularia veins were deposited in the normal fault zone, the Comstock fault, and along one of the bounding lateral fault zones, the Silver City fault. As deformation continued, the intrusion of dikes and small plugs into the hanging wall of the Comstock fault zone may have impeded the ability of the stepover to accommodate displacement on the bounding strike-slip faults through extension within the stepover. A transient period of transpressional deformation of the Comstock fault zone ensued, and the early-stage veins were deformed through boudinaging and hydraulic fragmentation, fault-motion inversion, and high- and low-angle axial rotations of segments of the fault planes and some fault-bounded wedges. This deformation led to the formation of spatially restricted compartments of high vertical permeability and hydraulic connectivity and low lateral hydraulic connectivity. Bonanza orebodies were formed in the compartmentalized zones of

  16. Physiographic compartmentation by the method of integrated analysis: a case study in Casa Branca, São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carrascosa do Amaral

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There are several procedures of spatialization and individualization of physical environmental units, such as the techniques of remote sensing and geoprocessing. The physiographic compartmentation can be performed by systematic photointerpretation processes of satellite images, trough the analysis of the drainage network’s properties, from the homogeneity and similarities of landscape units. The advantage of applying this technique in environmental planning is the generation of a single cartographic product sectioned into several landscape units, which summarize characteristics of relief, geology and land use. This study aimed at making the physiographic compartmentation in Casa Branca, São Paulo state, based on the integration of data from analysis of satellite images, mapping products, and geological and geomorphological data. The city suffers problems related to lack of urban planning and the development of erosive processes. Analyzing the results, it was concluded that the methodology adopted for the research was very efficient. Therefore, it is expected that this research may support the decisions of urban planning in the city and that the described procedures can be the basis for the development of geo-environmental zoning in other municipalities.

  17. Compartmentalization of the precheliceral neuroectoderm in the spider Cupiennius salei: development of the arcuate body, optic ganglia, and mushroom body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeffinger, Carola; Hartenstein, Volker; Stollewerk, Angelika

    2010-07-01

    Similarly to vertebrates, arthropod brains are compartmentalized into centers with specific neurological functions such as cognition, behavior, and memory. The centers can be further subdivided into smaller functional units. This raises the question of how these compartments are formed during development and how they are integrated into brain centers. We show here for the first time how the precheliceral neuroectoderm of the spider Cupiennius salei is compartmentalized to form the distinct brain centers of the visual system: the optic ganglia, the mushroom bodies, and the arcuate body. The areas of the visual brain centers are defined by the formation of grooves and vesicles and express the proneural gene CsASH1, followed by expression of the neural differentiation marker Prospero. Furthermore, the transcription factor dachshund, which is strongly enriched in the mushroom bodies and the outer optic ganglion of Drosophila, is expressed in the optic anlagen and the mushroom bodies of the spider. The developing brain centers are further subdivided into single neural precursor groups, which become incorporated into the grooves and vesicles but remain distinguishable throughout development, suggesting that they encode spatial information for neural subtype identity. Several molecular and morphological aspects of the development of the optic ganglia and the mushroom bodies are similar in the spider and in insects. Furthermore, we show that the primary engrailed head spot contributes neurons to the optic ganglia of the median eyes, whereas the secondary head spot, which has been associated with the optic ganglia in insects and crustaceans, is absent. PMID:20503430

  18. Use of transfer function and compartmental analysis to quantify 11C-labelled photoassimilate export from wheat leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compartmental analysis of tracer loss from a leaf after pulse-labelling with carbon isotopes has often been used to infer the flow of photosynthate through the leaf. Recently, a more general approach has been suggested based upon estimation of the transfer function using data from pulse-labelling as well as continuous labelling experiments. A comparison of these two approaches shows that with the same data set they give equivalent physiological interpretations. The measured decline of 11C activity from a wheat leaf after 11CO2 pulse-labelling was extrapolated by compartmental as well as transfer function analysis. Both methods estimated a 66.4% loss of the initially fixed 11C due to export and respiration. The advantage of transfer function analysis, however, is its applicability to continuous-labelling experiments. The model allows the use of the net photosynthetic rate as the reference (100%) value. Data from continuous-labelling experiments with wheat plants indicate diurnal variations in the export of freshly labelled assimilate of between 32.7% and 43.6% of net photosynthesis. (author)

  19. An empirically adjusted approach to reproductive number estimation for stochastic compartmental models: A case study of two Ebola outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Grant D; Oleson, Jacob J; Porter, Aaron T

    2016-06-01

    The various thresholding quantities grouped under the "Basic Reproductive Number" umbrella are often confused, but represent distinct approaches to estimating epidemic spread potential, and address different modeling needs. Here, we contrast several common reproduction measures applied to stochastic compartmental models, and introduce a new quantity dubbed the "empirically adjusted reproductive number" with several advantages. These include: more complete use of the underlying compartmental dynamics than common alternatives, use as a potential diagnostic tool to detect the presence and causes of intensity process underfitting, and the ability to provide timely feedback on disease spread. Conceptual connections between traditional reproduction measures and our approach are explored, and the behavior of our method is examined under simulation. Two illustrative examples are developed: First, the single location applications of our method are established using data from the 1995 Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and a traditional stochastic SEIR model. Second, a spatial formulation of this technique is explored in the context of the ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa with particular emphasis on potential use in model selection, diagnosis, and the resulting applications to estimation and prediction. Both analyses are placed in the context of a newly developed spatial analogue of the traditional SEIR modeling approach. PMID:26574727

  20. Inter-compartmental transport of organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides in South China: Implications for a regional risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic flux of an organophosphate and four pyrethroid pesticides was determined in an air-(soil)-water-sediment system based on monitoring data from Guangzhou, China. The total air–water flux, including air–water gaseous exchange and atmospheric deposition, showed deposition from air to water for chlorpyrifos, bifenthrin and cypermethrin, but volatilization for lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin. The transport of the pesticides from overlying water to sediment suggested that sediment acted as a sink for the pesticides. Additionally, distinct annual atmospheric depositional fluxes between legacy and current-use pesticides suggested the role of consumer usage in their transport throughout the system. Finally, pesticide toxicity was estimated from annual air–water-sediment flux within an urban stream in Guangzhou. A dynamic flux-based risk assessment indicated that inter-compartmental transport of chlorpyrifos decreased its atmospheric exposure, but had little influence on its aquatic toxicity. Instead, water-to-sediment transport of pyrethroids increased their sediment toxicity, which was supported by previously reported toxicity data. - Highlights: • Transport fluxes of chlorpyrifos and pyrethroids were assessed in Guangzhou, China. • Sediment acted as a sink for chlorpyrifos and pyrethroids. • Air-to-water transport decreased the exposure risk of atmospheric chlorpyrifos. • Dynamic transport might increase the risk of pyrethroids in air and sediment. • Flux-based pesticide concentrations provide a way to estimate sediment toxicity. - Regional risk assessment could be improved by integrating dynamic flux information derived from inter-compartmental models

  1. Multi-hollow polymer microspheres with enclosed surfaces and compartmentalized voids prepared by seeded swelling polymerization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qiong; Yu, Demei; Zhu, Kaiming; Hu, Guohe; Zhang, Lifeng; Liu, Yuhang

    2016-07-01

    Multi-hollow particles have drawn extensive research interest due to their high specific areas and abundant inner voids, whereas their convenient synthesis still remains challenging. In this paper, we report a simple and convenient method based on seeded swelling polymerization to prepare the multi-hollow microspheres with enclosed surfaces and compartmentalized voids using monodisperse poly (styrene-co-sodium 4-vinylbenzenesulfonate) microspheres as seed particles. A formation mechanism of the multi-hollow structure was proposed involving the processes of water absorption, coalescence and stabilization of water domains, immobilization of multi-hollow structure, and coverage of surface dimples. The influencing parameters on the morphology of the microspheres, including weight ratio of sodium 4-vinylbenzenesulfonate to styrene in the seed particles, dosage of the swelling monomer and the crosslinking agent were systematically investigated. The internal structure of the resultant microspheres could be tuned from solid to multi-hollow by controlling over these parameters. Multi-hollow microspheres with compartmentalized chambers, smooth surfaces and narrow size distributions were obtained as a result. PMID:27046772

  2. Computer Modeling of Sand Transport on Mars Using a Compart-Mentalized Fluids Algorithm (CFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Stratton, D.

    1999-01-01

    of sand comminution on Mars. A multiple-grain transport model using just the equations of grain motion describing lift and drag is impossible to develop owing to stochastic effects --the very effects we wish to model. Also, unless we were to employ supercomputing techniques and extremely complex computer codes that could deal with millions of grains simultaneously, it would also be difficult to model grain transport if we attempted to consider every grain in motion. No existing computer models were found that satisfactorily used the equations of motion to arrive at transport flux numbers for the different populations of saltation and reptation. Modeling all the grains in a transport system was an intractable problem within our resources, and thus we developed what we believe to be a new modeling approach to simulating grain transport. The CFA deals with grain populations, but considers them to belong to various compartmentalized fluid units in the boundary layer. In this way, the model circumvents the multigrain problem by dealing primarily with the consequences of grain transport --momentum transfer between air and grains, which is the physical essence of a dynamic grain-fluid mixture. We thus chose to model the aeolian transport process as a superposition of fluids. These fluids include the air as well as particle populations of various properties. The prime property distinguishing these fluids is upward and downward grain motion. In a normal saltation trajectory, a grain's downwind velocity increases with time, so a rising grain will have a smaller downwind velocity than a failing grain. Because of this disparity in rising and falling grain proper-ties, it seemed appropriate to track these as two separate grain populations within the same physical space. The air itself can be considered a separate fluid superimposed within and interacting with the various grain-cloud "fluids". Additional informaiton is contained in the original.

  3. Cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides play a combined role in the death of Lachanchea thermotolerans during mixed-culture alcoholic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Branco, Patrícia; Almeida, Maria Gabriela; Caldeira, Jorge; Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-07-01

    The roles of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides in the early death of Lachanchea thermotolerans CBS2803 during anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae S101 were investigated using a commercially available, double-compartment fermentation system separated by cellulose membranes with different pore sizes, i.e. 1000 kDa for mixed- and single-culture fermentations, and 1000 and 3.5-5 kDa for compartmentalized-culture fermentations. SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography were used to determine an antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the fermentations. Our results showed comparable amounts of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartments of the mixed-culture and 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentations containing L. thermotolerans after 4 days of fermentation, but a lower death rate of L. thermotolerans in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation than in the mixed-culture fermentation. Furthermore, L. thermotolerans died off even more slowly in the 3.5-5 kDa than in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation, which coincided with the presence of less of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartment of that fermentation than of the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation. Taken together, these results indicate that the death of L. thermotolerans in mixed cultures with S. cerevisiae is caused by a combination of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides. PMID:26109361

  4. Complex-shaped three-dimensional multi-compartmental microparticles generated by diffusional and Marangoni microflows in centrifugally discharged droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Masayuki; Onoe, Hiroaki; Nagai, Ken H.; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    We report a versatile method for the generation of complex-shaped three-dimensional multi-compartmental (3D-MC) microparticles. Complex-shaped microparticles have recently received much attention for potential application in self-assemblies, micromachines, and biomedical and environmental engineering. Here, we have developed a method based on 3D nonequilibrium-induced microflows (Marangoni and diffusional flows) of microdroplets that are discharged from the tip of a thin capillary in a simple centrifugal microfluidic device. The microparticle shapes can be tuned by the partial dissolution of specific compartments and by the deformation of the precursor microdroplets by manipulating the 3D microflows. We believe that this method will have wide applications in nano- and microscience and technologies.

  5. Effect of compartmentalization of donor and acceptor on the ultrafast resonance energy transfer from DAPI to silver nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Roopali; Chatterjee, Surajit; Kannaujiya, Krishna K.; Mukherjee, Tushar Kanti

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism and dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) from photo-excited 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) and its subsequent modulation in the presence of cationic polymer poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) and Calf Thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been demonstrated using steady-state fluorescence and femtosecond fluorescence upconversion techniques. The synthesized Ag NCs were characterized using FTIR, mass spectrometry, XPS, HRTEM, DLS, UV-Vis and PL spectroscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis reveals the formation of ultrasmall Ag4 NCs with a small amount of Ag5 NCs. UV-Vis and PL spectra reveal distinct molecular-like optoelectronic behaviour of these ultrasmall Ag NCs. The dihydrolipoic acid-capped Ag NCs strongly quench the fluorescence of DAPI with concomitant increase in its photoluminescence (PL) intensity at 675 nm. This steady-state fluorescence quenching proceeds with a significant shortening of the fluorescence lifetime of DAPI in the presence of Ag NCs, signifying the nonradiative Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from DAPI to Ag NCs. Various energy transfer parameters have been estimated from FRET theory. The present FRET pair shows a characteristic Förster distance of 2.45 nm and can be utilized as a reporter of short-range distances in various FRET based applications. Moreover, this nonradiative FRET is completely suppressed in the presence of both 0.2 wt% PDADMAC and CT-DNA. Our results reveal selective compartmentalization of Ag NCs and DAPI in the presence of 0.2 wt% PDADMAC and CT-DNA, respectively. This selective compartmentalization of donor and acceptor and the subsequent modification of the FRET process may find application in various sensing, photovoltaic, and light harvesting applications.The mechanism and dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) from photo-excited 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) and its subsequent modulation in the presence

  6. Analytical methods of biokinetics models with a large compartmental neutral systems. Applications of ICRP 66 and 78 models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New computer programs that include symbolic capability, like Mathematics, can be used to solve analytically large compartmental systems. In this paper some techniques are developed in order to make feasible a computer program that gives not only faster and more accurate solutions, but also analytic solutions for this kind of models. the main idea is to make a partition of subsystem and solve them sequentially. The concept of pseudo-trap compartments in a subsystem is crucial at this point. Impulse (acute), constant, and continuous (such as exponential) intakes are considered. This technique has been applied to develop a computer code (Hum orap) in Mathematic a for solving the ICRP 66 and 78 models. (Author) 11 refs

  7. Molecular analysis reveals high compartmentalization in aphid-primary parasitoid networks and low parasitoid sharing between crop and noncrop habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derocles, Stephane A P; Le Ralec, Anne; Besson, Mathilde M; Maret, Marion; Walton, Alan; Evans, Darren M; Plantegenest, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    The ecosystem service of insect pest regulation by natural enemies, such as primary parasitoids, may be enhanced by the presence of uncultivated, semi-natural habitats within agro-ecosystems, although quantifying such host-parasitoid interactions is difficult. Here, we use rRNA 16S gene sequencing to assess both the level of parasitism by Aphidiinae primary parasitoids and parasitoid identity on a large sample of aphids collected in cultivated and uncultivated agricultural habitats in Western France. We used these data to construct ecological networks to assess the level of compartmentalization between aphid and parasitoid food webs of cultivated and uncultivated habitats. We evaluated the extent to which uncultivated margins provided a resource for parasitoids shared between pest and nonpest aphids. We compared the observed quantitative ecological network described by our molecular approach to an empirical qualitative network based on aphid-parasitoid interactions from traditional rearing data found in the literature. We found that the molecular network was highly compartmentalized and that parasitoid sharing is relatively rare between aphids, especially between crop and noncrop compartments. Moreover, the few cases of putative shared generalist parasitoids were questionable and could be due to the lack of discrimination of cryptic species or from intraspecific host specialization. Our results suggest that apparent competition mediated by Aphidiinae parasitoids is probably rare in agricultural areas and that the contribution of field margins as a source of these biocontrol agents is much more limited than expected. Further large-scale (spatial and temporal) studies on other crops and noncrop habitats are needed to confirm this. PMID:24612360

  8. Kinetic compartmental analysis of carnitine metabolism in the human carnitine deficiency syndromes. Evidence for alterations in tissue carnitine transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human primary carnitine deficiency syndromes are potentially fatal disorders affecting children and adults. The molecular etiologies of these syndromes have not been determined. In this investigation, we considered the hypothesis that these syndromes result from defective transport of carnitine into tissues, particularly skeletal muscle. The problem was approached by mathematical modeling, by using the technique of kinetic compartmental analysis. A tracer dose of L-[methyl-3H]carnitine was administered intravenously to six normal subjects, one patient with primary muscle carnitine deficiency (MCD), and four patients with primary systemic carnitine deficiency (SCD). Specific radioactivity was followed in plasma for 28 d. A three-compartment model (extracellular fluid, muscle, and ''other tissues'') was adopted. Rate constants, fluxes, pool sizes, and turnover times were calculated. Results of these calculations indicated reduced transport of carnitine into muscle in both forms of primary carnitine deficiency. However, in SCD, the reduced rate of carnitine transport was attributed to reduced plasma carnitine concentration. In MCD, the results are consistent with an intrinsic defect in the transport process. Abnormal fluctuations of the plasma carnitine, but of a different form, occurred in MCD and SCD. The significance of these are unclear, but in SCD they suggest abnormal regulation of the muscle/plasma carnitine concentration gradient. In 8 of 11 subjects, carnitine excretion was less than dietary carnitine intake. Carnitine excretion rates calculated by kinetic compartmental analysis were higher than corresponding rates measured directly, indicating degradation of carnitine. However, we found no radioactive metabolites of L-[methyl-3H]carnitine in urine. These observations suggest that dietary carnitine was metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract

  9. Effect of compartmentalization of donor and acceptor on the ultrafast resonance energy transfer from DAPI to silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Roopali; Chatterjee, Surajit; Kannaujiya, Krishna K; Mukherjee, Tushar Kanti

    2016-07-14

    The mechanism and dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) from photo-excited 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) and its subsequent modulation in the presence of cationic polymer poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) and Calf Thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been demonstrated using steady-state fluorescence and femtosecond fluorescence upconversion techniques. The synthesized Ag NCs were characterized using FTIR, mass spectrometry, XPS, HRTEM, DLS, UV-Vis and PL spectroscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis reveals the formation of ultrasmall Ag4 NCs with a small amount of Ag5 NCs. UV-Vis and PL spectra reveal distinct molecular-like optoelectronic behaviour of these ultrasmall Ag NCs. The dihydrolipoic acid-capped Ag NCs strongly quench the fluorescence of DAPI with concomitant increase in its photoluminescence (PL) intensity at 675 nm. This steady-state fluorescence quenching proceeds with a significant shortening of the fluorescence lifetime of DAPI in the presence of Ag NCs, signifying the nonradiative Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from DAPI to Ag NCs. Various energy transfer parameters have been estimated from FRET theory. The present FRET pair shows a characteristic Förster distance of 2.45 nm and can be utilized as a reporter of short-range distances in various FRET based applications. Moreover, this nonradiative FRET is completely suppressed in the presence of both 0.2 wt% PDADMAC and CT-DNA. Our results reveal selective compartmentalization of Ag NCs and DAPI in the presence of 0.2 wt% PDADMAC and CT-DNA, respectively. This selective compartmentalization of donor and acceptor and the subsequent modification of the FRET process may find application in various sensing, photovoltaic, and light harvesting applications. PMID:27304093

  10. A stromal cell niche for human and mouse type 3 innate lymphoid cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hoorweg, Kerim; Narang, Priyanka; Li, Zhi; Thuery, Anne; Papazian, Natalie; Withers, David R; Coles, Mark C.; Cupedo, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity critically depends on the functional compartmentalization of secondary lymphoid organs. Mesenchymal stromal cells create and maintain specialized niches that support survival, activation and expansion of T and B cells, and integrated analysis of lymphocytes and their niche has been instrumental in understanding adaptive immunity. Lymphoid organs are also home to type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3), innate effector cells essential for barrier immunity. However, a specialized ...

  11. Multipotent Capacity of Immortalized Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado, Oliver; Kaisani, Aadil A.; Spinola, Monica; Xie, Xian-Jin; Batten, Kimberly G.; Minna, John D.; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W.

    2011-01-01

    While the adult murine lung utilizes multiple compartmentally restricted progenitor cells during homeostasis and repair, much less is known about the progenitor cells from the human lung. Translating the murine stem cell model to humans is hindered by anatomical differences between species. Here we show that human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) display characteristics of multipotent stem cells of the lung. These HBECs express markers indicative of several epithelial types of the adult lun...

  12. Visualization of plasma membrane compartmentalization by high-speed quantum dot tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M. P.; Lagerholm, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have imaged plasma membrane molecules labeled with quantum dots in live cells using a conventional wide-field microscope with high spatial precision at sampling frequencies of 1.75 kHz. Many of the resulting single molecule trajectories are sufficiently long (up to several...

  13. Multicellular compartmentation of catharanthus roseus alkaloid biosynthesis predicts intercellular translocation of a pathway intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, B; Vazquez-Flota, FA; De Luca V

    1999-01-01

    In situ RNA hybridization and immunocytochemistry were used to establish the cellular distribution of monoterpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus). Tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) and strictosidine synthase (STR1), which are involved in the biosynthesis of the central intermediate strictosidine, and desacetoxyvindoline 4-hydroxylase (D4H) and deacetylvindoline 4-O-acetyltransferase (DAT), which are involved in the terminal steps of vindoline biosynthesis, were localized. tdc and str1 mRNAs were present in the epidermis of stems, leaves, and flower buds, whereas they appeared in most protoderm and cortical cells around the apical meristem of root tips. In marked contrast, d4h and dat mRNAs were associated with the laticifer and idioblast cells of leaves, stems, and flower buds. Immunocytochemical localization for TDC, D4H, and DAT proteins confirmed the differential localization of early and late stages of vindoline biosynthesis. Therefore, we concluded that the elaboration of the major leaf alkaloids involves the participation of at least two cell types and requires the intercellular translocation of a pathway intermediate. A basipetal gradient of expression in maturing leaves also was shown for all four genes by in situ RNA hybridization studies and by complementary studies with dissected leaves, suggesting that expression of the vindoline pathway occurs transiently during early leaf development. These results partially explain why attempts to produce vindoline by cell culture technology have failed. PMID:10330473

  14. Follicle-restricted compartmentalization of transforming growth factor beta superfamily ligands in the feline ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, Sarah K; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2004-03-01

    Ovarian follicular development, follicle selection, and the process of ovulation remain poorly understood in most species. Throughout reproductive life, follicle fate is balanced between growth and apoptosis. These opposing forces are controlled by numerous endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors, including the ligands represented by the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) superfamily. TGFbeta, activin, inhibin, bone morphometric protein (BMP), and growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF-9) are present in the ovary of many animals; however, no comprehensive analysis of the localization of each ligand or its receptors and intracellular signaling molecules during folliculogenesis has been done. The domestic cat is an ideal model for studying ovarian follicle dynamics due to an abundance of all follicle populations, including primordial stage, and the amount of readily available tissue following routine animal spaying. Additionally, knowledge of the factors involved in feline follicular development could make an important impact on in vitro maturation/in vitro fertilization (IVM/IVF) success for endangered feline species. Thus, the presence and position of TGFbeta superfamily members within the feline ovary have been evaluated in all stages of follicular development by immunolocalization. The cat inhibin alpha subunit protein is present in all follicle stages but increases in intensity within the mural granulosa cells in large antral follicles. The inhibin betaA and betaB subunit proteins, in addition to the activin type I (ActRIB) and activin type II receptor (ActRIIB), are produced in primordial and primary follicle granulosa cells. Additionally, inhibin betaA subunit is detected in the theca cells from secondary through large antral follicle size classes. GDF-9 is restricted to the oocyte of preantral and antral follicles, whereas the type II BMP receptor (BMP-RII) protein is predominantly localized to primordial- and primary-stage follicles. TGFbeta1, 2

  15. Human biokinetic data and a new compartmental model of zirconium - A tracer study with enriched stable isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiter, Matthias B., E-mail: matthias.greiter@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Giussani, Augusto, E-mail: AGiussani@BfS.de; Hoellriegl, Vera, E-mail: vera.hoellriegl@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Li Weibo, E-mail: wli@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Oeh, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.oeh@helmholtz-muenchen.de

    2011-09-01

    Biokinetic models describing the uptake, distribution and excretion of trace elements are an essential tool in nutrition, toxicology, or internal dosimetry of radionuclides. Zirconium, especially its radioisotope {sup 95}Zr, is relevant to radiation protection due to its production in uranium fission and neutron activation of nuclear fuel cladding material. We present a comprehensive set of human data from a tracer study with stable isotopes of zirconium. The data are used to refine a biokinetic model of zirconium. Six female and seven male healthy adult volunteers participated in the study. It includes 16 complete double tracer investigations with oral ingestion and intravenous injection, and seven supplemental investigations. Tracer concentrations were measured in blood plasma and urine collected up to 100 d after tracer administration. The four data sets (two chemical tracer forms in plasma and urine) each encompass 105-240 measured concentration values above detection limits. Total fractional absorption of ingested zirconium was found to be 0.001 for zirconium in citrate-buffered drinking solution and 0.007 for zirconium oxalate solution. Biokinetic models were developed based on the linear first-order kinetic compartmental model approach used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The main differences of the optimized systemic model of zirconium to the current ICRP model are (1) recycling into the transfer compartment made necessary by the observed tracer clearance from plasma, (2) different parameters related to fractional absorption for each form of the ingested tracer, and (3) a physiologically based excretion pathway to urine. The study considerably expands the knowledge on the biokinetics of zirconium, which was until now dominated by data from animal studies. The proposed systemic model improves the existing ICRP model, yet is based on the same principles and fits well into the ICRP radiation protection approach. - Research

  16. Reconstruction and modeling protein translocation and compartmentalization in Escherichia coli at the genome-scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Joanne K.; O’Brien, Edward J.; Lerman, Joshua A.;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Membranes play a crucial role in cellular functions. Membranes provide a physical barrier, control the trafficking of substances entering and leaving the cell, and are a major determinant of cellular ultra-structure. In addition, components embedded within the membrane participate in...... into genome-scale models. Results: The recent genome-scale model of metabolism and protein expression in Escherichia coli (called a ME-model) computes the complete composition of the proteome required to perform whole cell functions. Here we expand the ME-model to include (1) a reconstruction of...... protein translocation pathways, (2) assignment of all cellular proteins to one of four compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, and outer membrane) and a translocation pathway, (3) experimentally determined translocase catalytic and porin diffusion rates, and (4) a novel membrane constraint...

  17. Segregation of fluorescent membrane lipids into distinct micrometric domains: evidence for phase compartmentation of natural lipids ?

    OpenAIRE

    D′auria, Ludovic; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Bruyneel, Frédéric; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2011-01-01

    Background We recently reported that sphingomyelin (SM) analogs substituted on the alkyl chain by various fluorophores (e.g. BODIPY) readily inserted at trace levels into the plasma membrane of living erythrocytes or CHO cells and spontaneously concentrated into micrometric domains. Despite sharing the same fluorescent ceramide backbone, BODIPY-SM domains segregated from similar domains labelled by BODIPY-D-e-lactosylceramide (D-e-LacCer) and depended on endogenous SM. Methodology/Principal F...

  18. Recombinational DNA repair is regulated by compartmentalization of DNA lesions at the nuclear pore complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Géli, Vincent; Lisby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is emerging as a center for recruitment of a class of "difficult to repair" lesions such as double-strand breaks without a repair template and eroded telomeres in telomerase-deficient cells. In addition to such pathological situations, a recent study by Su and colle...... lesions that relocalize to the NPC, the putative mechanisms of relocalization, and the types of recombinational repair that are stimulated by the NPC, and present a model for NPC-facilitated repair....

  19. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Srijana Upadhyay; Xinping Xu; David Lowry; Jennifer C. Jackson; Robert W. Roberson; Xiaorong Lin

    2016-01-01

    Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs, and how it is deposited as extracellular granules, remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are ...

  20. Determination of radon equivalent alpha-doses in different human organs from water ingestion using SSNTD and dosimetric compartmental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon (222Rn) is a chemically inert and very mobile gaseous daughter of uranium (238U) which is found in all rocks and soils. Radon is very soluble in water. Inhalation and ingestion of radon and its decay products represent the main source of exposure to ionizing radiation for population in most countries. Radon is soluble in the human body fluids and fats. Radon alpha activities per unit volume have been measured inside different drinking water samples belonging to different aquifers and sources by using CR-39 and LR-115 solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). Radon initial equivalent alpha doses due to water ingestion have been evaluated in the stomach assuming that all the radon ingested appears in this organ. The influence of the origin and quality of the water samples studied has been investigated. Radon equivalent alpha doses have been determined in other human organs by using dosimetric compartmental models. The influence of the radon mean residence time on the radon equivalent alpha doses in the different compartments of the gastrointestinal system has been studied. (author)

  1. Spatial Phosphoprotein Profiling Reveals a Compartmentalized Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Switch Governing Neurite Growth and Retraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Fu, Yi; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xining; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pertz, Olivier C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Orton, Daniel J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2011-05-20

    Abstract - Brain development and spinal cord regeneration require neurite sprouting and growth cone navigation in response to extension and collapsing factors present in the extracellular environment. These external guidance cues control neurite growth cone extension and retraction processes through intracellular protein phosphorylation of numerous cytoskeletal, adhesion, and polarity complex signaling proteins. However, the complex kinase/substrate signaling networks that mediate neuritogenesis have not been investigated. Here, we compare the neurite phosphoproteome under growth and retraction conditions using neurite purification methodology combined with mass spectrometry. More than 4000 non-redundant phosphorylation sites from 1883 proteins have been annotated and mapped to signaling pathways that control kinase/phosphatase networks, cytoskeleton remodeling, and axon/dendrite specification. Comprehensive informatics and functional studies revealed a compartmentalized ERK activation/deactivation cytoskeletal switch that governs neurite growth and retraction, respectively. Our findings provide the first system-wide analysis of the phosphoprotein signaling networks that enable neurite growth and retraction and reveal an important molecular switch that governs neuritogenesis.

  2. Inter-compartmental transport of organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides in South China: implications for a regional risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huizhen; Wei, Yanli; Lydy, Michael J; You, Jing

    2014-07-01

    The dynamic flux of an organophosphate and four pyrethroid pesticides was determined in an air-(soil)-water-sediment system based on monitoring data from Guangzhou, China. The total air-water flux, including air-water gaseous exchange and atmospheric deposition, showed deposition from air to water for chlorpyrifos, bifenthrin and cypermethrin, but volatilization for lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin. The transport of the pesticides from overlying water to sediment suggested that sediment acted as a sink for the pesticides. Additionally, distinct annual atmospheric depositional fluxes between legacy and current-use pesticides suggested the role of consumer usage in their transport throughout the system. Finally, pesticide toxicity was estimated from annual air-water-sediment flux within an urban stream in Guangzhou. A dynamic flux-based risk assessment indicated that inter-compartmental transport of chlorpyrifos decreased its atmospheric exposure, but had little influence on its aquatic toxicity. Instead, water-to-sediment transport of pyrethroids increased their sediment toxicity, which was supported by previously reported toxicity data. PMID:24704807

  3. Levels, spatial variation and compartmentalization of trace elements in brown algae Cystoseira from marine protected areas of Crimea (Black Sea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • 19 trace elements were determined in Cystoseira spp. from marine protected areas. • Levels of 10 elements were lower than reported data for Black Sea Cystoseira spp. • Concentrations of most trace elements were higher in “branches” than in “stems”. • Spatial variations of V, Co, Ni and Zn can be related to anthropogenic activities. • Al, Sc, Fe, Rb, Cs, Th, U varied depending on geological composition of the coast. - Abstract: Levels of Al, Sc, V, Co, Ni, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Ag, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, Th and U that were rarely or never studied, as well as the concentrations of classically investigated Mn, Fe and Zn in brown algae Cystoseira barbata C. Ag. and Cystoseira crinita (Desf.) Bory from the coastal waters of marine protected areas (Crimea, Black Sea), were determined using neutron activation analysis. Spatial variation and compartmentalization were studied for all 19 trace elements (TE). Concentrations of most TE were higher in “branches” than in “stems”. Spatial variations of V, Co, Ni and Zn can be related to anthropogenic activities while Al, Sc, Fe, Rb, Cs, Th and U varied depending on chemical peculiarities of the coastal zone rocks. TE concentrations in C. crinita from marine protected areas near Tarkhankut peninsula and Cape Fiolent, identified as the most clean water areas, are submitted as the background concentrations

  4. Acute effects of different inspiratory efforts on ventilatory pattern and chest wall compartmental distribution in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz de Souza, Helga; Rocha, Taciano; Campos, Shirley Lima; Brandão, Daniella Cunha; Fink, James B; Aliverti, Andrea; de Andrade, Armele Dornelas

    2016-06-15

    It is not completely described how aging affect ventilatory kinematics and what are the mechanisms adopted by the elderly population to overcome these structural modifications. Given this, the aim was to evaluate the acute effects of different inspiratory efforts on ventilatory pattern and chest wall compartmental distribution in elderly women. Variables assessed included: tidal volume (Vt), total chest wall volume (Vcw), pulmonary rib cage (Vrcp%), abdominal rib cage (Vrca%) and abdominal compartment (Vab%) relative contributions to tidal volume. These variables were assessed during quiet breathing, maximal inspiratory pressure maneuver (MIP), and moderate inspiratory resistance (MIR; i.e., 40% of MIP). 22 young women (age: 23.9±2.5 years) and 22 elderly women (age: 68.2±5.0 years) participated to this study. It was possible to show that during quiet breathing, Vab% was predominant in elderly (p<0.001), in young, however, Vab% was similar to Vrcp% (p=0.095). During MIR, Vrcp% was predominant in young (p<0.001) and comparable to Vab% in elderly (p=0.249). When MIP was imposed, both groups presented a predominance of Vrcp%. In conclusion, there are differences in abdominal kinematics between young and elderly women during different inspiratory efforts. In elderly, during moderate inspiratory resistance, the pattern is beneficial, deep, and slow. Although, during maximal inspiratory resistance, the ventilatory pattern seems to predict imminent muscle fatigue. PMID:26900004

  5. Compartmentalization Role of A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs in Mediating Protein Kinase A (PKA Signaling and Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Rababa'h

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs stimulation enhances contractility through protein kinase-A (PKA substrate phosphorylation. This PKA signaling is conferred in part by PKA binding to A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs. AKAPs coordinate multi-protein signaling networks that are targeted to specific intracellular locations, resulting in the localization of enzyme activity and transmitting intracellular actions of neurotransmitters and hormones to its target substrates. In particular, mAKAP (muscle-selective AKAP has been shown to be present on the nuclear envelope of cardiomyocytes with various proteins including: PKA-regulatory subunit (RIIα, phosphodiesterase-4D3, protein phosphatase-2A, and ryanodine receptor (RyR2. Therefore, through the coordination of spatial-temporal signaling of proteins and enzymes, mAKAP controls cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP levels very tightly and functions as a regulator of PKA-mediated substrate phosphorylation leading to changes in calcium availability and myofilament calcium sensitivity. The goal of this review is to elucidate the critical compartmentalization role of mAKAP in mediating PKA signaling and regulating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by acting as a scaffolding protein. Based on our literature search and studying the structure–function relationship between AKAP scaffolding protein and its binding partners, we propose possible explanations for the mechanism by which mAKAP promotes cardiac hypertrophy.

  6. Adequacy of compartmental model for positron emission tomography examinations; Adequacao de modelo compartimental para exames de tomografia por emissao de positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Joao Eduardo Maeda Moreira da; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Telecomunicacoes e Controle. Lab. de Engenharia Biomedica

    2011-12-15

    The objective of this work is the determination of the most adequate compartmental model for the study of physiological dynamics based on positron emission tomography exams. We propose the use of Akaike's information criterion for the optimal model selection, and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm with sensitivity equations for the task of estimating the characteristic parameters of the differential equations describing the models. We have considered three compartmental structures represented, respectively, by two compartments and two characteristic constants, three compartments and four characteristic constants and four compartments and six characteristics constants. The data considered in this work were synthesized taking into account key features of a real tomography exam, such as type and level of noise and morphology of the input function of the system. Applying the proposed methodology with three noise levels (low, medium and high), we obtained agreement of the best model with strong and considerable degrees (with Kappa indexes equal to 0.95, 0.93 and 0.63, respectively). It was observed that, with high noise level and more complex models (four compartments), the classification is deteriorated due to lack of data for the decision. Programs have been developed and a graphical interface that can be used in research, development, simulation and parameter identification of compartmental models, supporting analysis of clinical diagnostics and scientific practices. (author)

  7. Is the Dissociative Experiences Scale able to identify detachment and compartmentalization symptoms? Factor structure of the Dissociative Experiences Scale in a large sample of psychiatric and nonpsychiatric subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Eva; Farina, Benedetto; Imperatori, Claudio; Mansutti, Federica; Prunetti, Elena; Speranza, Anna Maria; Barbaranelli, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we explored the ability of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) to catch detachment and compartmentalization symptoms. Participants and methods The DES factor structure was evaluated in 768 psychiatric patients (546 women and 222 men) and in 2,403 subjects enrolled in nonpsychiatric settings (1,857 women and 546 men). All participants were administered the Italian version of DES. Twenty senior psychiatric experts in the treatment of dissociative symptoms independently assessed the DES items and categorized each of them as follows: “C” for compartmentalization, “D” for detachment, and “NC” for noncongruence with either C or D. Results Confirmatory factor analysis supported the three-factor structure of DES in both clinical and nonclinical samples and its invariance across the two groups. Moreover, factor analyses results overlapped with those from the expert classification procedure. Conclusion Our results showed that DES can be used as a valid instrument for clinicians to assess the frequency of different types of dissociative experiences including detachment and compartmentalization. PMID:27350746

  8. Compartmentalization of drug resistance-associated mutations in a treatment-naive HIV-infected female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, Grissell; Jove, Gloria; Kumar, Rakesh; Noel, Richard J; Reyes, Evelyn; Sepulveda, Gladys; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Kumar, Anil

    2004-06-01

    Development of a drug-resistant variant of HIV-1 has been one of the major concerns contributing to the transmission of the virus. A 40-year-old woman presented to the clinic with micosis and oral candidiasis. The subject was referred for HIV-1 diagnosis. Subsequent investigations revealed a very low CD4 T cell count (48 cell/microl blood) and high plasma HIV-1 RNA load (4.33 x 10(5) copy/ml). A 1.3-kb pol fragment was sequenced in virus collected from plasma and the vaginal compartment. Plasma virus had no mutation in reverse transcriptase and one mutation in protease (L63P). On the other hand vaginal virus contained L63P and M184V mutations in protease and reverse transcriptase, respectively. These mutations were accompanied by several other mutations in previously identified CTL epitopic regions of the two genes. In the absence of antiretroviral treatment, a drug-resistant mutant was thought to develop because of immune pressure. This is the first report describing the role of immune pressure in the development of a drug-resistant virus. PMID:15242547

  9. Compartmentalized AMPK Signaling Illuminated by Genetically Encoded Molecular Sensors and Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takafumi Miyamoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, whose activity is a critical determinant of cell health, serves a fundamental role in integrating extracellular and intracellular nutrient information into signals that regulate various metabolic processes. Despite the importance of AMPK, its specific roles within the different intracellular spaces remain unresolved, largely due to the lack of real-time, organelle-specific AMPK activity probes. Here, we present a series of molecular tools that allows for the measurement of AMPK activity at the different subcellular localizations and that allows for the rapid induction of AMPK inhibition. We discovered that AMPKα1, not AMPKα2, was the subunit that preferentially conferred spatial specificity to AMPK, and that inhibition of AMPK activity at the mitochondria was sufficient for triggering cytosolic ATP increase. These findings suggest that genetically encoded molecular probes represent a powerful approach for revealing the basic principles of the spatiotemporal nature of AMPK regulation.

  10. Foliar or root exposures to smelter particles: consequences for lead compartmentalization and speciation in plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, Eva; Dappe, Vincent; Sarret, Géraldine; Sobanska, Sophie; Nowak, Dorota; Nowak, Jakub; Stefaniak, Elżbieta Anna; Magnin, Valérie; Ranieri, Vincent; Dumat, Camille

    2014-04-01

    In urban areas with high fallout of airborne particles, metal uptake by plants mainly occurs by foliar pathways and can strongly impact crop quality. However, there is a lack of knowledge on metal localization and speciation in plants after pollution exposure, especially in the case of foliar uptake. In this study, two contrasting crops, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and rye-grass (Lolium perenne L.), were exposed to Pb-rich particles emitted by a Pb-recycling factory via either atmospheric or soil application. Pb accumulation in plant leaves was observed for both ways of exposure. The mechanisms involved in Pb uptake were investigated using a combination of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques (electron microscopy, laser ablation, Raman microspectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy). The results show that Pb localization and speciation are strongly influenced by the type of exposure (root or shoot pathway) and the plant species. Foliar exposure is the main pathway of uptake, involving the highest concentrations in plant tissues. Under atmospheric fallouts, Pb-rich particles were strongly adsorbed on the leaf surface of both plant species. In lettuce, stomata contained Pb-rich particles in their apertures, with some deformations of guard cells. In addition to PbO and PbSO4, chemical forms that were also observed in pristine particles, new species were identified: organic compounds (minimum 20%) and hexagonal platy crystals of PbCO3. In rye-grass, the changes in Pb speciation were even more egregious: Pb-cell wall and Pb-organic acid complexes were the major species observed. For root exposure, identified here as a minor pathway of Pb transfer compared to foliar uptake, another secondary species, pyromorphite, was identified in rye-grass leaves. Finally, combining bulk and spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques permitted both the overall speciation and the minor but possibly highly reactive lead species to be determined in order to better assess the

  11. Compartmentation of mono- and sesqui-terpene biosynthesis of the essential oil in poncirus trifoliata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fruit of Poncirus trifoliata shows glandular cells complexes in the exocarp, which produce a volatile oil rich in monoterpenes but poor in sesquiterpenes and oxigenated compounds. The juice vesicles of the endocarp possess similar cell complexes mainly containing sesquiterpenes and oxigenated compounds, whereas monoterpenes only occur in small amounts. By the use of combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry 19 components of the rind oil and 15 compounds of the endocarp oil could be identified. As demonstrated by electron microscopy the terpenes most probably are synthesized predominantly, if not exclusively in plastids. As shown by gasradiochromatography radioactive precursors (14Co2 and 14C-leucine) are incorporated into mono- and sesqui-terpenes to a different extent. This is due to two gland types producing essential oils of different composition with regard to their mono- and sesqui-terpene percentage. In fruit development the exocarp glands differentiate earlier than the endocarp glands do. The activity of exogenously applied 14Co2 first reaches the peripheral glands and later on appears in the interior glands. Depending upon the growth season, labelled leucine transported by the conducting tissues from lower plant parts leads to a high specific activity of the sesqui-terpenes and oxigenated compounds. It could be argued that in this instance the glands of the pulp are better provided with precursors than the exocarp glands. The successive maxima of essential oil production in both glandular complexes, and the changes in the concentration of individual oil constituents during the ontogeny of the fruit also contribute to different incorporation ratios of radioactive precursors into mono- and sesqui-terpenes. (author)

  12. Hepatic Subcellular Compartmentation of Cytoplasmic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Determined by Immunogold Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kuixiong; Cardell, Emma Lou; Morris, Randal E.; Giffin, Bruce F.; Cardell, Robert R.

    1995-08-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is the rate-limiting gluconeogenic enzyme and in liver occurs in a lobular gradient from periportal to pericentral regions. The subcellular distribution of cytoplasmic PEPCK molecules within hepatocytes and its relationship to organelles have not been determined previously. In this study, we have used immunogold electron microscopy to evaluate the subcellar distribution of the enzyme, in addition to brightfield and epipolarized light microscopy. Cryosections (10 [mu]m) of perfusion-fixed rat liver were collected on silanated slides and immunostained using goat anti-rat PEPCK followed by 5-nm gold-labeled secondary and tertiary antibodies. Additionally, free-floating vibratome sections (25, 50, and 100 [mu]m) of perfusion-immersion-fixed rat liver were immunogold stained using goat anti-rat PEPCK and 5-nm gold-labeled secondary antibody, with and without silver enhancement. The immunogold labeled sections from both procedures were embedded in epoxy resin for the preparation of thin sections for electron microscopy. The results showed that the gold-labeled antibodies penetrated the entire thickness of cryosections, resulting in a high signal for PEPCK, but membranes in general, the smooth endoplasmic reticulum in particular, were not identifiable as electron dense unit membranes. On the other hand, the vibratome sections of well-fixed tissue allowed good visualization of the ultrastructure of cellular organelles, with the smooth endoplasmic reticulum appearing as vesicles and tubules with electron dense unit membranes; however, the penetration of the gold-labeled antibody was limited to cells at the surface of the vibratome sections. In both procedures, PEPCK, as indicated by gold particles, is predominantly in the glycogen areas of the cytosome and not in mitochondria, nuclei, Golgi apparatus, or other cell organelles. Hepatocytes in periportal regions have a compact subcellular distribution of PEPCK shown by gold particles

  13. A compartmentalized mathematical model of the β1-adrenergic signaling system in mouse ventricular myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir E Bondarenko

    Full Text Available The β1-adrenergic signaling system plays an important role in the functioning of cardiac cells. Experimental data shows that the activation of this system produces inotropy, lusitropy, and chronotropy in the heart, such as increased magnitude and relaxation rates of [Ca(2+]i transients and contraction force, and increased heart rhythm. However, excessive stimulation of β1-adrenergic receptors leads to heart dysfunction and heart failure. In this paper, a comprehensive, experimentally based mathematical model of the β1-adrenergic signaling system for mouse ventricular myocytes is developed, which includes major subcellular functional compartments (caveolae, extracaveolae, and cytosol. The model describes biochemical reactions that occur during stimulation of β1-adrenoceptors, changes in ionic currents, and modifications of Ca(2+ handling system. Simulations describe the dynamics of major signaling molecules, such as cyclic AMP and protein kinase A, in different subcellular compartments; the effects of inhibition of phosphodiesterases on cAMP production; kinetics and magnitudes of phosphorylation of ion channels, transporters, and Ca(2+ handling proteins; modifications of action potential shape and duration; magnitudes and relaxation rates of [Ca(2+]i transients; changes in intracellular and transmembrane Ca(2+ fluxes; and [Na(+]i fluxes and dynamics. The model elucidates complex interactions of ionic currents upon activation of β1-adrenoceptors at different stimulation frequencies, which ultimately lead to a relatively modest increase in action potential duration and significant increase in [Ca(2+]i transients. In particular, the model includes two subpopulations of the L-type Ca(2+ channels, in caveolae and extracaveolae compartments, and their effects on the action potential and [Ca(2+]i transients are investigated. The presented model can be used by researchers for the interpretation of experimental data and for the developments of

  14. The assembly of metals chelation by thiols and vacuolar compartmentalization conferred increased tolerance to and accumulation of cadmium and arsenic in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Simultaneous transformation of AsPCS1 and ScYCF1 into Arabidopsis thaliana which is sensitive to heavy metals, leads to transgenic plants tolerant to Arsenic and cadmium. ► Dual-gene transgenic Arabidopsis showed higher accumulation of Arsenic and cadmium than single and non-transgenic plants. ► Our results proved that improved thiol peptides synthesis and vacuolar compartmentation in plant dramatically boosted the survival rates of plants when exposed to heavy metals. ► A new strategy for efficient phytoremediation of heavy metals by stacking genes transformation in plants was developed in this article. - Abstract: Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana were developed to increase tolerance for and accumulation of heavy metals and metalloids by simultaneous overexpression of AsPCS1 and YCF1 (derived from garlic and baker's yeast) based on the fact that chelation of metals and vacuolar compartmentalization are the main strategies for heavy metals/metalloids detoxification and tolerance in plants. Dual-gene transgenic lines had the longest roots and the highest accumulation of Cd and As than single-gene transgenic lines and wildtype. When grown on cadmium or arsenic (arsenite/arsenate), Dual-gene transgenic lines accumulated over 2–10 folds cadmium/arsenite and 2–3 folds arsenate than wild type or plants expressing AsPCS1 or YCF1 alone. Such stacking modified genes involved in chelation of toxic metals and vacuolar compartmentalization represents a highly promising new tool for use in phytoremediation efforts.

  15. The assembly of metals chelation by thiols and vacuolar compartmentalization conferred increased tolerance to and accumulation of cadmium and arsenic in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiangbo [Key Laboratory of Plant Resources, Institute of Botany, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093 (China); Inner Mongolia Key Laboratory of Biomass-Energy Conversion, The Institute of Bioengineering and Technology, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 040100 (China); Xu, Wenzhong [Key Laboratory of Plant Resources, Institute of Botany, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093 (China); Ma, Mi, E-mail: mami@ibcas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Plant Resources, Institute of Botany, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous transformation of AsPCS1 and ScYCF1 into Arabidopsis thaliana which is sensitive to heavy metals, leads to transgenic plants tolerant to Arsenic and cadmium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual-gene transgenic Arabidopsis showed higher accumulation of Arsenic and cadmium than single and non-transgenic plants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results proved that improved thiol peptides synthesis and vacuolar compartmentation in plant dramatically boosted the survival rates of plants when exposed to heavy metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new strategy for efficient phytoremediation of heavy metals by stacking genes transformation in plants was developed in this article. - Abstract: Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana were developed to increase tolerance for and accumulation of heavy metals and metalloids by simultaneous overexpression of AsPCS1 and YCF1 (derived from garlic and baker's yeast) based on the fact that chelation of metals and vacuolar compartmentalization are the main strategies for heavy metals/metalloids detoxification and tolerance in plants. Dual-gene transgenic lines had the longest roots and the highest accumulation of Cd and As than single-gene transgenic lines and wildtype. When grown on cadmium or arsenic (arsenite/arsenate), Dual-gene transgenic lines accumulated over 2-10 folds cadmium/arsenite and 2-3 folds arsenate than wild type or plants expressing AsPCS1 or YCF1 alone. Such stacking modified genes involved in chelation of toxic metals and vacuolar compartmentalization represents a highly promising new tool for use in phytoremediation efforts.

  16. Closed-form solutions for the optimum equivalence of first-order compartmental models and their implications for classical models of closed-circuit anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given a function that describes the uptake of a substance into the body with time, an analytical technique is described which transforms that function into a model of parallel first-order compartments that converges to the same uptake profile as the number of compartments is increased. The fitting of the compartmental model to the given uptake function is optimized to minimize the squared error. A necessary condition of the analytical method is that the uptake function be capable of being successively integrated at least as many times as the number of desired compartments. The uptake function should also be monotonically decreasing as all parallel first-order compartment models predict monotonically decreasing uptake. We applied this technique and ascertained the compartmental structure of the Severinghaus relationship, a longstanding observation in the field of clinical anesthesia that the uptake of nitrous oxide follows an inverse-square-root of time profile. The Severinghaus relationship is numerically poorly behaved at a time of zero elapsed minutes, predicting an instantaneously infinite uptake. Nevertheless, modeling of the first minute of anesthesia is necessary for characterizing the initial induction of anesthesia and methods of maintaining closed-circuit anesthesia such as the unit dose method. Using solely analytical methods, solutions for the compartmental properties of a mammillary model that matches the Severinghaus relationship for any expressed time interval are produced. These properties are compared to currently accepted values for the uptake of nitrous oxide. When matched to the Severinghaus relationship in the range of 0–100 min with a three-compartment model, we identified time constants of 0.28, 4.69 and 33.49 min with associated apparent volumes of 1.44, 2.14 and 7.97 l, respectively. The time constants in particular contrast to our earlier findings for the range of 1–100 min (1.46, 7.41 and 42.0 min). Our earlier findings were well

  17. Effect of leukemia inhibitory factor on long-term propagation of precursor cells derived from rat forebrain subventricular zone and ventral mesencephalon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke K; Zimmer, Jens; Wahlberg, Lars U; Meyer, Morten

    2008-01-01

    different immunohistochemical markers, we observed a distinct compartmentalization of cells within the spheres. In SVZ-derived NTS an outer compartment of proliferating (nestin(+)/Ki67(+)), preferentially neurogenic (beta-tubulin III(+)/MAP2(+)) cells, surrounded by an inner compartment of glial (GFAP...

  18. A new view into prokaryotic cell biology from electron cryotomography

    OpenAIRE

    Oikonomou, Catherine M.; Jensen, Grant J.

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryotomography (ECT) enables intact cells to be visualized in 3D in an essentially native state to 'macromolecular' (~4 nm) resolution, revealing the basic architectures of complete nanomachines and their arrangements in situ. Since its inception, ECT has advanced our understanding of many aspects of prokaryotic cell biology, from morphogenesis to subcellular compartmentalization and from metabolism to complex interspecies interactions. In this Review, we highlight how ECT has provid...

  19. Classical algorithms for automated parameter-search methods in compartmental neural models - A critical survey based on simulations using neuron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    gradient-descent techniques are adequate if the parameter space is low-dimensional, relatively smooth, and has a few local minima (e.g., parameterizing single-neuron compartmental models). Only the fast algorithms and/or a decent (low) number of model parameters are candidates for automated parameter search because of practical reasons. Eventually, the size of the parameter space may be reduced and/or parallel supercomputers may be used. Data overfitting may negatively affect the generalization ability of the model. Bayesian methods include Occam's factor, which set the preference for simpler models. Proliferation of (neural) models raises the question of rigorous criteria for comparing the overall performance of various models designed to match the same type of data. Bayesian methods provide the best framework to assess the neural models quantitatively. Paradoxically, parameter-search methods may sometimes be more useful when they fail by discarding unrealistic mechanisms used in the model design, rather than fitting experimental data to an alleged model

  20. Inhibition of glutathione biosynthesis alters compartmental redox status and the thiol proteome in organogenesis-stage rat conceptuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Craig; Shuster, Daniel Z; Roman Gomez, Rosaicela; Sant, Karilyn E; Reed, Matthew S; Pohl, Jan; Hansen, Jason M

    2013-10-01

    oxidation was seen in the BSO-treated AF compartment after 6 h. Biotinylated iodoacetamide (BIAM) labeling of proteins revealed the significant thiol oxidation of many EMB proteins following BSO treatment. Quantitative changes in the thiol proteome, associated with developmentally relevant pathways, were detected using isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) labeling and mass spectroscopy. Adaptive pathways were selectively enriched with increased concentrations of proteins involved in mRNA processing (splicesome) and mRNA stabilization (glycolysis, GAPDH), as well as protein synthesis (aminoacyl-tRNA) and protein folding (antigen processing, Hsp70, protein disulfide isomerase). These results show the ability of chemical and environmental modulators to selectively alter compartmental intracellular and extracellular GSH and Cys concentrations and change their corresponding E(h) within the intact viable conceptus. The altered E(h) were also of sufficient magnitude to alter the redox proteome and change relative protein concentrations, suggesting that the mechanistic links through which environmental factors inform and regulate developmental signaling pathways may be discovered using systems developmental biology techniques. PMID:23736079

  1. Glutamine analogs promote cytoophidium assembly in human and Drosophila cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kangni Chen; Jing Zhang; (O)mür Yilmaz Tastan; Zillah Anne Deussen; Mayte Yu-Yin Siswick; Ji-Long Liu

    2011-01-01

    CTP synthase is compartmentalized within a subcellular structure,termed the cytoophidium,in a range of organisms including bacteria,yeast,fruit fly and rat.Here we show that CTP synthase is also compartmentalized into cytoophidia in human cells.Surprisingly,the occurrence of cyloophidia in human cells increases upon treatment with a glutamine analog 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON),an inhibitor of glutaminedependent enzymes including CTP synthase.Experiments in flies confirmned that DON globally promotes cytoophidium assembly.Clonal analysis via CTP synthase RNA interference in somatic cells indicates that CTP synthase expression level is critical for the formation of cytoophidia.Moreover,DON facilitates cytoophidium assembly even when CTP synthase level is low.A second glutamine analog azaserine also promotes cytoophidum formation.Our data demonstrate that glutamine analogs serve as useful tools in the study of cytoophidia.

  2. Phospholipase C inhibitors and prostaglandins differentially regulate phosphatidylcholine synthesis in rat renal papilla. Evidence of compartmental regulation of CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase and CDP-choline:1,2-diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Tomé, María del Carmen; Speziale, Emir H S; Sterin-Speziale, Norma B

    2002-07-11

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant phospholipid in mammalian cell membranes. Several lines of evidence support that PC homeostasis is preserved by the equilibrium between PC biosynthetic enzymes and phospholipases catabolic activities. We have previously shown that papillary synthesis of PC depends on prostaglandins (PGs) that modulate biosynthetic enzymes. In papillary tissue, under bradikynin stimulus, arachidonic acid (AA) mobilization (the substrate for PG synthesis) requires a previous phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Thus, in the present work, we study the possible involvement of PLC in PC biosynthesis and its relationship with PG biosynthetic pathway on the maintenance of phospholipid renewal in papillary membranes; we also evaluated the relevance of CDP-choline pathway enzymes compartmentalization. To this end, neomycin, U-73122 and dibutiryl cyclic AMP, reported as PLC inhibitors, were used to study PC synthesis in rat renal papilla. All the PLC inhibitors assayed impaired PC synthesis. PG synthesis was also blocked by PLC inhibitors without affecting cyclooxygenase activity, indicating a metabolic connection between both pathways. However, we found that PC biosynthesis decrease in the presence of PLC inhibitors was not a consequence of PG decreased synthesis, suggesting that basal PLC activity and PGs exert their effect on different targets of PC biosynthetic pathway. The study of PC biosynthetic enzymes showed that PLC inhibitors affect CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT) activity while PGD(2) operates on CDP-choline:1,2-diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase (CPT), both activities associated to papillary enriched-nuclei fraction. The present results suggest that renal papillary PC synthesis is a highly regulated process under basal conditions. Such regulation might occur at least at two different levels of the CDP-choline pathway: on the one hand, PLC operates on CCT activity; on the other, while PGs regulate CPT activity. PMID

  3. Quantitative analysis of [99mTc]C2A-GST distribution in the area at risk after myocardial ischemia and reperfusion using a compartmental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: It was recently demonstrated that the radiolabeled C2A domain of synaptotagmin I accumulates avidly in the area at risk after ischemia and reperfusion. The objective was to quantitatively characterize the dynamic uptake of radiolabeled C2A in normal and ischemically injured myocardia using a compartmental model. Methods: To induce acute myocardial infarction, the left descending coronary artery was ligated for 18 min, followed by reperfusion. [99mTc]C2A-GST or its inactivated form, [99mTc]C2A-GST-NHS, was injected intravenously at 2 h after reperfusion. A group of four rats was sacrificed at 10, 30, 60 and 180 after injection. Uptake of [99mTc]C2A-GST and [99mTc]C2A-GST-NHS in the area at risk and in the normal myocardium were determined by gamma counting. A compartmental model was developed to quantitatively interpret myocardial uptake kinetic data. The model consists of two physical spaces (vascular space and tissue space), with plasma activity as input. The model allows for [99mTc]C2A-GST and [99mTc]C2A-GST-NHS diffusion between vascular and tissue spaces, as well as for [99mTc]C2A-GST sequestration in vascular and tissue spaces via specific binding. Results: [99mTc]C2A-GST uptake in the area at risk was significantly higher than that for [99mTc]C2A-GST-NHS at all time points. The compartmental model separated [99mTc]C2A-GST uptake in the area at risk due to passive retention from that due to specific binding. The maximum amount of [99mTc]C2A-GST that could be sequestered in the area at risk due to specific binding was estimated at a total of 0.048 nmol/g tissue. The rate of [99mTc]C2A-GST sequestration within the tissue space of the area at risk was 0.012 ml/min. Modeling results also revealed that the diffusion rate of radiotracer between vascular and tissue spaces is the limiting factor of [99mTc]C2A-GST sequestration within the tissue space of the area at risk. Conclusion: [99mTc]C2A-GST is sequestered in the ischemically injured myocardium in a

  4. Scaffolding during the cell cycle by A-kinase anchoring proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Han, B.; Poppinga, W J; Schmidt, M.

    2015-01-01

    Cell division relies on coordinated regulation of the cell cycle. A process including a well-defined series of strictly regulated molecular mechanisms involving cyclin-dependent kinases, retinoblastoma protein, and polo-like kinases. Dysfunctions in cell cycle regulation are associated with disease such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Compartmentalization of cellular signaling is a common strategy used to ensure the accuracy and efficiency of cellular responses. Compartmentalizati...

  5. Cooperative catalysis of noncompatible catalysts through compartmentalization: wacker oxidation and enzymatic reduction in a one-pot process in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hirofumi; Hummel, Werner; Gröger, Harald

    2015-04-01

    A Wacker oxidation using CuCl/PdCl2 as a catalyst system was successfully combined with an enzymatic ketone reduction to convert styrene enantioselectively into 1-phenylethanol in a one-pot process, although the two reactions conducted in aqueous media are not compatible due to enzyme deactivation by Cu ions. The one-pot feasibility was achieved via compartmentalization of the reactions. Conducting the Wacker oxidation in the interior of a polydimethylsiloxane thimble enables diffusion of only the organic substrate and product into the exterior where the biotransformation takes place. Thus, the Cu ions detrimental to the enzyme are withheld from the reaction media of the biotransformation. In this one-pot process, which formally corresponds to an asymmetric hydration of alkenes, a range of 1-arylethanols were formed with high conversions and 98-99 % ee. In addition, the catalyst system of the Wacker oxidation was recycled 15 times without significant decrease in conversion. PMID:25704961

  6. PET-based compartmental modeling of 124I-A33 antibody: quantitative characterization of patient-specific tumor targeting in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against tumor antigens has proven effective for targeted therapy of human cancers, as shown by a growing list of successful antibody-based drug products. We describe a novel, nonlinear compartmental model using PET-derived data to determine the ''best-fit'' parameters and model-derived quantities for optimizing biodistribution of intravenously injected 124I-labeled antitumor antibodies. As an example of this paradigm, quantitative image and kinetic analyses of anti-A33 humanized mAb (also known as ''A33'') were performed in 11 colorectal cancer patients. Serial whole-body PET scans of 124I-labeled A33 and blood samples were acquired and the resulting tissue time-activity data for each patient were fit to a nonlinear compartmental model using the SAAM II computer code. Excellent agreement was observed between fitted and measured parameters of tumor uptake, ''off-target'' uptake in bowel mucosa, blood clearance, tumor antigen levels, and percent antigen occupancy. This approach should be generally applicable to antibody-antigen systems in human tumors for which the masses of antigen-expressing tumor and of normal tissues can be estimated and for which antibody kinetics can be measured with PET. Ultimately, based on each patient's resulting ''best-fit'' nonlinear model, a patient-specific optimum mAb dose (in micromoles, for example) may be derived. (orig.)

  7. Test-retest reliability of automated whole body and compartmental muscle volume measurements on a wide bore 3T MR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure the test-retest reproducibility of an automated system for quantifying whole body and compartmental muscle volumes using wide bore 3 T MRI. Thirty volunteers stratified by body mass index underwent whole body 3 T MRI, two-point Dixon sequences, on two separate occasions. Water-fat separation was performed, with automated segmentation of whole body, torso, upper and lower leg volumes, and manually segmented lower leg muscle volumes. Mean automated total body muscle volume was 19.32 L (SD9.1) and 19.28 L (SD9.12) for first and second acquisitions (Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 1.0, 95 % level of agreement -0.32-0.2 L). ICC for all automated test-retest muscle volumes were almost perfect (0.99-1.0) with 95 % levels of agreement 1.8-6.6 % of mean volume. Automated muscle volume measurements correlate closely with manual quantification (right lower leg: manual 1.68 L (2SD0.6) compared to automated 1.64 L (2SD 0.6), left lower leg: manual 1.69 L (2SD 0.64) compared to automated 1.63 L (SD0.61), correlation coefficients for automated and manual segmentation were 0.94-0.96). Fully automated whole body and compartmental muscle volume quantification can be achieved rapidly on a 3 T wide bore system with very low margins of error, excellent test-retest reliability and excellent correlation to manual segmentation in the lower leg. (orig.)

  8. PET-based compartmental modeling of {sup 124}I-A33 antibody: quantitative characterization of patient-specific tumor targeting in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzonico, Pat; O' Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Ruan, Shutian; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Smith-Jones, Peter [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Stony Brook School of Medicine, Departments of Psychiatry and Radiology, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Divgi, Chaitanya [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Scott, Andrew M. [La Trobe University, Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Kemeny, Nancy E.; Wong, Douglas; Scheinberg, David [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Fong, Yuman [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); City of Hope, Department of Surgery, Duarte, CA (United States); Ritter, Gerd; Jungbluth, Achem; Old, Lloyd J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The molecular specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against tumor antigens has proven effective for targeted therapy of human cancers, as shown by a growing list of successful antibody-based drug products. We describe a novel, nonlinear compartmental model using PET-derived data to determine the ''best-fit'' parameters and model-derived quantities for optimizing biodistribution of intravenously injected {sup 124}I-labeled antitumor antibodies. As an example of this paradigm, quantitative image and kinetic analyses of anti-A33 humanized mAb (also known as ''A33'') were performed in 11 colorectal cancer patients. Serial whole-body PET scans of {sup 124}I-labeled A33 and blood samples were acquired and the resulting tissue time-activity data for each patient were fit to a nonlinear compartmental model using the SAAM II computer code. Excellent agreement was observed between fitted and measured parameters of tumor uptake, ''off-target'' uptake in bowel mucosa, blood clearance, tumor antigen levels, and percent antigen occupancy. This approach should be generally applicable to antibody-antigen systems in human tumors for which the masses of antigen-expressing tumor and of normal tissues can be estimated and for which antibody kinetics can be measured with PET. Ultimately, based on each patient's resulting ''best-fit'' nonlinear model, a patient-specific optimum mAb dose (in micromoles, for example) may be derived. (orig.)

  9. Effect of scatter correction on the compartmental measurement of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2 receptors using [123I]epidepride SPET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Masahiro; Varrone, Andrea; Kim, Kyeong Min; Watabe, Hiroshi; Zoghbi, Sami S; Seneca, Nicholas; Tipre, Dnyanesh; Seibyl, John P; Innis, Robert B; Iida, Hidehiro

    2004-05-01

    Prior studies with anthropomorphic phantoms and single, static in vivo brain images have demonstrated that scatter correction significantly improves the accuracy of regional quantitation of single-photon emission tomography (SPET) brain images. Since the regional distribution of activity changes following a bolus injection of a typical neuroreceptor ligand, we examined the effect of scatter correction on the compartmental modeling of serial dynamic images of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D(2) receptors using [(123)I]epidepride. Eight healthy human subjects [age 30+/-8 (range 22-46) years] participated in a study with a bolus injection of 373+/-12 (354-389) MBq [(123)I]epidepride and data acquisition over a period of 14 h. A transmission scan was obtained in each study for attenuation and scatter correction. Distribution volumes were calculated by means of compartmental nonlinear least-squares analysis using metabolite-corrected arterial input function and brain data processed with scatter correction using narrow-beam geometry micro (SC) and without scatter correction using broad-beam micro (NoSC). Effects of SC were markedly different among brain regions. SC increased activities in the putamen and thalamus after 1-1.5 h while it decreased activity during the entire experiment in the temporal cortex and cerebellum. Compared with NoSC, SC significantly increased specific distribution volume in the putamen (58%, P=0.0001) and thalamus (23%, P=0.0297). Compared with NoSC, SC made regional distribution of the specific distribution volume closer to that of [(18)F]fallypride. It is concluded that SC is required for accurate quantification of distribution volumes of receptor ligands in SPET studies. PMID:14730406

  10. Effect of scatter correction on the compartmental measurement of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2 receptors using [123I]epidepride SPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior studies with anthropomorphic phantoms and single, static in vivo brain images have demonstrated that scatter correction significantly improves the accuracy of regional quantitation of single-photon emission tomography (SPET) brain images. Since the regional distribution of activity changes following a bolus injection of a typical neuroreceptor ligand, we examined the effect of scatter correction on the compartmental modeling of serial dynamic images of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2 receptors using [123I]epidepride. Eight healthy human subjects [age 30±8 (range 22-46) years] participated in a study with a bolus injection of 373±12 (354-389) MBq [123I]epidepride and data acquisition over a period of 14 h. A transmission scan was obtained in each study for attenuation and scatter correction. Distribution volumes were calculated by means of compartmental nonlinear least-squares analysis using metabolite-corrected arterial input function and brain data processed with scatter correction using narrow-beam geometry μ (SC) and without scatter correction using broad-beam μ (NoSC). Effects of SC were markedly different among brain regions. SC increased activities in the putamen and thalamus after 1-1.5 h while it decreased activity during the entire experiment in the temporal cortex and cerebellum. Compared with NoSC, SC significantly increased specific distribution volume in the putamen (58%, P=0.0001) and thalamus (23%, P=0.0297). Compared with NoSC, SC made regional distribution of the specific distribution volume closer to that of [18F]fallypride. It is concluded that SC is required for accurate quantification of distribution volumes of receptor ligands in SPET studies. (orig.)

  11. Effect of scatter correction on the compartmental measurement of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptors using [{sup 123}I]epidepride SPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Masahiro; Seneca, Nicholas; Innis, Robert B. [Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine and VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT (United States); Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Varrone, Andrea [Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine and VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT (United States); Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute, National Research Council, Napoli (Italy); Kim, Kyeong Min; Watabe, Hiroshi; Iida, Hidehiro [Department of Investigative Radiology, National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Osaka (Japan); Zoghbi, Sami S. [Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine and VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT (United States); Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Department of Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine and VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT (United States); Tipre, Dnyanesh [Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Seibyl, John P. [Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Prior studies with anthropomorphic phantoms and single, static in vivo brain images have demonstrated that scatter correction significantly improves the accuracy of regional quantitation of single-photon emission tomography (SPET) brain images. Since the regional distribution of activity changes following a bolus injection of a typical neuroreceptor ligand, we examined the effect of scatter correction on the compartmental modeling of serial dynamic images of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptors using [{sup 123}I]epidepride. Eight healthy human subjects [age 30{+-}8 (range 22-46) years] participated in a study with a bolus injection of 373{+-}12 (354-389) MBq [{sup 123}I]epidepride and data acquisition over a period of 14 h. A transmission scan was obtained in each study for attenuation and scatter correction. Distribution volumes were calculated by means of compartmental nonlinear least-squares analysis using metabolite-corrected arterial input function and brain data processed with scatter correction using narrow-beam geometry {mu} (SC) and without scatter correction using broad-beam {mu} (NoSC). Effects of SC were markedly different among brain regions. SC increased activities in the putamen and thalamus after 1-1.5 h while it decreased activity during the entire experiment in the temporal cortex and cerebellum. Compared with NoSC, SC significantly increased specific distribution volume in the putamen (58%, P=0.0001) and thalamus (23%, P=0.0297). Compared with NoSC, SC made regional distribution of the specific distribution volume closer to that of [{sup 18}F]fallypride. It is concluded that SC is required for accurate quantification of distribution volumes of receptor ligands in SPET studies. (orig.)

  12. Disparate roles of marrow- and parenchymal cell-derived TLR4 signaling in murine LPS-induced systemic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Juskewitch, Justin E.; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Knudsen, Bruce E.; Knutson, Keith L.; Brunn, Gregory J.; Grande, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) occurs in a range of infectious and non-infectious disease processes. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) initiate such responses. We have shown that parenchymal cell TLR4 activation drives LPS-induced systemic inflammation; SIRS does not develop in mice lacking TLR4 expression on parenchymal cells. The parenchymal cell types whose TLR4 activation directs this process have not been identified. Employing a bone marrow transplant model to compartmentalize T...

  13. Identification of cytoskeletal elements enclosing the ATP pools that fuel human red blood cell membrane cation pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Haiyan; Puchulu-Campanella, Estela; Galan, Jacob A.; Tao, W. Andy; Low, Philip S.; Hoffman, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    The type of metabolic compartmentalization that occurs in red blood cells differs from the types that exist in most eukaryotic cells, such as intracellular organelles. In red blood cells (ghosts), ATP is sequestered within the cytoskeletal–membrane complex. These pools of ATP are known to directly fuel both the Na+/K+ and Ca2+ pumps. ATP can be entrapped within these pools either by incubation with bulk ATP or by operation of the phosphoglycerate kinase and pyruvate kinase reactions to enzyma...

  14. Cell surface acetylcholinesterase molecules on multinucleated myotubes are clustered over the nucleus of origin

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Multinucleated skeletal muscle fibers are compartmentalized with respect to the expression and organization of several intracellular and cell surface proteins including acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Mosaic muscle fibers formed from homozygous myoblasts expressing two allelic variants of AChE preferentially translate and assemble the polypeptides in the vicinity of the nucleus encoding the mRNA (Rotundo, R. L. 1990. J. Cell Biol. 110:715-719). To determine whether the locally synthesized AChE m...

  15. Lyophilized kits of diamino dithiol compounds for labelling with 99m-technetium. Pharmacokinetics studies and distribution compartmental models of the related complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work reflects the clinical interest for labelling diamino dithiol compounds with technetium-99m. Both chosen compounds, L,L-Ethylene dicysteine (L,L-EC) and L,L-Ethylene dicysteine diethyl esther (L,L-ECD) were obtained with relative good yield and characterized by IR and NMR. The study of labelling conditions with technetium-99m showed the influence of the type and mass of reducing agent as well as the pH on the formation of complexes with desired biological characteristics. Radiochemical purity was determined by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Lyophilised kits of L,L-EC and L,L-ECD for labelling with 99mTc were obtained, with stability superior to 120 days, when stored under refrigeration, enabling the kits marketing. The ideal formulation of the kits as well as the use of liquid nitrogen in the freezing process, determined the lyophilization success. Distribution biological studies of the 99mTc complexes were performed on mice by invasive method and on bigger animals by scintigraphic evaluation. Biological distribution studies of the complex 99mTc-L,L-EC showed fast blood clearance, with the elimination of about 90% of the administered dose after 60 minutes, almost exclusively by the urinary system. The biological distribution results were adjusted to a three compartmental distribution model, as expected for a radiopharmaceutical designed to renal dynamic studies, with tubular elimination. The complex interaction with renal tubular receptors is related with structural characteristics of the compound, more specifically with the presence and location of polar groups. In comparison with 99mTc-L,L-EC, biological studies of the complex 99mTc -L,L-ECD showed different distribution aspects, despite some structural similarities. The presence of ethyl groups confers to the complex neutrality and lipophilicity. It cross the intact blood brain barrier and is retained in the brain for enough period, permitting

  16. Estimate of FDG Excretion by means of Compartmental Analysis and Ant Colony Optimization of Nuclear Medicine Data

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Garbarino; Giacomo Caviglia; Massimo Brignone; Michela Massollo; Gianmario Sambuceti; Michele Piana

    2013-01-01

    [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is one of the most utilized tracers for positron emission tomography (PET) applications in oncology. FDG-PET relies on higher glycolytic activity in tumors compared to normal structures as the basis of image contrast. As a glucose analog, FDG is transported into malignant cells which typically exhibit an increased radioactivity. However, different from glucose, FDG is not reabsorbed by the renal system and is excreted to the bladder. The present paper de...

  17. Development of a paediatric population pharmacokinetic model for valacyclovir from literature non-compartmental values originating from sparse studies and Bayesian priors: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kechagia, Irene-Ariadne; Dokoumetzidis, Aristides

    2015-06-01

    A preliminary population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) model of valacyclovir in children was developed from non-compartmental analysis (NCA) parameter values from literature, including several age groups, combined with Bayesian priors from a PopPK model of acyclovir, the active metabolite of valacyclovir, from literature too. Also a simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performance of various modelling choices related to the estimation of model parameters from NCA parameters originating from sparse PK studies. Assuming a one-compartment model with first order absorption, a mixed effects, meta-analysis approach was utilized which allows accounting the random intergroup variability, the detection of covariates and the application of informative Bayesian priors on the parameters. The conclusions from the simulation study calculating bias and precision for various cases, were that a model which takes explicitly into account the sampling schedule, performs better than a model using the theoretical expressions of calculating the NCA parameters. Also by using the geometric rather than the arithmetic means of NCA parameters, less biased results are obtained. These findings guided the choices for the valacyclovir model, for which informative priors from a PopPK model of acyclovir were applied for some of the parameters, in order to include a richer covariate model for clearance, not supported by the NCA dataset and a value for bioavailability. This preliminary valacyclovir model can be used in simulations to provide dosage recommendations for children of various ages and to help design more efficiently prospective clinical trials. PMID:25821006

  18. Building America Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process - Queens, NY; Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis.
    CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  19. Compartmental analysis and dosimetric aspects applied to cholesterol with {sup 3}H labeled; Analise compartimental e aspectos dosimetricos aplicados ao colesterol marcado com {sup 3}H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Adriano dos Santos

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are one of the major reasons of death around the world according to the World Health Organization (WHO). It is well known that changes in levels of plasma lipoproteins, which are responsible for the transport of cholesterol into the bloodstream, are associated with cardiovascular diseases. For this reason to know the biokinetic parameters of plasma lipoproteins and quantifies them is important to correct and deep understanding about the diseases associated with these disorders. The main aim of this study is to provide a biokinetic model and estimate the radiometric doses for {sup 3}H-Cholesterol, a radioactive tracer widely used in physiological and metabolic studies. The model was based on [Schwartz et al. 2004] about the distribution of cholesterol by the lipoprotein and gastrointestinal model [ICRP 30, 1979]. The doses distribution in compartments of the model and other organs and tissues of a standard adult described in [ICRP 106, 2008] was calculated using MIRD method (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) and compartmental analysis using the computer program Matlab®. The dose coefficients were estimated for a standard phantom man (73 kg) described in [ICRP 60, 1991]. The estimated doses for both model and for other organs were low and did not exceed the highest dose obtained that was in the upper large intestine, as 44,8 μGy these parameters will assist in ethics committee's opinions on the use of works that use the {sup 3}H-cholesterol which radioactive tracer. (author)

  20. Compartmentalized and contrasted response of ectomycorrhizal and soil fungal communities of Scots pine forests along elevation gradients in France and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Ana; Santamaría-Pérez, Blanca; Rabasa, Sonia G; Coince, Aurore; Marçais, Benoit; Buée, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Fungi are principal actors of forest soils implied in many ecosystem services and the mediation of tree's responses. Forecasting fungal responses to environmental changes is necessary for maintaining forest productivity, although our partial understanding of how abiotic and biotic factors affect fungal communities is restricting the predictions. We examined fungal communities of Pinus sylvestris along elevation gradients to check potential responses to climate change-associated factors. Fungi of roots and soils were analysed at a regional scale, by using a high-throughput sequencing approach. Overall soil fungal richness increased with pH, whereas it did not vary with climate. However, when representative sub-assemblages, i.e. Ascomycetes/Basidiomycetes, and families were analysed, they differentially answered to climatic and edaphic variables. This response was dependent on where they settled, i.e. soil versus roots, and/or on their lifestyle, i.e. mycorrhizal or not, suggesting different potential functional weights within the community. Our results revealed a highly compartmentalized and contrasted response of fungal communities in forest soils. The different response of fungal sub-assemblages indicated a range of possible selective direct and indirect (i.e. via host) impacts of climatic variations on these communities, of unknown functional consequences, that helps in understanding potential fungal responses under future global change scenarios. PMID:25953485

  1. Transcriptomic analysis of Streptomyces coelicolor differentiation in solid sporulating cultures: first compartmentalized and second multinucleated mycelia have different and distinctive transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagüe, Paula; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; López-García, María T; Martín, Juan F; Rioseras, Beatriz; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Streptomycetes are very important industrial bacteria, which produce two thirds of all clinically relevant secondary metabolites. They have a complex developmental-cycle in which an early compartmentalized mycelium (MI) differentiates to a multinucleated mycelium (MII) that grows inside the culture medium (substrate mycelium) until it starts to growth into the air (aerial mycelium) and ends up forming spores. Streptomyces developmental studies have focused mainly on the later stages of MII differentiation (aerial mycelium and sporulation), with regulation of pre-sporulation stages (MI/MII transition) essentially unknown. This work represents the first study of the Streptomyces MI transcriptome, analyzing how it differs from the MII transcriptome. We have used a very conservative experimental approach to fractionate MI from MII and quantify gene expressions. The expression of well characterized key developmental/metabolic genes involved in bioactive compound production (actinorhodin, undecylprodigiosin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, cpk, geosmin) or hydrophobic cover formation-sporulation (bld, whi, wbl, rdl, chp, ram) was correlated with MII differentiation. Additionally, 122 genes conserved in the Streptomyces genus, whose biological function had not been previously characterized, were found to be differentially expressed (more than 4-fold) in MI or MII. These genes encoded for putative regulatory proteins (transcriptional regulators, kinases), as well as hypothetical proteins. Knowledge about differences between the MI (vegetative) and MII (reproductive) transcriptomes represents a huge advance in Streptomyces biology that will make future experiments possible aimed at characterizing the biochemical pathways controlling pre-sporulation developmental stages and activation of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces. PMID:23555999

  2. Application of the compartmental analysis theory to the studies of the kinetics of the rainfall infiltration in the unsaturated zone in Abadia de Goias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compartmental analysis was used for evaluation of kinetic parameters of the rainfall infiltration and determination of ground water recharge in Abadia-Goiania-Brazil. A model containing 13 compartments was proposed to explain the water infiltration and the kinetics of the unsaturated zone. To validate the model, tracer injections were carried out at a representative site of the region, at a depth of 50 cm, below the root zone. Soil samples were taken 4,9 and 12 months after the injection. In the first compartment, one component of the evaporation (K4,0) was considered and for the last compartment, one constant of removal for the water table (k13,0). Compartments 1, 2 and 3 were added to the system to consider precipitation effect. The AnaComp program, developed at IPEN, was used to determine the transfer constants ki,j ( from compartment i to compartment j)were i and j range from 0 to 13. In this program the constants ki,j were determined by the nonlinear last squares method, using eigenvalues - eigenvectors routines or alternatively, the fourth order Runge-Kutta routine. In this compartment model, the radioactive tracer was introduced as a single pulse, into the 6th compartment (50 cm depth). This permits to characterize the tracer diffusion processes in the soil studied. The adopted model showed an explanation coefficient f2 equal to 0.78, which is satisfactory for the methodology used. (author)

  3. Microfluidic high-throughput culturing of single cells for selection based on extracellular metabolite production or consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Benjamin L.; Ghaderi, Adel; Zhou, Hang; Agresti, Jeremy; David A Weitz; Fink, Gerald R; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Phenotyping single cells based on the products they secrete or consume is a key bottleneck in many biotechnology applications, such as combinatorial metabolic engineering for the overproduction of secreted metabolites. Here we present a flexible high-throughput approach that uses microfluidics to compartmentalize individual cells for growth and analysis in monodisperse nanoliter aqueous droplets surrounded by an immiscible fluorinated oil phase. We use this system to identify xylose-overconsu...

  4. Contribution of Chitinase A’s C-Terminal Vacuolar Sorting Determinant to the Study of Soluble Protein Compartmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidio Stigliano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant chitinases have been studied for their importance in the defense of crop plants from pathogen attacks and for their peculiar vacuolar sorting determinants. A peculiarity of the sequence of many family 19 chitinases is the presence of a C-terminal extension that seems to be important for their correct recognition by the vacuole sorting machinery. The 7 amino acids long C-terminal vacuolar sorting determinant (CtVSD of tobacco chitinase A is necessary and sufficient for the transport to the vacuole. This VSD shares no homology with other CtVSDs such as the phaseolin’s tetrapeptide AFVY (AlaPheValTyr and it is also sorted by different mechanisms. While a receptor for this signal has not yet been convincingly identified, the research using the chitinase CtVSD has been very informative, leading to the observation of phenomena otherwise difficult to observe such as the presence of separate vacuoles in differentiating cells and the existence of a Golgi-independent route to the vacuole. Thanks to these new insights in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER-to-vacuole transport, GFPChi (Green Fluorescent Protein carrying the chitinase A CtVSD and other markers based on chitinase signals will continue to help the investigation of vacuolar biogenesis in plants.

  5. Krüppel-like factor 9 regulates cell proliferation and compartmental expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in the mouse uterine endometrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The uterine endometrium undergoes dynamic changes in proliferation and differentiation in response to estrogen (E) and progesterone (P) during the estrous cycle and pregnancy. E and P exert their functions through their respective nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ESR) and progesterone receptor ...

  6. Expression of the Ly-6 family proteins Lynx1 and Ly6H in the rat brain is compartmentalized, cell-type specific, and developmentally regulated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Cinar, Betül; Jensen, Majbrit Myrup;

    2014-01-01

    The Ly-6 superfamily of proteins, which affects diverse processes in the immune system, has attracted renewed attention due to the ability of some Ly-6 proteins to bind to and modulate the function of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). However, there is a scarcity of knowledge r...

  7. Refinement of the kinetic model of the 2-[14C]deoxyglucose method to incorporate effects of intracellular compartmentation in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A translocase to transport hexose phosphate formed in the cytosol into the cisterns of the endoplasmic reticulum, where the phosphatase resides, is absent in brain. 2-Deoxyglucose-6-phosphate (DG-6-P) may therefore have limited access to glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase), and transport of the DG-6-P across the endoplasmic reticular membrane may be rate limiting to its dephosphorylation. To take this compartmentation into account, a five-rate constant (5K) model was developed to describe the kinetic behavior of 2-deoxyglucose (DG) and its phosphorylated product in brain. Loss of DG-6-P was modeled as a two-step process: (a) transfer of DG-6-P from the cytosol into the cisterns of the endoplasmic reticulum; (b) hydrolysis of DG-6-P by G-6-Pase and subsequent return of the free DG to the precursor pool. Local CMRglc (LCMRglc) was calculated in the rat on the basis of this model and compared with values calculated on the basis of the three-rate constant (3K) and the four-rate constant (4K) models of the DG method. The results show that under normal physiological conditions all three models yield values of LCMRglc that are essentially equivalent for experimental periods between 25 and 45 min. Therefore, the simplest model, the 3K model, is sufficient. For experimental periods from 60 to 120 min, the 4K and 5K models do not correct completely for loss of product, but the 5K model does yield estimates of LCMRglc that are closer to the values at 45 min than those obtained with the 3K and 4K models

  8. Synthesis, crystal structures and theoretical studies of dinuclear Mn(II) and Ni(II) complexes of phenol-based "end-off" compartmental ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Atanu; Das, Kinsuk; Konar, Saugata; Dhara, Anamika; Biswas, Sujan; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Two novel complexes [Mn2(phmp)2](ClO4)2 (1) and [Ni2(phmp)(μ-H2O)(H2O)4](NO3)3 (2) were synthesized using an "end-off" compartmental ligand [H-phmp = 4-Methyl-2,6-bis-(pyridin-2-yl-hydrazonomethyl)-phenol] with Mn(II)-perchlorate and Ni(II)-nitrate salts as metal precursors. Both these complexes were characterized by spectroscopic (IR, UV-Vis) and X-ray crystal structure analysis. The ligand, H-phmp acts as a pentadentate NNONN donor for both the metal complexes and the geometry of the complexes 1 and 2 is distorted octahedral. The DFT optimized bond distances and angles are well correlate to the X-ray structure bond parameters. For complex 1 the transitions at 435 nm and 428 nm have mixed MLCT (dπ(Mn) → π*(L)) and ILCT (π(L) → π*(L)) character whereas other transitions correspond to intra-ligand charge transfer transitions (ILCT). For complex 2, weak transitions at 464 and 405 nm correspond to ligand to metal charge transfer transitions (LMCT) (π(L) → dπ(Ni)) and most of the other transitions have ILCT character. As anticipated, various weak forces, i.e. anion-π/π-anion/anion-π/π-NH interactions as well as C-H/π interaction, play a key role in stabilizing the self-assembly process observed for both compounds.

  9. Studies of labelling conditions for gentamicin with sup(99m)Tc. Complexation with ruthexium. Establishment of pharmacokinetics parameters through compartmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentamicin sulphate is an aminoglycoside antibiotic type specifically used for treatment of infections produced by Gram-negative bacterias but at the other hand it presents ototoxic reactions as a serious side effect. The main purpose of labelling gentamicin with sup(99m)Tc was to obtain a radioactive tracer to carry out biological studies and compartmental analysis of this antibiotic. The optimal labelling conditions of gentamicin sulphate with sup(99m)Tc, using sodium pertechnetate solution eluted from a sup(99)Mo- sup(99m)Tc generator, were stablished by testing different masses of antibiotic, and reduction agent (SnCl sub(2).2H sub(2)O), and also different reaction time and final labelling PH. The same labelling procedure was used with Re (amonium perrenate) in order to obtain some semi-quantitative approximations of the chemical structure of the complex formed, since Re and Tc present similar chemical characteristics. In this way it is possible to suggest the role that the groups NH2 and C-O bonding of the gentamicin play in the complexation process. From the studies of the biological uptake of sup(99m)Tc-gentamicin sulphate in rats, the kidneys showed the highest affinity for the antibiotic. The maximum uptake was observed in 180 to 240 minutes followed by a decrease of it afterwards. For the dose and time used, no significative uptake by the auricular region was detected. Curve of plasma decay of sup(99m)Tc-gentamicin was obtained, and from the exponentials of each beanch of this curve respective half-lives were calculated. Furthermore the apparent volume of distribution was determined, and with the residual radioactivity in the body, the biological half-life and total clearance were obtained. The distribution of sup(99m)Tc-gentamicin in rats was set in a bi-compartments in addition to a retention one for the 24 hours time interval studied. (author)

  10. Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphates-at the interface between cell signalling and membrane traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marat, Andrea L; Haucke, Volker

    2016-03-15

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) form a minor class of phospholipids with crucial functions in cell physiology, ranging from cell signalling and motility to a role as signposts of compartmental membrane identity. Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphates are present at the plasma membrane and within the endolysosomal system, where they serve as key regulators of both cell signalling and of intracellular membrane traffic. Here, we provide an overview of the metabolic pathways that regulate cellular synthesis of PI 3-phosphates at distinct intracellular sites and discuss the mechanisms by which these lipids regulate cell signalling and membrane traffic. Finally, we provide a framework for how PI 3-phosphate metabolism is integrated into the cellular network. PMID:26888746

  11. Asymmetric division triggers cell-specific gene expression through coupled capture and stabilization of a phosphatase

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, Niels; Losick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Formation of a division septum near a randomly chosen pole during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis creates unequal sized daughter cells with dissimilar programs of gene expression. An unanswered question is how polar septation activates a transcription factor (σF) selectively in the small cell. We present evidence that the upstream regulator of σF, the phosphatase SpoIIE, is compartmentalized in the small cell by transfer from the polar septum to the adjacent cell pole where SpoIIE is protect...

  12. Virtual microfluidics for digital quantification and single-cell sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liyi; Brito, Ilana L; Alm, Eric J; Blainey, Paul C

    2016-09-01

    We have developed hydrogel-based virtual microfluidics as a simple and robust alternative to complex engineered microfluidic systems for the compartmentalization of nucleic acid amplification reactions. We applied in-gel digital multiple displacement amplification (dMDA) to purified DNA templates, cultured bacterial cells and human microbiome samples in the virtual microfluidics system, and demonstrated whole-genome sequencing of single-cell MDA products with excellent coverage uniformity and markedly reduced chimerism compared with products of liquid MDA reactions. PMID:27479330

  13. Ultra–Short-Term Reproducibility of Speckle-Noise Freed Fluid and Tissue Compartmentalization of the Choroid Analyzed by Standard OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloca, Peter; Gyger, Cyrill; Schoetzau, Andreas; Hasler, Pascal W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We measured reproducibility of speckle-noise freed fluid and tissue compartmentalization of the choroid (choroidal angiography and tissue characterization). Methods This study included 26 eyes of 13 healthy females: 13 were used for repeated measurements and 13 were used for side comparison. A semiautomated algorithm removed speckle-noise with structure preservation. Results Intraclass correlation (ICC), with respect to reproducibility of the method, showed an ICC for choroidal fluid inner space analysis (FISA) of 95.15% (90.01–98.24). The ICC of tissue inner space analysis (TISA) was 99.75% (99.47–99.91). The total choroid ratio (TCR), calculated from volumes of tissue to vessels, showed an ICC of 88.84% (78.28–95.82). Comparison of eyes (left to right) showed a difference for FISA of 0.033 (95% confidence interval [CI] −0.0018–0.0680, P = 0.063), TISA −0.118 (CI −0.2373–0.0023, P = 0.055), and TCR −0.590 (CI −0.9047 to −0.2754, P = 0.004). The ICC for FISA and TISA showed a trend in the difference comparing left and right eyes; however, TCR showed a significant difference between the eyes in the measured area (P TISA was 3.45 mm3 (range, 2.38–5.0 mm3, SD 0.072). Mean TCR was 6.13 (overall range, 3.93–10.2, SD = 1.34). Conclusions Differences in choroidal layers between subjects were found mainly due to alterations in choroidal tissue. Reproducibility of speckle-noise freed choroidal angiography appeared excellent. Translational Relevance Speckle noise is a granular “noise” that appears in a wide range of medical imaging methods as ultrasonography, magnetic resonance, computer tomography, or optical coherence tomography (OCT). Findings from basic science about speckle noise were translated into a novel, medical image postprocessing application that can separate signal from speckle noise with structure preservation with high reproducibility and enhance medical imaging. PMID:26629399

  14. Development and compartmentalization of chalky carbonate reservoirs: The Urgonian Jura-Bas Dauphiné platform model (Génissiat, southeastern France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, J.; Sizun, J. P.; Machhour, L.

    2007-06-01

    The chalky limestones of the upper Barremian-middle Aptian Urgonian Limestone Formation of the Jura-Bas Dauphiné platform (southeastern France) are characterised by a total porosity between 17.9 and 24.5%, a threshold radius between 1.04 and 2.13 μm, a trapped porosity between 51.4 and 68.3% and a gas permeability between 161 and 410 mD. They were formed in response to the diagenetic evolution of dominantly micritic sediments deposited during a "calcite sea" interval. Their present-day reservoir qualities and transport properties are controlled by the intercrystalline microporosity of microcrystalline areas (peloids or matrix). This intercrystalline microporosity is the product of a meteoric porewater input (installation of a shallow-burial phreatic environment characterised by a short residence time of porewaters) which promoted an aggrading neomorphism (Ostwald ripening process). The impact of the burial diagenesis on the reservoir qualities and the transport properties of these chalky limestones is limited. The chalky units are presently compartmentalized by horizontal layers of compact limestones characterised by a total porosity between 2.9 and 4.5%, a threshold radius between 0.04 and 0.09 μm, a trapped porosity of 92.4-92.8% and a gas permeability of 2 mD. Like the chalky limestones, the present-day reservoir qualities and transport properties of compact limestones are controlled by the intercrystalline microporosity of microcrystalline areas. The petrophysical differences between the chalky and compact limestones result from differences in the pore network of microcrystalline areas due to an increase in the average size of particles and a modification of crystal-crystal contacts. These petrographical differences reflect an evolution of micritic areas of original sediments during submarine lithifications (precipitation of microcrystalline cements within the pore space and/or an increase in solid-solid contacts by crystal growth) which preceded the

  15. Fluid flow compartmentalization in the Sicilian fold and thrust belt: Implications for the regional aqueous fluid flow and oil migration history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewever, B.; Swennen, R.; Breesch, L.

    2013-04-01

    The fluid flow history in the frontal part of the Sicilian fold and thrust belt (FTB) has been reconstructed using an integrated structural, petrographic, geochemical and microthermometric approach. The study focused on comparing fluid flow during progressive deformation along major thrust horizons and in pelagic sediments occurring in the associated thrust sheets (foot- and hanging wall). A fluid flow model is constructed for the frontal part of the Sicilian FTB. Syn-deformational quartz and calcite have been precipitated along décollement horizons in the Iudica-Scalpello study area. The microthermometric analysis of fluid inclusions in the quartz and calcite indicated migration of low saline high temperature aqueous fluids (- 1.5 history in the thrust sheets can be subdivided into two stages. Calcite of types 1 and 2 has identical light orange cathodoluminescence as the surrounding mudstone. Furthermore, its isotope signature (2 history. Type 3 calcite is volumetrically by far the most important calcite phase. It occurs in (hydro-)fractures that are limited to the hanging wall of major thrusts and within major strike-slip faults that are interpreted as transfer faults as a result of thrust development. The presence of associated fluorite suggests more open fluid flow conditions during the final stages of the fluid flow history. Fluorite is characterized by low salinity fluid inclusions (- 2.6 < Tm < - 1.6 °C) with Th between 80 and 140 °C. Type 3 calcite has less depleted δ18O values compared to calcite of types 1 and 2 and the δ18O from calcite in faults is even positive. During the final stages of fluid flow with precipitation of calcite type 3, the fluid flow model invokes infiltration of overpressured fluids that migrated along the décollement zone. These fluids only infiltrate the thrust sheet in the hanging wall of the thrust, leading to a compartmentalized fluid flow pattern. An identical fluid flow pattern with migration of low and hot saline fluids

  16. Modelagem por compartimentos para integrar e comunicar conhecimento em nutrição Compartmental modeling to integrate and communicate nutritional knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar O. Oviedo-Rondón

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Esta palestra tem o objetivo de apresentar e discutir metodologias utilizadas para modelar e integrar o conhecimento clássico em nutrição animal, e o produzido por novas ciências moleculares como nutrigenoma, proteoma e metaboloma. Estas ciências e a bioinformática estão ajudando a expandir rapidamente o conhecimento dos sistemas biológicos de interesse em nutrição animal. Na palestra discutirei como é importante dedicar parte de nosso tempo a integrar o conhecimento existente para esclarecer os problemas em pesquisa, utilizando as ferramentas mais adequadas para evitar duplicação de pesquisas, que causam desperdício de recursos humanos, econômicos, e de tempo. A modelagem matemática por compartimentos utilizando programas de computador pode ser a melhor maneira de acumular estas informações, integrar diferentes descobertas, e comunicar o conhecimento atual dos sistemas, e do metabolismo de nutrientes às novas gerações, e avançar na determinação mais adequada das exigências nutricionais.This presentation aims to present and discuss methodologies used to model and integrate classical knowledge in animal nutrition, and new discoveries produced by new molecular sciences like nutrigenomics, proteomics and metabolomics. These sciences and bioinformatics are helping to expand >very quickly the knowledge of the biological systems of interest in animal nutrition. I will discuss the importance of dedicating part of our efforts to integrate current knowledge to prioritize research problems using the most adequate tools. This will help to avoid research duplication that causes waste of valuable resources. Compartmental mathematical modeling using computer software could be one of the best ways to accumulate this information. It can help to integrate new discoveries, communicate the knowledge about animal systems and nutrient metabolism to a new generation of scientists, and advance to more accurate determination of nutrient

  17. Development of droplets‐based microfluidic systems for single­‐cell high‐throughput screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jun; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam; Godina, Alexei;

    2014-01-01

    investment, and a logarithmic increase to screen large combinatorial libraries over the decades also makes it gradually out of depth. Here, we are trying to develop a feasible high‐throughput system that uses microfluidics to compartmentalize a single cell for propagation and analysis in monodisperse...... picoliter aqueous droplets surround by an immiscible fluorinated oil phase. Our aim is to use this system to facilitate the screening process for both the biotechnology and food industry....

  18. A Structured Population Model of Cell Differentiation

    CERN Document Server

    Doumic, Marie; Perthame, Benoit; Zubelli, Jorge P

    2010-01-01

    We introduce and analyze several aspects of a new model for cell differentiation. It assumes that differentiation of progenitor cells is a continuous process. From the mathematical point of view, it is based on partial differential equations of transport type. Specifically, it consists of a structured population equation with a nonlinear feedback loop. This models the signaling process due to cytokines, which regulate the differentiation and proliferation process. We compare the continuous model to its discrete counterpart, a multi-compartmental model of a discrete collection of cell subpopulations recently proposed by Marciniak-Czochra et al. in 2009 to investigate the dynamics of the hematopoietic system. We obtain uniform bounds for the solutions, characterize steady state solutions, and analyze their linearized stability. We show how persistence or extinction might occur according to values of parameters that characterize the stem cells self-renewal. We also perform numerical simulations and discuss the q...

  19. Isolation of Cells Specialized in Anticancer Alkaloid Metabolism by Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carqueijeiro, Inês; Guimarães, Ana Luísa; Bettencourt, Sara; Martínez-Cortés, Teresa; Guedes, Joana G; Gardner, Rui; Lopes, Telma; Andrade, Cláudia; Bispo, Cláudia; Martins, Nuno Pimpão; Andrade, Paula; Valentão, Patrícia; Valente, Inês M; Rodrigues, José A; Duarte, Patrícia; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2016-08-01

    Plant specialized metabolism often presents a complex cell-specific compartmentation essential to accomplish the biosynthesis of valuable plant natural products. Hence, the disclosure and potential manipulation of such pathways may depend on the capacity to isolate and characterize specific cell types. Catharanthus roseus is the source of several medicinal terpenoid indole alkaloids, including the low-level anticancer vinblastine and vincristine, for which the late biosynthetic steps occur in specialized mesophyll cells called idioblasts. Here, the optical, fluorescence, and alkaloid-accumulating properties of C. roseus leaf idioblasts are characterized, and a methodology for the isolation of idioblast protoplasts by fluorescence-activated cell sorting is established, taking advantage of the distinctive autofluorescence of these cells. This achievement represents a crucial step for the development of differential omic strategies leading to the identification of candidate genes putatively involved in the biosynthesis, pathway regulation, and transmembrane transport leading to the anticancer alkaloids from C. roseus. PMID:27356972

  20. Relationship Between Kinetics of Inflow and Outflow as the Basis of a Computer Simulation for Solving Compartmental Models: Example of Electrolyte Transfers in Cardiovascular Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method commonly used for the study of the distribution of a substance among the different spaces ol a biological tissue is the continuous washout (outflow) and isotope counting of fragments of tissue previously incubated with a tracer. A first order kinetics compartmental system can be postulated and characterized by the transport rates (k) at which the substance of interest moves across its different compartments. Direct solution from the outflow data requires knowledge of the initial conditions for, or to have access for measurements in, each compartment. This cannot be fulfilled in most biological problems. In the course of studying 22Na distribution in segments of arteries a digital computer simulation approach was developed to solve the system. In the belief that the approach transcends this particular application, its mathematical basis is herein presented: the movement of radioactive tracer obeys ∣ dq/d ∣ = - ∣k∣ ∣q∣ + ∣r∣ (1) where |q| is a vector of response functions for each compartment, |k] is a square matrix of transport rate constants and |r| is a vector of input rates to the system. Solution of Eq. 1 is ∣q∣ = e-∣k∣t ∫0t e∣k∣t ∣r∣ dt + e-∣k∣t ∣q0∣ (2) (i) For an inflow experiment, with 0 initial conditions and a constant unit input rate |ru| ∣q∣ = (∣I∣ - e-∣k∣t) ∣k∣-1 ∣ru (3) as t --> ∞, ∣q∞∣ = ∣k∣-1∣ru∣, which replaced in Eq. 3, ∣q∣ =∣q∞∣ -e-∣k∣t ∣q∞∣ (4) (ii) For an outflow experiment ∣r∣ = 0 and Eq. 2 becomes ∣q∣ = e-∣k∣t ∣q0∣ (5) where ∣ q0 ∣ is a vector of initial conditions. For a system where the tracee is in steady state, the tracer final conditions ∣ q∞ ∣ of the inflow experiment are the initial conditions ∣ q0 ∣ of the outflow experiment. The SAAM program has been used on an IBM 360-50/75 computer. The computer simulates the inflow according to Eq. 3 by assigning to the k's some estimate values with zero boundary

  1. Visualization of the Nucleolus in Living Cells with Cell-Penetrating Fluorescent Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robert M; Herce, Henry D; Ludwig, Anne K; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is the hallmark of nuclear compartmentalization and has been shown to exert multiple roles in cellular metabolism besides its main function as the place of ribosomal RNA synthesis and assembly of ribosomes. The nucleolus plays also a major role in nuclear organization as the largest compartment within the nucleus. The prominent structure of the nucleolus can be detected using contrast light microscopy providing an approximate localization of the nucleolus, but this approach does not allow to determine accurately the three-dimensional structure of the nucleolus in cells and tissues. Immunofluorescence staining with antibodies specific to nucleolar proteins albeit very useful is time consuming, normally antibodies recognize their epitopes only within a small range of species and is applicable only in fixed cells. Here, we present a simple method to selectively and accurately label this ubiquitous subnuclear compartment in living cells of a large range of species using a fluorescently labeled cell-penetrating peptide. PMID:27576711

  2. Hydro-isotope Mixing Cell model for assessing fluxes in complex aquifers undergoing transient hydrochemical and isotopic evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to develop a flow model that will enable identification of the hydraulic parameters and quantitative calculation of groundwater fluxes in a complex and transient hydrogeological system in which the piezometric heads and the spatial distribution of solutes varies with time. In such a system the boundaries and hydrological conditions along the boundaries are not sufficiently clear or distinct, and there is a lack of hydrogeological and hydrochemical information. Thus it is difficult to construct, solve and calibrate a hydrological model based on the continuity equation. The algorithm proposed in this study is therefore based on a more simplistic approach in which the flow domain is subdivided into pseudo-homogeneous flow cells forming a multi-compartmental flow model. The creation of the multi-compartmental structure is based on spatial distribution of dissolved ions and isotopes in a transient hydrological system. (author)

  3. The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 substitutes for the cap-binding protein eIF4E to promote compartmentalized translation initiation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Rubilar, Paulina S; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2013-07-01

    Here, we show a novel molecular mechanism promoted by the DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 for translation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA. This occurs through the adenosine triphosphate-dependent formation of a translation initiation complex that is assembled at the 5' m(7)GTP cap of the HIV-1 mRNA. This is due to the property of DDX3 to substitute for the initiation factor eIF4E in the binding of the HIV-1 m(7)GTP 5' cap structure where it nucleates the formation of a core DDX3/PABP/eIF4G trimeric complex on the HIV-1 genomic RNA. By using RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled to indirect immunofluorescence, we further show that this viral ribonucleoprotein complex is addressed to compartmentalized cytoplasmic foci where the translation initiation complex is assembled. PMID:23630313

  4. Pectinous cell wall thickenings formation - A common defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzesłowska, Magdalena; Rabęda, Irena; Basińska, Aneta; Lewandowski, Michał; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Napieralska, Anna; Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Woźny, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Lead, one of the most abundant and hazardous trace metals affecting living organisms, has been commonly detected in plant cell walls including some tolerant plants, mining ecotypes and hyperaccumulators. We have previously shown that in tip growing Funaria sp. protonemata cell wall is remodeled in response to lead by formation of thickenings rich in low-methylesterified pectins (pectin epitope JIM5 - JIM5-P) able to bind metal ions, which accumulate large amounts of Pb. Hence, it leads to the increase of cell wall capacity for Pb compartmentalization. Here we show that diverse plant species belonging to different phyla (Arabidopsis, hybrid aspen, star duckweed), form similar cell wall thickenings in response to Pb. These thickenings are formed in tip growing cells such as the root hairs, and in diffuse growing cells such as meristematic and root cap columella cells of root apices in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis and in mesophyll cells in star duckweed fronds. Notably, all analyzed cell wall thickenings were abundant in JIM5-P and accumulated high amounts of Pb. In addition, the co-localization of JIM5-P and Pb commonly occurred in these cells. Hence, cell wall thickenings formed the extra compartment for Pb accumulation. In this way plant cells increased cell wall capacity for compartmentalization of this toxic metal, protecting protoplast from its toxicity. As cell wall thickenings occurred in diverse plant species and cell types differing in the type of growth we may conclude that pectinous cell wall thickenings formation is a widespread defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb. Moreover, detection of natural defense strategy, increasing plant cell walls capacity for metal accumulation, reveals a promising direction for enhancing plant efficiency in phytoremediation. PMID:27107260

  5. 空气重金属元素在悬铃木叶中的亚细胞分布及其区隔化效应%Subcellular Distribution and Compartmentalization Effects of Heavy Metal Elements from Atmosphere in Platanus hispanica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王爱霞; 方炎明

    2011-01-01

    以南京市常见行道树二球悬铃木为试材,研究了交通繁忙区和相对清洁区道路两边悬铃木叶内6种重金属元素的亚细胞分布及其区隔化效应.结果显示:交通污染区悬铃木叶内各亚细胞组分中Cr、Cu、Ni、Pb和Zn 5种重金属元素的含量均明显高于对照区,交通空气污染是影响其含量增加的主要原因之一.相对清洁区和交通污染区5种重金属元素在悬铃木叶片、叶柄的细胞壁组分中含量最高,胞外隔离系数和污染指数均大于0.900,细胞壁是大气重金属元素重要的吸滞器官,并对重金属有明显的阻隔效应;胞内细胞器对Pb和Cu的隔离系数和污染指数最大,细胞器双层膜能在一定程度上抵御重金属元素进入细胞内.悬铃木叶片和叶柄亚细胞组分的污染指数表现为胞质组分>细胞壁组分>细胞器组分,即包括液泡液在内的胞质组分是囤积重金属元素的场所.研究表明,悬铃木叶片、叶柄各亚细胞组分对重金属均有不同程度的累积能力,叶内胞质组分的囤积作用以及细胞壁、质膜与细胞器双层膜的区隔化作用可能是悬铃木叶解除重金属元素毒害的重要原因.%Common street trees Platanus hispanica in Nanjing were used to study subcellular distribution and compartmentalization effects of six heavy metal elements (Pb,Cd,Cr,Cu,Ni and Zn) in its’ leaves on both sides of the road in the heavy traffic areas and the relatively clean area.The results showed that:The contents of 5 heavy metal elements (except Cd) in the heavy traffic areas were significantly greater than that in the relatively clean areas,which means transportation pollution was one of the major causes in increasing heavy metal element contents.5 elements accumulation (except Cd) in cell wall fractions of leaves and petioles were the highest the heavy traffic areas,and extracellular segregation coefficient and the pollution index was greater than 0

  6. Recent Theoretical Approaches to Minimal Artificial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Mavelli

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Minimal artificial cells (MACs are self-assembled chemical systems able to mimic the behavior of living cells at a minimal level, i.e. to exhibit self-maintenance, self-reproduction and the capability of evolution. The bottom-up approach to the construction of MACs is mainly based on the encapsulation of chemical reacting systems inside lipid vesicles, i.e. chemical systems enclosed (compartmentalized by a double-layered lipid membrane. Several researchers are currently interested in synthesizing such simple cellular models for biotechnological purposes or for investigating origin of life scenarios. Within this context, the properties of lipid vesicles (e.g., their stability, permeability, growth dynamics, potential to host reactions or undergo division processes… play a central role, in combination with the dynamics of the encapsulated chemical or biochemical networks. Thus, from a theoretical standpoint, it is very important to develop kinetic equations in order to explore first—and specify later—the conditions that allow the robust implementation of these complex chemically reacting systems, as well as their controlled reproduction. Due to being compartmentalized in small volumes, the population of reacting molecules can be very low in terms of the number of molecules and therefore their behavior becomes highly affected by stochastic effects both in the time course of reactions and in occupancy distribution among the vesicle population. In this short review we report our mathematical approaches to model artificial cell systems in this complex scenario by giving a summary of three recent simulations studies on the topic of primitive cell (protocell systems.

  7. A Method for Detecting Circulating Tumor Cells Based on the Measurement of Single-Cell Metabolism in Droplet-Based Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ben, Fabio; Turetta, Matteo; Celetti, Giorgia; Piruska, Aigars; Bulfoni, Michela; Cesselli, Daniela; Huck, Wilhelm T S; Scoles, Giacinto

    2016-07-18

    The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood is strongly correlated with the progress of metastatic cancer. Current methods to detect CTCs are based on immunostaining or discrimination of physical properties. Herein, a label-free method is presented exploiting the abnormal metabolic behavior of cancer cells. A single-cell analysis technique is used to measure the secretion of acid from individual living tumor cells compartmentalized in microfluidically prepared, monodisperse, picoliter (pL) droplets. As few as 10 tumor cells can be detected in a background of 200 000 white blood cells and proof-of-concept data is shown on the detection of CTCs in the blood of metastatic patients. PMID:27247024

  8. Monodisperse Picoliter Droplets for Low-Bias and Contamination-Free Reactions in Single-Cell Whole Genome Amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Nishikawa

    Full Text Available Whole genome amplification (WGA is essential for obtaining genome sequences from single bacterial cells because the quantity of template DNA contained in a single cell is very low. Multiple displacement amplification (MDA, using Phi29 DNA polymerase and random primers, is the most widely used method for single-cell WGA. However, single-cell MDA usually results in uneven genome coverage because of amplification bias, background amplification of contaminating DNA, and formation of chimeras by linking of non-contiguous chromosomal regions. Here, we present a novel MDA method, termed droplet MDA, that minimizes amplification bias and amplification of contaminants by using picoliter-sized droplets for compartmentalized WGA reactions. Extracted DNA fragments from a lysed cell in MDA mixture are divided into 105 droplets (67 pL within minutes via flow through simple microfluidic channels. Compartmentalized genome fragments can be individually amplified in these droplets without the risk of encounter with reagent-borne or environmental contaminants. Following quality assessment of WGA products from single Escherichia coli cells, we showed that droplet MDA minimized unexpected amplification and improved the percentage of genome recovery from 59% to 89%. Our results demonstrate that microfluidic-generated droplets show potential as an efficient tool for effective amplification of low-input DNA for single-cell genomics and greatly reduce the cost and labor investment required for determination of nearly complete genome sequences of uncultured bacteria from environmental samples.

  9. Regulation of Cytoplasmic and Vacuolar Volumes by Plant Cells in Suspension Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Poole, Ronald J

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative microscopical measurements have been made of the proportion of cell volume occupied by cytoplasm in a cell suspension culture derived from cotyledons of bush bean (cv. Contender). On a 7-day culture cycle, the content of cytoplasm varies from 25% at the time of transfer to 45% at the...... start of the phase of rapid cell division. If the culture is continued beyond 7 days, the vacuole volume reaches 90% of cell volume by day 12.Attempts to measure relative cytoplasmic volumes by compartmental analysis of nonelectrolyte efflux were unsuccessful. The proportion of cell volume occupied by...... cytoplasm is roughly correlated with protein content, but shows no correlation with cell size or with intracellular concentrations of K or Na. The most striking observation is that the growth of cytoplasmic volume for the culture as a whole appears to be constant throughout the culture cycle, despite...

  10. Fabrication of pixilated architecture large panel organic flexible solar cell by reducing bulk electrical resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panag, Jasmeet Singh

    This study investigates experimentally the photovoltaic behavior and performance of a new pixilated architecture of large organic photovoltaic panels made of a large array of high-aspect ratio three-dimensional pillars surrounded by a matrix of polymer photoactive material. A least addressed problem in organic and thin-film solar cells is the high bulk resistance of cathodic and anodic layers that result in drastic reduction of currents and power conversion efficiency (PCE). For such panels to be practical and commercially competitive, this huge bulk-resistance has to be minimized as much as possible. In this study, therefore, we introduce a new novel architecture that essentially compartmentalizes large panels into smaller modules that are connected to each other in a parallel fashion. In this architecture, the metal cathode layer is applied on the top as a series of lines whereas the anodic layer is independently connected to the pixilated cells at the bottom. As a result, these modules act like independent pixel cells wherein the damage from process and operation is limited individual pixel cells. The factors considered in validating the pixilated architecture presented here consisted of effect of number of pixels on efficiency and bulk electrical resistance. In addition, the study shows that pixilated architecture offers more uniform photoactive layers, and hence better photovoltaic performance because of the compartmentalization.

  11. Suofu Qin’s work on studies of cell survival signaling in cancer and epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) encompass a variety of diverse chemical species including superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radicals and peroxynitrite, which are mainly produced via mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, enzymatic reactions, and light-initiated lipid peroxidation. Over-production of ROS and/or decrease in the antioxidant capacity cause cells to undergo oxi- dative stress that damages cellular macromolecules such as proteins, lipids, and DNA. Oxidative stress is associated with ageing and the development of agerelated diseases such as cancer and age-related macular degeneration. ROS activate signaling pathways that promote cell survival or lead to cell death, depending on the source and site of ROS production, the specific ROS generated, the concentration and kinetics of ROS generation, and the cell types being challenged. However, how the nature and compartmentalization of ROS contribute to the pathogenesis of individual diseases is poorly understood. Consequently, it is crucial to gain a comprehensive understanding of the molecular bases of cell oxidative stress signaling, which will then provide novel therapeutic opportunities to interfere with disease progression via targeting specific signaling pathways.Currently, Dr. Qin’s work is focused on inflammatory and oxidative stress responses using the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells as a model. The study of RPE cell inflammatory and oxidative stress responses has successfully led to a better understanding of RPE cell biology and identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  12. Compartmentalization of membrane trafficking, glucose transport, glycolysis, actin, tubulin and the proteasome in the cytoplasmic droplet/Hermes body of epididymal sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Catherine E; Hermo, Louis; Byrne, Elliot; Smirle, Jeffrey; Fazel, Ali; Kearney, Robert E; Smith, Charles E; Vali, Hojatollah; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Julia; Simon, Paul H G; Mandato, Craig; Nilsson, Tommy; Bergeron, John J M

    2015-08-01

    Discovered in 1909 by Retzius and described mainly by morphology, the cytoplasmic droplet of sperm (renamed here the Hermes body) is conserved among all mammalian species but largely undefined at the molecular level. Tandem mass spectrometry of the isolated Hermes body from rat epididymal sperm characterized 1511 proteins, 43 of which were localized to the structure in situ by light microscopy and two by quantitative electron microscopy localization. Glucose transporter 3 (GLUT-3) glycolytic enzymes, selected membrane traffic and cytoskeletal proteins were highly abundant and concentrated in the Hermes body. By electron microscope gold antibody labelling, the Golgi trafficking protein TMED7/p27 localized to unstacked flattened cisternae of the Hermes body, as did GLUT-3, the most abundant protein. Its biogenesis was deduced through the mapping of protein expression for all 43 proteins during male germ cell differentiation in the testis. It is at the terminal step 19 of spermiogenesis that the 43 characteristic proteins accumulated in the nascent Hermes body. PMID:26311421

  13. Sultr4;1 mutant seeds of Arabidopsis have an enhanced sulphate content and modified proteome suggesting metabolic adaptations to altered sulphate compartmentalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belghazi Maya

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulphur is an essential macronutrient needed for the synthesis of many cellular components. Sulphur containing amino acids and stress response-related compounds, such as glutathione, are derived from reduction of root-absorbed sulphate. Sulphate distribution in cell compartments necessitates specific transport systems. The low-affinity sulphate transporters SULTR4;1 and SULTR4;2 have been localized to the vacuolar membrane, where they may facilitate sulphate efflux from the vacuole. Results In the present study, we demonstrated that the Sultr4;1 gene is expressed in developing Arabidopsis seeds to a level over 10-fold higher than the Sultr4;2 gene. A characterization of dry mature seeds from a Sultr4;1 T-DNA mutant revealed a higher sulphate content, implying a function for this transporter in developing seeds. A fine dissection of the Sultr4;1 seed proteome identified 29 spots whose abundance varied compared to wild-type. Specific metabolic features characteristic of an adaptive response were revealed, such as an up-accumulation of various proteins involved in sugar metabolism and in detoxification processes. Conclusions This study revealed a role for SULTR4;1 in determining sulphate content of mature Arabidopsis seeds. Moreover, the adaptive response of sultr4;1 mutant seeds as revealed by proteomics suggests a function of SULTR4;1 in redox homeostasis, a mechanism that has to be tightly controlled during development of orthodox seeds.

  14. Programmed cell death during development of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) seed coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Nathália Bastos; Trindade, Fernanda Gomes; da Cunha, Maura; Oliveira, Antônia Elenir Amâncio; Topping, Jennifer; Lindsey, Keith; Fernandes, Kátia Valevski Sales

    2015-04-01

    The seed coat develops primarily from maternal tissues and comprises multiple cell layers at maturity, providing a metabolically dynamic interface between the developing embryo and the environment during embryogenesis, dormancy and germination of seeds. Seed coat development involves dramatic cellular changes, and the aim of this research was to investigate the role of programmed cell death (PCD) events during the development of seed coats of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.]. We demonstrate that cells of the developing cowpea seed coats undergo a programme of autolytic cell death, detected as cellular morphological changes in nuclei, mitochondria, chloroplasts and vacuoles, DNA fragmentation and oligonucleosome accumulation in the cytoplasm, and loss of membrane viability. We show for the first time that classes 6 and 8 caspase-like enzymes are active during seed coat development, and that these activities may be compartmentalized by translocation between vacuoles and cytoplasm during PCD events. PMID:25142352

  15. Multipotent capacity of immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Delgado

    Full Text Available While the adult murine lung utilizes multiple compartmentally restricted progenitor cells during homeostasis and repair, much less is known about the progenitor cells from the human lung. Translating the murine stem cell model to humans is hindered by anatomical differences between species. Here we show that human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs display characteristics of multipotent stem cells of the lung. These HBECs express markers indicative of several epithelial types of the adult lung when experimentally tested in cell culture. When cultured in three different three-dimensional (3D systems, subtle changes in the microenvironment result in unique responses including the ability of HBECs to differentiate into multiple central and peripheral lung cell types. These new findings indicate that the adult human lung contains a multipotent progenitor cell whose differentiation potential is primarily dictated by the microenvironment. The HBEC system is not only important in understanding mechanisms for specific cell lineage differentiation, but also for examining changes that correlate with human lung diseases including lung cancer.

  16. Review of compartmental analysis in ecosystem science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    The compartment model has a large number of applications in ecosystem science. An attempt is made to outline the problem areas and objectives for which this type of model has particular advantages. The areas identified are an adequate model of tracer movement through an undisturbed but non-equilibrium ecosystem; an adequate model of the movement of material in greater than tracer quantity through an ecosystem near steady state; a minimal model based on limited data; a tool for extrapolating past trends; a framework for the summarization of large data sets; and a theoretical tool for exploring and comparing limited aspects of ecosystem dynamics. The review is set in an historical perspective which helps explain why these models were adopted in ecology. References are also provided to literature which documents available mathematical techniques in an ecological context.

  17. Compartmentalization analysis using discrete fracture network models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Pointe, P.R.; Eiben, T.; Dershowitz, W. [Golder Associates, Redmond, VA (United States); Wadleigh, E. [Marathon Oil Co., Midland, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper illustrates how Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) technology can serve as a basis for the calculation of reservoir engineering parameters for the development of fractured reservoirs. It describes the development of quantitative techniques for defining the geometry and volume of structurally controlled compartments. These techniques are based on a combination of stochastic geometry, computational geometry, and graph the theory. The parameters addressed are compartment size, matrix block size and tributary drainage volume. The concept of DFN models is explained and methodologies to compute these parameters are demonstrated.

  18. Rifte Guaritas basin compartmentation in Camaqua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study contributes to the knowledge of the tectonic evolution of the Guaritas rift basin in Camaqua. Were used aero magnetic geophysical data for modeling the geometry and the depth of the structures and geological units. The research was supported in processing and interpretation of Aster images (EOS-Terra), which were extracted from geophysical models and digital image

  19. Reactive oxygen species and redox compartmentalization

    OpenAIRE

    Kaludercic, Nina; Deshwal, Soni; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and signaling are of major importance and regulate a number of processes in physiological conditions. A disruption in redox status regulation, however, has been associated with numerous pathological conditions. In recent years it has become increasingly clear that oxidative and reductive modifications are confined in a spatio-temporal manner. This makes ROS signaling similar to that of Ca2+ or other second messengers. Some subcellular compartments are m...

  20. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Christine; Lippert, Anna H.; Bonakdar, Navid; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Voll, Lars M

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, such as permeability, stability, or chemical reactivity. In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in...

  1. Chloroplast Dysfunction Causes Multiple Defects in Cell Cycle Progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf Mutant

    KAUST Repository

    Hudik, Elodie

    2014-07-18

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants.

  2. With or without rafts? Alternative views on cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevcsik, Eva; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2016-02-01

    The fundamental mechanisms of protein and lipid organization at the plasma membrane have continued to engage researchers for decades. Among proposed models, one idea has been particularly successful which assumes that sterol-dependent nanoscopic phases of different lipid chain order compartmentalize proteins, thereby modulating protein functionality. This model of membrane rafts has sustainably sparked the fields of membrane biophysics and biology, and shifted membrane lipids into the spotlight of research; by now, rafts have become an integral part of our terminology to describe a variety of cell biological processes. But is the evidence clear enough to continue supporting a theoretical concept which has resisted direct proof by observation for nearly twenty years? In this essay, we revisit findings that gave rise to and substantiated the raft hypothesis, discuss its impact on recent studies, and present alternative mechanisms to account for plasma membrane heterogeneity. PMID:26666984

  3. Inferring maps of forces inside cell membrane microdomains

    CERN Document Server

    Masson, J -B; Tuerkcan, S; Voisinne, G; Popoff, M R; Vergassola, M; Alexandrou, A

    2015-01-01

    Mapping of the forces on biomolecules in cell membranes has spurred the development of effective labels, e.g. organic fluorophores and nanoparticles, to track trajectories of single biomolecules. Standard methods use particular statistics, namely the mean square displacement, to analyze the underlying dynamics. Here, we introduce general inference methods to fully exploit information in the experimental trajectories, providing sharp estimates of the forces and the diffusion coefficients in membrane microdomains. Rapid and reliable convergence of the inference scheme is demonstrated on trajectories generated numerically. The method is then applied to infer forces and potentials acting on the receptor of the $\\epsilon$-toxin labeled by lanthanide-ion nanoparticles. Our scheme is applicable to any labeled biomolecule and results show show its general relevance for membrane compartmentation.

  4. Polarization of calcium signaling and fluid secretion in salivary gland cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambudkar, I S

    2012-01-01

    The secretion of fluid, electrolytes, and protein by exocrine gland acinar cells is a vectorial process that requires the coordinated regulation of multiple channel and transporter proteins, signaling components, as well as mechanisms involved in vesicular fusion and water transport. Most critical in this is the regulation of cytosolic free [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) in response to neurotransmitter stimulation. Control of [Ca(2+)](i) increase in specific regions of the cell is the main determinant of fluid and electrolyte secretion in salivary gland acinar cells as it regulates several major ion flux mechanisms as well as the water channel that are required for this process. Polarized [Ca(2+)](i) signals are also essential for protein secretion in pancreatic acinar cells. Thus, the mechanisms that generate and modulate these compartmentalized [Ca(2+)](i) signals are central to the regulation of exocrine secretion. These mechanisms include membrane receptors for neurotransmitters, intracellular Ca(2+) release channels, Ca(2+) entry channels, as well Ca(2+) as pumps and mitochondria. The spatial arrangement of proteins involved in Ca(2+) signaling is of primary significance in the generation of specific compartmentalized [Ca(2+)](i) signals. Within these domains, both local and global [Ca(2+)](i) changes are tightly controlled. Control of secretion is also dependent on the targeting of ion channels and transporters to specific domains in the cell where their regulation by [Ca(2+)](i) signals is facilitated. Together, the polarized localization of Ca(2+) signaling and secretory components drive vectorial secretion of fluid, electrolytes, and proteins in the exocrine salivary glands and pancreas. This review will discuss recent findings which have led to resolution of the molecular components underlying the spatio-temporal control of [Ca(2+)](i) signals in exocrine gland cells and their role in secretion. PMID:23061636

  5. Golgi-mediated synthesis and secretion of matrix polysaccharides of the primary cell wall of higher plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeddine eDriouich

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi apparatus of eukaryotic cells is known for its central role in the processing, sorting and transport of proteins to intra- and extracellular compartments. In plants, it has the additional task of assembling and exporting the non-cellulosic polysaccharides of the cell wall matrix including pectin and hemicelluloses, which are important for plant development and protection. In this review, we focus on the biosynthesis of complex polysaccharides of the primary cell wall. We present and discuss the compartmental organization of the Golgi stacks with regards to complex polysaccharides assembly and secretion using immuno-electron microscopy and specific antibodies recognizing various sugar epitopes. We also discuss the significance of the recently identified Golgi-localized glycosyltransferases that are responsible for the biosynthesis of complex polysaccharides of the primary cell wall matrix.

  6. Studying the Nucleated Mammalian Cell Membrane by Single Molecule Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Wu, Jiazhen; Gao, Jing; Liu, Shuheng; Jiang, Junguang; Jiang, Shibo; Wang, Hongda

    2014-01-01

    The cell membrane plays a key role in compartmentalization, nutrient transportation and signal transduction, while the pattern of protein distribution at both cytoplasmic and ectoplasmic sides of the cell membrane remains elusive. Using a combination of single-molecule techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), to study the structure of nucleated cell membranes, we found that (1) proteins at the ectoplasmic side of the cell membrane form a dense protein layer (4 nm) on top of a lipid bilayer; (2) proteins aggregate to form islands evenly dispersed at the cytoplasmic side of the cell membrane with a height of about 10–12 nm; (3) cholesterol-enriched domains exist within the cell membrane; (4) carbohydrates stay in microdomains at the ectoplasmic side; and (5) exposed amino groups are asymmetrically distributed on both sides. Based on these observations, we proposed a Protein Layer-Lipid-Protein Island (PLLPI) model, to provide a better understanding of cell membrane structure, membrane trafficking and viral fusion mechanisms. PMID:24806512

  7. Calcium accumulated by sickle cell anemia red cells does not affect their potassium (86Rb+) flux components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate here the hypothesis that the high Ca content of sickle cell anemia (SS) red cells may produce a sustained activation of the Ca2+-dependent K+ permeability (Gardos effect) and that the particularly high Ca levels in the dense SS cell fraction rich in irreversibly sickled cells (ISCs) might account for the Na pump inhibition observed in these cells. We measured active and passive 86Rb+ influx (as a marker for K+) in density-fractionated SS cells before and after extraction of their excess Ca by exposure to the Ca ionophore (A23187) and ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid and with or without adenosine triphosphate depletion or addition of quinine. None of these maneuvers revealed any evidence of a Ca2+-dependent K leak in SS discocytes or dense cells. Na pump inhibition in the dense SS cells was associated with normal activation by external K+ and a low Vmax that persisted after Ca extraction from the cells. These results are consistent with our recent findings that the excess Ca in these cells is compartmentalized in intracellular inside-out vesicles and unavailable as free Ca2+ to the inner membrane surface. Although the steady-state free cytoplasmic Ca2+ in oxygenated SS cells must be below the levels needed to activate the K+ channel, possible brief activation of the channels of some SS cells resulting from transient elevations of cell Ca2+ during deoxygenation-induced sickling cannot be excluded. The dense, ISC-rich SS cell fraction showed a Ca2+-independent increase in the ouabain-resistant, nonsaturable component of 86Rb+ influx that, if uncompensated by Na+ gain, could contribute to the dehydration of these cells

  8. The Endoplasmic Reticulum: A Social Network in Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Chen; Caitlin Doyle; Xingyun Qi; Huanquan Zheng

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an interconnected network comprised of ribosome-studded sheets and smooth tubules.The ER plays crucial roles in the biosynthesis and transport of proteins and lipids,and in calcium (Ca2+) regulation in compartmentalized eukaryotic cells including plant cells.To support its well-segregated functions,the shape of the ER undergoes notable changes in response to both developmental cues and outside influences.In this review,we will discuss recent findings on molecular mechanisms underlying the unique morphology and dynamics of the ER,and the importance of the interconnected ER network in cell polarity.In animal and yeast cells,two family proteins,the reticulons and DP1/Yop1,are required for shaping high-curvature ER tubules,while members of the atlastin family of dynamin-like GTPases are involved in the fusion of ER tubules to make an interconnected ER network.In plant cells,recent data also indicate that the reticulons are involved in shaping ER tubules,while RHD3,a plant member of the atlastin GTPases,is required for the generation of an interconnected ER network.We will also summarize the current knowledge on how the ER interacts with other membrane-bound organelles,with a focus on how the ER and Golgi interplay in plant cells.

  9. Chloride-inducible transient apoplastic alkalinizations induce stomata closure by controlling abscisic acid distribution between leaf apoplast and guard cells in salt-stressed Vicia faba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Mithöfer, Axel; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Zörb, Christian; Muehling, Karl H

    2015-11-01

    Chloride stress causes the leaf apoplast transiently to alkalize, an event that is presumed to contribute to the ability of plants to adapt to saline conditions. However, the initiation of coordinated processes downstream of the alkalinization is unknown. We hypothesize that chloride-inducible pH dynamics are a key chemical feature modulating the compartmental distribution of abscisic acid (ABA) and, as a consequence, affecting stomata aperture. Apoplastic pH and stomata aperture dynamics in intact Vicia faba leaves were monitored by microscopy-based ratio imaging and porometric measurements of stomatal conductance. ABA concentrations in leaf apoplast and guard cells were compared with pH dynamics by gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results demonstrate that, upon chloride addition to roots, an alkalizing factor that initiates the pH dynamic propagates from root to leaf in a way similar to xylem-distributed water. In leaves, it induces a systemic transient apoplastic alkalinization that causes apoplastic ABA concentration to increase, followed by an elevation of endogenous guard cell ABA. We conclude that the transient alkalinization, which is a remote effect of chloride stress, modulates the compartmental distribution of ABA between the leaf apoplast and the guard cells and, in this way, is instrumental in inducing stomata closure during the beginning of salinity. PMID:26096890

  10. CD8 T Cells Enter the Splenic T Cell Zones Independently of CCR7, but the Subsequent Expansion and Trafficking Patterns of Effector T Cells after Infection Are Dysregulated in the Absence of CCR7 Migratory Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naveen; Benechet, Alexandre P; Lefrançois, Leo; Khanna, Kamal M

    2015-12-01

    CCR7 is an important chemokine receptor that regulates T cell trafficking and compartmentalization within secondary lymphoid organs. However, the T cell-intrinsic role of CCR7 during infection in the spleen is not well understood. This study was designed to understand how CCR7-dependent localization and migration of CD8(+) T cells in different compartments of the spleen affected the primary and recall responses after infection. To this end, we used adoptive transfer of naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells (OT-I) that either lacked CCR7 or constitutively expressed CCR7 (CD2-CCR7) in mice that were subsequently infected i.v. with Listeria monocytogenes. We show that naive CCR7(-/-)CD8(+) T cells failed to enter the T cell zone, whereas CD2-CCR7 OT-I cells were exclusively confined to the T cell zones of the spleen. Surprisingly, however, CCR7(-/-) OT-I cells entered the T cell zones after infection, but the entry and egress migratory pattern of these cells was dysregulated and very distinct compared with wild-type OT-I cells. Moreover, CCR7-deficient OT-I cells failed to expand robustly when compared with wild-type OT-I cells and were preferentially skewed toward a short-lived effector cell differentiation pattern. Interestingly, CCR7(-/-), CD2-CCR7, and wild-type OT-I memory cells responded equally well to rechallenge infection. These results highlight a novel role of CCR7 in regulating effector CD8 T cell migration in the spleen and demonstrate differential requirement of CCR7 for primary and secondary CD8 T cell responses to infection. PMID:26500349

  11. The dynamics of p53 in single cells: physiologically based ODE and reaction-diffusion PDE models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliaš, Ján; Dimitrio, Luna; Clairambault, Jean; Natalini, Roberto

    2014-08-01

    The intracellular signalling network of the p53 protein plays important roles in genome protection and the control of cell cycle phase transitions. Recently observed oscillatory behaviour in single cells under stress conditions has inspired several research groups to simulate and study the dynamics of the protein with the aim of gaining a proper understanding of the physiological meanings of the oscillations. We propose compartmental ODE and PDE models of p53 activation and regulation in single cells following DNA damage and we show that the p53 oscillations can be retrieved by plainly involving p53-Mdm2 and ATM-p53-Wip1 negative feedbacks, which are sufficient for oscillations experimentally, with no further need to introduce any delays into the protein responses and without considering additional positive feedback.

  12. The dynamics of p53 in single cells: physiologically based ODE and reaction–diffusion PDE models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intracellular signalling network of the p53 protein plays important roles in genome protection and the control of cell cycle phase transitions. Recently observed oscillatory behaviour in single cells under stress conditions has inspired several research groups to simulate and study the dynamics of the protein with the aim of gaining a proper understanding of the physiological meanings of the oscillations. We propose compartmental ODE and PDE models of p53 activation and regulation in single cells following DNA damage and we show that the p53 oscillations can be retrieved by plainly involving p53–Mdm2 and ATM–p53–Wip1 negative feedbacks, which are sufficient for oscillations experimentally, with no further need to introduce any delays into the protein responses and without considering additional positive feedback. (paper)

  13. Nano thermo-hydrodynamics method for investigating cell membrane fluidity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    As a barrier to compartmentalize cells,mem-branes form the interface between a cell and its surround-ings.The essential function of a membrane is to maintain a relatively stable environment in the cell,exchange sub-stances selectively and transfer energy and information continually from the outside.It is intriguing that above the phase transition temperature,the membrane lipid molecule will have three modes-lateral diffusion,rotational movement and flip-flop activity.These thermodynamic processes are vital to cell existence,growth,division,differentiation and are also responsible for hundreds of thousands of phenomena in life.Previously,species transport across the membrane was interpreted mainly from a phenomenological view using a lumped system model.Therefore,detailed flow processes occurred in the membrane domain and clues related to life mechanism were not sufficiently tackled.Such important issues can be clarifled by modeling nano scale thermal hydrodynamics over the gap space of a cell membrane.Previously observed complex membrane behaviors will be shown in this paper and explained by the thermally induced fluidic convections inside the membrane.A correlation between nano scale hydrodynamics,non-equilibrium thermodynamics and eell membrane activities is set up.The disclosed mechanisms are expected to provide a new viewpoint on the interaction between intracellular and extracellular processes through the membrane.

  14. PLACE CELL FORMATION BY GRID CELL CONVERGENCE IN THE DENDRITES OF A CA1 MODEL NEURON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Pollali

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Place cells are pyramidal neurons in CA1 and CA3 regions of hippocampus which fire selectively when the animal is located in a particular place in space. CA1 place cells receive synaptic input from CA3 via the Schaffer collateral fibers to their proximal apical and basal dendrites and from the third layer of medial entorhinal cortex to their apical tuft dendrites. Both of these input pathways encode spatial information. Grid cells, which form the entorhinal input to CA1 cells, have a spatial firing field with multiple peaks which displays a regularly spaced, triangular grid pattern that covers the entire space of a given environment. Both grid and place cells are phase-modulated by theta rhythm and this modulation may be important for their spatial properties. Studying the formation of place cells is an important step in understanding how representation of the external environment is coded in neural networks that constitute spatial maps. It is not currently known how place fields emerge in CA1 neurons. An influential model of place cell formation predicts the convergence of various grid field inputs which combine linearly to create the place field output of CA1 cells. In this study, we constructed a model of CA1 place cell formation through the convergence of grid field inputs to the distal dendrites of our model neuron. We created a model of grid cell activity which represents the firing of grid cells modulated be the theta rhythm. We varied the number of different grid fields used as synaptic inputs to stimulate the distal dendrites of a biophysically constrained, detailed compartmental CA1 pyramidal cell model. In addition, inhibition was placed in both the distal and proximal dendrites. These inhibitory pathways are known to be active in different phases of the theta rhythm. We used this model to study the properties of CA1 place cell formation and to assess the output of the CA1 model cell during place cell activity. Additionally, we

  15. Sodium 22+ washout from cultured rat cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The washout of Na+ isotopes from tissues and cells is quite complex and not well defined. To further gain insight into this process, we have studied 22Na+ washout from cultured Wistar rat skin fibroblasts and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In these preparations, 22Na+ washout is described by a general three-exponential function. The exponential factor of the fastest component (k1) and the initial exchange rate constant (kie) of cultured fibroblasts decrease in magnitude in response to incubation in K+-deficient medium or in the presence of ouabain and increase in magnitude when the cells are incubated in a Ca++-deficient medium. As the magnitude of the kie declines (in the presence of ouabain) to the level of the exponential factor of the middle component (k2), 22Na+ washout is adequately described by a two-exponential function. When the kie is further diminished (in the presence of both ouabain and phloretin) to the range of the exponential factor of the slowest component (k3), the washout of 22Na+ is apparently monoexponential. Calculations of the cellular Na+ concentrations, based on the 22Na+ activity in the cells at the initiation of the washout experiments, and the medium specific activity agree with atomic absorption spectrometry measurements of the cellular concentration of this ion. Thus, all three components of 22Na+ washout from cultured rat cells are of cellular origin. Using the exponential parameters, compartmental analyses of two models (in parallel and in series) with three cellular Na+ pools were performed. The results indicate that, independent of the model chosen, the relative size of the largest Na+ pool is 92-93% in fibroblasts and approximately 96% in VSMCs. This pool is most likely to represent the cytosol

  16. The Early Results for the Treatment of Medial Compartmental Knee Osteoarthritis:Unicompart-mental Knee Arthroplasty(Oxford Ⅲ)Versus Total Knee Arthroplasty%单髁置换与全膝关节置换治疗内侧胫股关节炎早中期疗效比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    房小文; 薛峰; 盛晓文; 王正飞; 杨兴

    2015-01-01

    目的:比较Oxford Ⅲ代单髁置换( unicompartmental knee arthroplasty,UkA)和全膝关节置换术( total knee artgroplasty,TkA)治疗膝关节内侧胫股关节炎的早期疗效。方法2013年4月至2014年8月我院收治内侧胫股关节炎患者31例32膝,UkA组15例16膝,TkA组16例16膝。术前对UkA组和TkA组患者膝关节的功能评价采用膝关节评分( keen society score,kSS),分别为55.94分和56.47分;美国特种外科医院膝关节评分( hospital for special sur-gery knee score,HSS)分别为57.25分和59.37分;分别进行单髁置换和全膝关节置换。结果两组患者术后2周的功能改善情况UkA组较TkA组好,膝关节活动度更大;两组的手术时间UkA组较TkA组短。结论人工单髁置换治疗膝内侧胫股关节炎是一种行之有效的方法,与全膝置换早期效果类似,但手术时间短,恢复快。%Objective To investigate the early resuit of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty( OxfordⅢ)versus total knee arthroplasty for the treatment of medial compartmental knee osteoarthritis. Methods From April 2013 to August 2014,15 ca-ses(16 knee)of medial compartmental knee osteoarthritis were treated by unicompartmental knee arthroplasty(OxfordⅢ),16 cases(16 knee)of medial compartmental knee osteoarthritis were treated by total knee arthroplasty. The UkA group and TkA group hospital for special surgery knee score(HSS)were 57. 25 and 59. 37 respectively;keen Society Score(kSS)were 55. 94 and 56. 47 respectively. Results All the patients′data were collected. By the time of 2 weeks after operation,Patients in the group UkA had better results than group TkA in the range of motion( ROM),kSS,HSS and the operation time. Conclusion With the strict indications selection,UkA for the treatment of medial compartmental knee osteoarthritis is comparable to TkA, and has less time for operation,rapid postoperative recovery than TkA.

  17. Membrane potential and ion transport in lung epithelial type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alveolar type II pneumocyte is critically important to the function and maintenance of pulmonary epithelium. To investigate the nature of the response of type II cells to membrane injury, and describe a possible mechanism by which these cells regulate surfactant secretion, the membrane potential of isolated rabbit type II cells was characterized. This evaluation was accomplished by measurements of the accumulation of the membrane potential probes: [3H]triphenylmethylphosphonium ([3H]TPMP+), rubidium 86, and the fluorescent dye DiOC5. A compartmental analysis of probe uptake into mitochondrial, cytoplasmic, and non-membrane potential dependent stores was made through the use of selective membrane depolarizations with carbonycyanide M-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). These techniques and population analysis with flow cytometry, permitted the accurate evaluation of type II cell membrane potential under control conditions and under conditions which stimulated cell activity. Further analysis of ion transport by cells exposed to radiation or adrenergic stimulation revealed a common increase in Na+/K+ ATPase activity, and an increase in sodium influx across the plasma membrane. This sodium influx was found to be a critical step in the initiation of surfactant secretion. It is concluded that radiation exposure as well as other pulmonary toxicants can directly affect the membrane potential and ionic regulation of type II cells. Ion transport, particularly of sodium, plays an important role in the regulation of type II cell function

  18. Spatially Controlled Delivery of siRNAs to Stem Cells in Implants Generated by Multi-Component Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Østergaard; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Chen, Muwan;

    2013-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a promising technique in tissue engineering, as it enables truly individualized implants to be made to fit a particular defect. As previously shown, a feasible strategy to produce complex multicellular tissues is to deposit different small interfering RNA (siRNA) in porous...... implants that are subsequently sutured together. In this study, an additive manufacturing strategy to deposit carbohydrate hydrogels containing different siRNAs is applied into an implant, in a spatially controlled manner. When the obtained structures are seeded with mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells, the...... selected siRNAs are delivered to the cells and induces specific and localized gene silencing. Here, it is demonstrated how to replicate part of a patient's spinal cord from a computed tomography scan, using an additive manufacturing technique to produce an implant with compartmentalized siRNAs in the...

  19. SSeCKS, a Major Protein Kinase C Substrate with Tumor Suppressor Activity, Regulates G1→S Progression by Controlling the Expression and Cellular Compartmentalization of Cyclin D

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Xueying; Nelson, Peter; Gelman, Irwin H.

    2000-01-01

    SSeCKS, first isolated as a G1→S inhibitor that is downregulated in src- and ras-transformed cells, is a major cytoskeleton-associated PKC substrate with tumor suppressor and kinase-scaffolding activities. Previous attempts at constitutive expression resulted in cell variants with truncated ectopic SSeCKS products. Here, we show that tetracycline-regulated SSeCKS expression in NIH 3T3 cells induces G1 arrest marked by extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2-dependent decreases in cyclin D1 ex...

  20. Characterization of CD8+ T-Cell Responses in the Peripheral Blood and Skin Injection Sites of Melanoma Patients Treated with mRNA Electroporated Autologous Dendritic Cells (TriMixDC-MEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphné Benteyn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of melanoma patients with mRNA electroporated dendritic cells (TriMixDC-MEL stimulates T-cell responses against the presented tumor-associated antigens (TAAs. In the current clinical trials, melanoma patients with systemic metastases are treated, requiring priming and/or expansion of preexisting TAA-specific T cells that are able to migrate to both the skin and internal organs. We monitored the presence of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells infiltrating the skin at sites of intradermal TriMixDC-MEL injection (SKILs and within the circulation of melanoma patients treated in two clinical trials. In 10 out of fourteen (71% patients screened, CD8+ T cells recognizing any of the four TAA presented by TriMixDC-MEL cellular vaccine were found in both compartments. In total, 30 TAA-specific T-cell responses were detected among the SKILs and 29 among peripheral blood T cells, of which 24 in common. A detailed characterization of the antigen specificity of CD8+ T-cell populations in four patients indicates that the majority of the epitopes detected were only recognized by CD8+ T cells derived from either skin biopsies or peripheral blood, indicating that some compartmentalization occurs after TriMix-DC therapy. To conclude, functional TAA-specific CD8+ T cells distribute both to the skin and peripheral blood of patients after TriMixDC-MEL therapy.

  1. A new role for T cells in dampening innate inflammatory responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Hong; FU YangXin

    2010-01-01

    @@ The inflammatory response is an attempt by a host to protect itself against injurious stimuli and initiate the tissue healing process [1,2].Although the production of both proand anti-inflammatory mediators which occurs mainly within tissues is a systemic process, the pathophysiological events of inflammation are usually compartmentalized, being different from organ to organ, and between organs and the peripheral blood [3,4].Inflammation and consequential tissue injury vary according to the nature of the insults (e.g.burns, hemorrhages, trauma, peritonitis), the cellular composition of each tissue (e.g.the types of phagocytes or endothelial cells), the micro-environment (e.g.the localized presence of GM-CSF in the lungs, low levels of arginine in the liver, presence of endotoxins in the gut), and different modes of leukocyte recruitment.

  2. Intrinsic bursting of AII amacrine cells underlies oscillations in the rd1 mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hannah; Zhang, Lei; Cembrowski, Mark S; Sabottke, Carl F; Markowitz, Alexander L; Butts, Daniel A; Kath, William L; Singer, Joshua H; Riecke, Hermann

    2014-09-15

    In many forms of retinal degeneration, photoreceptors die but inner retinal circuits remain intact. In the rd1 mouse, an established model for blinding retinal diseases, spontaneous activity in the coupled network of AII amacrine and ON cone bipolar cells leads to rhythmic bursting of ganglion cells. Since such activity could impair retinal and/or cortical responses to restored photoreceptor function, understanding its nature is important for developing treatments of retinal pathologies. Here we analyzed a compartmental model of the wild-type mouse AII amacrine cell to predict that the cell's intrinsic membrane properties, specifically, interacting fast Na and slow, M-type K conductances, would allow its membrane potential to oscillate when light-evoked excitatory synaptic inputs were withdrawn following photoreceptor degeneration. We tested and confirmed this hypothesis experimentally by recording from AIIs in a slice preparation of rd1 retina. Additionally, recordings from ganglion cells in a whole mount preparation of rd1 retina demonstrated that activity in AIIs was propagated unchanged to elicit bursts of action potentials in ganglion cells. We conclude that oscillations are not an emergent property of a degenerated retinal network. Rather, they arise largely from the intrinsic properties of a single retinal interneuron, the AII amacrine cell. PMID:25008417

  3. Superoxide radical and iron modulate aconitase activity in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, P R; Raineri, I; Epstein, L B; White, C W

    1995-06-01

    Aconitase is a member of a family of iron-sulfur-containing (de)hydratases whose activities are modulated in bacteria by superoxide radical (O2-.)-mediated inactivation and iron-dependent reactivation. The inactivation-reactivation of aconitase(s) in cultured mammalian cells was explored since these reactions may impact important and diverse aconitase functions in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Conditions which increase O2-. production including exposure to the redox-cycling agent phenazine methosulfate (PMS), inhibitors of mitochondrial ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, or hyperoxia inactivated aconitase in mammalian cells. Overproduction of mitochondrial Mn-superoxide dismutase protected aconitase from inactivation by PMS or inhibitors of ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, but not from normobaric hyperoxia. Aconitase activity was reactivated (t1/2 of 12 +/- 3 min) upon removal of PMS. The iron chelator deferoxamine impaired reactivation and increased net inactivation of aconitase by O2-.. The ability of ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase-generated O2-. to inactivate aconitase in several cell types correlated with the fraction of the aconitase activity localized in mitochondria. Extracellular O2-. generated with xanthine oxidase did not affect aconitase activity nor did exogenous superoxide dismutase decrease aconitase inactivation by PMS. The results demonstrate a dynamic and cyclical O2-.-mediated inactivation and iron-dependent reactivation of the mammalian [4Fe-4S] aconitases under normal and stress conditions and provide further evidence for the membrane compartmentalization of O2-.. PMID:7768942

  4. Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  5. Lyophilized kits of diamino dithiol compounds for labelling with {sup 99m}-technetium. Pharmacokinetics studies and distribution compartmental models of the related complexes; Conjuntos de reativos liofilizados de compostos diaminoditiolicos para marcacao com tecnecio-99m. Estudo farmacocinetico e elaboracao de modelos compartimentalizados dos respectivos complexos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti de

    1995-07-01

    The present work reflects the clinical interest for labelling diamino dithiol compounds with technetium-99m. Both chosen compounds, L,L-Ethylene dicysteine (L,L-EC) and L,L-Ethylene dicysteine diethyl esther (L,L-ECD) were obtained with relative good yield and characterized by IR and NMR. The study of labelling conditions with technetium-99m showed the influence of the type and mass of reducing agent as well as the pH on the formation of complexes with desired biological characteristics. Radiochemical purity was determined by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Lyophilised kits of L,L-EC and L,L-ECD for labelling with {sup 99m}Tc were obtained, with stability superior to 120 days, when stored under refrigeration, enabling the kits marketing. The ideal formulation of the kits as well as the use of liquid nitrogen in the freezing process, determined the lyophilization success. Distribution biological studies of the {sup 99m}Tc complexes were performed on mice by invasive method and on bigger animals by scintigraphic evaluation. Biological distribution studies of the complex {sup 99m}Tc-L,L-EC showed fast blood clearance, with the elimination of about 90% of the administered dose after 60 minutes, almost exclusively by the urinary system. The biological distribution results were adjusted to a three compartmental distribution model, as expected for a radiopharmaceutical designed to renal dynamic studies, with tubular elimination. The complex interaction with renal tubular receptors is related with structural characteristics of the compound, more specifically with the presence and location of polar groups. In comparison with {sup 99m}Tc-L,L-EC, biological studies of the complex {sup 99m}Tc -L,L-ECD showed different distribution aspects, despite some structural similarities. The presence of ethyl groups confers to the complex neutrality and lipophilicity. It cross the intact blood brain barrier and is retained in the brain

  6. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis reveals the mechanisms of silicon-mediated cadmium tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Sheng, Huachun; Li, Xiuli; Wang, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    Silicon (Si) can alleviate cadmium (Cd) stress in rice (Oryza sativa) plants, however, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the single-cell level remains limited. To address these questions, we investigated suspension cells of rice cultured in the dark environment in the absence and presence of Si with either short- (12 h) or long-term (5 d) Cd treatments using a combination of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ), fluorescent staining, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). We identified 100 proteins differentially regulated by Si under the short- or long-term Cd stress. 70% of these proteins were down-regulated, suggesting that Si may improve protein use efficiency by maintaining cells in the normal physiological status. Furthermore, we showed two different mechanisms for Si-mediated Cd tolerance. Under the short-term Cd stress, the Si-modified cell walls inhibited the uptake of Cd ions into cells and consequently reduced the expressions of glycosidase, cell surface non-specific lipid-transfer proteins (nsLTPs), and several stress-related proteins. Under the long-term Cd stress, the amount of Cd in the cytoplasm in Si-accumulating (+Si) cells was decreased by compartmentation of Cd into vacuoles, thus leading to a lower expression of glutathione S-transferases (GST). These results provide protein-level insights into the Si-mediated Cd detoxification in rice single cells. PMID:27017433

  7. Splenectomy alters distribution and turnover but not numbers or protective capacity of de novo generated memory CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie eKim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The spleen is a highly compartmentalized lymphoid organ that allows for efficient antigen presentation and activation of immune responses. Additionally, the spleen itself functions to remove senescent red blood cells, filter bacteria, and sequester platelets. Splenectomy, commonly performed after blunt force trauma or splenomegaly, has been shown to increase risk of certain bacterial and parasitic infections years after removal of the spleen. Although previous studies report defects in memory B cells and IgM titers in splenectomized patients, the effect of splenectomy on CD8 T cell responses and memory CD8 T cell function remains ill defined. Using TCR-transgenic P14 cells, we demonstrate that homeostatic proliferation and representation of pathogen-specific memory CD8 T cells in the blood are enhanced in splenectomized compared to sham surgery mice. Surprisingly, despite the enhanced turnover, splenectomized mice displayed no changes in total memory CD8 T cell numbers nor impaired protection against lethal dose challenge with Listeria monocytogenes. Thus, our data suggest that memory CD8 T cell maintenance and function remain intact in the absence of the spleen.

  8. Gene expression programs of mouse endothelial cells in kidney development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S Steven

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cells are remarkably heterogeneous in both morphology and function, and they play critical roles in the formation of multiple organ systems. In addition endothelial cell dysfunction can contribute to disease processes, including diabetic nephropathy, which is a leading cause of end stage renal disease. In this report we define the comprehensive gene expression programs of multiple types of kidney endothelial cells, and analyze the differences that distinguish them. Endothelial cells were purified from Tie2-GFP mice by cell dissociation and fluorescent activated cell sorting. Microarrays were then used to provide a global, quantitative and sensitive measure of gene expression levels. We examined renal endothelial cells from the embryo and from the adult glomerulus, cortex and medulla compartments, as well as the glomerular endothelial cells of the db/db mutant mouse, which represents a model for human diabetic nephropathy. The results identified the growth factors, receptors and transcription factors expressed by these multiple endothelial cell types. Biological processes and molecular pathways were characterized in exquisite detail. Cell type specific gene expression patterns were defined, finding novel molecular markers and providing a better understanding of compartmental distinctions. Further, analysis of enriched, evolutionarily conserved transcription factor binding sites in the promoters of co-activated genes begins to define the genetic regulatory network of renal endothelial cell formation. Finally, the gene expression differences associated with diabetic nephropathy were defined, providing a global view of both the pathogenic and protective pathways activated. These studies provide a rich resource to facilitate further investigations of endothelial cell functions in kidney development, adult compartments, and disease. PMID:20706631

  9. Gene expression programs of mouse endothelial cells in kidney development and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W Brunskill

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells are remarkably heterogeneous in both morphology and function, and they play critical roles in the formation of multiple organ systems. In addition endothelial cell dysfunction can contribute to disease processes, including diabetic nephropathy, which is a leading cause of end stage renal disease. In this report we define the comprehensive gene expression programs of multiple types of kidney endothelial cells, and analyze the differences that distinguish them. Endothelial cells were purified from Tie2-GFP mice by cell dissociation and fluorescent activated cell sorting. Microarrays were then used to provide a global, quantitative and sensitive measure of gene expression levels. We examined renal endothelial cells from the embryo and from the adult glomerulus, cortex and medulla compartments, as well as the glomerular endothelial cells of the db/db mutant mouse, which represents a model for human diabetic nephropathy. The results identified the growth factors, receptors and transcription factors expressed by these multiple endothelial cell types. Biological processes and molecular pathways were characterized in exquisite detail. Cell type specific gene expression patterns were defined, finding novel molecular markers and providing a better understanding of compartmental distinctions. Further, analysis of enriched, evolutionarily conserved transcription factor binding sites in the promoters of co-activated genes begins to define the genetic regulatory network of renal endothelial cell formation. Finally, the gene expression differences associated with diabetic nephropathy were defined, providing a global view of both the pathogenic and protective pathways activated. These studies provide a rich resource to facilitate further investigations of endothelial cell functions in kidney development, adult compartments, and disease.

  10. Antimicrobial peptides and cell processes tracking endosymbiont dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Florent; Zaidman-Rémy, Anna; Heddi, Abdelaziz

    2016-05-26

    Many insects sustain long-term relationships with intracellular symbiotic bacteria that provide them with essential nutrients. Such endosymbiotic relationships likely emerged from ancestral infections of the host by free-living bacteria, the genomes of which experience drastic gene losses and rearrangements during the host-symbiont coevolution. While it is well documented that endosymbiont genome shrinkage results in the loss of bacterial virulence genes, whether and how the host immune system evolves towards the tolerance and control of bacterial partners remains elusive. Remarkably, many insects rely on a 'compartmentalization strategy' that consists in secluding endosymbionts within specialized host cells, the bacteriocytes, thus preventing direct symbiont contact with the host systemic immune system. In this review, we compile recent advances in the understanding of the bacteriocyte immune and cellular regulators involved in endosymbiont maintenance and control. We focus on the cereal weevils Sitophilus spp., in which bacteriocytes form bacteriome organs that strikingly evolve in structure and number according to insect development and physiological needs. We discuss how weevils track endosymbiont dynamics through at least two mechanisms: (i) a bacteriome local antimicrobial peptide synthesis that regulates endosymbiont cell cytokinesis and helps to maintain a homeostatic state within bacteriocytes and (ii) some cellular processes such as apoptosis and autophagy which adjust endosymbiont load to the host developmental requirements, hence ensuring a fine-tuned integration of symbiosis costs and benefits.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160600

  11. Nitrogen metabolism in Lignifying Pinus taeda cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, P. S.; Towers, G. H.; Lewis, N. G.

    1996-01-01

    The primary metabolic fate of phyenylalanine, following its deamination in plants, is conscription of its carbon skeleton for lignin, suberin, flavonoid, and related metabolite formation. Since this accounts for approximately 30-40% of all organic carbon, an effective means of recycling the liberated ammonium ion must be operative. In order to establish how this occurs, the uptake and metabolism of various 15N-labeled precursors (15N-Phe, 15NH4Cl, 15N-Gln, and 15N-Glu) in lignifying Pinus taeda cell cultures was investigated, using a combination of high performance liquid chromatography, 15N NMR, and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry analyses. It was found that the ammonium ion released during active phenylpropanoid metabolism was not made available for general amino acid/protein synthesis. Rather it was rapidly recycled back to regenerate phenylalanine, thereby providing an effective means of maintaining active phenylpropanoid metabolism with no additional nitrogen requirement. These results strongly suggest that, in lignifying cells, ammonium ion reassimilation is tightly compartmentalized.

  12. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambrecht Bart N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs, endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs.

  13. Tetraspanins and Transmembrane Adaptor Proteins As Plasma Membrane Organizers—Mast Cell Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halova, Ivana; Draber, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane contains diverse and specialized membrane domains, which include tetraspanin-enriched domains (TEMs) and transmembrane adaptor protein (TRAP)-enriched domains. Recent biophysical, microscopic, and functional studies indicated that TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains are involved in compartmentalization of physicochemical events of such important processes as immunoreceptor signal transduction and chemotaxis. Moreover, there is evidence of a cross-talk between TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains. In this review we discuss the presence and function of such domains and their crosstalk using mast cells as a model. The combined data based on analysis of selected mast cell-expressed tetraspanins [cluster of differentiation (CD)9, CD53, CD63, CD81, CD151)] or TRAPs [linker for activation of T cells (LAT), non-T cell activation linker (NTAL), and phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (PAG)] using knockout mice or specific antibodies point to a diversity within these two families and bring evidence of the important roles of these molecules in signaling events. An example of this diversity is physical separation of two TRAPs, LAT and NTAL, which are in many aspects similar but show plasma membrane location in different microdomains in both non-activated and activated cells. Although our understanding of TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these domains are under way.

  14. Three-dimensional reconstruction of cell nuclei, internalized quantum dots and sites of lipid peroxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysinger Dusica

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the study was to develop and illustrate three-dimensional (3-D reconstruction of nuclei and intracellular lipid peroxidation in cells exposed to oxidative stress induced by quantum dots. Programmed cell death is characterized by multiple biochemical and morphological changes in different organelles, including nuclei, mitochondria and lysosomes. It is the dynamics of the spatio-temporal changes in the signalling and morphological adaptations which will ultimately determine the 'shape' and fate of the cell. Results We present new approaches to the 3-D reconstruction of organelle morphology and biochemical changes in confocal live-cell images. We demonstrate the 3-D shapes of nuclei, the 3-D intracellular distributions of QDs and the accompanying lipid-membrane peroxidation, and provide methods for quantification. Conclusion This study provides an approach to 3-D organelle and nanoparticle visualization in the context of cell death; however, this approach is also applicable more generally to investigating changes in organelle morphology in response to therapeutic interventions, stressful stimuli and internalized nanoparticles. Moreover, the approach provides quantitative data for such changes, which will help us to better integrate compartmentalization of subcellular events and to link morphological and biochemical changes with physiological outcomes.

  15. Cholesterol accumulation in Niemann Pick type C (NPC) model cells causes a shift in APP localization to lipid rafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been suggested that cholesterol may modulate amyloid-β (Aβ) formation, a causative factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), by regulating distribution of the three key proteins in the pathogenesis of AD (β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), β-secretase (BACE1) and/or presenilin 1 (PS1)) within lipid rafts. In this work we tested whether cholesterol accumulation upon NPC1 dysfunction, which causes Niemann Pick type C disease (NPC), causes increased partitioning of APP into lipid rafts leading to increased CTF/Aβ formation in these cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. To test this we used CHO NPC1-/- cells (NPC cells) and parental CHOwt cells. By sucrose density gradient centrifugation we observed a shift in fl-APP/CTF compartmentalization into lipid raft fractions upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC vs. wt cells. Furthermore, γ-secretase inhibitor treatment significantly increased fl-APP/CTF distribution in raft fractions in NPC vs. wt cells, suggesting that upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC1-null cells increased formation of APP-CTF and its increased processing towards Aβ occurs in lipid rafts. Our results support that cholesterol overload, such as in NPC disease, leads to increased partitioning of APP/CTF into lipid rafts resulting in increased amyloidogenic processing of APP in these cholesterol-rich membranes. This work adds to the mechanism of the cholesterol-effect on APP processing and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and supports the role of lipid rafts in these processes.

  16. Bergmann glia and the recognition molecule CHL1 organize GABAergic axons and direct innervation of Purkinje cell dendrites.

    OpenAIRE

    Ango, Fabrice; Wu, Caizhi; van der Want, Johannes; Wu, Priscilla; Schachner, Melitta; Huang, Z. Josh

    2008-01-01

    Author Summary Large principal neurons in vertebrate neural circuits often consist of distinct anatomical and physiological compartments, which allow distributed and compartmentalized signaling and greatly increase the computational power of single neurons. Superimposed upon this intrinsic compartmental architecture is the subcellular organization of synaptic inputs, which exert local control over the biophysical properties and differentially regulate the input, integration, and output of pri...

  17. Characteristics of cadmium tolerance in 'Hermes' flax seedlings: contribution of cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douchiche, Olfa; Soret-Morvan, Odile; Chaïbi, Wided; Morvan, Claudine; Paynel, Florence

    2010-12-01

    Most flax (Linum usitatissimum) varieties are described as tolerant to high concentrations of Cd. The aim of the present paper was to better characterize this tolerance, by studying the responses of flax plantlets, cv Hermes, to 18d growth on 0.5mM Cd. In Cd-treated seedlings, the majority of Cd was compartmentalized in the roots. Analysis of other elements showed that only Fe concentration was reduced, while Mn increased. Growth parameters of Cd treated flax were only moderately altered, with similar mass tolerance-indices for roots and shoots. Tissue anatomy was unaffected by treatment. The effect on lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and antioxidative activities appeared low but slightly higher in roots. The most important impacts of Cd were, in all organs, cell expansion, cell-wall thickening, pectin cross-linking and increase of cell-wall enzymatic activities (pectin methylesterase and peroxidase). Thus, the role of the cell wall in Cd tolerance might be important at two levels: (i) in the reinforcement of the tissue cohesion and (ii) in the sequestration of Cd. PMID:20884040

  18. Electrochemical characterization and modeling of fuel cells via AC impedance and residence time distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Robert R. U.

    The performance of commercially available fuel cells was tested under a variety of test conditions and models were formulated to explain the experimental results. Several techniques were applied to single cells and groups of cells, each probing a different phenomenon responsible for limiting the power output of the cells. Nonuiformity of fuel cells in a stack can drastically affect the total power output, because a stack of cells in series can only provide as much electrical current as the weakest cell. Uniformity of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell voltage was measured for each cell of the 47 cells in a Nexa(TM) stack operating with 0 W and 800W supplied to an external load. Manufacturing consistency was assessed by comparing the mean cell potential of 10 different stacks. To minimize the cost of operating a stack, PEM fuel cells must be capable of withstanding higher impurity concentrations, which was accomplished by adding a manual purge line into the fuel exhaust line of a Nexa(TM) stack. The critical flow rate of the anode exhaust was determined by feeding gas diluted with up to 7% N2 to a stack supplying up to 200 W to an external load. The residence time distribution (RTD) of impurities in the stack was evaluated by injecting a pulse of inert gas and simultaneously measuring the time dependent voltage of each cell in the stack. A number of different compartmental flow models were developed to replicate the experimental data, but with minimal success; however, the added exhaust line successfully improved the impurity tolerance of the stack. Determining which and to what extent physical processes limit the electrical output of fuel cells is critical for evaluating system designs and performing diagnostics. Impedance spectroscopy was applied to cells to test the dynamic response of fuel cells and stacks thereof. Equivalent circuit models were fitted to the data, with each circuit element representing a different physical phenomenon. Data were

  19. Long-lived plasma cells are generated in mucosal immune responses and contribute to the bone marrow plasma cell pool in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, A; Kraft, M; Roth, K; Riedel, R; Lammerding, D; Hauser, A E

    2016-01-01

    During systemic immune responses, plasma blasts are generated in secondary lymphoid organs and migrate to the bone marrow, where they can become long-lived, being responsible for the maintenance of long-term antibody titers. Plasma blasts generated in mucosal immune responses of the small intestine home to the lamina propria (LP), producing mainly immunoglobulin A. The migration of these antibody-secreting cells is well characterized during acute immune responses. Less is known about their lifetime and contribution to the long-lived bone marrow compartment. Here we investigate the lifetime of plasma cells (PCs) and the relationship between the PC compartments of the gut and bone marrow after oral immunization. Our findings indicate that PCs in the LP can survive for extended time periods. PCs specific for orally administered antigens can be detected in the bone marrow for at least 9 months after immunization, indicating that the mucosal PC compartment can contribute to the long-lived PC pool in this organ, independent of the participation of splenic B cells. Our findings suggest that the compartmentalization between mucosal and systemic PC pools is less strict than previously thought. This may have implications for the development of vaccines as well as for autoantibody-mediated diseases. PMID:25943272

  20. Glycosylation-mediated phenylpropanoid partitioning in Populus tremuloides cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babst Benjamin A

    2009-12-01

    identified candidate genes for glycosyltransferases that may mediate the glycosylation, and for transporters that mediate the subcellular compartmentalization of sugars and phenolic glycosides. The suspension cells appear to represent a facile system for dissecting the regulation of phenolic carbon partitioning, and in turn, its effects on growth in Populus.

  1. Analysis of the Rab GTPase Interactome in Dendritic Cells Reveals Anti-microbial Functions of the Rab32 Complex in Bacterial Containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yu; Zou, Liyun; Tang, Xiangyu; Yang, Yi; Ma, Li; Jia, Qingzhu; Ni, Qingshan; Liu, Siqi; Tang, Lizhang; Lin, Regina; Wong, Elizabeth; Sun, Wei; Wang, Liting; Wei, Quanfang; Ran, Haiying; Zhang, Liqun; Lian, Hengning; Huang, Wei; Wu, Yuzhang; Li, Qi-Jing; Wan, Ying

    2016-02-16

    Dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate complex membrane trafficking through an interconnected transportation network linked together by Rab GTPases. Through a tandem affinity purification strategy and mass spectrometry, we depicted an interactomic landscape of major members of the mammalian Rab GTPase family. When complemented with imaging tools, this proteomic analysis provided a global view of intracellular membrane organization. Driven by this analysis, we investigated dynamic changes to the Rab32 subnetwork in DCs induced by L. monocytogenes infection and uncovered an essential role of this subnetwork in controlling the intracellular proliferation of L. monocytogenes. Mechanistically, Rab32 formed a persistent complex with two interacting proteins, PHB and PHB2, to encompass bacteria both during early phagosome formation and after L. monocytogenes escaped the original containment vacuole. Collectively, we have provided a functional compartmentalization overview and an organizational framework of intracellular Rab-mediated vesicle trafficking that can serve as a resource for future investigations. PMID:26885862

  2. Molecular dissection of SO (SOFT) protein in stress-induced aggregation and cell-to-cell interactive functions in filamentous fungal multicellularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukasaki, Wakako; Saeki, Kei; Katayama, Takuya; Maruyama, Jun-Ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Filamentous fungi grow by organizing multicellularity through hyphal compartmentalization and cell fusion. SO (SOFT) protein, which was originally identified in Neurospora crassa, plays distinct functional roles in cell-to-cell interactions, such as septal plugging and cell fusion. We previously reported that AoSO, an Aspergillus oryzae SO homologue, forms aggregates at the septal pore in response to stress, as well as upon hyphal wounding. However, the functional regions that mediate the multicellular functions of AoSO, which is a large protein composed of 1195 amino acids, have not been elucidated. Here, we divided AoSO protein into regions according to amino acid sequence conservation among other fungal SO homologues. By heterologous expression of full-length and truncated forms of AoSO in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the region responsible for the stress-induced aggregation of AoSO was identified to be between amino acids 556 and 1146. In A. oryzae, however, septal localization of AoSO aggregates required the 49 C-terminal amino acids. Thus, expression of only the C-terminal half of AoSO was sufficient for septal plugging and prevention of excessive cytoplasmic loss upon hyphal wounding. In contrast, the N-terminal half of AoSO, from amino acids 1 to 555, together with the C-terminal end, was revealed to be indispensable for cell fusion. Collectively, these findings suggest that the C-terminal half of AoSO, which mediates stress-induced aggregation, is required for both septal plugging and cell fusion, whereas the N-terminal half confers an additional functionality that is essential for cell fusion. PMID:27109373

  3. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine the cytoskeletal dynamics they chose magnetic twisting cytometry, where the spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads was measured, which is a measure for the cytoskeletal remodeling dynamics. The group of Katarina Wolf measured the stiffness of the cell nucleus because it is the largest and stiffest organelle, which may hinder the migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue [2]. They combined atomic force confocal microscopy for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness (the inverse of the compressibility) with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact as well as monitoring of the cell's fate. The dynamics of tissue topology such as the mixing of compartments during cancer invasion and metastasis were theoretically analyzed by Lance L Munn [3]. In particular, he presented a mathematical model of tissue repair and tumor growth based on collective cell migration that simulates a wide range of tumor behaviors using correct tissue compartmentalization and connectivity. In the future, the topological analysis could be helpful for tumor diagnosis or monitoring tumor therapy. The group of Cynthia A Reinhart-King analyzed how the topological guidance of a 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities affects cell motility [4]. In particular, they mimicked the heterogeneities in density of the tumor stroma by preparing gels with an interface of high and low density collagen gels and investigated how this affects cell motility. The author's review paper details the effect of focal adhesion proteins such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on cell motility and how this effect is driven by mechanical alterations of cells expressing FAK compared to cells with FAK knock-out [5]. In particular, it focused on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. This article highlights that both focal adhesion proteins

  4. Local ATP generation by brain-type creatine kinase (CK-B facilitates cell motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan W P Kuiper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Creatine Kinases (CK catalyze the reversible transfer of high-energy phosphate groups between ATP and phosphocreatine, thereby playing a storage and distribution role in cellular energetics. Brain-type CK (CK-B deficiency is coupled to loss of function in neural cell circuits, altered bone-remodeling by osteoclasts and complement-mediated phagocytotic activity of macrophages, processes sharing dependency on actomyosin dynamics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we provide evidence for direct coupling between CK-B and actomyosin activities in cortical microdomains of astrocytes and fibroblasts during spreading and migration. CK-B transiently accumulates in membrane ruffles and ablation of CK-B activity affects spreading and migration performance. Complementation experiments in CK-B-deficient fibroblasts, using new strategies to force protein relocalization from cytosol to cortical sites at membranes, confirmed the contribution of compartmentalized CK-B to cell morphogenetic dynamics. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide evidence that local cytoskeletal dynamics during cell motility is coupled to on-site availability of ATP generated by CK-B.

  5. Real-time dynamics of RNA Polymerase II clustering in live human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisse, Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in the central dogma of molecular biology, when genetic information encoded on DNA is made into messenger RNA. How this fundamental process occurs within living cells (in vivo) is poorly understood,[1] despite extensive biochemical characterizations with isolated biomolecules (in vitro). For high-order organisms, like humans, transcription is reported to be spatially compartmentalized in nuclear foci consisting of clusters of RNA Polymerase II, the enzyme responsible for synthesizing all messenger RNAs. However, little is known of when these foci assemble or their relative stability. We developed an approach based on photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM) combined with a temporal correlation analysis, which we refer to as tcPALM. The tcPALM method enables the real-time characterization of biomolecular spatiotemporal organization, with single-molecule sensitivity, directly in living cells.[2] Using tcPALM, we observed that RNA Polymerase II clusters form transiently, with an average lifetime of 5.1 (+/- 0.4) seconds. Stimuli affecting transcription regulation yielded orders of magnitude changes in the dynamics of the polymerase clusters, implying that clustering is regulated and plays a role in the cells ability to effect rapid response to external signals. Our results suggest that the transient crowding of enzymes may aid in rate-limiting steps of genome regulation.

  6. Glyoxylate Reductase Isoform 1 is Localized in the Cytosol and Not Peroxisomes in Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steven L. K. Ching; Satinder K. Gidda; Amanda Rochon; Owen R. van Cauwenberghe; Barry J. Shelp; Robert T. Mullen

    2012-01-01

    Glyoxylate reductase (GLYR) is a key enzyme in plant metabolism which catalyzes the detoxification of both photorespiratory glyoxylate and succinic semialdehdye,an intermediate of the γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) pathway.Two isoforms of GLYR exist in plants,GLYR1 and GLYR2,and while GLYR2 is known to be localized in plastids,GLYR1 has been reported to be localized in either peroxisomes or the cytosol.Here,we reappraised the intracellular localization of GLYR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana L.Heynh (ecotype Lansberg erecta) using both transiently-transformed suspension cells and stably-transformed plants,in combination with fluorescence microscopy.The results indicate that GLYR1 is localized exclusively to the cytosol regardless of the species,tissue and/or cell type,or exposure of plants to environmental stresses that would increase flux through the GABA pathway.Moreover,the C-terminal tripeptide sequence of GLYR1,-SRE,despite its resemblance to a type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal,is not sufficient for targeting to peroxisomes.Collectively,these results define the cytosol as the intracellular location of GLYR1 and provide not only important insight to the metabolic roles of GLYR1 and the compartmentation of the GABA and photorespiratory pathways in plant cells,but also serve as a useful reference for future studies of proteins proposed to be localized to peroxisomes and/or the cytosol.

  7. Global Identification and Differential Distribution Analysis of Glycans in Subcellular Fractions of Bladder Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ganglong; Huang, Luyu; Zhang, Jiaxu; Yu, Hanjie; Li, Zheng; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular components and their associated biological processes is crucial for cellular function. Protein glycosylation provides a basis for diversity of protein functions. Diversity of glycan composition in animal cells remains poorly understood. We used differential centrifugation techniques to isolate four subcellular protein fractions from homogenate of metastatic bladder YTS1 cells, low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer KK47 cells and normal bladder epithelia HCV29 cells: microsomal (Mic), mitochondrial (Mito), nuclear (Nuc), and cytosolic (Cyto). An integrated strategy combining lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis was then applied to evaluate protein glycosylation of the four fractions. Lectin microarray analysis revealed significant differences among the four fractions in terms of glycan binding to the lectins LCA, AAL, MPL, WGA and PWM in YTS1 cell, STL, Jacalin, VVA, LCA and WGA in KK47, and ConA, GNA, VVA and ACA in HCV29 cell. Among a total of 40, 32 and 15 N-glycans in four fractions of three cells detected by MS analysis, high-mannose and fucosylated structures were predominant, 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 5 N-glycans in KK47 and 7 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in all four fractions; and 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 16 N-glycans in KK47, and 3 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in only one fraction. Glycans in the latter category are considered potential markers for the corresponding organelles. The integrated strategy described here allows detailed examination of glycomes subcellular fraction with high resolution and sensitivity, and will be useful for elucidation of the functional roles of glycans and corresponding glycosylated proteins in distinct organelles. PMID:27313494

  8. Global Identification and Differential Distribution Analysis of Glycans in Subcellular Fractions of Bladder Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ganglong; Huang, Luyu; Zhang, Jiaxu; Yu, Hanjie; Li, Zheng; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular components and their associated biological processes is crucial for cellular function. Protein glycosylation provides a basis for diversity of protein functions. Diversity of glycan composition in animal cells remains poorly understood. We used differential centrifugation techniques to isolate four subcellular protein fractions from homogenate of metastatic bladder YTS1 cells, low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer KK47 cells and normal bladder epithelia HCV29 cells: microsomal (Mic), mitochondrial (Mito), nuclear (Nuc), and cytosolic (Cyto). An integrated strategy combining lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis was then applied to evaluate protein glycosylation of the four fractions. Lectin microarray analysis revealed significant differences among the four fractions in terms of glycan binding to the lectins LCA, AAL, MPL, WGA and PWM in YTS1 cell, STL, Jacalin, VVA, LCA and WGA in KK47, and ConA, GNA, VVA and ACA in HCV29 cell. Among a total of 40, 32 and 15 N-glycans in four fractions of three cells detected by MS analysis, high-mannose and fucosylated structures were predominant, 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 5 N-glycans in KK47 and 7 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in all four fractions; and 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 16 N-glycans in KK47, and 3 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in only one fraction. Glycans in the latter category are considered potential markers for the corresponding organelles. The integrated strategy described here allows detailed examination of glycomes subcellular fraction with high resolution and sensitivity, and will be useful for elucidation of the functional roles of glycans and corresponding glycosylated proteins in distinct organelles. PMID:27313494

  9. Distinct and conserved prominin-1/CD133-positive retinal cell populations identified across species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Jászai

    Full Text Available Besides being a marker of various somatic stem cells in mammals, prominin-1 (CD133 plays a role in maintaining the photoreceptor integrity since mutations in the PROM1 gene are linked with retinal degeneration. In spite of that, little information is available regarding its distribution in eyes of non-mammalian vertebrates endowed with high regenerative abilities. To address this subject, prominin-1 cognates were isolated from axolotl, zebrafish and chicken, and their retinal compartmentalization was investigated and compared to that of their mammalian orthologue. Interestingly, prominin-1 transcripts--except for the axolotl--were not strictly restricted to the outer nuclear layer (i.e., photoreceptor cells, but they also marked distinct subdivisions of the inner nuclear layer (INL. In zebrafish, where the prominin-1 gene is duplicated (i.e., prominin-1a and prominin-1b, a differential expression was noted for both paralogues within the INL being localized either to its vitreal or scleral subdivision, respectively. Interestingly, expression of prominin-1a within the former domain coincided with Pax-6-positive cells that are known to act as progenitors upon injury-induced retino-neurogenesis. A similar, but minute population of prominin-1-positive cells located at the vitreal side of the INL was also detected in developing and adult mice. In chicken, however, prominin-1-positive cells appeared to be aligned along the scleral side of the INL reminiscent of zebrafish prominin-1b. Taken together our data indicate that in addition to conserved expression of prominin-1 in photoreceptors, significant prominin-1-expressing non-photoreceptor retinal cell populations are present in the vertebrate eye that might represent potential sources of stem/progenitor cells for regenerative therapies.

  10. The specific role of plastidial glycolysis in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells under scrutiny through the study of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoman, Armand Djoro; Flores-Tornero, María; Rosa-Telléz, Sara; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2016-03-01

    The cellular compartmentalization of metabolic processes is an important feature in plants where the same pathways could be simultaneously active in different compartments. Plant glycolysis occurs in the cytosol and plastids of green and non-green cells in which the requirements of energy and precursors may be completely different. Because of this, the relevance of plastidial glycolysis could be very different depending on the cell type. In the associated study, we investigated the function of plastidial glycolysis in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells by specifically driving the expression of plastidial glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) in a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double mutant background (gapcp1gapcp2). We showed that GAPCp is not functionally significant in photosynthetic cells, while it plays a crucial function in heterotrophic cells. We also showed that (i) GAPCp activity expression in root tips is necessary for primary root growth, (ii) its expression in heterotrophic cells of aerial parts and roots is necessary for plant growth and development, and (iii) GAPCp is an important metabolic connector of carbon and nitrogen metabolism through the phosphorylated pathway of serine biosynthesis (PPSB). We discuss here the role that this pathway could play in the control of plant growth and development. PMID:26953506

  11. Selenium Metabolism in Cancer Cells: The Combined Application of XAS and XFM Techniques to the Problem of Selenium Speciation in Biological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh H. Harris

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Determining the speciation of selenium in vivo is crucial to understanding the biological activity of this essential element, which is a popular dietary supplement due to its anti-cancer properties. Hyphenated techniques that combine separation and detection methods are traditionally and effectively used in selenium speciation analysis, but require extensive sample preparation that may affect speciation. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption and fluorescence techniques offer an alternative approach to selenium speciation analysis that requires minimal sample preparation. We present a brief summary of some key HPLC-ICP-MS and ESI-MS/MS studies of the speciation of selenium in cells and rat tissues. We review the results of a top-down approach to selenium speciation in human lung cancer cells that aims to link the speciation and distribution of selenium to its biological activity using a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS and X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM. The results of this approach highlight the distinct fates of selenomethionine, methylselenocysteine and selenite in terms of their speciation and distribution within cells: organic selenium metabolites were widely distributed throughout the cells, whereas inorganic selenium metabolites were compartmentalized and associated with copper. New data from the XFM mapping of electrophoretically-separated cell lysates show the distribution of selenium in the proteins of selenomethionine-treated cells. Future applications of this top-down approach are discussed.

  12. Pneumatic-aided micro-molding for flexible fabrication of homogeneous and heterogeneous cell-laden microgels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Tian, Chang; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Jinyi

    2016-07-01

    Microgels are favorable for numerous applications such as drug delivery, biomaterials science and tissue engineering. Conventionally, photolithographic methods and micro-molding techniques are extensively exploited to prepare microgels; however, they are, respectively, limited to photocrosslinkable polymers and inadequate to generate serially patterned hydrogels due to the static nature of utilized molds. Herein, we proposed a simple and versatile approach, termed pneumatic-aided micro-molding (PAM), to flexibly fabricate microgels with precise control over multiple cell types and microarchitectures of hydrogels through strategically designed pneumatic microvalves. Using the PAM approach, different cells were encapsulated in various hydrogels that had well-defined geometries. Additionally, single/multiple micro-channeled cell-laden microgels were fabricated, of which the shape, number and arrangement could be finely tuned by varying microvalve configurations. Moreover, multi-compartmental microgels comprising composite hydrogel structures were engineered following a two-step PAM, which demonstrated the utility for biomimetically constructing a three-dimensional (3D) liver microtissue composed of a radially orchestrated network of hepatic cords and sinusoids. The resulting microtissue resembled the organizational complexity of the liver lobule and was applied for the evaluation of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Collectively, the PAM strategy could be a useful and powerful tool in biomedical engineering, in vitro 3D cell culture, and fundamental biological studies. PMID:27229899

  13. T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    T Cells - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign ... Is MS? Definition of MS T Cells T Cells Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print In this ...

  14. Cell counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, M C; Lawler, G

    2001-05-01

    This unit presents protocols for counting cells using either a hemacytometer or electronically using a Coulter counter. Cell counting with a hemacytometer permits effective discrimination of live from dead cells using trypan blue exclusion. In addition, the procedure is less subject to errors arising from cell clumping or size heterogeneity. Counting cells is more quickly and easily performed using an electronic counter, but live-dead discrimination is unreliable. Cell populations containing large numbers of dead cells and/or cell clumps are difficult to count accurately. In addition, electronic counting requires resetting of the instrument for cell populations of different sizes; heterogeneous populations can give rise to inaccurate counts, and resting and activated cells may require counting at separate settings. In general, electronic cell counting is best performed on fresh peripheral blood cells. PMID:18770655

  15. Steady-state Compartmentalization of Lipid Membranes by Active Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Mads Christian; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1998-01-01

    -protein assembly reorganizes into a steady-state structure with a typical length scale determined by the strength of the external drive. In the specific case of a mixed dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine-distearoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the gel-fluid coexistence region, it is shown explicitly by computer...... conformational excitations governed by an external drive, and the deexcitation is controlled by interaction of the protein with its lipid surroundings. In response to the flux of energy into the proteins from the environment and the subsequent dissipation of energy into the lipid bilayer, the lipid...

  16. Cation-sensitive compartmentalization in metallacarborane containing polymer nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ďorďovič, V.; Uchman, M.; Reza, M.; Ruokolainen, J.; Zhigunov, Alexander; Ivankov, O. I.; Matějíček, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 12 (2016), s. 9884-9892. ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-14608S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polymer nanoparticles * metallacarborane * double-hydrophilic block copolymer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.840, year: 2014

  17. Differential Compartmentalization and Distinct Functions of GABAB Receptor Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Vigot, Réjan; Barbieri, Samuel; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Turecek, Rostislav; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Luján, Rafael; Jacobson, Laura H.; Biermann, Barbara; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Vacher, Claire-Marie; Müller, Matthias; Sansig, Gilles; Guetg, Nicole; Cryan, John F.

    2006-01-01

    GABAB receptors are the G protein-coupled receptors for the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Molecular diversity in the GABAB system arises from the GABAB1a and GABAB1b subunit isoforms that solely differ in their ectodomains by a pair of sushi repeats that is unique to GABAB1a. Using a combined genetic, physiological, and morphological approach, we now demonstrate that GABAB1 isoforms localize to distinct synaptic sites and convey separate functions ...

  18. Compartmentation and complexation of metals in hyperaccumulator plants

    OpenAIRE

    Leitenmaier, Barbara; Küpper, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaccumulators are being intensely investigated. They are not only interesting in scientific context due to their “strange” behavior in terms of dealing with high concentrations of metals, but also because of their use in phytoremediation and phytomining, for which understanding the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation is crucial. Hyperaccumulators naturally use metal accumulation as a defense against herbivores and pathogens, and therefore deal with accumulated metals in very specific ways of ...

  19. Compartmentation and complexation of metals in hyperaccumulator plants

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara eLeitenmaier; Hendrik eKüpper

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaccumulators are being intensely investigated. They are not only interesting in scientific context due to their strange behaviour in terms of dealing with high concentrations of metals, but also because of their use in phytoremediation and phytomining, for which understanding the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation is crucial. Hyperaccumulators naturally use metal accumulation as a defence against herbivores and pathogens, and therefore deal with accumulated metals in very specific ways of c...

  20. Quantitation of phosphorus excretion in sheep by compartmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control of phosphorus excretion in sheep has been examined by constructing a kinetic model that contains a mechanistic set of connections between blood and gastrointestinal tract. The model was developed using experimental data from chaff-fed sheep and gives an accurate description of the absorption and excretion of 32P phosphorus in feces and urine of the ruminating sheep. These results indicated the main control site for phosphorus excretion in the ruminating sheep was the gastrointestinal tract, whereas for the non-ruminating sheep fed the liquid diet, control was exerted by the kidney. A critical factor in the induction of adaptation of phosphorus reabsorption by the kidney was the reduction in salivation, and since this response occurred independently of marked changes in the delivery of phosphorus to the kidney, a humoral factor may be involved in this communication between salivary gland and kidney

  1. Differential compartmentalization and distinct functions of GABAB receptor variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigot, Réjan; Barbieri, Samuel; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans;

    2006-01-01

    GABAB receptors are the G protein-coupled receptors for the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Molecular diversity in the GABAB system arises from the GABAB1a and GABAB1b subunit isoforms that solely differ in their ectodomains by a pair of sushi repeats...... release, while predominantly GABAB1b mediates postsynaptic inhibition. Electron microscopy reveals a synaptic distribution of GABAB1 isoforms that agrees with the observed functional differences. Transfected CA3 neurons selectively express GABAB1a in distal axons, suggesting that the sushi repeats, a...

  2. Compartmental Modelling of the Pharmacokinetics of an Efflux Transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Beyer, A.; Steinbach, A; Brožič, P.; Gobec, S.; Rižner, T. Lanišnik; Ablinger, E.; Wegscheider, S.; Pavkov-Keller, T.; Keller, W.; Milak, S.; Chemelli, A.; Glatter, O; Petró, É.; Csóka, I.; Balogh, Á

    2010-01-01

    The enhancement of dissolution rate is one of the most commonly used approaches to improve the bioavailability of drugs, since for a great extent of new drug substances their absorption is limited with their dissolution rate. The aim of this work was to prepare and optimize microparticles containing ketoprofen using spray-drying technology, which would enhance the dissolution rate of ketoprofen, which is poorly soluble at lower pH values. Different hydrophilic polymers with relatively low mel...

  3. HIGH TIBIAL CLOSED WEDGE OSTEOTOMY FOR MEDIAL COMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS To study the outcome of high tibial osteotomy in medial compartment arthritis. SETTINGS AND DESIGN Prospective as well as retrospective study of thirty six patients with unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee presenting to our hospital from the year 2013 to 2015, who were treated with high tibial osteotomy. METHODS AND MATERIAL The study material includes data collection, clinical examination and investigations of thirty six patients who underwent high tibial osteotomy. Out of thirty six patients, twenty four patients were women and twelve patients were men with a ratio of 2:1. The mean age at the time of surgery was 54.44years with a range of 33 years to 73 years. Right side unicompartmental osteoarthrosis is seen in seventeen patients (41.67% and nineteen patients (58.33% had left side involvement. RESULTS A 75% patients had 90% to 100% of pain relief. Two fold increase in the number of patients with pain free unlimited walking distance. All patients had an improvement in their knee score. Over 90% of patients were free of complications. CONCLUSIONS High tibial osteotomy remains a useful and efficient procedure. The improvement in the post op scoring encourages us to continue recommending HTO in the most painful early and medium stages of medial compartment osteoarthritis. HTO is thus very beneficial in cases of a good patient selection and good operative technique has been achieved.

  4. Gamma time-dependency in Blaxter's compartmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matis, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A new two-compartment model for the passage of particles through the gastro-intestinal tract of ruminants is proposed. In this model, a gamma distribution of lifetimes is introduced in the first compartment; thereby, passage from that compartment becomes time-dependent. This modification is strongly suggested by the physical alteration which certain substances, e.g. hay particles, undergo in the digestive process. The proposed model is applied to experimental data.

  5. Compartmentalization in environmental science and the perversion of multiple thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nature and living organisms are separated into compartments. The self-assembly of phospholipid micelles was as fundamental to the emergence of life and evolution as the formation of DNA precursors and their self-replication. Also, modern science owes much of its success to the study of single compartments, the dissection of complex structures and event chains into smaller study objects which can be manipulated with a set of more and more sophisticated equipment. However, in environmental science, these insights are obtained at a price: firstly, it is difficult to recognize, let alone to take into account what is lost during fragmentation and dissection; and secondly, artificial compartments such as scientific disciplines become self-sustaining, leading to new and unnecessary boundaries, subtly framing scientific culture and impeding progress in holistic understanding. The long-standing but fruitless quest to define dose-effect relationships and thresholds for single toxic agents in our environment is a central part of the problem. Debating single-agent toxicity in splendid isolation is deeply flawed in view of a modern world where people are exposed to low levels of a multitude of genotoxic and non-genotoxic agents. Its potential danger lies in the unwarranted postulation of separate thresholds for agents with similar action. A unifying concept involving toxicology and radiation biology is needed for a full mechanistic assessment of environmental health risks. The threat of synergism may be less than expected, but this may also hold for the safety margin commonly thought to be a consequence of linear no-threshold dose-effect relationship assumptions

  6. Apartment Compartmentalization With an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Sean [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Berger, David [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Harrington, Curtis [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Building America Team, Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a new construction multifamily building in Queens, New York. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before-and-after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of an apartment during sealing.

  7. Subcellular localization and compartmentation of thiamine derivatives in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettendorff, L; Wins, P; Lesourd, M

    1994-05-26

    The subcellular distribution of thiamine derivatives in rat brain was studied. Thiamine diphosphate content was highest in the mitochondrial and synaptosomal fractions, and lowest in microsomal, myelin and cytosolic fractions. Only 3-5% of total thiamine diphosphate was bound to transketolase, a cytosolic enzyme. Thiamine triphosphate was barely detectable in the microsomal and cytosolic fraction, but synaptosomes were slightly enriched in this compound compared to the crude homogenate. Both myelin and mitochondrial fractions contained significant amounts of thiamine triphosphate. In order to estimate the relative turnover rates of these compounds, the animals received an intraperitoneal injection of either [14C]thiamine or [14C]sulbutiamine (isobutyrylthiamine disulfide) 1 h before decapitation. The specific radioactivities of thiamine compounds found in the brain decreased in the order: thiamine > thiamine triphosphate > thiamine monophosphate > thiamine diphosphate. Incorporation of radioactivity into thiamine triphosphate was more marked with [14C]sulbutiamine than with [14C]thiamine. The highest specific radioactivity of thiamine diphosphate was found in the cytosolic fraction of the brain, though this pool represents less than 10% of total thiamine diphosphate. Cytosolic thiamine diphosphate had a twice higher specific radioactivity when [14C]sulbutiamine was used as precursor compared with thiamine though no significant differences were found in the other cellular compartments. Our results suggest the existence of two thiamine diphosphate pools: the bound cofactor pool is essentially mitochondrial and has a low turnover; a much smaller cytosolic pool (6-7% of total TDP) of high turnover is the likely precursor of thiamine triphosphate. PMID:8186256

  8. On the compartmental modeling of cesium migration in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prediction of the migration of radionuclides in soil following deposition after a nuclear accident is important for both external dose and plant uptake prediction. In this paper, the validity conditions of compartment models for cesium migration in soils are investigated. A compartment model is derived from a diffusion-convection model. The model considers free and bound cesium compartments and is applied to measured profiles of 137Cs of undisturbed soil in Northern Greece. It is concluded that the rate of cesium transfer must vary linearly with depth and that from measured equilibrium profiles, the ratios of model parameters can be determined but not the parameters themselves. This model is applied to measured profiles of 137Cs in soil due to wet deposition following the Chernobyl accident

  9. The ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase regulates adult intestinal stem cell proliferation during homeostasis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenghan; Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Tacchelly-Benites, Ofelia; Yang, Eungi; Nojima, Hisashi; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-05-15

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation, and is aberrantly activated in colorectal cancer. Inhibitors of the ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase (Tnks) have become lead therapeutic candidates for Wnt-driven cancers, following the recent discovery that Tnks targets Axin, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, for proteolysis. Initial reports indicated that Tnks is important for Wnt pathway activation in cultured human cell lines. However, the requirement for Tnks in physiological settings has been less clear, as subsequent studies in mice, fish and flies suggested that Tnks was either entirely dispensable for Wnt-dependent processes in vivo, or alternatively, had tissue-specific roles. Here, using null alleles, we demonstrate that the regulation of Axin by the highly conserved Drosophila Tnks homolog is essential for the control of ISC proliferation. Furthermore, in the adult intestine, where activity of the Wingless pathway is graded and peaks at each compartmental boundary, Tnks is dispensable for signaling in regions where pathway activity is high, but essential where pathway activity is relatively low. Finally, as observed previously for Wingless pathway components, Tnks activity in absorptive enterocytes controls the proliferation of neighboring ISCs non-autonomously by regulating JAK/STAT signaling. These findings reveal the requirement for Tnks in the control of ISC proliferation and suggest an essential role in the amplification of Wnt signaling, with relevance for development, homeostasis and cancer. PMID:27190037

  10. Microbiota restricts trafficking of bacteria to mesenteric lymph nodes by CX(3)CR1(hi) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Gretchen E; Longman, Randy S; Zhang, Jing-Xin; Breart, Beatrice; Galan, Carolina; Cuesta, Adolfo; Schwab, Susan R; Littman, Dan R

    2013-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota has a critical role in immune system and metabolic homeostasis, but it must be tolerated by the host to avoid inflammatory responses that can damage the epithelial barrier separating the host from the luminal contents. Breakdown of this regulation and the resulting inappropriate immune response to commensals are thought to lead to the development of inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. We proposed that the intestinal immune system is instructed by the microbiota to limit responses to luminal antigens. Here we demonstrate in mice that, at steady state, the microbiota inhibits the transport of both commensal and pathogenic bacteria from the lumen to a key immune inductive site, the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). However, in the absence of Myd88 or under conditions of antibiotic-induced dysbiosis, non-invasive bacteria were trafficked to the MLNs in a CCR7-dependent manner, and induced both T-cell responses and IgA production. Trafficking was carried out by CX(3)CR1(hi) mononuclear phagocytes, an intestinal-cell population previously reported to be non-migratory. These findings define a central role for commensals in regulating the migration to the MLNs of CX(3)CR1(hi) mononuclear phagocytes endowed with the ability to capture luminal bacteria, thereby compartmentalizing the intestinal immune response to avoid inflammation. PMID:23334413

  11. Quantitative single cell monitoring of protein synthesis at subcellular resolution using fluorescently labeled tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoom, Sima; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cooperman, Barry S; Smorodinsky, Nechama I; Smilansky, Zeev; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a novel technique of using fluorescent tRNA for translation monitoring (FtTM). FtTM enables the identification and monitoring of active protein synthesis sites within live cells at submicron resolution through quantitative microscopy of transfected bulk uncharged tRNA, fluorescently labeled in the D-loop (fl-tRNA). The localization of fl-tRNA to active translation sites was confirmed through its co-localization with cellular factors and its dynamic alterations upon inhibition of protein synthesis. Moreover, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals, generated when fl-tRNAs, separately labeled as a FRET pair occupy adjacent sites on the ribosome, quantitatively reflect levels of protein synthesis in defined cellular regions. In addition, FRET signals enable detection of intra-populational variability in protein synthesis activity. We demonstrate that FtTM allows quantitative comparison of protein synthesis between different cell types, monitoring effects of antibiotics and stress agents, and characterization of changes in spatial compartmentalization of protein synthesis upon viral infection. PMID:21795382

  12. Galvanic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, I. G.

    1973-01-01

    Many standard physical chemistry textbooks contain ambiguities which lead to confusion about standard electrode potentials, calculating cell voltages, and writing reactions for galvanic cells. This article shows how standard electrode potentials can be used to calculate cell voltages and deduce cell reactions. (Author/RH)

  13. TNF inhibits Notch-1 in skeletal muscle cells by Ezh2 and DNA methylation mediated repression: implications in duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarnali Acharyya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Classical NF-kappaB signaling functions as a negative regulator of skeletal myogenesis through potentially multiple mechanisms. The inhibitory actions of TNFalpha on skeletal muscle differentiation are mediated in part through sustained NF-kappaB activity. In dystrophic muscles, NF-kappaB activity is compartmentalized to myofibers to inhibit regeneration by limiting the number of myogenic progenitor cells. This regulation coincides with elevated levels of muscle derived TNFalpha that is also under IKKbeta and NF-kappaB control. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on these findings we speculated that in DMD, TNFalpha secreted from myotubes inhibits regeneration by directly acting on satellite cells. Analysis of several satellite cell regulators revealed that TNFalpha is capable of inhibiting Notch-1 in satellite cells and C2C12 myoblasts, which was also found to be dependent on NF-kappaB. Notch-1 inhibition occurred at the mRNA level suggesting a transcriptional repression mechanism. Unlike its classical mode of action, TNFalpha stimulated the recruitment of Ezh2 and Dnmt-3b to coordinate histone and DNA methylation, respectively. Dnmt-3b recruitment was dependent on Ezh2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that in dystrophic muscles, elevated levels of TNFalpha and NF-kappaB inhibit the regenerative potential of satellite cells via epigenetic silencing of the Notch-1 gene.

  14. Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Madhukar Thakur

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this presentation is to create awareness of stem cell applications in the ISORBE community and to foster a strategy of how the ISORBE community can disseminate information and promote the use of radiolabeled stem cells in biomedical applications. Methods: The continued excitement in Stem Cells, in many branches of basic and applied biomedical science, stems from the remarkable ability of stem cells to divide and develop into different types of cells in ...

  15. Cell Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Albenne, Cécile; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2008-01-01

    This chapter covers our present knowledge of cell wall proteomics highlighting the distinctive features of cell walls and cell wall proteins in relation to problems encountered for protein extraction, separation and identification. It provides clues to design strategies for efficient cell wall proteomic studies. It gives an overview of the kinds of proteins that have yet been identified: the expected proteins vs the identified proteins. Finally, the new vision of the cell wall proteome, and t...

  16. Reorganization of the endosomal system in Salmonella-infected cells: the ultrastructure of Salmonella-induced tubular compartments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Krieger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During the intracellular life of Salmonella enterica, a unique membrane-bound compartment termed Salmonella-containing vacuole, or SCV, is formed. By means of translocated effector proteins, intracellular Salmonella also induce the formation of extensive, highly dynamic membrane tubules termed Salmonella-induced filaments or SIF. Here we report the first detailed ultrastructural analyses of the SCV and SIF by electron microscopy (EM, EM tomography and live cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM. We found that a subset of SIF is composed of double membranes that enclose portions of host cell cytosol and cytoskeletal filaments within its inner lumen. Despite some morphological similarities, we found that the formation of SIF double membranes is independent from autophagy and requires the function of the effector proteins SseF and SseG. The lumen of SIF network is accessible to various types of endocytosed material and our CLEM analysis of double membrane SIF demonstrated that fluid phase markers accumulate only between the inner and outer membrane of these structures, a space continual with endosomal lumen. Our work reveals how manipulation of the endosomal membrane system by an intracellular pathogen results in a unique tubular membrane compartmentalization of the host cell, generating a shielded niche permissive for intracellular proliferation of Salmonella.

  17. Rabies Internalizes into Primary Peripheral Neurons via Clathrin Coated Pits and Requires Fusion at the Cell Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinotti, Silvia; Whelan, Sean P. J.

    2016-01-01

    The single glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RABV) dictates all viral entry steps from receptor engagement to membrane fusion. To study the uptake of RABV into primary neuronal cells in culture, we generated a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus in which the G protein was replaced with that of the neurotropic RABV CVS-11 strain (rVSV CVS G). Using microfluidic compartmentalized culture, we examined the uptake of single virions into the termini of primary neurons of the dorsal root ganglion and ventral spinal cord. By pharmacologically disrupting endocytosis at the distal neurites, we demonstrate that rVSV CVS G uptake and infection are dependent on dynamin. Imaging of single virion uptake with fluorescent endocytic markers further identifies endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits as the predominant internalization mechanism. Transmission electron micrographs also reveal the presence of viral particles in vesicular structures consistent with incompletely coated clathrin pits. This work extends our previous findings of clathrin-mediated uptake of RABV into epithelial cells to two neuronal subtypes involved in rabies infection in vivo. Chemical perturbation of endosomal acidification in the neurite or somal compartment further shows that establishment of infection requires pH-dependent fusion of virions at the cell body. These findings correlate infectivity to existing single particle evidence of long-range endosomal transport of RABV and clathrin dependent uptake at the plasma membrane. PMID:27463226

  18. Selective alterations of the host cell architecture upon infection with parvovirus minute virus of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a productive infection, the prototype strain of parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVMp) induces dramatic morphological alterations to the fibroblast host cell A9, resulting in cell lysis and progeny virus release. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying these changes, we characterized the fate of various cytoskeletal filaments and investigated the nuclear/cytoplasmic compartmentalization of infected cells. While most pronounced effects could be seen on micro- and intermediate filaments, manifest in dramatic rearrangements and degradation of filamentous (F-)actin and vimentin structures, only little impact could be seen on microtubules or the nuclear envelope during the entire monitored time of infection. To further analyze the disruption of the cytoskeletal structures, we investigated the viral impact on selective regulatory pathways. Thereby, we found a correlation between microtubule stability and MVM-induced phosphorylation of α/β tubulin. In contrast, disassembly of actin filaments late in infection could be traced back to the disregulation of two F-actin associated proteins gelsolin and Wiscott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP). Thereby, an increase in the amount of gelsolin, an F-actin severing protein was observed during infection, accounting for the disruption of stress fibers upon infection. Concomitantly, the actin polymerization activity also diminished due to a loss of WASP, the activator protein of the actin polymerization machinery the Arp2/3 complex. No effects could be seen in amount and distribution of other F-actin regulatory factors such as cortactin, cofilin, and profilin. In summary, the selective attack of MVM towards distinct host cell cytoskeletal structures argues for a regulatory feature during infection, rather than a collapse of the host cell as a mere side effect of virus production

  19. Ca²⁺ signaling and regulation of fluid secretion in salivary gland acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambudkar, Indu S

    2014-06-01

    Neurotransmitter stimulation of plasma membrane receptors stimulates salivary gland fluid secretion via a complex process that is determined by coordinated temporal and spatial regulation of several Ca(2+) signaling processes as well as ion flux systems. Studies over the past four decades have demonstrated that Ca(2+) is a critical factor in the control of salivary gland function. Importantly, critical components of this process have now been identified, including plasma membrane receptors, calcium channels, and regulatory proteins. The key event in activation of fluid secretion is an increase in intracellular [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)]i) triggered by IP3-induced release of Ca(2+) from ER via the IP3R. This increase regulates the ion fluxes required to drive vectorial fluid secretion. IP3Rs determine the site of initiation and the pattern of [Ca(2+)]i signal in the cell. However, Ca(2+) entry into the cell is required to sustain the elevation of [Ca(2+)]i and fluid secretion. This Ca(2+) influx pathway, store-operated calcium influx pathway (SOCE), has been studied in great detail and the regulatory mechanisms as well as key molecular components have now been identified. Orai1, TRPC1, and STIM1 are critical components of SOCE and among these, Ca(2+) entry via TRPC1 is a major determinant of fluid secretion. The receptor-evoked Ca(2+) signal in salivary gland acinar cells is unique in that it starts at the apical pole and then rapidly increases across the cell. The basis for the polarized Ca(2+) signal can be ascribed to the polarized arrangement of the Ca(2+) channels, transporters, and signaling proteins. Distinct localization of these proteins in the cell suggests compartmentalization of Ca(2+) signals during regulation of fluid secretion. This chapter will discuss new concepts and findings regarding the polarization and control of Ca(2+) signals in the regulation of fluid secretion. PMID:24646566

  20. Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell motility is a fascinating example of cell behavior which is fundamentally important to a number of biological and pathological processes. It is based on a complex self-organized mechano-chemical machine consisting of cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. In general, the cytoskeleton is responsible for the movement of the entire cell and for movements within the cell. The main challenge in the field of cell motility is to develop a complete physical description on how and why cells move. For this purpose new ways of modeling the properties of biological cells have to be found. This long term goal can only be achieved if new experimental techniques are developed to extract physical information from these living systems and if theoretical models are found which bridge the gap between molecular and mesoscopic length scales. Cell Motility gives an authoritative overview of the fundamental biological facts, theoretical models, and current experimental developments in this fascinating area.

  1. Translocação e compartimentalização de Zn aplicado via ZnSO4 e ZnEDTA nas folhas de cafeeiro e feijoeiro Translocation and compartmentation of zinc by ZnSO4 e ZnEDTA applied on coffee and bean seedlings leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Alencar de Lima Franco

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a translocação e a compartimentalização de Zn, aplicado via foliar nas formas de ZnSO4 e ZnEDTA, foram conduzidos dois ensaios em solução nutritiva, em casa de vegetação, utilizando-se mudas de cafeeiro e feijoeiro, em condições de suficiência e deficiência de Zn. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos ao acaso com quatro repetições em esquema fatorial (2 x 3, correspondendo a dois níveis de Zn na solução nutritiva (suficiência e deficiência e três formas de suprimento de Zn às plantas (ZnSO4 e ZnEDTA a 14mmol L-1 de Zn, ambos em pincelamento na folha, e testemunha sem receber aplicação de Zn. Em ambas as espécies, o ZnSO4 foi mais adsorvido à cutícula da folha do que o ZnEDTA, demonstrando ser a retenção cuticular de Zn importante barreira na sua absorção. O estado nutricional do feijoeiro em Zn afetou o aproveitamento do Zn aplicado via foliar. Tanto a folha pincelada como a planta inteira de feijoeiro adquiriram maior quantidade de Zn do que as do cafeeiro. Em condição de inadequada nutrição em Zn, em ambas as espécies, a utilização de ZnEDTA foi mais eficiente na translocação do Zn. Quando foi aplicado ZnSO4 às folhas de cafeeiro crescidas em solução nutritiva não contendo Zn, houve acúmulo de Zn no caule, indicando que há grande afinidade do Zn2+ do sulfato com as cargas livres existentes nos vasos condutores.Two experiments were conducted aiming to evaluate translocation and compartmentation of ZnSO4 and ZnEDTA applied on leaves of coffee and bean seedlings previously grown under Zn sufficiency or deficiency in nutritive solution in greenhouse. The treatments applied were 14mmol L-1 ZnSO4, ZnEDTA and test without zinc applied on leaves. In both species, ZnSO4 was more retained on leaf cuticle, indicating cuticular zinc retention to be an important barrier in its uptake. The nutritional status of bean plants had a significant effect upon zinc utilization when it was

  2. Solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuquel, A.; Roussel, M.

    The physical and electronic characteristics of solar cells are discussed in terms of space applications. The principles underlying the photovoltaic effect are reviewed, including an analytic model for predicting the performance of individual cells and arrays of cells. Attention is given to the effects of electromagnetic and ionizing radiation, micrometeors, thermal and mechanical stresses, pollution and degassing encountered in space. The responses of different types of solar cells to the various performance-degrading agents are examined, with emphasis on techniques for quality assurance in the manufacture and mounting of Si cells.

  3. Effect of hypoxia on thallium kinetics in cultured chick myocardial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the effect of hypoxia on cellular thallium-201 (201Tl) uptake and washout independent of coronary flow, we studied thallium kinetics during normoxia and hypoxia in cultured chick ventricular cells. Monolayers of contracting ventricular cells grown on coverslips were placed in a chamber and perfused to asymptote with media containing 201Tl. Perfusates were equilibrated with 5% CO2-95% air or 5% CO2-95% nitrogen for normoxia and hypoxia, respectively. Washout thallium kinetics were then observed during perfusion with unlabeled media. Twenty paired experiments were performed, randomly alternating the sequence of normoxia and hypoxia. Pharmacokinetics for thallium were determined by computer using standard formulae. Thallium uptake and washout were best described by assuming that intracellular thallium was contained within a single compartment. Cellular thallium uptake, as well as transfer rate constants for thallium uptake and for thallium washout during normoxia and hypoxia, were compared using paired t-tests. During normoxia and hypoxia, respectively, thallium uptake was 22 +/- 7% and 19 +/- 7% of asymptote (p less than 0.01); the compartmental rate constant for uptake by the cell was 0.16 +/- 0.07 min-1 and 0.15 +/- 0.06 min-1 (N.S.); and the transfer rate constant for washout from the cell was 0.26 +/- 0.06 min-1 and 0.23 +/- 0.05 min-1 (p less than 0.01). We conclude that there was a small (14%) decrease in thallium uptake during hypoxia. The rate of thallium uptake and washout was slightly less during hypoxia, although only the rate of washout was significantly less. These data show that cellular accumulation of thallium and the rate of washout of thallium were minimally decreased by hypoxia independent of blood flow

  4. Alterations in regulatory T cells induced by specific oligosaccharides improve vaccine responsiveness in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel A Schijf

    Full Text Available Prophylactic vaccinations are generally performed to protect naïve individuals with or without suppressed immune responsiveness. In a mouse model for Influenza vaccinations the specific alterations of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs in the immune modulation induced by orally supplied oligosaccharides containing scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS was assessed. This dietary intervention increased vaccine specific DTH responses. In addition, a significant increased percentage of T-bet(+ (Th1 activated CD69(+CD4(+ T cells (p<0.001 and reduced percentage of Gata-3(+ (Th2 activated CD69(+CD4(+T cells (p<0.001 was detected in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN of mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS compared to control mice. Although no difference in the number or percentage of Tregs (CD4(+Foxp3(+ could be determined after scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS intervention, the percentage of CXCR3 (+ /T-bet(+ (Th1-Tregs was significantly reduced (p<0.05 in mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS as compared to mice receiving placebo diets. Moreover, although no absolute difference in suppressive capacity could be detected, an alteration in cytokine profile suggests a regulatory T cell shift towards a reducing Th1 suppression profile, supporting an improved vaccination response.These data are indicative for improved vaccine responsiveness due to reduced Th1 suppressive capacity in the Treg population of mice fed the oligosaccharide specific diet, showing compartmentalization within the Treg population. The modulation of Tregs to control immune responses provides an additional arm of intervention using alternative strategies possibly leading to the development of improved vaccines.

  5. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: Implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Lieberam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, the mitochondria or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein-protein interactions or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease.

  6. Calcium Forms,Subcelluar Distribution and Ultrastructure of Pulp Cells as Influenced by Calcium Deficiency in Apple (Malus pumila) Fruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-hui; ZHOU Wei

    2004-01-01

    Calcium in Red Fuji and Starkrimson apples during storage were fractionated by sequent extracting. Localization and distribution of calcium and influence of calcium nutrition on cell ultrastructure were observed by transmission electron microscopy combined with in situ precipitation of calcium with an improved method of potassium pyroantimonate technique. Results indicated that spraying calcium solution on surface of young fruits increased contents of calcium in all forms. During storage, contents of soluble calcium and pectic calcium declined and thosein calcium phosphate, calcium oxalate and calcium silicate increased. Calcium contents of Red Fuji in all forms were higher than those of Starkrimson, indicating that calcium accumulating capability of Red Fuji fruits preceded that of Starkrimson. Under transmission electron microscopy, calcium antimonite precipitates (CaAP) was mainly distributed in cell wall, tonoplast, nuclear membrane and nucleoplasm,much more CaAP deposited in vacuole. Calcium deficiency during storage leads to decrease of CaAP in locations mentioned above, disappearance of compartmentation, and entrance of CaAP to cytoplasm. Transformation from soluble calcium and pectic calcium to calcium phosphate,oxalate and damages of biomembranes structuraly and functionally resulted from calcium deficiency during storage were the crucial causation of physiological disorder.

  7. Cholesterol accumulation in Niemann Pick type C (NPC) model cells causes a shift in APP localization to lipid rafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosicek, Marko, E-mail: marko.kosicek@irb.hr [Division of Molecular Medicine, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Malnar, Martina, E-mail: martina.malnar@irb.hr [Division of Molecular Medicine, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Goate, Alison, E-mail: goate@icarus.wustl.edu [Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Hecimovic, Silva, E-mail: silva.hecimovic@irb.hr [Division of Molecular Medicine, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2010-03-12

    It has been suggested that cholesterol may modulate amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) formation, a causative factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), by regulating distribution of the three key proteins in the pathogenesis of AD ({beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP), {beta}-secretase (BACE1) and/or presenilin 1 (PS1)) within lipid rafts. In this work we tested whether cholesterol accumulation upon NPC1 dysfunction, which causes Niemann Pick type C disease (NPC), causes increased partitioning of APP into lipid rafts leading to increased CTF/A{beta} formation in these cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. To test this we used CHO NPC1{sup -/-} cells (NPC cells) and parental CHOwt cells. By sucrose density gradient centrifugation we observed a shift in fl-APP/CTF compartmentalization into lipid raft fractions upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC vs. wt cells. Furthermore, {gamma}-secretase inhibitor treatment significantly increased fl-APP/CTF distribution in raft fractions in NPC vs. wt cells, suggesting that upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC1-null cells increased formation of APP-CTF and its increased processing towards A{beta} occurs in lipid rafts. Our results support that cholesterol overload, such as in NPC disease, leads to increased partitioning of APP/CTF into lipid rafts resulting in increased amyloidogenic processing of APP in these cholesterol-rich membranes. This work adds to the mechanism of the cholesterol-effect on APP processing and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and supports the role of lipid rafts in these processes.

  8. Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukar Thakur

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this presentation is to create awareness of stem cell applications in the ISORBE community and to foster a strategy of how the ISORBE community can disseminate information and promote the use of radiolabeled stem cells in biomedical applications. Methods: The continued excitement in Stem Cells, in many branches of basic and applied biomedical science, stems from the remarkable ability of stem cells to divide and develop into different types of cells in the body. Often called as Magic Seeds, stem cells are produced in bone marrow and circulate in blood, albeit at a relatively low concentration. These virtues together with the ability of stem cells to grow in tissue culture have paved the way for their applications to generate new and healthy tissues and to replace diseased or injured human organs. Although possibilities of stem cell applications are many, much remains yet to be understood of these remarkable magic seeds. Conclusion: This presentation shall briefly cover the origin of stem cells, the pros and cons of their growth and division, their potential application, and shall outline some examples of the contributions of radiolabeled stem cells, in this rapidly growing branch of biomedical science

  9. Types of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... stem cells blog from the International Society for Stem Cell Research. Learn About Stem Cells From Lab to You ...

  10. Electrochemical Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a rechargeable electrochemical cell comprising a negative electrode, an electrolyte and a positive electrode in which the positive electrode structure comprises a lithium cobalt manganese oxide of the composition Li¿2?Co¿y?Mn¿2-y?O¿4? where 0 cells and lithium-alloy cells....

  11. Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells have been the subject of intense research and development efforts for the past decades. Even so, the technology has not had its commercial breakthrough yet. This entry gives an overview of the technological challenges and status of fuel cells and discusses the most promising applications...... of the different types of fuel cells. Finally, their role in a future energy supply with a large share of fluctuating sustainable power sources, e.g., solar or wind, is surveyed....

  12. Cell suicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fight of the cell against the damages caused to its DNA by genotoxic agents and specially by ionizing radiations, the p53 protein plays a central part. It intervenes in the proliferation control and the differentiation but also in the keeping of genome integrity. It can direct the damages cells toward suicide, or apoptosis, to avoid the risk of tumor appearance that would be fatal to the whole organism. That is by the disordered state of cells suicide programs that the tumor cells are going to develop. The knowledge of apoptosis mechanisms, to eventually start them on demand, rises up broad hopes in the cancer therapy. (N.C.)

  13. Impact of Concanavalin-A-Mediated Cytoskeleton Disruption on Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1 Internalization and Cell Surface Expression in Glioblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Samuel Burke; Pratt, Jonathan; Beauchemin, David; Haidara, Khadidja; Annabi, Borhane

    2016-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) is a multiligand endocytic receptor, which plays a pivotal role in controlling cytoskeleton dynamics during cancer cell migration. Its rapid endocytosis further allows efficient clearance of extracellular ligands. Concanavalin-A (ConA) is a lectin used to trigger in vitro physiological cellular processes, including cytokines secretion, nitric oxide production, and T-lymphocytes activation. Given that ConA exerts part of its effects through cytoskeleton remodeling, we questioned whether it affected LRP-1 expression, intracellular trafficking, and cell surface function in grade IV U87 glioblastoma cells. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we found that loss of the cell surface 600-kDa mature form of LRP-1 occurs upon ConA treatment. Consequently, internalization of the physiological α2-macroglobulin and the synthetic angiopep-2 ligands of LRP-1 was also decreased. Silencing of known mediators of ConA, such as the membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase, and the Toll-like receptors (TLR)-2 and TLR-6 was unable to rescue ConA-mediated LRP-1 expression decrease, implying that the loss of LRP-1 was independent of cell surface relayed signaling. The ConA-mediated reduction in LRP-1 expression was emulated by the actin cytoskeleton-disrupting agent cytochalasin-D, but not by the microtubule inhibitor nocodazole, and required both lysosomal- and ubiquitin-proteasome system-mediated degradation. Our study implies that actin cytoskeleton integrity is required for proper LRP-1 cell surface functions and that impaired trafficking leads to specialized compartmentation and degradation. Our data also strengthen the biomarker role of cell surface LRP-1 functions in the vectorized transport of therapeutic angiopep bioconjugates into brain cancer cells.

  14. Reprogrammed Pluripotent Stem Cells from Somatic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Hyun Woo; Choi, Sol; Do, Jeong Tae

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem (ES) cells, can differentiate into all cell types. So, these cells can be a biological resource for regenerative medicine. However, ES cells known as standard pluripotent cells have problem to be used for cell therapy because of ethical issue of the origin and immune response on the graft. Hence, recently reprogrammed pluripotent cells have been suggested as an alternative source for regenerative medicine. Somatic cells can acquire the ES cell-li...

  15. Clear Cell Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Wang; Tracey Harbert; Jennifer Olivella; Daniel Olson; Sarma, Deba P; Stephanie Ortman

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Clear cell basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is an uncommon and unusual variant of BCC, which is characterized by a variable component of clear cells. The pathogenesis of this histological variant and its clinical significance has not been clarified. Differentiation of this uncommon variant of BCC from other clear cell tumors is important for the treatment. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male presented with a 0.9 cm dome-shaped lesion on his upper chest. A shave biopsy revealed a der...

  16. Passive membrane properties and electrotonic signal processing in retinal rod bipolar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltedal, Leif; Veruki, Margaret Lin; Hartveit, Espen

    2009-02-15

    Rod bipolar cells transmit visual signals from their dendrites, where they receive input from rod photoreceptors, to their axon terminals, where they synapse onto amacrine cells. Little is known, however, about the transmission and possible transformation of these signals. We have combined axon terminal recording in retinal slices, quantitative, light-microscopic morphological reconstruction and computer modelling to obtain detailed compartmental models of rat rod bipolar cells. Passive cable properties were estimated by directly fitting the current responses of the models evoked by voltage pulses to the physiologically recorded responses. At a holding potential of -60 mV, the average best-fit parameters were 1.1 microF cm(-2) for specific membrane capacitance (C(m)), 130 Omega cm for cytoplasmic resistivity (R(i)), and 24 kOmega cm(2) for specific membrane resistance (R(m)). The passive integration of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs was examined by computer modelling with physiologically realistic synaptic conductance waveforms. For both transient and steady-state synaptic inhibition, the inhibitory effect was relatively insensitive to the location of the inhibition. For transient synaptic inhibition, the time window of effective inhibition depended critically on the relative timing of inhibition and excitation. The passive signal transmission between soma and axon terminal was examined by the electrotonic transform and quantified as the frequency-dependent voltage attenuation of sinusoidal voltage waveforms. For the range of parameters explored (axon diameter and length, R(i)), the lowest cutoff frequency observed was approximately 300 Hz, suggesting that realistic scotopic visual signals will be faithfully transmitted from soma to axon terminal, with minimal passive attenuation along the axon. PMID:19124538

  17. Fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Srivastava

    1962-05-01

    Full Text Available The current state of development of fuel cells as potential power sources is reviewed. Applications in special fields with particular reference to military requirements are pointed out.

  18. Dry cell battery poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  19. Glucose alleviates cadmium toxicity by increasing cadmium fixation in root cell wall and sequestration into vacuole in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Zhi Shi; Xiao-Fang Zhu; Jiang-Xue Wan; Gui-Xin Li; Shao-Jian Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Glucose (Glu) is involved in not only plant physiological and developmental events but also plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we found that the exogenous Glu improved root and shoot growth, reduced shoot cadmium (Cd) concentration, and rescued Cd-induced chlorosis in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia ecotype, Col-0) under Cd stressed conditions. Glucose increased Cd retained in the roots, thus reducing its translocation from root to shoot significantly. The most Cd retained in the roots was found in the hemicellulose 1. Glucose combined with Cd (Glu þ Cd) treatment did not affect the content of pectin and its binding capacity of Cd while it increased the content of hemicelluloses 1 and the amount of Cd retained in it significantly. Furthermore, Leadmium Green staining indicated that more Cd was compartmented into vacuoles in Glu þ Cd treatment compared with Cd treatment alone, which was in accordance with the significant upregulation of the expression of tonoplast-localized metal transporter genes, suggesting that com-partmentation of Cd into vacuoles also contributes to the Glu-alleviated Cd toxicity. Taken together, we demonstrated that Glu-alleviated Cd toxicity is mediated through increas-ing Cd fixation in the root cell wall and sequestration into the vacuoles.

  20. Polymersomes Containing Iron Sulfide (FeS) as Primordial Cell Model. For the investigation of energy providing redox reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpermann, Theodor; Rüdel, Kristin; Rüger, Ronny; Steiniger, Frank; Nietzsche, Sandor; Filiz, Volkan; Förster, Stephan; Fahr, Alfred; Weigand, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    According to Wächtershäuser's "Iron-Sulfur-World" one major requirement for the development of life on the prebiotic Earth is compartmentalization. Vesicles spontaneously formed from amphiphilic components containing a specific set of molecules including sulfide minerals may have lead to the first autotrophic prebiotic units. The iron sulfide minerals may have been formed by geological conversions in the environment of deep-sea volcanos (black smokers), which can be observed even today. Wächtershäuser postulated the evolution of chemical pathways as fundamentals of the origin of life on earth. In contrast to the classical Miller-Urey experiment, depending on external energy sources, the "Iron-Sulfur-World" is based on the catalytic and energy reproducing redox system FeS + {H_2}S to FeS{}_2 + {H_2} . The energy release out of this redox reaction (∆RG° = -38 kJ/mol, pH 0) could be the cause for the subsequent synthesis of complex organic molecules and the precondition for the development of more complex units similar to cells known today. Here we show the possibility for precipitating iron sulfide inside vesicles composed of amphiphilic block-copolymers as a model system for a first prebiotic unit. Our findings could be an indication for a chemoautotrophic FeS based origin of life.

  1. Polymersomes containing iron sulfide (FeS) as primordial cell model : for the investigation of energy providing redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpermann, Theodor; Rüdel, Kristin; Rüger, Ronny; Steiniger, Frank; Nietzsche, Sandor; Filiz, Volkan; Förster, Stephan; Fahr, Alfred; Weigand, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    According to Wächtershäuser's "Iron-Sulfur-World" one major requirement for the development of life on the prebiotic Earth is compartmentalization. Vesicles spontaneously formed from amphiphilic components containing a specific set of molecules including sulfide minerals may have lead to the first autotrophic prebiotic units. The iron sulfide minerals may have been formed by geological conversions in the environment of deep-sea volcanos (black smokers), which can be observed even today. Wächtershäuser postulated the evolution of chemical pathways as fundamentals of the origin of life on earth. In contrast to the classical Miller-Urey experiment, depending on external energy sources, the "Iron-Sulfur-World" is based on the catalytic and energy reproducing redox system FeS+H2S-->FeS2+H2. The energy release out of this redox reaction (∆RG°=-38 kJ/mol, pH 0) could be the cause for the subsequent synthesis of complex organic molecules and the precondition for the development of more complex units similar to cells known today. Here we show the possibility for precipitating iron sulfide inside vesicles composed of amphiphilic block-copolymers as a model system for a first prebiotic unit. Our findings could be an indication for a chemoautotrophic FeS based origin of life. PMID:20697814

  2. Cell sorting by deterministic cell rolling

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sungyoung; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Karnik, Rohit

    2011-01-01

    This communication presents the concept of “deterministic cell rolling”, which leverages transient cell-surface molecular interactions that mediate cell rolling to sort cells with high purity and efficiency in a single step.

  3. Remodeling of B-Cell Subsets in Blood during Pegylated IFNα-2a Therapy in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Marie-Christine; Dufeu-Duchesne, Tania; Bertucci, Inga; Pouget, Noelle; Brevot-Lutton, Ophelie; Zoulim, Fabien; Bourliere, Marc; Plumas, Joel; Leroy, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of pegylated interferon-alfa-2a (Peg-IFN-α) therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is HBsAg seroconversion. Even though B cells are major mediators of a positive clinical outcome, their modulation during Peg-IFN-α therapy has not yet been described. We investigated here the effects of Peg-IFN-α on eight circulating B-cell subsets thanks to an original multi-gating approach based on CD19, CD27, IgD, CD10, and CD38 markers in patients with CHB treated with nucleos(t)ide analog alone or in combination with Peg-IFN-α. These dynamic changes were analyzed during the 48-weeks of Peg-IFN-α therapy and up to 2 years after the cessation of treatment. The CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10+CD38high transitional B cells and the CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38high plasmablasts continuously increased, whereas the CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10-CD38low naive, CD19+CD27+IgD+ natural memory, and CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38low post-germinal center B cells decreased during the course of Peg-IFNα treatment. Such modulations correlated with a sustained increase in sCD30 levels and the decrease in plasma HBsAg. However, no seroconversion occurred and all parameters returned to baseline after the stop of the treatment. Peg-IFN-α therapy mediates a remodeling of B-cell compartmentalization, without clinical relevance. Our study provides new insights into the immunomodulatory effects of Peg-IFN-α on circulating B-cells, and questioned the benefit of the add-on Peg-IFN-α treatment in CHB. PMID:27281019

  4. Remodeling of B-Cell Subsets in Blood during Pegylated IFNα-2a Therapy in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspord, Caroline; Bruder Costa, Juliana; Jacob, Marie-Christine; Dufeu-Duchesne, Tania; Bertucci, Inga; Pouget, Noelle; Brevot-Lutton, Ophelie; Zoulim, Fabien; Bourliere, Marc; Plumas, Joel; Leroy, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of pegylated interferon-alfa-2a (Peg-IFN-α) therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is HBsAg seroconversion. Even though B cells are major mediators of a positive clinical outcome, their modulation during Peg-IFN-α therapy has not yet been described. We investigated here the effects of Peg-IFN-α on eight circulating B-cell subsets thanks to an original multi-gating approach based on CD19, CD27, IgD, CD10, and CD38 markers in patients with CHB treated with nucleos(t)ide analog alone or in combination with Peg-IFN-α. These dynamic changes were analyzed during the 48-weeks of Peg-IFN-α therapy and up to 2 years after the cessation of treatment. The CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10+CD38high transitional B cells and the CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38high plasmablasts continuously increased, whereas the CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10-CD38low naive, CD19+CD27+IgD+ natural memory, and CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38low post-germinal center B cells decreased during the course of Peg-IFNα treatment. Such modulations correlated with a sustained increase in sCD30 levels and the decrease in plasma HBsAg. However, no seroconversion occurred and all parameters returned to baseline after the stop of the treatment. Peg-IFN-α therapy mediates a remodeling of B-cell compartmentalization, without clinical relevance. Our study provides new insights into the immunomodulatory effects of Peg-IFN-α on circulating B-cells, and questioned the benefit of the add-on Peg-IFN-α treatment in CHB. PMID:27281019

  5. A simulation study on the effects of dendritic morphology on layer V PFC pyramidal cell firing behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Psarrou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of neuronal cells found in the cerebral cortex are pyramidal neurons. Their function has been associated with higher cognitive and emotional functions. Pyramidal neurons have a characteristic structure, consisting of a triangular shaped soma whereon descend two extended and complex dendritic trees, and a long bifurcated axon. All the morphological components of the pyramidal neurons exhibit significant variability across different brain areas and layers. Pyramidal cells receive numerous synaptic inputs along their structure, integration of which in space and in time generates local dendritic spikes that shape their firing pattern. In addition, synaptic integration is influenced by voltage-gated and ion channels, which are expressed in a large repertoire by pyramidal neurons. Electrophysiological categories of pyramidal cells can be established, based on the action potential frequency, generated from a fixed somatic stimulus: (1 cells that fire repetitive action potentials (Regular Spiking – RS, (2 cells that fire clusters of 2 – 5 action potentials with short ISIs (Intrinsic Bursting – IB, and (3 cells that fire in repetitive clusters of 2 – 5 action potentials with short ISIs (Repetitive Oscillatory Bursts – ROB. In vitro and in silico scientific studies, correlate the firing patterns of the pyramidal neurons to their morphological features. This study provides a quantitatively analysis via compartmental neuronal modelling of the effects of dendritic morphology and distribution and concentration of ionic mechanisms, along the basal and/or apical dendrites on the firing behavior of a 112-set of layer V rat PFC pyramidal cells. We focus on how particular morphological and passive features of the dendritic trees shape the neuronal firing patterns. Our results suggest that specific morphological parameters (such as total length, volume and branch number can discriminate the cells as RS or IB, regardless of what is the

  6. Solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treble, F. C.

    1980-11-01

    The history, state of the art, and future prospects of solar cells are reviewed. Solar cells are already competitive in a wide range of low-power applications, and during the 1980's they are expected to become cheaper to run than diesel or gasoline generators, the present mainstay of isolated communities. At this stage they will become attractive for water pumping, irrigation, and rural electrification, particularly in developing countries. With further cost reduction, they may be used to augment grid supplies in domestic, commercial, institutional, and industrial premises. Cost reduction to the stage where photovoltaics becomes economic for large-scale power generation in central stations depends on a technological breakthrough in the development of thin-film cells. DOE aims to reach this goal by 1990, so that by the end of the century about 20% of the estimated annual additions to their electrical generating capacity will be photovoltaic.

  7. Cell Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA contract led to the development of faster and more energy efficient semiconductor materials for digital integrated circuits. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) conducts electrons 4-6 times faster than silicon and uses less power at frequencies above 100-150 megahertz. However, the material is expensive, brittle, fragile and has lacked computer automated engineering tools to solve this problem. Systems & Processes Engineering Corporation (SPEC) developed a series of GaAs cell libraries for cell layout, design rule checking, logic synthesis, placement and routing, simulation and chip assembly. The system is marketed by Compare Design Automation.

  8. Solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of producing solar cells is described which consists of producing a substantially monocrystalline tubular body of silicon or other suitable semiconductor material, treating this body to form an annular rectifying junction and then cutting it longitudinally to form a number of nearly flat ribbons from which the solar cells are fabricated. The P=N rectifying junction produced by the formation of silicon dioxide on the layers at the inner and outer surfaces of the body can be formed by ion-implantation or diffusion. (U.K.)

  9. Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2004-01-01

    In his influential essay on markets, An essay on framing and overflowing (1998), Michel Callon writes that `the growing complexity of industrialized societies [is] due in large part to the movements of the technosciences, which are causing connections and interdependencies to proliferate'. This p...... and tantalizing than stem cells, in research, in medicine, or as products.......'. This paper is about tech-noscience, and about the proliferation of connections and interdependencies created by it.More specifically, the paper is about stem cells. Biotechnology in general has the power to capture the imagination. Within the field of biotechnology nothing seems more provocative...

  10. Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like ... normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also get stuck in blood ...

  11. Stem Cell Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Stem Cell Basics Stem Cell Basics: Introduction Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current Research Policy Glossary Site Map Stem Cell Basics Introduction: What are stem cells, and why ...

  12. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neurons Oligodendrocyte Parthenogenesis Passage Pluripotent Polar body Preimplantation Proliferation Regenerative medicine Reproductive cloning Signals Somatic cell Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) Somatic (adult) stem cell Stem cells Stromal cells Subculturing Surface markers ...

  13. Learn About Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... ISSCR Get Involved Media © 2015 International Society for Stem Cell Research Terms of Use Disclaimer Privacy Policy

  14. Photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kurtz, Sarah

    1984-11-27

    In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

  15. Fuel cells:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil and...... nuclear fuel-based energy technologies....

  16. Cell Docking, Movement and Cell-Cell Interactions of Heterogeneous Cell Suspensions in a Cell Manipulation Microdevice

    OpenAIRE

    Long-Sun Huang; Yu-Hung Wang; Yu-Wei Chung; Fei-Lung Lai; Shiaw-Min Hwang

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel cell manipulation microdevice for cell docking, culturing, cell-cell contact and interaction by microfluidic manipulation of heterogeneous cell suspensions. Heterogeneous cell suspensions include disparate blood cells of natural killer cells and leukemia cancer cells for immune cell transplantation therapy. However, NK cell alloreactivity from different healthy donors present various recovery response levels. Little is still known about the interactions and cyt...

  17. Application of the Principles of Systems Biology and Wiener's Cybernetics for Analysis of Regulation of Energy Fluxes in Muscle Cells in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Guzun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of regulation of respiration and energy fluxes in the cells are analyzed based on the concepts of systems biology, non-equilibrium steady state kinetics and applications of Wiener’s cybernetic principles of feedback regulation. Under physiological conditions cardiac function is governed by the Frank-Starling law and the main metabolic characteristic of cardiac muscle cells is metabolic homeostasis, when both workload and respiration rate can be changed manifold at constant intracellular level of phosphocreatine and ATP in the cells. This is not observed in skeletal muscles. Controversies in theoretical explanations of these observations are analyzed. Experimental studies of permeabilized fibers from human skeletal muscle vastus lateralis and adult rat cardiomyocytes showed that the respiration rate is always an apparent hyperbolic but not a sigmoid function of ADP concentration. It is our conclusion that realistic explanations of regulation of energy fluxes in muscle cells require systemic approaches including application of the feedback theory of Wiener’s cybernetics in combination with detailed experimental research. Such an analysis reveals the importance of limited permeability of mitochondrial outer membrane for ADP due to interactions of mitochondria with cytoskeleton resulting in quasi-linear dependence of respiration rate on amplitude of cyclic changes in cytoplasmic ADP concentrations. The system of compartmentalized creatine kinase (CK isoenzymes functionally coupled to ANT and ATPases, and mitochondrial-cytoskeletal interactions separate energy fluxes (mass and energy transfer from signalling (information transfer within dissipative metabolic structures – intracellular energetic units (ICEU. Due to the non-equilibrium state of CK reactions, intracellular ATP utilization and mitochondrial ATP regeneration are interconnected by the PCr flux from mitochondria. The feedback regulation of respiration occurring via

  18. Peptide-coated semiconductor quantum dots and their applications in biological imaging of single molecules in live cells and organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinaud, Fabien Florent

    2007-12-01

    A new surface chemistry has been developed for the solubilization and biofunctionalization of inorganic semiconductor nanocrystals fluorescent probes, also known as quantum dots. This chemistry is based on the surface coating of quantum dots with custom-designed polycysteine peptides and yields water-soluble, small, monodispersed and colloidally stable probes that remain bright and photostable in complex biological milieus. This peptide coating strategy was successfully tested on several types of core and core-shell quantum dots emitting from the visible (e.g. CdSe/ZnS) to the NIR spectrum range (e.g. CdTe/CdSe/ZnS). By taking advantage of the versatile physico-chemical properties of peptides, a peptide "toolkit" was designed and employed to impart several biological functions to individual quantum dots and control their biochemical activity at the nanometer scale. These biofunctionalized peptide-coated quantum dots were exploited in very diverse biological applications. Near-infrared emitting quantum dot probes were engineered with optimized blood circulation and biodistribution properties for in vivo animal imaging. Visible emitting quantum dots were used for single molecule tracking of raft-associated GPI-anchored proteins in live cells. This last application revealed the presence of discrete and non-caveolar lipid microdomains capable of impeding free lateral diffusions in the plasma membrane of Hela cells. Imaging and tracking of peptide-coated quantum dots provided the first direct evidence that microdomains having the composition and behavior expected for lipid rafts can induce molecular compartmentalization in the membrane of living cells.

  19. Detection of differentially regulated subsarcolemmal calcium signals activated by vasoactive agonists in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Krishna P.; Paudel, Omkar

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) plays pivotal roles in distinct cellular functions through global and local signaling in various subcellular compartments, and subcellular Ca2+ signal is the key factor for independent regulation of different cellular functions. In vascular smooth muscle cells, subsarcolemmal Ca2+ is an important regulator of excitation-contraction coupling, and nucleoplasmic Ca2+ is crucial for excitation-transcription coupling. However, information on Ca2+ signals in these subcellular compartments is limited. To study the regulation of the subcellular Ca2+ signals, genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators (cameleon), D3cpv, targeting the plasma membrane (PM), cytoplasm, and nucleoplasm were transfected into rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and Ca2+ signals were monitored using laser scanning confocal microscopy. In situ calibration showed that the Kd for Ca2+ of D3cpv was comparable in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm, but it was slightly higher in the PM. Stimulation of digitonin-permeabilized cells with 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) elicited a transient elevation of Ca2+ concentration with similar amplitude and kinetics in the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Activation of G protein-coupled receptors by endothelin-1 and angiotensin II preferentially elevated the subsarcolemmal Ca2+ signal with higher amplitude in the PM region than the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. In contrast, the receptor tyrosine kinase activator, platelet-derived growth factor, elicited Ca2+ signals with similar amplitudes in all three regions, except that the rise-time and decay-time were slightly slower in the PM region. These data clearly revealed compartmentalization of Ca2+ signals in the subsarcolemmal regions and provide the basis for further investigations of differential regulation of subcellular Ca2+ signals in PASMCs. PMID:24352334

  20. The ancient Virus World and evolution of cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolja Valerian V

    2006-09-01

    with a specific model of precellular evolution under which the primordial gene pool dwelled in a network of inorganic compartments. Somewhat paradoxically, under this scenario, we surmise that selfish genetic elements ancestral to viruses evolved prior to typical cells, to become intracellular parasites once bacteria and archaea arrived at the scene. Selection against excessively aggressive parasites that would kill off the host ensembles of genetic elements would lead to early evolution of temperate virus-like agents and primitive defense mechanisms, possibly, based on the RNA interference principle. The emergence of the eukaryotic cell is construed as the second melting pot of virus evolution from which the major groups of eukaryotic viruses originated as a result of extensive recombination of genes from various bacteriophages, archaeal viruses, plasmids, and the evolving eukaryotic genomes. Again, this vision is predicated on a specific model of the emergence of eukaryotic cell under which archaeo-bacterial symbiosis was the starting point of eukaryogenesis, a scenario that appears to be best compatible with the data. Conclusion The existence of several genes that are central to virus replication and structure, are shared by a broad variety of viruses but are missing from cellular genomes (virus hallmark genes suggests the model of an ancient virus world, a flow of virus-specific genes that went uninterrupted from the precellular stage of life's evolution to this day. This concept is tightly linked to two key conjectures on evolution of cells: existence of a complex, precellular, compartmentalized but extensively mixing and recombining pool of genes, and origin of the eukaryotic cell by archaeo-bacterial fusion. The virus world concept and these models of major transitions in the evolution of cells provide complementary pieces of an emerging coherent picture of life's history. Reviewers W. Ford Doolittle, J. Peter Gogarten, and Arcady Mushegian.

  1. Reprogrammed pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Hyun Woo; Choi, Sol; Do, Jeong Tae

    2011-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem (ES) cells, can differentiate into all cell types. So, these cells can be a biological resource for regenerative medicine. However, ES cells known as standard pluripotent cells have problem to be used for cell therapy because of ethical issue of the origin and immune response on the graft. Hence, recently reprogrammed pluripotent cells have been suggested as an alternative source for regenerative medicine. Somatic cells can acquire the ES cell-like pluripotency by transferring somatic cell nuclei into oocytes, by cell fusion with pluripotent cells. Retroviral-mediated introduction of four factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc can successfully reprogram somatic cells into ES cell-like pluripotent stem cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These cells closely resemble ES cells in gene expression pattern, cell biologic and phenotypic characteristics. However, to reach the eventual goal of clinical application, it is necessary to overcome the major drawbacks such as low reprogramming efficiency and genomic alterations due to viral integration. In this review, we discuss the current reprogramming techniques and mechanisms of nuclear reprogramming induced by transcription factor transduction. PMID:24298328

  2. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  3. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  4. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). ... abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as seen in this photomicrograph.

  5. Type II PKAs are anchored to mature insulin secretory granules in INS-1 β-cells and required for cAMP-dependent potentiation of exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalpando, Sabrina; Cazevieille, Chantal; Fernandez, Anne; Lamb, Ned J; Hani, El-Habib

    2016-06-01

    Specificity of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) pathway relies on an extremely sophisticated compartmentalization mechanism of the kinase within a given cell, based on high-affinity binding of PKA tetramer pools to different A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs). We and others have previously shown that AKAPs-dependent PKA subcellular targeting is a requisite for optimal cAMP-dependent potentiation of insulin exocytosis. We thus hypothesized that a PKA pool may directly anchor to the secretory compartment to potentiate insulin exocytosis. Here, using immunofluorescence analyses combined to subcellular fractionations and purification of insulin secretory granules (ISGs), we identified discrete subpools of type II PKAs, RIIα and RIIβ PKAs, along with the catalytic subunit, physically associated with ISGs within pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cells. Ultrastructural analysis of native rodent β-cells confirmed in vivo the occurrence of PKA on dense-core ISGs. Isoform-selective disruption of binding of PKAs to AKAPs reinforced the requirement of type II PKA isoforms for cAMP potentiation of insulin exocytosis. This granular localization of PKA was of critical importance since siRNA-mediated depletion of either RIIα or RIIβ PKAs resulted in a significant reduction of cAMP-dependent potentiation of insulin release. The present work provides evidence for a previously unrecognized pool of type II PKAs physically anchored to the β-cell ISGs compartment and supports a non-redundant function for type II PKAs during cAMP potentiation of exocytosis. PMID:26898328

  6. Stem cell glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Makoto

    2011-09-01

    Glycolipids are compounds containing one or more monosaccharide residues bound by a glycosidic linkage to a hydrophobic moiety. Because of their expression patterns and the intracellular localization patterns, glycolipids, including stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEA-3, SSEA-4, and possibly SSEA-1) and gangliosides (e.g., GD3, GD2, and A2B5 antigens), have been used as marker molecules of stem cells. In this review, I will introduce glycolipids expressed in pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, very small embryonic-like stem cells, amniotic stem cells, and multilineage-differentiating stress enduring cells), multipotent stem cells (neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, fetal liver multipotent progenitor cells, and hematopoietic stem cells), and cancer stem cells (brain cancer stem cells and breast cancer stem cells), and discuss their availability as biomarkers for identifying and isolating stem cells. PMID:21161592

  7. Murine Mueller cells are progenitor cells for neuronal cells and fibrous tissue cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammalian Mueller cells have been reported to possess retinal progenitor cell properties and generate new neurons after injury. This study investigates murine Mueller cells under in vitro conditions for their capability of dedifferentiation into retinal progenitor cells. Mueller cells were isolated from mouse retina, and proliferating cells were expanded in serum-containing medium. For dedifferentiation, the cultured cells were transferred to serum-replacement medium (SRM) at different points in time after their isolation. Interestingly, early cell passages produced fibrous tissue in which extracellular matrix proteins and connective tissue markers were differentially expressed. In contrast, aged Mueller cell cultures formed neurospheres in SRM that are characteristic for neuronal progenitor cells. These neurospheres differentiated into neuron-like cells after cultivation on laminin/ornithine cell culture substrate. Here, we report for the first time that murine Mueller cells can be progenitors for both, fibrous tissue cells and neuronal cells, depending on the age of the cell culture

  8. Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are ... pain and organ damage. A genetic problem causes sickle cell anemia. People with the disease are born with two ...

  9. Sickle cell test

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sickle cell test looks for the abnormal hemoglobin in the blood that causes the disease sickle cell anemia . ... if a person has abnormal hemoglobin that causes sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait. Hemoglobin is a ...

  10. What are Stem Cells?

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadshah Farhat; Ashraf Mohammadzadeh; Rezaie, M.

    2014-01-01

      Stem cells are undifferentiated self regenerating multi potential cells. There are three types of stem cells categories by the ability to form after cells and correlated with the body’s development process. Totipotent: these stem cells can form an entire organism such as fertilized egg. Ploripotent: ploripotent cells are those that can form any cell in the body but cannot form an entire organism such as developing embryo’s totipotent cells become ploripotent  Multipotent: Multi potent stem ...

  11. Pluripotent stem cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Junying; Thomson, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The derivation of human embryonic stem cells 10 years ago ignited an explosion of public interest in stem cells, yet this achievement depended on prior decades of research on mouse embryonic carcinoma cells and embryonic stem cells. In turn, the recent derivation of mouse and human induced pluripotent stem cells depended on the prior studies on mouse and human embryonic stem cells. Both human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells can self-renew indefinitely in vitro while ma...

  12. DNA-cell conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  13. Discrimination of intra- and extracellular 23Na + signals in yeast cell suspensions using longitudinal magnetic resonance relaxography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yajie; Poirer-Quinot, Marie; Springer, Charles S.; Balschi, James A.

    2010-07-01

    This study tested the ability of MR relaxography (MRR) to discriminate intra- (Nai+) and extracellular (Nae+)23Na + signals using their longitudinal relaxation time constant ( T1) values. Na +-loaded yeast cell ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suspensions were investigated. Two types of compartmental 23Na +T1 differences were examined: a selective Nae+T1 decrease induced by an extracellular relaxation reagent (RR e), GdDOTP 5-; and, an intrinsic T1 difference. Parallel studies using the established method of 23Na MRS with an extracellular shift reagent (SR e), TmDOTP 5-, were used to validate the MRR measurements. With 12.8 mM RR e, the 23Nae+T1 was 2.4 ms and the 23Nai+T1 was 9.5 ms (9.4T, 24 °C). The Na + amounts and spontaneous efflux rate constants were found to be identical within experimental error whether measured by MRR/RR e or by MRS/SR e. Without RR e, the Na +-loaded yeast cell suspension 23Na MR signal exhibited two T1 values, 9.1 (±0.3) ms and 32.7 (±2.3) ms, assigned to 23Nai+ and 23Nae+, respectively. The Nai+ content measured was lower, 0.88 (±0.06); while Nae+ was higher, 1.43 (±0.12) compared with MRS/SR e measures on the same samples. However, the measured efflux rate constant was identical. T1 MRR potentially may be used for Nai+ determination in vivo and Na + flux measurements; with RR e for animal studies and without RR e for humans.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Cell-cell Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia-Huai

    2004-01-01

    Cell-cell recognition is the key for multicellular organisms to survive. This recognition critically depends on protein-protein interactions from opposing cell surfaces. Recent structural investigations reveal unique features of these cell surface receptors and how they interact. These interactions are specific, but usually relatively weak, with more hydrophilic forces involved in binding. The receptors appear to have specialized ways to present their key interacting elements for ligand-binding from the cell surface. Cell-cell contacts are multivalent. A large group of cell surface molecules are engaged in interactions. Characteristic weak interactions make possible for each individual molecule pair within the group to constantly associate-dissociate-reassociate, such that the cell-cell recognition becomes a dynamic process. The immunological synapse is a good example for immune receptors to be orchestrated in performing immunological function in a collective fashion.

  15. Integrated circuit cell library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Sterling R. (Inventor); Miles, Lowell H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    According to the invention, an ASIC cell library for use in creation of custom integrated circuits is disclosed. The ASIC cell library includes some first cells and some second cells. Each of the second cells includes two or more kernel cells. The ASIC cell library is at least 5% comprised of second cells. In various embodiments, the ASIC cell library could be 10% or more, 20% or more, 30% or more, 40% or more, 50% or more, 60% or more, 70% or more, 80% or more, 90% or more, or 95% or more comprised of second cells.

  16. Modeling cell-in-cell structure into its biological significance

    OpenAIRE

    He, M-f; Wang, S.; Y Wang; Wang, X-n

    2013-01-01

    Although cell-in-cell structure was noted 100 years ago, the molecular mechanisms of ‘entering' and the destination of cell-in-cell remain largely unclear. It takes place among the same type of cells (homotypic cell-in-cell) or different types of cells (heterotypic cell-in-cell). Cell-in-cell formation affects both effector cells and their host cells in multiple aspects, while cell-in-cell death is under more intensive investigation. Given that cell-in-cell has an important role in maintainin...

  17. nduced pluripotent stem cells and cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu İskender

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells are derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst-stage embryo. They hold a huge promise for cell therapy with their self-renewing ability and pluripotency, which is known as the potential to differentiate into all cell types originating from three embryonic germ layers. However, their unique pluripotent feature could not be utilised for therapeutic purposes due to the ethical and legal problems during derivation. Recently, it was shown that the cells from adult tissues could be reverted into embryonic state, thereby restoring their pluripotent feature. This has strenghtened the possiblity of directed differentition of the reprogrammed somatic cells into the desired cell types in vitro and their use in regenerative medicine. Although these cells were termed as induced pluripotent cells, the mechanism of pluripotency has yet to be understood. Still, induced pluripotent stem cell technology is considered to be significant by proposing novel approaches in disease modelling, drug screening and cell therapy. Besides their self-renewing ability and their potential to differentiate into all cell types in a human body, they arouse a great interest in scientific world by being far from the ethical concerns regarding their embryonic counterparts and their unique feature of being patient-specific in prospective cell therapies. In this review, induced pluripotent stem cell technology and its role in cell-based therapies from past to present will be discussed. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 550-561

  18. Monitoring cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, W

    2001-05-01

    This appendix provides two protocols for monitoring cell growth. Counting cells using a hemacytometer is tedious but it allows one to effectively distinguish live cells from dead cells (using Trypan Blue exclusion). In addition, this procedure is less subject to errors due to cell clumping or heterogeneity of cell size. The use of an electronic cell counter is quicker and easier than counting cells using a hemacytometer. However, an electronic cell counter as currently constructed does not distinguish live from dead cells in a reliable fashion and is subject to error due to the presence of cell clumps. Overall, the electronic cell counter is best reserved for repetitive and rapid counting of fresh peripheral blood cells and should be used with caution when counting cell populations derived from tissues. PMID:18432653

  19. Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jyotsna Vijaykumar Wader; Sujata S Kumbhar; Huddedar AD; Wasim GM Khatib

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common neoplasm of the kidney comprised of different histological variants. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC) is a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) mainly diagnosed in the sixth decade of life. It is important to identify this entity because it has significantly better prognosis than the clear cell (conventional) and papillary renal cell carcinomas. The chromophobe renal cell carcinoma should be differentiated from oncocytoma and clear cell ca...

  20. Comparison of the contributions of the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments to global gene expression in human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Ronald M

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the most general sense, studies involving global analysis of gene expression aim to provide a comprehensive catalog of the components involved in the production of recognizable cellular phenotypes. These studies are often limited by the available technologies. One technology, based on microarrays, categorizes gene expression in terms of the abundance of RNA transcripts, and typically employs RNA prepared from whole cells, where cytoplasmic RNA predominates. Results Using microarrays comprising oligonucleotide probes that represent either protein-coding transcripts or microRNAs (miRNA, we have studied global transcript accumulation patterns for the HepG2 (human hepatoma cell line. Through subdividing the total pool of RNA transcripts into samples from nuclei, the cytoplasm, and whole cells, we determined the degree of correlation of these patterns across these different subcellular locations. The transcript and miRNA abundance patterns for the three RNA fractions were largely similar, but with some exceptions: nuclear RNA samples were enriched with respect to the cytoplasm in transcripts encoding proteins associated with specific nuclear functions, such as the cell cycle, mitosis, and transcription. The cytoplasmic RNA fraction also was enriched, when compared to the nucleus, in transcripts for proteins related to specific nuclear functions, including the cell cycle, DNA replication, and DNA repair. Some transcripts related to the ubiquitin cycle, and transcripts for various membrane proteins were sorted into either the nuclear or cytoplasmic fractions. Conclusion Enrichment or compartmentalization of cell cycle and ubiquitin cycle transcripts within the nucleus may be related to the regulation of their expression, by preventing their translation to proteins. In this way, these cellular functions may be tightly controlled by regulating the release of mRNA from the nucleus and thereby the expression of key rate limiting

  1. Automated Cell-Cutting for Cell Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Akihiko; Tanikawa, Tamio; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Takahashi, Seiya; Ohba, Kohtaro

    We develop an automated cell-cutting technique for cell cloning. Animal cells softened by the cytochalasin treatment are injected into a microfluidic chip. The microfluidic chip contains two orthogonal channels: one microchannel is wide, used to transport cells, and generates the cutting flow; the other is thin and used for aspiration, fixing, and stretching of the cell. The injected cell is aspirated and stretched in the thin microchannel. Simultaneously, the volumes of the cell before and after aspiration are calculated; the volumes are used to calculate the fluid flow required to aspirate half the volume of the cell into the thin microchannel. Finally, we apply a high-speed flow in the orthogonal microchannel to bisect the cell. This paper reports the cutting process, the cutting system, and the results of the experiment.

  2. Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting the Facts Mantle Cell Lymphoma Overview Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The two main forms of lymphoma are Hodgkin lymphoma ... lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells). Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare, B-cell ...

  3. Host cell reactivation in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus was determined in cultured Potoroo (a marsupial) and human cells under lighting conditions which promoted photereactivation. Photoreactivation was readily demonstrated for herpes virus in two lines of Potoroo cells with dose reduction factors of 0.7 to 0.8 for ovary cells and 0.5 to 0.7 for kidney cells. Light from Blacklite (near UV) lamps was more effective than from Daylight (mostly visible) lamps, suggesting that near UV radiation was more effecient for photoreactivation in Potoroo cells. The quantitative and qualitative aspects of this photoreactivation were similar to those reported for a similar virus infecting chick embryo cells. UV-survival curves of herpes virus in Potoroo cells indicated a high level of 'dark' host cell reactivation. No photoreactivation was found for UV-irradiated vaccinia virus in Potoroo cells. A similar photoreactivation study was done using special control lighting (lambda>600 nm) and human cells with normal repair and with cells deficient in excision repair (XP). No photoreactivation was found for UV-irradiated herpes virus in either human cell with either Blacklite or Daylight lamps as the sources of photoreactivating light. This result contrasts with a report of photoreactivation for a herpes virus in the same XP cells using incandescent lamps. (author)

  4. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture

  5. CELL RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    REVIEWSInducible resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis in B cells…………………………………ROTHSTEIN Thomas L (245)Executionary pathway for apoptosis: lessons from mutant mice………………………………………WOO Minna, Razqallah Hakem, Tak W Mak (267)The SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase: Signaling mechanisms and biological functions…………………………………QU Cheng Kui (279)REGULAR ARTICLESTemperature dependent expression of cdc2 and cyclin B1 in spermatogenic cells during spermatogenesis…………………………KONG Wei Hua, Zheng GU, Jining LU, Jiake TSO (289)Transgenic mice overexpressing γ-aminobutyric acid transporter subtype I develop obesity…………………………………MA Ying Hua, Jia Hua HU, Xiao Gang ZHOU, Ruo Wang ZENG, Zhen Tong MEI, Jian FEI, Li He GUO (303)Genetic aberration in primary hepatocellular carcinoma: correlation between p53 gene mutation and loss-of-heterozygosity on chromosome 16q21-q23 and 9p21-p23………………………………………WANG Gang, Chang Hui HUANG, Yan ZHAO, Ling CAI, Ying WANG, Shi Jin XIU, Zheng Wen JIANG, Shuang YANG, Xin Tai ZHAO, Wei HUANG, Jian Ren GU (311)Identification and genetic mapping of four novel genes that regulate leaf deve- lopment in Arabidopsis………………………………………………SUN Yue, Wei ZHANG, Feng Ling LI, Ying Li GUO, Tian Lei LIU, Hai HUANG (325)NOTICE FOR CONTRIBUTORS…………………………………(337)CONTENTS of Vol. 10, 2000…………………………………………………(338)

  6. Cell Membrane Softening in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Händel, Chris; Käs, Josef

    Biomechanical properties are useful characteristics and regulators of the cell's state. Current research connects mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton to many cellular processes but does not investigate the biomechanics of the plasma membrane. We evaluated thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles, directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells and observed a lowered rigidity in the plasma membrane of malignant cells compared to non-malignant cells. To investigate the specific role of membrane rigidity changes, we treated two cell lines with the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor Soraphen A. It changed the lipidome of cells and drastically increased membrane stiffness by up regulating short chained membrane lipids. These altered cells had a decreased motility in Boyden chamber assays. Our results indicate that the thermal fluctuations of the membrane, which are much smaller than the fluctuations driven by the cytoskeleton, can be modulated by the cell and have an impact on adhesion and motility.

  7. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael D; Petit, Valérie; Alasdair Russell, I; Giraddi, Rajshekhar R; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A; Stingl, John

    2014-10-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt actin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using two independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage-tracing approach we follow the progeny of myoepithelial cells that express α-smooth muscle actin and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  8. Galvanic cells: setting up the Daniell cell.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    With the reagents (0.05M copper nitrate solution, 0.05M zinc nitrate solution) and material (glassware, potentiometer, electric wire) availabe in the laboratory, the user must set up the Daniell cell. Different configurations can be possible if the half cells are filled with either electrolyte solution. The cell connections to the measuring device can also be changed. In all instances, an explanation of the set up cell is obtained as well as of the measured potential difference.

  9. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties

    OpenAIRE

    Prater, Michael D.; Petit, Val?rie; Russell, I Alasdair; Giraddi, Rajshekhar; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F.; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt acin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepi...

  10. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  11. GSPEL - Fuel Cell Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fuel Cell Lab (FCL) Provides testing for technology readiness of fuel cell systems The FCL investigates, tests and verifies the performance of fuel-cell systems...

  12. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... earliest form of squamous cell cancer is called Bowen disease (or squamous cell carcinoma in situ). This type ... cancer; Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin Images Bowen's disease on the hand Keratoacanthoma Keratoacanthoma Skin cancer, squamous ...

  13. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  14. Cell sheet engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Yamato

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available We have developed ‘cell sheet engineering’ in order to avoid the limitations of tissue reconstruction using biodegradable scaffolds or single cell suspension injection. Our concept is tissue reconstruction, not from single cells, but from cell sheets. Cell sheets are prepared using temperature-responsive culture dishes. Temperature-responsive polymers are covalently grafted onto the dishes, allowing various types of cells to adhere and proliferate at 37°C. The cells spontaneously detach when the temperature is reduced below 32°C without the need for proteolytic enzymes. The confluent cells are noninvasively harvested as single, contiguous cell sheets with intact cell-cell junctions and deposited extracellular matrix (ECM. We have used these harvested cell sheets for various tissue reconstructions, including ocular surfaces, periodontal ligaments, cardiac patches, and bladder augmentation.

  15. Sickle Cell Disease (SCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease (SCD) Email this page Print this page Sickle cell disease (SCD) Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a disease of the hemoglobin. ... and form a sickle or a cresent. Tweet Sickle cell disease (SCD) Symptoms of SCD How transplant can ...

  16. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Sickle Cell Disease New supplement from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine describes the state of sickle cell disease related care in the United States. Read Supplement » ... are affected by sickle cell disease. More WEBINAR ...

  17. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Español The term sickle cell disease (SCD) ... common forms of SCD. Some Forms of Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin SS Hemoglobin SC Hemoglobin Sβ 0 thalassemia ...

  18. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epithelioma, is the most common form of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma usually occurs on sun-damaged skin, especially ... other health issues. Infiltrating or morpheaform basal cell carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive ...

  19. Cancer cells metabolically "fertilize" the tumor microenvironment with hydrogen peroxide, driving the Warburg effect: implications for PET imaging of human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Trimmer, Casey; Flomenberg, Neal; Wang, Chenguang; Pavlides, Stephanos; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2011-08-01

    Previously, we proposed that cancer cells behave as metabolic parasites, as they use targeted oxidative stress as a "weapon" to extract recycled nutrients from adjacent stromal cells. Oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts triggers autophagy and  mitophagy, resulting in compartmentalized cellular catabolism, loss of mitochondrial function, and the onset of aerobic glycolysis, in the tumor stroma. As such, cancer-associated fibroblasts produce high-energy nutrients (such as lactate and ketones) that fuel mitochondrial biogenesis, and oxidative metabolism in cancer cells. We have termed this new energy-transfer mechanism the "reverse Warburg effect." To further test the validity of this hypothesis, here we used an in vitro MCF7-fibroblast co-culture system, and quantitatively measured a variety of metabolic parameters by FACS analysis (analogous to laser-capture micro-dissection).  Mitochondrial activity, glucose uptake, and ROS production were measured with highly-sensitive fluorescent probes (MitoTracker, NBD-2-deoxy-glucose, and DCF-DA). Interestingly, using this approach, we directly show that cancer cells initially secrete hydrogen peroxide that then triggers oxidative stress in neighboring fibroblasts. Thus, oxidative stress is contagious (spreads like a virus) and is propagated laterally and vectorially from cancer cells to adjacent fibroblasts. Experimentally, we show that oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts quantitatively reduces mitochondrial activity, and increases glucose uptake, as the fibroblasts become more dependent on aerobic glycolysis.  Conversely, co-cultured cancer cells show significant increases in mitochondrial activity, and corresponding reductions in both glucose uptake and GLUT1 expression. Pre-treatment of co-cultures with extracellular catalase (an anti-oxidant enzyme that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide) blocks the onset of oxidative stress, and potently induces the death of cancer cells, likely via starvation

  20. Snail modulates cell metabolism in MDCK cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► MDCK/snail cells were more sensitive to glucose deprivation than MDCK/neo cells. ► MDCK/snail cells had decreased oxidative phosphorylation, O2 consumption and ATP content. ► TCA cycle enzyme activity, but not expression, was lower in MDCK/snail cells. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced PDH activity and increased PDK1 expression. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced expression of GLS2 and ACLY. -- Abstract: Snail, a repressor of E-cadherin gene transcription, induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is involved in tumor progression. Snail also mediates resistance to cell death induced by serum depletion. By contrast, we observed that snail-expressing MDCK (MDCK/snail) cells undergo cell death at a higher rate than control (MDCK/neo) cells in low-glucose medium. Therefore, we investigated whether snail expression influences cell metabolism in MDCK cells. Although gylcolysis was not affected in MDCK/snail cells, they did exhibit reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, which controls pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Indeed, the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the TCA cycle was decreased in MDCK/snail cells, including that of mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and electron transport Complex II and Complex IV. Consequently, lower ATP content, lower oxygen consumption and increased survival under hypoxic conditions was also observed in MDCK/snail cells compared to MDCK/neo cells. In addition, the expression and promoter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which phosphorylates and inhibits the activity of PDH, was increased in MDCK/snail cells, while expression levels of glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), which are involved in glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis, were decreased in MDCK/snail cells. These results suggest that snail modulates cell metabolism by altering the expression and activity of key enzymes

  1. Snail modulates cell metabolism in MDCK cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraguchi, Misako, E-mail: haraguci@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Indo, Hiroko P. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Iwasaki, Yasumasa [Health Care Center, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan); Iwashita, Yoichiro [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Fukushige, Tomoko [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Majima, Hideyuki J. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Izumo, Kimiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa [Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kanekura, Takuro [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Furukawa, Tatsuhiko [Department of Molecular Oncology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ozawa, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► MDCK/snail cells were more sensitive to glucose deprivation than MDCK/neo cells. ► MDCK/snail cells had decreased oxidative phosphorylation, O{sub 2} consumption and ATP content. ► TCA cycle enzyme activity, but not expression, was lower in MDCK/snail cells. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced PDH activity and increased PDK1 expression. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced expression of GLS2 and ACLY. -- Abstract: Snail, a repressor of E-cadherin gene transcription, induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is involved in tumor progression. Snail also mediates resistance to cell death induced by serum depletion. By contrast, we observed that snail-expressing MDCK (MDCK/snail) cells undergo cell death at a higher rate than control (MDCK/neo) cells in low-glucose medium. Therefore, we investigated whether snail expression influences cell metabolism in MDCK cells. Although gylcolysis was not affected in MDCK/snail cells, they did exhibit reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, which controls pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Indeed, the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the TCA cycle was decreased in MDCK/snail cells, including that of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and electron transport Complex II and Complex IV. Consequently, lower ATP content, lower oxygen consumption and increased survival under hypoxic conditions was also observed in MDCK/snail cells compared to MDCK/neo cells. In addition, the expression and promoter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which phosphorylates and inhibits the activity of PDH, was increased in MDCK/snail cells, while expression levels of glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), which are involved in glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis, were decreased in MDCK/snail cells. These results suggest that snail modulates cell metabolism by altering the expression and activity of

  2. Artificial Stem Cell Niches

    OpenAIRE

    Lutolf, Matthias P.; Blau, Helen M.

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their dual ability to reproduce themselves (self-renew) and specialize (differentiate), yielding a plethora of daughter cells that maintain and regenerate tissues. In contrast to their embryonic counterparts, adult stem cells retain their unique functions only if they are in intimate contact with an instructive microenvironment, termed stem cell niche. In these niches, stem cells integrate a complex array of molecular signals that, in concert with induced cell-...

  3. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Ni Hong, Zhendong Li, Yunhan Hong

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is th...

  4. Stem Cell Separation Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Beili; Murthy, Shashi K

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy and translational stem cell research require large-scale supply of stem cells at high purity and viability, thus leading to the development of stem cell separation technologies. This review covers key technologies being applied to stem cell separation, and also highlights exciting new approaches in this field. First, we will cover conventional separation methods that are commercially available and have been widely adapted. These methods include Fluorescence-activated cell so...

  5. Cell control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This extensive report provides an essential overview of cells and their use as factory automation building blocks. The following issues are discussed in depth: Cell integration Cell software and standards Future technologies applied to cells Plus Cell control applications including: - rotary parts manufacturing - diesel engine component development - general cell control development at the General Electric Corporation - a vendor list.

  6. Dental mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kaukua, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been found in various tissues and act as source for renewal and repair. The mouse incisor tooth continuously grows throughout life, implicating that there are stem cell niches constantly contributing with cells. The composition of these stem cell niches is not fully understood. Here, we show that Schwann cells on the peripheral nerves in the close proximity to the incisor tooth constitute a stem cell niche. Transgenic mouse models were used to label ...

  7. Sickle Cell Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Word Visual Art Historical Perspectives General Information Research Articles Books Primary Documents Images Sickle Cell on Instagram Sickle Cell Organizations State National International Newsletter NIH Report on Evidence- ...

  8. Cell-cell interactions promote mammary epithelial cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Mammary epithelium differentiates in a stromal milieu of adipocytes and fibroblasts. To investigate cell-cell interactions that may influence mammary epithelial cell differentiation, we developed a co-culture system of murine mammary epithelium and adipocytes and other fibroblasts. Insofar as caseins are specific molecular markers of mammary epithelial differentiation, rat anti-mouse casein monoclonal antibodies were raised against the three major mouse casein components to study this interac...

  9. Fusion with stem cell makes the hepatocellular carcinoma cells similar to liver tumor-initiating cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ran; Chen, Shuxun; Li, Changxian; Ng, Kevin Tak Pan; Kong, Chi-Wing; Cheng, Jinping; Cheng, Shuk Han; Li, Ronald A.; Lo, Chung Mau; Man, Kwan; Sun, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Background Cell fusion is a fast and highly efficient technique for cells to acquire new properties. The fusion of somatic cells with stem cells can reprogram somatic cells to a pluripotent state. Our research on the fusion of stem cells and cancer cells demonstrates that the fused cells can exhibit stemness and cancer cell-like characteristics. Thus, tumor-initiating cell-like cells are generated. Methods We employed laser-induced single-cell fusion technique to fuse the hepatocellular carci...

  10. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felthaus, O. [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Ettl, T.; Gosau, M.; Driemel, O. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Brockhoff, G. [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Regensburg (Germany); Reck, A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Zeitler, K. [Institute of Pathology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Hautmann, M. [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Regensburg (Germany); Reichert, T.E. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Schmalz, G. [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Morsczeck, C., E-mail: christian.morsczeck@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). {yields} Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. {yields} Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. {yields} In situ CD133{sup +} cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. {yields} CD133{sup +} and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133{sup +} cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  11. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). → Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. → Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. → In situ CD133+ cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. → CD133+ and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133+ cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  12. LOCALIZATION AND PROTEOMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF CHOLESTEROL-RICH MEMBRANE MICRODOMAINS IN THE INNER EAR

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Paul V.; Cheng, Andrew L.; Colby, Candice C.; Liu, Liqian; Patel, Chintan K.; Josephs, Lydia; Duncan, R. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes organize and compartmentalize cell signaling into discrete microdomains, a process that often involves stable, cholesterol-rich platforms that facilitate protein-protein interactions. Polarized cells with distinct apical and basolateral cell processes rely on such compartmentalization to maintain proper function. In the cochlea, a variety of highly polarized sensory and non-sensory cells are responsible for the early stages of sound processing in the ear, yet little is kn...

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. ► Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. ► MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  14. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  15. CELL VOLUME CONFERENCES

    OpenAIRE

    V. Štrbák

    2016-01-01

    This mini-review describes the history of cell volume conferences with the emphasis on the research of cell volume sensitive peptide exocytosis initiated by Prof. Monte A. Greer as well as the recent achievements on the study of the mechanisms of cell volume adjustment and their implications in the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cell proliferation and death.

  16. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sickle cell disease? Sickle cell disease, also called sickle cell anemia, is a hereditary condition (which means it runs ... or blocks blood and oxygen reaching nearby tissues. Sickle cell disease ... the whites of the eyes) Anemia (the decreased ability of the blood to carry ...

  17. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  18. Cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides play a combined role in the death of Lachanchea thermotolerans during mixed-culture alcoholic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Branco, Patrícia; Almeida, Maria Gabriela;

    2015-01-01

    by cellulose membranes with different pore sizes, i.e. 1000 kDa for mixed- and single-culture fermentations, and 1000 and 3.5-5 kDa for compartmentalized-culture fermentations. SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography were used to determine an antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the fermentations. Our results...

  19. When Blood Cells Bend: Understanding Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe When Blood Cells Bend Understanding Sickle Cell Disease For people who don’t suspect they ... Cells Bend Wise Choices Links Living with Sickle Cell Disease See a sickle cell disease expert regularly. ...

  20. The cell cycle as a brake for β-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-01

    The generation of insulin-producing β cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic β cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle ...