WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell biomedical applications

  1. Synthetic biology: programming cells for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörner, Maximilian; Reischmann, Nadine; Weber, Wilfried

    2012-01-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology is a novel biological discipline at the interface between traditional biology, chemistry, and engineering sciences. Synthetic biology aims at the rational design of complex synthetic biological devices and systems with desired properties by combining compatible, modular biological parts in a systematic manner. While the first engineered systems were mainly proof-of-principle studies to demonstrate the power of the modular engineering approach of synthetic biology, subsequent systems focus on applications in the health, environmental, and energy sectors. This review describes recent approaches for biomedical applications that were developed along the synthetic biology design hierarchy, at the level of individual parts, of devices, and of complex multicellular systems. It describes how synthetic biological parts can be used for the synthesis of drug-delivery tools, how synthetic biological devices can facilitate the discovery of novel drugs, and how multicellular synthetic ecosystems can give insight into population dynamics of parasites and hosts. These examples demonstrate how this new discipline could contribute to novel solutions in the biopharmaceutical industry. PMID:23502560

  2. Designing Cell-Compatible Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliktar, Dror

    2012-06-01

    Hydrogels are polymeric materials distinguished by high water content and diverse physical properties. They can be engineered to resemble the extracellular environment of the body’s tissues in ways that enable their use in medical implants, biosensors, and drug-delivery devices. Cell-compatible hydrogels are designed by using a strategy of coordinated control over physical properties and bioactivity to influence specific interactions with cellular systems, including spatial and temporal patterns of biochemical and biomechanical cues known to modulate cell behavior. Important new discoveries in stem cell research, cancer biology, and cellular morphogenesis have been realized with model hydrogel systems premised on these designs. Basic and clinical applications for hydrogels in cell therapy, tissue engineering, and biomedical research continue to drive design improvements using performance-based materials engineering paradigms.

  3. Biomedical Applications of the Cold Atmospheric Plasma: Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. Depending on the configuration the cold plasma sources can be used in the following areas: wound healing, skin diseases, hospital hygiene, sterilization, antifungal treatments, dental care, cosmetics targeted cell/tissue removal, and cancer treatments. This dissertation is focused on the studies of biomedical applications of cold atmospheric plasma jet based on helium flow and resultant cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. The studies were carried out on extra-cellular and intra-cellular levels in vitro. The main practical applications are wound healing and alternative to existing cancer therapy methods, areas of great interest and significant challenges. The CAP jet was built in the Micropropulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory of Dr. Michael Keidar, as a part of multidisciplinary collaboration with the GW Medical School (Dr. M.A. Stepp) concerned with plasma medicine and bioengineering studies. Normal and cancer cells have two fundamental behavioral properties, proliferation and motility, which can be evaluated through cell migration rates and cell cycle progression. Various microscopic, spectroscopic and flow cytometry techniques were used to characterize cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. It was found that CAP effect on the cells is localized within the area of the treatment (of around ˜ 5mm in diameter). The migration rates of the normal skin cells can be reduced up to ˜ 40%. However, depending on the cell type the required treatment time is different, thus differential treatment of various cells presented in tissue is possible. The CAP effect on the migration was explained through the changes of the cell surface proteins/integrins. It was also found that normal and cancer cells respond differently to the CAP treatment under the same

  4. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  5. Human stem cell decorated nanocellulose threads for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertaniemi, Henrikki; Escobedo-Lucea, Carmen; Sanz-Garcia, Andres; Gandía, Carolina; Mäkitie, Antti; Partanen, Jouni; Ikkala, Olli; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2016-03-01

    Upon surgery, local inflammatory reactions and postoperative infections cause complications, morbidity, and mortality. Delivery of human adipose mesenchymal stem cells (hASC) into the wounds is an efficient and safe means to reduce inflammation and promote wound healing. However, administration of stem cells by injection often results in low cell retention, and the cells deposit in other organs, reducing the efficiency of the therapy. Thus, it is essential to improve cell delivery to the target area using carriers to which the cells have a high affinity. Moreover, the application of hASC in surgery has typically relied on animal-origin components, which may induce immune reactions or even transmit infections due to pathogens. To solve these issues, we first show that native cellulose nanofibers (nanofibrillated cellulose, NFC) extracted from plants allow preparation of glutaraldehyde cross-linked threads (NFC-X) with high mechanical strength even under the wet cell culture or surgery conditions, characteristically challenging for cellulosic materials. Secondly, using a xenogeneic free protocol for isolation and maintenance of hASC, we demonstrate that cells adhere, migrate and proliferate on the NFC-X, even without surface modifiers. Cross-linked threads were not found to induce toxicity on the cells and, importantly, hASC attached on NFC-X maintained their undifferentiated state and preserved their bioactivity. After intradermal suturing with the hASC decorated NFC-X threads in an ex vivo experiment, cells remained attached to the multifilament sutures without displaying morphological changes or reducing their metabolic activity. Finally, as NFC-X optionally allows facile surface tailoring if needed, we anticipate that stem-cell-decorated NFC-X opens a versatile generic platform as a surgical bionanomaterial for fighting postoperative inflammation and chronic wound healing problems. PMID:26763735

  6. Biomedical Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles: Delivering Genes and Remote Control of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Jon

    2013-03-01

    The use of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for biomedical applications was first proposed in the 1920s as a way to measure the rehological properties of the cell's cytoplasm. Since that time, magnetic micro- and nanoparticle synthesis, coating and bio-functionalization have advanced significantly, as have the applications for these particles. Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles are now used in a variety of biomedical techniques such as targeted drug delivery, MRI contrast enhancement, gene transfection, immno-assay and cell sorting. More recently, magnetic micro- and nanoparticles have been used to investigate and manipulate cellular processes both in vitro and in vivo. This talk will focus on magnetic nanoparticle targeting to and actuation of cell surface receptors to control cell signaling cascades to control cell behavior. This technology has applications in disease therapy, cell engineering and regenerative medicine. The use of magnetic nanoparticles and oscillating magnet arrays for enhanced gene delivery will also be discussed.

  7. A special issue on reviews in biomedical applications of nanomaterials, tissue engineering, stem cells, bioimaging, and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2014-10-01

    This second special issue of the Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology in a series contains another 30 state-of-the-art reviews focused on the biomedical applications of nanomaterials, biosensors, bone tissue engineering, MRI and bioimaging, single-cell detection, stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, toxicity and biosafety of nanodrugs, nanoparticle-based new therapeutic approaches for cancer, hepatic and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25992404

  8. Biomedical applications of polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Gebelein, C G

    1991-01-01

    The biomedical applications of polymers span an extremely wide spectrum of uses, including artificial organs, skin and soft tissue replacements, orthopaedic applications, dental applications, and controlled release of medications. No single, short review can possibly cover all these items in detail, and dozens of books andhundreds of reviews exist on biomedical polymers. Only a few relatively recent examples will be cited here;additional reviews are listed under most of the major topics in this book. We will consider each of the majorclassifications of biomedical polymers to some extent, inclu

  9. Sensors for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, Piet

    1986-01-01

    This paper considers the impact during the last decade of modern IC technology, microelectronics, thin- and thick-film technology, fibre optic technology, etc. on the development of sensors for biomedical applications.

  10. Mammalian designer cells: Engineering principles and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingqi; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Biotechnology is a widely interdisciplinary field focusing on the use of living cells or organisms to solve established problems in medicine, food production and agriculture. Synthetic biology, the science of engineering complex biological systems that do not exist in nature, continues to provide the biotechnology industry with tools, technologies and intellectual property leading to improved cellular performance. One key aspect of synthetic biology is the engineering of deliberately reprogrammed designer cells whose behavior can be controlled over time and space. This review discusses the most commonly used techniques to engineer mammalian designer cells; while control elements acting on the transcriptional and translational levels of target gene expression determine the kinetic and dynamic profiles, coupling them to a variety of extracellular stimuli permits their remote control with user-defined trigger signals. Designer mammalian cells with novel or improved biological functions not only directly improve the production efficiency during biopharmaceutical manufacturing but also open the door for cell-based treatment strategies in molecular and translational medicine. In the future, the rational combination of multiple sets of designer cells could permit the construction and regulation of higher-order systems with increased complexity, thereby enabling the molecular reprogramming of tissues, organisms or even populations with highest precision. PMID:26010998

  11. Biomedical applications of nisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J M; Gwak, J W; Kamarajan, P; Fenno, J C; Rickard, A H; Kapila, Y L

    2016-06-01

    Nisin is a bacteriocin produced by a group of Gram-positive bacteria that belongs to Lactococcus and Streptococcus species. Nisin is classified as a Type A (I) lantibiotic that is synthesized from mRNA and the translated peptide contains several unusual amino acids due to post-translational modifications. Over the past few decades, nisin has been used widely as a food biopreservative. Since then, many natural and genetically modified variants of nisin have been identified and studied for their unique antimicrobial properties. Nisin is FDA approved and generally regarded as a safe peptide with recognized potential for clinical use. Over the past two decades the application of nisin has been extended to biomedical fields. Studies have reported that nisin can prevent the growth of drug-resistant bacterial strains, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococci and Clostridium difficile. Nisin has now been shown to have antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative disease-associated pathogens. Nisin has been reported to have anti-biofilm properties and can work synergistically in combination with conventional therapeutic drugs. In addition, like host-defence peptides, nisin may activate the adaptive immune response and have an immunomodulatory role. Increasing evidence indicates that nisin can influence the growth of tumours and exhibit selective cytotoxicity towards cancer cells. Collectively, the application of nisin has advanced beyond its role as a food biopreservative. Thus, this review will describe and compare studies on nisin and provide insight into its future biomedical applications. PMID:26678028

  12. Biomedical applications of photochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, BP

    2010-01-01

    Photochemistry is the study of photochemical reactions between light and molecules. Recently, there have been increasing interests in using photochemical reactions in the fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering. This work revisits the components and mechanisms of photochemistry and reviews biomedical applications of photochemistry in various disciplines, including oncology, molecular biology, and biosurgery, with particular emphasis on tissue engineering. Finally, potential toxicities a...

  13. Optical Polarizationin Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tuchin, Valery V; Zimnyakov, Dmitry A

    2006-01-01

    Optical Polarization in Biomedical Applications introduces key developments in optical polarization methods for quantitative studies of tissues, while presenting the theory of polarization transfer in a random medium as a basis for the quantitative description of polarized light interaction with tissues. This theory uses the modified transfer equation for Stokes parameters and predicts the polarization structure of multiple scattered optical fields. The backscattering polarization matrices (Jones matrix and Mueller matrix) important for noninvasive medical diagnostic are introduced. The text also describes a number of diagnostic techniques such as CW polarization imaging and spectroscopy, polarization microscopy and cytometry. As a new tool for medical diagnosis, optical coherent polarization tomography is analyzed. The monograph also covers a range of biomedical applications, among them cataract and glaucoma diagnostics, glucose sensing, and the detection of bacteria.

  14. Microfluidics-Based Single-Cell Functional Proteomics for Fundamental and Applied Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Zhou, Jing; Sutherland, Alex; Wei, Wei; Shin, Young Shik; Xue, Min; Heath, James R.

    2014-06-01

    We review an emerging microfluidics-based toolkit for single-cell functional proteomics. Functional proteins include, but are not limited to, the secreted signaling proteins that can reflect the biological behaviors of immune cells or the intracellular phosphoproteins associated with growth factor-stimulated signaling networks. Advantages of the microfluidics platforms are multiple. First, 20 or more functional proteins may be assayed simultaneously from statistical numbers of single cells. Second, cell behaviors (e.g., motility) may be correlated with protein assays. Third, extensions to quantized cell populations can permit measurements of cell-cell interactions. Fourth, rare cells can be functionally identified and then separated for further analysis or culturing. Finally, certain assay types can provide a conduit between biology and the physicochemical laws. We discuss the history and challenges of the field then review design concepts and uses of the microchip platforms that have been reported, with an eye toward biomedical applications. We then look to the future of the field.

  15. Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.

    2002-07-25

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy is a newly emerging bioanalytical and imaging tool. This unique technique provides mid-infrared (IR) spectra, hence chemical information, with high signal-to-noise at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 to 10 microns. Thus it enables researchers to locate, identify, and track specific chemical events within an individual living mammalian cell. Mid-IR photons are too low in energy (0.05 - 0.5 eV) to either break bonds or to cause ionization. In this review, we show that the synchrotron IR beam has no detectable effects on the short- and long-term viability, reproductive integrity, cell-cycle progression, and mitochondrial metabolism in living human cells, and produces only minimal sample heating (< 0.5 degrees C). We will then present several examples demonstrating the application potentials of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy in biomedical research. These will include monitoring living cells progressing through the cell cycle, including death, and cells reacting to dilute concentrations of toxins.

  16. Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy is a newly emerging bioanalytical and imaging tool. This unique technique provides mid-infrared (IR) spectra, hence chemical information, with high signal-to-noise at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 to 10 microns. Thus it enables researchers to locate, identify, and track specific chemical events within an individual living mammalian cell. Mid-IR photons are too low in energy (0.05 - 0.5 eV) to either break bonds or to cause ionization. In this review, we show that the synchrotron IR beam has no detectable effects on the short- and long-term viability, reproductive integrity, cell-cycle progression, and mitochondrial metabolism in living human cells, and produces only minimal sample heating (< 0.5 degrees C). We will then present several examples demonstrating the application potentials of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy in biomedical research. These will include monitoring living cells progressing through the cell cycle, including death, and cells reacting to dilute concentrations of toxins

  17. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties. (topical review)

  18. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, M.; Mazare, A.; Gongadze, E.; Perutkova, Š.; Kralj-Iglič, V.; Milošev, I.; Schmuki, P.; Iglič, A.; Mozetič, M.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  19. Advanced silk material spun by a transgenic silkworm promotes cell proliferation for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Xu, Hanfu; Wang, Yuancheng; Wang, Riyuan; Yuan, Lin; Ding, Huan; Song, Chunnuan; Ma, Sanyuan; Peng, Zhixin; Peng, Zhangchuan; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-12-01

    Natural silk fiber spun by the silkworm Bombyx mori is widely used not only for textile materials, but also for biofunctional materials. In the present study, we genetically engineered an advanced silk material, named hSFSV, using a transgenic silkworm, in which the recombinant human acidic fibroblast growth factor (hFGF1) protein was specifically synthesized in the middle silk gland and secreted into the sericin layer to surround the silk fiber using our previously optimized sericin1 expression system. The content of the recombinant hFGF1 in the hSFSV silk was estimated to be approximate 0.07% of the cocoon shell weight. The mechanical properties of hSFSV raw silk fiber were enhanced slightly compared to those of the wild-type raw silk fiber, probably due to the presence of the recombinant of hFGF1 in the sericin layer. Remarkably, the hSFSV raw silk significantly stimulated the cell growth and proliferation of NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells, suggesting that the mitogenic activity of recombinant hFGF1 was well maintained and functioned in the sericin layer of hSFSV raw silk. These results show that the genetically engineered raw silk hSFSV could be used directly as a fine biomedical material for mass application. In addition, the strategy whereby functional recombinant proteins are expressed in the sericin layer of silk might be used to create more genetically engineered silks with various biofunctions and applications. PMID:24980060

  20. Piezoelectric nanomaterials for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Menciassi, Arianna

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale structures and materials have been explored in many biological applications because of their novel and impressive physical and chemical properties. Such properties allow remarkable opportunities to study and interact with complex biological processes. This book analyses the state of the art of piezoelectric nanomaterials and introduces their applications in the biomedical field. Despite their impressive potentials, piezoelectric materials have not yet received significant attention for bio-applications. This book shows that the exploitation of piezoelectric nanoparticles in nanomedicine is possible and realistic, and their impressive physical properties can be useful for several applications, ranging from sensors and transducers for the detection of biomolecules to “sensible” substrates for tissue engineering or cell stimulation.

  1. Nitric oxide releasing iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications: cell viability, apoptosis and cell death evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in several physiological and pathophysiological processes, such as control of vascular tone and immune responses against microbes. Thus, there is great interest in the development of NO-releasing materials to carry and deliver NO for biomedical applications. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been used in important pharmacological applications, including drug-delivery. In this work, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were coated with thiol-containing hydrophilic ligands: mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). Free thiol groups on the surface of MSA- or DMSA- coated nanoparticles were nitrosated, leading to the formation of NO-releasing iron oxide nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity of MSA- or DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) (thiolated nanoparticles) and nitrosated MSA- or nitrosated DMSA- coated MNPs (NO-releasing nanoparticles) were evaluated towards human lymphocytes. The results showed that MNP-MSA and MNP-DMSA have low cytotoxicity effects. On the other hand, NO-releasing MNPs were found to increase apoptosis and cell death compared to free NO-nanoparticles. Therefore, the cytotoxicity effects observed for NO-releasing MNPs may result in important biomedical applications, such as the treatment of tumors cells.

  2. Hydroxyapatite coatings for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings are of great importance in the biological and biomedical coatings fields, especially in the current era of nanotechnology and bioapplications. With a bonelike structure that promotes osseointegration, hydroxyapatite coating can be applied to otherwise bioinactive implants to make their surface bioactive, thus achieving faster healing and recovery. In addition to applications in orthopedic and dental implants, this coating can also be used in drug delivery. Hydroxyapatite Coatings for Biomedical Applications explores developments in the processing and property characteri

  3. Modified chitosans for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Yalınca, Zülal

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The subject of this thesis is the exploration of the suitability of chitosan and some of its derivatives for some chosen biomedical applications. Chitosan-graft-poly (N-vinyl imidazole), Chitosan-tripolyphosphate and ascorbyl chitosan were synthesized and characterized for specific biomedical applications in line with their chemical functionalities. Chitosan-graft-poly (N-vinyl imidazole), Chi-graft-PNVI, was synthesized by two methods; via an N-protection route and without N-pr...

  4. Biomedical applications in EELA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Miguel; Hernández, Vicente; Mayo, Rafael; Blanquer, Ignacio; Perez-Griffo, Javier; Isea, Raul; Nuñez, Luis; Mora, Henry Ricardo; Fernández, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The current demand for Grid Infrastructures to bring collabarating groups between Latina America and Europe has created the EELA proyect. This e-infrastructure is used by Biomedical groups in Latina America and Europe for the studies of ocnological analisis, neglected diseases, sequence alignments and computation plygonetics. PMID:16823158

  5. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Khalili, Amelia; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events. PMID:26251901

  6. Biomedical and biotechnology applications of noncontact femtosecond laser microsurgery of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilina, Inna V.; Rakityanskiy, Mikhail M.; Sitnikov, Dmitry S.; Ovchinnikov, Andrey V.; Agranat, Mikhail B.; Khramova, Yulia V.; Semenova, Maria L.

    2012-07-01

    We employed femtosecond (fs) laser pulses to solve important biomedical and biotechnology problems, embryo biopsy and cell fusion respectively. We report on the results of fully contactless laser-mediated polar body (PB) and trophectoderm (TE) biopsy of early mammalian embryos. In the former case the fs laser scalpel (Cr:Forsterite seed oscillator and a regenerative amplifier, 100 fs, 10 Hz) was initially used to drill an opening in the outer covering of the embryo, and then the PB was extracted out of the zygote by means of optical tweezers (cw fiber laser, 1064 nm). In the latter case the laser scalpel was employed to dissect 5-7 TE cells that had just left the zona pellucida (ZP) during the hatching. The energy of laser pulses was thoroughly optimized to prevent cell damage and provide high viability of treated cells. Morphological and fluorescent analysis showed that femtosecond laser-based embryo biopsy did not compromise further in vitro embryo development. We also demonstrated the possibilities of using fs laser pulses for cell fusion. The contact border of the blastomeres of two-cell mouse embryos was perforated by a single fs-laser pulse with energy of 30-50 nJ. The blastomeres fusion process was usually complete within ˜60 min. In conclusion, the proposed techniques of laser microprocessing of living cells enable accurate, contamination-free, simple and quick performance of the procedures, and thus show a great potential for using fs lasers as a microsurgical tool.

  7. Biomedical applications of supermagnetic nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Daniel; Babič, Michal; Kubinová, Šárka; Schmiedtová, M.; Poledne, R.; Herynek, V.; Sundstrom, T.; Altanerova, V.; Borisova, T.

    Prague : Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry AS CR, 2015. s. 18. [Research Postdoctoral Colloquium. 14.05.2015, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : biomedical applications * supermagnetic nanoparticles Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  8. Biomedical Imaging Principles and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Salzer, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    This book presents and describes imaging technologies that can be used to study chemical processes and structural interactions in dynamic systems, principally in biomedical systems. The imaging technologies, largely biomedical imaging technologies such as MRT, Fluorescence mapping, raman mapping, nanoESCA, and CARS microscopy, have been selected according to their application range and to the chemical information content of their data. These technologies allow for the analysis and evaluation of delicate biological samples, which must not be disturbed during the profess. Ultimately, this may me

  9. Nanomaterials in biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Jesper de Claville; Potarniche, Catalina-Gabriela; Vuluga, Z.;

    2011-01-01

    Advances in nano materials have lead to applications in many areas from automotive to electronics and medicine. Nano composites are a popular group of nano materials. Nanocomposites in medical applications provide novel solutions to common problems. Materials for implants, biosensors and drug...... delivery are examples of important applications, but as the materials are new there are challenges e.g. related to bio integration and inflammatory response....

  10. Biomedical Application of Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. X. He; Alan Chow; Jiada Mo; Wang Zhuo

    2004-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Lasers have revolutionized research and development in medicine and dentistry. They have led to development and production of many new products. Laser applications in diagnosis, treatment and surgery are enormous and have led to speedy and more efficient results, as well as better and quicker healing Processes. The applications could be classified in terms of areas of uses or in terms of instruments/products.In this paper, discussions will not be grouped in a particular fashion, but will be on specific applications. A lot of information on these applications can be found in the Internet. Such information will be mentioned in related discussions and will be given in the appendix.

  11. Molecular Theory of the Living Cell Concepts, Molecular Mechanisms, and Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Sungchul

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive molecular theory of the living cell based on over thirty concepts, principles and laws imported from thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, chemical kinetics, informatics, computer science, linguistics, semiotics, and philosophy. The author formulates physically, chemically and enzymologically realistic molecular mechanisms to account for the basic living processes such as ligand-receptor interactions, protein folding, single-molecule enzymic catalysis, force-generating mechanisms in molecular motors, signal transduction, regulation of the genome-wide RNA metabolism, morphogenesis, the micro-macro coupling in coordination dynamics, the origin of life, and the mechanisms of biological evolution itself. Possible solutions to basic and practical problems facing contemporary biology and biomedical sciences have been suggested, including pharmacotheragnostics and personalized medicine.

  12. Functionalized conjugated polyelectrolytes design and biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Functionalized Conjugated Polyelectrolytes presents a comprehensive review of these polyelectrolytes and their biomedical applications. Basic aspects like molecular design and optoelectronic properties are covered in the first chapter. Emphasis is placed on the various applications including sensing (chemical and biological), disease diagnosis, cell imaging, drug/gene delivery and disease treatment. This book explores a multi-disciplinary topic of interest to researchers working in the fields of chemistry, materials, biology and medicine. It also offers an integrated perspective on both basic

  13. Novel nanosized water soluble fluorescent micelles with embedded perylene diimide fluorophores for potential biomedical applications: cell permeability, localization and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryaskova, Rayna; Georgiev, Nikolai I; Dimov, Stefan M; Tzoneva, Rumiana; Detrembleur, Christophe; Asiri, Abdullah M; Alamry, Khalid A; Bojinov, Vladimir B

    2015-06-01

    Novel biocompatible water-soluble fluorescent micelles with embedded perylene diimides (PDI) for intracellular applications have been prepared by self assembling of amphiphilic poly(vinyl alcohol)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) (PVA-b-PAN) copolymers in the presence of synthesized fluorophores. Amphiphilic PVA-b-PAN copolymers were obtained by selective hydrolysis of well-defined poly(vinyl acetate)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) (PVAc-b-PAN) copolymer. The preparation of the novel fluorescence micelles consisting of PVA hydrophilic shell and PAN hydrophobic core with incorporated PDI fluorophores has been confirmed by DLS and TEM analysis. The cytotoxicity of the water-soluble fluorophores and their internalization into living cells depending on the micellar concentration have been tested. It was shown that they could successfully enter in living cells without destroying their morphology. The results obtained indicate that the novel water-soluble fluorescent micelles with embedded PDI fluorophores would be suitable for potential intracellular biomedical applications. PMID:25842102

  14. Biomedical devices and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    This volume introduces readers to the basic concepts and recent advances in the field of biomedical devices. The text gives a detailed account of novel developments in drug delivery, protein electrophoresis, estrogen mimicking methods and medical devices. It also provides the necessary theoretical background as well as describing a wide range of practical applications. The level and style make this book accessible not only to scientific and medical researchers but also to graduate students.

  15. Thermoresponsive Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theoni K. Georgiou

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermoresponsive polymers are a class of “smart” materials that have the ability to respond to a change in temperature; a property that makes them useful materials in a wide range of applications and consequently attracts much scientific interest. This review focuses mainly on the studies published over the last 10 years on the synthesis and use of thermoresponsive polymers for biomedical applications including drug delivery, tissue engineering and gene delivery. A summary of the main applications is given following the different studies on thermoresponsive polymers which are categorized based on their 3-dimensional structure; hydrogels, interpenetrating networks, micelles, crosslinked micelles, polymersomes, films and particles.

  16. Cell mechanics as a marker for diseases: Biomedical applications of AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianna, Carmela; Radmacher, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Many diseases are related to changes in cell mechanics. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is one of the most suitable techniques allowing the investigation of both topography and mechanical properties of adherent cells with high spatial resolution under physiological conditions. Over the years the use of this technique in medical and clinical applications has largely increased, resulting in the notion of cell mechanics as a biomarker to discriminate between different physiological and pathological states of cells. Cell mechanics has proven to be a biophysical fingerprint able discerning between cell phenotypes, unraveling processes in aging or diseases, or even detecting and diagnosing cellular pathologies. We will review in this report some of the works on cell mechanics investigated by AFM with clinical and medical relevance in order to clarify the state of research in this field and to highlight the role of cell mechanics in the study of pathologies, focusing on cancer, blood and cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Superhydrophobic materials for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falde, Eric J; Yohe, Stefan T; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-10-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are actively studied across a wide range of applications and industries, and are now finding increased use in the biomedical arena as substrates to control protein adsorption, cellular interaction, and bacterial growth, as well as platforms for drug delivery devices and for diagnostic tools. The commonality in the design of these materials is to create a stable or metastable air layer at the material surface, which lends itself to a number of unique properties. These activities are catalyzing the development of new materials, applications, and fabrication techniques, as well as collaborations across material science, chemistry, engineering, and medicine given the interdisciplinary nature of this work. The review begins with a discussion of superhydrophobicity, and then explores biomedical applications that are utilizing superhydrophobicity in depth including material selection characteristics, in vitro performance, and in vivo performance. General trends are offered for each application in addition to discussion of conflicting data in the literature, and the review concludes with the authors' future perspectives on the utility of superhydrophobic biomaterials for medical applications. PMID:27449946

  18. Biomedical Applications of Nanodiamonds: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeri, D; Rinaldi, F; Ingallina, C; Carafa, M; Rossi, M; Terranova, M L; Marianecci, C

    2015-02-01

    Nanodiamonds are a novel class of nanomaterials which have raised much attention for application in biomedical field, as they combine the possibility of being produced on large scale using relatively inexpensive synthetic processes, of being fluorescent as a consequence of the presence of nitrogen vacancies, of having their surfaces functionalized, and of having good biocompatibility. Among other applications, we mainly focus on drug delivery, including cell interaction, targeting, cancer therapy, gene and protein delivery. In addition, nanodiamonds for bone and dental implants and for antibacterial use is discussed. Techniques for detection and imaging of nanodiamonds in biological tissues are also reviewed, including electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, Raman mapping, atomic force microscopy, thermal imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography, either in vitro, in vivo, or ex vivo. Toxicological aspects related to the use of nanodiamonds are also discussed. Finally, patents, preclinical and clinical trials based on the use of nanodiamonds for biomedical applications are reviewed. PMID:26353603

  19. Biomedical applications of graphene and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chul; Kim, Young-Kwan; Shin, Dolly; Ryoo, Soo-Ryoon; Hong, Byung Hee; Min, Dal-Hee

    2013-10-15

    Graphene has unique mechanical, electronic, and optical properties, which researchers have used to develop novel electronic materials including transparent conductors and ultrafast transistors. Recently, the understanding of various chemical properties of graphene has facilitated its application in high-performance devices that generate and store energy. Graphene is now expanding its territory beyond electronic and chemical applications toward biomedical areas such as precise biosensing through graphene-quenched fluorescence, graphene-enhanced cell differentiation and growth, and graphene-assisted laser desorption/ionization for mass spectrometry. In this Account, we review recent efforts to apply graphene and graphene oxides (GO) to biomedical research and a few different approaches to prepare graphene materials designed for biomedical applications. Because of its excellent aqueous processability, amphiphilicity, surface functionalizability, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and fluorescence quenching ability, GO chemically exfoliated from oxidized graphite is considered a promising material for biological applications. In addition, the hydrophobicity and flexibility of large-area graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) allow this material to play an important role in cell growth and differentiation. The lack of acceptable classification standards of graphene derivatives based on chemical and physical properties has hindered the biological application of graphene derivatives. The development of an efficient graphene-based biosensor requires stable biofunctionalization of graphene derivatives under physiological conditions with minimal loss of their unique properties. For the development graphene-based therapeutics, researchers will need to build on the standardization of graphene derivatives and study the biofunctionalization of graphene to clearly understand how cells respond to exposure to graphene derivatives. Although several

  20. Biomedical applications of control engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hacısalihzade, Selim S

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical Applications of Control Engineering is a lucidly written textbook for graduate control engin­eering and biomedical engineering students as well as for medical prac­ti­tioners who want to get acquainted with quantitative methods. It is based on decades of experience both in control engineering and clinical practice.   The book begins by reviewing basic concepts of system theory and the modeling process. It then goes on to discuss control engineering application areas like ·         Different models for the human operator, ·         Dosage and timing optimization in oral drug administration, ·         Measuring symptoms of and optimal dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson’s disease, ·         Measure­ment and control of blood glucose le­vels both naturally and by means of external controllers in diabetes, and ·         Control of depth of anaesthesia using inhalational anaesthetic agents like sevoflurane using both fuzzy and state feedback controllers....

  1. Holographic lithography for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankevicius, E.; Balciunas, E.; Malinauskas, M.; Raciukaitis, G.; Baltriukiene, D.; Bukelskiene, V.

    2012-06-01

    Fabrication of scaffolds for cell growth with appropriate mechanical characteristics is top-most important for successful creation of tissue. Due to ability of fast fabrication of periodic structures with a different period, the holographic lithography technique is a suitable tool for scaffolds fabrication. The scaffolds fabricated by holographic lithography can be used in various biomedical investigations such as the cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability. These investigations allow selection of the suitable material and geometry of scaffolds which can be used in creation of tissue. Scaffolds fabricated from di-acrylated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-DA-258) over a large area by holographic lithography technique are presented in this paper. The PEG-DA scaffolds fabricated by holographic lithography showed good cytocompatibility for rabbit myogenic stem cells. It was observed that adult rabbit muscle-derived myogenic stem cells grew onto PEG-DA scaffolds. They were attached to the pillars and formed cell-cell interactions. It demonstrates that the fabricated structures have potential to be an interconnection channel network for cell-to-cell interactions, flow transport of nutrients and metabolic waste as well as vascular capillary ingrowth. These results are encouraging for further development of holographic lithography by improving its efficiency for microstructuring three-dimensional scaffolds out of biodegradable hydrogels

  2. Organic Bioelectronic Tools for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Löffler

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic bioelectronics forms the basis of conductive polymer tools with great potential for application in biomedical science and medicine. It is a rapidly growing field of both academic and industrial interest since conductive polymers bridge the gap between electronics and biology by being electronically and ionically conductive. This feature can be employed in numerous ways by choosing the right polyelectrolyte system and tuning its properties towards the intended application. This review highlights how active organic bioelectronic surfaces can be used to control cell attachment and release as well as to trigger cell signaling by means of electrical, chemical or mechanical actuation. Furthermore, we report on the unique properties of conductive polymers that make them outstanding materials for labeled or label-free biosensors. Techniques for electronically controlled ion transport in organic bioelectronic devices are introduced, and examples are provided to illustrate their use in self-regulated medical devices. Organic bioelectronics have great potential to become a primary platform in future bioelectronics. We therefore introduce current applications that will aid in the development of advanced in vitro systems for biomedical science and of automated systems for applications in neuroscience, cell biology and infection biology. Considering this broad spectrum of applications, organic bioelectronics could lead to timely detection of disease, and facilitate the use of remote and personalized medicine. As such, organic bioelectronics might contribute to efficient healthcare and reduced hospitalization times for patients.

  3. Polyaspartate coated magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) in biomedical applications is subject to specific conditions. Special demands such as non-toxic core material and a biocompatible shell are prerequisites. These are fulfilled with magnetite cores and amino acid shell material, which provide different functional groups for coupling biomolecules as presented here. In this study the biocompatibility was tested by using breast cancer cell lines and leukocytes from peripheral blood. Functionalization with antibodies and the binding experiments detected by magneto-optical relaxation measurements confirm the bonding capacity and demonstrate the application of the presented MNP in magnetic immunoassays or magnetic drug targeting

  4. Semiconducting silicon nanowires for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Coffer, JL

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical applications have benefited greatly from the increasing interest and research into semiconducting silicon nanowires. Semiconducting Silicon Nanowires for Biomedical Applications reviews the fabrication, properties, and applications of this emerging material. The book begins by reviewing the basics, as well as the growth, characterization, biocompatibility, and surface modification, of semiconducting silicon nanowires. It goes on to focus on silicon nanowires for tissue engineering and delivery applications, including cellular binding and internalization, orthopedic tissue scaffol

  5. Cell-phone-based platform for biomedical device development and education applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary J Smith

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the development of two attachments to a commercial cell phone that transform the phone's integrated lens and image sensor into a 350x microscope and visible-light spectrometer. The microscope is capable of transmission and polarized microscopy modes and is shown to have 1.5 micron resolution and a usable field-of-view of 150 x 50 with no image processing, and approximately 350 x 350 when post-processing is applied. The spectrometer has a 300 nm bandwidth with a limiting spectral resolution of close to 5 nm. We show applications of the devices to medically relevant problems. In the case of the microscope, we image both stained and unstained blood-smears showing the ability to acquire images of similar quality to commercial microscope platforms, thus allowing diagnosis of clinical pathologies. With the spectrometer we demonstrate acquisition of a white-light transmission spectrum through diffuse tissue as well as the acquisition of a fluorescence spectrum. We also envision the devices to have immediate relevance in the educational field.

  6. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) systems for biomedical sensor applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bird , Aoibheann

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates the use of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) for biomedical sensor applications. FRET is a process by which energy is transferred, via long range dipole-dipole interactions, from a donor molecule (D) in an excited electronic state to an acceptor molecule (A). The emission band of D must overlap the absorption band of A in order for FRET to occur. FRET is employed in a variety of biomedical applications, including the study of cell biology an...

  7. Applications of computational intelligence in biomedical technology

    CERN Document Server

    Majernik, Jaroslav; Pancerz, Krzysztof; Zaitseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This book presents latest results and selected applications of Computational Intelligence in Biomedical Technologies. Most of contributions deal with problems of Biomedical and Medical Informatics, ranging from theoretical considerations to practical applications. Various aspects of development methods and algorithms in Biomedical and Medical Informatics as well as Algorithms for medical image processing, modeling methods are discussed. Individual contributions also cover medical decision making support, estimation of risks of treatments, reliability of medical systems, problems of practical clinical applications and many other topics  This book is intended for scientists interested in problems of Biomedical Technologies, for researchers and academic staff, for all dealing with Biomedical and Medical Informatics, as well as PhD students. Useful information is offered also to IT companies, developers of equipment and/or software for medicine and medical professionals.  .

  8. Atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APPs) have attracted great interest and have been widely applied in biomedical applications, as due to their non-thermal and reactive properties, they interact with living tissues, cells and bacteria. Various types of plasma sources generated at atmospheric pressure have been developed to achieve better performance in specific applications. This article presents an overview of the general characteristics of APPs and a brief summary of their biomedical applications, and reviews a wide range of these sources developed for biomedical applications. The plasma sources are classified according to their power sources and cover a wide frequency spectrum from dc to microwaves. The configurations and characteristics of plasma sources are outlined and their biomedical applications are presented. (invited review)

  9. An Investigation of Micro and Nanomanufactured Polymer Substrates to Direct Stem Cell Response for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, John W.

    The development of high aspect ratio large feature density polymer microarrays requires the synergistic optimization of design, material, mold tooling, and processing. A conventional mold base with steel inserts and controllable resistance heating was assembled to incorporate interchangeable inserts with microfeatured silicon inlays. Ultraviolet (UV) lithography with dry etching was used to impart microfeatures into silicon wafers with a variety of different geometries containing aspect ratios ranging from 0.92 to 6. Multiple polymer resins, including polystyrene (PS), low density polyethylene (LDPE), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), were used to test replication and cellular response to materials with different bulk stiffness and topography-modified surface stiffness. The maximum achieved microfeature aspect ratio was 9.3 (high impact polystyrene), owed to tensile stretching during part ejection. For non-stretched substrates, the maximum molded aspect ratio was 4.5 (LDPE) and highest replication quotient (RQ = feature height / tooling feature depth) was 0.97 (COC). The maximum aspect ratio molded with consistent features across the entire surface was 2.1 (TPU). Parameters shown to enhance replication were mold temperature (T mold = Tg was a critical replication transition point), injection velocity at higher mold temperatures, holding time, holding pressure, and nozzle temperature. The importance of certain parameters was material dependent, but mold temperature consistently had a relatively large impact. A concern that was addressed for a high density array of microfeatures was the consistency of replication, which is vital for the intended application and seldom address in published literature. Increased consistency was attained through strategic placement of temperature control, modification of the main cavity design, and optimized silicon tooling with reduced microcavity nanoroughness. Silicon tooling was fabricated with the

  10. Biotechnological and biomedical applications of mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimzadeh, Amirbahman; Tabatabaei Mirakabad, Fatemeh Sadat; Movassaghpour, Aliakbar; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Kariminekoo, Saber; Talebi, Mehdi; Shekari, Abolfazl; Zeighamian, Vahideh; Gandomkar Ghalhar, Masoud; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are non-hematopoietic, multipotent progenitor cells which reside in bone marrow (BM), support homing of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and self-renewal in the BM. These cells have the potential to differentiate into tissues of mesenchymal origin, such as fibroblasts, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, and stromal cells. MSCs can express surface molecules like CD13, CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD166, CXCL12 and toll-like receptors (TLRs). Different factors, such as TGF-β, IL-10, IDO, PGE-2, sHLA-G5, HO, and Galectin-3, secreted by MSCs, induce interaction in cell to cell immunomodulatory effects on innate and adaptive cells of the immune system. Furthermore, these cells can stimulate and increase the TH2 and regulatory T-cells through inhibitory effects on the immune system. MSCs originate from the BM and other tissues including the brain, adipose tissue, peripheral blood, cornea, thymus, spleen, fallopian tube, placenta, Wharton's jelly and umbilical cord blood. Many studies have focused on two significant features of MSC therapy: (I) MSCs can modulate T-cell-mediated immunological responses, and (II) systemically administered MSCs home in to sites of ischemia or injury. In this review, we describe the known mechanisms of immunomodulation and homing of MSCs. As a result, this review emphasizes the functional role of MSCs in modulating immune responses, their capability in homing to injured tissue, and their clinical therapeutic potential. PMID:25340260

  11. Radiation synthesis and fabrication for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation synthesis and fabrication techniques can make various specific forms and structures of materials enhancedly which are useful for biomedical applications. Those materials are a porous gel and membrane, an interpenetrating networked (IPN) hydrogel, a heterogeneous surface phase membrane, an ultra-thin membrane, a biofunctional laminate and an ultra-fine particle. Radiation techniques can attach various biofunctionalities to those materials effectively by means of immobilization of biofunctional components such as enzymes, proteins, hormones, drugs, microbial cells and tissue cells. It is convenient that the immobilization can be finished at the same time as the synthesis and fabrication in many cases. The applications to bioreactors, biosensors, artificial organs, drug delivery systems and recently to signal responsive chemical delivery systems, have been studied and developed based on those techniques. (Author)

  12. Radiation synthesis and fabrication for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation synthesis and fabrication techniques can make various specific forms and structures of materials enhancedly which are useful for biomedical applications. These materials are a porous gel and membrane, and interpenetrating networked (IPN) hydrogel, a heterogeneous surface phase membrane, an ultra-thin membrane, a biofunctional laminate and an ultra-fine particle. Radiation techniques can attach various biofunctionalities to those materials effectively by means of immobilization of biofunctional components such as enzymes, proteins, hormones, drugs, microbial cell and tissue cells. It is convenient that the immobilization can be finished at the same time as the synthesis and fabrication in many cases. The applications to bioreactors, biosensors, artificial organs, drugs delivery systems and recently to signal responsive chemical delivery systems, have been studied and developed based on those techniques. (Author)

  13. An Investigation of Micro and Nanomanufactured Polymer Substrates to Direct Stem Cell Response for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, John W.

    The development of high aspect ratio large feature density polymer microarrays requires the synergistic optimization of design, material, mold tooling, and processing. A conventional mold base with steel inserts and controllable resistance heating was assembled to incorporate interchangeable inserts with microfeatured silicon inlays. Ultraviolet (UV) lithography with dry etching was used to impart microfeatures into silicon wafers with a variety of different geometries containing aspect ratios ranging from 0.92 to 6. Multiple polymer resins, including polystyrene (PS), low density polyethylene (LDPE), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), were used to test replication and cellular response to materials with different bulk stiffness and topography-modified surface stiffness. The maximum achieved microfeature aspect ratio was 9.3 (high impact polystyrene), owed to tensile stretching during part ejection. For non-stretched substrates, the maximum molded aspect ratio was 4.5 (LDPE) and highest replication quotient (RQ = feature height / tooling feature depth) was 0.97 (COC). The maximum aspect ratio molded with consistent features across the entire surface was 2.1 (TPU). Parameters shown to enhance replication were mold temperature (T mold = Tg was a critical replication transition point), injection velocity at higher mold temperatures, holding time, holding pressure, and nozzle temperature. The importance of certain parameters was material dependent, but mold temperature consistently had a relatively large impact. A concern that was addressed for a high density array of microfeatures was the consistency of replication, which is vital for the intended application and seldom address in published literature. Increased consistency was attained through strategic placement of temperature control, modification of the main cavity design, and optimized silicon tooling with reduced microcavity nanoroughness. Silicon tooling was fabricated with the

  14. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ying

    Nanotechnology is revolutionizing human's life. Synthesis and application of magnetic nanoparticles is a fast burgeoning field which has potential to bring significant advance in many fields, for example diagnosis and treatment in biomedical area. Novel nanoparticles to function efficiently and intelligently are in desire to improve the current technology. We used a magnetron-sputtering-based nanocluster deposition technique to synthesize magnetic nanoparticles in gas phase, and specifically engineered nanoparticles for different applications. Alternating magnetic field heating is emerging as a technique to assist cancer treatment or drug delivery. We proposed high-magnetic-moment Fe3Si particles with relatively large magnetic anisotropy energy should in principle provide superior performance. Such nanoparticles were experimentally synthesized and characterized. Their promising magnetic properties can contribute to heating performance under suitable alternating magnetic field conditions. When thermal energy is used for medical treatment, it is ideal to work in a designed temperature range. Biocompatible and "smart" magnetic nanoparticles with temperature self-regulation were designed from both materials science and biomedicine aspects. We chose Fe-Si material system to demonstrate the concept. Temperature dependent physical property was adjusted by tuning of exchange coupling between Fe atoms through incorporation of various amount of Si. The magnetic moment can still be kept in a promising range. The two elements are both biocompatible, which is favored by in-vivo medical applications. A combination of "smart" magnetic particles and thermo-sensitive polymer were demonstrated to potentially function as a platform for drug delivery. Highly sensitive diagnosis for point-of-care is in desire nowadays. We developed composition- and phase-controlled Fe-Co nanoparticles for bio-molecule detection. It has been demonstrated that Fe70Co30 nanoparticles and giant

  15. Bio-Inspired Extreme Wetting Surfaces for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sera Shin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological creatures with unique surface wettability have long served as a source of inspiration for scientists and engineers. More specifically, materials exhibiting extreme wetting properties, such as superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic surfaces, have attracted considerable attention because of their potential use in various applications, such as self-cleaning fabrics, anti-fog windows, anti-corrosive coatings, drag-reduction systems, and efficient water transportation. In particular, the engineering of surface wettability by manipulating chemical properties and structure opens emerging biomedical applications ranging from high-throughput cell culture platforms to biomedical devices. This review describes design and fabrication methods for artificial extreme wetting surfaces. Next, we introduce some of the newer and emerging biomedical applications using extreme wetting surfaces. Current challenges and future prospects of the surfaces for potential biomedical applications are also addressed.

  16. Lanthanides fluorides doped nanocrystals for biomedical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podhorodecki, A.; Noculak, A.; Banski, M.; Sojka, B.; Zelazo, A.; Misiewicz, J.; Cichos, J.; Karbowiak, M.; Zasońska, Beata Anna; Horák, Daniel; Sikora, B.; Elbaum, D.; Dumych, T.; Bilyy, R.; Szewczyk, M.

    Orlando : The Electrochemical Society, 2014. R1-1581. [ECS Meeting /225./. 11.05.2014-15.05.2014, Orlando] Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : nanocrystals * biomedical applications Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  17. Computer vision for biomedical image applications. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the First International Workshop on Computer Vision for Biomedical Image Applications: Current Techniques and Future Trends, CVBIA 2005, held in Beijing, China, in October 2005 within the scope of ICCV 20. (orig.)

  18. Shape-Memory Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakacki, Christopher M.; Gall, Ken

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are a class of mechanically functional "smart" materials that have generated substantial interest for biomedical applications. SMPs offer the ability to promote minimally invasive surgery, provide structural support, exert stabilizing forces, elute therapeutic agents, and biodegrade. This review focuses on several areas of biomedicine including vascular, orthopedic, and neuronal applications with respect to the progress and potential for SMPs to improve the standard of treatment in these areas. Fundamental studies on proposed biomedical SMP systems are discussed with regards to biodegradability, tailorability, sterilization, and biocompatibility. Lastly, a proposed research and development pathway for SMP-based biomedical devices is proposed based on trends in the recent literature.

  19. Biomedical image understanding methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Joo-Hwee; Xiong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive guide to understanding and interpreting digital images in medical and functional applications Biomedical Image Understanding focuses on image understanding and semantic interpretation, with clear introductions to related concepts, in-depth theoretical analysis, and detailed descriptions of important biomedical applications. It covers image processing, image filtering, enhancement, de-noising, restoration, and reconstruction; image segmentation and feature extraction; registration; clustering, pattern classification, and data fusion. With contributions from ex

  20. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang(College of William and Mary); Yuhe Zhu; Susan Liao; Jiajia Li

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matr...

  1. Optical nanoparticles: synthesis and biomedical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhung Tran, Hong; Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Thuy Duong Vu, Thi; Chu, Viet Ha; Huan Le, Quang; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Thanh Nguyen, Lai; Pham, Duc Minh; Thuan Tong, Kim; Hoa Do, Quang; Vu, Duong; Nghia Nguyen, Trong; Tan Pham, Minh; Nguyen Duong, Cao; Thuy Tran, Thanh; Son Vu, Van; Thuy Nguyen, Thi; Nguyen, Thi Bich Ngoc; Tran, Anh Duc; Thuong Trinh, Thi; Nguyen, Thi Thai An

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of our results on studies of synthesis and biomedical application of optical nanoparticles. Gold, dye-doped silica based and core-shell multifunctional multilayer (SiO2/Au, Fe3O4/SiO2, Fe3O4/SiO2/Au) water-monodispersed nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical route and surface modified with proteins and biocompatible chemical reagents. The particles were conjugated with antibody or aptamer for specific detecting and imaging bacteria and cancer cells. The photothermal effects of gold nanoshells (SiO2/Au and Fe3O4/SiO2/Au) on cells and tissues were investigated. The nano silver substrates were developed for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy to detect melamine.

  2. Selected Topics in MicroNano-robotics for Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Selected Topics in Micro/Nano-robotics for Biomedical Applications features a system approach and incorporates modern methodologies in autonomous mobile robots for programmable and controllable micro/nano-robots aiming at biomedical applications. The book provides chapters of instructional materials and cutting-edge research results in micro/nanorobotics for biomedical applications. The book presents new sensing technology on nanofibers, new power supply techniques including miniature fuel cells and energy harvesting devices, and manipulation techniques including AFM-based nano-robotic manipulation, robot-aided optical tweezers, and robot-assisted catheter surgery systems. It also contains case studies on using micro/nano-robots in biomedical environments and in biomedicine, as well as a design example to conceptually develop a Vitamin-pill sized robot to enter human’s gastrointestinal tract. Each chapter covers a different topic of the highly interdisciplinary area. Bring together the selected topics into ...

  3. Teaching biomedical applications to secondary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, S; Fleisher, A; Ljunggren, C

    1999-01-01

    Certain aspects of biomedical engineering applications lend themselves well to experimentation that can be done by high school students. This paper describes two experiments done during a six-week summer internship program in which two high school students used electrodes, circuit boards, and computers to mimic a sophisticated heart monitor and also to control a robotic car. Our experience suggests that simple illustrations of complex instrumentation can be effective in introducing adolescents to the biomedical engineering field. PMID:11143394

  4. Silk fibroin nanostructured materials for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitropoulos, Alexander N.

    Nanostructured biopolymers have proven to be promising to develop novel biomedical applications where forming structures at the nanoscale normally occurs by self-assembly. However, synthesizing these structures can also occur by inducing materials to transition into other forms by adding chemical cross-linkers, changing pH, or changing ionic composition. Understanding the generation of nanostructures in fluid environments, such as liquid organic solvents or supercritical fluids, has not been thoroughly examined, particularly those that are based on protein-based block-copolymers. Here, we examine the transformation of reconstituted silk fibroin, which has emerged as a promising biopolymer due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and ease of functionalization, into submicron spheres and gel networks which offer applications in tissue engineering and advanced sensors. Two types of gel networks, hydrogels and aerogels, have small pores and large surface areas that are defined by their structure. We design and analyze silk nanoparticle formation using a microfluidic device while offering an application for drug delivery. Additionally, we provide a model and characterize hydrogel formation from micelles to nanoparticles, while investigating cellular response to the hydrogel in an in vitro cell culture model. Lastly, we provide a second model of nanofiber formation during near-critical and supercritical drying and characterize the silk fibroin properties at different drying pressures which, when acting as a stabilizing matrix, shows to improve the activity of entrapped enzymes dried at different pressures. This work has created new nanostructured silk fibroin forms to benefit biomedical applications that could be applied to other fibrous proteins.

  5. Nanomaterials and nanofabrication for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Chia-Wen Wu, Kevin

    2013-08-01

    Traditional boundaries between materials science and engineering and life sciences are rapidly disintegrating as interdisciplinary research teams develop new materials-science-based tools for exploring fundamental issues in both medicine and biology. With recent technological advances in multiple research fields such as materials science, cell and molecular biology and micro-/nano-technology, much attention is shifting toward evaluating the functional advantages of nanomaterials and nanofabrication, at the cellular and molecular levels, for specific, biomedically relevant applications. The pursuit of this direction enhances the understanding of the mechanisms of, and therapeutic potentials for, some of the most lethal diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, organ fibrosis and cancers. This interdisciplinary approach has generated great interest among researchers working in a wide variety of communities including industry, universities and research laboratories. The purpose of this focus issue in Science and Technology of Advanced Materials is to bridge nanotechnology and biology with medicine, focusing more on the applications of nanomaterials and nanofabrication in biomedically relevant issues. This focus issue, we believe, will provide a more comprehensive understanding of (i) the preparation of nanomaterials and the underlying mechanisms of nanofabrication, and (ii) the linkage of nanomaterials and nanofabrication with biomedical applications. The multidisciplinary focus issue that we have attempted to organize is of interest to various research fields including biomaterials and tissue engineering, bioengineering, nanotechnology and nanomaterials, i.e. chemistry, physics and engineering. Nanomaterials and nanofabrication topics addressed in this focus issue include sensing and diagnosis (e.g. immunosensing and diagnostic devices for diseases), cellular and molecular biology (e.g. probing cellular behaviors and stem cell differentiation) and drug delivery

  6. Biomedical Applications of DNA-Conjugated Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Chi; Wu, Shou-Mei; Li, Hung-Wen; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2016-06-16

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are useful for diagnostic and biomedical applications, mainly because of their ease in preparation and conjugation, biocompatibility, and size-dependent optical properties. However, bare AuNPs do not possess specificity for targets. AuNPs conjugated with DNA aptamers offer specificity for various analytes, such as proteins and small molecules/ions. Although DNA aptamers themselves have therapeutic and target-recognizing properties, they are susceptible to degradation in vivo. When DNA aptamers are conjugated to AuNPs, their stability and cell uptake efficiency both increase, making aptamer-AuNPs suitable for biomedical applications. Additionally, drugs can be efficiently conjugated with DNA aptamer-AuNPs to further enhance their therapeutic efficiency. This review focuses on the applications of DNA aptamer-based AuNPs in several biomedical areas, including anticoagulation, anticancer, antibacterial, and antiviral applications. PMID:26864481

  7. Fullerenol - properties and applications in biomedical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Grębowski

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Fullerenols, the water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, are currently being recently intensively studied in the context of the possibility of their application in the biomedicine. Due to their hydrophilic properties and the ability to eliminate free radicals, fullerenols may in the future provide a solid alternative to currently used pharmacological methods in chemotherapy, treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and radiobiology. Depending on the research protocol applied, fullerenols may also act as pro oxidants. The dualistic nature of fullerenols may contribute to finding new biomedical applications of these agents in the future, by exerting a cytotoxic or protective effect respectively against cancer cells or healthy cells. Because of the encapsulated structure of fullerenols, there exists the possibility of their application in medical diagnostics in the transfer of contrast agents or in the drug transport. During the planning of an experiment designed to investigate the effects of radiation in combination with derivatives of water-soluble fullerenes, the possibility of appearance of the “dose-response effect” should be taken into consideration since it significantly contributes to one of the two possible effects: protection or sensitization. The same applies to the possibility of using these compounds as potential neuroprotectors. Fullerenol may protect neurons in the particular areas of the brain but in the definedcertain doses it may also induce cell death. A giant leap in the field of nanotechnology not only leads scientists to search for new applications of nanomaterials such as fullerenols, but also raises the question about their harmful effect on the environment. High utilization of hardly biodegradable fullerenols increases the likelihood of their accidental release into natural systems and their bioaccumulation. Despite convincing evidences about the potential applications of fullerenols in biomedicine, we still have

  8. Porphyrin Microparticles for Biological and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Elizabeth

    Lipids are one of the critical building blocks of life, forming the plasma membrane of cells. In addition, porphyrins also play an equally important role in life, for example, through carrying oxygen in blood. The importance of both these components is evident through the biological and biomedical applications of supramolecular structures generated from lipids and porphyrins. This thesis investigates new porphyrin microparticles based on porphyrin-lipid architecture and their potential applications in biology and medicine. In Chapter 1, a background on lipid and porphyrin-based supramolecular structures is presented and design considerations for generating multifunctional agents. Chapter 2 describes the generation of a monolayer porphyrin microparticle as a dual-modal ultrasound and photoacoustic contrast agent and subsequently, a trimodal ultrasound, photoacoustic and fluorescence contrast agent. Chapter 3 examines the optical and morphological response of these multimodality ultrasound-based contrast agents to low frequency, high duty cycle ultrasound that causes the porphyrin microparticles to convertinto nanoparticles. Chapter 4 examines the generation of bilayer micrometer-sized porphyrin vesicles and their properties. Chapter 5 presents a brief summary and potential future directions. Although these microscale structures are similar in structure, the applications of these structures greatly differ with potential applications in biology and also imaging and therapy of disease. This thesis aims to explore and demonstrate the potential of new simplified, supramolecular structures based on one main building block, porphyrin-lipid.

  9. Europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syamchand, S.S., E-mail: syamchand.ss@gmail.com; Sony, G., E-mail: emailtosony@gmail.com

    2015-09-15

    Lanthanide based nanoparticles are receiving great attention ought to their excellent luminescent and magnetic properties and find challenging biomedical applications. Among the luminescent lanthanide NPs, europium based NPs (Eu-NPs) are better candidates for immunoassay and imaging applications. The Eu-NPs have an edge over quantum dots (QDs) by means of their stable luminescence, long fluorescence lifetime, sharp emission peaks with narrow band width, lack of blinking and biocompatibility. This review surveys the synthesis and properties of a variety of Eu-NPs consolidated from different research articles, for their applications in medicine and biology. The exquisite luminescent properties of Eu-NPs are explored for developing biomedical applications such as immunoassay and bioimaging including multimodal imaging. The biomedical applications of Eu-NPs are mostly diagnostic in nature and mainly focus on various key analytes present in biological systems. The luminescent properties of europium enabled NPs are influenced by a number of factors such as the site symmetry, the metal nanoparticles, metal ions, quantum dots, surfactants, morphology of Eu-NPs, crystal defect, phenomena like antenna effect and physical parameters like temperature. Through this review we explore and assimilate all the factors which affect the luminescence in Eu-NPs and coil a new thread of parameters that control the luminescence in Eu-NPs, which would provide further insight in developing Eu-based nanoprobes for future biomedical prospects. - Highlights: • The review describes 14 major factors that influence the luminescence properties of europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles (Eu-NPs). • Surveys different types of europium containing nanoparticles that have been reported for their biomedical applications. • Eu-NPs are conveniently divided into four different categories, based on the type of the substrates involved. The four categories are (1) virgin Eu-substrate based NPs; (2

  10. Europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanthanide based nanoparticles are receiving great attention ought to their excellent luminescent and magnetic properties and find challenging biomedical applications. Among the luminescent lanthanide NPs, europium based NPs (Eu-NPs) are better candidates for immunoassay and imaging applications. The Eu-NPs have an edge over quantum dots (QDs) by means of their stable luminescence, long fluorescence lifetime, sharp emission peaks with narrow band width, lack of blinking and biocompatibility. This review surveys the synthesis and properties of a variety of Eu-NPs consolidated from different research articles, for their applications in medicine and biology. The exquisite luminescent properties of Eu-NPs are explored for developing biomedical applications such as immunoassay and bioimaging including multimodal imaging. The biomedical applications of Eu-NPs are mostly diagnostic in nature and mainly focus on various key analytes present in biological systems. The luminescent properties of europium enabled NPs are influenced by a number of factors such as the site symmetry, the metal nanoparticles, metal ions, quantum dots, surfactants, morphology of Eu-NPs, crystal defect, phenomena like antenna effect and physical parameters like temperature. Through this review we explore and assimilate all the factors which affect the luminescence in Eu-NPs and coil a new thread of parameters that control the luminescence in Eu-NPs, which would provide further insight in developing Eu-based nanoprobes for future biomedical prospects. - Highlights: • The review describes 14 major factors that influence the luminescence properties of europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles (Eu-NPs). • Surveys different types of europium containing nanoparticles that have been reported for their biomedical applications. • Eu-NPs are conveniently divided into four different categories, based on the type of the substrates involved. The four categories are (1) virgin Eu-substrate based NPs; (2

  11. Filtration track membranes and their biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of track filtration membranes has been performed. The investigation of radiation resistance has been carried out for different types of polymer foil used as a membrane material. Biomedical applications of track filtration membranes have been presented and discussed. 10 refs, 10 figs

  12. Lanthanides fluorides doped nanocrystals for biomedical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podhorodecki, A.; Noculak, A.; Banski, M.; Sojka, B.; Zelazo, A.; Misiewicz, J.; Cichos, J.; Karbowiak, M.; Zasońska, Beata Anna; Horák, Daniel; Sikora, B.; Elbaum, D.; Dumych, T.; Bilyy, R.; Szewczyk, M.

    Pennington : Electrochemical Soc, 2014, Roč. 61, č. 5, s. 115-125. ISBN 978-1-60768-520-3. ISSN 1938-5862. [ECS Meeting /225./. Orlando (US), 11.05.2014-15.05.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : nanocrystals * biomedical applications Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  13. Biological and Biomedical Coatings Handbook Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Written in a versatile, contemporary style that will benefit both novice and expert alike, Biological and Biomedical Coatings Handbook, Two-Volume Set covers the state of the art in the development and implementation of advanced thin films and coatings in the biological field. Consisting of two volumes--Processing and Characterization and Applications--this handbook details the latest understanding of advances in the design and performance of biological and biomedical coatings, covering a vast array of material types, including bio-ceramics, polymers, glass, chitosan, and nanomaterials. Contri

  14. Furfuryl methacrylate plasma polymers for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Hanieh Safizadeh; Rogers, Nicholas; Michelmore, Andrew; Whittle, Jason D

    2016-01-01

    Furfuryl methacrylate (FMA) is a promising precursor for producing polymers for biomedical and cell therapy applications. Herein, FMA plasma polymer coatings were prepared with different powers, deposition times, and flow rates. The plasma polymer coatings were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results from AFM and SEM show the early growth of the coatings and the existence of particle aggregates on the surfaces. XPS results indicated no measureable chemical differences between the deposited films produced under different power and flow rate conditions. ToF-SIMS analysis demonstrated differing amounts of C5H5O (81 m/z) and C10H9O2 (161 m/z) species in the coatings which are related to the furan ring structure. Through judicious choice of plasma polymerization parameters, the quantity of the particle aggregates was reduced, and the fabricated plasma polymer coatings were chemically uniform and smooth. Primary human fibroblasts were cultured on FMA plasma polymer surfaces to determine the effect of surface chemical composition and the presence of particle aggregates on cell culture. Particle aggregates were shown to inhibit fibroblast attachment and proliferation. PMID:27609095

  15. Biomedical and environmental applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of syntheses and applications of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) at the Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology. Three families of oxide MNPs, magnetite, manganite and spinel ferrite materials, were prepared in various ways: coprecipitation, sol–gel and high energy mechanical milling. Basic properties of MNPs were characterized by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) and Physical Properties Measurement Systems (PPMS). As for biomedical application, the aim was to design a novel multifunctional, nanosized magnetofluorescent water-dispersible Fe3O4-curcumin conjugate, and its ability to label, target and treat tumor cells was described. The conjugate possesses a magnetic nano Fe3O4 core, chitosan (CS) or Oleic acid (OL) as an outer shell and entrapped curcumin (Cur), serving the dual function of naturally autofluorescent dye as well as antitumor model drug. Fe3O4-Cur conjugate exhibited a high loading cellular uptake with the help of a macrophage, which was clearly visualized dually by Fluorescence Microscope and Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope (LSCM), as well as by magnetization measurement (PPMS). A preliminary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study also showed a clear contrast enhancement by using the conjugate. As for the environmental aspect, the use of magnetite MNPs for the removal of heavy toxic metals, such as Arsenic (As) and Lead (Pb), from contaminated water was studied

  16. Organic Bioelectronic Tools for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Susanne Löffler; Ben Libberton; Agneta Richter-Dahlfors

    2015-01-01

    Organic bioelectronics forms the basis of conductive polymer tools with great potential for application in biomedical science and medicine. It is a rapidly growing field of both academic and industrial interest since conductive polymers bridge the gap between electronics and biology by being electronically and ionically conductive. This feature can be employed in numerous ways by choosing the right polyelectrolyte system and tuning its properties towards the intended application. This review ...

  17. Biomedical application of the nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Studsvik Nuclear Microprobe (SMP) has mainly been devoted to applications in the biomedical field. Its ultimate resolution is reached at 2.9x2.9 μm2 with a proton current of 100 pA. With this performance the SMP has been used in a wide range of disciplines covering environmental hygiene, toxicology, various aspects of internal medicine and trace element physiology. Examples of recent applications in these fields are described. (orig.)

  18. Bibliography of astatine chemistry and biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overall bibliography is presented on astatine chemistry and on the biomedical applications of its 211At isotope. The references were grouped in the following chapters: General reviews; Discovery, Natural Occurence; Nuclear Data; Preparation, Handling, Radiation Risk; Physico-chemical Properties; Astatine Compounds and Chemical Reactions; Biological Effects and Applications. Entries are sorted alphabetically by authors name in each chapter, and cross-references to other chapters are provided if appropriate. (R.P.)

  19. Implantable biomedical microsystems design principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bhunia, Swarup; Sawan, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Research and innovation in areas such as circuits, microsystems, packaging, biocompatibility, miniaturization, power supplies, remote control, reliability, and lifespan are leading to a rapid increase in the range of devices and corresponding applications in the field of wearable and implantable biomedical microsystems, which are used for monitoring, diagnosing, and controlling the health conditions of the human body. This book provides comprehensive coverage of the fundamental design principles and validation for implantable microsystems, as well as several major application areas. Each co

  20. Amphiphilic Fullerenes for Biomedical and Optoelectronical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Witte, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Fullerenes have an enormous potential in applications to physics and biology. Specifically [60]fullerene with its unique electronic, optical and structural properties has attracted considerable attention for its application in biomedical materials and optoelectronic devices. In this context the selective functionalization of C60, which allows to combine the parent properties with new attributes like water-solubility or amphiphilicity is still a challenging topic for the synthetic chemist. In ...

  1. Biomedical applications of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation techniques application in medical diagnostics have been presented especially for: trace element analysis in tissues, elemental mapping, chemical speciation at trace levels, chemical structure determination. Presented techniques are very useful for early cancer discovery

  2. Sodium Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madelin, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present an up-to-date overview of the potential biomedical applications of sodium MRI in vivo. Sodium MRI is a subject of increasing interest in translational research as it can give some direct and quantitative biochemical information on the tissue viability, cell integrity and function, and therefore not only help the diagnosis but also the prognosis of diseases and treatment outcomes. It has already been applied in vivo in most of human tissues, such as brain for stroke or tumor detection and therapeutic response, in breast cancer, in articular cartilage, in muscle and in kidney, and it was shown in some studies that it could provide very useful new information not available through standard proton MRI. However, this technique is still very challenging due to the low detectable sodium signal in biological tissue with MRI and hardware/software limitations of the clinical scanners. The article is divided in three parts: (1) the role of sodium in biological tissues, (2) a short review on s...

  3. College Physics with Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurcher, Ulrich; Kaufman, Miron; Bergen, Zakiyyha; Ferguson, Robert

    2004-10-01

    As team members of the Northeast Ohio Center of Excellence for Mathematics and Science Teachers Education [NEOCEx], we prepared some innovative lesson plans aimed in particular for students majoring in Biology and PreMed. We discuss several examples involving the high-jump, baseball, hydrostatic pressure, and swimming [buoyancy]. We find that applications from biology and medicine provide a source of context-rich problems for algebra-based introductory physics.

  4. Inorganic nanolayers: structure, preparation, and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifullah, Bullo; Hussein, Mohd Zobir B

    2015-01-01

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds are two-dimensional inorganic nanolayers also known as clay minerals or anionic clays or layered double hydroxides/layered hydroxy salts, and have emerged as a single type of material with numerous biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, gene delivery, cosmetics, and biosensing. Inorganic nanolayers are promising materials due to their fascinating properties, such as ease of preparation, ability to intercalate different type of anions (inorganic, organic, biomolecules, and even genes), high thermal stability, delivery of intercalated anions in a sustained manner, high biocompatibility, and easy biodegradation. Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science. These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery. They have also been applied in biosensing technology, and most recently in bioimaging science. The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes. In this paper, we review the structure, methods of preparation, and latest advances made by inorganic nanolayers in such biomedical applications as drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging. PMID:26366081

  5. Nanocrystalline diamond films for biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Alcaide, Maria

    2014-01-01

    resistance, chemical inertness, superior electrochemical behavior, biocompatibility, and nontoxicity. These properties have positioned the nanocrystalline diamond films as an attractive class of materials for a range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications in the biomedical field. Consequently, the...... better understand the terminology used in the literature, which is related to the fabrication and surface functionalization of this class of materials, some of the most common approaches for synthesis and modification of CVD diamond films is introduced. Although many challenges still remain, it is...

  6. Magnetic Fluids: Biomedical Applications and Magnetic Fractionation

    OpenAIRE

    Rheinländer, Thomas; Kötitz, Róman; Weitschies, Werner; Semmler, Wolfhard

    2000-01-01

    In addition to engineering applications, magnetic fluids containing magnetic nanoparticles are being increasingly applied to biomedical purposes. Besides the well established use of magnetic particles for biological separation or as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic particles are also being tested for the inductive heat treatment of tumors or as markers for the quantification of biologically active substances. The properties of magnetic nanoparticles usually exhibit a b...

  7. Multijet atmospheric plasma device for biomedical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Hubička, Zdeněk; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2011), s. 135-141. ISSN 1947-5764 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC202/09/J017; GA AV ČR KAN301370701; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : atmospheric plasma * plasma sources * biomedical applications Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  8. Integrated nanobiosensor technology for biomedical application

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Chulhee

    2012-01-01

    Chulhee Choi1,21Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, 2Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, 3KI for the BioCentury 4Optical Bioimaging Center, KAIST, Daejeon, Republic of KoreaAbstract: Advances in nanotechnology have led to the development of nanoscale biosensors that have exquisite sensitivity and versatility. The biomedical application of nanobiosensors is wide; moreover, the future impact of nanobiosensor systems for point-of-care diagnostics will be unmatched. The ultim...

  9. Biotechnology development for biomedical applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehl, Michael; Brozik, Susan Marie; Rogers, David Michael; Rempe, Susan L.; Abhyankar, Vinay V.; Hatch, Anson V.; Dirk, Shawn M.; Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Sukharev, Sergei (University of Maryland, College Park, MD); Anishken, Andriy (University of Maryland, College Park, MD); Cicotte, Kirsten; De Sapio, Vincent; Buerger, Stephen P.; Mai, Junyu

    2010-11-01

    Sandia's scientific and engineering expertise in the fields of computational biology, high-performance prosthetic limbs, biodetection, and bioinformatics has been applied to specific problems at the forefront of cancer research. Molecular modeling was employed to design stable mutations of the enzyme L-asparaginase with improved selectivity for asparagine over other amino acids with the potential for improved cancer chemotherapy. New electrospun polymer composites with improved electrical conductivity and mechanical compliance have been demonstrated with the promise of direct interfacing between the peripheral nervous system and the control electronics of advanced prosthetics. The capture of rare circulating tumor cells has been demonstrated on a microfluidic chip produced with a versatile fabrication processes capable of integration with existing lab-on-a-chip and biosensor technology. And software tools have been developed to increase the calculation speed of clustered heat maps for the display of relationships in large arrays of protein data. All these projects were carried out in collaboration with researchers at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX.

  10. Development of polyphenolic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huaitzung Andrew

    enough to be uptaken into mammalian cells. Furthermore, by self-assembling with gadolinium, pseudotannins can effectively attenuate the signal of gadolinium based MRI contrast agents. This in conjunction with oxidation responsive decomplexation could be a viable option for diagnosing the severity and risk of rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Also, we demonstrate that pegylated compounds can easily be incorporated into pseudotannin nanoparticles to impart cell targeting functionality. The subsequent uptake of pseudotannin nanoparticles into breast cancer cells demonstrated the ability to increase their sensitivity to UV radiation. The creation of synthetic tannin-like polymers leads to directly to making a variety of self-assembling, stimuli responsive, and bioactive nanoparticles well-suited for various biomedical applications.

  11. Chitosan composite films. Biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Galo; Anaya, Paola; von Plessing, Carlos; Rojas, Carlos; Sepúlveda, Jackeline

    2008-06-01

    Chitosan acetate films have been prepared using chitosans from shrimps (Pleuroncodes monodon) of low and high molecular weight (LMv = 68,000 g/mol and HMv = 232,000 g/mol) and deacetylation degree of 80 and 100%, respectively. The chitosan films were obtained by addition of several additives to acetic acid chitosan solutions, such as: glycerol, oleic acid and linoleic acid in different proportions. The pH of the solutions before casting ranged from 5.0 to 6.0. The composite film thickness are reported. The films have been analyzed by FTIR showing characteristic bands corresponding to the additives. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies reveals the different morphology of the composite films. The films exhibit different physical properties depending upon the additives and/or mixture of them. The addition of glycerol to composite improves the elasticity of the films. The swelling in glucose and saline solutions for several films was evaluated, being higher in the glucose solution. The bactericide test against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomona aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanii in plates with either blood and or agar tripticase showed that the molecular weight influences on the bactericidal properties of the chitosan composite films and over its effect against gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Medical applications of the composite films were done in patients with burns, ulcers and injuries, the films containing glycerol showed good adhesion in comparison with those without it. The composite films tested were mainly three (1) chitosan acetate with glycerol, (2) chitosan acetate with oleic acid and (3) chitosan acetate with glycerol and oleic acid. Excellent results in the skin recovery were obtained after 7-10 days. Since the chitosan is biodegradable by the body enzymes it does not need to be removed and increases the gradual grows of the damage tissues. PMID:18165888

  12. Two-photon probes for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Su Lim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Two-photon microscopy (TPM, which uses two photons oflower energy as the excitation source, is a vital tool in biologyand clinical science, due to its capacity to image deep insideintact tissues for a long period of time. To make TPM a moreversatile tool in biomedical research, we have developed avariety of two-photon probes for specific applications. In thismini review, we will briefly discuss two-photon probes forlipid rafts, lysosomes, mitochondria, and pH, and theirbiomedical applications. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(4: 188-194

  13. Production and Biomedical Applications of Probiotic Biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariq, Anila; Saeed, Ayesha

    2016-04-01

    Biosurfactants have been widely used for environmental and industrial applications. However, their use in medical field is still limited. Probiotic biosurfactants possess an immense antimicrobial, anti-adhesive, antitumor, and antibiofilm potential. Moreover, they have an additional advantage over conventional microbial surfactants because probiotics are an integral part of normal human microflora and their biosurfactants are innocuous to human. So, they can be effectively exploited for medicinal use. Present review is aimed to discourse the production and biomedical applications of probiotic biosurfactants. PMID:26742771

  14. Fibrinogen and fibrin based micro and nano scaffolds incorporated with drugs, proteins, cells and genes for therapeutic biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajangam T

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Thanavel Rajangam, Seong Soo A An Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Seongnam-Si, Republic of Korea Abstract: Over the past two decades, many types of natural and synthetic polymer-based micro- and nanocarriers, with exciting properties and applications, have been developed for application in various types of tissue regeneration, including bone, cartilage, nerve, blood vessels, and skin. The development of suitable polymers scaffold designs to aid the repair of specific cell types have created diverse and important potentials in tissue restoration. Fibrinogen (Fbg- and fibrin (Fbn-based micro- and nanostructures can provide suitable natural matrix environments. Since these primary materials are abundantly available in blood as the main coagulation proteins, they can easily interact with damaged tissues and cells through native biochemical interactions. Fbg- and Fbn-based micro and nanostructures can also be consecutively furnished/or encapsulated and specifically delivered, with multiple growth factors, proteins, and stem cells, in structures designed to aid in specific phases of the tissue regeneration process. The present review has been carried out to demonstrate the progress made with micro and nanoscaffold applications and features a number of applications of Fbg- and Fbn-based carriers in the field of biomaterials, including the delivery of drugs, active biomolecules, cells, and genes, that have been effectively used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Keywords: biomaterial, polymer composite, cross-linking, growth factor, drug delivery, controlled release, tissue regeneration

  15. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Van Kampen, C. L.; Babbush, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters used as ion sources have demonstrated a unique capability to vary the surface morphology of surgical implant materials. The microscopically rough surface texture produced by ion beam sputtering of these materials may result in improvements in the biological response and/or performance of implanted devices. Control of surface roughness may result in improved attachment of the implant to soft tissue, hard tissue, bone cement, or components deposited from blood. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam texturing discussed include: vascular prostheses, artificial heart pump diaphragms, pacemaker fixation, percutaneous connectors, orthopedic prosthesis fixation, and dental implants.

  16. CMT for biomedical and other applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This session includes two presentations describing applications for x-ray tomography using synchrotron radiation for biomedical uses and fluid flow modeling, and outlines advantages for using monoenergetic x-rays. Contrast mechanisms are briefly described and several graphs of absorbed doses and scattering of x-rays are included. Also presented are schematic diagrams of computerized tomographic instrumentation with camera head. A brief description of goals for a real time tomographic system and expected improvements to the system are described. Color photomicrographs of the Berea Sandstone and human bone are provided, as well as a 3-D microtomographic reconstruction of a human vertebra sample

  17. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Babbush, C. A.; Vankampen, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters used as ion sources have demonstrated a unique capability to vary the surface morphology of surgical implant materials. The microscopically rough surface texture produced by ion beam sputtering of these materials may result in improvements in the biological response and/or performance of implanted devices. Control of surface roughness may result in improved attachment of the implant to soft tissue, hard tissue, bone cement, or components deposited from blood. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam texturing discussed include: vascular prostheses, artificial heart pump diaphragms, pacemaker fixation, percutaneous connectors, orthopedic pros-thesis fixtion, and dental implants.

  18. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development. PMID:26551147

  19. Biomedical Applications of Advanced Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Yang, Yong; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Thi, Cao Minh; Cao, Yanqin; Nogami, Masayuki

    2015-12-01

    In this review, we have presented the latest results and highlights on biomedical applications of a class of noble metal nanoparticles, such as gold, silver and platinum, and a class of magnetic nanoparticles, such as cobalt, nickel and iron. Their most important related compounds are also discussed for biomedical applications for treating various diseases, typically as cancers. At present, both physical and chemical methods have been proved very successful to synthesize, shape, control, and produce metal- and oxide-based homogeneous particle systems, e.g., nanoparticles and microparticles. Therefore, we have mainly focused on functional magnetic nanoparticles for nanomedicine because of their high bioadaptability to the organs inside human body. Here, bioconjugation techniques are very crucial to link nanoparticles with conventional drugs, nanodrugs, biomolecules or polymers for biomedical applications. Biofunctionalization of engineered nanoparticles for biomedicine is shown respective to in vitro and in vivo analysis protocols that typically include drug delivery, hyperthermia therapy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and recent outstanding progress in sweep imaging technique with Fourier transformation (SWIFT) MRI. The latter can be especially applied using magnetic nanoparticles, such as Co-, Fe-, Ni-based nanoparticles, α-Fe2O3, and Fe3O4 oxide nanoparticles for analysis and treatment of malignancies. Therefore, this review focuses on recent results of scientists, and related research on diagnosis and treatment methods of common and dangerous diseases by biomedical engineered nanoparticles. Importantly, nanosysems (nanoparticles) or microsystems (microparticles) or hybrid micronano systems are shortly introduced into nanomedicine. Here, Fe oxide nanoparticles ultimately enable potential and applicable technologies for tumor-targeted imaging and therapy. Finally, we have shown the latest aspects of the most important Fe-based particle systems, such as Fe,

  20. CMT for biomedical and other applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spanne, P. [ESRF, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    This session includes two presentations describing applications for x-ray tomography using synchrotron radiation for biomedical uses and fluid flow modeling, and outlines advantages for using monoenergetic x-rays. Contrast mechanisms are briefly described and several graphs of absorbed doses and scattering of x-rays are included. Also presented are schematic diagrams of computerized tomographic instrumentation with camera head. A brief description of goals for a real time tomographic system and expected improvements to the system are described. Color photomicrographs of the Berea Sandstone and human bone are provided, as well as a 3-D microtomographic reconstruction of a human vertebra sample.

  1. Functional modification of chitosan for biomedical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ruogu

    Chitosan is a linear polysaccharide. Normally commercial chitosan consists of randomly distributed beta-(1-4)-linked D-glucosamine (deacetylated proportion) and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (acetylated proportion) together. Chitosan has been proved to be a multifunctional biopolymer that presents several unique properties due to free amino groups in the repeating unit therefore chitosan has been widely applied in various areas. To be specific, provided by the excellent biocompatibility, chitosan is expected to be used in biological and medical applications including wound dressing, implants, drug carrier/delivery, etc. In this thesis, we worked on chitosan functionalization for biomedical application. The thesis are composed of three parts: In the first part, we focused on modifying the chitosan thin film, chemically introducing the nitric oxide functional groups on chitosan film. We covalently bonded small molecule diazeniumdiolates onto the chitosan films and examined the antimicrobial function and biocompatibility. Commercial chitosan was cast into films from acidic aqueous solutions. Glutaraldehyde reacted with the chitosan film to introduce aldehyde groups onto the chitosan film (GA-CS film). GA-CS reacted with a small molecule NO donor, NOC-18, to covalently immobilize NONO groups onto the polymer (NO-CS film). The-CHO and [NONO] group were verified by FT IR, UV and Griess reagent. The NO releasing rate in aqueous solution and and thermal stability were studied quantitatively to prove its effectiveness. A series of antimicrobial tests indicated that NO-CS films have multiple functions: 1. It could inhibit the bacteria growth in nutrient rich environment; 2. It could directly inactivate bacteria and biofilm; 3. It could reduce the bacteria adherence on the film surface as well as inhibit biofilm formation. In addition, the NO-CS film was proved to be biocompatible with cell and it was also compatible with other antibiotics like Amoxicillin. In the second part, we

  2. Fabrication of keratin-silica hydrogel for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Prachi; Madhan, Balaraman

    2016-09-01

    In the recent past, keratin has been fabricated into different forms of biomaterials like scaffold, gel, sponge, film etc. In lieu of the myriad advantages of the hydrogels for biomedical applications, a keratin-silica hydrogel was fabricated using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). Textural analysis shed light on the physical properties of the fabricated hydrogel, inturn enabling the optimization of the hydrogel. The optimized keratin-silica hydrogel was found to exhibit instant springiness, optimum hardness, with ease of spreadability. Moreover, the hydrogel showed excellent swelling with highly porous microarchitecture. MTT assay and DAPI staining revealed that keratin-silica hydrogel was biocompatible with fibroblast cells. Collectively, these properties make the fabricated keratin-silica hydrogel, a suitable dressing material for biomedical applications. PMID:27207052

  3. Surface tailoring of inorganic materials for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rimondini, Lia; Vernè, Enrica

    2012-01-01

    This e-book provides comprehensive information on technologies for development and characterization of successful functionalized materials for biomedical applications relevant to surface modification.

  4. Chitosan Modification and Pharmaceutical/Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Zhang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan has received much attention as a functional biopolymer for diverse applications, especially in pharmaceutics and medicine. Our recent efforts focused on the chemical and biological modification of chitosan in order to increase its solubility in aqueous solutions and absorbability in the in vivo system, thus for a better use of chitosan. This review summarizes chitosan modification and its pharmaceutical/biomedical applications based on our achievements as well as the domestic and overseas developments: (1 enzymatic preparation of low molecular weight chitosans/chitooligosaccharides with their hypocholesterolemic and immuno-modulating effects; (2 the effects of chitin, chitosan and their derivatives on blood hemostasis; and (3 synthesis of a non-toxic ion ligand—D-Glucosaminic acid from Oxidation of D-Glucosamine for cancer and diabetes therapy.

  5. Fluid-structure interaction and biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Galdi, Giovanni; Nečasová, Šárka

    2014-01-01

    This book presents, in a methodical way, updated and comprehensive descriptions and analyses of some of the most relevant problems in the context of fluid-structure interaction (FSI). Generally speaking, FSI is among the most popular and intriguing problems in applied sciences and includes industrial as well as biological applications. Various fundamental aspects of FSI are addressed from different perspectives, with a focus on biomedical applications. More specifically, the book presents a mathematical analysis of basic questions like the well-posedness of the relevant initial and boundary value problems, as well as the modeling and the numerical simulation of a number of fundamental phenomena related to human biology. These latter research topics include blood flow in arteries and veins, blood coagulation and speech modeling. We believe that the variety of the topics discussed, along with the different approaches used to address and solve the corresponding problems, will help readers to develop a more holis...

  6. Biomedical applications of polypeptide multilayer nanofilms and microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Jai Simha S.

    The past few years have witnessed considerable growth in synthetic polymer chemistry and physics, biomaterials science, and nano-scale engineering. Research on polypeptide multilayer films, coatings, and microcapsules is located at the intersection of these areas and are promising materials for applications in medicine, biotechnology, environmental science. Most envisioned applications of polypeptide multilayers have a biomedical bent. This dissertation on polypeptide multilayer film applications covers key points of polypeptides as materials, means of polymer production, film preparation, film characterization methods, and key points of current research in basic science. Both commercial and designed peptides have been used to fabricate films for in-vitro applications such as antimicrobial coatings and cell culture coatings and also microcapsules for drug delivery applications. Other areas of product development include artificial red blood cells, anisotropic coatings, enantioselective membranes, and artificial viruses.

  7. Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies Developed for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Alphus D.; Manuela Baietto

    2011-01-01

    The research and development of new electronic-nose applications in the biomedical field has accelerated at a phenomenal rate over the past 25 years. Many innovative e-nose technologies have provided solutions and applications to a wide variety of complex biomedical and healthcare problems. The purposes of this review are to present a comprehensive analysis of past and recent biomedical research findings and developments of electronic-nose sensor technologies, and to identify current and futu...

  8. Synthesis and spectroscopic investigations of iron oxide nano-particles for biomedical applications in the treatment of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, Aly H.; El-ghamry, Mosad A.; Hamzaoui, Adel; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-04-01

    Recently, upon the great importance of synthesized nano-particles especially ferric oxides on medicinal applications, these nano-particles have been prepared here using friendly and low cost biological precursors moieties via a thermal decomposition method. The Fe2O3 nano-particles preparation method is based on thermal degradation of ferric complexes of hippuric acid, itaconic acid, or tyrosine amino acid at 600 °C. The used precursors were characterized by several characterization techniques such as microanalysis, conductance, infrared spectra, electronic spectra, and thermogravimetric (TG/DTG). The calcinations stages were identified from the thermogravimetric analyses of ferric complexes. The narrow size distribution in nano-scale range for the Fe2O3 crystals have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer (EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyzer. XRD data indicate that a single phase Fe2O3 nano-particles are obtained with particle size ranging from 20 to 60 nm. The cytotoxic activity of the Fe2O3 nanoparticles was tested against the breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7 cell line). The results of inhibitory concentration fifty (IC50) were existed within the 3.10-3.81 μg limit.

  9. In vivo evaluation of whey protein-based biofilms as scaffolds for cutaneous cell cultures and biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the toxicity, biodegradability and immunogenicity of newly developed whey protein-based biofilms for possible use as biomaterials for medical applications. Biofilms were prepared using (A) a whey protein isolate plasticized with either diethylene glycol (DEG) or glycerol (GLY), and (B) β-lactoglobulin (βLGA) plasticized with DEG. The biofilms were implanted subcutaneously into Balb/c mice. Analyses were performed at various time points. At 15, 30 and 60 days post-implantation, no necrotic zones or exudates were present at the recipient sites. The biofilms began to degrade as early as 15 days post-implantation, as evidenced by erosion and crumbling. The macroscopic observations were supported by tissue analyses revealing no tissue necrosis or degradation and confirming that the biodegradation of the biofilms began as early as 15 days post-implantation and was almost complete after 60 days. The biodegradation was accompanied by significant leukocyte infiltration at 15 days which significantly decreased at 60 days. The absence of splenomagaly in the implanted mice confirms that these biofilms were not immunogenic. Whey protein-based biofilms are biocompatible and biodegradable and may be of interest for medical applications such as scaffolds for cutaneous cell cultures and skin recovery in burn patients

  10. Irradiation effects on hydrases for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Masakazu E-mail: mfuruta@riast.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Ohashi, Isao; Oka, Masahito; Hayashi, Toshio

    2000-03-01

    To apply an irradiation technique to sterilize 'Hybrid' biomedical materials including enzymes, we selected papain, a well-characterized plant endopeptidase as a model to examine durability of enzyme activity under the practical irradiation condition in which limited data were available for irradiation inactivation of enzymes. Dry powder and frozen aqueous solution of papain showed significant durability against {sup 60}Co-gamma irradiation suggesting that, the commercial irradiation sterilizing method is applicable without modification. Although irradiation of unfrozen aqueous papain solution showed an unusual change of the enzymatic activity with the increasing doses, and was totally inactivated at 15 kGy, we managed to keep the residual activity more than 50% of initial activity after 30-kGy irradiation, taking such optimum conditions as increasing enzyme concentration from 10 to 100 mg/ml and purging with N{sub 2} gas to suppress the formation of free radicals. (author)

  11. Irradiation effects on hydrases for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Masakazu; Ohashi, Isao; Oka, Masahito; Hayashi, Toshio

    2000-03-01

    To apply an irradiation technique to sterilize "Hybrid" biomedical materials including enzymes, we selected papain, a well-characterized plant endopeptidase as a model to examine durability of enzyme activity under the practical irradiation condition in which limited data were available for irradiation inactivation of enzymes. Dry powder and frozen aqueous solution of papain showed significant durability against 60Co-gamma irradiation suggesting that, the commercial irradiation sterilizing method is applicable without modification. Although irradiation of unfrozen aqueous papain solution showed an unusual change of the enzymatic activity with the increasing doses, and was totally inactivated at 15 kGy, we managed to keep the residual activity more than 50% of initial activity after 30-kGy irradiation, taking such optimum conditions as increasing enzyme concentration from 10 to 100 mg/ml and purging with N 2 gas to suppress the formation of free radicals.

  12. Irradiation effects on hydrases for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To apply an irradiation technique to sterilize 'Hybrid' biomedical materials including enzymes, we selected papain, a well-characterized plant endopeptidase as a model to examine durability of enzyme activity under the practical irradiation condition in which limited data were available for irradiation inactivation of enzymes. Dry powder and frozen aqueous solution of papain showed significant durability against 60Co-gamma irradiation suggesting that, the commercial irradiation sterilizing method is applicable without modification. Although irradiation of unfrozen aqueous papain solution showed an unusual change of the enzymatic activity with the increasing doses, and was totally inactivated at 15 kGy, we managed to keep the residual activity more than 50% of initial activity after 30-kGy irradiation, taking such optimum conditions as increasing enzyme concentration from 10 to 100 mg/ml and purging with N2 gas to suppress the formation of free radicals. (author)

  13. AMS at the ANU including biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); King, S.J.; Day, J.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31

    An extensive accelerator mass spectrometry program has been conducted on the 14UD accelerator at the Australian National University since 1986. In the two years since the previous conference, the research program has expanded significantly to include biomedical applications of {sup 26}Al and studies of landform evolution using isotopes produced in situ in surface rocks by cosmic ray bombardment. The system is now used for the measurement of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 129}I, and research is being undertaken in hydrology, environmental geochemistry, archaeology and biomedicine. On the technical side, a new test system has permitted the successful off-line development of a high-intensity ion source. A new injection line to the 14UD has been established and the new source is now in position and providing beams to the accelerator. 4 refs.

  14. Encapsulated magnetite particles for biomedical application

    CERN Document Server

    Landfester, K

    2003-01-01

    The process of miniemulsification allows the generation of small, homogeneous, and stable droplets containing monomer or polymer precursors and magnetite which are then transferred by polymer reactions to the final polymer latexes, keeping their particular identity without serious exchange kinetics involved. It is shown that the miniemulsion process can excellently be used for the formulation of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles which can further be used for biomedical applications. The use of high shear, appropriate surfactants, and the addition of a hydrophobe in order to suppress the influence of Ostwald ripening are key factors for the formation of the small and stable droplets in miniemulsion and will be discussed. Two different approaches based on miniemulsion processes for the encapsulation of magnetite into polymer particles will be presented in detail.

  15. Novel Hyperbranched Polyurethane Brushes for Biomedical Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ton; Loontjens; Bart; Plum

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The objective was to make hyperbranched (HB) polyurethane brushes with reactive end groups, to coat biomedical devices and to enable the introduction of various functionalities that are needed to fulfill biomedical tasks.Biomedical materials should fulfill at least three requirements: (1) good mechanical properties, (2) good biocompatibility and (3) provided with functionalities to perform the required tasks. Since polyurethanes are able to fulfill the first 2 requirements we focused in this w...

  16. Dielectric Elastomers for Fluidic and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoul, David James

    Dielectric elastomers have demonstrated tremendous potential as high-strain electromechanical transducers for a myriad of novel applications across all engineering disciplines. Because their soft, viscoelastic mechanical properties are similar to those of living tissues, dielectric elastomers have garnered a strong foothold in a plethora of biomedical and biomimetic applications. Dielectric elastomers consist of a sheet of stretched rubber, or elastomer, coated on both sides with compliant electrode materials; application of a voltage generates an electrostatic pressure that deforms the elastomer. They can function as soft generators, sensors, or actuators, and this last function is the focus of this dissertation. Many design configurations are possible, such as stacks, minimum energy structures, interpenetrating polymer networks, shape memory dielectric elastomers, and others; dielectric elastomers are already being applied to many fields of biomedicine. The first part of the original research presented in this dissertation details a PDMS microfluidic system paired with a dielectric elastomer stack actuator of anisotropically prestrained VHB(TM) 4910 (3M(TM)) and single-walled carbon nanotubes. These electroactive microfluidic devices demonstrated active increases in microchannel width when 3 and 4 kV were applied. Fluorescence microscopy also indicated an accompanying increase in channel depth with actuation. The cross-sectional area strains at 3 and 4 kV were approximately 2.9% and 7.4%, respectively. The device was then interfaced with a syringe pump, and the pressure was measured upstream. Linear pressure-flow plots were developed, which showed decreasing fluidic resistance with actuation, from 0.192 psi/(microL/min) at 0 kV, to 0.160 and 0.157 psi/(microL/min) at 3 and 4 kV, respectively. This corresponds to an ~18% drop in fluidic resistance at 4 kV. Active de-clogging was tested in situ with the device by introducing ~50 microm diameter PDMS microbeads and

  17. Biomedical Applications of Shape Memory Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Petrini

    2011-01-01

    behaviors, due to the peculiar crystallographic structure of the alloys, assure the recovery of the original shape even after large deformations and the maintenance of a constant applied force in correspondence of significant displacements. These properties, joined with good corrosion and bending resistance, biological and magnetic resonance compatibility, explain the large diffusion, in the last 20 years, of SMA in the production of biomedical devices, in particular for mini-invasive techniques. In this paper a detailed review of the main applications of NiTi alloys in dental, orthopedics, vascular, neurological, and surgical fields is presented. In particular for each device the main characteristics and the advantages of using SMA are discussed. Moreover, the paper underlines the opportunities and the room for new ideas able to enlarge the range of SMA applications. However, it is fundamental to remember that the complexity of the material and application requires a strict collaboration between clinicians, engineers, physicists and chemists for defining accurately the problem, finding the best solution in terms of device design and accordingly optimizing the NiTi alloy properties.

  18. TLC/HPTLC in Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, A.; Moheman, A.

    The main objective of this chapter is to encapsulate the applications of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) as used in the analysis of compounds of pharmaceutical importance. The chapter discusses the advantages of using TLC or HPTLC for biomedical applications and summarizes important information on stationary and mobile phases, adopted methodology, sample application, zone detection, and identification and quantification of amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, bile acids, drugs, vitamins, and porphyrins in biological matrices such as blood, urine, feces, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, body tissues, etc. Among the stationary phases, silica gel has been the most preferred layer material in combination of mixed aqueous- organic or multicomponent organic solvent systems as mobile phase. For quantitative determination of analyte in various matrices, densitometry has been more commonly used. According to the literature survey, the interest of chromatographers in using the TLC/HPTLC has been in the following order: drugs > amino acids and proteins > lipids > bile acids > carbohydrates/vitamins > porphyrins.

  19. Doped DLC coatings for biomedical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Písařík, Petr; Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Mikšovský, Jan; Remsa, Jan; Zemek, Josef; Jurek, Karel

    Kladno: CTU Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, 2015 - (Jelínek, M.). s. 19 ISBN 978-80-01-05809-1. [Progressive Biomedical Materials and Technologies 2015. 09.10.2015-10.10.2015, Kladno] Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : biomaterials * doped materials * thin films * diamond like carbon * hydroxyapatite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  20. Radiation formation of hydrogels for biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogels, i.e. materials consisting of a permanent, three-dimensional network of hydrophilic polymers and water filling the space between the polymer chains, have a number of biomedical applications, such as wound care products, dental and ophthalmic materials, drug delivery systems, elements of implants, constituents of hybrid-type organs, as well as stimuli-sensitive systems. Among various methods applied for the production of hydrogels, the radiation technique has many advantages, as a simple, efficient, clean and environment-friendly process. It usually allows to combine the synthesis and sterilization in a single technological step, thus reducing costs and production time. Efficient application and further development of this method requires broadening of the basic knowledge on the underlying radiation chemistry of polymer systems. Some selected aspects of radiation chemistry of polymers in aqueous solution are presented in this work. The experimental techniques used for studying the radiation-induced processes in polymer solutions are described with special emphasizing of determination of radiation yield of crosslinking by various methods. Also, pulse radiolysis method with different detection methods is briefly described. Selected results of our studies concerning the early stages of polymerization of water-soluble monomers are described together with the studies of mechanisms of radiation-induced crosslinking of polymers in aqueous solution. Separate section of the presentation is devoted to the radiation-induced crosslinking and degradation of polyelectrolytes (i.e. poly (poly (acrylic acid), poly (poly (methacrylic acid)) and biologically important polysaccharide, chitosan. Additionally, special attention is paid to the differences between intra- and intermolecular crosslinking. The irradiation method of changing the proportion between these two processes at the expense on intramolecular crosslinking is described. This leads to the synthesis of

  1. Nuclear microprobe applications to biomedical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Microprobe techniques have a remarkable potential in biomedicine once image information on tissue topography, structural organisation and elemental distribution is simultaneously obtained. These micro-analytical techniques can constitute an important tool for studies of the influence of external aggressors in health, such as internalised airborne particulate matter, and in pathological conditions associated to inflammatory processes that may result from endogenous aggressors (e.g., reactive products of metabolism, essential trace elements impairment). The tissue reactivity to exogenous or endogenous toxic substances may involve remodelling of specific cells organisation, such as epithelial layers or basement membranes. The evaluation of the magnitude of tissue remodelling and its progression is of the foremost importance to assess the mechanisms involved. The fate of respired particles in the human respiratory system and the evaluation of skin alterations in haemochromatosis condition (disease characterised by impaired Fe metabolism) will illustrate some of the helpful aspects of NMP in biomedical studies. The chemical characterisation of individual particles in the epithelial regions of trachea and bronchi, the accumulation of toxic elements, such as V, Cr, and Ni, in lung alveoli and their mobilisation to surrounding tissue, to phagocytic cells and to the associated lymphatic tissue will be discussed. Also, the abnormal deposition of Fe and its possible role in skin inflammation an din changes of skin integrity and structure will also be presented

  2. Biochemical imaging of tissues by SIMS for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of optimal surface cleaning techniques by cluster ion beam sputtering, certain applications of SIMS for analyzing cells and tissues have been actively investigated. For this report, we collaborated with bio-medical scientists to study bio-SIMS analyses of skin and cancer tissues for biomedical diagnostics. We pay close attention to the setting up of a routine procedure for preparing tissue specimens and treating the surface before obtaining the bio-SIMS data. Bio-SIMS was used to study two biosystems, skin tissues for understanding the effects of photoaging and colon cancer tissues for insight into the development of new cancer diagnostics for cancer. Time-of-flight SIMS imaging measurements were taken after surface cleaning with cluster ion bombardment by Bin or C60 under varying conditions. The imaging capability of bio-SIMS with a spatial resolution of a few microns combined with principal component analysis reveal biologically meaningful information, but the lack of high molecular weight peaks even with cluster ion bombardment was a problem. This, among other problems, shows that discourse with biologists and medical doctors are critical to glean any meaningful information from SIMS mass spectrometric and imaging data. For SIMS to be accepted as a routine, daily analysis tool in biomedical laboratories, various practical sample handling methodology such as surface matrix treatment, including nano-metal particles and metal coating, in addition to cluster sputtering, should be studied

  3. Biochemical imaging of tissues by SIMS for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Geol; Park, Ji-Won; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Moon, Dae Won; Choi, Won Woo; Li, Kapsok; Chung, Jin Ho

    2008-12-01

    With the development of optimal surface cleaning techniques by cluster ion beam sputtering, certain applications of SIMS for analyzing cells and tissues have been actively investigated. For this report, we collaborated with bio-medical scientists to study bio-SIMS analyses of skin and cancer tissues for biomedical diagnostics. We pay close attention to the setting up of a routine procedure for preparing tissue specimens and treating the surface before obtaining the bio-SIMS data. Bio-SIMS was used to study two biosystems, skin tissues for understanding the effects of photoaging and colon cancer tissues for insight into the development of new cancer diagnostics for cancer. Time-of-flight SIMS imaging measurements were taken after surface cleaning with cluster ion bombardment by Bi n or C 60 under varying conditions. The imaging capability of bio-SIMS with a spatial resolution of a few microns combined with principal component analysis reveal biologically meaningful information, but the lack of high molecular weight peaks even with cluster ion bombardment was a problem. This, among other problems, shows that discourse with biologists and medical doctors are critical to glean any meaningful information from SIMS mass spectrometric and imaging data. For SIMS to be accepted as a routine, daily analysis tool in biomedical laboratories, various practical sample handling methodology such as surface matrix treatment, including nano-metal particles and metal coating, in addition to cluster sputtering, should be studied.

  4. Biochemical imaging of tissues by SIMS for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Geol; Park, Ji-Won; Shon, Hyun Kyong [Nanobio Fusion Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Dae Won [Nanobio Fusion Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: dwmoon@kriss.re.kr; Choi, Won Woo; Li, Kapsok; Chung, Jin Ho [Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    With the development of optimal surface cleaning techniques by cluster ion beam sputtering, certain applications of SIMS for analyzing cells and tissues have been actively investigated. For this report, we collaborated with bio-medical scientists to study bio-SIMS analyses of skin and cancer tissues for biomedical diagnostics. We pay close attention to the setting up of a routine procedure for preparing tissue specimens and treating the surface before obtaining the bio-SIMS data. Bio-SIMS was used to study two biosystems, skin tissues for understanding the effects of photoaging and colon cancer tissues for insight into the development of new cancer diagnostics for cancer. Time-of-flight SIMS imaging measurements were taken after surface cleaning with cluster ion bombardment by Bi{sub n} or C{sub 60} under varying conditions. The imaging capability of bio-SIMS with a spatial resolution of a few microns combined with principal component analysis reveal biologically meaningful information, but the lack of high molecular weight peaks even with cluster ion bombardment was a problem. This, among other problems, shows that discourse with biologists and medical doctors are critical to glean any meaningful information from SIMS mass spectrometric and imaging data. For SIMS to be accepted as a routine, daily analysis tool in biomedical laboratories, various practical sample handling methodology such as surface matrix treatment, including nano-metal particles and metal coating, in addition to cluster sputtering, should be studied.

  5. Biomedical applications of SPION@APTES@PEG-folic acid@carboxylated quercetin nanodrug on various cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akal, Z. Ü.; Alpsoy, L.; Baykal, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, carboxylated quercetin (CQ) was conjugated to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) which were modified by (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES), Folic acid (FA) and carboxylated Polyethylene glycol (PEG); (SPION@APTES@FA-PEG@CQ), nanodrug has been synthesized via polyol and accompanying by various chemical synthesis routes. The characterization of the final product was done via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), Transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM) and Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Its cytotoxic and apoptotic activities on over expressed folic acid receptor (FR +) (MCF-7, HeLa) and none expressed folic acid receptor (FR-) (A549) cancer cell lines were determined by using MTT assay, Real-Time Cell Analysis, TUNEL assay, Annexin assay and RT-PCR analysis for Caspase3/7 respectively. SPION@APTES@FA-PEG@CQ nanodrug showed higher cytotoxicity against HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines as compared with A549 cell line. Moreover, SPION@APTES@FA-PEG@CQ nanodrug also caused higher apoptotic and necrotic effects in 100 μg/mL HeLa and MCF-7 cells than A549 cells. The findings showed that SPION@APTES@FA-PEG@CQ nanodrug has cytotoxic, apoptotic and necrotic effects on HeLa and MCF-7 which are FR over expressed cell lines and can be potentially used for the delivery of quercetin to cervical and breast cancer cells.

  6. Guided self-assembly of magnetic beads for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gusenbauer, Markus; Reichel, Franz; Exl, Lukas; Bance, Simon; Fischbacher, Johann; Özelt, Harald; Kovacs, Alexander; Brandl, Martin; Schrefl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Micromagnetic beads are widely used in biomedical applications for cell separation, drug delivery, and hypothermia cancer treatment. Here we propose to use self-organized magnetic bead structures which accumulate on fixed magnetic seeding points to isolate circulating tumor cells. The analysis of circulating tumor cells is an emerging tool for cancer biology research and clinical cancer management including the detection, diagnosis and monitoring of cancer. Microfluidic chips for isolating circulating tumor cells use either affinity, size or density capturing methods. We combine multiphysics simulation techniques to understand the microscopic behavior of magnetic beads interacting with Nickel accumulation points used in lab-on-chip technologies. Our proposed chip technology offers the possibility to combine affinity and size capturing with special antibody-coated bead arrangements using a magnetic gradient field created by Neodymium Iron Boron permanent magnets. The multiscale simulation environment combines ...

  7. Laser-based nanoengineering of surface topographies for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlie, Sabrina; Fadeeva, Elena; Koroleva, Anastasia; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Koch, Jürgen; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Chichkov, Boris. N.

    2011-04-01

    In this study femtosecond laser systems were used for nanoengineering of special surface topographies in silicon and titanium. Besides the control of feature sizes, we demonstrated that laser structuring caused changes in material wettability due to a reduced surface contact area. These laser-engineered topographies were tested for their capability to control cellular behavior of human fibroblasts, SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, and MG-63 osteoblasts. We found that fibroblasts reduced cell growth on the structures, while the other cell types proliferated at the same rate. These findings make laser-surface structuring very attractive for biomedical applications. Finally, to explain the results the correlation between topography and the biophysics of cellular adhesion, which is the key step of selective cell control, is discussed.

  8. Wireless RF communication in biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on wireless transcutaneous RF communication in biomedical applications. It discusses current technology, restrictions and applications and also illustrates possible future developments. It focuses on the application in biotelemetry where the system consists of a transmitter and a receiver with a transmission link in between. The transmitted information can either be a biopotential or a nonelectric value like arterial pressure, respiration, body temperature or pH value. In this paper the use of radio-frequency (RF) communication and identification for those applications is described. Basically, radio-frequency identification or RFID is a technology that is analogous to the working principle of magnetic barcode systems. Unlike magnetic barcodes, passive RFID can be used in extreme climatic conditions—also the tags do not need to be within close proximity of the reader. Our proposed solution is to exploit an exciting new development in making circuits on polymers without the need for battery power. This solution exploits the principle of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device on a polymer substrate. The SAW device is a set of interdigitated conducting fingers on the polymer substrate. If an appropriate RF signal is sent to the device, the fingers act as microantennas that pick up the signal, and this energy is then converted into acoustic waves that travel across the surface of the polymer substrate. Being a flexible polymer, the acoustic waves cause stresses that can either contract or stretch the material. In our case we mainly focus on an RF controllable microvalve that could ultimately be used for fertility control

  9. Some biomedical applications of chitosan-based hybrid nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Being naturally abundant resources and having many interesting physicochemical and biological properties, chitin/chitosan have been found to be useful in many fields, especially biomedical ones. This paper describes the strategy to design multifunctional, hybrid chitosan-based nanomaterials and test them in some typical biomedical applications

  10. Zeolite inorganic scaffolds for novel biomedical application: Effect of physicochemical characteristic of zeolite membranes on cell adhesion and viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavolaro, Palmira; Catalano, Silvia; Martino, Guglielmo; Tavolaro, Adalgisa

    2016-09-01

    The design, preparation and selection of inorganic materials useful as functional scaffolds for cell adhesion is a complex question based both on the understanding of the chemical behavior of the materials and individual cells, and on their interactions. Pure zeolite membranes formed from synthetic crystals offer chemically-capable being modulated silanolic surfaces that are amenable to adhesion and growth of fibroblasts. We report the facile preparation of reusable, very longlasting, biocompatible, easily sterilized synthetic scaffolds in a zeolite membrane configuration, which are very stable in aqueous media (apart from ionic strength and pH values), able to adsorb pollutant species and to confine undesired toxic ions (present in culture media). This may ultimately lead to the development of cell supports for economic antibiotic-free culture media.

  11. Diagnostics and biomedical applications of radiofrequency plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazović, Saša

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we present spatial profiles of ion and atomic oxygen concentrations in a large scale cylindrical 13.56 MHz capacitively coupled plasma low pressure reactor suitable for indirect biomedical applications (like treatment of textile to increase antibacterial properties) and direct (treatment of seeds of rare and protected species). Such reactor can easily be used for the sterilization of medical instruments by removing bacteria, spores, prions and fungi as well. We also discuss electrical properties of the system based on the signals obtained by the derivative probes and show the light emission profiles close to the sample platform. In the case of seeds treatment, the desired effect is to plasma etch the outer shell of the seed which will lead to the easier nutrition and therefore increase of the germination. In the case of textile treatment the functionalization is done by bounding atomic oxygen to the surface. It appears that antibacterial properties of the textile are increased by incorporating nanoparticles to the fibres which can successfully be done after the plasma treatment. From these two examples it is obvious that the balance of ion and atomic oxygen concentrations as well as proper choice of ion energy and power delivered to the plasma direct the nature of the plasma treatment.

  12. Inorganic Janus particles for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Schick

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on recent developments regarding the synthesis and design of Janus nanoparticles, they have attracted increased scientific interest due to their outstanding properties. There are several combinations of multicomponent hetero-nanostructures including either purely organic or inorganic, as well as composite organic–inorganic compounds. Janus particles are interconnected by solid state interfaces and, therefore, are distinguished by two physically or chemically distinct surfaces. They may be, for instance, hydrophilic on one side and hydrophobic on the other, thus, creating giant amphiphiles revealing the endeavor of self-assembly. Novel optical, electronic, magnetic, and superficial properties emerge in inorganic Janus particles from their dimensions and unique morphology at the nanoscale. As a result, inorganic Janus nanoparticles are highly versatile nanomaterials with great potential in different scientific and technological fields. In this paper, we highlight some advances in the synthesis of inorganic Janus nanoparticles, focusing on the heterogeneous nucleation technique and characteristics of the resulting high quality nanoparticles. The properties emphasized in this review range from the monodispersity and size-tunability and, therefore, precise control over size-dependent features, to the biomedical application as theranostic agents. Hence, we show their optical properties based on plasmonic resonance, the two-photon activity, the magnetic properties, as well as their biocompatibility and interaction with human blood serum.

  13. Stimuli responsive magnetic nanogels for biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanogels based on magnetite nanoparticles sterically stabilized by double layer oleic acid in water carrier and chemically cross linked poly (N-isopropylacril amide) (pNIPA) and poly (acrylic acid) (pAAc). In this structure the magnetite nanoparticles are attached to the flexible network chain by adhesive forces, resulting in a direct coupling between magnetic and elastic properties. Stable water suspensions of dual responsive magnetic nanogels based on temperature-responsive N-isopropyl acryl amide, pH responsive acrylic acid were obtained. The FTIR spectra of p(NIPA-AAc) ferrogel samples, showed the absorption region of the specific chemical groups associated with pNIPA, pAAc and the Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles. The morphology and the structure of the as prepared materials were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the size distribution was determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic microgels have high magnetization and superparamagnetic behaviour being suitable materials for biomedical application

  14. Diagnostics and biomedical applications of radiofrequency plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present spatial profiles of ion and atomic oxygen concentrations in a large scale cylindrical 13.56 MHz capacitively coupled plasma low pressure reactor suitable for indirect biomedical applications (like treatment of textile to increase antibacterial properties) and direct (treatment of seeds of rare and protected species). Such reactor can easily be used for the sterilization of medical instruments by removing bacteria, spores, prions and fungi as well. We also discuss electrical properties of the system based on the signals obtained by the derivative probes and show the light emission profiles close to the sample platform. In the case of seeds treatment, the desired effect is to plasma etch the outer shell of the seed which will lead to the easier nutrition and therefore increase of the germination. In the case of textile treatment the functionalization is done by bounding atomic oxygen to the surface. It appears that antibacterial properties of the textile are increased by incorporating nanoparticles to the fibres which can successfully be done after the plasma treatment. From these two examples it is obvious that the balance of ion and atomic oxygen concentrations as well as proper choice of ion energy and power delivered to the plasma direct the nature of the plasma treatment.

  15. Fluorescent Dye Encapsulated ZnO Particles with Cell-specific Toxicity for Potential use in Biomedical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hua [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Wingett, Denise [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Mountain States Tumor and Medical Research Inst., Boise, ID (United States); Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Feris, Kevin [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Reddy, K. M. [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Turner, Paul [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Layne, Janet [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Hanley, Cory [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Bell, Jason [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Tenne, Dmitri [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Wang, Chong M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Punnoose, Alex [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India)

    2008-07-24

    Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-encapsulated core-shell particles with a nanoscale ZnO finishing layer have been synthesized for the first time as multifunctional “smart” nanostructures for particle tracking and cell imaging using the visible fluorescence emission of the dye or UV fluorescence emission of ZnO, and anti-cancer/antibacterial treatments using the selective toxicity of the nanoscale ZnO outer surface. The chemical phase composition, morphology, size, and the layered core-shell architecture of the particles were characterized using detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometry. Systematic XPS studies after removing nanometer thick layers confirmed the expected layered structure in the order ZnO-SiO2-APTMS-FITC proceeding from the surface to the core of the ~200 nm sized particles. Detailed investigation of the fluorescence properties of these hydrophilic particles in bio-compatible media using fluorescence spectroscopy, flow cytometry and fluorescence confocal microscopy demonstrated that the silica/ZnO outer layer offers considerable protection to the encapsulated dye molecules from photobleaching and quenching due to reactive species such as oxygen in the solvent. These particles showed promise toward cell imaging, for example when the bacterium Escherichia coli was used as a test system, the green fluorescence of the particles allowed confocal microscopy to image the cells. The FITC encapsulated ZnO (FITC-ZnO) particles demonstrated excellent selectivity in preferentially killing Jurkat cancer cells (18% cell viability) without any significant toxicity to normal primary immune cells (75% cell viability) at 60 μg/mL concentrations and inhibited the growth of both gram-positive and gram negative bacteria at concentrations ≥ 250-500 μg/mL (for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, respectively). These results indicate that the

  16. Bio-inspired Aloe vera sponges for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S S; Oliveira, M B; Mano, J F; Reis, R L

    2014-11-01

    Chemical composition and biological properties of Aloe vera (AV), a tropical plant, explain its potential use for cosmetic, nutritional and biomedical applications. AV gel present in AV leaves is rich in several compounds, nutrients and polysaccharides. This work proposes using AV gel complex structure and chemical composition, associated with freeze-drying, to produce sponges. To increase the structures stability in aqueous media, a thin coating of gellan gum (GG), was applied onto AV gel. AV-based sponges showed a heterogeneous porous formation, interconnected pores and good porosity (72-77%). The coating with a GG layer onto AV influenced the stability, swelling behavior and mechanical properties of the resulting sponges. Moreover, sponges provided the sustained release of BSA-FTIC, used as a model protein, over 3 weeks. Also, in vitro cell culture studies evidenced that sponges are not cytotoxic for a mouse fibroblast-like cell line. Therefore, developed AV-based sponges have potential use in biomedical applications. PMID:25129743

  17. Hydrogel coatings for biomedical and biofouling applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ekblad, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Many applications share a substantial and yet unmet need for prediction and control of interactions between surfaces and proteins or living cells. Examples are blood-contacting biomaterials, biosensors, and non-toxic anti-biofouling coatings for ship hulls. The main focus of this thesis work has been the synthesis, characterization and properties of a group of coatings, designed for such applications. Many types of substrates, particularly plastics, were coated directly with ultrathin, hydrop...

  18. Switchable and responsive surfaces and materials for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Johnathan

    2015-01-01

    Surface modification of biomaterials can ultimately determine whether a material is accepted or rejected from the human body, and a responsive surface can further make the material ""smart"" and ""intelligent"". Switchable and Responsive Surfaces and Materials for Biomedical Applications outlines synthetic and biological materials that are responsive under different stimuli, their surface design and modification techniques, and applicability in regenerative medicine/tissue engineering,  drug delivery, medical devices, and biomedical diagnostics. Part one provides a detailed overview of swit

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Thermal Flow Sensing in Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Baseerat; Ahmed, Suhaib; Kakkar, Vipan

    2016-01-01

    Flow sensors have diverse applications in the field of biomedical engineering and also in industries. Micromachining of flow sensors has accomplished a new goal when it comes to miniaturization. Due to the scaling in dimensions, power consumption, mass cost, sensitivity and integration with other modules such as wireless telemetry has improvised to a great extent. Thermal flow sensors find wide applications in biomedical such as in hydrocephalus shunts and drug delivery systems. Infrared ther...

  20. Derivation of porcine pluripotent stem cells for biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Yow-Ling; Yang, Jenn-Rong; Liao, Yu-Jing; Kuo, Ting-Yung; Liao, Chia-Hsin; Kang, Ching-Hsun; Tai, Chein; Anderson, Gary B; Chen, Lih-Ren

    2016-07-01

    Pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), embryonic germ cells (EGCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are capable of self-renew and limitlessly proliferating in vitro with undifferentiated characteristics. They are able to differentiate in vitro, spontaneously or responding to suitable signals, into cells of all three primary germ layers. Consequently, these pluripotent stem cells will be valuable sources for cell replacement therapy in numerous disorders. However, the promise of human ESCs and EGCs is cramped by the ethical argument about destroying embryos and fetuses for cell line creation. Moreover, there are still carcinogenic risks existing toward the goal of clinical application for human ESCs, EGCs, and iPSCs. Therefore, a suitable animal model for stem cell research will benefit the further development of human stem cell technology. The pigs, on the basis of their similarity in anatomy, immunology, physiology, and biochemical properties, have been wide used as model animals in the study of various human diseases. The development of porcine pluripotent stem cell lines will hold the opportunity to provide an excellent material for human counterpart to the transplantation in biomedical research and further development of cell-based therapeutic strategy. PMID:27158128

  1. Personalized biomedical devices & systems for healthcare applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I.-Ming; Phee, Soo Jay; Luo, Zhiqiang; Lim, Chee Kian

    2011-03-01

    With the advancement in micro- and nanotechnology, electromechanical components and systems are getting smaller and smaller and gradually can be applied to the human as portable, mobile and even wearable devices. Healthcare industry have started to benefit from this technology trend by providing more and more miniature biomedical devices for personalized medical treatments in order to obtain better and more accurate outcome. This article introduces some recent development in non-intrusive and intrusive biomedical devices resulted from the advancement of niche miniature sensors and actuators, namely, wearable biomedical sensors, wearable haptic devices, and ingestible medical capsules. The development of these devices requires carful integration of knowledge and people from many different disciplines like medicine, electronics, mechanics, and design. Furthermore, designing affordable devices and systems to benefit all mankind is a great challenge ahead. The multi-disciplinary nature of the R&D effort in this area provides a new perspective for the future mechanical engineers.

  2. Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies Developed for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The research and development of new electronic-nose applications in the biomedical field has accelerated at a phenomenal rate over the past 25 years. Many innovative e-nose technologies have provided solutions and applications to a wide variety of complex biomedical and healthcare problems. The purposes of this review are to present a comprehensive analysis of past and recent biomedical research findings and developments of electronic-nose sensor technologies, and to identify current and future potential e-nose applications that will continue to advance the effectiveness and efficiency of biomedical treatments and healthcare services for many years. An abundance of electronic-nose applications has been developed for a variety of healthcare sectors including diagnostics, immunology, pathology, patient recovery, pharmacology, physical therapy, physiology, preventative medicine, remote healthcare, and wound and graft healing. Specific biomedical e-nose applications range from uses in biochemical testing, blood-compatibility evaluations, disease diagnoses, and drug delivery to monitoring of metabolic levels, organ dysfunctions, and patient conditions through telemedicine. This paper summarizes the major electronic-nose technologies developed for healthcare and biomedical applications since the late 1980s when electronic aroma detection technologies were first recognized to be potentially useful in providing effective solutions to problems in the healthcare industry.

  3. Bioprinting synthetic self-assembling peptide hydrogels for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Yihua; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a disruptive technology for creating organotypic constructs for high-throughput screening and regenerative medicine. One major challenge is the lack of suitable bioinks. Short synthetic self-assembling peptides are ideal candidates. Several classes of peptides self-assemble into nanofibrous hydrogels resembling the native extracellular matrix. This is a conducive microenvironment for maintaining cell survival and physiological function. Many peptides also demonstrate stimuli-responsive gelation and tuneable mechanical properties, which facilitates extrusion before dispensing and maintains the shape fidelity of the printed construct in aqueous media. The inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability bodes well for in vivo applications as implantable tissues and drug delivery matrices, while their short length and ease of functionalization facilitates synthesis and customization. By applying self-assembling peptide inks to bioprinting, the dynamic complexity of biological tissue can be recreated, thereby advancing current biomedical applications of peptide hydrogel scaffolds. PMID:26694103

  4. Chitosan Microgels and Nanoparticles via Electrofluidodynamic Techniques for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Guarino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrofluidodynamics techniques (EFDTs are emerging methodologies based on liquid atomization induced by electrical forces to obtain a fine suspension of particles from hundreds of micrometers down to nanometer size. As a function of the characteristic size, these particles are interesting for a wide variety of applications, due to the high scalability of chemical and physical properties in comparison to the bulk form. Here, we propose the optimization of EFDT techniques to design chitosan systems in the form of microgels or nanoparticles for several biomedical applications. Different microscopy techniques (Optical, SEM, TEM have been used to investigate the morphology of chitosan systems at multiple size scale. The proposed study confirms the high versatility and feasibility of EFDTs for creating micro and nano-sized carriers for cells and drug species.

  5. Tunable magnetic nanowires for biomedical and harsh environment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yurii P.; Alfadhel, Ahmed; Alnassar, Mohammed; Perez, Jose E.; Vazquez, Manuel; Chuvilin, Andrey; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We have synthesized nanowires with an iron core and an iron oxide (magnetite) shell by a facile low-cost fabrication process. The magnetic properties of the nanowires can be tuned by changing shell thicknesses to yield remarkable new properties and multi-functionality. A multi-domain state at remanence can be obtained, which is an attractive feature for biomedical applications, where a low remanence is desirable. The nanowires can also be encoded with different remanence values. Notably, the oxidation process of single-crystal iron nanowires halts at a shell thickness of 10 nm. The oxide shell of these nanowires acts as a passivation layer, retaining the magnetic properties of the iron core even during high-temperature operations. This property renders these core-shell nanowires attractive materials for application to harsh environments. A cell viability study reveals a high degree of biocompatibility of the core-shell nanowires.

  6. Tunable magnetic nanowires for biomedical and harsh environment applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2016-04-13

    We have synthesized nanowires with an iron core and an iron oxide (magnetite) shell by a facile low-cost fabrication process. The magnetic properties of the nanowires can be tuned by changing shell thicknesses to yield remarkable new properties and multi-functionality. A multi-domain state at remanence can be obtained, which is an attractive feature for biomedical applications, where a low remanence is desirable. The nanowires can also be encoded with different remanence values. Notably, the oxidation process of single-crystal iron nanowires halts at a shell thickness of 10 nm. The oxide shell of these nanowires acts as a passivation layer, retaining the magnetic properties of the iron core even during high-temperature operations. This property renders these core-shell nanowires attractive materials for application to harsh environments. A cell viability study reveals a high degree of biocompatibility of the core-shell nanowires.

  7. Micro and Nano Manipulations for Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yih, Tachung C

    2007-01-01

    Taking bio-device research and development to "the next level," this book covers the latest advances in biomedical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The book presents new developments in the synthesis and use of metallic nanoparticles in bio-sensing and drug delivery, including quantum dots semiconductors nanocrystals.

  8. Natural Polymers and their Application in Drug Delivery and Biomedical Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana S*,1

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable polymers are widely being studied as a potential carrier material for site specific drug delivery because of its non-toxic,biocompatible in nature. Natural polysaccharides have been investigated for drug delivery applications as well as in biomedical fields. Modified polymer has found its application as a support material for gene delivery, cell culture, and tissue engineering. Now a day, the polymer is being modified to obtain novel biomaterial for controlled drug delivery applications. This review provides an overview of the different modified polymer derivatives and their applications with special attention being put on controlled drug delivery and biomedical engineering.

  9. Nanoliter-droplet thermophoresis for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Specific interactions of biomolecules are central to cellular processes, drug discovery and immunodiagnostics. Such biological binding events are quantifiable via thermophoresis, the directed molecule movement driven by a temperature gradient. Biomolecule thermophoresis can be induced by infrared laser heating and analyzed using fluorescence. The objective of this thesis was to enhance and optimize these all-optical measurements, regarding instrumentation, assay design and biomedical applicat...

  10. Light-guide snapshot spectrometer for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Pawlowski, Michal E.; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2016-04-01

    We present a proof-of-principle prototype of a fiber-based snapshot spectrometer to provide high spatial and spectral sampling for biomedical application such as cell signaling or diagnostics. An image is collected by a custom fiber bundle and then divided into spatial groups with spaces in between for dispersion. The image is later scaled down by an image taper (to scale down the image size and allow smaller optical components), dispersed with a prism and captured by a CCD camera. An interpolation algorithm is used to locate each wavelength and reconstruct the image for each spectral channel. The fiber bundle is fabricated by aligning multi-mode bare fiber ribbons as matrix, gluing together in Teflon molds, laser cutting and polishing. We present preliminary finger occlusion results obtained with the spectrometer where the oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin spectrum could be differentiated.

  11. Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Xiaoxia; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications: Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction presents the necessary algorithms needed to assist screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and these algorithms will play a critical role in the accurate detection of abnormalities present in biomedical imaging. Terahertz biomedical imaging has become an area of interest due to its ability to simultaneously acquire both image and spectral information. Terahertz imaging systems are being commercialized with an increasing number of trials performed in a biomedical setting. Terahertz tomographic imaging and detection technology contributes to the ability to identify opaque objects with clear boundaries,and would be useful to both in vivo and ex vivo environments. This book also: Introduces terahertz radiation techniques and provides a number of topical examples of signal and image processing, as well as machine learning Presents the most recent developments in an emerging field, terahertz radiation Utilizes new methods...

  12. Recent progress in biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been proposed for biomedical applications for several years. Various research groups worldwide have focused on improving their synthesis, their characterization techniques and the specific tailoring of their properties. Yet, it is the recent, impressive advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology which caused the breakthrough in their successful application in biomedicine. This paper aims at reviewing some current biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles as well as some recent patents in this field. Special emphasis is placed on i) hyperthermia, ii) therapeutics iii) diagnostics. Future prospects are also discussed. © 2010 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

  13. Biomedical applications of radiation technology in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Pardo, Ma. Esther; Vera-Graziano, R.; Ramos-Duron, L. E

    1998-06-01

    Mexican Health Institutions continuously require suitable medical grade prosthetic materials for reconstructive and plastic surgery. In particular, the requirements of polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS, for soft tissue replacements are rapidly growing. In addition to molecular weight, the properties of PDMS in biomedicine strongly depend on its purity, formulation and processing. High energy radiation has been used for both the synthesis of highly pure PDMS, free of catalyst and chemicals, and for sterilization of biomedical products. Here, are discussed the gamma radiation polymerization of different siloxane precursors to obtain PDMS with specific functionality and molecular structure as well as the radiation sterilization of amniotic membranes used as wound dressing.

  14. Biomedical applications of radiation technology in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mexican Health Institutions continuously require suitable medical grade prosthetic materials for reconstructive and plastic surgery. In particular, the requirements of polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS, for soft tissue replacements are rapidly growing. In addition to molecular weight, the properties of PDMS in biomedicine strongly depend on its purity, formulation and processing. High energy radiation has been used for both the synthesis of highly pure PDMS, free of catalyst and chemicals, and for sterilization of biomedical products. Here, are discussed the gamma radiation polymerization of different siloxane precursors to obtain PDMS with specific functionality and molecular structure as well as the radiation sterilization of amniotic membranes used as wound dressing

  15. MODELING MICROBUBBLE DYNAMICS IN BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAHINE Georges L.; HSIAO Chao-Tsung

    2012-01-01

    Controlling mierobubble dynamics to produce desirable biomedical outcomes when and where necessary and avoid deleterious effects requires advanced knowledge,which can be achieved only through a combination of experimental and numerical/analytical techniques.The present communication presents a multi-physics approach to study the dynamics combining viscousinviseid effects,liquid and structure dynamics,and multi bubble interaction.While complex numerical tools are developed and used,the study aims at identifying the key parameters influencing the dynamics,which need to be included in simpler models.

  16. EDITORIAL: Biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, K.

    2002-07-01

    involving the use in-vivo and those involving the use of magnetic particles in-vitro. Obviously for safety reasons the development of in-vitro applications are more accessible. However, and somewhat ironically, the one application currently used on a significant scale involves the use of magnetic particles to produce a distortion in the magnetic field at a given site under examination via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The presence of the particles at a given site can alter the contrast of certain types of cells by several orders of magnitude, making visible objects that were hitherto difficult to image. With the increasing sophistication of pharmaceuticals, the dramatic development of cell manipulation and even DNA sequencing, the possibility of using magnetic nanoparticles to improve the effectiveness of such technologies is obviously appealing. Hence there are proposals for drug delivery systems, particularly for anti-inflammatory agents and also for the use of magnetic separation technologies for rapid DNA sequencing. A further and somewhat surprising application of magnetic nanoparticles lies in the production of controlled heating effects. Each cycle of a hysteresis loop of any magnetic material involves an energy loss proportional to the area of the loop. Hence if magnetic nanoparticles having the required coercivity are remotely positioned at a given site in the body, perhaps the site of a malignancy, then the application of an alternating magnetic field can be used to selectively warm a given area. It has been proposed that this simple physical effect could be used both to destroy cells directly or to induce a modest increase in temperature so as to increase the efficacy of either chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Clearly this area of potential technology is highly novel and offers many exciting possibilities for future developments. The area is relatively young and highly multidisciplinary, requiring a range of scientific knowledge from inorganic chemistry involved

  17. Magnetic Force Microscopy of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Tanya M.

    In recent years, both synthetic as well as naturally occurring superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNs) have become increasingly important in biomedicine. For instance, iron deposits in many pathological tissues are known to contain an accumulation of the superparamagnetic protein, ferritin. Additionally, man-made SPNs have found biomedical applications ranging from cell-tagging in vitro to contrast agents for in vivo diagnostic imaging. Despite the widespread use and occurrence of SPNs, detection and characterization of their magnetic properties, especially at the single-particle level and/or in biological samples, remains a challenge. Magnetic signals arising from SPNs can be complicated by factors such as spatial distribution, magnetic anisotropy, particle aggregation and magnetic dipolar interaction, thereby confounding their analysis. Techniques that can detect SPNs at the single particle level are therefore highly desirable. The goal of this thesis was to develop an analytical microscopy technique, namely magnetic force microscopy (MFM), to detect and spatially localize synthetic and natural SPNs for biomedical applications. We aimed to (1) increase MFM sensitivity to detect SPNs at the single-particle level and (2) quantify and spatially localize iron-ligated proteins (ferritin) in vitro and in biological samples using MFM. Two approaches were employed to improve MFM sensitivity. First, we showed how exploitation of magnetic anisotropy could produce a higher, more uniform MFM signal from single SPNs. Second, we showed how an increase in probe magnetic moment increased both the magnitude and range up to which the MFM signal could be detected from a single SPN. We further showed how MFM could enable accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin-apoferritin mixtures. Finally, we demonstrated how MFM could be used to detect iron/ferritin in serum and animal tissue with spatial resolution and sensitivity surpassing that obtained using

  18. Stimuli Responsive Poly(Vinyl Caprolactam Gels for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kummara Madhusudana Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinyl caprolactam (PNVCL is one of the most important thermoresponsive polymers because it is similar to poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide. PNVCL precipitates from aqueous solutions in a physiological temperature range (32–34 °C. The use of PNVCL instead of PNIPAM is considered advantageous because of the assumed lower toxicity of PNVCL. PNVCL copolymer gels are sensitive to external stimuli, such as temperature and pH; which gives them a wide range of biomedical applications and consequently attracts considerable scientific interest. This review focuses on the recent studies on PNVCL-based stimuli responsive three dimensional hydrogels (macro, micro, and nano for biomedical applications. This review also covers the future outlooks of PNVCL-based gels for biomedical applications, particularly in the drug delivery field.

  19. Marine Polysaccharides from Algae with Potential Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Filomena de Jesus Raposo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a current tendency towards bioactive natural products with applications in various industries, such as pharmaceutical, biomedical, cosmetics and food. This has put some emphasis in research on marine organisms, including macroalgae and microalgae, among others. Polysaccharides with marine origin constitute one type of these biochemical compounds that have already proved to have several important properties, such as anticoagulant and/or antithrombotic, immunomodulatory ability, antitumor and cancer preventive, antilipidaemic and hypoglycaemic, antibiotics and anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, making them promising bioactive products and biomaterials with a wide range of applications. Their properties are mainly due to their structure and physicochemical characteristics, which depend on the organism they are produced by. In the biomedical field, the polysaccharides from algae can be used in controlled drug delivery, wound management, and regenerative medicine. This review will focus on the biomedical applications of marine polysaccharides from algae.

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Thermal Flow Sensing in Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Baseerat; Kakkar, Vipan

    2016-01-01

    Flow sensors have diverse applications in the field of biomedical engineering and also in industries. Micromachining of flow sensors has accomplished a new goal when it comes to miniaturization. Due to the scaling in dimensions, power consumption, mass cost, sensitivity and integration with other modules such as wireless telemetry has improvised to a great extent. Thermal flow sensors find wide applications in biomedical such as in hydrocephalus shunts and drug delivery systems. Infrared thermal sensing is used for preclinical diagnosis of breast cancer, for identifying various neurological disorders and for monitoring various muscular movements. In this paper, various modes of thermal flow sensing and transduction methods with respect to different biomedical applications are discussed. Thermal flow sensing is given prime focus because of the simplicity in the design. Finally, a comparison of flow sensing technologies is also presented.

  1. Characterization of Sucrose Thin Films for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Iconaru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sucrose is a natural osmolyte accumulated in the cells of organisms as they adapt to environmental stress. In vitro sucrose increases protein stability and forces partially unfolded structures to refold. Thin films of sucrose (C12H22O11 were deposited on thin cut glass substrates by the thermal evaporation technique (P∼10−5 torr. Characteristics of thin films were put into evidence by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and differential thermal analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis (TG/DTA. The experimental results confirm a uniform deposition of an adherent layer. In this paper we present a part of the characteristics of sucrose thin films deposited on glass in medium vacuum conditions, as a part of a culture medium for osteoblast cells. Osteoblast cells were used to determine proliferation, viability, and cytotoxicity interactions with sucrose powder and sucrose thin films. The osteoblast cells have been provided from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC Centre. The outcome of this study demonstrated the effectiveness of sucrose thin films as a possible nontoxic agent for biomedical applications.

  2. Polymeric and Ceramic Nanoparticles in Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura-Ileana Moreno-Vega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials in the nanometer size range may possess unique and beneficial properties, which are very useful for different medical applications including stomatology, pharmacy, and implantology tissue engineering. The application of nanotechnology to medicine, known as nanomedicine, concerns the use of precisely engineered materials at this length scale to develop novel therapeutic and diagnostic modalities. Nanomaterials have unique physicochemical properties, such as small size, large surface area to mass ratio, and high reactivity, which are different from bulk materials of the same composition. Polymeric and ceramic nanoparticles have been extensively studied as particulate carriers in the pharmaceutical and medical fields, because they show promise as drug delivery systems as a result of their controlled- and sustained-release properties, subcellular size, and biocompatibility with tissue and cells. These properties can be used to overcome some of the limitations found in traditional therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Nanotechnology is showing promising developments in many areas and may benefit our health and welfare. However, a wide range of ethical issues has been raised by this innovative science. Many authorities believe that these advancements could lead to irreversible disasters if not limited by ethical guidelines.

  3. Application of nanotechnology in antimicrobial finishing of biomedical textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zille, Andrea; Almeida, Luís; Amorim, Teresa; Carneiro, Noémia; Fátima Esteves, Maria; Silva, Carla J.; Souto, António Pedro

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, the antimicrobial nanofinishing of biomedical textiles has become a very active, high-growth research field, assuming great importance among all available material surface modifications in the textile industry. This review offers the opportunity to update and critically discuss the latest advances and applications in this field. The survey suggests an emerging new paradigm in the production and distribution of nanoparticles for biomedical textile applications based on non-toxic renewable biopolymers such as chitosan, alginate and starch. Moreover, a relationship among metal and metal oxide nanoparticle (NP) size, its concentration on the fabric, and the antimicrobial activity exists, allowing the optimization of antimicrobial functionality.

  4. A flexible organic resistance memory device for wearable biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yimao; Tan, Jing; YeFan, Liu; Lin, Min; Huang, Ru

    2016-07-01

    Parylene is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved material which can be safely used within the human body and it is also offers chemically inert and flexible merits. Here, we present a flexible parylene-based organic resistive random access memory (RRAM) device suitable for wearable biomedical application. The proposed device is fabricated through standard lithography and pattern processes at room temperature, exhibiting the feasibility of integration with CMOS circuits. This organic RRAM device offers a high storage window (>104), superior retention ability and immunity to disturbing. In addition, brilliant mechanical and electrical stabilities of this device are demonstrated when under harsh bending (bending cycle >500, bending radius biomedical applications.

  5. Application of nanotechnology in antimicrobial finishing of biomedical textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, the antimicrobial nanofinishing of biomedical textiles has become a very active, high-growth research field, assuming great importance among all available material surface modifications in the textile industry. This review offers the opportunity to update and critically discuss the latest advances and applications in this field. The survey suggests an emerging new paradigm in the production and distribution of nanoparticles for biomedical textile applications based on non-toxic renewable biopolymers such as chitosan, alginate and starch. Moreover, a relationship among metal and metal oxide nanoparticle (NP) size, its concentration on the fabric, and the antimicrobial activity exists, allowing the optimization of antimicrobial functionality. (topical review)

  6. Synthesis, toxicity, biocompatibility, and biomedical applications of graphene and graphene-related materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurunathan S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sangiliyandi Gurunathan, Jin-Hoi Kim Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea Abstract: Graphene is a two-dimensional atomic crystal, and since its development it has been applied in many novel ways in both research and industry. Graphene possesses unique properties, and it has been used in many applications including sensors, batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, transistors, components of high-strength machinery, and display screens in mobile devices. In the past decade, the biomedical applications of graphene have attracted much interest. Graphene has been reported to have antibacterial, antiplatelet, and anticancer activities. Several salient features of graphene make it a potential candidate for biological and biomedical applications. The synthesis, toxicity, biocompatibility, and biomedical applications of graphene are fundamental issues that require thorough investigation in any kind of applications related to human welfare. Therefore, this review addresses the various methods available for the synthesis of graphene, with special reference to biological synthesis, and highlights the biological applications of graphene with a focus on cancer therapy, drug delivery, bio-imaging, and tissue engineering, together with a brief discussion of the challenges and future perspectives of graphene. We hope to provide a comprehensive review of the latest progress in research on graphene, from synthesis to applications. Keywords: biomedical applications, cancer therapy, drug delivery, graphene, graphene-related materials, tissue engineering, toxicity 

  7. Biomedical applications of diamond-like carbon coatings: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ritwik Kumar; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol

    2007-10-01

    Owing to its superior tribological and mechanical properties with corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, and hemocompatibility, diamond-like carbon (DLC) has emerged as a promising material for biomedical applications. DLC films with various atomic bond structures and compositions are finding places in orthopedic, cardiovascular, and dental applications. Cells grew on to DLC coating without any cytotoxity and inflammation. DLC coatings in orthopedic applications reduced wear, corrosion, and debris formation. DLC coating also reduced thrombogenicity by minimizing the platelet adhesion and activation. However, some contradictory results (Airoldi et al., Am J Cardiol 2004;93:474-477, Taeger et al., Mat-wiss u Werkstofftech 2003;34:1094-1100) were also reported that no significant improvement was observed in the performance of DLC-coated stainless stent or DLC-coated femoral head. This controversy should be discussed based on the detailed information of the coating such as atomic bond structure, composition, and/or electronic structure. In addition, instability of the DLC coating caused by its high level of residual stress and poor adhesion in aqueous environment should be carefully considered. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are thus required to confirm its use for medical devices. PMID:17285609

  8. Biochemical and biomedical applications of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for future medical diagnosis and therapy. Various types of nanoparticles have been extensively studied for numerous biochemical and biomedical applications. Magnetic nanoparticles are well-established nanomaterials that offer controlled size, ability to be manipulated by an external magnetic field, and enhancement of contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. As a result, these nanoparticles could have many applications including bacterial detection, protein purification, enzyme immobilization, contamination decorporation, drug delivery, hyperthermia, etc. All these biochemical and biomedical applications require that these nanoparticles should satisfy some prerequisites including high magnetization, good stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Because of the potential benefits of multimodal functionality in biomedical applications, in this account highlights some general strategies to generate magnetic nanoparticle-based multifunctional nanostructures. After these magnetic nanoparticles are conjugated with proper ligands (e.g., nitrilotriacetate), polymers (e.g., polyacrylic acid, chitosan, temperature- and pH-sensitive polymers), antibodies, enzymes, and inorganic metals (e.g., gold), such biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles exhibit many advantages in biomedical applications. In addition, the multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles have been widely applied in biochemical fields including enzyme immobilization and protein purification.

  9. Antibody-Conjugated Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Arruebo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have found their way into the fields of Biotechnology and Medicine. Nanoparticles by themselves offer specific physicochemical properties that they do not exhibit in bulk form, where materials show constant physical properties regardless of size. Antibodies are nanosize biological products that are part of the specific immune system. In addition to their own properties as pathogens or toxin neutralizers, as well as in the recruitment of immune elements (complement, improving phagocytosis, cytotoxicity antibody dependent by natural killer cells, etc., they could carry several elements (toxins, drugs, fluorochroms, or even nanoparticles, etc. and be used in several diagnostic procedures, or even in therapy to destroy a specific target. The conjugation of antibodies to nanoparticles can generate a product that combines the properties of both. For example, they can combine the small size of nanoparticles and their special thermal, imaging, drug carrier, or magnetic characteristics with the abilities of antibodies, such as specific and selective recognition. The hybrid product will show versatility and specificity. In this review, we analyse both antibodies and nanoparticles, focusing especially on the recent developments for antibody-conjugated nanoparticles, offering the researcher an overview of the different applications and possibilities of these hybrid carriers.

  10. Chitosan: An Update on Potential Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Chi Fai Cheung

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a natural polycationic linear polysaccharide derived from chitin. The low solubility of chitosan in neutral and alkaline solution limits its application. Nevertheless, chemical modification into composites or hydrogels brings to it new functional properties for different applications. Chitosans are recognized as versatile biomaterials because of their non-toxicity, low allergenicity, biocompatibility and biodegradability. This review presents the recent research, trends and prospects in chitosan. Some special pharmaceutical and biomedical applications are also highlighted.

  11. Rapid screening of potential metallic glasses for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C.H. [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, C.H. [Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chuang, J.F. [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, J.C., E-mail: jacobc@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Jang, J.S.C. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Chung-Li, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, C.H. [Department of Orthopedics, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Orthopedics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Orthopedic Research Center, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a rapid screening process to select potential titanium and zirconium based metallic glasses (MGs) for bio-material applications. Electrochemical activity of 7 MGs including 6 bulk metallic glasses and 1 thin-film deposited MG in simulation body and human serum is first inspected. A low-voltage potential state test is also developed to simulate the cell membrane potential that the implant MGs will suffer. Results show that the MGs composed of Ti{sub 65}Si{sub 15}Ta{sub 10}Zr{sub 10} and Ta{sub 57}Zr{sub 23}Cu{sub 12}Ti{sub 8} exhibit excellent electrochemical stability in both simulation body fluid and human serum. In addition, the copper content in the MGs plays an important role on the electrochemical activity. MGs with the copper content higher than 17.5% show significant electrochemical responses. The cytotoxicity of the solid MG samples and the corrosion released ions are also evaluated by an in-vitro MTT test utilizing the murine bone marrow stem cells. Results indicate that all the solid MG samples show no acute cytotoxicity yet the corrosion released ions show significant toxicity for murine bone marrow stem cells. The rapid screening process developed in the present study suggests that the Ti{sub 65}Si{sub 15}Ta{sub 10}Zr{sub 10} metallic glass has high potential for biomedical applications due to its good electrochemical stability and very low cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • A rapid electrochemical cycle screening process is proposed. • This process can select potential metallic glasses for bio-material applications. • The Ti{sub 65}Si{sub 15}Ta{sub 10}Zr{sub 10} metallic glass exhibits the best response and high potential.

  12. Rapid screening of potential metallic glasses for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a rapid screening process to select potential titanium and zirconium based metallic glasses (MGs) for bio-material applications. Electrochemical activity of 7 MGs including 6 bulk metallic glasses and 1 thin-film deposited MG in simulation body and human serum is first inspected. A low-voltage potential state test is also developed to simulate the cell membrane potential that the implant MGs will suffer. Results show that the MGs composed of Ti65Si15Ta10Zr10 and Ta57Zr23Cu12Ti8 exhibit excellent electrochemical stability in both simulation body fluid and human serum. In addition, the copper content in the MGs plays an important role on the electrochemical activity. MGs with the copper content higher than 17.5% show significant electrochemical responses. The cytotoxicity of the solid MG samples and the corrosion released ions are also evaluated by an in-vitro MTT test utilizing the murine bone marrow stem cells. Results indicate that all the solid MG samples show no acute cytotoxicity yet the corrosion released ions show significant toxicity for murine bone marrow stem cells. The rapid screening process developed in the present study suggests that the Ti65Si15Ta10Zr10 metallic glass has high potential for biomedical applications due to its good electrochemical stability and very low cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • A rapid electrochemical cycle screening process is proposed. • This process can select potential metallic glasses for bio-material applications. • The Ti65Si15Ta10Zr10 metallic glass exhibits the best response and high potential

  13. Au coated Ni nanowires with tuneable dimensions for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pondman, K.M.; Maijenburg, A.W.; Celikkol, F.B.; Pathan, A.A.; Kishore, U.D.; Haken, ten B.; Elshof, ten J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Due to their shape anisotropy, high aspect ratio magnetic nanoparticles offer many advantages in biomedical applications. For biocompatibility, it is essential to have full control over the dimensions and surface chemistry of the particles. The aim of this study was to synthesize biocompatible nanow

  14. Bovine tuberculosis research: Immune mechanisms relevant to biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioneer studies on infectious disease and immunology by Jenner, Pasteur, Koch, Von Behring, Nocard, Roux, and Ehrlich forged a path for the dual-purpose with dual benefit approach, clearly demonstrating the relevance of veterinary studies for biomedical applications. Tuberculosis (TB), primarily due...

  15. Recent Advances in Shape Memory Soft Materials for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Benjamin Qi Yu; Low, Zhi Wei Kenny; Heng, Sylvester Jun Wen; Chan, Siew Yin; Owh, Cally; Loh, Xian Jun

    2016-04-27

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart and adaptive materials able to recover their shape through an external stimulus. This functionality, combined with the good biocompatibility of polymers, has garnered much interest for biomedical applications. In this review, we discuss the design considerations critical to the successful integration of SMPs for use in vivo. We also highlight recent work on three classes of SMPs: shape memory polymers and blends, shape memory polymer composites, and shape memory hydrogels. These developments open the possibility of incorporating SMPs into device design, which can lead to vast technological improvements in the biomedical field. PMID:27018814

  16. Micro/Nanostructured Films and Adhesives for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungkyu K; Kang, Sung Min; Yang, Sung Ho; Cho, Woo Kyung

    2015-12-01

    The advanced technologies available for micro/nanofabrication have opened new avenues for interdisciplinary approaches to solve the unmet medical needs of regenerative medicine and biomedical devices. This review highlights the recent developments in micro/nanostructured adhesives and films for biomedical applications, including waterproof seals for wounds or surgery sites, drug delivery, sensing human body signals, and optical imaging of human tissues. We describe in detail the fabrication processes required to prepare the adhesives and films, such as tape-based adhesives, nanofilms, and flexible and stretchable film-based electronic devices. We also discuss their biomedical functions, performance in vitro and in vivo, and the future research needed to improve the current systems. PMID:26510305

  17. Current investigations into magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Wei, Jianrong; Aifantis, Katerina E; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2016-05-01

    It is generally recognized that nanoparticles possess unique physicochemical properties that are largely different from those of conventional materials, specifically the electromagnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). These properties have attracted many researchers to launch investigations into their potential biomedical applications, which have been reviewed in this article. First, common types of MNPs were briefly introduced. Then, the biomedical applications of MNPs were reviewed in seven parts: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cancer therapy, the delivery of drugs and genes, bone and dental repair, tissue engineering, biosensors, and in other aspects, which indicated that MNPs possess great potentials for many kinds of biomedical applications due to their unique properties. Although lots of achievements have been obtained, there is still a lot of work to do. New synthesis techniques and methods are still needed to develop the MNPs with satisfactory biocompatibility. More effective methods need to be exploited to prepare MNPs-based composites with fine microstructures and high biomedical performances. Other promising research points include the development of more appropriate techniques of experiments both in vitro and in vivo to detect and analyze the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of MNPs and understand the possible influencing mechanism of the two properties. More comprehensive investigations into the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of composites containing MNPs with "core-shell" structure and deeper understanding and further study into the properties of MNPs to reveal their new biomedical applications, are also described in the conclusion and perspectives part. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1285-1296, 2016. PMID:26779606

  18. Transferrin-bearing maghemite nano-constructs for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piraux, H.; Hai, J.; Gaudisson, T.; Ammar, S.; Gazeau, F.; El Hage Chahine, J. M.; Hémadi, M.

    2015-05-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in biomedicine for hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imagery. Targeting them to specific cancerous cells is, therefore, of a great value for therapy and diagnostic. Transferrin and its receptor constitute the major iron-acquisition system in human. The former crosses the plasma membrane within a few minutes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Thus, transferrin can be a valuable vector for the delivery of NPs to specific cells and across the blood brain barrier. For such a purpose, three different sizes of maghemite NPs (5, 10, and 15 nm) were synthesized by the polyol method, coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, and coupled to transferrin by amide bonds. The number of transferrins per nanoparticle was determined. Raw nanoparticles and the "transferrin-nanoparticle" constructs were characterized. The magnetic properties and the colloidal stability of raw NPs and transferrin-NP constructs were measured and analyzed in relation to their inorganic core size variation. They all proved to be good candidates for nanoparticle targeting for biomedical application.

  19. Microbial xylanases and their biomedical applications: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish K. Goswami

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Xylanases have a great potential, mainly known for industrial applications. They can hydrolyze the xylose (Hemicellulose of plant cell wall and can be used for bio-bleaching the kraft pulp. As it reduces the requirement of harsh chemicals in the process, it can be used further to a number of bio-products with a great aggregate value. Microbial-origin xylanases can also be used in improving the nutritional quality of animal feed (e.g. food additives to poultry, piggery or fishery and indirectly affect the humans. Additionally they can be used directly in human food in bakery, clarification of juices and in xenobiotics like tobacco processing. The great value of xylanase as a bio-bleaching agent has now a new dimension of fiber digesting agent having relevance to food, drugs and cosmetics act. This review presents some important applications of Xylanases extended up to biomedical sciences. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(3.000: 237-246

  20. Multifunctional Magnetic-fluorescent Nanocomposites for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakovich Yury

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractNanotechnology is a fast-growing area, involving the fabrication and use of nano-sized materials and devices. Various nanocomposite materials play a number of important roles in modern science and technology. Magnetic and fluorescent inorganic nanoparticles are of particular importance due to their broad range of potential applications. It is expected that the combination of magnetic and fluorescent properties in one nanocomposite would enable the engineering of unique multifunctional nanoscale devices, which could be manipulated using external magnetic fields. The aim of this review is to present an overview of bimodal “two-in-one” magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposite materials which combine both magnetic and fluorescent properties in one entity, in particular those with potential applications in biotechnology and nanomedicine. There is a great necessity for the development of these multifunctional nanocomposites, but there are some difficulties and challenges to overcome in their fabrication such as quenching of the fluorescent entity by the magnetic core. Fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites include a variety of materials including silica-based, dye-functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and quantum dots-magnetic nanoparticle composites. The classification and main synthesis strategies, along with approaches for the fabrication of fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites, are considered. The current and potential biomedical uses, including biological imaging, cell tracking, magnetic bioseparation, nanomedicine and bio- and chemo-sensoring, of magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposites are also discussed.

  1. Biomedical Applications Of Interference Reflection Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opas, Michal

    1990-04-01

    The relationship between cell adhesiveness and motility is being studied extensively for its paramount importance in the normal development of an organism and in pathological conditions such as tumour metastasis. Although they have been intensively studied at both the cellular and molecular levels, correlative studies of cell structure and adhesiveness, and the precise determination of cell adhesion to a substratum in living cells have been hampered by the fact that cell adhesion has been very difficult to visualize. Two techniques have emerged recently which have allowed successful visualization of cell adhesion. The most recent one, total internal reflection fluorescence, is technically complicated and thus not widespread and so it will not be dealt with here. The other one is a variant of incident light interferometry of thin layers, known as interference reflection microscopy (IRM).

  2. Development of a novel microwave hyperthermia system for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cañavate Sánchez, María Jesús

    2015-01-01

    [ENG]Microwave technology is now widely used in a variety of medical applications such as cancer treatment and diagnostics. This project describes the structure of a novel hyperthermia system for biomedical research. The software Ansoft HFSS was used to design a rectangular waveguide applicator. A closed-loop is presented in order to control the output power of the system by the temperature measured on the sample. Initial results from experimental testing are presented. In thes...

  3. Biomedical applications of soy protein: A brief overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansaz, Samira; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2016-02-01

    Soy protein (SP) based materials are gaining increasing interest for biomedical applications because of their tailorable biodegradability, abundance, being relatively inexpensive, exhibiting low immunogenicity, and for being structurally similar to components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tissues. Analysis of the available literature indicates that soy protein can be fabricated into different shapes, being relatively easy to be processed by solvent or melt based techniques. Furthermore soy protein can be blended with other synthetic and natural polymers and with inorganic materials to improve the mechanical properties and the bioactive behavior for several demands. This review discusses succinctly the biomedical applications of SP based materials focusing on processing methods, properties and applications highlighting future avenues for research. PMID:26402327

  4. Biocompatible magnetic particles for biomedical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Daniel

    Zagreb : Croatian Institute for Brain Research , 2013. s. 19-20. [EU FP7 Project GlowBrain Workshop "Stem Cell Techniques". 23.05.2013-25.05.2013, Zagreb] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/12/0381 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : nanoparticles * microspheres * magnetic Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  5. Catalytic properties and biomedical applications of cerium oxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Walkey, Carl D.

    2014-11-10

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) have shown promise as catalytic antioxidants in the test tube, cell culture models and animal models of disease. However given the reactivity that is well established at the surface of these nanoparticles, the biological utilization of nanoceria as a therapeutic still poses many challenges. Moreover the form that these particles take in a biological environment, such as the changes that can occur due to a protein corona, are not well established. This review aims to summarize the existing literature on biological use of nanoceria, and to raise questions about what further study is needed to apply this interesting catalytic material to biomedical applications. These questions include: 1) How does preparation, exposure dose, route and experimental model influence the reported effects of nanoceria in animal studies? 2) What are the considerations to develop nanoceria as a therapeutic agent in regards to these parameters? 3) What biological targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are relevant to this targeting, and how do these properties also influence the safety of these nanomaterials?

  6. Marine Derived Polysaccharides for Biomedical Applications: Chemical Modification Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Laurienzo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharide-based biomaterials are an emerging class in several biomedical fields such as tissue regeneration, particularly for cartilage, drug delivery devices and gelentrapment systems for the immobilization of cells. Important properties of the polysaccharides include controllable biological activity, biodegradability, and their ability to form hydrogels. Most of the polysaccharides used derive from natural sources; particularly, alginate and chitin, two polysaccharides which have an extensive history of use in medicine, pharmacy and basic sciences, and can be easily extracted from marine plants (algae kelp and crab shells, respectively. The recent rediscovery of poly-saccharidebased materials is also attributable to new synthetic routes for their chemical modification, with the aim of promoting new biological activities and/or to modify the final properties of the biomaterials for specific purposes. These synthetic strategies also involve the combination of polysaccharides with other polymers. A review of the more recent research in the field of chemical modification of alginate, chitin and its derivative chitosan is presented. Moreover, we report as case studies the results of our recent work concerning various different approaches and applications of polysaccharide-based biomaterials, such as the realization of novel composites based on calcium sulphate blended with alginate and with a chemically modified chitosan, the synthesis of novel alginate-poly(ethylene glycol copolymers and the development of a family of materials based on alginate and acrylic polymers of potential interest as drug delivery systems.

  7. Nanoceria as Antioxidant: Synthesis and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    The therapeutic application of nanomaterials has been a focus of numerous studies in the past decade. Due to its unique redox properties, cerium oxide (ceria) is finding widespread use in the treatment of medical disorders caused by the reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). The radical-scavenging rol...

  8. Development of carboxymethyl cellulose acrylate for various biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Kunal; Banthia, A. K.; Majumdar, D. K.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to prepare a pH-sensitive hydrogel membrane of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose acrylate for drug delivery and other biomedical applications. The hydrogel was made by esterification of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (SCMC) and acryloyl chloride (ACl). The esterified product was characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and XRD. Swelling, hemocompatibility, water vapor transmission rate, contact angle and diffusional studies were also done. Biocompatibility of the membrane was established by quantification of cell growth of L929 cells and mice splenocytes. The FTIR spectrum of the hydrogel suggested the formation of ester bonds between the hydroxyl groups of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and the carbonyl group of acryloyl chloride. Water vapor transmission rate, hemocompatibility, contact angle and swelling studies indicated that the hydrogel can be tried as a wound dressing material. The hydrogel showed pH-dependent swelling behavior arising from the acidic pendant group in the polymer network. The permeability of the hydrogel membrane produced, as shown by salicylic acid diffusion, increased in response to an increase in pH of the external medium. The hydrogel membrane was permeable to salicylic acid at pH 7.2 but not at pH 2.0 (0.01N HCl). The effect of changes of pH on the hydrogel's permeability was found to be reversible. The hydrogel membrane was found to be compatible with the L929 mice fibroblast cell line and mice splenocytes. The esterified product of SCMC and ACl swells on increase of pH indicating its possible use in a pH-sensitive drug delivery system and as a wound dressing material.

  9. Development of carboxymethyl cellulose acrylate for various biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Kunal [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Banthia, A K [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Majumdar, D K [Delhi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, Formerly College of Pharmacy, University of Delhi, Pushp Vihar, Sector III, New Delhi 110017 (India)

    2006-06-15

    The purpose of this work is to prepare a pH-sensitive hydrogel membrane of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose acrylate for drug delivery and other biomedical applications. The hydrogel was made by esterification of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (SCMC) and acryloyl chloride (ACl). The esterified product was characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and XRD. Swelling, hemocompatibility, water vapor transmission rate, contact angle and diffusional studies were also done. Biocompatibility of the membrane was established by quantification of cell growth of L929 cells and mice splenocytes. The FTIR spectrum of the hydrogel suggested the formation of ester bonds between the hydroxyl groups of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and the carbonyl group of acryloyl chloride. Water vapor transmission rate, hemocompatibility, contact angle and swelling studies indicated that the hydrogel can be tried as a wound dressing material. The hydrogel showed pH-dependent swelling behavior arising from the acidic pendant group in the polymer network. The permeability of the hydrogel membrane produced, as shown by salicylic acid diffusion, increased in response to an increase in pH of the external medium. The hydrogel membrane was permeable to salicylic acid at pH 7.2 but not at pH 2.0 (0.01N HCl). The effect of changes of pH on the hydrogel's permeability was found to be reversible. The hydrogel membrane was found to be compatible with the L929 mice fibroblast cell line and mice splenocytes. The esterified product of SCMC and ACl swells on increase of pH indicating its possible use in a pH-sensitive drug delivery system and as a wound dressing material.

  10. Development of carboxymethyl cellulose acrylate for various biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to prepare a pH-sensitive hydrogel membrane of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose acrylate for drug delivery and other biomedical applications. The hydrogel was made by esterification of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (SCMC) and acryloyl chloride (ACl). The esterified product was characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and XRD. Swelling, hemocompatibility, water vapor transmission rate, contact angle and diffusional studies were also done. Biocompatibility of the membrane was established by quantification of cell growth of L929 cells and mice splenocytes. The FTIR spectrum of the hydrogel suggested the formation of ester bonds between the hydroxyl groups of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and the carbonyl group of acryloyl chloride. Water vapor transmission rate, hemocompatibility, contact angle and swelling studies indicated that the hydrogel can be tried as a wound dressing material. The hydrogel showed pH-dependent swelling behavior arising from the acidic pendant group in the polymer network. The permeability of the hydrogel membrane produced, as shown by salicylic acid diffusion, increased in response to an increase in pH of the external medium. The hydrogel membrane was permeable to salicylic acid at pH 7.2 but not at pH 2.0 (0.01N HCl). The effect of changes of pH on the hydrogel's permeability was found to be reversible. The hydrogel membrane was found to be compatible with the L929 mice fibroblast cell line and mice splenocytes. The esterified product of SCMC and ACl swells on increase of pH indicating its possible use in a pH-sensitive drug delivery system and as a wound dressing material

  11. Fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chekina, Nataliya; Horák, Daniel; Jendelová, Pavla; Trchová, Miroslava; Beneš, Milan J.; Hrubý, Martin; Herynek, V.; Turnovcová, Karolína; Syková, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 21 (2011), s. 7630-7639. ISSN 0959-9428 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E09109; GA ČR GA203/09/1242; GA AV ČR KAN201110651; GA AV ČR KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : magnetic * fluorescent * stem cells Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.968, year: 2011

  12. Biomedical tritium applications with AMS detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are numerous applications for tritium (3 H) as a tracer isotope in biomedicine commonly combined with liquid scintillation counting method. The use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a rather new detection method will, enlarge and open new possibilities for tritium applications in biomedicine, especially when sample volumes are small. The tritium in the samples has to be transformed to solid form, which yields a high output of negative hydrogen ion current. The sample preparation is done in two steps: firstly extracting water from the biological sample and secondly, extracting hydrogen/tritium from the water and forming a chemically suitable compound for the AMS ion source. In this paper a chemical for the sample preparation is described. The results of the first measurements of tritiated water with known activity using the AMS detection technique will also be presented.(authors)

  13. Fluorinated nanofibers for potential biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Saner, Burcu

    2007-01-01

    The application of supercritical carbon dioxide has been attracting more attention in the synthesis of biodegradable polymers. Highly pure products without residues can be recovered after the polymerization in supercritical carbon dioxide. In the present work, three types of block poly(L-lactide-co-s-caprolactone), with a central fluorinated segment and polylactide/polycaprolactone side chains were synthesized by sequential ring-opening polymerization in supercritical carbon dioxide. Perfl...

  14. Computational modeling of nanomaterials for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials, i.e., materials that are manufactured at a very small spatial scale, can possess unique physical and chemical properties and exhibit novel characteristics as compared to the same material without nanoscale features. The reduction of size down to the nanometer scale leads to the abundance of potential applications in different fields of technology. For instance, tailoring the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials for modification of their interaction with a biological envi...

  15. Biomedical applications of PIXE at Fudan University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aspects of the PIXE technique in the Van de Graaff Laboratory of Fudan University are reported. The analytical precision is within 5% when handling with care and within 10% in routine analysis. Some recent applications of PIXE are presented, including the pathogeny analysis of Kashin-Beck's disease and cancer, hair analysis of pregnant women and an unknown primate, and PIXE analysis in DNA study. (author) 69 refs

  16. Mass spectrometry imaging for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jiangjiang; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The development of mass spectrometry imaging technologies is of significant current research interest. Mass spectrometry potentially is capable of providing highly specific information about the distribution of chemical compounds on tissues at highly sensitive levels. The required in-situ analysis for the tissue imaging forced MS analysis being performed off the traditional conditions optimized in pharmaceutical applications with intense sample preparation. This critical review seeks to prese...

  17. Inorganic nanolayers: structure, preparation, and biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifullah B

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bullo Saifullah, Mohd Zobir B HusseinMaterials Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, MalaysiaAbstract: Hydrotalcite-like compounds are two-dimensional inorganic nanolayers also known as clay minerals or anionic clays or layered double hydroxides/layered hydroxy salts, and have emerged as a single type of material with numerous biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, gene delivery, cosmetics, and biosensing. Inorganic nanolayers are promising materials due to their fascinating properties, such as ease of preparation, ability to intercalate different type of anions (inorganic, organic, biomolecules, and even genes, high thermal stability, delivery of intercalated anions in a sustained manner, high biocompatibility, and easy biodegradation. Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science. These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery. They have also been applied in biosensing technology, and most recently in bioimaging science. The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes. In this paper, we review the structure, methods of preparation, and latest advances made by inorganic nanolayers in such biomedical applications as drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging.Keywords: inorganic nanolayers, layered double hydroxides, layered hydroxy salts, drug delivery, biosensors, bioimaging

  18. Stimulus-responsive polymeric nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles with unique properties are regarded as the most promising materials for biomedical applications including drug delivery and in vitro/in vivo imaging.Among them,stimulus-responsive polymeric nanoparticles,usually termed as "intelligent" nanoparticles,could undergo structure,shape,and property changes after being exposed to external signals including pH,temperature,magnetic field,and light,which could be used to modulate the macroscopical behavior of the nanoparticles.This paper reviews the recent progress in stimulus-responsive nanoparticles used for drug delivery and in vitro/in vivo imaging,with an emphasis on double/multiple stimulus-responsive systems and their biomedical applications.

  19. Biomedical Applications of Magnetically Functionalized Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa-Jeong Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanofibers are one-dimensional nanomaterial in fiber form with diameter less than 1 µm and an aspect ratio (length/diameter larger than 100:1. Among the different types of nanoparticle-loaded nanofiber systems, nanofibers loaded with magnetic nanoparticles have gained much attention from biomedical scientists due to a synergistic effect obtained from the unique properties of both the nanofibers and magnetic nanoparticles. These magnetic nanoparticle-encapsulated or -embedded nanofiber systems can be used not only for imaging purposes but also for therapy. In this review, we focused on recent advances in nanofibers loaded with magnetic nanoparticles, their biomedical applications, and future trends in the application of these nanofibers.

  20. Comparative study of acceleration transducers for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchczik, Dariusz; Wyżgolik, Roman; Pietraszek, Stanisław

    2006-10-01

    The results of comparative studies of the metrological parameters of acceleration transducers constructed in Institute of Electronics, Silesian University of Technology is presented in this article. The construction of the transducers is based on commercially available monolithic accelerometers and optimized for biomedical applications. The parameters determined during the tests are similar to the parameters of the monolithic accelerometers declared by their manufacturers. It proofs that both the mechanical and the electronic construction of the transducers are correct.

  1. A CMOS Magnetic Sensor Chip for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Peng

    2012-01-01

    The growing need for point-of-care applications in global health and personalized medicine motivates a significant reduction in the size and cost of present technologies. Current solutions use fluorescent or enzymatic labels with complex optical instrumentation that has proven difficult to miniaturize. Recently, magnetic bead labeling has emerged as an alternative solution enabling portable and low-cost platforms. A compact and robust magnetic label detector for biomedical assays is implem...

  2. A multi-material virtual prototyping system for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, SH; Cheung, HH; Zhu, WK

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a multi-material virtual prototyping (MMVP) system for modelling and digital fabrication of discrete and functionally graded multi-material objects for biomedical applications. The MMVP system consists of a DMMVP module, an FGMVP module, and a virtual reality (VR) simulation module. The DMMVP module is used for design and process planning of discrete multi-material (DMM) objects, while the FGMVP module is for functionally graded multimaterial (FGM) objects. The VR simulat...

  3. Au coated Ni nanowires with tuneable dimensions for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pondman, K.M.; Maijenburg, A.W.; Celikkol, F.B.; Pathan, A A; Kishore, U.D.; Haken, ten, Bennie; Elshof, ten, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Due to their shape anisotropy, high aspect ratio magnetic nanoparticles offer many advantages in biomedical applications. For biocompatibility, it is essential to have full control over the dimensions and surface chemistry of the particles. The aim of this study was to synthesize biocompatible nanowires with tuneable dimensions. This was achieved by electrodeposition of Ni in polycarbonate membranes. To ensure biocompatibility, a continuous gold coating was deposited onto the Ni wires by a ne...

  4. Biomedical applications of functionalized fullerene-based nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Ranga Partha; Conyers, Jodie L.

    2009-01-01

    Ranga Partha, Jodie L ConyersCenter for Translational Injury Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030, USAAbstract: Since their discovery in 1985, fullerenes have been investigated extensively due to their unique physical and chemical properties. In recent years, studies on functionalized fullerenes for various applications in the field of biomedical sciences have seen a significant increase. The ultimate goal is towards employing these functionalized fullere...

  5. Emerging Raman Applications and Techniques in Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    The book presents the latest technological advances in Raman spectroscopy that are presently redrawing the landscape of many fields of biomedical and pharmaceutical R&D. Numerous examples are given to illustrate the application of the new methods and compared with established and related techniques. The book is suitable for both new researchers and practitioners in this area as well as for those familiar with the Raman technique but seeking to keep abreast of the latest dramatic advances in this field.

  6. Recent advances in carbon nanodots: synthesis, properties and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Peng; Han, Kun; Tang, Yuguo; Wang, Bidou; Lin, Tao; Cheng, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Herein, a mini review is presented concerning the most recent research progress of carbon nanodots, which have emerged as one of the most attractive photoluminescent materials. Different synthetic methodologies to achieve advanced functions and better photoluminescence performances are summarized, which are mainly divided into two classes: top-down and bottom-up. The inspiring properties, including photoluminescence emission, chemiluminescence, electrochemical luminescence, peroxidase-like activity and toxicity, are discussed. Moreover, the biomedical applications in biosensing, bioimaging and drug delivery are reviewed.

  7. Numerical modeling in electroporation-based biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pavšelj, Nataša; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Numerous experiments have to be performed before a biomedical application is put to practical use in clinical environment. As a complementary work to in vitro, in vivo and medical experiments, we can use analytical and numerical models to represent, as realistically as possible, real biological phenomena of, in our case, electroporation. In this way we canevaluate different electrical parameters in advance, such as pulse amplitude, duration, number of pulses, or different electrod...

  8. Numerical modeling in electroporation-based biomedical applications:

    OpenAIRE

    Miklavčič, Damijan; Pavšelj, Nataša

    2008-01-01

    Background. Numerous experiments have to be performed before a biomedical application is put to practical use in clinical environment. As a complementary work to in vitro, in vivo and medical experiments, we can use analytical and numerical models to represent, as realistically as possible, real biological phenomena of, in our case, electroporation. In this way we canevaluate different electrical parameters in advance, such as pulse amplitude, duration, number of pulses, or different electrod...

  9. Beyond KERMA - neutron data for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presently, many new applications of fast neutrons are emerging or under development, like dose effects due to cosmic-ray neutrons for airplane crew, fast-neutron cancer therapy, studies of electronic failures induced by cosmic-ray neutrons, and accelerator-driven incineration of nuclear waste and energy production technologies. All these areas would benefit from improved neutron dosimetry. In this paper, the present rapid progress on measurements of double-differential neutron-induced nuclear reaction data are described. With such data at hand, the full response of, in principle, any system, including human tissue, can be calculated in detail. This could potentially revolutionise our understanding of biological effects in tissue due to fast neutrons. (author)

  10. Ultra-wideband and 60 GHz communications for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yuce, Mehmet R

    2013-01-01

    This book investigates the design of devices, systems, and circuits for medical applications using the two recently established frequency bands: ultra-wideband (3.1-10.6 GHz) and 60 GHz ISM band. These two bands provide the largest bandwidths available for communication technologies and present many attractive opportunities for medical applications. The applications of these bands in healthcare are wireless body area network (WBAN), medical imaging, biomedical sensing, wearable and implantable devices, fast medical device connectivity, video data transmission, and vital signs monitoring. The r

  11. Decoration of silk fibroin by click chemistry for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongshi; Heusler, Eva; Jones, Gabriel; Li, Linhao; Werner, Vera; Germershaus, Oliver; Ritzer, Jennifer; Luehmann, Tessa; Meinel, Lorenz

    2014-06-01

    Silkfibroin (SF) has an excellent biocompatibility and its remarkable structure translates into exciting mechanical properties rendering this biomaterial particularly fascinating for biomedical application. To further boost the material's biological/preclinical impact, SF is decorated with biologics, typically by carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide coupling (EDC/NHS). For biomedical application, this chemistry challenges the product risk profile due to the formation of covalent aggregates, particularly when decoration is with biologics occurring naturally in humans as these aggregates may prime for autoimmunity. Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC; click chemistry) provides the necessary specificity to avoid such intermolecular, covalent aggregates. We present a blueprint outlining the necessary chemistry rendering SF compatible with CuAAC and with a particular focus on structural consequences. For that, the number of SF carboxyl groups (carboxyl-SF; required for EDC/NHS chemistry) or azido groups (azido-SF; required for click chemistry) was tailored by means of diazonium coupling of the SF tyrosine residues. Structural impact on SF and decorated SF was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The click chemistry yielded a better controlled product as compared to the EDC/NHS chemistry with no formation of inter- and intramolecular crosslinks as demonstrated for SF decorated with fluorescent model compounds or a biologic, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), respectively. In conclusion, SF can readily be translated into a scaffold compatible with click chemistry yielding decorated products with a better risk profile for biomedical application. PMID:24576682

  12. Metrological reliability of optical coherence tomography in biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goloni, C. M.; Temporão, G. P.; Monteiro, E. C.

    2013-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been proving to be an efficient diagnostics technique for imaging in vivo tissues, an optical biopsy with important perspectives as a diagnostic tool for quantitative characterization of tissue structures. Despite its established clinical use, there is no international standard to address the specific requirements for basic safety and essential performance of OCT devices for biomedical imaging. The present work studies the parameters necessary for conformity assessment of optoelectronics equipment used in biomedical applications like Laser, Intense Pulsed Light (IPL), and OCT, targeting to identify the potential requirements to be considered in the case of a future development of a particular standard for OCT equipment. In addition to some of the particular requirements standards for laser and IPL, also applicable for metrological reliability analysis of OCT equipment, specific parameters for OCT's evaluation have been identified, considering its biomedical application. For each parameter identified, its information on the accompanying documents and/or its measurement has been recommended. Among the parameters for which the measurement requirement was recommended, including the uncertainty evaluation, the following are highlighted: optical radiation output, axial and transverse resolution, pulse duration and interval, and beam divergence.

  13. Metrological reliability of optical coherence tomography in biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been proving to be an efficient diagnostics technique for imaging in vivo tissues, an optical biopsy with important perspectives as a diagnostic tool for quantitative characterization of tissue structures. Despite its established clinical use, there is no international standard to address the specific requirements for basic safety and essential performance of OCT devices for biomedical imaging. The present work studies the parameters necessary for conformity assessment of optoelectronics equipment used in biomedical applications like Laser, Intense Pulsed Light (IPL), and OCT, targeting to identify the potential requirements to be considered in the case of a future development of a particular standard for OCT equipment. In addition to some of the particular requirements standards for laser and IPL, also applicable for metrological reliability analysis of OCT equipment, specific parameters for OCT's evaluation have been identified, considering its biomedical application. For each parameter identified, its information on the accompanying documents and/or its measurement has been recommended. Among the parameters for which the measurement requirement was recommended, including the uncertainty evaluation, the following are highlighted: optical radiation output, axial and transverse resolution, pulse duration and interval, and beam divergence

  14. SURFACE MODIFITED MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yu. Vasyukov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Unique physicochemical properties of nanomaterials arouse a great interest of specialists of various fields. Materials based on nanostructures purchase new mechanical, optical, and electrical properties. Great practical importance is the magnetic properties of materials, structural elements which lie at the nanoscale. Nanomaterials with magnetic properties have been used in drug delivery, magnetic hyperthermia, magnetic separation, and magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic properties of nanoparticles depend on many factors, such as particle size and shape, chemical properties and lattice type. Magnetic characteristics can be changed by the interaction of particles with the surrounding matrix and neighboring particles.Unfortunately, many studies show that a great disadvantage of the unmodified nanoparticles is their non-specific interaction with the cells, which leads to their accumulation outside the target organs, also to­xicity of nanomaterials and their low colloidal stability. Surface modification of nanoparticles can solve this problem. Development of nanostructures based on magnetic nanoparticles and functionalized by biocompatible agents is one of the main targets of nanobiotechnology.

  15. Biomedical applications of single molecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, D. M.

    1997-05-01

    The search for increased sensitivity of bio-analytical techniques has recently shifted from signal generation to detection. While enzyme amplifiers and chemiluminescent reporters developed by chemists over the last two decades gradually moved detection limits to the attomol level, it has taken engineers only a few years to reach single- molecule sensitivity with the development of new instrumentation. A number of different approaches have successfully achieved single-molecule fluorescence detection including confocal and near-field scanning optical microscopy, photon-counting cameras, fluorescence- correlation and time-gated spectroscopy. They detect labels immobilized on substrates, diffusing in solution and flowing in electro-osmotic and hydrodynamically focused streams. Biotechnology has created numerous application s for single- molecule detection. In research labs, it can dramatically increase the rate of DNA sequencing, screen libraries for products of directed evolution, and characterize compounds in drug discovery programs. In medical diagnostics, ultra- sensitive detection technologies can be used for genetic screening, detection of infectious diseases, or multi- analyte profiles. It can be applied to immunoassays as well as DNA or RNA hybridization assays.

  16. Perspectives on the Emerging Applications of Multifaceted Biomedical Polymeric Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mohammed Gumel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable and biocompatible polymeric nanomaterials, serving as biomedical devices have garnered significant attention as a promising solution to therapeutic management of many chronic diseases. Despite their potentials, majority of the synthetic nanomaterials used in biomedical applications lack crucial properties, for example, ligand binding sites, responsiveness, and switchability to efficiently deliver intended drugs to the target site. Advancements in manipulating nanoscale geometry have incurred the incorporation of triggered release mechanism within the nanomaterials design. This expanded their potential applications beyond nanocarriers to theranostics exhibiting both tandem drug delivery and diagnostic capabilities. Additionally, it highlights possibilities to design nanomaterials that could translate chemical response(s to photometric display, thus making affordable biosensors and actuators readily available for biomedical exploitation. It is anticipated that, in the near future, these implementations could be made to access some of the most difficult therapy locations, for example, blood brain barrier to provide efficient management of Alzheimer, Huntington, and other neurodegenerative diseases. This review aims to serve as a reference platform by providing the readers with the overview of the recent advancements and cutting-edge techniques employed in the production and instrumentation of such nanomaterials.

  17. Novel block, graft and random copolymers for biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Tanaka, Masaru;

    Despite the simple structure, poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA) shows excellent blood compatibility [1]. Both the freezing-bound water (intermediate water: preventing the biocomponents from directly contacting the polymer surface) and non-freezing water on the polymer surface play important ro...... copolymers with MMA [4] utilizing ATRP. Here we present other block, graft and random copolymers of MEA intended for biomedical applications. These macromolecular architectures have been constructed by employing controlled radical polymerization methods such as RAFT and ATRP....... roles for this [2]. An artificial lung (oxygenator), already in use, is coated with high MW PMEA prepared by radical polymerization with AIBN [2]. To broaden the possibilities for designing biomedical devices [3] and inspired from these findings we first prepared homo polymers of MEA and their block...

  18. All-optoelectronic continuous wave THz imaging for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an all-optoelectronic THz imaging system for ex vivo biomedical applications based on photomixing of two continuous-wave laser beams using photoconductive antennas. The application of hyperboloidal lenses is discussed. They allow for f-numbers less than 1/2 permitting better focusing and higher spatial resolution compared to off-axis paraboloidal mirrors whose f-numbers for practical reasons must be larger than 1/2. For a specific histological sample, an analysis of image noise is discussed

  19. Layer-by-layer films for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Picart, Catherine; Voegel, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition technique is a versatile approach for preparing nanoscale multimaterial films: the fabrication of multicomposite films by the LbL procedure allows the combination of literally hundreds of different materials with nanometer thickness in a single device to obtain novel or superior performance. In the last 15 years the LbL technique has seen considerable developments and has now reached a point where it is beginning to find applications in bioengineering and biomedical engineering. The book gives a thorough overview of applications of the LbL technique in the c

  20. Economical and green synthesis of bagasse-derived fluorescent carbon dots for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon quantum dots (CDs) are promising nanomaterials in biomedical, photocatalytical and photoelectronic applications. However, determining how to explore an ideal precursor for a renewable carbon resource is still an interesting challenge. Here, for the first time, we report that renewable wastes of bagasse as a new precursor were prepared for fluorescent CDs by a hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process. The characterization results show that such bagasse-derived CDs are monodispersed, contain quasi spherical particles with a diameter of about 1.8 nm and exhibit favorable photoluminescence properties, super-high photostability and good dispersibility in water. Most importantly, bagasse-derived CDs have good biocompatibility and can be easily and quickly internalized by living cancer cells; they can also be used for multicolour biolabeling and bioimaging in cancer cells. It is suggested that bagasse-derived CDs might have potential applications in biomedical and photoelectronic fields. (paper)

  1. Synthesis, toxicity, biocompatibility, and biomedical applications of graphene and graphene-related materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional atomic crystal, and since its development it has been applied in many novel ways in both research and industry. Graphene possesses unique properties, and it has been used in many applications including sensors, batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, transistors, components of high-strength machinery, and display screens in mobile devices. In the past decade, the biomedical applications of graphene have attracted much interest. Graphene has been reported to have antibacterial, antiplatelet, and anticancer activities. Several salient features of graphene make it a potential candidate for biological and biomedical applications. The synthesis, toxicity, biocompatibility, and biomedical applications of graphene are fundamental issues that require thorough investigation in any kind of applications related to human welfare. Therefore, this review addresses the various methods available for the synthesis of graphene, with special reference to biological synthesis, and highlights the biological applications of graphene with a focus on cancer therapy, drug delivery, bio-imaging, and tissue engineering, together with a brief discussion of the challenges and future perspectives of graphene. We hope to provide a comprehensive review of the latest progress in research on graphene, from synthesis to applications.

  2. DoFP polarimeter based polarization microscope for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jintao; He, Honghui; He, Chao; Ma, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Polarization microscope is a useful technique to observe the optical anisotropic nature of biomedical specimens and provide more microstructural information than the conventional microscope. In this paper, we present a division of focal plane (DoFP) polarimeter based polarization microscope which is capable of imaging both the Stokes vector and the 3×4 Mueller matrix. The Mueller matrix measurement can help us completely understand the polarization properties of the sample and the Stokes vector measurement is a simultaneous technology. First, we calibrate a DoFP polarimeter using the polarization data reduction method for accurate Stokes vector measurements. Second, as the Stokes vector computation for all pixels using the calibrated instrument matrix is usually time consuming, we develop a GPU acceleration algorithm for real time Stokes vector calculations. Third, based on the accurate and fast Stokes vector calculation, we present an optimal 4-states of polarization (4-SoP) illumination scheme for Mueller matrix measurement using the DoFP polarimeter. Finally, we demonstrate the biomedical applications of the DoFP polarimeter based polarization microscope. Experiment results show that the characteristic features of many biomedical samples can be observed in the "polarization staining" images using the circularly polarized light as illumination. In this way, combined with GPU acceleration algorithm, the DoFP polarization microscope has the capacity for real time polarization monitoring of dynamic processes in biological samples.

  3. Application of an efficient Bayesian discretization method to biomedical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishnan Vanathi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several data mining methods require data that are discrete, and other methods often perform better with discrete data. We introduce an efficient Bayesian discretization (EBD method for optimal discretization of variables that runs efficiently on high-dimensional biomedical datasets. The EBD method consists of two components, namely, a Bayesian score to evaluate discretizations and a dynamic programming search procedure to efficiently search the space of possible discretizations. We compared the performance of EBD to Fayyad and Irani's (FI discretization method, which is commonly used for discretization. Results On 24 biomedical datasets obtained from high-throughput transcriptomic and proteomic studies, the classification performances of the C4.5 classifier and the naïve Bayes classifier were statistically significantly better when the predictor variables were discretized using EBD over FI. EBD was statistically significantly more stable to the variability of the datasets than FI. However, EBD was less robust, though not statistically significantly so, than FI and produced slightly more complex discretizations than FI. Conclusions On a range of biomedical datasets, a Bayesian discretization method (EBD yielded better classification performance and stability but was less robust than the widely used FI discretization method. The EBD discretization method is easy to implement, permits the incorporation of prior knowledge and belief, and is sufficiently fast for application to high-dimensional data.

  4. Piezoelectric single crystals for ultrasonic transducers in biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qifa; Lam, Kwok Ho; Zheng, Hairong; Qiu, Weibao; Shung, K Kirk

    2014-10-01

    Piezoelectric single crystals, which have excellent piezoelectric properties, have extensively been employed for various sensors and actuators applications. In this paper, the state-of-art in piezoelectric single crystals for ultrasonic transducer applications is reviewed. Firstly, the basic principles and design considerations of piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers will be addressed. Then, the popular piezoelectric single crystals used for ultrasonic transducer applications, including LiNbO3 (LN), PMN-PT and PIN-PMN-PT, will be introduced. After describing the preparation and performance of the single crystals, the recent development of both the single-element and array transducers fabricated using the single crystals will be presented. Finally, various biomedical applications including eye imaging, intravascular imaging, blood flow measurement, photoacoustic imaging, and microbeam applications of the single crystal transducers will be discussed. PMID:25386032

  5. Biomedical text mining and its applications in cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fei; Patumcharoenpol, Preecha; Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Yang; Chan, Jonathan; Meechai, Asawin; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Shen, Bairong

    2013-04-01

    Cancer is a malignant disease that has caused millions of human deaths. Its study has a long history of well over 100years. There have been an enormous number of publications on cancer research. This integrated but unstructured biomedical text is of great value for cancer diagnostics, treatment, and prevention. The immense body and rapid growth of biomedical text on cancer has led to the appearance of a large number of text mining techniques aimed at extracting novel knowledge from scientific text. Biomedical text mining on cancer research is computationally automatic and high-throughput in nature. However, it is error-prone due to the complexity of natural language processing. In this review, we introduce the basic concepts underlying text mining and examine some frequently used algorithms, tools, and data sets, as well as assessing how much these algorithms have been utilized. We then discuss the current state-of-the-art text mining applications in cancer research and we also provide some resources for cancer text mining. With the development of systems biology, researchers tend to understand complex biomedical systems from a systems biology viewpoint. Thus, the full utilization of text mining to facilitate cancer systems biology research is fast becoming a major concern. To address this issue, we describe the general workflow of text mining in cancer systems biology and each phase of the workflow. We hope that this review can (i) provide a useful overview of the current work of this field; (ii) help researchers to choose text mining tools and datasets; and (iii) highlight how to apply text mining to assist cancer systems biology research. PMID:23159498

  6. Recent patents on bacteriocins: food and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmechernene, Zineb; Fernandez-No, Inmaculada; Kihal, Mebrouk; Böhme, Karola; Calo-Mata, Pilar; Barros-Velazquez, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    Most types of bacteria produce bacteriocins, which are proteinaceous extracellular compounds that can inhibit the growth of other undesirable microorganisms. Bacteriocins are receiving increasing attention, due to their many applications, ranging from their initial application in strategies for food preservation to more recent proposed uses in biomedical strategies aimed at fighting certain bacterial infections. Thus, while nisin has a long history of use as a safe additive in certain food products for the purpose of food preservation, certain bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria, which are generally recognised as safe microorganisms, or their extracellular extracts are receiving increased attention as protective cultures or antimicrobial extracts in minimally processed food products. More recently, a number of these bacteriocinproducing cultures have been proposed for use in other applications, such as in probiotics, for the inhibition of biofilms in the food industry, or even as coadjuvants of combined therapeutical strategies along with other antimicrobial agents in biomedical applications. This review aims to provide a brief overview of the most relevant recent patents in this field. PMID:22921084

  7. Polymer-Enriched 3D Graphene Foams for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun Kit; Xiong, Gordon Minru; Zhu, Minmin; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Castro Neto, Antonio Helio; Tan, Nguan Soon; Choong, Cleo

    2015-04-22

    Graphene foams (GFs) are versatile nanoplatforms for biomedical applications because of their excellent physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. However, the brittleness and inflexibility of pristine GF (pGF) are some of the important factors restricting their widespread application. Here, a chemical-vapor-deposition-assisted method was used to synthesize 3D GFs, which were subsequently spin-coated with polymer to produce polymer-enriched 3D GFs with high conductivity and flexibility. Compared to pGF, both poly(vinylidene fluoride)-enriched GF (PVDF/GF) and polycaprolactone-enriched GF (PCL/GF) scaffolds showed improved flexibility and handleability. Despite the presence of the polymers, the polymer-enriched 3D GF scaffolds retained high levels of electrical conductivity because of the presence of microcracks that allowed for the flow of electrons through the material. In addition, polymer enrichment of GF led to an enhancement in the formation of calcium phosphate (Ca-P) compounds when the scaffolds were exposed to simulated body fluid. Between the two polymers tested, PCL enrichment of GF resulted in a higher in vitro mineralization nucleation rate because the oxygen-containing functional group of PCL had a higher affinity for Ca-P deposition and formation compared to the polar carbon-fluorine (C-F) bond in PVDF. Taken together, our current findings are a stepping stone toward future applications of polymer-enriched 3D GFs in the treatment of bone defects as well as other biomedical applications. PMID:25822669

  8. Orthogonal analysis of functional gold nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, De-Hao; Lu, Yi-Fu; DelRio, Frank W; Cho, Tae Joon; Guha, Suvajyoti; Zachariah, Michael R; Zhang, Fan; Allen, Andrew; Hackley, Vincent A

    2015-11-01

    We report a comprehensive strategy based on implementation of orthogonal measurement techniques to provide critical and verifiable material characteristics for functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) used in biomedical applications. Samples were analyzed before and after ≈50 months of cold storage (≈4 °C). Biomedical applications require long-term storage at cold temperatures, which could have an impact on AuNP therapeutics. Thiolated polyethylene glycol (SH-PEG)-conjugated AuNPs with different terminal groups (methyl-, carboxylic-, and amine-) were chosen as a model system due to their high relevancy in biomedical applications. Electrospray-differential mobility analysis, asymmetric-flow field flow fractionation, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and small-angle X-ray scattering were employed to provide both complementary and orthogonal information on (1) particle size and size distribution, (2) particle concentrations, (3) molecular conjugation properties (i.e., conformation and surface packing density), and (4) colloidal stability. Results show that SH-PEGs were conjugated on the surface of AuNPs to form a brush-like polymer corona. The surface packing density of SH-PEG was ≈0.42 nm(-2) for the methyl-PEG-SH AuNPs, ≈0.26 nm(-2) for the amine-SH-PEG AuNPs, and ≈0.18 nm(-2) for the carboxylic-PEG-SH AuNPs before cold storage, approximately 10 % of its theoretical maximum value. The conformation of surface-bound SH-PEGs was then estimated to be in an intermediate state between brush-like and random-coiled, based on the measured thicknesses in liquid and in dry states. By analyzing the change in particle size distribution and number concentration in suspension following cold storage, the long term colloidal stability of AuNPs was shown to be significantly improved via functionalization with SH-PEG, especially in the case of methyl-PEG-SH and carboxylic

  9. Lab-on-a-chip techniques, circuits, and biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghallab, Yehya H

    2010-01-01

    Here's a groundbreaking book that introduces and discusses the important aspects of lab-on-a-chip, including the practical techniques, circuits, microsystems, and key applications in the biomedical, biology, and life science fields. Moreover, this volume covers ongoing research in lab-on-a-chip integration and electric field imaging. Presented in a clear and logical manner, the book provides you with the fundamental underpinnings of lab-on-a-chip, presents practical results, and brings you up to date with state-of-the-art research in the field. This unique resource is supported with over 160 i

  10. Nonlinear aspects of acoustic radiation force in biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrovsky, Lev, E-mail: Lev.A.Ostrovsky@noaa.gov [NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Tsyuryupa, Sergey; Sarvazyan, Armen, E-mail: armen@artannlabs.com [Artann Laboratories, Inc., 1459 Lower Ferry Rd., West Trenton, New Jersey,08618 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    In the past decade acoustic radiation force (ARF) became a powerful tool in numerous biomedical applications. ARF from a focused ultrasound beam acts as a virtual “finger” for remote probing of internal anatomical structures and obtaining diagnostic information. This presentation deals with generation of shear waves by nonlinear focused beams. Albeit the ARF has intrinsically nonlinear origin, in most cases the primary ultrasonic wave was considered in the linear approximation. In this presentation, we consider the effects of nonlinearly distorted beams on generation of shear waves by such beams.

  11. Polymers in life sciences: Pharmaceutical and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Anna Angela; Dalmoro, Annalisa; d'Amore, Matteo; Lamberti, Gaetano; Cascone, Sara; Titomanlio, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the work done by prof. Titomanlio and his group in the fields of pharmaceutical and biomedical applications of polymers. In particular, the main topics covered are: i) controlled drug release from pharmaceuticals based on hydrogel for oral delivery of drugs; ii) production and characterization of micro and nanoparticles based on stimuli-responsive polymers; iii) use of polymers for coronary stent gel-paving; iv) design and realization of novel methods (in-vitro and in-silico) to test polymer-based pharmaceuticals.

  12. Applications of ionizing radiation processing in biomedical engineering and microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applied radiation chemistry has made great contributions to the development of polymeric industrial materials by the characteristic reaction means such as corsslinking, graft copolymerization and low-temperature or solid-phase polymerization, and become an important field on peaceful use of atomic energy. A brief review on the applications of ionizing radiation processing in biomedical engineering and microelectronics is presented. The examples of this techique were the studies on biocompatible and biofunctional polymers for medical use and on resists of lithography in microelectronics. (author)

  13. Tribocorrosion of Diamond Like Carbon (DLC) coatings for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez Adam, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Tribocorrosion has arisen as one of the most important material degradation processes in biomedical applications; thus, the improvement of the materials used in hip or knee prosthesis is very relevant. The aim of this project is to test the outstanding properties of the diamond like carbon material as a coating; a comparison between CoCrMo with several types of DLC as ta-C, a-C:H and metal doped with Ti and Si. Also different deposition methods will be compared like Physical Vapour Deposit...

  14. Advanced Nanomaterials in Multimodal Imaging: Design, Functionalization, and Biomedical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biomedical applications of nanoparticles in molecular imaging, drug delivery, and therapy give rise to the term nanomedicine and have led to ever-growing developments in the past decades. New generation of imaging probes (or contrast agents) and state of the art of various strategies for efficient multimodal molecular imaging have drawn much attention and led to successful preclinical uses. In this context, we intend to elucidate the fundamentals and review recent advances as well as to provide an outlook perspective in these fields.

  15. A Compact, High Performance Atomic Magnetometer for Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Vishal K

    2013-01-01

    We present a highly sensitive room-temperature atomic magnetometer (AM), designed for use in biomedical applications. The magnetometer sensor head is only 2x2x5 cm^3 and it is constructed using readily available, low-cost optical components. The magnetic field resolution of the AM is <10 fT/sqrt(Hz), which is comparable to cryogenically cooled superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. We present side-by-side comparisons between our AM and a SQUID magnetometer, and show that equally high quality magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) recordings can be obtained using our AM.

  16. Nonlinear aspects of acoustic radiation force in biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past decade acoustic radiation force (ARF) became a powerful tool in numerous biomedical applications. ARF from a focused ultrasound beam acts as a virtual “finger” for remote probing of internal anatomical structures and obtaining diagnostic information. This presentation deals with generation of shear waves by nonlinear focused beams. Albeit the ARF has intrinsically nonlinear origin, in most cases the primary ultrasonic wave was considered in the linear approximation. In this presentation, we consider the effects of nonlinearly distorted beams on generation of shear waves by such beams

  17. Biomedical Applications of Mulberry Silk and its Proteins: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivedita, S.; Sivaprasad, V.

    2014-04-01

    Silk is a natural fibre used mainly for aesthetic purposes. It has also been used for making surgical sutures for centuries. The recent rediscovery of silk's biological properties have led to new areas of research and utilization in cosmetic, health and medical fields. The silk proteins, fibroin and sericin are processed into biomaterials because of bio-compatibility, bio-degradability, excellent mechanical properties, thermo tolerance and UV protective properties. Silk proteins could be obtained as pure liquids and regenerated in different forms suitable for tissue engineering applications. This paper presents some of the biomedical products and biomaterials made from native, degraded and regenerated silk and their fabrication techniques.

  18. Biomedical technical transfer. Applications of NASA science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Lower body negative pressure testing in cardiac patients has been completed as well as the design and construction of a new leg negative unit for evaluating heart patients. This technology is based on NASA research, using vacuum chambers to stress the cardiovascular system during space flight. Additional laboratory tests of an intracranial pressure transducer, have been conducted. Three new biomedical problems to which NASA technology is applicable are also identified. These are: a communication device for the speech impaired, the NASA development liquid-cooled garment, and miniature force transducers for heart research.

  19. Biomedical Applications of Thermally Activated Shape Memory Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small IV, W; Singhal, P; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2009-04-10

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs.

  20. Biomedical applications of functionalized fullerene-based nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranga Partha

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Ranga Partha, Jodie L ConyersCenter for Translational Injury Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030, USAAbstract: Since their discovery in 1985, fullerenes have been investigated extensively due to their unique physical and chemical properties. In recent years, studies on functionalized fullerenes for various applications in the field of biomedical sciences have seen a significant increase. The ultimate goal is towards employing these functionalized fullerenes in the diagnosis and therapy of human diseases. Functionalized fullerenes are one of the many different classes of compounds that are currently being investigated in the rapidly emerging field of nanomedicine. In this review, the focus is on the three categories of drug delivery, reactive oxygen species quenching, and targeted imaging for which functionalized fullerenes have been studied in depth. In addition, an exhaustive list of the different classes of functionalized fullerenes along with their applications is provided. We will also discuss and summarize the unique approaches, mechanisms, advantages, and the aspect of toxicity behind utilizing functionalized fullerenes for biomedical applications.Keywords: fullerenes, functionalized fullerenes, nanomedicine, drug delivery, buckysomes, radiation protection

  1. High-Fidelity Geometric Modelling for Biomedical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeyun Yu, Michael Holst, and J.A. McCammon

    2008-04-01

    We describe a combination of algorithms for high fidelity geometric modeling and mesh generation. Although our methods and implementations are application-neutral, our primary target application is multiscale biomedical models that range in scales across the molecular, cellular, and organ levels. Our software toolchain implementing these algorithms is general in the sense that it can take as input a molecule in PDB/PQR forms, a 3D scalar volume, or a user-defined triangular surface mesh that may have very low quality. The main goal of our work presented is to generate high quality and smooth surface triangulations from the aforementioned inputs, and to reduce the mesh sizes by mesh coarsening. Tetrahedral meshes are also generated for finite element analysis in biomedical applications. Experiments on a number of bio-structures are demonstrated, showing that our approach possesses several desirable properties: feature-preservation, local adaptivity, high quality, and smoothness (for surface meshes). The availability of this software toolchain will give researchers in computational biomedicine and other modeling areas access to higher-fidelity geometric models.

  2. Rational engineering of physicochemical properties of nanomaterials for biomedical applications with nanotoxicological perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navya, P. N.; Daima, Hemant Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Innovative engineered nanomaterials are at the leading edge of rapidly emerging fields of nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. Meticulous synthesis, unique physicochemical properties, manifestation of chemical or biological moieties on the surface of materials make engineered nanostructures suitable for a variety of biomedical applications. Besides, tailored nanomaterials exhibit entirely novel therapeutic applications with better functionality, sensitivity, efficiency and specificity due to their customized unique physicochemical and surface properties. Additionally, such designer made nanomaterials has potential to generate series of interactions with various biological entities including DNA, proteins, membranes, cells and organelles at nano-bio interface. These nano-bio interactions are driven by colloidal forces and predominantly depend on the dynamic physicochemical and surface properties of nanomaterials. Nevertheless, recent development and atomic scale tailoring of various physical, chemical and surface properties of nanomaterials is promising to dictate their interaction in anticipated manner with biological entities for biomedical applications. As a result, rationally designed nanomaterials are in extensive demand for bio-molecular detection and diagnostics, therapeutics, drug and gene delivery, fluorescent labelling, tissue engineering, biochemical sensing and other pharmaceuticals applications. However, toxicity and risk associated with engineered nanomaterials is rather unclear or not well understood; which is gaining considerable attention and the field of nanotoxicology is evolving promptly. Therefore, this review explores current knowledge of articulate engineering of nanomaterials for biomedical applications with special attention on potential toxicological perspectives.

  3. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles for biomedical and catalytical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiaoxing [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Mesoporous silica materials, discovered in 1992 by the Mobile Oil Corporation, have received considerable attention in the chemical industry due to their superior textual properties such as high surface area, large pore volume, tunable pore diameter, and narrow pore size distribution. Among those materials, MCM-41, referred to Mobile Composition of Matter NO. 41, contains honeycomb liked porous structure that is the most common mesoporous molecular sieve studied. Applications of MCM-41 type mesoporous silica material in biomedical field as well as catalytical field have been developed and discussed in this thesis. The unique features of mesoporous silica nanoparticles were utilized for the design of delivery system for multiple biomolecules as described in chapter 2. We loaded luciferin into the hexagonal channels of MSN and capped the pore ends with gold nanoparticles to prevent premature release. Luciferase was adsorbed onto the outer surface of the MSN. Both the MSN and the gold nanoparticles were protected by poly-ethylene glycol to minimize nonspecific interaction of luciferase and keep it from denaturating. Controlled release of luciferin was triggered within the cells and the enzymatic reaction was detected by a luminometer. Further developments by varying enzyme/substrate pairs may provide opportunities to control cell behavior and manipulate intracellular reactions. MSN was also served as a noble metal catalyst support due to its large surface area and its stability with active metals. We prepared MSN with pore diameter of 10 nm (LP10-MSN) which can facilitate mass transfer. And we successfully synthesized an organo silane, 2,2'-Bipyridine-amide-triethoxylsilane (Bpy-amide-TES). Then we were able to functionalize LP10-MSN with bipyridinyl group by both post-grafting method and co-condensation method. Future research of this material would be platinum complexation. This Pt (II) complex catalyst has been reported for a C-H bond activation reaction as an

  4. Biomedical engineering principles

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Arthur B; Valdevit, Antonio; Ascione, Alfred N

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Modeling of Physiological ProcessesCell Physiology and TransportPrinciples and Biomedical Applications of HemodynamicsA Systems Approach to PhysiologyThe Cardiovascular SystemBiomedical Signal ProcessingSignal Acquisition and ProcessingTechniques for Physiological Signal ProcessingExamples of Physiological Signal ProcessingPrinciples of BiomechanicsPractical Applications of BiomechanicsBiomaterialsPrinciples of Biomedical Capstone DesignUnmet Clinical NeedsEntrepreneurship: Reasons why Most Good Designs Never Get to MarketAn Engineering Solution in Search of a Biomedical Problem

  5. Magnetic microfluidic platform for biomedical applications using magnetic nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Stipsitz, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Microfluidic platforms are well-suited for biomedical analysis and usually consist of a set of units which guarantee the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalyte in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for perfoming the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gainining interest. This is due to the fact that magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the diagnostic system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are used. In this paper, we present some of our most recent results in research towards a) microfluidic diagnostics using MR sensors and magnetic particles and b) single cell analysis using magnetic particles. We have successfully manipulated magnetically labeled bacteria and measured their response with integrated GMR sensors and we have also managed to separate magnetically labeled jurkat cells for single cell analysis. © 2015 Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  6. Use of dextran nanoparticle: A paradigm shift in bacterial exopolysaccharide based biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aparna; Bandopadhyay, Rajib

    2016-06-01

    This review is a concise compilation of all the major researches on dextran nanoparticle based biomedical applications. Dextran is a highly biocompatible and biodegradable neutral bacterial exopolysaccharide with simple repeating glucose subunits. It's simple yet unique biopolymeric nature made it highly suitable as nanomedicine, nanodrug carrier, and cell imaging system or nanobiosensor. Most importantly, it is extremely water soluble and shows no post drug delivery cellular toxicity. Complete metabolism of dextran is possible inside body thus possibility of renal failure is minimum. Dextran based nanoparticles have superior aqueous solubility, high cargo capacity and intrinsic viscosity, and short storage period. The main focus area of this review is- past and present of major biomedical applications of dextran based nanomaterials thus showing a paradigm shift in bacterial exopolysaccharide based nanobiotechnology. PMID:26927936

  7. A flexible organic resistance memory device for wearable biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yimao; Tan, Jing; YeFan, Liu; Lin, Min; Huang, Ru

    2016-07-01

    Parylene is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved material which can be safely used within the human body and it is also offers chemically inert and flexible merits. Here, we present a flexible parylene-based organic resistive random access memory (RRAM) device suitable for wearable biomedical application. The proposed device is fabricated through standard lithography and pattern processes at room temperature, exhibiting the feasibility of integration with CMOS circuits. This organic RRAM device offers a high storage window (>10(4)), superior retention ability and immunity to disturbing. In addition, brilliant mechanical and electrical stabilities of this device are demonstrated when under harsh bending (bending cycle >500, bending radius <10 mm). Finally, the underlying mechanism for resistance switching of this kind of device is discussed, and metallic conducting filament formation and annihilation related to oxidization/redox of Al and Al anions migrating in the parylene layer can be attributed to resistance switching in this device. These advantages reveal the significant potential of parylene-based flexible RRAM devices for wearable biomedical applications. PMID:27242345

  8. Significance of Tribocorrosion in Biomedical Applications: Overview and Current Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Mathew

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, “tribocorrosion,” a research area combining the science of tribology and corrosion, has drawn attention from scientists and engineers belonging to a wide spectrum of research domains. This is due to its practical impact on daily life and also the accompanying economical burdens. It encompasses numerous applications including the offshore, space, and biomedical industry, for instance, in the case of artificial joints (Total Hip Replacement, THR in orthopedic surgery, where implant metals are constantly exposed to tribological events (joint articulations in the presence of corrosive solutions, that is, body fluids. Keeping the importance of this upcoming area of research in biomedical applications in mind, it was thought to consolidate the work in this area with some fundamental aspects so that a comprehensive picture of the current state of knowledge can be depicted. Complexity of tribocorrosion processes has been highlighted, as it is influenced by several parameters (mechanical and corrosion and also due to the lack of an integrated/efficient test system. Finally a review of the recent work in the area of biotribocorrosion is provided, by focusing on orthopedic surgery and dentistry.

  9. Utilization of pion production accelerators in biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A discussion is presented of biomedical applications of pion-producing accelerators in a number of areas, but with emphasis on pion therapy for treatment of solid, non-metastasized malignancies. The problem of cancer management is described from the standpoint of the physicist, magnitude of the problem, and its social and economic impact. Barriers to successful treatment are identified, mainly with regard to radiation therapy. The properties and characteristics of π mesons, first postulated on purely theoretical grounds by H. Yukawa are described. It is shown how they can be used to treat human cancer and why they appear to have dramatic advantages over conventional forms of radiation by virtue of the fact that they permit localization of energy deposition, preferentially, in the tumor volume. The Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), and its operating characteristics, are briefly described, with emphasis on the biomedical channel. The design of a relatively inexpensive accelerator specifically for pion therapy is described as is also the status of clinical trials using the existing Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The advantages of proton over electron accelerator for the production of high quality, high intensity negative pion beams suitable for radiation therapy of malignancies is also addressed. Other current, medically related applications of LAMPF technology are also discussed

  10. Advances in biomedical and pharmaceutical applications of functional bacterial cellulose-based nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Hanif; Wahid, Fazli; Santos, Hélder A; Khan, Taous

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) synthesized by certain species of bacteria, is a fascinating biopolymer with unique physical and mechanical properties. BC's applications range from traditional dessert, gelling, stabilizing and thickening agent in the food industry to advanced high-tech applications, such as immobilization of enzymes, bacteria and fungi, tissue engineering, heart valve prosthesis, artificial blood vessels, bone, cartilage, cornea and skin, and dental root treatment. Various BC-composites have been designed and investigated in order to enhance its biological applicability. This review focuses on the application of BC-based composites for microbial control, wound dressing, cardiovascular, ophthalmic, skeletal, and endodontics systems. Moreover, applications in controlled drug delivery, biosensors/bioanalysis, immobilization of enzymes and cells, stem cell therapy and skin tissue repair are also highlighted. This review will provide new insights for academia and industry to further assess the BC-based composites in terms of practical applications and future commercialization for biomedical and pharmaceutical purposes. PMID:27312644

  11. Potential Biomedical Application of Enzymatically Treated Alginate/Chitosan Hydrosols in Sponges—Biocompatible Scaffolds Inducing Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose Derived Multipotent Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zimoch-Korzycka

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Current regenerative strategies used for cartilage repair rely on biomaterial functionality as a scaffold for cells that may have potential in chondrogenic differentiation. The purpose of the research was to investigate the biocompatibility of enzymatically treated alginate/chitosan hydrosol sponges and their suitability to support chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose derived multipotent stromal cells (hASCs. The alginate/chitosan and enzyme/alginate/chitosan sponges were formed from hydrosols with various proportions and were used as a biomaterial in this study. Sponges were tested for porosity and wettability. The porosity of each sponge was higher than 80%. An equal dose of alginate and chitosan in the composition of sponges improved their swelling ability. It was found that equal concentrations of alginate and chitosan in hydrosols sponges assure high biocompatibility properties that may be further improved by enzymatic treatment. Importantly, the high biocompatibility of these biomaterials turned out to be crucial in the context of hydrosols’ pro-chondrogenic function. After exposure to the chondrogenic conditions, the hASCs in N/A/C and L/A/C sponges formed well developed nodules and revealed increased expression of collagen type II, aggrecan and decreased expression of collagen type I. Moreover, in these cultures, the reactive oxygen species level was lowered while superoxide dismutase activity increased. Based on the obtained results, we conclude that N/A/C and L/A/C sponges may have prospective application as hASCs carriers for cartilage repair.

  12. Designing advanced functional periodic mesoporous organosilicas for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Esquivel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Periodic mesoporous organosilicas (PMOs, reported for the first time in 1999, constitute a new branch of organic-inorganic hybrid materials with high-ordered structures, uniform pore size and homogenous distribution of organic bridges into a silica framework. Unlike conventional mesoporous silicas, these materials offer the possibility to adjust the surface (hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity and physical properties (morphology, porosity as well as their mechanical stability through the incorporation of different functional organic moieties in their pore walls. A broad variety of PMOs has been designed for their subsequent application in many fields. More recently, PMOs have attracted growing interest in emerging areas as biology and biomedicine. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the most recent breakthroughs achieved for PMOs in biological and biomedical applications.

  13. Fundamental developments in infrared spectroscopic imaging for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, Michael; Gardner, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Infrared chemical imaging is a rapidly emerging field with new advances in instrumentation, data acquisition and data analysis. These developments have had significant impact in biomedical applications and numerous studies have now shown that this technology offers great promise for the improved diagnosis of the diseased state. Relying on purely biochemical signatures rather than contrast from exogenous dyes and stains, infrared chemical imaging has the potential to revolutionise histopathology for improved disease diagnosis. In this review we discuss the recent advances in infrared spectroscopic imaging specifically related to spectral histopathology (SHP) and consider the current state of the field. Finally we consider the practical application of SHP for disease diagnosis and consider potential barriers to clinical translation highlighting current directions and the future outlook. PMID:26996636

  14. Electrospinning of ultrafine core/shell fibers for biomedical applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Because of the inherent appearance similar to the natural extracellular matrix,ultrafine fibrous membranes prepared via electrospinning exhibit widespread applications,especially in the biomedical area.Extensional modifications of coaxial and emulsion electrospinning have drawn much attention in preparation of core/shell fibers for applications as tissue engineering scaffolds and controlled delivery systems for bioactive substances.Due to incorporation of multi-components in the electrospun core/ shell fibers,the process of coaxial and emulsion electrospinning became more susceptible.The theories have not been fully understood.A series of investigations were carried out evaluating the systematic and processing parameters.This paper reviews advantages and potentials of electrospun core/shell fibers as well as factors influencing their formation on the basis of our research and new progress.

  15. Pharmaceutical and biomedical applications of lipid-based nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Claudia; Leonardi, Antonio; Cupri, Sarha; Puglisi, Giovanni; Pignatello, Rosario

    2014-03-01

    Increasing attention is being given to lipid nanocarriers (LNs) as drug delivery systems, due to the advantages offered of a higher biocompatibility and lower toxicity compared with polymeric nanoparticles. Many administration routes are being investigated for LNs, including topical, oral and parenteral ones. LNs are also proposed for specific applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, diagnosis and medical devices production. However, the high number of published research articles does not match an equal amount of patents. A recent Review of ours, published in Pharmaceutical Patent Analyst, reported the patents proposing novel methods for the production of LNs. This review work discusses recent patents, filed in 2007-2013 and dealing with the industrial applications of lipid-based nanocarriers for the vectorization of therapeutically relevant molecules, as well as biotech products such as proteins, gene material and vaccines, in the pharmaceutical, diagnostic and biomedical areas. PMID:24588596

  16. A review on stereolithography and its applications in biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchels, Ferry P W; Feijen, Jan; Grijpma, Dirk W

    2010-08-01

    Stereolithography is a solid freeform technique (SFF) that was introduced in the late 1980s. Although many other techniques have been developed since then, stereolithography remains one of the most powerful and versatile of all SFF techniques. It has the highest fabrication accuracy and an increasing number of materials that can be processed is becoming available. In this paper we discuss the characteristic features of the stereolithography technique and compare it to other SFF techniques. The biomedical applications of stereolithography are reviewed, as well as the biodegradable resin materials that have been developed for use with stereolithography. Finally, an overview of the application of stereolithography in preparing porous structures for tissue engineering is given. PMID:20478613

  17. Multiple wavelength infrared cameras and their biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbar, Michael

    1995-03-01

    There have been substantial advances in multiple wavelength infrared imaging systems that can measure emissivity and temperature of surfaces. Multiplewavelength measurements can be done (1) using an array of detectors, each sensitive to a different range of photon energies; (2) using a tunable filter in front of a broad-band infrared detector; or (3) by using a focal plane array of tunable detectors. In choosing a multiplewavelength infrared camera for biomedical research or for clinical practice, the parameters of importance include cost, spectral resolution, spatial resolution, and response time. For many biological systems the assessment of infrared emissivity and/or fluorescence must be done simultaneously with the temperature measurement, because these parameters may rapidly change independently from each other. In addition to providing accurate absolute temperature readings in any thermological study, the measurement of emissivity and fluorescence and the display of their spatial distribution can be especially helpful in dermatology, dermatological oncology, dermatological pharmacology (assessment of pharmacokinetics and of diaphoretic excretion of drug metabolites), skin toxicology, burns management, assessment of radiation overexposure and microtelecalorimetry of cells, micro-organisms and tissue cultures. The measurement of light induced cutaneous vasoconstriction pose novel biomedical research problems that require the use of multiplewavelength cameras. In addition to the use of more sophisticated cameras, precision clinical telethermometry requires a better controlled environment. One must take into account infrared fluorescence, photoreflectance and light induced vasoconstriction all of which are induced by environmental illumination.

  18. Current investigations into carbon nanotubes for biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nano-dimensionality of nature has logically given rise to the interest in using nanomaterials in the biomedical field. Currently, a lot of investigations into carbon nanotubes (CNTs), as one of the typical nanomaterials, are being made for biomedical application. In this review, five parts, such as cellular functions induced by CNTs, apatite formation on CNTs, CNT-based tissue engineering scaffold, functionalized CNTs for the delivery of genes and drugs and CNT-based biosensors, are stated, which might indicate that CNTs, with a range of unique properties, appear suited as a biomaterial and may become a useful tool for tissue engineering. However, everything has two parts and CNTs is not an exception. There are still concerns about cytotoxicity and biodegradation of CNTs. Chemical fictionalization may be one of the effective ways to improve the 'disadvantages' and utilize the 'advantages' of CNTs. One of their 'disadvantages', unbiodegradable property, may be utilized by creating monitors in in vivo-engineered tissues or nanosized CNT-based biosensors. Other promising research points, for example proteins adsorbed on CNTs, use of CNTs in combination with other biomaterials to achieve the goals of tissue engineering, mineralization of CNTs and standard toxicological tests for CNTs, are also described in the conclusion and perspectives part. (topical review)

  19. Preparation of TiMn alloy by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F.; Weidmann, A.; Nebe, B. J.; Burkel, E.

    2009-01-01

    TiMn alloy was prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique for exploration of biomedical applications. The microstructures, mechanical properties and cytotoxicity of the TiMn alloys were investigated in comparison with the pure Ti and Mn metals. Ti8Mn and Ti12Mn alloys with high relative density (99%) were prepared by mechanical alloying for 60 h and SPS at 700 °C for 5 min. The doping of Mn in Ti has decreased the transformation temperature from α to β phase, increased the relative density and enhanced the hardness of the Ti metal significantly. The Ti8Mn alloys showed 86% cell viability which was comparable to that of the pure Ti (93%). The Mn can be used as a good alloying element for biomedical Ti metal, and the Ti8Mn alloy could have a potential use as bone substitutes and dental implants.

  20. Nanocellulose in Polymer Composites and Biomedical: Research and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yuan [ORNL; Tekinalp, Halil L [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Eberle, Cliff [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Ozcan, Soydan [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Nanocellulose materials are nano-sized cellulose fibers or crystals that are produced by bacteria or derived from plants. These materials exhibit exceptional strength characteristics, light weight, transparency, and excellent biocompatibility. Compared to some other nanomaterials, nanocellulose is renewable and less expensive to produce. As such, a wide range of applications for nanocellulose has been envisioned. Most extensively studied areas include polymer composites and biomedical applications. Cellulose nanofibrils and nanocrystals have been used to reinforce both thermoplastic and thermoset polymers. Given the hydrophilic nature of these materials, the interfacial properties with most polymers are often poor. Various surface modification procedures have thus been adopted to improve the interaction between polymer matrix and cellulose nanofibrils or nanocrystals. In addition, the applications of nanocellulose as biomaterials have been explored including wound dressing, tissue repair, and medical implants. Nanocellulose materials for wound healing and periodontal tissue recovery have become commercially available, demonstrating the great potential of nanocellulose as a new generation of biomaterials. In this review, we highlight the applications of nanocellulose as reinforcing fillers for composites and the effect of surface modification on the mechanical properties as well as the application as biomaterials.

  1. A pattern recognition application framework for biomedical datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanco, Rodrigo; Demko, Aleksander B; Jarmasz, Mark; Somorjai, Ray L; Pizzi, Nick J

    2007-01-01

    Scopira facilitates the development of high-performance applications by providing many useful subsystems, flexible and efficient data models, low-level tools such as memory management and serialization, GUI constructs, high-level visualization modules, and the ability to implement parallel algorithms with MPI. Scopira plug-in extensions have been developed to enable Matlab scripts to easily call any Scopira module, thus facilitating the migration of prototypes to highly efficient C++ applications. Scopira is continuously under development and future capabilities will include the ability to develop distributed programs using agents, applicable to grid-computing data mining applications. Scopira has proven to be a successful programming framework for implementing high-performance biomedical data analysis applications. It is based on C++, an efficient object-oriented language, and the source code is available as an open-source project for other researchers to use and adapt to their own research endeavours. Scopira has been compiled to work on Linux and Windows XP operating systems with a port to the Mac OS under development. Scopira, EvIdent and RDP are freely available for download from www.scopira.org. PMID:17441612

  2. Application of nuclear microlocalization techniques to biomedical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beams at the Brookhaven 3.5 MV Research Van de Graaff accelerator have been used for elemental analysis and distribution in biomedical samples. Results from several collaborations are presented. Both collimated and uncollimated charged particle beams are used for elemental analysis by measurement of characteristic x-rays (PIXE). A collimated proton beam, using a pinhole collimator (approx. 20 μm) has been used as a particle microprobe in the laboratory ambient. Thick, essentially unprepared, samples can be measured with general elemental sensitivities of 2H(3H,n)4He reaction initiated by the triton beam at the accelerator. Alpha particles from the reaction register the deuterium distribution in a plastic track detector. This technique suggests that 3H may be replaced by the stable isotope 2H in tracer studies. Studies have included the detection of nonexchangeable 2H in oocytes and the uptake of deuterated thymidine in blood cells

  3. Wire gaseous coordinate detectors and their applications in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wire gaseous coordinate detectors continue to be a basic tool in experimental high-energy physics and are being intensively introduced into related areas of science and technology, particularly biomedical research. The constant evolution of these detectors allows broad application of their new modificatons: multistep chambers, low-pressure detectors, time-projection chambers, and so on, so that detector systems are enriched with new possibilities. In this review we give the operating principles and fundamental parameters of these detectors and discuss some examples of how they are used in experimental physics. We also explore some of the features of the use of these detectors for research in molecular biology and medical diagnostics for examples of existing and projected setups

  4. Preparation of natural zeolitic supports for potential biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering the biological properties reported for the purified natural clinoptilolite, NZ, we prepared K- and Li-enriched forms aimed at release matrices for biomedical applications. The raw material and the obtained solid samples were characterized by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, 27Al and 29Si MAS nuclear magnetic resonance, and nitrogen adsorption. The results demonstrated the structural stability of the materials after the different transformations applied. The chemical behavior of the samples in bi-distilled water and hydrochloric acid was studied by pH and conductivity measurements. A preliminary study related with the liberation of K and Li in aqueous medium was carried out by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The studies showed that the release of both ions from the solid samples is favored in HCl solutions, and that lithium is released faster than potassium in both dissolution media.

  5. Emerging chitin and chitosan nanofibrous materials for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fuyuan; Deng, Hongbing; Du, Yumin; Shi, Xiaowen; Wang, Qun

    2014-07-01

    Over the past several decades, we have witnessed significant progress in chitosan and chitin based nanostructured materials. The nanofibers from chitin and chitosan with appealing physical and biological features have attracted intense attention due to their excellent biological properties related to biodegradability, biocompatibility, antibacterial activity, low immunogenicity and wound healing capacity. Various methods, such as electrospinning, self-assembly, phase separation, mechanical treatment, printing, ultrasonication and chemical treatment were employed to prepare chitin and chitosan nanofibers. These nanofibrous materials have tremendous potential to be used as drug delivery systems, tissue engineering scaffolds, wound dressing materials, antimicrobial agents, and biosensors. This review article discusses the most recent progress in the preparation and application of chitin and chitosan based nanofibrous materials in biomedical fields.

  6. Biomedical applications of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas chromatography coupled with mass-spectrometry (GC/MS) is a modern technique, which has very important applications in the biomedical area. A large number of qualitative and quantitative determinations of drugs, amino acids, vitamins, lipids, aroma compounds, important nutrients, herb extracts were developed. The extraction procedure is the first important step in the analytical work. The internal standard is usually added at the very begin ing of the quantitative work. The best one is the stable isotopic labeled compound, usually the analogue of the compound of interest. Stable isotopic internal standard or compounds from the same chemical class having boiling point close to that of the compound of interest were used. Quantitation needs very well selected standards and method validation. Some validated methods for the determination of drugs and some active principles in biological media are presented. Several preconcentration extraction procedures were used. The quantitative determinations by detection (GC-MS) were performed. Good validation parameters were obtained: precision, accuracy, linearity in the range of interest, good limit of detection and quantitation, selectivity and specificity. Chromatography was performed on a 5% phenyl methyl polysiloxane column (15 or 30 m x 0.25 mm I.D., 0.25 μm film thickness) operated in suitable temperature programs. Helium carrier gas flow was 1ml/min. Ionization was performed by electron impact and detection in scan or selected ion monitoring (SIM) modes. The methods provided high response linearity (mean r = 0.99), precision and accuracy (< 10% C.V.). Applications of the quantitative methods in biomedical area are described. (author)

  7. Design of double-walled carbon nanotubes for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, V.; Heister, E.; Costa, S.; Tîlmaciu, C.; Flahaut, E.; Soula, B.; Coley, H. M.; McFadden, J.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2012-09-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) prepared by catalytic chemical vapour deposition were functionalized in such a way that they were optimally designed as a nano-vector for the delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA), which is of great interest for biomedical research and drug development. DWNTs were initially oxidized and coated with a polypeptide (Poly(Lys:Phe)), which was then conjugated to thiol-modified siRNA using a heterobifunctional cross-linker. The obtained oxDWNT-siRNA was characterized by Raman spectroscopy inside and outside a biological environment (mammalian cells). Uptake of the custom-designed nanotubes was not associated with detectable biochemical perturbations in cultured cells, but transfection of cells with DWNTs loaded with siRNA targeting the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, serving as a model system, as well as with therapeutic siRNA targeting the survivin gene, led to a significant gene silencing effect, and in the latter case a resulting apoptotic effect in cancer cells.

  8. Training in radionuclide methodology and applications in biomedical area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Training in the field of radionuclide methodology and applications in biomedical area is important to assure that radionuclide should duly be used without risk for patients or for technicians manipulating them. The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) from its creation is giving training courses of different technical levels to those working in science and technology. The Course on Radionuclide Methodology and application is the most continuous, varied and requested within CNEA. This is a basic course mainly given to Biochemistry and Medicine. Its goal is to give both theoretical and practical knowledge for use and application of radionuclides bearing in mind radiological safety regulations. Personnel from CNEA and Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) carry out teaching. On the other hand, a course for Technicians in Nuclear Medicine is giving supplying knowledge in this field, as well as expertise and practice to attend a responsible Medical Doctor. These curses comprise radionuclide methodology, anatomy, physiology, instrumentation and practical applications in Nuclear Medicine. Statistics concerning these course are giving. (author)

  9. Biomedical Application of Low Molecular Weight Heparin/Protamine Nano/Micro Particles as Cell- and Growth Factor-Carriers and Coating Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Masayuki; Kishimoto, Satoko; Takikawa, Makoto; Hattori, Hidemi; Nakamura, Shingo; Shimizu, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH)/protamine (P) nano/micro particles (N/MPs) (LMWH/P N/MPs) were applied as carriers for heparin-binding growth factors (GFs) and for adhesive cells including adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). A mixture of LMWH and P yields a dispersion of N/MPs (100 nm–3 μm in diameter). LMWH/P N/MPs can be immobilized onto cell surfaces or extracellular matrix, control the release, activate GFs and protect various GFs. Furthermore, LMWH/P N/MPs can also bind to adhesive cell surfaces, inducing cells and LMWH/P N/MPs-aggregate formation. Those aggregates substantially promoted cellular viability, and induced vascularization and fibrous tissue formation in vivo. The LMWH/P N/MPs, in combination with ADSCs or BMSCs, are effective cell-carriers and are potential promising novel therapeutic agents for inducing vascularization and fibrous tissue formation in ischemic disease by transplantation of the ADSCs and LMWH/P N/MPs-aggregates. LMWH/P N/MPs can also bind to tissue culture plates and adsorb exogenous GFs or GFs from those cells. The LMWH/P N/MPs-coated matrix in the presence of GFs may provide novel biomaterials that can control cellular activity such as growth and differentiation. Furthermore, three-dimensional (3D) cultures of cells including ADSCs and BMSCs using plasma-medium gel with LMWH/P N/MPs exhibited efficient cell proliferation. Thus, LMWH/P N/MPs are an adequate carrier both for GFs and for stromal cells such as ADSCs and BMSCs, and are a functional coating matrix for their cultures. PMID:26006248

  10. Synthesis optimization of calcium aluminate cement phases for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium aluminate cement (CAC) has been studied as a potential material for applications in the areas of health such as, endodontics and bone reconstruction. These studies have been based on commercial products consisting of a mixture of phases. Improvements can be attained by investigating the synthesis routes of CAC aiming the proper balance between the phases and the control of impurities that may impair its performance for biomedical applications. Thus, the aim of this work was to study the CAC synthesis routes in the Al2O3-CaCO3 and Al2O3-CaO systems, as well as the phase characterization attained by means of X ray analysis. The Al2O3-CaO route enabled the production of the target phases (CA, CA2, C3A and C12A7) with a higher purity compared to the Al2O3-CaCO3 one. As a result the particular properties of these phases can be evaluated to define a more suitable composition that results in better properties for an endodontic cement and other applications. (author)

  11. Fe/Au Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sra, Amandeep; Leslie-Pelecky, Diandra

    2009-10-01

    The physical properties of nanoparticles, including size, composition and surface chemistry, greatly influence biological and pharmacological properties and, ultimately, their clinical applications. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are widely used for applications such as MRI contrast agents, drug delivery via magnetic targeting and hyperthermia due to their chemical stability and biocompatibility; however, enhancing the saturation magnetization (Ms) of nanoparticles would produce greater sensitivity. Our design strategy involves a bottom-up wet chemistry approach to the synthesis of Fe nanoparticles. Specific advantages of Fe are the high value of Ms (210 emu/g in bulk) coupled with low toxicity; however, Fe nanoparticles must be protected from oxidation, which causes a dramatic reduction in Ms. To circumvent oxidation, Fe nanoparticles are coated with a Au shell that prevents the oxidation of the magnetic core and also provides the nanoparticles with plasmonic properties for optical stimulation. Ligands of various functionalities can be introduced through the well established Au-thiol surface chemistry for different biomedical applications while maintaining the magnetic functionality of the Fe core. In this presentation, we will discuss the physical, chemical and magnetic properties of our Fe/Au nanoparticles and their resistance to oxidation.

  12. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120°C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. PMID:25492167

  13. Composite Membranes of Recombinant Silkworm Antimicrobial Peptide and Poly (L-lactic Acid) (PLLA) for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Liu, Xuan; Li, Yi; Lan, Xiqian; Leung, Polly Hangmei; Li, Jiashen; Li, Gang; Xie, Maobin; Han, Yanxia; Lin, Xiaofen

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides, produced by innate immune system of hosts in response to invading pathogens, are capable of fighting against a spectrum of bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites and cancer cells. Here, a recombinant silkworm AMP Bmattacin2 from heterologous expression is studied, indicating a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity and showing selective killing ability towards skin and colon cancer cells over their normal cell counterparts. For the purpose of biomedical application, the electrospinning fabrication technique is employed to load Bmattacin2 into PLLA nanofibrous membrane. In addition to a good compatibility with the normal cells, Bmattacin2 loaded nanofibrous membranes demonstrate instant antibacterial effects and sustained anticancer effects. The cancer cell and bacteria targeting dynamics of recombinant Bmattacin2 are investigated. With these characteristics, PLLA/Bmattacin2 composite membranes have a great potential for developing novel biomedical applications such as cancer therapies and wound healing treatments. PMID:27503270

  14. Processing and characterization of poly(lactic acid) based bioactive composites for biomedical scaffold application

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, J.; Ghosh, A. K.; Bhatnagar, N; Mohanty, S.

    2013-01-01

    The current study focuses on three-components material systems (poly(lactic acid) (PLA), poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and wollastonite (W)) in view of possible application a biomedical scaffold constructs. Melt extruded PLA/PCL/W composites (PLCL15, PLCLW1, PLCLW4, PLCLW8 containing 0, 1, 4, 8 phr filler respectively) are batch foamed using compressed CO2 and the porous foams are studied for in vitro biocompatibility by seeding osteoblast cells. SEM images of the unfoamed polymers show imm...

  15. Gold, Silver and Carbon Nanoparticles Grafted on Activated Polymers for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznickova, A; Novotna, Z; Kvitek, O; Kolska, Z; Svorcik, V

    2015-12-01

    Organic polymers have been applied successfully in fields such as adhesion, biomaterials, protective coatings, friction and wear, composites, microelectronic devices, and thin-film technology. In general, special surface properties with regard to chemical composition, hydrophilicity, roughness, crystallinity, conductivity, lubricity, and cross-linking density are required for the success of these applications. Polymers very often do not possess the surface properties needed for these applications. For these reasons, surface modification techniques which can transform these inexpensive materials into highly valuable finished products have become an important part of the plastics industry. In case of biomedical polymers is plasma treatment used for enhancing cell adhesion, growth and proliferation and to make them suitable for implants and tissue engineering scaffolds. Nanoparticles fascinated scientists for over a century and are now heavily utilized in chemistry, biology, engineering, and medicine. Nowadays nanoparticles can be synthesized reproducibly, modified with seemingly limitless chemical functional groups, and, in certain cases, characterized with atomic-level precision. In recent years, focus has turned to therapeutic possibilities for such materials. Structures, which behave as drug carriers, antimicrobial agents, and photoresponsive therapeutics have been developed and studied in the context of cells and many debilitating diseases. These structures are not simply chosen as alternatives to molecule-based systems, but rather for their new physical and chemical properties, which confer substantive advantages in cellular and medical applications. In this review, we provide insights into immobilization, toxicity and biomedical applications of gold, silver and carbon nanoparticles and discuss their grafting to polymer substrates and the influence on cell-material interactions. The adhesion and the response of cells in contact with the surface play an important

  16. Bio-inspired magnetic swimming microrobots for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyer, Kathrin E.; Zhang, Li; Nelson, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    Microrobots have been proposed for future biomedical applications in which they are able to navigate in viscous fluidic environments. Nature has inspired numerous microrobotic locomotion designs, which are suitable for propulsion generation at low Reynolds numbers. This article reviews the various swimming methods with particular focus on helical propulsion inspired by E. coli bacteria. There are various magnetic actuation methods for biomimetic and non-biomimetic microrobots, such as rotating fields, oscillating fields, or field gradients. They can be categorized into force-driven or torque-driven actuation methods. Both approaches are reviewed and a previous publication has shown that torque-driven actuation scales better to the micro- and nano-scale than force-driven actuation. Finally, the implementation of swarm or multi-agent control is discussed. The use of multiple microrobots may be beneficial for in vivo as well as in vitro applications. Thus, the frequency-dependent behavior of helical microrobots is discussed and preliminary experimental results are presented showing the decoupling of an individual agent within a group of three microrobots.

  17. Fabrication of honeycomb-structured poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactic acid) porous films and biomedical applications for cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Honeycomb-structured PEG-PLA porous films were fabricated. • The organization of pores depends on molecular weight ratio of PEG-to-PLA block. • The pores in the film were internally decorated with a layer of PEG. • The honeycomb-structured PEG-PLA film was suitable as a substrate for cell growth. - Abstract: A series of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactic acid) (PEG-PLA) copolymers with a hydrophobic PLA block of different molecular weights and a fixed length hydrophilic PEG were synthesized successfully and characterized. These amphiphilic block copolymers were used to fabricate honeycomb-structured porous films using the breath figure (BF) templating technique. The surface topology and composition of the highly ordered pattern film were further characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fluorescence microscopy. The results indicated that the PEG-to-PLA block molecular weight ratio influenced the BF film surface topology. The film with the best ordered pores was obtained with a PEG-to-PLA ratio of 2.0 × 103:3.0 × 104. The self-organization of the hydrophilic PEG chains within the pores was confirmed by XPS and fluorescence labeled PEG. A model is proposed to elucidate the stabilization process of the amphiphilic PEG-PLA aggregated architecture on the water droplet-based templates. In addition, GFP-U87 cell viability has been investigated by MTS test and the cell morphology on the honeycomb-structured PEG-PLA porous film has been evaluated using phase-contrast microscope. This porous film is shown to be suitable as a matrix for cell growth

  18. Fabrication of honeycomb-structured poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactic acid) porous films and biomedical applications for cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Bingjian [Key Laboratory of Special Functional Aggregated Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250199 (China); College of chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Collaborative Innovation Center of Functionalized Probes for Chemical Imaging, Key Laboratory of Molecular and Nano Probes, Ministry of Education, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Zhu, Qingzeng, E-mail: qzzhu@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Special Functional Aggregated Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250199 (China); Yao, Linli [Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Experimental Teratology, Department of Histology and Embryology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 250012 Jinan (China); Hao, Jingcheng [Key Laboratory of Special Functional Aggregated Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250199 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Honeycomb-structured PEG-PLA porous films were fabricated. • The organization of pores depends on molecular weight ratio of PEG-to-PLA block. • The pores in the film were internally decorated with a layer of PEG. • The honeycomb-structured PEG-PLA film was suitable as a substrate for cell growth. - Abstract: A series of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactic acid) (PEG-PLA) copolymers with a hydrophobic PLA block of different molecular weights and a fixed length hydrophilic PEG were synthesized successfully and characterized. These amphiphilic block copolymers were used to fabricate honeycomb-structured porous films using the breath figure (BF) templating technique. The surface topology and composition of the highly ordered pattern film were further characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fluorescence microscopy. The results indicated that the PEG-to-PLA block molecular weight ratio influenced the BF film surface topology. The film with the best ordered pores was obtained with a PEG-to-PLA ratio of 2.0 × 10{sup 3}:3.0 × 10{sup 4}. The self-organization of the hydrophilic PEG chains within the pores was confirmed by XPS and fluorescence labeled PEG. A model is proposed to elucidate the stabilization process of the amphiphilic PEG-PLA aggregated architecture on the water droplet-based templates. In addition, GFP-U87 cell viability has been investigated by MTS test and the cell morphology on the honeycomb-structured PEG-PLA porous film has been evaluated using phase-contrast microscope. This porous film is shown to be suitable as a matrix for cell growth.

  19. Thiol-ene crosslinking polyamidoamine dendrimer-hyaluronic acid hydrogel system for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiangdong; Liang, Aiye; Tan, Yu; Maturavongsadit, Panita; Higginbothem, Ashley; Gado, Togor; Gramling, Abigail; Bahn, Hanna; Wang, Qian

    2016-06-01

    A series of alkene functionalized polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were synthesized to prepare in situ forming hydrogels with varied gelation time and mechanical properties through crosslinking with thiolated hyaluronic acid (HS-HA). By varying the alkenyl groups on the dendrimers, the gelation time displayed a large range from 8 seconds to 18 hours, and the modulus of the hydrogels ranged from 36 to 183 Pa under experimental conditions. Investigation by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy revealed that the gelation time and the stiffness of the hydrogels were governed by the degree of electron deficiency of alkenyl groups on the dendrimers. This research provided a systematic study on the relationship between chemical structures versus gelation time and mechanical properties of hydrogels, which could guide the way to synthesize in situ forming hydrogels with designated gelation time and stiffness for biomedical applications. Further, a RGD peptide was attached to the PAMAM dendrimers to enhance cell attachment and proliferation. Viability assays of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) in the synthesized hydrogels demonstrated the biocompatibility of the hydrogels after 48 hours of culturing, and the RGD peptide improved the viability of HUVEC cells in hydrogels. We believe the PAMAM/HA hydrogel system is a tuneable and biocompatible system for diverse biomedical applications. PMID:26923639

  20. Biological performance of functionalized biomedical polymers for potential applications as intraocular lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiwen; Wang, Yingjun; Jiao, Yan; Zhai, Zhichen

    2016-08-01

    To study the biological performance of surface-modified biomedical polymer materials, a model of the functional mechanism of nonspecific adsorption resistance was constructed. Cell behavior on the surface and in vivo transplantation features of intraocular lens (IOL) materials, such as hydrophobic acrylic ester and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), were investigated. The results of cell adhesion and proliferation studies showed that the addition of hirudin can significantly resist epithelial cell adhesion, better than the pure amination process, and thereby inhibit excessive proliferation on the surface. Experiments on the eyes of rabbits indicated that the IOL surfaces with hirudin modification reduced the incidence of cell aggregation and inflammation. Combined with a study of protein-resistant layer construction with recombinant hirudin on the material surface, the mechanism of surface functionalization was determined. The biological performance indicated that nonspecific adsorption is greatly decreased due to the existence of amphiphilic ions or hydration layers, which lead to stability and long-term resistance to nonspecific adsorption. These results offer a theoretical basis for the use of traditional biomedical polymer materials in long-term clinical applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1961-1967, 2016. PMID:27027387

  1. Biomedical application of electroporation: electrochemotherapy and electrogene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Čemažar, Maja; Todorović, Vesna; Meulenberg, Cecil W.; Tešić, Nataša; Cor, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation refers to exposure of cells to external electric field thatresults in transiently or permanently increased permeability of cell membranes. Cancer treatment, where local application of electroporation to tumor nodules is combined with chemotherapeutic drugs bleomycin or cisplatin is called electrochemotherapy. The antitumor effectiveness of electrochemotherapy is primarily based on direct killing of tumor cells due to the increased chemotherapeutic drug uptake, but other mechan...

  2. Poly hydroxybutyrate/ethylcellulose blends for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We are investigating blends of a biopolyester, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), with a chemical deri of another biologically important polymer (cellulose), ethyl cellulose (EC). PHB has many pr properties which are typical of an engineering thermoplastic as well as being biodegradabl biocompatible. PHB and EC are both suitable for use in bioresorbable structures for biomedical applications. Unfavourable properties of PHB are that it is prone to crystallisation during processing and in environmental conditions, becoming brittle, and is quite expensive to produce. EC has added in blends because it inhibits PHB crystallisation but it is also much cheaper than PHI examine the interaction and interface between the two polymers in the solid phase by small neutron scattering. A more favourable scattering contrast between the two phases is obtain using biodeuterated PHB. Deviations of the interfacial behaviour from the Porod law are an, using the model of Koberstein et al of a diffuse interface [1]. The composition of the blends I physiological degradation has been examined with FTIR spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction.

  3. MAPI: a software framework for distributed biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Johan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of web-based resources (databases, tools etc. in biomedicine has increased, but the integrated usage of those resources is complex due to differences in access protocols and data formats. However, distributed data processing is becoming inevitable in several domains, in particular in biomedicine, where researchers face rapidly increasing data sizes. This big data is difficult to process locally because of the large processing, memory and storage capacity required. Results This manuscript describes a framework, called MAPI, which provides a uniform representation of resources available over the Internet, in particular for Web Services. The framework enhances their interoperability and collaborative use by enabling a uniform and remote access. The framework functionality is organized in modules that can be combined and configured in different ways to fulfil concrete development requirements. Conclusions The framework has been tested in the biomedical application domain where it has been a base for developing several clients that are able to integrate different web resources. The MAPI binaries and documentation are freely available at http://www.bitlab-es.com/mapi under the Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 2.5 Spain License. The MAPI source code is available by request (GPL v3 license.

  4. Corrosion behavior of β titanium alloys for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion behavior of biocompatible β titanium alloys Ti-13Mo-7Zr-3Fe (TMZF) and Ti-35Nb-7Zr-5Ta (TiOsteum) was investigated in 0.9% NaCl and 5 M HCl solutions. Extra-low-interstitial Ti-6Al-4V, which is also a candidate material for biomedical applications, was studied for comparison. The as-received TiOsteum and TMZF alloys exhibited single-phase β and α + β microstructures, respectively, so the latter was also investigated in the solutionized and quenched condition. In 0.9% NaCl solution, all three alloys exhibited spontaneous passivity and very low corrosion rates. Ti-6Al-4V and the as-received TMZF exhibited active-passive transitions in 5 M HCl whereas TiOsteum and TMZF in the metastable β condition showed spontaneous passivity. Potentiodynamic polarization tests, weight loss and immersion tests revealed that TiOsteum exhibited the best corrosion resistance in 5 M HCl. Analysis of surfaces of the corroded specimens indicated that the α/β phase boundaries were preferential sites for corrosion in Ti-6Al-4V while the β phase was preferentially attacked in the two-phase TMZF. The performance of the alloys in corrosive environment was discussed in terms of the volume fraction of the constituent phases and partitioning of alloying elements between these phases.

  5. A biomedical application of 32Si using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a first application of the 32Si tracer to a biomedical project, the first measurement of silicon uptake by a human subject has been carried out. The motivation for this study aroused from the supposition that silicate may be important in human physiology in protecting against aluminium toxicity. Indeed, in an earlier study of aluminium uptake, using the isotopic tracer, 26Al, it had been shown that blood-Al levels following Al dosing were lower when the dose was accompanied by dissolved silicate than when it was not. An experiment was set out to determine directly the fraction absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, and to quantify the kinetics of renal elimination, using the silicon isotopic tracer, 32Si. A gas-filled magnet technique was developed for measuring 32Si by AMS which allows a spatial separation of 32S from 32Si and hence a reduction in the counting rate entering the detector by a factor of 106. The results for silicon absorption are consistent with those from earlier studies, indicating that the simultaneous ingestion of Al and silicate enhances the rate of aluminium excretion for a period of 12-24 hours

  6. Corrosion behavior of {beta} titanium alloys for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atapour, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pilchak, A.L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate/RXLM, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Universal Technology Corporation, Dayton OH 45432 (United States); Frankel, G.S., E-mail: frankel.10@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Williams, J.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-07-20

    The corrosion behavior of biocompatible {beta} titanium alloys Ti-13Mo-7Zr-3Fe (TMZF) and Ti-35Nb-7Zr-5Ta (TiOsteum) was investigated in 0.9% NaCl and 5 M HCl solutions. Extra-low-interstitial Ti-6Al-4V, which is also a candidate material for biomedical applications, was studied for comparison. The as-received TiOsteum and TMZF alloys exhibited single-phase {beta} and {alpha} + {beta} microstructures, respectively, so the latter was also investigated in the solutionized and quenched condition. In 0.9% NaCl solution, all three alloys exhibited spontaneous passivity and very low corrosion rates. Ti-6Al-4V and the as-received TMZF exhibited active-passive transitions in 5 M HCl whereas TiOsteum and TMZF in the metastable {beta} condition showed spontaneous passivity. Potentiodynamic polarization tests, weight loss and immersion tests revealed that TiOsteum exhibited the best corrosion resistance in 5 M HCl. Analysis of surfaces of the corroded specimens indicated that the {alpha}/{beta} phase boundaries were preferential sites for corrosion in Ti-6Al-4V while the {beta} phase was preferentially attacked in the two-phase TMZF. The performance of the alloys in corrosive environment was discussed in terms of the volume fraction of the constituent phases and partitioning of alloying elements between these phases.

  7. Voltage effects on cells cultured on metallic biomedical implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerihosseini, Seyed Morteza

    Electrochemical voltage shifts in metallic biomedical implants occur in-vivo due to a number of processes including mechanically assisted corrosion. Surface potential of biomedical implants and excursions from resting open circuit potential (OCP), which is the voltage they attain while in contact with an electrolyte, can significantly change the interfacial properties of the metallic surfaces and alter the behavior of the surrounding cells, compromising the biocompatibility of metallic implants. Voltages can also be controlled to modulate cell function and fate. To date, the details of the physico-chemical phenomena and the role of different biomaterial parameters involved in the interaction between cells and metallic surfaces under cathodic bias have not been fully elucidated. In this work, changes in the interfacial properties of a CoCrMo biomedical alloy (ASTM F-1537) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (pH 7.4) at different voltages was studied. Step polarization impedance spectroscopy technique was used to apply 50 mV voltage steps to samples, and the time-based current transients were recorded. A new equation was derived based on capacitive discharge through a Tafel element and generalized to deal with non-ideal impedance behavior. The new function compared to the KWW-Randles function, better matched the time-transient response. The results also showed a voltage dependent oxide resistance and capacitance behavior. Additionally, the in-vitro effect of static voltages on the behavior of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts cultured on CoCrMo alloy (ASTM-1537) was studied to determine the range of cell viability and mode of cell death beyond the viable range. Cell viability and morphology, changes in actin cytoskeleton, adhesion complexes and nucleus, and mode of cell death (necrosis, or intrinsic or extrinsic apoptosis) were characterized at different voltages ranging from -1000 to +500 mV (Ag/AgCl). Moreover, electrochemical currents and metal ion concentrations at each

  8. Polymer and polymer-hybrid nanoparticles from synthesis to biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rangelov, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric and hybrid nanoparticles have received increased scientific interest in terms of basic research as well as commercial applications, promising a variety of uses for nanostructures in fields including bionanotechnology and medicine. Condensing the relevant research into a comprehensive reference, Polymer and Polymer-Hybrid Nanoparticles: From Synthesis to Biomedical Applications covers an array of topics from synthetic procedures and macromolecular design to possible biomedical applications of nanoparticles and materials based on original and unique polymers. The book presents a well-r

  9. Applicability of PIXE for multielemental analysis in a biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of PIXE for multielemental analysis is demonstrated. The method is used in a major systematic study on hair samples using one target analysis. The pathological state considered is agitated elderly people. The main elements examined are S, K, Ca, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Hg and Pb. The minimum detectable limits are 1-10 ppm using 180 μg of dry hair at 25 μe irradiations for elements between K and Br. The significance of differences between the hair elements in control populations and patients suffering from the pathological conditions are investigated. Investigations of possible linear and multiple-correlations between elements in each population are made. The work indicates that some elements do exhibit variation with pathological state, and the multielement PIXE analysis gives useful information about the subject. (author). 13 refs, 4 figs, 6 tabs

  10. Potentiality of the “Gum Metal” titanium-based alloy for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the “Gum Metal” titanium-based alloy (Ti–23Nb–0.7Ta–2Zr–1.2O) was synthesized by melting and then characterized in order to evaluate its potential for biomedical applications. Thus, the mechanical properties, the corrosion resistance in simulated body fluid and the in vitro cell response were investigated. It was shown that this alloy presents a very high strength, a low Young's modulus and a high recoverable strain by comparison with the titanium alloys currently used in medicine. On the other hand, all electrochemical and corrosion parameters exhibited more favorable values showing a nobler behavior and negligible toxicity in comparison with the commercially pure Ti taken as reference. Furthermore, the biocompatibility tests showed that this alloy induced an excellent response of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts in terms of attachment, spreading, viability, proliferation and differentiation. Consequently, the “Gum Metal” titanium-based alloy processes useful characteristics for the manufacturing of highly biocompatible medical devices. - Highlights: • The Gum Metal alloy composition was synthesized by melting in this study. • Appropriate mechanical properties for biomedical applications were obtained. • High corrosion resistance in simulated body fluids was observed. • Excellent in-vitro cell response was evidenced

  11. Potentiality of the “Gum Metal” titanium-based alloy for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordin, D.M. [Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (UMR CNRS 6226), INSA Rennes, 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, F-35043 Rennes Cedex (France); Ion, R. [University of Bucharest, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 91-95 Spl. Independentei, 050095 Bucharest (Romania); Vasilescu, C.; Drob, S.I. [Institute of Physical Chemistry “Ilie Murgulescu” of Romanian Academy, Spl. Independentei 202, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Cimpean, A. [University of Bucharest, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 91-95 Spl. Independentei, 050095 Bucharest (Romania); Gloriant, T., E-mail: Thierry.Gloriant@insa-rennes.fr [Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (UMR CNRS 6226), INSA Rennes, 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, F-35043 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the “Gum Metal” titanium-based alloy (Ti–23Nb–0.7Ta–2Zr–1.2O) was synthesized by melting and then characterized in order to evaluate its potential for biomedical applications. Thus, the mechanical properties, the corrosion resistance in simulated body fluid and the in vitro cell response were investigated. It was shown that this alloy presents a very high strength, a low Young's modulus and a high recoverable strain by comparison with the titanium alloys currently used in medicine. On the other hand, all electrochemical and corrosion parameters exhibited more favorable values showing a nobler behavior and negligible toxicity in comparison with the commercially pure Ti taken as reference. Furthermore, the biocompatibility tests showed that this alloy induced an excellent response of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts in terms of attachment, spreading, viability, proliferation and differentiation. Consequently, the “Gum Metal” titanium-based alloy processes useful characteristics for the manufacturing of highly biocompatible medical devices. - Highlights: • The Gum Metal alloy composition was synthesized by melting in this study. • Appropriate mechanical properties for biomedical applications were obtained. • High corrosion resistance in simulated body fluids was observed. • Excellent in-vitro cell response was evidenced.

  12. Stretchable conducting materials with multi-scale hierarchical structures for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Shim, Bong Sup

    2014-08-01

    Electrogenetic tissues in human body such as central and peripheral nerve systems, muscular and cardiomuscular systems are soft and stretchable materials. However, most of the artificial materials, interfacing with those conductive tissues, such as neural electrodes and cardiac pacemakers, have stiff mechanical properties. The rather contradictory properties between natural and artificial materials usually cause critical incompatibility problems in implanting bodymachine interfaces for wide ranges of biomedical devices. Thus, we developed a stretchable and electrically conductive material with complex hierarchical structures; multi-scale microstructures and nanostructural electrical pathways. For biomedical purposes, an implantable polycaprolactone (PCL) membrane was coated by molecularly controlled layer-bylayer (LBL) assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) or poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT). The soft PCL membrane with asymmetric micro- and nano-pores provides elastic properties, while conductive SWNT or PEDOT coating preserves stable electrical conductivity even in a fully stretched state. This electrical conductivity enhanced ionic cell transmission and cell-to-cell interactions as well as electrical cellular stimulation on the membrane. Our novel stretchable conducting materials will overcome long-lasting challenges for bioelectronic applications by significantly reducing mechanical property gaps between tissues and artificial materials and by providing 3D interconnected electro-active pathways which can be available even at a fully stretched state.

  13. Elaboration and characterization of nanostructured biocements for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Heriberto Almeida Camargo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Biocements formed from the composition Ca/P have been studied and developed since 1983. These biomaterials are promissing and have aroused great interest to biomedical surgery applications, fixation of prostheses and filling and reconstruction of bones. They can be employed as an element of load to fix implant and bone structure. In addition, biocements are easily shaped during surgical processes and favor early bone habitation, absorption, osseointegration, and osteoconduction of bone structure into the microstructure of the biocement thus favoring regeneration and reconstruction of bone tissue. This paper aims to develop biocements formed from calcium phosphate through the aqueous precipitation method by means of the dissolution-precipitation reaction, which involves solid/ liquid phase of CaO and phosphoric acid to form the calcium phosphate. The biocements investigated were synthesized when the molar ratios of Ca/P = 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7 and 1.8. The present results indicate that the aqueous precipitation method allowed nanostructured powder of calcium phosphate to form. Thermal treatment at 1300 °C for 2 hours provided biocements formed from calcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite. The study of hydration behaviour from 1 to 28 days in a solution, which contained 0.4% of sodium phosphate, emphasized phase modification and the presence of a microporous microstructure made of crystalline fibers. It was found that the shape and size of the crystalline fiber had a direct influence on the resulting mechanical properties. Investigating more carefully the behaviour of the specimens with a Ca/P molar ratio of 1.5, there was an increase in the strength value under compression as a function of time so that it reached the maximum value of strength ±45 MPa to specimens that had been hydrated for 28 days.

  14. The construction of three-dimensional composite fibrous macrostructures with nanotextures for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juqing; Gao, Huichang; Zhu, Guanglin; Cao, Xiaodong; Shi, Xuetao; Wang, Yingjun

    2016-01-01

    The development of modern biomedical nanotechnology requires three-dimensional macrostructures with nanotextures to meet the requirements for practical applications in intricate biological systems. Additionally, the restoration and regeneration of some specific body tissues and organs rely on the function of conductive polymers, which can provide electrical cues for cells. In this study, we fabricated three-dimensional composite nanofibre macrostructures of polycaprolactone (PCL) with different concentrations of polyaniline (PANi) by employing an improved electrospinning technology with a specially designed collector. The 3D structures possessed cap-like macrostructures with centimetre-scale thickness and interconnected pore nanotextures with nanometre-scale nanofibres. To estimate the biocompatibility of the 3D PCL/PANi composite nanofibre macrostructures, mouse myoblasts (C2C12 cells) were cultured as model cells. The initial responses of C2C12 cells to the 3D PCL/PANi composite macrostructures were significantly superior to those to pure PCL, that is, the cells exhibited typical myoblast-like morphologies with obvious pseudopodia and the moderate incorporation (less than 2.0 wt%) of conductive PANi facilitated cell proliferation, which indicated that PANi has appreciable cell affinity. Moreover, the addition of conductive PANi to the 3D composite nanofibre macrostructures considerably enhanced myoblast differentiation and myotube maturation. These results suggest that electrospun 3D PCL/PANi composite nanofibre macrostructures would have promising applications in tissue engineering. PMID:27563025

  15. Recent research and development in titanium alloys for biomedical applications and healthcare goods

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuo Niinomi

    2003-01-01

    Nb, Ta and Zr are the favorable non-toxic alloying elements for titanium alloys for biomedical applications. Low rigidity titanium alloys composed of non-toxic elements are getting much attention. The advantage of low rigidity titanium alloy for the healing of bone fracture and the remodeling of bone is successfully proved by fracture model made in tibia of rabbit. Ni-free super elastic and shape memory titanium alloys for biomedical applications are energetically developed. Titanium alloys f...

  16. Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles: From Sensors to Theranostics

    OpenAIRE

    Goel, Shreya; Chen, Feng; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention from biomedical researchers across the globe, because of their intriguing properties which have been mainly explored for energy- and catalysis-related applications to date. This focused review article aims to summarize the recent progress made in the synthesis and biomedical applications of various CuS nanoparticles. After a brief introduction to CuS nanoparticles in the first section, we will provide a concise outline of ...

  17. Synthesis and bio-medical application of the intelligent nano-gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents a general view of the development in the field of intelligent nano-gel and its bio-medical application, introduces the methods about synthesizing the nano-gels and controlling the diameter size under 100 nm. Finally focuses on the on-off mechanism of the Nano-based Drug Delivery System (NDDS), and the bio-medical application such as gene therapy

  18. Biomedical applications of digital autoradiography with a MWPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Multiwire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) was used as a β- radioactivity detector in biological and medical applications. Two different kinds of experiments were performed: the study of variations in the ability of cell clones to incorporate a radioactive precursor of DNA biosynthesis (3H-thymidine) and the regional carbohydrate consumption in myocardial tissue by means of a deposit tracer of glucose metabolism

  19. Synthesis, properties, and biomedical applications of gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kan; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Tamayol, Ali; Annabi, Nasim; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogels have been widely used for various biomedical applications due to their suitable biological properties and tunable physical characteristics. GelMA hydrogels closely resemble some essential properties of native extracellular matrix (ECM) due to the presence of cell-attaching and matrix metalloproteinase responsive peptide motifs, which allow cells to proliferate and spread in GelMA-based scaffolds. GelMA is also versatile from a processing perspective. It crosslinks when exposed to light irradiation to form hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties. It can also be microfabricated using different methodologies including micromolding, photomasking, bioprinting, self-assembly, and microfluidic techniques to generate constructs with controlled architectures. Hybrid hydrogel systems can also be formed by mixing GelMA with nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide, and other polymers to form networks with desired combined properties and characteristics for specific biological applications. Recent research has demonstrated the proficiency of GelMA-based hydrogels in a wide range of tissue engineering applications including engineering of bone, cartilage, cardiac, and vascular tissues, among others. Other applications of GelMA hydrogels, besides tissue engineering, include fundamental cell research, cell signaling, drug and gene delivery, and bio-sensing. PMID:26414409

  20. Layer-by-layer assembly for biomedical applications in the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, P.; Carmagnola, I.; Nardo, T.; Chiono, V.

    2015-10-01

    In the past two decades, the design and manufacture of nanostructured materials has been of tremendous interest to the scientific community for their application in the biomedical field. Among the available techniques, layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly has attracted considerable attention as a convenient method to fabricate functional coatings. Nowadays, more than 1000 scientific papers are published every year, tens of patents have been deposited and some commercial products based on LBL technology have become commercially available. LBL presents several advantages, such as (1): a precise control of the coating properties; (2) environmentally friendly, mild conditions and low-cost manufacturing; (3) versatility for coating all available surfaces; (4) obtainment of homogeneous film with controlled thickness; and (5) incorporation and controlled release of biomolecules/drugs. This paper critically reviews the scientific challenge of the last 10 years—functionalizing biomaterials by LBL to obtain appropriate properties for biomedical applications, in particular in tissue engineering (TE). The analysis of the state-of-the-art highlights the current techniques and the innovative materials for scaffold and medical device preparation that are opening the way for the preparation of LBL-functionalized substrates capable of modifying their surface properties for modulating cell interaction to improve substitution, repair or enhancement of tissue function.

  1. Virgin olive oil blended polyurethane micro/nanofibers ornamented with copper oxide nanocrystals for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amna T

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Touseef Amna,1 M Shamshi Hassan,2 Jieun Yang,1 Myung-Seob Khil,2 Ki-Duk Song,3 Jae-Don Oh,3 Inho Hwang1 1Department of Animal Sciences and Biotechnology, 2Department of Organic Materials and Fiber Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, South Korea; 3Genomic Informatics Center, Hankyong National University, Anseong, South Korea Abstract: Recently, substantial interest has been generated in using electrospun biomimetic nanofibers of hybrids, particularly organic/inorganic, to engineer different tissues. The present work, for the first time, introduced a unique natural and synthetic hybrid micronanofiber wound dressing, composed of virgin olive oil/copper oxide nanocrystals and polyurethane (PU, developed via facile electrospinning. The as-spun organic/inorganic hybrid micronanofibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, and transmission electron microscopy. The interaction of cells with scaffold was studied by culturing NIH 3T3 fibroblasts on an as-spun hybrid micronanofibrous mat, and viability, proliferation, and growth were assessed. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay results and SEM observation showed that the hybrid micronanofibrous scaffold was noncytotoxic to fibroblast cell culture and was found to benefit cell attachment and proliferation. Hence our results suggest the potential utilization of as-spun micronanoscaffolds for tissue engineering. Copper oxide–olive oil/PU wound dressing may exert its positive beneficial effects at every stage during wound-healing progression, and these micronanofibers may serve diverse biomedical applications, such as tissue regeneration, damaged skin treatment, wound healing applications, etc. Conclusively, the fabricated olive oil–copper oxide/PU micronanofibers combine the benefits of virgin olive oil and copper oxide, and therefore hold great promise for

  2. Interactive Processing and Visualization of Image Data forBiomedical and Life Science Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staadt, Oliver G.; Natarjan, Vijay; Weber, Gunther H.; Wiley,David F.; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-02-01

    Background: Applications in biomedical science and life science produce large data sets using increasingly powerful imaging devices and computer simulations. It is becoming increasingly difficult for scientists to explore and analyze these data using traditional tools. Interactive data processing and visualization tools can support scientists to overcome these limitations. Results: We show that new data processing tools and visualization systems can be used successfully in biomedical and life science applications. We present an adaptive high-resolution display system suitable for biomedical image data, algorithms for analyzing and visualization protein surfaces and retinal optical coherence tomography data, and visualization tools for 3D gene expression data. Conclusion: We demonstrated that interactive processing and visualization methods and systems can support scientists in a variety of biomedical and life science application areas concerned with massive data analysis.

  3. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshatwi, Ali A., E-mail: alshatwi@ksu.edu.sa; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120 °C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Simple, rapid and convenient process • Amorphous and spherical with 10–30 nm size SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were fabricated. • Biogenic silica nanoparticles showed biocompatibility. • bSNPs are an alternative to synthetic forms of silica.

  4. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120 °C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Simple, rapid and convenient process • Amorphous and spherical with 10–30 nm size SiO2 nanoparticles were fabricated. • Biogenic silica nanoparticles showed biocompatibility. • bSNPs are an alternative to synthetic forms of silica

  5. From biomedical-engineering research to clinical application and industrialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi; Aoyagi, Takao

    2012-12-01

    The rising costs and aging of the population due to a low birth rate negatively affect the healthcare system in Japan. In 2011, the Council for Science and Technology Policy released the 4th Japan's Science and Technology Basic Policy Report from 2011 to 2015. This report includes two major innovations, 'Life Innovation' and 'Green Innovation', to promote economic growth. Biomedical engineering research is part of 'Life Innovation' and its outcomes are required to maintain people's mental and physical health. It has already resulted in numerous biomedical products, and new ones should be developed using nanotechnology-based concepts. The combination of accumulated knowledge and experience, and 'nanoarchitechtonics' will result in novel, well-designed functional biomaterials. This focus issue contains three reviews and 19 original papers on various biomedical topics, including biomaterials, drug-delivery systems, tissue engineering and diagnostics. We hope that it demonstrates the importance of collaboration among scientists, engineers and clinicians, and will contribute to the further development of biomedical engineering.

  6. Applicability of existing magnesium alloys as biomedical implant materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erinc, M.; Sillekens, W.H.; Mannens, R.G.T.M.; Werkhoven, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Being biocompatible and biodegradable, magnesium alloys are considered as the new generation biomedical implant materials, such as for stents, bone fixtures, plates and screws. A major drawback is the poor chemical stability of metallic magnesium; it corrodes at a pace that is too high for most pros

  7. Application of text mining in the biomedical domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleuren, W.W.M.; Alkema, W.B.L.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the amount of experimental data that is produced in biomedical research and the number of papers that are being published in this field have grown rapidly. In order to keep up to date with developments in their field of interest and to interpret the outcome of experiments in light of

  8. Black Phosphorus (BP) Nanodots for Potential Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Uk; Park, So Young; Lee, Soon Chang; Choi, Saehae; Seo, Soonjoo; Kim, Hyeran; Won, Jonghan; Choi, Kyuseok; Kang, Kyoung Suk; Park, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Hee-Sik; An, Ha Rim; Jeong, Kwang-Hun; Lee, Young-Chul; Lee, Jouhahn

    2016-01-13

    Recently, the appeal of 2D black phosphorus (BP) has been rising due to its unique optical and electronic properties with a tunable band gap (≈0.3-1.5 eV). While numerous research efforts have recently been devoted to nano- and optoelectronic applications of BP, no attention has been paid to promising medical applications. In this article, the preparation of BP-nanodots of a few nm to water or air is observed. As for the BP-nanodot crystals' stability (ionization and persistence of fluorescent intensity) in aqueous solution, after 10 d, ≈80% at 1.5 mg mL(-1) are degraded (i.e., ionized) in phosphate buffered saline. They showed no or little cytotoxic cell-viability effects in vitro involving blue- and green-fluorescence cell imaging. Thus, BP-nanodots can be considered a promising agent for drug delivery or cellular tracking systems. PMID:26584654

  9. Silicone and Fluorosilicone Based Materials for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsule, Aniruddha S.

    The biocompatibility and the biodurability of silicones is a result of various material properties such as hydrophobicity, low surface tension, high elasticity and chemical and thermal stability. A variety of biomedical implants employ an inflatable silicone rubber balloon filled with a saline solution. Commercial examples of such a system are silicone breast implants, tissue expanders and gastric bands for obesity control. Despite the advantages, saline filled silicones systems still have a certain set of challenges that need to be addressed in order to improve the functionality of these devices and validate their use as biomaterials. The central goal of this research is to identify these concerns, design solutions and to provide a better understanding of the behavior of implantable silicones. The first problem this research focuses on is the quantification and identification of the low molecular weight silicones that are not crosslinked into the elastomeric matrix and therefore can be leached out by solvent extraction. We have developed an environmentally friendly pre-extraction technique using supercritical CO 2 and also determined the exact nature of the extractables using Gas Chromatography. We have also attempted to address the issue of an observed loss of pressure in the saline filled device during application by studying the relaxation behavior of silicone elastomer using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis and constructing long-term relaxation master curves. We have also developed a technique to develop highly hydrophobic fluorinated barrier layers for the silicone in order to prevent diffusion of water vapor across the walls of the implant. This involves a hybrid process consisting of surface modification by plasma technology followed by two different coating formulations. The first formulation employed UV curable fluorinated acrylate monomers for the coating process and the second was based on Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) to generate a fluorinated

  10. Novel 3D Tissue Engineered Bone Model, Biomimetic Nanomaterials, and Cold Atmospheric Plasma Technique for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian

    This thesis research is consist of four chapters, including biomimetic three-dimensional tissue engineered nanostructured bone model for breast cancer bone metastasis study (Chapter one), cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer (Chapter two), design of biomimetic and bioactive cold plasma modified nanostructured scaffolds for enhanced osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (Chapter three), and enhanced osteoblast and mesenchymal stem cell functions on titanium with hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite/magnetically treated carbon nanotubes for orthopedic applications (Chapter four). All the thesis research is focused on nanomaterials and the use of cold plasma technique for various biomedical applications.

  11. Synthesis and optimization of chitosan nanoparticles: Potential applications in nanomedicine and biomedical engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadi, Arezou; Mahjoub, Soleiman; Tabandeh, Fatemeh; Talebnia, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chitosan nanoparticles have become of great interest for nanomedicine, biomedical engineering and development of new therapeutic drug release systems with improved bioavailability, increased specificity and sensitivity, and reduced pharmacological toxicity. The aim of the present study was to synthesis and optimize of the chitosan nanoparticles for industrial and biomedical applications. Methods: Fe3O4 was synthesized and optimized as magnetic core nanoparticles and then chitosan ...

  12. Interactive processing and visualization of image data for biomedical and life science applications

    OpenAIRE

    Staadt, Oliver G; Natarajan, Vijay; Weber, Gunther H.; Wiley, David F.; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Background: Applications in biomedical science and life science produce large data sets using increasingly powerful imaging devices and computer simulations. It is becoming increasingly difficult for scientists to explore and analyze these data using traditional tools. Interactive data processing and visualization tools can support scientists to overcome these limitations. Results: We show that new data processing tools and visualization systems can be used successfully in biomedical and l...

  13. Interactive Processing and Visualization of Image Data for Biomedical and Life Science Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Staadt, Oliver G; Natarjan, Vijay; Weber, Gunther H.; Wiley, David F.; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Background Applications in biomedical science and life science produce large data sets using increasingly powerful imaging devices and computer simulations. It is becoming increasingly difficult for scientists to explore and analyze these data using traditional tools. Interactive data processing and visualization tools can support scientists to overcome these limitations. Results We show that new data processing tools and visualization systems can be used successfully in biomedical and life s...

  14. Interactive processing and visualization of image data for biomedical and life science applications

    OpenAIRE

    Staadt, Oliver G.; Natarajan, Vijay; Weber, Gunther H.; Wiley, David F; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Background Applications in biomedical science and life science produce large data sets using increasingly powerful imaging devices and computer simulations. It is becoming increasingly difficult for scientists to explore and analyze these data using traditional tools. Interactive data processing and visualization tools can support scientists to overcome these limitations. Results We show that new data processing tools and visualization systems can be used successfully in biomedical and life s...

  15. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HYDROXYAPATITE WITH TAMARIND KERNEL POWDER (BIO - POLYMER FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Sakt

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite which composes inorganic phase is one of the biomaterials for artificial bone and reconstruction of broken or disordered bones. It has great biocompatibility. Polysaccharide based biomaterials are an emerging class in several biomedical field such as tissue regeneration, particularly in drug delivery device. Tamarind kernel powder is used as a source of carbohydrate for the adhesive or binding agent in many of t he pharmaceutical products. There fore synthesis of Nano hydroxyapatite with tamarind kernel powder (nHAp/TKP has been carried out to study its characterization in biomedical application. Chemical structures and functional groups of the synthesized compos ite have been examined by the Fourier transform infrared technique and x - ray diffraction. Composite morphology is determined using Transmission electron microscopy. Thermal stability was done by thermo gravimetric analysis(TGA. Crystallite size, fraction of crystallinity, surface area, microstrain, dislocation density are calculated using XRD data. The results confirms the presence of the nano particle in the composite. Nanosized composite have more number of properties such as higher specific surface are a, improved strength , hardness and thermal stability. The lattice parameter and unit cell volume are matched with JCPDS card no.09 - 0432.

  16. Photo-fluorescent and magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Donglu; Sadat, M. E.; Dunn, Andrew W.; Mast, David B.

    2015-04-01

    Iron oxide exhibits fascinating physical properties especially in the nanometer range, not only from the standpoint of basic science, but also for a variety of engineering, particularly biomedical applications. For instance, Fe3O4 behaves as superparamagnetic as the particle size is reduced to a few nanometers in the single-domain region depending on the type of the material. The superparamagnetism is an important property for biomedical applications such as magnetic hyperthermia therapy of cancer. In this review article, we report on some of the most recent experimental and theoretical studies on magnetic heating mechanisms under an alternating (AC) magnetic field. The heating mechanisms are interpreted based on Néel and Brownian relaxations, and hysteresis loss. We also report on the recently discovered photoluminescence of Fe3O4 and explain the emission mechanisms in terms of the electronic band structures. Both optical and magnetic properties are correlated to the materials parameters of particle size, distribution, and physical confinement. By adjusting these parameters, both optical and magnetic properties are optimized. An important motivation to study iron oxide is due to its high potential in biomedical applications. Iron oxide nanoparticles can be used for MRI/optical multimodal imaging as well as the therapeutic mediator in cancer treatment. Both magnetic hyperthermia and photothermal effect has been utilized to kill cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. Once the iron oxide nanoparticles are up taken by the tumor with sufficient concentration, greater localization provides enhanced effects over disseminated delivery while simultaneously requiring less therapeutic mass to elicit an equal response. Multi-modality provides highly beneficial co-localization. For magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles the co-localization of diagnostics and therapeutics is achieved through magnetic based imaging and local hyperthermia generation through magnetic field or photon

  17. Reprint of: Biomedical applications reviewed: Hot topic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. A.; Wells, K.

    2014-02-01

    Making reference to the British Journal of Radiology and competitor journal titles, we look at the general area of biomedical physics, reviewing some of the associated topics in ionising radiation research attracting interest over the past 2 years. We also reflect on early developments that have paved the way for these endeavours. The talk is illustrated by referring to a number of biomedical physics areas in which this group has been directly involved, including novel imaging techniques that address compositional and structural makeup as well as use of elastically scattered X-ray phase contrast, radiation damage linking to possible pericardial effects in radiotherapy, simulation of microvascularity and oxygenation with a focus of radiation resistant hypoxic tumours, issues of high spatial resolution dosimetry and tissue interface radiotherapy with doses enhanced through use of high atomic number photoelectron conversion media.

  18. Designing novel starch/cellulose acetate structures for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, M; S.S. Silva; Duarte, Ana Rita C.; Reis, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    Starch-based blends present an enormous potential to be widely used in the biomedical area, because they are totally biodegradable, inexpensive, available in large quantities. However, natural-based polymers have great limitations in processability particularly due to their usually high crystallinity which limits their solubility. This can be overcome by the use of ionic liquids which are recognized as ‘green’ replacements for conventional organic solvents. Earlier reports e...

  19. Advances in the biomedical applications of the EELA Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Vicente; Blanquer, Ignacio; Aparicio, Gabriel; Isea, Raúl; Chaves, Juan Luis; Hernández, Alvaro; Mora, Henry Ricardo; Fernández, Manuel; Acero, Alicia; Montes, Esther; Mayo, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    In the last years an increasing demand for Grid Infrastructures has resulted in several international collaborations. This is the case of the EELA Project, which has brought together collaborating groups of Latin America and Europe. One year ago we presented this e-infrastructure used, among others, by the biomedical groups for the studies of oncological analysis, neglected diseases, sequence alignments and computational phylogenetics. After this period, the achieved advances are summarised in this paper. PMID:17476045

  20. Advances in the Biomedical Applications of the EELA Project

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, Vicente; Aparicio, Gabriel; Isea, Raul; Chavés, Juan Luis; Hernández, Álvaro; Mora, Henry Ricardo; Fernández, Manuel; Acero, Alicia; Montes, Esther; Mayo, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    In the last years an increasing demand for Grid Infrastructures has resulted in several international collaborations. This is the case of the EELA Project, which has brought together collaborating groups of Latin America and Europe. One year ago we presented this e-infrastructure used, among others, by the Biomedical groups for the studies of oncological analysis, neglected diseases, sequence alignments and computation phylogenetics. After this period, the achieved advances are summarised in this paper.

  1. Advances in the Biomedical Applications of the EELA Project

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández, Vicente; Blanquer, Ignacio; Aparicio, Gabriel; Isea, Raul; Chavés, Juan Luis; Hernández, Álvaro; Mora, Henry Ricardo; Fernández, Manuel; Acero, Alicia; Montes, Esther; Mayo, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    In the last years an increasing demand for Grid Infrastructures has resulted in several international collaborations. This is the case of the EELA Project, which has brought together collaborating groups of Latin America and Europe. One year ago we presented this e-infrastructure used, among others, by the Biomedical groups for the studies of oncological analysis, neglected diseases, sequence alignments and computation phylogenetics. After this period, the achieved advances are summarised in ...

  2. Novel block, graft and random copolymers for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Tanaka, Masaru; Hvilsted, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Despite the simple structure, poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA) shows excellent blood compatibility [1]. Both the freezing-bound water (intermediate water: preventing the biocomponents from directly contacting the polymer surface) and non-freezing water on the polymer surface play important roles for this [2]. An artificial lung (oxygenator), already in use, is coated with high MW PMEA prepared by radical polymerization with AIBN [2]. To broaden the possibilities for designing biomedical d...

  3. Microfluidic devices with integrated biosensors for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Parra Cabrera, César Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the LOC community has focused most of its research in the biomedical and biotechnology fields, due to the need of portable, low power consumption and low cost theranostics microdevices. Some developing countries do not have suitable medical diagnostics technologies and the supply and storage of the reagents is in many cases limited as well as the access to energy. Furthermore, developed countries are experimenting population aging needing novel low cost efficient disease-scre...

  4. Functionality of Porous Silicon Particles; Surface Modification for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    GALLACH D.; RECIO SÁNCHEZ G.; MUÑOZ NOVAL Alvaro; Manso Silvan, Miguel; Ceccone, Giacomo; MARTÍN PALMAA R.j.; Torres Costa, V; Martínez Duart, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Porous silicon based particles (PSp) with tailored physical and biological properties have recently attracted great attention given their biomedical potential. Within this context, the objective of the present work is to optimize the experimental parameters for the formation of biofunctional mesoporous PSps. Their functionality has been studied on the one hand by analyzing the fluorescence characteristics, such as tunable narrow band emission and fluorescence aging for PSps with different ...

  5. Reprint of: Biomedical applications reviewed: Hot topic areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Making reference to the British Journal of Radiology and competitor journal titles, we look at the general area of biomedical physics, reviewing some of the associated topics in ionising radiation research attracting interest over the past 2 years. We also reflect on early developments that have paved the way for these endeavours. The talk is illustrated by referring to a number of biomedical physics areas in which this group has been directly involved, including novel imaging techniques that address compositional and structural makeup as well as use of elastically scattered X-ray phase contrast, radiation damage linking to possible pericardial effects in radiotherapy, simulation of microvascularity and oxygenation with a focus of radiation resistant hypoxic tumours, issues of high spatial resolution dosimetry and tissue interface radiotherapy with doses enhanced through use of high atomic number photoelectron conversion media. - Highlights: • Review of recent biomedical ionising radiation research. • Examples of novel imaging techniques addressing compositional and structural makeup among other examples. • Novel spatially fractionated beams in radiotherapy and dosimetric measurements

  6. Structural and morphological investigation of magnetic nanoparticles based on iron oxides for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Paula S. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Caixa Postal 6192, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil)], E-mail: pferreira@lnls.br; Martins, Tatiana M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Caixa Postal 6192, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin (IFGW), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Caixa Postal 6165, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); D' Souza-Li, Lilia [Laboratorio de Endocrinologia Pediatrica da Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas (FCM), UNICAMP, Caixa Postal 6111, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Li, Li M. [Departamento de Neurologia da FCM, UNICAMP, Caixa Postal 6111, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Metze, Konradin; Adam, Randall L. [Grupo interdisciplinar ' Patologia Analitica Celular' , Departamento de Anatomia Patologica da FCM, UNICAMP, Caixa Postal 6111, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Knobel, Marcelo [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin (IFGW), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Caixa Postal 6165, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Zanchet, Daniela [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Caixa Postal 6192, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2008-05-01

    The present work reports the synthesis, characterization and properties of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications, correlating the nanoscale tunabilities in terms of size, structure, and magnetism. Magnetic nanoparticles in different conditions were prepared through thermal decomposition of Fe(acac){sub 3} in the presence of 1,2 hexadecanodiol (reducing agent) and oleic acid and oleylamine (ligands) in a hot organic solvent. The 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was exchanged onto the nanocrystal surface making the particles stable in water. Nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Preliminary tests of incorporation of these nanoparticles in cells and their magnetic resonance image (MRI) were also carried out. The magnetization characterizations were made by isothermal magnetic measurements.

  7. Study on iron oxide nanoparticles coated with glucose-derived polymers for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herea, D. D.; Chiriac, H.; Lupu, N.; Grigoras, M.; Stoian, G.; Stoica, B. A.; Petreus, T.

    2015-10-01

    This study reports an approach for a facile one-step synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) coated with glucose-derived polymers (GDP) through a mechanochemical hydrothermal process for biomedical applications. Polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe2O3/Fe3O4), with sizes below 10 nm, exhibited superparamagnetic behavior, with a specific magnetization saturation value of about 40 emu/g, and a maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) of 30 W/g in AC magnetic fields. Depending on the intensity of the applied AC magnetic field, a temperature of 42 °C can be achieved in 4-17 min. The surface polymerized layer affords functional hydroxyl groups for binding to biomolecules containing carboxyl, thiol, or amino groups, thereby making the coated nanoparticles feasible for bio-conjugation. In vitro cytotoxicity evaluation pointed out that a relatively high concentration of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles (GDP-MNPs) did not induce severe cell alteration, suggesting a good biocompatibility.

  8. Low modulus Ti–Nb–Hf alloy for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, M., E-mail: Marta.Gonzalez.Colominas@upc.edu [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Materials Science, Elisava Escola Superior de Disseny i Enginyeria de Barcelona, La Rambla 30-32, 08002 Barcelona (Spain); Peña, J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Materials Science, Elisava Escola Superior de Disseny i Enginyeria de Barcelona, La Rambla 30-32, 08002 Barcelona (Spain); Gil, F.J.; Manero, J.M. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ciber-BBN (Spain)

    2014-09-01

    β-Type titanium alloys with a low elastic modulus are a potential strategy to reduce stress shielding effect and to enhance bone remodeling in implants used to substitute failed hard tissue. For biomaterial application, investigation on the mechanical behavior, the corrosion resistance and the cell response is required. The new Ti25Nb16Hf alloy was studied before and after 95% cold rolling (95% C.R.). The mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing and its corrosion behavior was analyzed by potentiostatic equipment in Hank's solution at 37 °C. The cell response was studied by means of cytotoxicity evaluation, cell adhesion and proliferation measurements. The stress–strain curves showed the lowest elastic modulus (42 GPa) in the cold worked alloy and high tensile strength, similar to that of Ti6Al4V. The new alloy exhibited better corrosion resistance in terms of open circuit potential (E{sub OCP}), but was similar in terms of corrosion current density (i{sub CORR}) compared to Ti grade II. Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the chemical composition of the alloy does not induce cytotoxic activity. Cell studies in the new alloy showed a lower adhesion and a higher proliferation compared to Ti grade II presenting, therefore, mechanical features similar to those of human cortical bone and, simultaneously, a good cell response. - Highlights: • Presents low elastic modulus and high strength and elastic deformability. • Exhibits good biocompatibility in terms of cytotoxicity and cell response. • Corrosion resistance of this alloy is good, similar to that of Ti grade II. • Potential candidate for implants used to substitute failed hard tissue.

  9. Low modulus Ti–Nb–Hf alloy for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    β-Type titanium alloys with a low elastic modulus are a potential strategy to reduce stress shielding effect and to enhance bone remodeling in implants used to substitute failed hard tissue. For biomaterial application, investigation on the mechanical behavior, the corrosion resistance and the cell response is required. The new Ti25Nb16Hf alloy was studied before and after 95% cold rolling (95% C.R.). The mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing and its corrosion behavior was analyzed by potentiostatic equipment in Hank's solution at 37 °C. The cell response was studied by means of cytotoxicity evaluation, cell adhesion and proliferation measurements. The stress–strain curves showed the lowest elastic modulus (42 GPa) in the cold worked alloy and high tensile strength, similar to that of Ti6Al4V. The new alloy exhibited better corrosion resistance in terms of open circuit potential (EOCP), but was similar in terms of corrosion current density (iCORR) compared to Ti grade II. Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the chemical composition of the alloy does not induce cytotoxic activity. Cell studies in the new alloy showed a lower adhesion and a higher proliferation compared to Ti grade II presenting, therefore, mechanical features similar to those of human cortical bone and, simultaneously, a good cell response. - Highlights: • Presents low elastic modulus and high strength and elastic deformability. • Exhibits good biocompatibility in terms of cytotoxicity and cell response. • Corrosion resistance of this alloy is good, similar to that of Ti grade II. • Potential candidate for implants used to substitute failed hard tissue

  10. Synthesis, Surface Modification and Characterisation of Biocompatible Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Zaki Ab Rahman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs with appropriate surface chemistry exhibit many interesting properties that can be exploited in a variety of biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement, tissue repair, hyperthermia, drug delivery and in cell separation. These applications required that the MNPs such as iron oxide Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4 MNPs having high magnetization values and particle size smaller than 100 nm. This paper reports the experimental detail for preparation of monodisperse oleic acid (OA-coated Fe3O4 MNPs by chemical co-precipitation method to determine the optimum pH, initial temperature and stirring speed in order to obtain the MNPs with small particle size and size distribution that is needed for biomedical applications. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. The results show that the particle size as well as the magnetization of the MNPs was very much dependent on pH, initial temperature of Fe2+ and Fe3+ solutions and steering speed. The monodisperse Fe3O4 MNPs coated with oleic acid with size of 7.8 ± 1.9 nm were successfully prepared at optimum pH 11, initial temperature of 45 °C and at stirring rate of 800 rpm. FTIR and XRD data reveal that the oleic acid molecules were adsorbed on the magnetic nanoparticles by chemisorption. Analyses of TEM show the oleic acid provided the Fe3O4 particles with better dispersibility. The synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic behavior and the saturation magnetization of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles increased with the particle size.

  11. Graphene nanocomposite for biomedical applications: fabrication, antimicrobial and cytotoxic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials possessing excellent bacterial toxicity, while presenting low cytotoxicity to human cells, are strong candidates for biomaterials applications. In this study, we present the fabrication of a nanocomposite containing poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) and graphene (G) in solutions and thin films. Highly dispersed PVK–G (97-3 w/w%) solutions in various organic and aqueous solvents were prepared by solution mixing and sonication methods. The thermal properties and morphology of the new composite were analyzed using thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. PVK–G films were immobilized onto indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates via electrodeposition. AFM was used to characterize the resulting topography of the nanocomposite thin films, while cyclic voltammetry and UV–vis were used to monitor their successful electrodeposition. The antimicrobial properties of the electrodeposited PVK–G films and solution-based PVK–G were investigated against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). Microbial growth after exposure to the nanocomposite, metabolic assay and live–dead assay of the bacterial solutions exposed to PVK–G presented fewer viable and active bacteria than those exposed to pure PVK or pure graphene solutions. The PVK–G film inhibited about 80% of biofilm surface coverage whereas the PVK- and G-modified surfaces allowed biofilm formation over almost the whole coated surface (i.e. > 80%). The biocompatibility of the prepared PVK–G solutions on NIH 3T3 cells was evaluated using the MTS cell proliferation assay. A 24 h exposure of the PVK–G nanocomposite to the NIH 3T3 cells presented ∼80% cell survival. (paper)

  12. HR TEM examinations of nanodiamond particles for biomedical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mitura

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the study is an analysis of a different type of nano-diamond powders on HR TEM (material characterisation, the normal distribution of grain size. These nano-powders were used in many biological researches and each of them had a special biological activity. Comparison between the material and biological properties of diamond powders answered many questions about the chemical and physical reactionson a boundary: diamond surface – living organism.Design/methodology/approach: In this work we used cytotoxicity assays using MTT test and HR TEM examinations. We examined the nanodiamond particles manufactured by detonation method, RF/MW PACVD method, RF PACVD method, pure diamond from De Beers Company and graphite powder as a control.Findings: In this subject the material characterisation of diamond powders are known but we examineda different type of powders and we manufactured some of these nanopowders in our laboratory.Practical implications: Nanocrystalline Diamond Coatings have many applications in various fieldsof medicine. Nanodiamond Particles are an extended surface of diamond powder. Biological research with endothelial and lung cancer cells are the introduction to application in human’s treatment.Originality/value: There are in vitro examinations with bioactive biomaterial. Nanodiamond particles havea very high bioactivity on cell level and inhibit cancerogenesis.

  13. Analysis and application of analog electronic circuits to biomedical instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Northrop, Robert B

    2003-01-01

    This book introduces the basic mathematical tools used to describe noise and its propagation through linear systems and provides a basic description of the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio by signal averaging and linear filtering. The text also demonstrates how op amps are the keystone of modern analog signal conditioning systems design, and illustrates their use in isolation and instrumentation amplifiers, active filters, and numerous biomedical instrumentation systems and subsystems. It examines the properties of the ideal op amp and applies this model to the analysis of various circuits

  14. Analysis and application of analog electronic circuits to biomedical instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Northrop, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    All chapters include an introduction and chapter summary.Sources and Properties of Biomedical SignalsSources of Endogenous Bioelectric SignalsNerve Action PotentialsMuscle Action PotentialsThe ElectrocardiogramOther BiopotentialsElectrical Properties of BioelectrodesExogenous Bioelectric SignalsProperties and Models of Semiconductor Devices Used in Analog Electronic Systemspn Junction DiodesMidfrequency Models for BJT BehaviorMidfrequency Models for Field-Effect TransistorsHigh-Frequency Models for Transistors and Simple Transistor AmplifiersPhotons, Photodiodes, Photoconductors, LEDs, and Las

  15. Environmental and biomedical applications of natural metal stable isotope variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, T.D.; Walczyk, T.

    2009-01-01

    etal stable isotopes are now being used to trace metal contaminants in the environment and as indicators of human systemic function where metals play a role. Stable isotope abundance variations provide information about metal sources and the processes affecting metals in complex natural systems, complementing information gained from surrogate tracers, such as metal abundance ratios or biochemical markers of metal metabolism. The science is still in its infancy, but the results of initial studies confirm that metal stable isotopes can provide a powerful tool for forensic and biomedical investigations.

  16. Radioanalytical and imaging techniques. Challenges and opportunities in biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Where human health worldwide is under threat, radioanalytical and imaging scientists are expected to make significant difference and contribution. Diabetes, malnutrition, Alzheimer's and cardiovascular diseases can be better understood by probing elemental distributions to nano-scales and quantifying elemental compositions to ultratrace levels. As we aim towards personalized medicine, cancer management awaits new diagnostic and therapy methods which account, for example, for tissue oxygenation. In the context of such biomedical issues, recent trends and future developments are presented taking into consideration the availability of research reactors and ion beam facilities, as well as alternative and emerging techniques such as PIXE tomography (PIXE-T) and two- and three-gamma PET. (author)

  17. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties and biocompatibility of Mg-Zn-Mn alloys for biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mn and Zn were selected to develop a Mg-Zn-Mn magnesium alloy for biomedical application due to the good biocompatibility of Zn and Mn elements. Microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion properties and biocompatibility of the Mg-Zn-Mn alloys have been investigated by use of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, tensile testing, and blood hemolysis and cell toxicity. Microstructure observation has shown that the addition of Zn and the extrusion significantly refined the grain size of both the as-cast and the extruded magnesium alloys, which mainly contributes to the high tensile strength and good elongation. Polarization test has shown Zn could accelerate the formation of a passivation film, which provides good protection to the magnesium alloy against simulate body fluid. Cell culture and hemolysis tests have shown that the magnesium alloy did not have cell toxicity, showing good cytocompatibility, but the alloy caused hemolysis to blood system. It was suggested that surface modification have to be adopted to improve the blood compatibility of the magnesium alloy for the application in blood environment.

  18. Biomedical Applications of the Information-efficient Spectral Imaging Sensor (ISIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, S.M.; Levenson, R.

    1999-01-21

    The Information-efficient Spectral Imaging Sensor (ISIS) approach to spectral imaging seeks to bridge the gap between tuned multispectral and fixed hyperspectral imaging sensors. By allowing the definition of completely general spectral filter functions, truly optimal measurements can be made for a given task. These optimal measurements significantly improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and speed, minimize data volume and data rate, while preserving classification accuracy. The following paper investigates the application of the ISIS sensing approach in two sample biomedical applications: prostate and colon cancer screening. It is shown that in these applications, two to three optimal measurements are sufficient to capture the majority of classification information for critical sample constituents. In the prostate cancer example, the optimal measurements allow 8% relative improvement in classification accuracy of critical cell constituents over a red, green, blue (RGB) sensor. In the colon cancer example, use of optimal measurements boost the classification accuracy of critical cell constituents by 28% relative to the RGB sensor. In both cases, optimal measurements match the performance achieved by the entire hyperspectral data set. The paper concludes that an ISIS style spectral imager can acquire these optimal spectral images directly, allowing improved classification accuracy over an RGB sensor. Compared to a hyperspectral sensor, the ISIS approach can achieve similar classification accuracy using a significantly lower number of spectral samples, thus minimizing overall sample classification time and cost.

  19. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) based thermosensitive injectable hydrogels for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Amit; Ajazuddin; Khan, Junaid; Saraf, Swarnlata; Saraf, Shailendra

    2014-11-01

    Protein and peptide delivery by the use of stimuli triggered polymers remains to be the area of interest among the scientist and innovators. In-situ forming gel for the parenteral route in the form of hydrogel and implants are being utilized for various biomedical applications. The formulation of gel depends upon factors such as temperature modulation, pH changes, the presence of ions and ultra-violet irradiation, from which drug is released in a sustained and controlled manner. Among various stimuli triggered factors, thermoresponsive is the most potential one for the delivery of protein and peptides. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based copolymers play a crucial role as a biomedical material for biomedical applications, because of its biocompatibility, biodegradability, thermosensitivity and easy controlled characters. This review, stresses on the physicochemical property, stability and compositions prospects of smart thermoresponsive polymer specifically, PEG/Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) based thermoresponsive injectable hydrogels, recently utilized for biomedical applications. PEG-PNIPAAm based hydrogel exhibits good gelling mechanical strength and minimizes the initial burst effect of the drug. In addition, upon changing the composition and proportion of the copolymer molecular weight and ratio, the gelling time can be reduced to a great extent providing better sol-gel transition. The hydrogel formed by the same is able to release the drug over a long duration of time, meanwhile is also biocompatible and biodegradable. Manuscript will give the new researchers an idea about the potential and benefits of PNIPAAm based thermoresponsive hydrogels for the biomedical application. PMID:25092423

  20. Antibacterial polyelectrolyte-coated Mg alloys for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraz, Md. S.; Asmatulu, R.; Chen, Z.; Ceylan, M.; Mahapatro, A.; Yang, S. Y.

    2014-04-01

    This study deals with two biomedical subjects: corrosion rates of polyelectrolyte-coated magnesium (Mg) alloys, mainly used for biomedical purposes, and antibacterial properties of these alloys. Thin sheets of Mg alloys were coated with cationic polyelectrolyte chitosan (CHI) and anionic polyelectrolyte carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) using a layer-by-layer coating method and then embedded with antibacterial agents under vacuum. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was employed to analyze these samples in order to detect their corrosion properties at different conditions. In the electrochemical analysis section, a corrosion rate of 72 mille inches per year was found in a salt solution for the sample coated with a 12 phosphonic acid self-assembled monolayer and 9 CHI/CMC multilayers. In the antibacterial tests, gentamicin was used to investigate the effects of the drug embedded with the coated surfaces against the Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. Antibacterial studies were tested using the disk diffusion method. Based on the standard diameter of the zone of inhibition chart, the antibacterial diffusion from the surface strongly inhibited bacterial growth in the regions. The largest recorded diameter of the zone of inhibition was 50 mm for the pre-UV treated and gentamicin-loaded sample, which is more than three times the standard diameter.

  1. [Development and application of electroanalytical methods in biomedical fields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusu, Fumiyo

    2015-01-01

    To summarize our electroanalytical research in the biomedical field over the past 43 years, this review describes studies on specular reflection measurement, redox potential determination, amperometric acid sensing, HPLC with electrochemical detection, and potential oscillation across a liquid membrane. The specular reflection method was used for clarifying the adsorption of neurotransmitters and their related drugs onto a gold electrode and the interaction between dental alloys and compound iodine glycerin. A voltammetric screening test using a redox potential for the antioxidative effect of flavonoids was proposed. Amperometric acid sensing based on the measurement of the reduction prepeak current of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (VK3) or 3,5-di-tert-buty1-1,2-benzoquinone (DBBQ) was applied to determine acid values of fats and oils, titrable acidity of coffee, and enzyme activity of lipase, free fatty acids (FFAs) in serum, short-chain fatty acids in feces, etc. The electrode reactions of phenothiazines, catechins, and cholesterol were applied to biomedical analysis using HPLC with electrochemical detection. A three-channel electrochemical detection system was utilized for the sensitive determination of redox compounds in Chinese herbal medicines. The behavior of barbituric acid derivatives was examined based on potential oscillation measurements. PMID:25759051

  2. Recent research and development in titanium alloys for biomedical applications and healthcare goods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuo Niinomi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nb, Ta and Zr are the favorable non-toxic alloying elements for titanium alloys for biomedical applications. Low rigidity titanium alloys composed of non-toxic elements are getting much attention. The advantage of low rigidity titanium alloy for the healing of bone fracture and the remodeling of bone is successfully proved by fracture model made in tibia of rabbit. Ni-free super elastic and shape memory titanium alloys for biomedical applications are energetically developed. Titanium alloys for not only implants, but also dental products like crowns, dentures, etc. are also getting much attention in dentistry. Development of investment materials suitable for titanium alloys with high melting point is desired in dental precision castings. Bioactive surface modifications of titanium alloys for biomedical applications are very important for achieving further developed biocompatibility. Low cost titanium alloys for healthcare goods, like general wheel chairs, etc. has been recently proposed.

  3. Preparation of Magnetic Carbon Nanotubes (Mag-CNTs for Biomedical and Biotechnological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been widely studied for their potential applications in many fields from nanotechnology to biomedicine. The preparation of magnetic CNTs (Mag-CNTs opens new avenues in nanobiotechnology and biomedical applications as a consequence of their multiple properties embedded within the same moiety. Several preparation techniques have been developed during the last few years to obtain magnetic CNTs: grafting or filling nanotubes with magnetic ferrofluids or attachment of magnetic nanoparticles to CNTs or their polymeric coating. These strategies allow the generation of novel versatile systems that can be employed in many biotechnological or biomedical fields. Here, we review and discuss the most recent papers dealing with the preparation of magnetic CNTs and their application in biomedical and biotechnological fields.

  4. Polymeric AIE-based nanoprobes for biomedical applications: recent advances and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Ke; Liu, Meiying; Zhang, Xiqi; Tao, Lei; Chen, Yiwang; Wei, Yen

    2015-07-01

    The development of polymeric luminescent nanomaterials for biomedical applications has recently attracted a large amount of attention due to the remarkable advantages of these materials compared with small organic dyes and fluorescent inorganic nanomaterials. Among these polymeric luminescent nanomaterials, polymeric luminescent nanomaterials based on dyes with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) properties should be of great research interest due to their unique AIE properties, the designability of polymers and their multifunctional potential. In this review, the recent advances in the design and biomedical applications of polymeric luminescent nanomaterials based on AIE dyes is summarized. Various design strategies for incorporation of these AIE dyes into polymeric systems are included. The potential biomedical applications such as biological imaging, and use in biological sensors and theranostic systems of these polymeric AIE-based nanomaterials have also been highlighted. We trust this review will attract significant interest from scientists from different research fields in chemistry, materials, biology and interdisciplinary areas.

  5. PLA/chitosan/keratin composites for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanase, Constantin Edi, E-mail: etanase@live.com [Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, ‘Grigore T. Popa’ University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 9-13 Kogalniceanu Street, 700454 Iasi (Romania); Spiridon, Iuliana [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania)

    2014-07-01

    Novel composites based on PLA, chitosan and keratin was obtained via blend preparation. The goal of this contribution was to evaluate mechanical and in vitro behavior of the composites. The results point out composites with improved Young modulus and decreased tensile strength, significant increase in hardness (compared to PLA) and a good uptake of the surface properties. Biological assessments using human osteosarcoma cell line on these composites indicate a good viability/proliferation outcome. Hence preliminary results regarding mechanical behavior and in vitro osteoblast response suggest that these composites might have prospective application in medical field. - Highlights: • PLA, chitosan and keratin composites are prepared by blend preparation. • PLA, chitosan and keratin composites present improved mechanical properties and water uptake compare to PLA. • PLA, chitosan and keratin composites present good in vitro behavior.

  6. PLA/chitosan/keratin composites for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel composites based on PLA, chitosan and keratin was obtained via blend preparation. The goal of this contribution was to evaluate mechanical and in vitro behavior of the composites. The results point out composites with improved Young modulus and decreased tensile strength, significant increase in hardness (compared to PLA) and a good uptake of the surface properties. Biological assessments using human osteosarcoma cell line on these composites indicate a good viability/proliferation outcome. Hence preliminary results regarding mechanical behavior and in vitro osteoblast response suggest that these composites might have prospective application in medical field. - Highlights: • PLA, chitosan and keratin composites are prepared by blend preparation. • PLA, chitosan and keratin composites present improved mechanical properties and water uptake compare to PLA. • PLA, chitosan and keratin composites present good in vitro behavior

  7. Antibiotic and chemotherapeutic enhanced three-dimensional printer filaments and constructs for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weisman JA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jeffery A Weisman,1 James C Nicholson,2 Karthik Tappa,1 UdayaBhanu Jammalamadaka,1 Chester G Wilson,2 David K Mills1,3 1Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science, 2Nanosystems Engineering, 3School of Biological Sciences, Louisiana Technical University, Ruston, LA, USAAbstract: Three-dimensional (3D printing and additive manufacturing holds potential for highly personalized medicine, and its introduction into clinical medicine will have many implications for patient care. This paper demonstrates the first application of 3D printing as a method for the potential sustained delivery of antibiotic and chemotherapeutic drugs from constructs for patient treatment. Our design is focused on the on-demand production of anti-infective and chemotherapeutic filaments that can be used to create discs, beads, catheters, or any medical construct using a 3D printing system. The design parameters for this project were to create a system that could be modularly loaded with bioactive agents. All 3D-printed constructs were loaded with either gentamicin or methotrexate and were optimized for efficient and extended antibacterial and cancer growth-inhibiting cytostatic activity. Preliminary results demonstrate that combining gentamicin and methotrexate with polylactic acid forms a composite possessing a superior combination of strength, versatility, and enhanced drug delivery. Antibacterial effects and a reduction in proliferation of osteosarcoma cells were observed with all constructs, attesting to the technical and clinical viability of our composites. In this study, 3D constructs were loaded with gentamicin and methotrexate, but the method can be extended to many other drugs. This method could permit clinicians to provide customized and tailored treatment that allows patient-specific treatment of disease and has significant potential for use as a tunable drug delivery system with sustained-release capacity for an array of biomedical applications

  8. LIF and fast imaging plasma jet characterization relevant for NTP biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of biomedical application, many publications report on non-thermal plasma jet potentialities for cell behaviour modifications in cancer treatment, wound healing or sterilization. However most previous plasma jet characterizations were performed when jets expend freely in air. Only recently has the influence of the targeted surface been properly considered. In this work, modifications induced by various types of targets, mimicking the biological samples, in the plasma propagation and production of hydroxyl radicals are evidenced through time-resolved intensified charge-coupled device imaging and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. A LIF model, also specifically dedicated to estimate air and water penetration inside the jet, is used and proves to be well adapted to characterize the plasma jet under biomedical application conditions. It is shown that the plasma produced by the plasma gun counter-propagates after impinging the surface which, for the same operating parameters, leads to an increase of almost one order of magnitude in the maximum OH density (from ∼2 × 1013 cm−3 for open-air propagation to ∼1 × 1014 cm−3 for a grounded metal target). The nature of the target, especially its electrical conductivity, as well as gas flow rate and voltage amplitude are playing a key role in the production of hydroxyl radicals. The strong interplay between gas flow dynamics and plasma propagation is here confirmed by air and water distribution measurements. The need for a multi-diagnostic approach, as well as great care in setting up the in situ characterization of plasma jets, is here emphasized. Special attention must not only be paid to voltage amplitude and gas flow rate but also to the nature, humidity and conductivity of the target. (paper)

  9. Evaluation of Ni-free Zr–Cu–Fe–Al bulk metallic glass for biomedical implant applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A Zr62.5Cu22.5Fe5Al10 bulk metallic glass (BMG) with 50 GPa elastic modulus was used. ► This Ni-free Zr-based BMG had lower metal ion release rate than the commercial Ti. ► This Ni-free Zr-based BMG had better proteins adsorption than the commercial Ti. ► This Ni-free Zr-based BMG has a high potential for biomedical implant applications. -- Abstract: This study was conducted to investigate the surface characteristics, including the chemical composition, metal ion release, protein adsorption, and cell adhesion, of a Ni-free Zr-based (Zr62.5Cu22.5Fe5Al10) bulk metallic glass (BMG) with low elastic modulus for biomedical implant applications. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to identify the surface chemical composition and the protein (albumin and fibronectin) adsorption of the specimen. The metal ions released from the specimen in simulated blood plasma and artificial saliva solutions were measured using an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. The cell adhesion, in terms of the morphology, focal adhesion complex, and skeletal arrangement, of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was evaluated using scanning electron microscope observations and immunofluorescent staining. For comparison purposes, the above-mentioned tests were also carried out on the widely used biomedical metal, Ti. The results showed that the main component on the outermost surface of the amorphous Zr62.5Cu22.5Fe5Al10 BMG was ZrO2 with small amounts of Cu, Al, and Fe oxides. The released metal ions from Zr62.5Cu22.5Fe5Al10 BMG were well below the critical concentrations that cause negative biological effects. The Zr62.5Cu22.5Fe5Al10 BMG had a greater adsorption capacity for albumin and fibronectin than that of commercial biomedical Ti. The Zr62.5Cu22.5Fe5Al10 BMG surface showed an attached cell number similar to the Ti surface but had better cell adhesion morphology and cytoskeletal arrangement. Based on the present results, the Ni-free Zr62.5Cu22.5Fe5Al10

  10. Biomedical applications of PIXE [Particle Induced X-ray Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern medicine recognizes a series of diseases for which it has been established that one or more trace elements is a significant factor in the etiology. Research about the adverse or beneficial effects of minerals and metals as well as nonmetals concern, at present, 17 elements, the essentiality of which has been proven or is indicated. Analytical methods with multielement capacity are required to study the complex phenomena involved in trace-element biology. PIXE (Particle-Induced X-ray Emission) is such a method with concentration sensitivity for most elements down to the parts-per-million level. When it comes to analytical efforts in biomedicine, the method is comparable to X-ray fluorescence. The greatest advantages accrue when the PIXE method is applied in a microprobe with micron resolution. Individual cells can thus be investigated for their contents of major and trace elements. Employing raster scanning in the microprobe, two-dimensional elemental maps can be constructed for most elements in tissue sections. In this paper, an overview of both biological and medical applications is presented. Special emphasis is paid to microprobe applications to toxicology, immunotoxicology and the role of trace elements in diabetes

  11. A biobank management model applicable to biomedical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patenaude Johane

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The work of Research Ethics Boards (REBs, especially when involving genetics research and biobanks, has become more challenging with the growth of biotechnology and biomedical research. Some REBs have even rejected research projects where the use of a biobank with coded samples was an integral part of the study, the greatest fear being the lack of participant protection and uncontrolled use of biological samples or related genetic data. The risks of discrimination and stigmatization are a recurrent issue. In light of the increasing interest in biomedical research and the resulting benefits to the health of participants, it is imperative that practical solutions be found to the problems associated with the management of biobanks: namely, protecting the integrity of the research participants, as well as guaranteeing the security and confidentiality of the participant's information. Methods We aimed to devise a practical and efficient model for the management of biobanks in biomedical research where a medical archivist plays the pivotal role as a data-protection officer. The model had to reduce the burden placed on REBs responsible for the evaluation of genetics projects and, at the same time, maximize the protection of research participants. Results The proposed model includes the following: 1 a means of protecting the information in biobanks, 2 offers ways to provide follow-up information requested about the participants, 3 protects the participant's confidentiality and 4 adequately deals with the ethical issues at stake in biobanking. Conclusion Until a governmental governance body is established in Quebec to guarantee the protection of research participants and establish harmonized guidelines for the management of biobanks in medical research, it is definitely up to REBs to find solutions that the present lack of guidelines poses. The model presented in this article offers a practical solution on a day-to-day basis for REBs

  12. Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangling Gu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA coated iron oxide nanoparticles have served as a feasible, robust, and functional platform for various biomedical applications. However, there is scarcely a systemic paper reviewed about such functionalising nanomaterials to date. In this review, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles, the mechanism of dopamine self-oxidation, the interaction between iron oxide and dopamine, and the functionality and the safety assessment of dopamine modified iron oxide nanoparticles as well as the biomedical application of such nanoparticles are discussed. To enlighten the future research, the opportunities and the limitations of functionalising iron oxide nanoparticles coated with PDA are also analyzed.

  13. Biomedical applications of medium energy particle beams at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At LAMPF an 800-MeV proton accelerator is used to produce intense beams of secondary protons, pi mesons, and muons which are being employed in several areas of biomedical research. The primary proton beam is used to produce short-lived radioisotopes of clinical interest. Carefully tailored secondary proton beams are used to obtain density reconstructions of samples with a dose much less than that required by x-ray CT scanners. The elemental composition of tissue samples is being determined non-destructively with muonic x-ray analysis. Finally, an extensive program, with physical, biological, and clinical components, is underway to evaluate negative pi mesons for use in cancer radiotherapy. The techniques used in these experiments and recent results are described

  14. Syntheses and biomedical applications of hollow micro-/nano-spheres with large-through-holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Yinsong; Chen, Min; Wu, Limin

    2016-02-01

    Hollow micro-/nano-spheres with large-through-holes in shells (denoted as HMLS) have demonstrated great potential in biomedical applications owing to the combination of hollow structure and their porous shells. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of synthesis methods of HMLS obtained from the template-directed approach, shell-breaking method, Ostwald ripening and galvanic replacement primarily based on the formation mechanism of the large-through-holes in the shell. We further discuss the biomedical applications of HMLS including guest adsorption and encapsulation of proteins, drug/gene delivery, biomedical imaging, and theranostics. We conclude this review with some perspectives on the future research and development of the HMLS with desired morphologies and properties. PMID:26658638

  15. Fabrication and characterization of gold nanoparticle reinforced Chitosan nanocomposites for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nimitt G.

    temperatures using instrumented indentation techniques. The obtained films were confirmed to be biocompatible by their ability to support the growth and proliferation of human tissue cells in vitro. Statistical analysis on mechanical properties and biocompatibility results, were conducted. Results revealed significant enhancement on both the mechanical properties and cell adherence and proliferation. The results will enhance our understanding of the effect of nanostructures reinforcement on these important functional polymeric thin films for potential biomedical applications.

  16. Processing and characterization of poly(lactic acid based bioactive composites for biomedical scaffold application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Goswami

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The current study focuses on three-components material systems (poly(lactic acid (PLA, poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL and wollastonite (W in view of possible application a biomedical scaffold constructs. Melt extruded PLA/PCL/W composites (PLCL15, PLCLW1, PLCLW4, PLCLW8 containing 0, 1, 4, 8 phr filler respectively are batch foamed using compressed CO2 and the porous foams are studied for in vitro biocompatibility by seeding osteoblast cells. SEM images of the unfoamed polymers show immiscibility in all compositions. Materials have been tested under compressive load using dry and wet conditions (using phosphate buffered saline at pH 7.4 for in vitro study. Contact angle measurement shows enhanced hydrophilicity in the composites changing from 80° in PLCL15 to 72° in PLCLW8. The foams are found to be microcellular (5–8 µm in morphology showing quite uniform pore distribution in the composites. The prepared foams, when studied as scaffold constructs, show osteoblast cell attachment and proliferation over the incubation period of 7 days. As expected, PLCLW8 containing highest amount of CaSiO3 supported maximum cell growth on its surface as visible from MTT assay data and SEM scans.

  17. Revealing the potential of squid chitosan-based structures for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reys, L L; Silva, S S; Oliveira, J M; Caridade, S G; Mano, J F; Silva, T H; Reis, R L

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, much attention has been given to different marine organisms, namely as potential sources of valuable materials with a vast range of properties and characteristics. In this work, β-chitin was isolated from the endoskeleton of the giant squid Dosidicus gigas and further deacetylated to produce chitosan. Then, the squid chitosan was processed into membranes and scaffolds using solvent casting and freeze-drying, respectively, to assess their potential biomedical application. The developed membranes have shown to be stiffer and less hydrophobic than those obtained with commercial chitosan. On the other hand, the morphological characterization of the developed scaffolds, by SEM and micro-computed tomography, revealed that the matrices were formed with a lamellar structure. The findings also indicated that the treatment with ethanol prior to neutralization with sodium hydroxide caused the formation of larger pores and loss of some lamellar features. The in vitro cell culture study has shown that all chitosan scaffolds exhibited a non-cytotoxic effect over the mouse fibroblast-like cell line, L929 cells. Thus, chitosan produced from the endoskeletons of the giant squid Dosidicus gigas has proven to be a valuable alternative to existing commercial materials when considering its use as biomaterial. PMID:23715133

  18. Revealing the potential of squid chitosan-based structures for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, much attention has been given to different marine organisms, namely as potential sources of valuable materials with a vast range of properties and characteristics. In this work, β-chitin was isolated from the endoskeleton of the giant squid Dosidicus gigas and further deacetylated to produce chitosan. Then, the squid chitosan was processed into membranes and scaffolds using solvent casting and freeze-drying, respectively, to assess their potential biomedical application. The developed membranes have shown to be stiffer and less hydrophobic than those obtained with commercial chitosan. On the other hand, the morphological characterization of the developed scaffolds, by SEM and micro-computed tomography, revealed that the matrices were formed with a lamellar structure. The findings also indicated that the treatment with ethanol prior to neutralization with sodium hydroxide caused the formation of larger pores and loss of some lamellar features. The in vitro cell culture study has shown that all chitosan scaffolds exhibited a non-cytotoxic effect over the mouse fibroblast-like cell line, L929 cells. Thus, chitosan produced from the endoskeletons of the giant squid Dosidicus gigas has proven to be a valuable alternative to existing commercial materials when considering its use as biomaterial. (paper)

  19. Engineering of microscale three-dimensional pancreatic islet models in vitro and their biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin; Wang, Lin; Han, Shuang; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes now is the most common chronic disease in the world inducing heavy burden for the people's health. Based on this, diabetes research such as islet function has become a hot topic in medical institutes of the world. Today, in medical institutes, the conventional experiment platform in vitro is monolayer cell culture. However, with the development of micro- and nano-technologies, several microengineering methods have been developed to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) islet models in vitro which can better mimic the islet of pancreases in vivo. These in vitro islet models have shown better cell function than monolayer cells, indicating their great potential as better experimental platforms to elucidate islet behaviors under both physiological and pathological conditions, such as the molecular mechanisms of diabetes and clinical islet transplantation. In this review, we present the state-of-the-art advances in the microengineering methods for fabricating microscale islet models in vitro. We hope this will help researchers to better understand the progress in the engineering 3D islet models and their biomedical applications such as drug screening and islet transplantation. PMID:25669871

  20. The antibacterial properties and biocompatibility of a Ti–Cu sintered alloy for biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antibacterial activity, the cytotoxicity and the cell function of a sintered Ti-10 wt% Cu alloy were investigated in order to assess the suitability of the alloy for biomedical application. The antibacterial activity of the alloy was investigated by a plate-count method and the cytotoxicity was studied by examining the MG63 cell response by CCK8 assessment. The cell function was monitored by measuring the AKP activity. The Cu ion released from the Ti–Cu alloy was also measured by an inductively coupled plasma spectrometer at different immersion durations. The results show that the antibacterial rates of the alloy against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus increase with an increase in the incubation duration. After 7 h of incubation, the alloy showed an antibacterial rate of 91.66% against S. aureus and 99. 01% against E. coli. With a further extension of incubation time to 24 h, the antibacterial rate increased to 100% against S. aureus and 99.93% against E. coli. No cytotoxicity was observed on the alloy by a CKK8 test during three days of incubation in comparison with commercially available pure titanium (cp-Ti). AKP test results showed a significantly high AKP value (p = 0.001 < 0.01) on the Ti–Cu alloy on day 1. The Cu ion release was thought to contribute to the strong antibacterial property, but the Cu ion did not lead to cell cytotoxicity. Strong antibacterial activity and good cell biocompatibility suggest that the Ti–Cu alloy could reduce bacterial infection and have a potential application as an implant material. (paper)

  1. Design and surface modification of potential luminomagnetic nanocarriers for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Ranu K., E-mail: ranu.dutta16@gmail.com; Sharma, Prashant K.; Pandey, Avinash C. [University of Allahabad, Nanophosphor Application Centre (India)

    2010-05-15

    Targeted delivery of therapeutics possesses the potential to localize therapeutic agents to a specific tissue as a mechanism to enhance treatment efficacy and mitigate side effects. Moeities that combine imaging and therapeutic modalities in a single macromolecular construct may confer advantages in the development and applications of nanomedicine. Here is an insight into the synthesis of luminomagnetic (luminescent and magnetic, simultaneously) nanocarriers of ZnO:Fe, synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method and surface modified by the ligand folate. This functionalized luminomagnetic nanocarrier system is a bioconjugation approach which combines the specificity of folate receptors on cancer cells with the excellent optical and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles so as to develop biocompatible molecular imaging agents, drug delivery systems, and hyperthermia agents. The vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) studies showed clear hysteresis loops having coercivity 5.1 mT with corresponding magnetization of remanence 7.6 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, indicating strong magnetic character of the samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements show that these nanoparticles are spherical with 6-9 nm size and hence are quite appropriate for in vivo applications as well. The immobilization of folic acid was confirmed by fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis. All these properties make these luminomagnetic nanocarriers one of the most feasible candidates for folate receptor-mediated biomedical applications.

  2. Quantum dots in biomedical applications: advances and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinteza, Ludmila Otilia

    2010-09-01

    In the past two decades, nanotechnology has made great progress in generating novel materials with superior properties. Quantum dots (QDs) are an example of such materials. With unique optical properties, they have proven to be useful in a wide range of applications in life sciences, especially as a better alternative to overcome the shortcomings of conventional fluorophores. Current progress in the synthesis of biocompatible QDs allows for the possibility of producing a large variety of semiconductor nanocrystals in terms of size, surface functionality, bioconjugation, and targeting facilities. Strategies to enhance the water-dispersibility and biocompatibility of these nanoparticles have been developed, involving various encapsulation techniques and surface functionalization. The major obstacle in the clinical use of QDs remains their toxicity, and the systematic investigation on harmful effects of QDs both to humans and to the environment has become critical. Many examples of the experimental use of QDs prove their far-reaching potential for the study of intracellular processes at the molecular level, high resolution cellular imaging, and in vivo observation of cell trafficking. Biosensing methods based on QD bioconjugates proved to be successful in rapid detection of pathogens, and significant improvements are expected in early cancer diagnostic, non-conventional therapy of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. TiO2/PCL hybrid materials synthesized via sol–gel technique for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present work has been the synthesis of organic/inorganic hybrid materials based on titanium dioxide and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) to be used in the biomedical field. Several materials have been synthesized using sol–gel methods by adding different amounts of polymer to the inorganic sol. The obtained gels have been characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The FT-IR data allowed us to hypothesize that the structure formed was that of an interpenetrating network, realized by hydrogen bonds between Ti-OH groups in the sol–gel intermediate species and carbonyl groups in the polymer repeating units. SEM and AFM analyses highlighted that the obtained materials were nanostructurated hybrids. To evaluate the biological properties of the hybrids, their bioactivity and cytotoxicity were investigated as a function of the PCL amount. The bioactivity of the synthesized systems was proven by the formation of a hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of samples soaked in a fluid simulating human blood plasma (SBF). MTT cytotoxicity tests and Trypan Blue dye exclusion tests were carried out exposing NIH-3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts for 24 and 48 h to extracts from the investigated hybrid materials. The results showed that all the hybrids had a non-cytotoxic effect on target cells. - Highlights: • TiO2/PCL hybrids were obtained by the sol–gel process for biomedical applications. • Synthesized materials were found to be first-class hybrid nanocomposites. • Hybrids appear to be bioactive, a fundamental characteristic for osseointegration. • MTT and Trypan Blue viability test show that the materials are biocompatible. • The organic phase is able to modulate the biocompatibility of the materials

  4. Engineering oligo(ethylene glycol) based nonfouling surfaces and microstructures for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongwei

    This thesis presents the initial development of oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) based "nonfouling"---protein and cell resistant---coatings that can be applied to a wide range of biomedical applications. The hypothesis underlying this work is that a high density of OEG will eliminate nonspecific protein adsorption thus reduce or eradicate undesired surface phenomena, such as poor biocompatibility, which are direct consequences of the nonspecific protein adsorption. A generalized method for creating functionalized nonfouling surfaces was developed by combining two strategies, namely "Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl methacrylate (SI-ATRP of OEGMA)" and "Modular design of initiator", demonstrated on gold (metallic materials), glass and silicon oxide (hydroxylated substrates). SI-ATRP was able to achieve an OEG coating with a density higher than all the pre-existing techniques could achieve. It also provided control over the coating thickness and architecture that are not easily controlled by other techniques. Thickness-density profile of poly(OEGMA) was constructed based on SI-ATRP from mixed SAMs on gold. For the first time, we constructed a map of protein resistance of PEG coated surfaces, which reveals the relationship between the poly(OEGMA) coatings and their protein adsorption. Besides its scientific implications, the practical use (from an engineering point of view) of these results is that the information shall be instructive in designing nonfouling surfaces by providing critical structural parameters. This thesis also demonstrates integration of SI-ATRP with micro and nano scale pattern fabrication, which further expands the applications of this technology. In vitro cell culturing on patterned surfaces confirmed that high-density OEG coatings were exceptionally nonfouling even in physiological milieu, which shows great promise for the in vivo study of OEG coatings. A prototype protein microarray was

  5. Surface characterization of anodized zirconium for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, A. Gomez [Division corrosion - INTEMA, Universidad Nacional del Mar del Plata - CONICET, Juan B. Justo 4302, (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Schreiner, W. [LSI - LANSEN, Departamento de Fisica, UFPR, Curitiba (Brazil); Duffo, G. [Departamento de Materiales, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica - CONICET, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de Gral. San Martin, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cere, S., E-mail: smcere@fi.mdp.edu.ar [Division corrosion - INTEMA, Universidad Nacional del Mar del Plata - CONICET, Juan B. Justo 4302, (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2011-05-15

    Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of zirconium make this material suitable for biomedical implants. Its good in vivo performance is mainly due to the presence of a protective oxide layer that minimizes corrosion rate, diminishes the amount of metallic ions released to the biological media and facilitates the osseointegration process. Since the implant surface is the region in contact with living tissues, the characteristics of the surface film are of great interest. Surface modification is a route to enhance both biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of permanent implant materials. Anodizing is presented as an interesting process to modify metal surfaces with good reproducibility and independence of the geometry. In this work the surface of zirconium before and after anodizing in 1 mol/L phosphoric acid solution at a fixed potential between 3 and 30 V, was characterized by means of several surface techniques. It was found that during anodization the surface oxide grows with an inhomogeneous coverage on zirconium surface, modifying the topography. The incorporation of P from the electrolyte to the surface oxide during the anodizing process changes the surface chemistry. After 30 days of immersion in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) solution, Ca-P rich compounds were present on anodized zirconium.

  6. Functionality of porous silicon particles: Surface modification for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallach, D.; Recio Sanchez, G.; Munoz Noval, A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada y Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Investigaciones Biomedicas en Red, Biomateriales, Bioingenieria y Nanomedicina (CIBERbbn) (Spain); Manso Silvan, M., E-mail: miguel.manso@uam.es [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada y Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Investigaciones Biomedicas en Red, Biomateriales, Bioingenieria y Nanomedicina (CIBERbbn) (Spain); Ceccone, G. [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, European Commission, 21020 Ispra (Italy); Martin Palma, R.J.; Torres Costa, V.; Martinez Duart, J.M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada y Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Investigaciones Biomedicas en Red, Biomateriales, Bioingenieria y Nanomedicina (CIBERbbn) (Spain)

    2010-05-25

    Porous silicon-based particles (PSps) with tailored physical and biological properties have recently attracted great attention given their biomedical potential. Within this context, the objective of the present work is to optimize the experimental parameters for the formation of biofunctional mesoporous PSps. Their functionality has been studied on the one hand by analyzing the fluorescence characteristics, such as tunable narrow band emission and fluorescence aging for PSps with different molecular capping. With regard to the biofunctional characteristics, two different molecular end-capping processes have been assayed: antifouling polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polar binding amino silanes (APTS), which were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Both PEG and APTS binding to the particles could be confirmed from the analysis of Si 2p and C 1s XPS core level spectra. The finding that these PSp-molecule conjugates allow the reduction of fluorescence degradation with time in solution is of interest for the development of cellular or tissue markers. From the morphological point of view, PEG termination is of special interest allowing the PSps after an ultrasonic treatment to get spherical shapes in the micron scale. The functionality as solid state dyes is preliminarily evaluated by direct fluorescence imaging.

  7. Surface characterization of anodized zirconium for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, A. Gomez; Schreiner, W.; Duffó, G.; Ceré, S.

    2011-05-01

    Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of zirconium make this material suitable for biomedical implants. Its good in vivo performance is mainly due to the presence of a protective oxide layer that minimizes corrosion rate, diminishes the amount of metallic ions released to the biological media and facilitates the osseointegration process. Since the implant surface is the region in contact with living tissues, the characteristics of the surface film are of great interest. Surface modification is a route to enhance both biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of permanent implant materials. Anodizing is presented as an interesting process to modify metal surfaces with good reproducibility and independence of the geometry. In this work the surface of zirconium before and after anodizing in 1 mol/L phosphoric acid solution at a fixed potential between 3 and 30 V, was characterized by means of several surface techniques. It was found that during anodization the surface oxide grows with an inhomogeneous coverage on zirconium surface, modifying the topography. The incorporation of P from the electrolyte to the surface oxide during the anodizing process changes the surface chemistry. After 30 days of immersion in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) solution, Ca-P rich compounds were present on anodized zirconium.

  8. Surface characterization of anodized zirconium for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of zirconium make this material suitable for biomedical implants. Its good in vivo performance is mainly due to the presence of a protective oxide layer that minimizes corrosion rate, diminishes the amount of metallic ions released to the biological media and facilitates the osseointegration process. Since the implant surface is the region in contact with living tissues, the characteristics of the surface film are of great interest. Surface modification is a route to enhance both biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of permanent implant materials. Anodizing is presented as an interesting process to modify metal surfaces with good reproducibility and independence of the geometry. In this work the surface of zirconium before and after anodizing in 1 mol/L phosphoric acid solution at a fixed potential between 3 and 30 V, was characterized by means of several surface techniques. It was found that during anodization the surface oxide grows with an inhomogeneous coverage on zirconium surface, modifying the topography. The incorporation of P from the electrolyte to the surface oxide during the anodizing process changes the surface chemistry. After 30 days of immersion in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) solution, Ca-P rich compounds were present on anodized zirconium.

  9. Functionality of porous silicon particles: Surface modification for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porous silicon-based particles (PSps) with tailored physical and biological properties have recently attracted great attention given their biomedical potential. Within this context, the objective of the present work is to optimize the experimental parameters for the formation of biofunctional mesoporous PSps. Their functionality has been studied on the one hand by analyzing the fluorescence characteristics, such as tunable narrow band emission and fluorescence aging for PSps with different molecular capping. With regard to the biofunctional characteristics, two different molecular end-capping processes have been assayed: antifouling polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polar binding amino silanes (APTS), which were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Both PEG and APTS binding to the particles could be confirmed from the analysis of Si 2p and C 1s XPS core level spectra. The finding that these PSp-molecule conjugates allow the reduction of fluorescence degradation with time in solution is of interest for the development of cellular or tissue markers. From the morphological point of view, PEG termination is of special interest allowing the PSps after an ultrasonic treatment to get spherical shapes in the micron scale. The functionality as solid state dyes is preliminarily evaluated by direct fluorescence imaging.

  10. A Biomedical Application of Activated Carbon Adsorption: An Experiment Using Acetaminophen and N-Acetylcysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybolt, Thomas R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Illustrates an interesting biomedical application of adsorption from solution and demonstrates some of the factors that influence the in vivo adsorption of drug molecules onto activated charcoal. Uses acetaminophen and N-acetylcysteine for the determination. Suggests several related experiments. (MVL)

  11. ANTIMICROBIAL REAGENTS AS FUNCTIONAL FINISHING FOR TEXTILES INTENDED FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS. I. SYNTHETIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina Zanoaga

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article offers an overview of some contemporary antimicrobial (biocides and biostatics agents used as functional finishing for textiles intended for biomedical applications. It reviews only synthetic agents, namely quaternary ammonium compounds, halogenated phenols, polybiguanides, N-halamines, and renewable peroxides, as a part of an extensive study currently in progress.

  12. ANTIMICROBIAL REAGENTS AS FUNCTIONAL FINISHING FOR TEXTILES INTENDED FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS. I. SYNTHETIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    OpenAIRE

    Madalina Zanoaga; Fulga Tanasa

    2014-01-01

    This article offers an overview of some contemporary antimicrobial (biocides and biostatics) agents used as functional finishing for textiles intended for biomedical applications. It reviews only synthetic agents, namely quaternary ammonium compounds, halogenated phenols, polybiguanides, N-halamines, and renewable peroxides, as a part of an extensive study currently in progress.

  13. Introduction to the Special Section on Biomedical Devices for Personal Health Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I-Ming CHEN

    2011-01-01

    @@ This Special Section of Frontiers of Mechanical Engineering (FME) is dedicated to the topic of Biomedical Devices for Personal Health Applications.To reflect the fast pace of development in this area of research, a number of special sessions were firstly organized in the 2010 IEEE International Conference on Robotics, Automation, and Mechatronics (RAM 2010) from 28 to 30 June 2010 in Singapore.

  14. Photonic Sensors Based on Flexible Materials with FBGs for Use on Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Alexandre Ferreira da; Rocha, Rui Pedro; Carmo, João Paulo; Correia, José Higino

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is intended for presenting biomedical applications of FBGs embedded into flexible carriers for enhancing the sensitivity and to provide interference-free instrumentation. This work was fully supported by the Algoritmi’s Strategic Project UI 319-2011-2012, under the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology grant Pest C/EEI/UI0319/2011.

  15. Viruses, Artificial Viruses and Virus-Based Structures for Biomedical Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick; Schirhagl, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Nanobiomaterials such as virus particles and artificial virus particles offer tremendous opportunities to develop new biomedical applications such as drug- or gene-delivery, imaging and sensing but also improve understanding of biological mechanisms. Recent advances within the field of virus-based s

  16. Filtration track membranes and their biomedical applications; Trekowe membrany filtracyjne oraz ich zastosowania biomedyczne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buczkowski, M.; Wawszczak, D.; Starosta, W. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-10-01

    The characteristics of track filtration membranes has been performed. The investigation of radiation resistance has been carried out for different types of polymer foil used as a membrane material. Biomedical applications of track filtration membranes have been presented and discussed. 10 refs, 10 figs.

  17. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Electrodes for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Meyyappan, M.

    2008-01-01

    A nanotube array based on vertically aligned nanotubes or carbon nanofibers has been invented for use in localized electrical stimulation and recording of electrical responses in selected regions of an animal body, especially including the brain. There are numerous established, emerging, and potential applications for localized electrical stimulation and/or recording, including treatment of Parkinson s disease, Tourette s syndrome, and chronic pain, and research on electrochemical effects involved in neurotransmission. Carbon-nanotube-based electrodes offer potential advantages over metal macroelectrodes (having diameters of the order of a millimeter) and microelectrodes (having various diameters ranging down to tens of microns) heretofore used in such applications. These advantages include the following: a) Stimuli and responses could be localized at finer scales of spatial and temporal resolution, which is at subcellular level, with fewer disturbances to, and less interference from, adjacent regions. b) There would be less risk of hemorrhage on implantation because nano-electrode-based probe tips could be configured to be less traumatic. c) Being more biocompatible than are metal electrodes, carbon-nanotube-based electrodes and arrays would be more suitable for long-term or permanent implantation. d) Unlike macro- and microelectrodes, a nano-electrode could penetrate a cell membrane with minimal disruption. Thus, for example, a nanoelectrode could be used to generate an action potential inside a neuron or in proximity of an active neuron zone. Such stimulation may be much more effective than is extra- or intracellular stimulation via a macro- or microelectrode. e) The large surface area of an array at a micron-scale footprint of non-insulated nanoelectrodes coated with a suitable electrochemically active material containing redox ingredients would make it possible to obtain a pseudocapacitance large enough to dissipate a relatively large amount of electric charge

  18. [The application progresses of the two dimensional electrophoresis in biomedical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuebin; Tang, Hong

    2011-12-01

    Research about proteomics is of great significance. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) is a core technology of proteomics research, which is used for analysis of the protein extracted from cell, tissue and other sam-nology of proteomics research, which is used for analysis of the protein extracted from cell, tissue and other samples. In recent years, 2-DE combined with mass spectrum (MS) technology is widely used to identify differentialples. In recent years, 2-DE combined with mass spectrum (MS) technology is widely used to identify differential protein, to screen tumor markers, to detect drug targets and so on. Proteomics research has become key technology,protein, to screen tumor markers, to detect drug targets and so on. Proteomics research has become key technology, with its high throughput, high resolution and repeatability, and is widely used in various fields, particularly in bio-with its high throughput, high resolution and repeatability, and is widely used in various fields, particularly in biomedical research. We provided here a short review about the application development of 2-DE, especially its contribution on biological medicine. PMID:22295720

  19. Synthesis of hybrid polymer networks of irradiated chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybrid polymer network (HPN) of chitosan (CS) with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) was prepared by using radiation degraded chitosan. The chemical structure of chitosan promoted chain scission reactions upon irradiation which lowered its molecular weight and also changed its hydrophilic balance. The effect of molecular weight and hydrophilicity of irradiated chitosan on structural, thermal and surface properties of the HPN were studied. The increased hydrophilicity of irradiated chitosan lowered the crystallinity of the HPN. The endothermic peak was shifted towards higher temperatures in HPN having irradiated chitosan. The decreased value of contact angle with increasing dose, further confirmed the increased hydrophilicity of the HPN. The cytotoxicity results of HPN showed the viability of human fibroblast cells and their non-toxic nature making it suitable for tissue engineering and other biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Biocompatible HPN are prepared from irradiated chitosan. • XRD showed the decrease in crystallinity of the HPN with increase in dose. • Lowering of contact angle with increase in dose showed increased hydrophilicity. • Cytotoxicity results showed nontoxicity of HPN and viability of the cells

  20. Mid-Infrared Fiber-Coupled Photoacoustic Sensor for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Kottmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical devices employed in therapy, diagnostics and for self-monitoring often require a high degree of flexibility and compactness. Many near infrared (NIR optical fiber-coupled systems meet these requirements and are employed on a daily basis. However, mid-infrared (MIR fibers-based systems have not yet found their way to routine application in medicine. In this work we present the implementation of the first MIR fiber-coupled photoacoustic sensor for the investigation of condensed samples in the MIR fingerprint region. The light of an external-cavity quantum-cascade laser (1010–1095 cm-1 is delivered by a silver halide fiber, which is attached to the PA cell. The PA chamber is conically shaped to perfectly match the beam escaping the fiber and to minimize the cell volume. This results in a compact and handy sensor for investigations of biological samples and the monitoring of constituents both in vitro and in vivo. The performance of the fiber-coupled PA sensor is demonstrated by sensing glucose in aqueous solutions. These measurements yield a detection limit of 57 mg/dL (SNR = 1. Furthermore, the fiber-coupled sensor has been applied to record human skin spectra at different body sites to illustrate its flexibility.

  1. Ion beam modification of surfaces for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human life expectancy increased significantly within the last century. Hence, medical care must ever be improved. Optimizing artificial replacements such as hip joints or stents etc. is of special interest. For this purpose, new materials are constantly developed or known ones modified. This work focused on the possibility to change the chemistry and topography of biomedically relevant materials such as diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) by means of ion beam irradiation. Mass-separated ion beam deposition was used in order to synthesize DLC layers with a high sp3 content (> 70%), a sufficiently smooth surface (RMS<1 nm) and a manageable film thickness (50 nm). The chemistry of the DLC layers was changed by ion beam doping with different ion species (Ag,Ti) and concentrations. Additionally, the surface topography of silicon and titanium dioxide was altered by ion beam irradiation under non-perpendicular angle of incidence. The created periodic wave structures (so-called ripples) were characterized and their dependency on the ion energy was investigated. Moreover, ripples on silicon were covered with a thin DLC layer in order to create DLC ripples. The biocompatibility of all samples was investigated by adsorption experiments. For this purpose, human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) was used due to its ambiphilic character, which allows the protein to assume different conformations on materials with different hydrophilicities. Moreover, HPF is a crucial factor in the blood coagulation process. This work comes to the conclusion that the interaction of both, the surface chemistry and topography, has a strong influence on the adsorption behavior of HPF and thus the biocompatibility of a material. Both factors can be specifically tuned by means of ion beam irradiation.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of a new photo-crosslinkable glycol chitosan thermogel for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ik Sung; Cho, Myeong Ok; Li, Zhengzheng; Nurunnabi, Md; Park, Sung Young; Kang, Sun-Woong; Huh, Kang Moo

    2016-06-25

    The major limitations of typical thermogelling polymers for practical applications are low gel stability and weak mechanical properties under physiological conditions. In this study, we have synthesized a new polysaccharide-based thermogelling polymer that can be photo-crosslinked by UV irradiation to form a mechanically resilient and elastic hydrogel. Methacrylated hexanoyl glycol chitosan (M-HGC), was synthesized by a series of chemical modifications, N-hexanoylation and N-methacrylation, of glycol chitosan (GC). Various M-HGC polymers with different methacryl group contents were synthesized and their thermogelling and photo-crosslinkable properties were evaluated. The M-HGCs demonstrated a thermo-reversible sol-gel transition behavior in aqueous solutions. The thermally-induced hydrogels could be chemically crosslinked by UV-triggered photo-crosslinking. From the cytotoxicity studies using MTT and the live/dead assay, the M-HGC hydrogels showed non-cytotoxicity. These photo-crosslinkable thermogelling M-HGC polymers may hold great promises for various biomedical applications, such as an injectable delivery system and 3D cell culture. PMID:27083793

  3. A novel miniature virus-inspired swimming robot for biomedical applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arash; TAHERI; Sakineh; ORANGI

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel concept of virus-like swimming robot in the range of nano to micro scales for biomedical applications. Viruses are submicroscopic, intracellular parasites that consist of nucleic acid genome and protein capsid. Their shapes help them to move within the infected host organisms and attach to host cells. In this paper, main geometrical features of the viral structure are utilized for conceptual design of the virus-inspired swimming robot and resultant thorny spherical shaped body is equipped with a new inclined and concentric multi-flagella propulsion system for operation in low Reynolds number fluid flow environment. In off-propulsion situation a theoretical formula is derived for thrust value estimation. On the other hand, to investigate the robot behavior in the fluid media in on-propulsion condition, flow field around the robot is simulated using a numerical strategy consisting of surface methods of regularized Stokeslet and Rotlet theory. For propulsion control of the robot a multilayer artificial neural network is designed and employed then flow field of the robot wake is analyzed using Lagrangian Coherent Structure (LCS) concept. Furthermore, potential characteristics and specific features of this kind of miniature robots are discussed as well as its application. The results indicate the capability of the miniature robot to perform complex missions in low Reynolds number fluid flow environment especially bodily fluid systems including lymphatic, urinary and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) systems.

  4. In Vitro Hemocompatibility and Cytotoxicity Evaluation of Halloysite Nanotubes for Biomedical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Yang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs, due to their unique structures and properties, may play an important role in biomedical applications. In vitro test is usually conducted as a preliminary screening evaluation of the hemocompatibility and cytotoxicity of HNTs for its short term consuming, convenience, and less expense. In this work, HNTs were processed with anticoagulated rabbit blood to detect its blood compatibility. The result of hemolysis test shows that the hemolysis ratios are below 0.5%, indicating nonhemolysis of HNTs. Plasma recalcification time suggests that HNTs are dose-dependently contributing to blood coagulation in platelet poor plasma (PPP. The effect of platelet activation caused by HNTs was also examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Meanwhile, HNTs were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC to observe its intracellular distribution in A549 cells under confocal microscopy. CCK-8 test and TUNEL test of HNTs at different concentration levels were performed in vitro, respectively. Therefore, the potential usage of HNTs in medicine may be very meaningful in oral dosing, dermal application, dental uses, or medical implants.

  5. Hybrid fluorescent curcumin loaded zein electrospun nanofibrous scaffold for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanomedicine utilizes engineered nanodevices and nanostructures for monitoring, repair, construction and control of human biological systems at the molecular level. In this study, we investigated the feasibility and potential of zein nanofiber as a delivery vehicle for curcumin in biomedical applications. By optimizing the electrospinning parameters, ultrafine zein fluorescence nanofibers containing curcumin were developed with interconnected fibrous networks. We found that these nanofibers show an increase in fluorescence due to the incorporation of curcumin. The morphology and material properties of the resulting multifunctional nanofiber including the surface area were examined by a field emission-scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and confocal microscopy. The surface area and pore size were characterized by N2 adsorption–desorption isotherm. SEM and fluorescence images showed that the uniform fibers with smooth surface had an average diameter of about 310 nm. An in vitro degradation study showed significant morphological changes. The in vitro evaluations suggested that the curcumin incorporated zein nanofibers showed sustained release of curcumin and maintained its free radical scavenging ability. It provides an attractive structure for the attachment and growth of fibroblast as cell culture surfaces. The results demonstrate that the curcumin loaded zein nanofiber could be a good candidate for soft tissue engineering scaffolds and has the potential for further applications in drug delivery system. (paper)

  6. Biomedical applications on the GRID efficient management of parallel jobs

    CERN Document Server

    Moscicki, Jakub T; Lee Hurng Chun; Lin, S C; Pia, Maria Grazia

    2004-01-01

    Distributed computing based on the Master-Worker and PULL interaction model is applicable to a number of applications in high energy physics, medical physics and bio-informatics. We demonstrate a realistic medical physics use-case of a dosimetric system for brachytherapy using distributed Grid resources. We present the efficient techniques for running parallel jobs in a case of the BLAST, a gene sequencing application, as well as for the Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. We present a strategy for improving the runtime performance and robustness of the jobs as well as for the minimization of the development time needed to migrate the applications to a distributed environment.

  7. Synthesis and surface modification of magnetic nanoparticles for in vivo biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Conroy Ghin Chee

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) possess unique magnetic properties and the ability to function at the cellular and molecular level of biological interactions making them an attractive platform to serve as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as carriers for drug delivery. Recent advances in nanotechnology have improved the ability to engineer the features and properties of MNPs allowing them to be tailored specifically for these biomedical applications. MNPs composed of metallic, oxide, and nanoalloy cores and a variety of protective coatings are being investigated for applications in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of malignant tumors, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disease. To better address specific clinical needs, MNPs with higher magnetic moments, non-fouling surfaces, and increased functionalities are now being developed. The goal of this interdisciplinary research is to develop novel superparamagnetic nanoprobes for non-invasive cancer diagnosis and treatment. This strategy utilizes iron oxide nanoparticles coated with various biocompatible polymers, such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and chitosan, to serve as both a contrast agent for MRI and a carrier for drug delivery. In this project, we have conjugated various targeting agents, such as folic acid (FA) and chlorotoxin (CTX), to these iron oxide nanoparticles to improve their tumor specific accumulation. The folate receptor is known to be overexpressed on the surfaces of many human tumor cells, including ovarian, lung, breast, endometrial, renal, and colon cancers, while CTX binds with high affinity to gliomas, medulloblastomas, and other tumors of the neuroectodermal origin. To evaluate its effectiveness as a targeted drug carrier, methotrexate (MTX), a convention chemotherapeutic agent, was conjugated to iron oxide nanoparticles in combination with CTX. Specific tumor cell targeting of our nanoparticle system has been demonstrated through increased contrast

  8. The application of electron paramagnetic resonance in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron paramagnetic resonance technique has been found more than half a century, for free radicals detection application, it has been applied to various research studies, and promotes the development of the biomedicine. This article summarized the various free radicals measurement by the electron paramagnetic resonance in biology tissue, and the application of the spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging technology in biomedicine. (authors)

  9. Spintronic microfluidic platform for biomedical and environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, F. A.; Martins, V. C.; Fonseca, L. P.; Germano, J.; Sousa, L. A.; Piedade, M. S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2010-09-01

    Faster, more sensitive and easy to operate biosensing devices still are a need at important areas such as biomedical diagnostics, food control and environmental monitoring. Recently, spintronic-devices have emerged as a promising alternative to the existent technologies [1-3]. A number of advantages, namely high sensitivity, easy integration, miniaturization, scalability, robustness and low cost make these devices potentially capable of responding to the existent technological need. In parallel, the field of microfluidics has shown great advances [4]. Microfluidic systems allow the analysis of small sample volumes (from micro- down to pico-liters), often by automate sample processing with the ability to integrate several steps into a single device (analyte amplification, concentration, separation and/or labeling), all in a reduced assay time (minutes to hours) and affordable cost. The merging of these two technologies, magnetoresistive biochips and microfluidics, will enable the development of highly competitive devices. This work reports the integration of a magnetoresistive biochip with a microfluidic system inside a portable and autonomous electronic platform aiming for a fully integrated device. A microfluidic structure fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane with dimensions of W: 0.5mm, H: 0.1mm, L: 10mm, associated to a mechanical system to align and seal the channel by pressure is presented (Fig. 1) [5]. The goal is to perform sample loading and transportation over the chip and simultaneously control the stringency and uniformity of the wash-out process. The biochip output is acquired by an electronic microsystem incorporating the circuitry to control, address and read-out the 30 spin-valve sensors sequentially (Fig. 1) [2]. This platform is being applied to the detection of water-borne microbial pathogens (e.g. Salmonella and Escherichia coli) and genetic diseases diagnosis (e.g. cystic fibrosis) through DNA hybridization assays. Open chamber measurements were

  10. Electron transport calculations with biomedical and environmental applications: [Progress report, FY 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project investigated radiation interactions with matter and radiation transport in bulk media, to generate basic radiological physics information. Applications include biomedical radiation dosimetry, the assessment of radiation hazards in nuclear technology, and modeling of biological radiation action. This work included the development of transport-theoretic methods, the compilation and critical evaluation of the underlying single-scattering cross sections, and the application of the transport methods to radiological physics problems. 7 refs

  11. Polymers in regenerative medicine biomedical applications from nano- to macro-structures

    CERN Document Server

    Monleon Pradas, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical applications of Polymers from Scaffolds toNanostructures The ability of polymers to span wide ranges of mechanicalproperties and morph into desired shapes makes them useful for avariety of applications, including scaffolds, self-assemblingmaterials, and nanomedicines. With an interdisciplinary list ofsubjects and contributors, this book overviews the biomedicalapplications of polymers and focuses on the aspect of regenerativemedicine. Chapters also cover fundamentals, theories, and tools forscientists to apply polymers in the following ways: Matrix protein interactions with synthe

  12. Isolation, Characterization and Biological Evaluation of Jellyfish Collagen for Use in Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Lethias

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillar collagens are the more abundant extracellular proteins. They form a metazoan-specific family, and are highly conserved from sponge to human. Their structural and physiological properties have been successfully used in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. On the other hand, the increase of jellyfish has led us to consider this marine animal as a natural product for food and medicine. Here, we have tested different Mediterranean jellyfish species in order to investigate the economic potential of their collagens. We have studied different methods of collagen purification (tissues and experimental procedures. The best collagen yield was obtained using Rhizostoma pulmo oral arms and the pepsin extraction method (2–10 mg collagen/g of wet tissue. Although a significant yield was obtained with Cotylorhiza tuberculata (0.45 mg/g, R. pulmo was used for further experiments, this jellyfish being considered as harmless to humans and being an abundant source of material. Then, we compared the biological properties of R. pulmo collagen with mammalian fibrillar collagens in cell cytotoxicity assays and cell adhesion. There was no statistical difference in cytotoxicity (p > 0.05 between R. pulmo collagen and rat type I collagen. However, since heparin inhibits cell adhesion to jellyfish-native collagen by 55%, the main difference is that heparan sulfate proteoglycans could be preferentially involved in fibroblast and osteoblast adhesion to jellyfish collagens. Our data confirm the broad harmlessness of jellyfish collagens, and their biological effect on human cells that are similar to that of mammalian type I collagen. Given the bioavailability of jellyfish collagen and its biological properties, this marine material is thus a good candidate for replacing bovine or human collagens in selected biomedical applications.

  13. Silver-doped nanocomposite carbon coatings (Ag-DLC) for biomedical applications - Physiochemical and biological evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bociaga, Dorota; Komorowski, Piotr; Batory, Damian; Szymanski, Witold; Olejnik, Anna; Jastrzebski, Krzysztof; Jakubowski, Witold

    2015-11-01

    The formation of bacteria biofilm on the surface of medical products is a major clinical issue nowadays. Highly adaptive ability of bacteria to colonize the surface of biomaterials causes a lot of infections. This study evaluates samples of the AISI 316 LVM with special nanocomposite silver-doped (by means of ion implantation) diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating prepared by hybrid RF/MS PACVD (radio frequency/magnetron sputtering plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition) deposition technique in order to improve the physicochemical and biological properties of biomaterials and add new features such as antibacterial properties. The aim of the following work was to evaluate antimicrobial efficacy and biocompatibility of gradient a-C:H/Ti + Ag coatings in relation to the physiochemical properties of the surface and chemical composition of coating. For this purpose, samples were tested in live/dead test using two cell strains: human endothelial cells (Ea.hy926) and osteoblasts-like cells (Saos-2). For testing bactericidal activity of the coatings, an exponential growth phase of Escherichia coli strain DH5α was used as a model microorganism. Surface condition and its physicochemical properties were investigated using SEM, AFM and XPS. Examined coatings showed a uniformity of silver ions distribution in the amorphous DLC matrix, good biocompatibility in contact with mammalian cells and an increased level of bactericidal properties. What is more, considering very good mechanical parameters of these Ag including gradient a-C:H/Ti coatings, they constitute an excellent material for biomedical application in e.g. orthopedics or dentistry.

  14. Diode laser based light sources for biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André; Marschall, Sebastian; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin;

    2013-01-01

    lasers simultaneously offer tunability, high-power emission and compact size at fairly low cost. Therefore, diode lasers are increasingly preferred in important applications, such as photocoagulation, optical coherence tomography, diffuse optical imaging, fluorescence lifetime imaging, and terahertz...

  15. High resolution characterization of responsive hydrogels for biomedical application

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogels are 3D polymer network that, differing from conventional solids, can eliminate or absorb water and as a consequence undergo changes in volume, mechanical properties. Various properties of the hydrogels can be altered as a consequence of their response to external stimuli. Thus, hydrogels are considered important materials for a variety of applications in medical technology.Here it will introduce the application of interferometric readout platform for determination of swelling proper...

  16. Molecularly imprinted polymers for biomedical and biotechnological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, E. V.; Pyshnaya, I. A.; Martyanov, O. N.; Pyshnyi, D. V.

    2016-05-01

    This survey covers main advances in the preparation and application of molecularly imprinted polymers which are capable of specific recognition of biologically active compounds. The principles underlying the production of highly efficient and template-specific molecularly imprinted polymers are discussed. The focus is on the imprinting of highly structured macromolecular and supramolecular templates. The existing and potential applications of molecularly imprinted polymers in various fields of chemistry and molecular biology are considered. The bibliography includes 261 references.

  17. Quaternized Chitosan as an Antimicrobial Agent: Antimicrobial Activity, Mechanism of Action and Biomedical Applications in Orthopedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziwei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (CS is a linear polysaccharide with good biodegradability, biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity, which makes it potentially useful for biomedical applications, including an antimicrobial agent either alone or blended with other polymers. However, the poor solubility of CS in most solvents at neutral or high pH substantially limits its use. Quaternary ammonium CS, which was prepared by introducing a quaternary ammonium group on a dissociative hydroxyl group or amino group of the CS, exhibited improved water solubility and stronger antibacterial activity relative to CS over an entire range of pH values; thus, this quaternary modification increases the potential biomedical applications of CS in the field of anti-infection. This review discusses the current findings on the antimicrobial properties of quaternized CS synthesized using different methods and the mechanisms of its antimicrobial actions. The potential antimicrobial applications in the orthopedic field and perspectives regarding future studies in this field are also considered.

  18. Nano-engineered materials based on fullerenes: synthesis and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierascu, Radu Claudiu; Dumitriu, Irina; Ion, Rodica Mariana; Neagu, Monica; Constantin, Carolina; Stavaru, Crina

    2010-11-01

    The nanoengineering of various materials for biomedical application has became in the last decade one of the most important research areas, due to the continuous struggle to find new and more efficient instruments for the therapy of cancer and other diseases. Attempts to obtain functionalized derivatives of fullerene seek the synthesis of watersoluble materials, in order to investigate their effects in physiological conditions. International studies on the biological properties of fullerenes and their derivatives, are now targeted towards anti-tumor effects, pharmacology and their involvement in oxidative stress. Their toxicity, demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo is important for characterization and selection of applications. Phototoxicity of some molecules of fullerenes has been identified as future therapeutic tool. The present paper describes the synthesis, characterization and some biomedical applications of some nanomaterials based on fullerenes.

  19. Electrospun propolis/polyurethane composite nanofibers for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong In [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Pant, Hem Raj, E-mail: hempant@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Science and Humanities, Pulchowk Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu (Nepal); Research Institute for Next Generation, Kalanki, Kathmandu (Nepal); Sim, Hyun-Jaung [Department of Bioactive Material Science, Research Center of Bioactive Material, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Chonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Min [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Science, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Cheol Sang, E-mail: chskim@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering requires functional polymeric membrane for adequate space for cell migration and attachment within the nanostructure. Therefore, biocompatible propolis loaded polyurethane (propolis/PU) nanofibers were successfully prepared using electrospinning of propolis/PU blend solution. Here, composite nanofibers were subjected to detailed analysis using electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and mechanical properties and water contact angle measurement. FE-SEM images revealed that the composite nanofibers became point-bonded with increasing amounts of propolis in the blend due to its adhesive properties. Incorporation of small amount of propolis through PU matrix could improve the hydrophilicity and mechanical strength of the fibrous membrane. In order to assay the cytocompatibility and cell behavior on the composite scaffolds, fibroblast cells were seeded on the matrix. Results suggest that the incorporation of propolis into PU fibers could increase its cell compatibility. Moreover, composite nanofibers have effective antibacterial activity. Therefore, as-synthesized nanocomposite fibrous mat has great potentiality in wound dressing and skin tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Sufficient amount of propolis is simply loaded through PU fibers. • Propolis increases the hydrophilicity and mechanical properties of PU fibers. • Composite mat shows excellent antibacterial activity. • Small amount of propolis can enhance the cell compatibility of PU fibers.

  20. Electrospun propolis/polyurethane composite nanofibers for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue engineering requires functional polymeric membrane for adequate space for cell migration and attachment within the nanostructure. Therefore, biocompatible propolis loaded polyurethane (propolis/PU) nanofibers were successfully prepared using electrospinning of propolis/PU blend solution. Here, composite nanofibers were subjected to detailed analysis using electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and mechanical properties and water contact angle measurement. FE-SEM images revealed that the composite nanofibers became point-bonded with increasing amounts of propolis in the blend due to its adhesive properties. Incorporation of small amount of propolis through PU matrix could improve the hydrophilicity and mechanical strength of the fibrous membrane. In order to assay the cytocompatibility and cell behavior on the composite scaffolds, fibroblast cells were seeded on the matrix. Results suggest that the incorporation of propolis into PU fibers could increase its cell compatibility. Moreover, composite nanofibers have effective antibacterial activity. Therefore, as-synthesized nanocomposite fibrous mat has great potentiality in wound dressing and skin tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Sufficient amount of propolis is simply loaded through PU fibers. • Propolis increases the hydrophilicity and mechanical properties of PU fibers. • Composite mat shows excellent antibacterial activity. • Small amount of propolis can enhance the cell compatibility of PU fibers

  1. Biomedical photonics handbook biomedical diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-01-01

    Shaped by Quantum Theory, Technology, and the Genomics RevolutionThe integration of photonics, electronics, biomaterials, and nanotechnology holds great promise for the future of medicine. This topic has recently experienced an explosive growth due to the noninvasive or minimally invasive nature and the cost-effectiveness of photonic modalities in medical diagnostics and therapy. The second edition of the Biomedical Photonics Handbook presents fundamental developments as well as important applications of biomedical photonics of interest to scientists, engineers, manufacturers, teachers, studen

  2. Generation of Focused Shock Waves in Water for Biomedical Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Petr; Šunka, Pavel; Hoffer, Petr; Stelmashuk, Vitaliy; Beneš, J.; Poučková, P.; Zadinová, M.; Zeman, J.

    Dordrecht: Springer, 2012 - (Machala, Z.; Hensel, K.; Akishev, Y.), s. 403-416 ISBN 978-94-007-2851-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tandem shock waves * Extracorporeal lithotripsy * Melanoma cells * Sarcoma tumor Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  3. Self-organizing magnetic beads for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of biomedicine magnetic beads are used for drug delivery and to treat hyperthermia. Here we propose to use self-organized bead structures to isolate circulating tumor cells using lab-on-chip technologies. Typically blood flows past microposts functionalized with antibodies for circulating tumor cells. Creating these microposts with interacting magnetic beads makes it possible to tune the geometry in size, position and shape. We developed a simulation tool that combines micromagnetics and discrete particle dynamics, in order to design micropost arrays made of interacting beads. The simulation takes into account the viscous drag of the blood flow, magnetostatic interactions between the magnetic beads and gradient forces from external aligned magnets. We developed a particle–particle particle–mesh method for effective computation of the magnetic force and torque acting on the particles. - Highlights: ► We propose to use self-organized bead structures to isolate circulating tumor cells. ► Flexible ways are important to get a high probability of catching cancer cells. ► The beads make it possible to tune the geometry in size position and shape.

  4. Laser induced micro plasma processing of polymer substrates for biomedical implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, P. W.; Rosowski, A.; Murphy, M.; Irving, M.; Sharp, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the experimental results of a new hybrid laser processing technique; Laser Induced Micro Plasma Processing (LIMP2). A transparent substrate is placed on top of a medium that will interact with the laser beam and create a plasma. The plasma and laser beam act in unison to ablate material and create micro-structuring on the "backside" of the substrate. We report the results of a series of experiments on a new laser processing technique that will use the same laser-plasma interaction to micromachining structures into glass and polymer substrates on the "topside" of the substrate and hence machine non-transparent material. This new laser processing technique is called Laser Induced Micro Plasma Processing (LIMP2). Micromachining of biomedical implants is proving an important enabling technology in controlling cell growth on a macro-scale. This paper discusses LIMP2 structuring of transparent substrate such as glasses and polymers for this application. Direct machining of these materials by lasers in the near infrared is at present impossible. Laser Induced Micro Plasma Processing (LIMP2) is a technique that allows laser operating at 1064 nm to machine microstructures directly these transparent substrates.

  5. Study of Organosilicon Plasma Polymer Used in Composite Layers with Biomedical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radeva, E.; Pramatarova, L.; Pecheva, E.; Hikov, T.; Iacob, E.; Vanzetti, L.; Dimitrova, R.; Krasteva, N.; Spassov, T.; Fingarova, D.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we study the ability of plasma polymer (PP) films obtained from hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDS) on silica glass (SG) to induce hydroxyapatite (HA)-based composite layers from a mixture of simulated body fluid (SBF) and clear solution of detonation nanodiamond (DND) by a biomimetic process. The grown composites (PPHMDS/HADND) were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) techniques. FTIR spectra of the PPHMDS indicated diminishing of the polymer characteristic bands when the polymer is immersed in DND clear solution. Furthermore, after sample immersion in the SBF-DND mixture, the FTIR spectra showed the presence of carbonate-containing HA through the characteristic vibration modes of P-O in the phosphate group and C-O in the carbonate group. The formation of HA layers, rich in silica and/or carbon was confirmed by RBS and SEM. The cell viability measured after 7 days on the polymer surface is more then 95% for all samples. The results show that the PPHMDS is promising as a substrate for growing HA/DND layers and that the materials obtained are biocompatible. The variations of plasma polymerization conditions and modification of the composite layers will aid in using such materials for biomedical applications.

  6. Laser surface modification of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveiro, A.; Soto, R.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Boutinguiza, M.; Quintero, F.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2014-05-01

    Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a synthetic polymer used for biomedical applications because of its high impact resistance, ductility and stability in contact with physiological fluids. Therefore, this material is being used in human orthopedic implants such as total hip or knee replacements. Surface modification of this material relates to changes on its chemistry, microstructure, roughness, and topography, all influencing its biological response. Surface treatment of UHMWPE is very difficult due to its high melt viscosity. This work presents a systematic approach to discern the role of different laser wavelengths (λ = 1064, 532, and 355 nm) on the surface modification of carbon coated UHMWPE samples. Influence of laser processing conditions (irradiance, pulse frequency, scanning speed, and spot overlapping) on the surface properties of this material was determined using an advanced statistical planning of experiments. A full factorial design of experiments was used to find the main effects of the processing parameters. The obtained results indicate the way to maximize surface properties which largely influence cell-material interaction.

  7. Effect of sterilization procedures on properties of plasma polymers relevant to biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemenko, A. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Kylian, O., E-mail: ondrej.kylian@gmail.com [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Choukourov, A.; Gordeev, I.; Petr, M. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Vandrovcova, M. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Department of Growth and Differentiation of Cell Populations, Videnska 1083, 142 20, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Polonskyi, O. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Bacakova, L. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Department of Growth and Differentiation of Cell Populations, Videnska 1083, 142 20, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Slavinska, D.; Biederman, H. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-10-01

    This study is focused on the evaluation of resistance of plasma polymers toward common sterilization techniques, i.e. property important for possible use of such materials in biomedical applications. Three kinds of plasma polymers having different bioadhesive natures were studied: plasma polymerized poly(ethylene oxide), fluorocarbon plasma polymers, and nitrogen-rich plasma polymers. These plasma polymers were subjected to dry heat, autoclave and UV radiation treatment. Their physical, chemical and bioresponsive properties were determined by means of different techniques (ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, wettability measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and biological tests with osteoblast-like cells MG63). The results clearly show that properties of thin films of plasma polymers may be significantly altered by a sterilization process. Moreover, observed changes induced by selected sterilization methods were found to depend strongly on the sterilized plasma polymer. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of common sterilization methods on three kinds of plasma polymers is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical, chemical and bioresponsive properties of plasma polymers are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changes induced by sterilization depend strongly on type of the plasma polymer.

  8. Effect of sterilization procedures on properties of plasma polymers relevant to biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is focused on the evaluation of resistance of plasma polymers toward common sterilization techniques, i.e. property important for possible use of such materials in biomedical applications. Three kinds of plasma polymers having different bioadhesive natures were studied: plasma polymerized poly(ethylene oxide), fluorocarbon plasma polymers, and nitrogen-rich plasma polymers. These plasma polymers were subjected to dry heat, autoclave and UV radiation treatment. Their physical, chemical and bioresponsive properties were determined by means of different techniques (ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, wettability measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and biological tests with osteoblast-like cells MG63). The results clearly show that properties of thin films of plasma polymers may be significantly altered by a sterilization process. Moreover, observed changes induced by selected sterilization methods were found to depend strongly on the sterilized plasma polymer. - Highlights: ► Effect of common sterilization methods on three kinds of plasma polymers is studied. ► Physical, chemical and bioresponsive properties of plasma polymers are analyzed. ► Changes induced by sterilization depend strongly on type of the plasma polymer.

  9. Emulsion Electrospinning as an Approach to Fabricate PLGA/Chitosan Nanofibers for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ajalloueian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel nanofibers from blends of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA and chitosan have been produced through an emulsion electrospinning process. The spinning solution employed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA as the emulsifier. PVA was extracted from the electrospun nanofibers, resulting in a final scaffold consisting of a blend of PLGA and chitosan. The fraction of chitosan in the final electrospun mat was adjusted from 0 to 33%. Analyses by scanning and transmission electron microscopy show uniform nanofibers with homogenous distribution of PLGA and chitosan in their cross section. Infrared spectroscopy verifies that electrospun mats contain both PLGA and chitosan. Moreover, contact angle measurements show that the electrospun PLGA/chitosan mats are more hydrophilic than electrospun mats of pure PLGA. Tensile strengths of 4.94 MPa and 4.21 MPa for PLGA/chitosan in dry and wet conditions, respectively, illustrate that the polyblend mats of PLGA/chitosan are strong enough for many biomedical applications. Cell culture studies suggest that PLGA/chitosan nanofibers promote fibroblast attachment and proliferation compared to PLGA membranes. It can be assumed that the nanofibrous composite scaffold of PLGA/chitosan could be potentially used for skin tissue reconstruction.

  10. Synthesis of superparamagnetic silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Navjot; Chudasama, Bhupendra

    2015-05-01

    Multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) coated with silica are widely researched for biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, tissue repair, cell separation, hyperthermia, drug delivery, etc. In this article synthesis of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles and their coating with SiO2 is reported. Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation and it was coated with silica by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate. XRD, FTIR, TEM and VSM techniques were used to characterize bare and coated nanoparticles. Results indicated that the average size of SPIONS was 8.4 nm. X-ray diffraction patterns of silica coated SPIONS were identical to that of SPIONS confirming the inner spinal structure of SPIONS. FTIR results confirmed the binding of silica with the magnetite and the formation of the silica shell around the magnetite core. Magnetic properties of SPIONS and silica coated SPIONS are determined by VSM. They are superparamagnetic. The major conclusion drawn from this study is that the synthesis route yields stable, non-aggregated magnetite-silica core-shell nanostructures with tailored morphology and excellent magnetic properties.

  11. Synthesis of superparamagnetic silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) coated with silica are widely researched for biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, tissue repair, cell separation, hyperthermia, drug delivery, etc. In this article synthesis of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles and their coating with SiO2 is reported. Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation and it was coated with silica by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate. XRD, FTIR, TEM and VSM techniques were used to characterize bare and coated nanoparticles. Results indicated that the average size of SPIONS was 8.4 nm. X-ray diffraction patterns of silica coated SPIONS were identical to that of SPIONS confirming the inner spinal structure of SPIONS. FTIR results confirmed the binding of silica with the magnetite and the formation of the silica shell around the magnetite core. Magnetic properties of SPIONS and silica coated SPIONS are determined by VSM. They are superparamagnetic. The major conclusion drawn from this study is that the synthesis route yields stable, non-aggregated magnetite-silica core-shell nanostructures with tailored morphology and excellent magnetic properties

  12. Novel degradablepolymeric materials for biomedical and antibacterial applications

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis degradable polymers for three different purposes, DNA transfection, drug delivery and antibacterial properties were designed, synthesized and characterized. In the first part of the DNA transfection application the novel degradable and biocompatible poly(PEG-co-(BMDO-co-DMAEMA)) and its quaternized derivative poly(PEG-co-(BMDO-co-DMAEMA•EtBr)) were successfully synthesized and characterized. This copolymer shows a ...

  13. Micro- and nanofluidic devices for environmental and biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardeniers, Han; Berg, van den Albert

    2004-01-01

    During the last decade, an increasing amount of pocket-size chemistry equipment based on the so-called 'lab-on-a-chip'approach has become available. Besides the popular application in the analysis of biological macromolecules, such chips in combination with portable electronic equipment are applicab

  14. Biomedical engineering and nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is predominantly a compilation of papers presented in the conference which is focused on the development in biomedical materials, biomedical devises and instrumentation, biomedical effects of electromagnetic radiation, electrotherapy, radiotherapy, biosensors, biotechnology, bioengineering, tissue engineering, clinical engineering and surgical planning, medical imaging, hospital system management, biomedical education, biomedical industry and society, bioinformatics, structured nanomaterial for biomedical application, nano-composites, nano-medicine, synthesis of nanomaterial, nano science and technology development. The papers presented herein contain the scientific substance to suffice the academic directivity of the researchers from the field of biomedicine, biomedical engineering, material science and nanotechnology. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  15. Radiation technology in designing cross-linked hydrogels for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation technology has emerging as an environment friendly commercially viable technology with broad applications that can essentially contribute to achieve the goal of sustainable development. This technology is based on the use of ionizing radiation to modify the structure and properties of materials in different industrial applications particularly in heath care, polymer and environmental applications. In the field of material science, radiation technology produces the high performance polymeric materials with unique physical and chemical properties. The present work reports biomedical applications of radiation processed hydrogels. (author)

  16. Getting the most from microfluidic platforms for biomedical applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Amy

    2016-03-01

    Microfluidics has emerged in recent years as a versatile method of manipulating fluids at small length-scales, and in particular, for generating and manipulating micron size droplets with controllable size and functionality. For example, many research groups developed microfluidics devices for cell encapsulation, and synthesizing functionalized polymer microspheres and inorganic nanoparticles with precise control over their shapes and sizes. In this talk, I will showcase 2 microfluidic platforms to highlight their versatility and potential biomedical applications. (1) Droplet microfluidic platforms (a) A droplet microfluidics method to fabricate alginate microspheres while simultaneously immobilizing anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex IgY and anti-Escherichia coli IgG antibodies primarily on the porous alginate carriers for specific binding and binding affinity tests. The binding affinity of antibodies is directly measured by fluorescence intensity of stained target bacteria on the microspheres. We demonstrate that the functionalized alginate microspheres yield specificity comparable with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We can easily modify the size and shape of alginate microspheres, and increase the concentration of functionalized alginate microspheres to further enhance binding kinetics and enable multiplexing. (b) A novel droplet microfluidics method to image oxygen in single islets (pancreatic cells) for glucose sensing. Individual islets and a fluorescent oxygen-sensitive dye were encased within a thin alginate polymer microcapsule for insulin secretion monitoring. The sensing system operated similarly from 2-48 hours following encapsulation, and viability and function of the islets were not significantly affected by the encapsulation process. This approach should be applicable to other cell types and dyes sensitive to other biologically important molecules. (2) A microfluidic chamber to perform uniform electric field stimulation in circular shaped

  17. Self-organizing magnetic beads for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gusenbauer, Markus; Reichel, Franz; Exl, Lukas; Bance, Simon; Ozelt, Harald; Schrefl, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In the field of biomedicine magnetic beads are used for drug delivery and to treat hyperthermia. Here we propose to use self-organized bead structures to isolate circulating tumor cells using lab-on-chip technologies. Typically blood flows past microposts functionalized with antibodies for circulating tumor cells. Creating these microposts with interacting magnetic beads makes it possible to tune the geometry in size, position and shape. We developed a simulation tool that combines micromagnetics and discrete particle dynamics, in order to design micropost arrays made of interacting beads. The simulation takes into account the viscous drag of the blood flow, magnetostatic interactions between the magnetic beads and gradient forces from external aligned magnets. We developed a particle-particle particle-mesh method for effective computation of the magnetic force and torque acting on the particles.

  18. The influence of sterilization on nitrogen-included ultrananocrystalline diamond for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei; Tran, Phong A; Turnley, Ann M; Aramesh, Morteza; Prawer, Steven; Brandt, Milan; Fox, Kate

    2016-04-01

    Diamond has shown great potential in different biomedical applications, but the effects of sterilization on its properties have not been investigated. Here, we studied the influence of five sterilization techniques (solvent cleaning, oxygen plasma, UV irradiation, autoclave and hydrogen peroxide) on nitrogen-included ultrananocrystalline diamond. The chemical modification of the diamond surface was evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements. Different degrees of surface oxidation and selective sp(2) bonded carbon etching were found following all sterilization techniques, resulting in an increase of hydrophilicity. Higher viabilities of in vitro mouse 3T3 fibroblasts and rat cortical neuron cells were observed on oxygen plasma, autoclave and hydrogen peroxide sterilized diamond, which correlated with their higher hydrophilicity. By examination of apatite formation in simulated body fluid, in vivo bioactivity was predicted to be best on those surfaces which have been oxygen plasma treated and lowest on those which have been exposed to UV irradiation. The charge injection properties were also altered by the sterilization process and there appears to be a correlation between these changes and the degree of oxygen termination of the surface. We find that the modification brought by autoclave, oxygen plasma and hydrogen peroxide were most consistent with the use of N-UNCD in biological applications as compared to samples sterilized by solvent cleaning or UV exposure or indeed non-sterilized. A two-step process of sterilization by hydrogen peroxide following oxygen plasma treatment was then suggested. However, the final choice of sterilization technique will depend on the intended end application. PMID:26838856

  19. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prall, M.; Durante, M.; Berger, T.; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, P. M.; Latessa, C.; Shestov, L.; Simoniello, P.; Danly, C.; Mariam, F.; Merrill, F.; Nedrow, P.; Wilde, C.; Varentsov, D.

    2016-06-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics.

  20. Nanostructured Si-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, Julietta V., E-mail: giulietta.rau@ism.cnr.it [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133 Rome (Italy); Fosca, Marco [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133 Rome (Italy); Cacciotti, Ilaria [Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale,UR INSTM “Roma Tor Vergata”, Via del Politecnico, 1-00133 Rome (Italy); Laureti, Sara [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Salaria km 29.300-00016 Monterotondo Scalo (RM) (Italy); Bianco, Alessandra [Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale,UR INSTM “Roma Tor Vergata”, Via del Politecnico, 1-00133 Rome (Italy); Teghil, Roberto [Università della Basilicata, Dipartimento di Scienze, Via dell' Ateneo Lucano 10-85100, Potenza (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    In the present work, the Si-HAp coatings were deposited on titanium substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. For deposition, the Si-HAp targets (1.4 wt.% of Si), produced starting from wet synthesized powders, were used. The properties of coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Vickers microhardness. The obtained Si-HAp coatings presented a nanosized structure, proper thickness and hardness for applications in orthopedical and dental surgery, aimed at improving the stability and the osteointegration of bone implants. - Highlights: ► Pulsed Laser Deposition method was applied to coat heated Titanium supports. ► Films were deposited using a target of Silicon-Hydroxyapatite sintered ceramics. ► Nanostructured crystalline hard film was grown replicating target composition. ► Prepared coating could be used for orthopedic and dental implants applications.

  1. Selective micro metallization of polymers for biomedical and medical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    new and developing. Metallized plastic parts have many application in micro electro-mechanical devices. Injection moulded plastic parts combined with micro metallic structures (with nanosized features) can be used in the bio-sensing devices like plasmon resonance sensors. Hearing aids, lab-on-a-chip......Integration of micro/nano metallic structures in polymer devices is a broad multi-disciplinary research field, consisting of various combinations of mechanical, chemical and physical fabrication methods. Some of these combinations have been known for years and other combinations or methods are very...... devices, bioelectronics etc. are also potential application areas for metallized plastic parts. This paper shows various methods used in selective micro metallization of polymers....

  2. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prall, M.; Durante, M.; Berger, T.; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, P. M.; LaTessa, C.; Shestov, L.; Simoniello, P.; Danly, C.; Mariam, F.; Merrill, F.; Nedrow, P.; Wilde, C.; Varentsov, D.

    2016-01-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics. PMID:27282667

  3. Bioinspired Nanoscale Materials for Biomedical and Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-05-01

    The demand of green, affordable and environmentally sustainable materials has encouraged scientists in different fields to draw inspiration from nature in developing materials with unique properties such as miniaturization, hierarchical organization, and adaptability. Together with the exceptional properties of nanomaterials, over the past century, the field of bioinspired nanomaterials has taken huge leaps. While on one hand, the sophistication of hierarchical structures endow biological systems with multifunctionality, the synthetic control on the creation of nanomaterials enables the design of materials with specific functionalities. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of the field of bioinspired nanomaterials, which we have broadly categorized into biotemplates and biomimics. We will discuss the application of bioinspired nanomaterials as biotemplates in catalysis, nanomedicine, immunoassays and in energy, drawing attention to novel materials such as protein cages. Further, the applications of bioinspired materials in tissue engineering and biomineralization will also be discussed.

  4. Microarrays—Current and Future Applications in Biomedical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich Certa

    2011-01-01

    Microarrays covers research where microarrays are applied to address complex biological questions. This new open access journal publishes articles where novel applications or state-of-the art technology developments in the field are reported. In addition, novel methods or data analysis algorithms are under the scope of Microarrays. This journal will serve as a platform for fast and efficient sharing of data within this large user community. As one of the first microarray users in Europe back ...

  5. Treatment of textile surfaces by plasma technology for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Labay, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    Medical applications of technical textiles are an expanding field of research. One of the added values of these new materials would be that they were suitable to contain and release active compounds in a controlled and sustained manner. Drug incorporation and release from synthetic fibers is related to the interaction of the drug with the polymer and probably greatly depends on the surface chemistry of the fiber. Plasma technology is a tool that enables to modify physical and chemical prop...

  6. Phytofabrication of bioinduced silver nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Nabeel Ahmad,1 Sharad Bhatnagar,1 Syed Salman Ali,2 Rajiv Dutta3 1School of Biotechnology, 2School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, IFTM University, Lodhipur Rajput, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India; 3Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, Shri Ramswaroop Memorial University, Barabanki, Uttar Pradesh, India Abstract: Synthesis of nanomaterials holds infinite possibilities as nanotechnology is revolutionizing the field of medicine by its myriad applications. Green synthesis of nanoparticles has ...

  7. In-situ gelling polymers for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the research involving in situ gelling polymers and can be used as a guidebook for academics, industrialists and postgraduates interested in this area. This work summaries the academic contributions from the top authorities in the field and explore the fundamental principles of in situ gelling polymeric networks, along with examples of their major applications. This book aims to provide an up-to-date resource of in situ gelling polymer research.

  8. Introduction to fiber optics: Sensors for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, R. Y.; Y. K. Agrawal

    2011-01-01

    The paper focuses on the introduction of fiber optics, a fusion of science and engineering and describes the materials generally used for its construction along with the procedure used to design the fibers. It gives an idea of the materials used for the construction along with the pros and cons associated with them and various factors governing the emission of ultraviolet, infrared or visible radiations. The central core revolves around the applications of optical fibers in the medical and bi...

  9. Measurement of 41Ca with AMS and its biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    41Ca (T1/2 = 1.0 x 105 a) as a tracer, confined with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) method and its applications are reviewed. Measurement of 41Ca with HI-13 tandem AMS system at the China Institute of Atomic Energy is also introduced. The measurement of 41Ca used for studying mechanism of cancer caused by carcinogenic substances and mechanism of Ca supplement in human body diseases are being developed in collaboration with Department of Occupational Health, Beijing University

  10. Peptide protected gold clusters: chemical synthesis and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing; Wang, Yaling; Zhao, Lina; Liu, Ru; Gao, Fuping; Gao, Liang; Gao, Xueyun

    2016-06-01

    Bridging the gap between atoms and nanoparticles, noble metal clusters with atomic precision continue to attract considerable attention due to their important applications in catalysis, energy transformation, biosensing and biomedicine. Greatly different to common chemical synthesis, a one-step biomimetic synthesis of peptide-conjugated metal clusters has been developed to meet the demand of emerging bioapplications. Under mild conditions, multifunctional peptides containing metal capturing, reactive and targeting groups are rationally designed and elaborately synthesized to fabricate atomically precise peptide protected metal clusters. Among them, peptide-protected Au Cs (peptide-Au Cs) possess a great deal of exceptional advantages such as nanometer dimensions, high photostability, good biocompatibility, accurate chemical formula and specific protein targeting capacity. In this review article, we focus on the recent advances in potential theranostic fields by introducing the rising progress of peptide-Au Cs for biological imaging, biological analysis and therapeutic applications. The interactions between Au Cs and biological systems as well as potential mechanisms are also our concerned theme. We expect that the rapidly growing interest in Au Cs-based theranostic applications will attract broader concerns across various disciplines.

  11. Advanced biohybrid materials based on nanoclays for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo; Darder, Margarita; Wicklein, Bernd; Fernandes, Francisco M.; Castro-Smirnov, Fidel A.; Martín del Burgo, M. Angeles; del Real, Gustavo; Aranda, Pilar

    2012-10-01

    Bio-nanohybrids prepared by assembling natural polymers (polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids, etc) to nanosized silicates (nanoclays) and related solids (layered double hydroxides, LDHs) give rise to the so-called bionanocomposites constituting a group of biomaterials with potential applications in medicine. In this way, biopolymers, including chitosan, pectin, alginate, xanthan gum, ι-carrageenan, gelatin, zein, and DNA, as well as phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine, have been incorporated in layered host matrices by means of ion-exchange mechanisms producing intercalation composites. Also bio-nanohybrids have been prepared by the assembly of diverse bio-polymers with sepiolite, a natural microfibrous magnesium silicate, in this case through interactions affecting the external surface of this silicate. The properties and applications of these resulting biomaterials as active phases of ion-sensors and biosensors, for potential uses as scaffolds for tissue engineering, drug delivery, and gene transfection systems, are introduced and discussed in this work. It is also considered the use of synthetic bionanocomposites as new substrates to immobilize microorganisms, as for instance to bind Influenza virus particles, allowing their application as effective low-cost vaccine adjuvants and carriers.

  12. Synthesis of functionalized Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report a simple one step method for the synthesis of uniform, water dispersible amine functionalized Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles (AF-CZF) of size about 6 nm. The synthesis process was accomplished by refluxing Fe(acac)3, Co(acac)2 and Zn(acac)2 in diethylene glycol and ethanolamine. The magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, TGDTA, FTIR, SEM and TEM techniques. Their magnetic properties were also studied by using SQUID. The synthesized particles show superparamagnetism at room temperature. AF-CZF nanoparticles exhibit good cell viability, which is above 95% at a concentration of 80 µg mL−1 on MCF7 cell line. The AF-CZF can be a new versatile platform for many interesting biomedical applications. - Highlights: • The amine functionalized CZF (AF-CZF) was obtained in one step. • Prepared MNPs exhibit superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. • SRB assay reveals that prepared nanoparticles are biocompatible. • The AF-CZF can be a new platform for many biomedical applications

  13. Self-healing supramolecular bioelastomers with shape memory property as a multifunctional platform for biomedical applications via modular assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaobin; Wang, Ling; Zhao, Xin; Hou, Sen; Guo, Baolin; Ma, Peter X

    2016-10-01

    Mimicking native functional dynamics for traditional biomaterials such as thermoset elastomers is limited due to their lack of responsiveness to biological stimuli and difficulties to incorporate biofunctionalities. Furthermore, the mechanical fracture of traditional thermoset elastomers caused by irreversible covalent bond rupture would lead to their permanent loss of properties. To overcome these challenges, degradable self-healed supramolecular bioelastomers are designed by an elastic poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) backbone and multiple hydrogen-bonding ureido-pyrimidinone (UPy) grafts. These supramolecular elastic polymers exhibit efficient self-healing, rapid shape-memory abilities and highly tunable mechanical properties due to the dynamic supramolecular interactions, and perform a good biocompatibility in vitro and a mild host response in vivo. By combining modular approaches, these supramolecular bioelastomers have been further assembled into a multifunctional platform to expand their applications in different biomedical fields. These include a complex 3D scaffold with shape-memory capacity and anisotropic mechanical properties, a controllable drug delivery model via a layer-by-layer technique, a surface antibacterial composite by physical modification, and a spatial oriented cell co-culture system via incorporating different cell-laden self-healing films, demonstrating their potential as building blocks in a wide range of biomedical applications where dynamic properties and biological functions are desired. PMID:27424213

  14. An approach to design new coatings for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    El-Hadad, Amir Abdel-Samie

    2012-01-01

    Ti6Al4V alloy is widely used as implants for orthopedic and dental applications because of its superior mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and good biocompatibility. However, it takes long period of several months for Ti6Al4V implants to integrate with the bone tissue due to their bio-inert feature in nature. An innovating and incipient method to solve the above mentioned drawbacks consist of the development of new coatings which could improve both the biological and corros...

  15. Light-emitting diodes - Their potential in biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Naichia Gary; Wu, Chia-Hao [College of Applied Sciences, MingDao University, 369 Wen-Hua Road, Peetou, Changhua 52345 (China); Cheng, Ta Chih [Department of Tropical Agriculture and International Cooperation, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, 1 Hseuh-Fu Rd., Nei-Pu Hsiang, Pingtung 91201 (China)

    2010-10-15

    The rapid development of high brightness light-emitting diodes (LEDs) makes feasible the use of LEDs, among other light sources (such as laser, intense pulse light and other incoherent light systems), for medical treatment and light therapy. This paper provides a general review on red, green, blue, ultraviolet LED applications in photo rejuvenation and medical treatments of a variety of physical abnormalities, as well as the relief of stress, circadian rhythm disorders, and seasonal affective disorder. The review, concentrated in the papers published after 1990, intends to show that LEDs are well qualified to succeed its more energy demanding counterparts in the named areas and beyond. (author)

  16. Nano technologies, technologies converging and potential biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of nano technology to biology and medicine appear really promising for diagnostics, for various therapeutic approaches and in medical instrumentations. The growing synergism among nano technology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive sciences, their convergence (NBIC) from the nano scale, could involve on next decades great changes in medicine, from a reactive to a predictive and preventive approach. It is expected that NBIC converging technologies could achieve tremendous improvements in human abilities and enhance societal achievement of related social and ethical implications, in the framework of a constant dialogue between science and society

  17. Biomedical and environmental applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Unnikrishnan; K S Choudhari; Suresh D Kulkarni; Rajesh Nayak; V B Kartha; C Santhosh; B M Suri

    2014-02-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique with numerous advantages such as rapidity, multi-elemental analysis, minimal sample preparation, minimal destruction, low cost and versatility of being applied to a wide range of materials. In this paper, we report the preliminary observations we obtained using LIBS for clinical and environmental samples. Elemental analysis has been done qualitatively in human teeth samples which show encouraging results. It has also been demonstrated in this paper that LIBS can be very well utilized in field applications such as plastic waste sorting and recycling.

  18. Nanostructural Characteristics of Vacuum Cold-Sprayed Hydroxyapatite/Graphene-Nanosheet Coatings for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Huang, Jing; Li, Hua

    2014-10-01

    Development of novel biocompatible nanomaterials has provided insights into their potential biomedical applications. Bulk fabrication of the nanomaterials in the form of coatings remains challenging. Here, we report hydroxyapatite (HA)/graphene-nanosheet (GN) composite coatings deposited by vacuum cold spray (VCS). Significant shape changes of HA nanograins during the coating deposition were revealed. The nanostructural features of HA together with curvature alternation of GN gave rise to dense structures. Based on the microstructural characterization, a structure model was proposed to elucidate the nanostructural characteristics of the HA-GN nanocomposites. Results also showed that addition of GN significantly enhanced fracture toughness and elastic modulus of the HA-based coatings, which is presumably accounted for by crack bridging offered by GN in the composites. The VCS HA-GN coatings show potential for biomedical applications for the repair or replacement of hard tissues.

  19. Radiation Synthesis of PVA/ Chitosan Membranes Containing Silver Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver Nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized by γ-rays of polyvinyl alcohol/ chitosan (PVA/ CS) membranes containing silver nitrate (AgNO) with promising antimicrobial and biomedical applications. The synthesized silver nanoparticles characterized by Ultra Violet spectroscopy (UV), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). UV studies showed a strong peak around λmax at 420 nm. A uniform distribution of silver nanoparticles inside PVA/ CS membranes was achieved by TEM investigation. The prepared silver nanoparticles showed good antimicrobial activity. The membranes containing AgNPs showed non-thrombogenicity effect and slightly haemolytic potential. The prepared membranes containing AgNPs had promising use in biomedical applications.

  20. Chitosan functionalized poly(vinyl alcohol) for prospects biomedical and industrial applications: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Ammara; Mahmood Zia, Khalid; Zuber, Mohammad; Tabasum, Shazia; Rehman, Saima

    2016-06-01

    Chitin and chitosan are amino polysaccharides having multidimensional properties, such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, antibacterial properties and non-toxicity, muco-adhesivity, adsorption properties, etc., and thus they can be widely used in variety of areas. Although human history mainly relies on the biopolymers, however synthetic materials like polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) have good mechanical, chemical and physical properties. Functionalization of PVA with chitin and chitosan is considered very appropriate for the development of well-designed biomaterials such as biodegradable films, for membrane separation, for tissue engineering, for food packaging, for wound healing and dressing, hydro gels formation, gels formation, etc. Considering versatile properties of the chitin and chitosan, and wide industrial and biomedical applications of PVA, this review sheds a light on chitin and chitosan based PVA materials with their potential applications especially focusing the bio-medical field. All the technical scientific issues have been addressed highlighting the recent advancement. PMID:26893051

  1. Improved functionalization of oleic acid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can provide multiple benefits for biomedical applications in aqueous environments such as magnetic separation or magnetic resonance imaging. To increase the colloidal stability and allow subsequent reactions, the introduction of hydrophilic functional groups onto the particles’ surface is essential. During this process, the original coating is exchanged by preferably covalently bonded ligands such as trialkoxysilanes. The duration of the silane exchange reaction, which commonly takes more than 24 h, is an important drawback for this approach. In this paper, we present a novel method, which introduces ultrasonication as an energy source to dramatically accelerate this process, resulting in high-quality water-dispersible nanoparticles around 10 nm in size. To prove the generic character, different functional groups were introduced on the surface including polyethylene glycol chains, carboxylic acid, amine, and thiol groups. Their colloidal stability in various aqueous buffer solutions as well as human plasma and serum was investigated to allow implementation in biomedical and sensing applications.

  2. Toxicity, toxicokinetics and biodistribution of dextran stabilized Iron oxide Nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remya, N S; Syama, S; Sabareeswaran, A; Mohanan, P V

    2016-09-10

    Advancement in the field of nanoscience and technology has alarmingly raised the call for comprehending the potential health effects caused by deliberate or unintentional exposure to nanoparticles. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have an increasing number of biomedical applications and hence a complete toxicological profile of the nanomaterial is therefore a mandatory requirement prior to its intended usage to ensure safety and to minimize potential health hazards upon its exposure. The present study elucidates the toxicity of in house synthesized Dextran stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles (DINP) in a regulatory perspective through various routes of exposure, its associated molecular, immune, genotoxic, carcinogenic effects and bio distribution profile. Synthesized ferrite nanomaterials were successfully coated with dextran (behavior changes or visible pathological lesions. Furthermore no anticipated health hazards are likely to be associated with the use of DINP and could be concluded that the synthesized DINP is nontoxic/safe to be used for biomedical applications. PMID:27451271

  3. Polyurethane thermoplastic elastomers with inherent radiopacity for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, S; James, Nirmala R; Jayakrishnan, A; Joseph, Roy

    2012-12-01

    Synthesis and characterization of three different radiopaque thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers are reported. Radiopacity was introduced to the polyurethanes by incorporating an iodinated chain extender, namely, 4,4'-isopropylidinedi-(2,6-diiodophenol) (IBPA), into the polymer chain during polyurethane synthesis. Radiopaque polyurethanes (RPUs) were synthesized by reacting 4,4'-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI), IBPA, and three different diols. The polyols used for the synthesis were polypropylene glycol, polycaprolactone diol, and poly(hexamethylene carbonate) diol. RPUs were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, thermogravimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, gel permeation chromatography, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and X-radiography. X-ray images showed that all RPUs prepared using IBPA as the chain extender are highly radiopaque compared with an Aluminum wedge of equivalent thickness. Elemental analysis revealed that the polyurethanes contained 18-19% iodine in the polymer matrix. The RPUs developed have radiopacity equivalent to that of a polymer filled with 20 wt % barium sulfate. Results revealed that RPUs of wide range of properties may be produced by incorporating different diols as the soft chain segment. Cell culture cytotoxicity studies conducted using L929 cells by direct contact test and MTT assay proved that these RPUs are noncytotoxic in nature. PMID:22815186

  4. Piezoelectric Polymer Ultrasound Transducers and Its Biomedical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Kang Lyeol; Cao, Yanggang [Department of Physics, Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    PVDF(poly vinylidene fluoride) and P(VDF-TrFE)(poly vinylidene fluoride-tetrafluoroethylene) are the typical piezoelectric polymers with unique properties. Even they are inferior to conventional piezoelectric ceramics PZT in electromechanical conversion efficiency and interior loss, though they are superior in receiving sensitivity and frequency bandwidth. Their acoustic impedances are relatively close to water or biological tissue and it is easier to make thin film than other piezoelectric materials. Furthermore, the film is so flexible that it is easy to attach on a complex surface. Those properties are suitable for the ultrasound transducers which are useful for medical and biological application, so that various types of polymer transducers have been developed. In this paper, several important considerations for design and fabrication of piezoelectric polymer transducers were described and their effect on the transducer performance were demonstrated through the KLM model analysis. Then, it was briefly reviewed about the structures of the polymer transducers developed for obtaining images as well as the characteristics of the images in several important medical and biological application fields.

  5. Microfabricated Tactile Sensors for Biomedical Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Saccomandi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, tactile sensors based on different sensing principles have been developed due to the growing interest in robotics and, mainly, in medical applications. Several technological solutions have been employed to design tactile sensors; in particular, solutions based on microfabrication present several attractive features. Microfabrication technologies allow for developing miniaturized sensors with good performance in terms of metrological properties (e.g., accuracy, sensitivity, low power consumption, and frequency response. Small size and good metrological properties heighten the potential role of tactile sensors in medicine, making them especially attractive to be integrated in smart interfaces and microsurgical tools. This paper provides an overview of microfabricated tactile sensors, focusing on the mean principles of sensing, i.e., piezoresistive, piezoelectric and capacitive sensors. These sensors are employed for measuring contact properties, in particular force and pressure, in three main medical fields, i.e., prosthetics and artificial skin, minimal access surgery and smart interfaces for biomechanical analysis. The working principles and the metrological properties of the most promising tactile, microfabricated sensors are analyzed, together with their application in medicine. Finally, the new emerging technologies in these fields are briefly described.

  6. Recent biomedical applications of the Oxford Scanning Proton Microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oxford Scanning Proton Microprobe continues to be used in the field of trace element measurement in biological systems, exploiting the unique advantages of sensitive, quantitative trace element analysis using PIXE, high spatial resolution and the long penetrating power of MeV protons. This paper outlines a number of recent applications which highlight these advantages. These include: (a) Analysing the distribution of metals in the pupae of leaf-cutting ants to determine the storage sites and transport mechanism of metals used to harden the edges of the mandibles. (b) A study of the distribution of zinc in the retina of rats to determine the role of zinc in light and dark adaptation of the eye. (c) The analysis of crystals of proteins and other large organic molecules prepared for structure determination using x-ray diffraction. These often contain metal atoms, and the identity and concentration of the metal is an important diagnostic for determining the nature of the protein and the quality of the crystallisation. The crystals are normally small (∼100 μm) and so micro PIXE is being used to characterise them. This technique has wide ranging applications, including qualitative and quantitative identification of metals in reaction centres, in active sites and in metal binding proteins, and of DNA or RNA bound to proteins. (author)

  7. Biologically Inspired Design of Biocompatible Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Demirer, Gözde S.; Okur, Aysu C; Kızılel, Seda

    2015-01-01

    During the last couple of decades considerable research efforts have been directed towards the synthesis and coating of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) for biomedical applications. To address the current limitations, recent studies have focused on the design of new generation nanoparticle systems whose internalization and targeting capabilities have been improved through surface modifications. This review covers the most recent challenges and advances in the development of IONPs with enhance...

  8. Thermal and thermomechanical behaviour of polycaprolactone and starch/polycaprolactone blends for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Y.; Rodriguez-Perez, M. A.; Reis, R. L.; Mano, J.F

    2005-01-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) and starch/PCL blends (SPCL) are shown to have the potential to be used in a range of biomedical applications and can be processed with conventional melting-based procedures. In this paper, the thermal and thermomechanical analyses of PCL and SPCL were performed, using DSC, optical microscopy and DMA. Starch effectively increased the non-isothermal crystallisation rate of PCL. Non-isothermal crystallisation kinetics was analyzed using Ozawa model, and a method, which co...

  9. Preparation and Functionalization of Macromolecule-Metal and Metal Oxide Nanocomplexes for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Vadala, Michael Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    Preparation and Functionalization of Macromolecule-Metal and Metal Oxide Nanocomplexes For Biomedical Applications Michael L. Vadala Abstract Copolymer-cobalt complexes have been formed by thermolysis of dicobalt octacarbonyl in solutions of copolysiloxanes. The copolysiloxane-cobalt complexes formed from toluene solutions of PDMS-b-[PMVS-co-PMTMS] block copolymers were annealed at 600-700 °C under nitrogen to form protective siliceous shells around the nanoparticles. Magn...

  10. Hydrogel membrane CEACEL preparation at CEADEN for biomedical application. Characterization and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogel membrane production was done at CEADEN using gamma irradiation facility. It's based on the synthesis, crosslinking and sterilization of the mixture of polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyethylene glycol, agar and water. The quality of the production process of hydrogels is monitored throughout the process to ensure the reliability and traceability of the final product according to the good manufacture practices. The hydrogel membranes production for biomedical applications have been gotten the medical register by CECMED. (Author)

  11. Revealing the potential of squid chitosan-based structures for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Reys, L. L.; S.S. Silva; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Caridade, S. G.; Mano, J. F.; Silva, Tiago H.; Reis, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, much attention has been given to different marine organisms, namely as potential sources of valuable materials with a vast range of properties and characteristics. In this work, β-chitin was isolated from the endoskeleton of the giant squid Dosidicus gigas and further deacetylated to produce chitosan. Then, the squid chitosan was processed into membranes and scaffolds using solvent casting and freeze-drying, respectively, to assess their potential biomedical application. The ...

  12. Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Xiangling Gu; Yancong Zhang; Hanwen Sun; Xinfeng Song; Chunhua Fu; Pingxuan Dong

    2015-01-01

    Mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) coated iron oxide nanoparticles have served as a feasible, robust, and functional platform for various biomedical applications. However, there is scarcely a systemic paper reviewed about such functionalising nanomaterials to date. In this review, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles, the mechanism of dopamine self-oxidation, the interaction between iron oxide and dopamine, and the functionality and the safety assessment of dopamine modified iron oxide n...

  13. An analog front-end enables electrical impedance spectroscopy system on-chip for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Seoane, Fernando; Ferreira, Javier; Sanchéz, Juan José; Bragós, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    The increasing number of applications of electrical bioimpedance measurements in biomedical practice, together with continuous advances in textile technology, has encouraged several researchers to make the first attempts to develop portable, even wearable, electrical bioimpedance measurement systems. The main target of these systems is personal and home monitoring. Analog Devices has made available AD5933, a new system-on-chip fully integrated electrical impedance spectrometer, which might al...

  14. Biomedical applications of hydrogels: a review of patents and commercial products

    OpenAIRE

    Caló, Enrica; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels have become very popular due to their unique properties such as high water content, softness, flexibility and biocompatibility. Natural and synthetic hydrophilic polymers can be physically or chemically cross-linked in order to produce hydrogels. Their resemblance to living tissue opens up many opportunities for applications in biomedical areas. Currently, hydrogels are used for manufacturing contact lenses, hygiene products, tissue engineering scaffolds, drug delivery systems and w...

  15. Improved functionalization of oleic acid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bloemen, Maarten; Brullot, Ward; Luong, Thien Tai; Geukens, Nick; Gils, Ann; Verbiest, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can provide multiple benefits for biomedical applications in aqueous environments such as magnetic separation or magnetic resonance imaging. To increase the colloidal stability and allow subsequent reactions, the introduction of hydrophilic functional groups onto the particles’ surface is essential. During this process, the original coating is exchanged by preferably covalently bonded ligands such as trialkoxysilanes. The duration of the silane excha...

  16. Superhydrophobic surfaces produced using natural silica-based structures with potential for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Nuno M.; Reis, R. L.; Mano, J.F

    2013-01-01

    Publicado em "Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine", vol. 17, supp. 1 (2013) Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) are characterized for exhibit extreme water repellency. Where water droplets roll easily and have a contact angle higher than 150º. The inspiration to produce artificial SHS comes from nature, the Lotus leaf. Hierarchical surface topographies at micro/nanoscale are critical for this effect. On biomedical and tissue engineering fields several applications for SHS h...

  17. Intra/Inter-Particle Energy Transfer of Luminescence Nanocrystals for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ping Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Elaborate design of energy transfer systems in luminescent nanocrystals revealed tremendous advantages in nanotechnology, especially in biosensing and drug delivery systems. Recently, upconversion nanoparticles have been discussed as promising probes as labels in biological assays and imaging. This article reviews the works performed in the recent years using quantum dot- and rare-earth doped nanoparticle-based energy transfer systems for biomedical applications.

  18. In Vitro Hemocompatibility and Cytotoxicity Evaluation of Halloysite Nanotubes for Biomedical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Hao-Yang Liu; Lei Du; Yan-Teng Zhao; Wei-Qun Tian

    2015-01-01

    Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), due to their unique structures and properties, may play an important role in biomedical applications. In vitro test is usually conducted as a preliminary screening evaluation of the hemocompatibility and cytotoxicity of HNTs for its short term consuming, convenience, and less expense. In this work, HNTs were processed with anticoagulated rabbit blood to detect its blood compatibility. The result of hemolysis test shows that the hemolysis ratios are below 0.5%, ind...

  19. High-Speed Imaging and Optical Sensing Systems for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mahjoubfar, Ata

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput real-time optical sensing and imaging instruments for capture and analysis of fast phenomena are among the most essential tools for scientific, industrial, military, and most importantly biomedical applications. The key challenge in these instruments is the fundamental trade-off between speed and sensitivity of the measurement system due to the limited signal energy collected in each measurement window. Based on two enabling technologies, namely photonic time-stretch dispersiv...

  20. Frontiers in biomaterials the design, synthetic strategies and biocompatibility of polymer scaffolds for biomedical application

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Shunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Frontiers in Biomaterials: The Design, Synthetic Strategies and Biocompatibility of Polymer Scaffolds for Biomedical Application, Volume 1" highlights the importance of biomaterials and their interaction with biological system. The need for the development of biomaterials as scaffold for tissue regeneration is driven by the increasing demands for materials that mimic functions of extracellular matrices of body tissues.This ebook covers the latest challenges on the biocompatibility of scaffold overtime after implantation and discusses the requirement of innovative technologies and strategies f

  1. Thermal properties of thermoplastic starch/synthetic polymer blends with potential biomedical applicability

    OpenAIRE

    Mano, J. F.; Koniarova, D.; Reis, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies shown that thermoplastic blends of corn starch with some biodegradable synthetic polymers (poly(-caprolactone), cellulose acetate, poly(lactic acid) and ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer) have good potential to be used in a series of biomedical applications. In this work the thermal behavior of these structurally complex materials is investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In addition, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) s...

  2. Development of Pinhole-Free Amorphous Aluminum Oxide Protective Layers for Biomedical Device Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Litvinov, Julia; Wang, Yi-Ju; George, Jinnie; Chinwangso, Pawilai; Brankovic, Stanko; Willson, Richard C.; Litvinov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes synthesis of ultrathin pinhole-free insulating aluminum oxide layers for electronic device protection in corrosive liquid environments, such as phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or clinical fluids, to enable emerging biomedical applications such as biomolecular sensors. A pinhole-free 25-nm thick amorphous aluminum oxide layer has been achieved using ultra-high vacuum DC magnetron reactive sputtering of aluminum in oxygen/argon plasma followed by oxygen plasma post-processi...

  3. Refined Composite Multiscale Dispersion Entropy and its Application to Biomedical Signals

    OpenAIRE

    Azami, Hamed; Rostaghi, Mostafa; Abasolo, Daniel; Escudero, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Multiscale entropy (MSE) is a widely-used tool to analyze biomedical signals. It was proposed to overcome the deficiencies of conventional entropy methods when quantifying the complexity of time series. However, MSE is undefined for very short signals and slow for real-time applications because of the use of sample entropy (SampEn). To overcome these shortcomings, we introduce multiscale dispersion entropy (DisEn - MDE) as a very fast and powerful method to quantify the complexity of signals....

  4. Low density biodegradable shape memory polyurethane foams for embolic biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, Pooja; Small, Ward; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Maitland, Duncan J.; Wilson, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Low density shape memory polymer foams hold significant interest in the biomaterials community for their potential use in minimally invasive embolic biomedical applications. The unique shape memory behavior of these foams allows them to be compressed to a miniaturized form, which can be delivered to an anatomical site via a transcatheter process, and thereafter actuated to embolize the desired area. Previous work in this field has described the use of a highly covalently crosslinked polymer s...

  5. Nanostructured sensors for biomedical applications--a current perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sivashankar

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructured sensors have unique capabilities that can be tailored to advantage in advancing the diagnosis, monitoring and cure of several diseases and health conditions. This report aims at providing a current perspective on, (a) the emerging clinical needs that defines the challenges to be addressed by nanostructured sensors, with specific emphasis on early stage diagnosis, drug-diagnostic combinations, and predictive models to design therapy, (b) the emerging industry trends in in vitro diagnostics, mobile health care, high-throughput molecular and cell-based diagnostic platforms, and (c) recent instances of nanostructured biosensors, including promising sensing concepts that can be enhanced using nanostructures that carry high promise towards catering to the emerging clinical needs, as well as the market/industry trends. PMID:25591062

  6. Comparison of different metrological devices used in biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryniewicz, A.; Gaska, A., E-mail: andrzej@ryniewicz.p, E-mail: agaska@mech.pk.edu.p [Laboratory of Coordinate Metrology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cracow University of Technology, al. Jana Pawla II 37, 31-864 Cracow (Poland)

    2010-07-01

    Thanks to the progress in examination of human body, it is possible to create new methods of diagnostics. To diagnose diseases properly, one should recognize the internal and external structure of organs, their geometrical parameters, width, height, etc. And this is a place, in which cooperation between coordinate metrology and medicine is the most strong. Metrological devices could be used in this area, in a variety of uses. Paper shows usage of Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM) and Coordinate Measuring Arms (CMA) in determination of external structure, dimensions and shape of measured objects (part of bones and joints). Also use of Computed Tomographs (CT) in medical applications will be presented. Then the comparison of results of measurements performed on each device will be made. Apart from this, article puts attention on practical meaning of results obtained from CT measurements. Problem of the shape mapping and its accuracy will also be discussed.

  7. Comparison of different metrological devices used in biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thanks to the progress in examination of human body, it is possible to create new methods of diagnostics. To diagnose diseases properly, one should recognize the internal and external structure of organs, their geometrical parameters, width, height, etc. And this is a place, in which cooperation between coordinate metrology and medicine is the most strong. Metrological devices could be used in this area, in a variety of uses. Paper shows usage of Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM) and Coordinate Measuring Arms (CMA) in determination of external structure, dimensions and shape of measured objects (part of bones and joints). Also use of Computed Tomographs (CT) in medical applications will be presented. Then the comparison of results of measurements performed on each device will be made. Apart from this, article puts attention on practical meaning of results obtained from CT measurements. Problem of the shape mapping and its accuracy will also be discussed.

  8. Structure, synthetic methods, magnetic properties and biomedical applications of ferrofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrollahi, H

    2013-07-01

    This paper is aimed at conducting a survey of the synthetic methods and magnetic properties of nanoparticles as ferrofluids used in biomedicine. As compared with other works in the field, the distinctive feature of the current work is the systematic study of recent advances in ferrofluids utilized in hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The most important feature for application of ferrofluids is super-paramagnetic behavior of magnetic cores with relatively high saturation magnetization. Although Fe3O4 nanoparticles have traditionally been used in medicine; the modified Mn-ferrite has recently received special attention due to its higher saturation magnetization and r2-relaxivity as a contrast agent in MRI. Co-ferrite nanoparticles are also good candidates for hyperthermia treatment because of their high coercivity and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The thermal decomposition and hydrothermal methods are good candidates for obtaining appropriate super-paramagnetic particles. PMID:23623058

  9. High energy beams of radioactive nuclei and their biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of high-energy beams of radioactive species is the most recent advancement in the field of accelerator physics. One of the primary interactions experienced by relativistic heavy ions is the peripheral nuclear collision. Thus, radioactive nuclei are produced as secondary particles from peripheral nuclear fragmentation reactions. These nuclei have trajectories and energies differing little from that of the parent particle. Various radioactive beams produced as a result of these reactions, now available on a regular basis from the Bevalac, are: 11C, 13N, 15O, and 19Ne with sufficient intensity. Besides the interest in such beams for nuclear physics, important applications in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology and in nuclear medicine are discussed

  10. Glycolipid biosurfactants: Potential related biomedical and biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inès, Mnif; Dhouha, Ghribi

    2015-10-30

    Glycolipids, consisting of a carbohydrate moiety linked to fatty acids, are microbial surface active compounds produced by various microorganisms. They are characterized by highly structural diversity and have the ability to decrease the surface and interfacial tension at the surface and interface respectively. Rhamnolipids, trehalolipids, mannosylerythritol-lipids and cellobiose lipids are among the most popular glycolipids. Moreover, their ability to form pores and destabilize biological membrane permits their use in biomedicine as antibacterial, antifungal and hemolytic agents. Their antiviral and antitumor effects enable their use in pharmaceutic as therapeutic agents. Also, glycolipids can inhibit the bioadhesion of pathogenic bacteria enabling their use as anti-adhesive agents and for disruption of biofilm formation and can be used in cosmetic industry. Moreover, they have great potential application in industry as detergents, wetting agents and for flotation. Furthermore, glycolipids can act at the surface and can modulate enzyme activity permitting the enhancement or the inhibition of the activity of certain enzymes. PMID:26359535

  11. Phytofabrication of bioinduced silver nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad N

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nabeel Ahmad,1 Sharad Bhatnagar,1 Syed Salman Ali,2 Rajiv Dutta3 1School of Biotechnology, 2School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, IFTM University, Lodhipur Rajput, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India; 3Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, Shri Ramswaroop Memorial University, Barabanki, Uttar Pradesh, India Abstract: Synthesis of nanomaterials holds infinite possibilities as nanotechnology is revolutionizing the field of medicine by its myriad applications. Green synthesis of nanoparticles has become the need of the hour because of its eco-friendly, nontoxic, and economic nature. In this study, leaf extract of Rosa damascena was used as a bioreductant to reduce silver nitrate, leading to synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs in a single step, without the use of any additional reducing or capping agents. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by the use of UV-visible spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Time-dependent synthesis of AgNPs was studied spectrophotometrically. Synthesized AgNPs were found to possess flower-like spherical structure where individual nanoparticles were of 16 nm in diameter, whereas the agglomerated AgNPs were in the range of 60–80 nm. These biologically synthesized AgNPs exhibited significant antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacterial species but not against Gram-positive ones (Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities were studied on a Wistar rat model to gauge the impact of AgNPs for a probable role in these applications. AgNPs tested positive for both these activities, although the potency was less as compared to the standard drugs. Keywords: silver nanoparticles, green synthesis, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, animal model study, antibacterial

  12. Theoretical studies to elucidate the influence of magnetic dipolar interactions occurring in the magnetic nanoparticle systems, for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaci, M.; Cacciola, M.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the study of magnetic nanoparticles has been intensively developed not only for their fundamental theoretical interest, but also for their many technological applications, especially biomedical applications, ranging from contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging to the deterioration of cancer cells via hyperthermia treatment. The theoretical and experimental research has shown until now that the magnetic dipolar interactions between nanoparticles can have a significant influence on the magnetic behaviour of the system. But, this influence is not well understood. It is clear that the magnetic dipolar interaction intensity is correlated with the nanoparticle concentration, volume fraction and magnetic moment orientations. In this paper, we try to understand the influence of magnetic dipolar interactions on the behaviour of magnetic nanoparticle systems, for biomedical applications. For the model, we considered spherical nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropy and lognormal distribution of the sizes. The model involves a simulation stage of the spatial distribution and orientation of the nanoparticles and their easy axes of magnetic anisotropy, and an evaluation stage of the Néel relaxation time. To assess the Néel relaxation time, we are going to discretise and adapt, to the local magnetic field, the Coffey analytical solution for the equation Fokker-Planck describing the dynamics of magnetic moments of nanoparticles in oblique external magnetic field. There are three fundamental aspects of interest in our studies on the magnetic nanoparticles: their spatial & orientational distributions, concentrations and sizes.

  13. To Design High CMRR, High Slew rate Instrumentation Amplifier using OTA and CDTA for Biomedical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Jain

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In today’s world operational amplifier is used in lot of application. The techniques for achieving high slew rate and high CMRR is by cascading the transistors. This paper focus is on understanding of Operational Trans conductance Amplifier (OTA and Current Differencing Trans conductance Amplifier (CDTA with its application as Instrumentation Amplifier (IA for Biomedical application. We have designed Instrumentation Amplifier using CDTA to obtain high common mode rejection ratio (CMRR, high slew rate in comparison with OTA using PSPICE software.

  14. Radiation induced modification of polyurethane for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polyether urethane WH8 was modified by radiation induced grafting Biocompatibility was achieved using hydrophil or hydrophil made monomers. Grafting of the monomers HEMA, GMA, GOMA and AAm onto the polyether urethane was performed by means of preswelling technique. By variation of preswelling time and irradiation dose different degrees of grafting were obtained. The grafted products were characterized by IR-Spectroscopy and the deepness of grafting was determined for the systems WH8-g-HEMA, WH8-g-GMA and WH8-g-AAm. Mechanical properties of the basis polymer and the grafted samples were measured by tension-extension experiments in the dry and waterswelled state. To the systems WH8-g-GMA and WH8-g-AAm hydrophil groups as the diol and the sulfonic group were attached by chemical reactions. The content of water of modified samples was determined and rose with increasing degree of grafting. To characterize the surface the contact angle against water (THETAsub(H2O)) and octane (THETAsub(octane)THETAsub(H2O)) was determined and therefrom the free boundary surface energy (#betta#sw) between the polymer and water. Increasing the degree of grafting adsorption of albumine rises strongly with all systems. Cell culture tests and biocompatibility tests were positive with one exception. The influence of the samples on the intravasal curdling system was determined by measuring recalcification time after incubation in human plasm. (SPI)

  15. Preparation of pyrenyl-based multifunctional nanocomposites for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Nanocomposites are widely used to obtain an accurate diagnosis of, and to provide effective therapy for, a number of diseases, because they can be easily formulated by introducing therapeutic agents (e.g., drugs and genes) and imaging agents (e.g., magnetic nanocrystals). Furthermore, nanocomposites can be developed as all-in-one systems, which enable cancer diagnosis and therapy, as well as the simultaneous monitoring of drug behavior. In this protocol, we describe the synthesis of four pyrenyl-based polymers (pyrenyl polyethylene glycol (Py-PEG), pyrenyl dextran (Py-DEX), pyrenyl hyaluronan (Py-HA) and pyrenyl-conjugated heterofunctional PEG (pyrenyl PEG)) and their subsequent use in the preparation of multifunctional nanocomposites for different applications including multimodal imaging, targeted cancer detection and pH-sensitive drug delivery. Notably, these nanocomposites can be used to simultaneously perform multiple tasks--for example, delivering magnetic particles for early cancer detection by MRI, efficient cataloging of patient groups for personalized therapy and real-time monitoring of disease progress. Starting from the synthesis of pyrenyl-based polymers, this protocol can be completed in ∼15 d. PMID:26741408

  16. Periodical Microstructures Based on Novel Piezoelectric Material for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giedrius Janusas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel cantilever type piezoelectric sensing element was developed. Cost-effective and simple fabrication design allows the use of this element for various applications in the areas of biomedicine, pharmacy, environmental analysis and biosensing. This paper proposes a novel piezoelectric composite material whose basic element is PZT and a sensing platform where this material was integrated. Results showed that a designed novel cantilever-type element is able to generate a voltage of up to 80 µV at 50 Hz frequency. To use this element for sensing purposes, a four micron periodical microstructure was imprinted. Silver nanoparticles were precipitated on the grating to increase the sensitivity of the designed element, i.e., Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR effect appears in the element. To tackle some issues (a lack of sensitivity, signal delays the element must have certain electronic and optical properties. One possible solution, proposed in this paper, is a combination of piezoelectricity and SPR in a single element.

  17. Irradiated cobra (Naja naja) venom for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is known to cause damage to proteins in aqueous solutions in a selective manner, thereby producing remarkable changes in their properties. Since venoms are very rich in proteins, it was felt that they would also show such changes upon irradiation. It was of interest to know if one could get rid of the toxicity and retain the immunogenicity of the venom by suitable choice of radiation dose and strength of venom solution. If so, the method could be profitably exploited for the rapid preparation of venom toxoid and this could be expected to have many applications in the biological sciences. Accordingly, laboratory investigations were undertaken on the effect of gamma radiation on cobra (Naja naja) venom. To avoid drastic changes, solutions of cobra venom having low protein content were irradiated with gamma radiation from a cobalt-60 source. The results obtained with 0.01 to 1.0% venom solutions are found to be encouraging. The solutions did not manifest any toxicity in mice. For the immunogenicity test, guinea pigs were immunized with varying doses of the irradiated cobra venom and the immunized guinea pigs were found to survive when challenged with as big a dose as 10 MLD (i.e. minimum lethal dose, approximately 1 mg). The paper describes the experimental details and the results of the observations. (author)

  18. Characterization of nickel-doped biphasic calcium phosphate/graphene nanoplatelet composites for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradaran, S; Moghaddam, E; Nasiri-Tabrizi, Bahman; Basirun, W J; Mehrali, M; Sookhakian, M; Hamdi, M; Alias, Y

    2015-04-01

    The effect of the addition of an ionic dopant to calcium phosphates for biomedical applications requires specific research due to the essential roles played in such processes. In the present study, the mechanical and biological properties of Ni-doped hydroxyapatite (HA) and Ni-doped HA mixed with graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were evaluated. Ni (3wt.% and 6wt.%)-doped HA was synthesized using a continuous precipitation method and calcined at 900°C for 1h. The GNP (0.5-2wt.%)-reinforced 6% Ni-doped HA (Ni6) composite was prepared using rotary ball milling for 15h. The sintering process was performed using hot isostatic pressing at processing conditions of 1150°C and 160MPa with a 1-h holding time. The results indicated that the phase compositions and structural features of the products were noticeably affected by the Ni and GNPs. The mechanical properties of Ni6 and 1.5Ni6 were increased by 55% and 75% in hardness, 59% and 163% in fracture toughness and 120% and 85% in elastic modulus compared with monolithic HA, respectively. The in-vitro biological behavior was investigated using h-FOB osteoblast cells in 1, 3 and 5days of culture. Based on the osteoblast results, the cytotoxicity of the products was indeed affected by the Ni doping. In addition, the effect of GNPs on the growth and proliferation of osteoblast cells was investigated in Ni6 composites containing different ratios of GNPs, where 1.5wt.% was the optimum value. PMID:25686995

  19. Characterization of nickel-doped biphasic calcium phosphate/graphene nanoplatelet composites for biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baradaran, S., E-mail: saeid_baradaran@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Moghaddam, E. [Tropical Infectious Diseases Research and Education Centre, Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Nasiri-Tabrizi, Bahman, E-mail: bahman_nasiri@hotmail.com [Advanced Materials Research Center, Materials Engineering Department, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Basirun, W.J. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Institute of Nanotechnology& Catalysis Research (NanoCat), University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mehrali, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Sookhakian, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Hamdi, M. [Center of Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Alias, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

    2015-04-01

    The effect of the addition of an ionic dopant to calcium phosphates for biomedical applications requires specific research due to the essential roles played in such processes. In the present study, the mechanical and biological properties of Ni-doped hydroxyapatite (HA) and Ni-doped HA mixed with graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were evaluated. Ni (3 wt.% and 6 wt.%)-doped HA was synthesized using a continuous precipitation method and calcined at 900 °C for 1 h. The GNP (0.5–2 wt.%)-reinforced 6% Ni-doped HA (Ni6) composite was prepared using rotary ball milling for 15 h. The sintering process was performed using hot isostatic pressing at processing conditions of 1150 °C and 160 MPa with a 1-h holding time. The results indicated that the phase compositions and structural features of the products were noticeably affected by the Ni and GNPs. The mechanical properties of Ni6 and 1.5Ni6 were increased by 55% and 75% in hardness, 59% and 163% in fracture toughness and 120% and 85% in elastic modulus compared with monolithic HA, respectively. The in-vitro biological behavior was investigated using h-FOB osteoblast cells in 1, 3 and 5 days of culture. Based on the osteoblast results, the cytotoxicity of the products was indeed affected by the Ni doping. In addition, the effect of GNPs on the growth and proliferation of osteoblast cells was investigated in Ni6 composites containing different ratios of GNPs, where 1.5 wt.% was the optimum value. - Highlights: • Ni doped biphasic calcium phosphate/graphene nanoplatelets composite was investigated. • Mechanical and biological properties were evaluated. • Phase compositions and structural features were influenced noticeably by the Ni and GNPs. • The cytotoxicity of the Ni was improved with the addition of GNPs.

  20. Characterization of nickel-doped biphasic calcium phosphate/graphene nanoplatelet composites for biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the addition of an ionic dopant to calcium phosphates for biomedical applications requires specific research due to the essential roles played in such processes. In the present study, the mechanical and biological properties of Ni-doped hydroxyapatite (HA) and Ni-doped HA mixed with graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were evaluated. Ni (3 wt.% and 6 wt.%)-doped HA was synthesized using a continuous precipitation method and calcined at 900 °C for 1 h. The GNP (0.5–2 wt.%)-reinforced 6% Ni-doped HA (Ni6) composite was prepared using rotary ball milling for 15 h. The sintering process was performed using hot isostatic pressing at processing conditions of 1150 °C and 160 MPa with a 1-h holding time. The results indicated that the phase compositions and structural features of the products were noticeably affected by the Ni and GNPs. The mechanical properties of Ni6 and 1.5Ni6 were increased by 55% and 75% in hardness, 59% and 163% in fracture toughness and 120% and 85% in elastic modulus compared with monolithic HA, respectively. The in-vitro biological behavior was investigated using h-FOB osteoblast cells in 1, 3 and 5 days of culture. Based on the osteoblast results, the cytotoxicity of the products was indeed affected by the Ni doping. In addition, the effect of GNPs on the growth and proliferation of osteoblast cells was investigated in Ni6 composites containing different ratios of GNPs, where 1.5 wt.% was the optimum value. - Highlights: • Ni doped biphasic calcium phosphate/graphene nanoplatelets composite was investigated. • Mechanical and biological properties were evaluated. • Phase compositions and structural features were influenced noticeably by the Ni and GNPs. • The cytotoxicity of the Ni was improved with the addition of GNPs

  1. Surface modification of nanodiamonds for biomedical application and analysis by infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Burleson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Diamond nanoparticles are gaining much interest in biomedical applications due to the attractive chemical and biological properties. Studies have shown the potential of these “nanodiamonds” (NDs for bioimaging, drug delivery, and biosensing. However, depending on the origin, the nanodiamond surface is often rich in various functional groups which can result in diverse behaviours in biological environments ranging from bioinertness to changes in cell function and cytotoxicity. We have observed the substantial difference in cellular response of several cell lines to NDs of various origins. Therefore, the aim of this study was to modify nanodiamond surface in a controlled manner to discriminate the effect of different functional groups on the cellular response.Design/methodology/approach: Commercial detonation nanodiamond powders with the mean grain size 5 nm but different size of agglomerates and synthetic diamond particles ranging from 50 nm to 1 μm were modified under hydro- and solvo- thermal conditions to introduce specific functional groups to the surface. The processed nanoparticles were investigated with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and the results were compared between the samples. Modified NDs were tested for their toxicity in vitro with several cell lines (cell viability studies and for the capability for small molecule anti-cancerous drug loading.Findings: We demonstrated that different chemical groups can be introduced and controlled onto the synthetic diamond surface depending on the solvent and process parameters used. In vitro assays showed that no cellular toxicity was found when CO, OH, or NH-groups dominated on the surface of the diamond particle.Practical implications: Many potent drugs that have proven to be useful in treating diseases such as cancer pose a challenge in delivery because they are not soluble in polar protic solvents such as water. These drugs are soluble in polar aprotic solvents

  2. Nanocomposite Apatite-biopolymer Materials and Coatings for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F. Sukhodub

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The microoverview paper describes synthesis and characterization of novel third generation composite biomaterials and coatings which correspond to the second structural level of human bone tissue (HBT organization obtained at Sumy state university “Bionanocomposite” laboratory. To obtain such composites an animal collagen is usually used, which is not potentially safe for medical applications. That is why investigations were started using some other biopolymers to obtain composites close to the second level in the structural hierarchy of HBT. Proposed natural polymers (Na alginate, chitosan are the most perspective because they have bacteriostatic properties for a vast number of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, high biocompatibility towards the connective tissue, low toxicity, an ability to improve regenerative processes during wounds healing, degradation ability with the creation of chemotaxic activity towards fibroblasts and osteoblasts. The formation of nanosized (25-75 nm calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (cdHA particles in the polymer scaffold approaches the derived material to the biogenic bone tissue, which can provide its more effective implantation. The influence of the imposition of static magnetic field on brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O crystallization was also investigated. It was shown that changing the magnetic field configuration could greatly affect crystallinity and texture of the derived particles. To increase the biocompatibility of existing medical implants (Ti–6Al 4V, Ti Ni, Mg the technology for obtaining bioactive coatings with corresponding mechanical, structural and morphology characteristics is developed in our laboratory. In this direction coatings based on cdHA in combination with biopolymer matrices (Na alginate, chitosan, are obtained in “soft” conditions using a thermal substrate technology. This technology was proposed by Japan scientists [1] and was sufficiently improved by us [2] in order to obtain coatings in

  3. Tunable elastin-mimetic multiblock hybrid copolymers for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshaber, Sarah Elizabeth

    Elastin-mimetic hybrid polymers (EMHPs) have been developed to capture the multiblock molecular architecture of tropoelastin, allowing tunability in chemical, structural, biological, and mechanical properties. Multiblock EMHPs containing flexible synthetic segments were first synthesized via step growth polymerization of diazido-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and alkyne-terminated AKA3KA (K = lysine, A = alanine) (AK2) peptide employing copper (I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC, or orthogonal click chemistry). Covalent crosslinking of the EMHPs with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) through the lysine residues in the peptide domain afforded an elastomeric hydrogel (xEMHP) with a compressive modulus of 0.12 +/- 0.018 MPa when hydrated. xEMHPs exhibited minimal cytotoxicity to primary porcine vocal fold fibroblasts. The modular nature of the synthesis allowed facile adjustment of the peptide sequence to modulate the structural and the biological properties of EMHPs. Thus, EMHPs containing integrin-binding peptides were constructed using di-azido-PEG and an alkyne-terminated AK2 peptide with a terminal, integrin-binding GRGDSP domain via the step growth click coupling reaction. Hydrogels formed by covalent crosslinking of the RGD-containing EMHPs had a compressive modulus of 1.06 +/- 0.1MPa when hydrated. Neonatal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) were able to adhere to the hydrogels within 1 h, and to spread and develop F-actin filaments 24 h post seeding. NHDF proliferation was only observed on hydrogels containing RGD domains, demonstrating the importance of integrin engagement for cell growth and the potential use of these EMHPs as tissue engineering scaffolds. The tunability of the EMHP system was further investigated by development of self-assembling, pH-responsive multiblock polymers composed of alternating domains of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and a peptide derived from the hydrophobic domains of elastin with the sequence (VPGVG)2 (VG2). The

  4. Diagnostic and analysis of aggregation stability of magnetic fluids for biomedical applications by small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnostics of aggregation and determination of the aggregation regimes and their control in biocompatible magnetic fluids are necessary for their development in biomedical applications. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) method was applied in the structure analysis of various types of magnetic fluids for biomedical applications. Additionally the interaction characteristics between surfactant/polymer molecules used in stabilization of magnetic fluids were investigated, which is very important for understanding the synthesis procedure of highly stable magnetic fluids with controllable properties.

  5. Characterization of a new beta titanium alloy, Ti-12Mo-3Nb, for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, S.B., E-mail: sinara@metalmat.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica de Materiais, C.P. 68505, Rio de Janeiro (RJ) 21945-970 (Brazil); Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda, Volta Redonda (RJ) (Brazil); Panaino, J.V.P. [Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda, Volta Redonda (RJ) (Brazil); Santos, I.D. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (RJ) (Brazil); Araujo, L.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica de Materiais, C.P. 68505, Rio de Janeiro (RJ) 21945-970 (Brazil); Mei, P.R. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Almeida, L.H. de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica de Materiais, C.P. 68505, Rio de Janeiro (RJ) 21945-970 (Brazil); Nunes, C.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, C.P. 116, Lorena (SP) 12.600-970 (Brazil)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper focused on the development of Ti-12Mo-3Nb alloy for it to be used as a bone substitute. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alloy show good mechanical properties and exhibit spontaneous passivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ti-12Mo-3Nb alloy can be a promising alternative for biomedical application. - Abstract: In recent years, different beta titanium alloys have been developed for biomedical applications with a combination of mechanical properties including a low Young's modulus, high strength, fatigue resistance and good ductility with excellent corrosion resistance. From this perspective, a new metastable beta titanium Ti-12Mo-3Nb alloy was developed with the replacement of both vanadium and aluminum from the traditional Ti-6Al-4V alloy. This paper presents the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the Ti-12Mo-3Nb alloy heat-treated at 950 Degree-Sign C for 1 h. The material was characterized by X-ray diffraction and by scanning electron microscopy. Tensile tests were carried out at room temperature. Corrosion tests were performed using Ringer's solution at 25 Degree-Sign C. The results showed that this alloy could potentially be used for biomedical purposes due to its good mechanical properties and spontaneous passivation.

  6. Artificial Tongue-Placed Tactile Biofeedback for perceptual supplementation: application to human disability and biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    The present paper aims at introducing the innovative technologies, based on the concept of "sensory substitution" or "perceptual supplementation", we are developing in the fields of human disability and biomedical engineering. Precisely, our goal is to design, develop and validate practical assistive biomedical and/technical devices and/or rehabilitating procedures for persons with disabilities, using artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback systems. Proposed applications are dealing with: (1) pressure sores prevention in case of spinal cord injuries (persons with paraplegia, or tetraplegia); (2) ankle proprioceptive acuity improvement for driving assistance in older and/or disabled adults; and (3) balance control improvement to prevent fall in older and/or disabled adults. This paper presents results of three feasibility studies performed on young healthy adults.

  7. A sub-microwatt asynchronous level-crossing ADC for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongjia; Zhao, Duan; Serdijn, Wouter A

    2013-04-01

    A continuous-time level-crossing analog-to-digital converter (LC-ADC) for biomedical applications is presented. When compared to uniform-sampling (US) ADCs LC-ADCs generate fewer samples for various sparse biomedical signals. Lower power consumption and reduced design complexity with respect to conventional LC-ADCs are achieved due to: 1) replacing the n-bit digital-to-analog converter (DAC) with a 1-bit DAC; 2) splitting the level-crossing detections; and 3) fixing the comparison window. Designed and implemented in 0.18 μm CMOS technology, the proposed ADC uses a chip area of 220 × 203 μm(2). Operating from a supply voltage of 0.8 V, the ADC consumes 313-582 nW from 5 Hz to 5 kHz and achieves an ENOB up to 7.9 bits. PMID:23853297

  8. Big Data Application in Biomedical Research and Health Care: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jake; Wu, Min; Gopukumar, Deepika; Zhao, Yiqing

    2016-01-01

    Big data technologies are increasingly used for biomedical and health-care informatics research. Large amounts of biological and clinical data have been generated and collected at an unprecedented speed and scale. For example, the new generation of sequencing technologies enables the processing of billions of DNA sequence data per day, and the application of electronic health records (EHRs) is documenting large amounts of patient data. The cost of acquiring and analyzing biomedical data is expected to decrease dramatically with the help of technology upgrades, such as the emergence of new sequencing machines, the development of novel hardware and software for parallel computing, and the extensive expansion of EHRs. Big data applications present new opportunities to discover new knowledge and create novel methods to improve the quality of health care. The application of big data in health care is a fast-growing field, with many new discoveries and methodologies published in the last five years. In this paper, we review and discuss big data application in four major biomedical subdisciplines: (1) bioinformatics, (2) clinical informatics, (3) imaging informatics, and (4) public health informatics. Specifically, in bioinformatics, high-throughput experiments facilitate the research of new genome-wide association studies of diseases, and with clinical informatics, the clinical field benefits from the vast amount of collected patient data for making intelligent decisions. Imaging informatics is now more rapidly integrated with cloud platforms to share medical image data and workflows, and public health informatics leverages big data techniques for predicting and monitoring infectious disease outbreaks, such as Ebola. In this paper, we review the recent progress and breakthroughs of big data applications in these health-care domains and summarize the challenges, gaps, and opportunities to improve and advance big data applications in health care. PMID:26843812

  9. Big Data Application in Biomedical Research and Health Care: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jake; Wu, Min; Gopukumar, Deepika; Zhao, Yiqing

    2016-01-01

    Big data technologies are increasingly used for biomedical and health-care informatics research. Large amounts of biological and clinical data have been generated and collected at an unprecedented speed and scale. For example, the new generation of sequencing technologies enables the processing of billions of DNA sequence data per day, and the application of electronic health records (EHRs) is documenting large amounts of patient data. The cost of acquiring and analyzing biomedical data is expected to decrease dramatically with the help of technology upgrades, such as the emergence of new sequencing machines, the development of novel hardware and software for parallel computing, and the extensive expansion of EHRs. Big data applications present new opportunities to discover new knowledge and create novel methods to improve the quality of health care. The application of big data in health care is a fast-growing field, with many new discoveries and methodologies published in the last five years. In this paper, we review and discuss big data application in four major biomedical subdisciplines: (1) bioinformatics, (2) clinical informatics, (3) imaging informatics, and (4) public health informatics. Specifically, in bioinformatics, high-throughput experiments facilitate the research of new genome-wide association studies of diseases, and with clinical informatics, the clinical field benefits from the vast amount of collected patient data for making intelligent decisions. Imaging informatics is now more rapidly integrated with cloud platforms to share medical image data and workflows, and public health informatics leverages big data techniques for predicting and monitoring infectious disease outbreaks, such as Ebola. In this paper, we review the recent progress and breakthroughs of big data applications in these health-care domains and summarize the challenges, gaps, and opportunities to improve and advance big data applications in health care. PMID:26843812

  10. Evaluation of Ni-free Zr–Cu–Fe–Al bulk metallic glass for biomedical implant applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Ying-Sui [Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Wei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China); Kai, Wu [Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan (China); Liaw, Peter K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Huang, Her-Hsiung, E-mail: hhhuang@ym.edu.tw [Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: ► A Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} bulk metallic glass (BMG) with 50 GPa elastic modulus was used. ► This Ni-free Zr-based BMG had lower metal ion release rate than the commercial Ti. ► This Ni-free Zr-based BMG had better proteins adsorption than the commercial Ti. ► This Ni-free Zr-based BMG has a high potential for biomedical implant applications. -- Abstract: This study was conducted to investigate the surface characteristics, including the chemical composition, metal ion release, protein adsorption, and cell adhesion, of a Ni-free Zr-based (Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10}) bulk metallic glass (BMG) with low elastic modulus for biomedical implant applications. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to identify the surface chemical composition and the protein (albumin and fibronectin) adsorption of the specimen. The metal ions released from the specimen in simulated blood plasma and artificial saliva solutions were measured using an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. The cell adhesion, in terms of the morphology, focal adhesion complex, and skeletal arrangement, of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was evaluated using scanning electron microscope observations and immunofluorescent staining. For comparison purposes, the above-mentioned tests were also carried out on the widely used biomedical metal, Ti. The results showed that the main component on the outermost surface of the amorphous Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} BMG was ZrO{sub 2} with small amounts of Cu, Al, and Fe oxides. The released metal ions from Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} BMG were well below the critical concentrations that cause negative biological effects. The Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} BMG had a greater adsorption capacity for albumin and fibronectin than that of commercial biomedical Ti. The Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} BMG surface showed an attached cell number similar

  11. Nanostructured thin film formation on femtosecond laser-textured Ti-35Nb-xZr alloy for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the nanostructured thin film formation on femtosecond (FS) laser-textured Ti-35Nb-xZr alloy for biomedical applications. The initial surface roughening treatment involved irradiation with the FS laser in ambient air. After FS laser texturing, nanotubes were formed on the alloy surface using a potentiostat and a 1 M H3PO4 solution containing 0.8 wt.% NaF with an applied cell voltage of 10 V for 2 h. The surface phenomena were investigated by FE-SEM, EDS, XRD, XPS and a cell proliferation test. It was found that nanostructured Ti-35Nb-xZr alloys after FS laser texturing had a hybrid surface topography with micro and nano scale structures, which should provide very effective osseointegration.

  12. Nanostructured thin film formation on femtosecond laser-textured Ti-35Nb-xZr alloy for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yong-Hoon [Department of Dental Materials and Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Han-Cheol, E-mail: hcchoe@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials and Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Brantley, William A. [Division of Restorative and Prosthetic Dentistry and Primary Care, College of Dentistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2011-05-31

    The aim of this study was to investigate the nanostructured thin film formation on femtosecond (FS) laser-textured Ti-35Nb-xZr alloy for biomedical applications. The initial surface roughening treatment involved irradiation with the FS laser in ambient air. After FS laser texturing, nanotubes were formed on the alloy surface using a potentiostat and a 1 M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution containing 0.8 wt.% NaF with an applied cell voltage of 10 V for 2 h. The surface phenomena were investigated by FE-SEM, EDS, XRD, XPS and a cell proliferation test. It was found that nanostructured Ti-35Nb-xZr alloys after FS laser texturing had a hybrid surface topography with micro and nano scale structures, which should provide very effective osseointegration.

  13. Surface modification of poly(dimethylsiloxane) through oxygen and nitrogen plasma treatment to improve its characteristics towards biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymeric materials successfully applied in biomedical applications have an issue of poor surface properties which may restrict their applications as biomaterials. The present paper aims to study the effect of oxygen and nitrogen plasma treatment on physico-chemical properties of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and enhancement in its biocompatibility. Various characterization techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy were used to evaluate the changes in surface chemistry and morphology of plasma treated PDMS. Changes in the wettability after plasma treatments and the effects of ageing on wettability were studied by contact angle measurement. Ageing studies showed that the contact angle was stable after two hours. The effect of plasma treatment on biocompatibility was studied through cell adhesion and MTT using 3T3 fibroblast cells. Morphology of cells obtained through SEM was analyzed using ImageJ software. Among the different treated and untreated samples, substantial enhancement in biocompatibility was observed for nitrogen plasma treated PDMS for 5 min in terms of highest cell area observed from cell adhesion test and highest cell viability observed from MTT test. This may be probably due to its highest polarity (0.4) and surface energy (33.3 N mm−2) with a moderate surface roughness (Rrms = 100.24 nm) among the other treated and untreated samples. (paper)

  14. Recent progress in biomedical applications of Pluronic (PF127): Pharmaceutical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akash, Muhammad Sajid Hamid; Rehman, Kanwal

    2015-07-10

    Most of the administered anti-cancer drugs are hydrophobic in nature and are known to have poor water solubility, short residence time, rapid clearance from the body and systemic side effects. Polymeric-based targeted particulate carrier system has shown to directly deliver the encapsulated anti-cancer drug to the desired site of action and prevent the interaction of encapsulated drug with the normal cells. Pluronic F127 (PF127) has been widely investigated for its broad-range of therodiagnostic applications in biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences, but rapid dissolution in the physiological fluids, short residence time, rapid clearance, and weak mechanical strength are the main shortcomings that are associated with PF127 and have recently been overcome by making various modifications in the structure of PF127 notably through preparation of PF127-based mixed polymeric micelles, PF127-conjugated nanoparticles and PF127-based hydrophobically modified thermogels. In this article, we have briefly discussed the recent studies that have been conducted on various anti-cancer drugs using PF127 as nano-carrier modified with other copolymers and/or conjugated with magnetic nanoparticles. The key findings of these studies demonstrated that the modified form of PF127 can significantly increase the stability of incorporated hydrophobic drugs with enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of anti-cancer drugs. Moreover, the modified form of PF127 has also shown its therapeutic potentials as therodiagnostics in various types of tumors and cancers. Hence, it can be concluded that the modified form of PF127 exhibits significant therodiagnostic effects with increased tumor-specific delivery of anti-cancer drugs having minimal toxic effects as compared to PF127 alone and/or other copolymers. PMID:25921088

  15. Use of Atomic Oxygen for Increased Water Contact Angles of Various Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim; Berger, Lauren; Roberts, Lily

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) exposure on the hydrophilicity of nine different polymers for biomedical applications. Atomic oxygen treatment can alter the chemistry and morphology of polymer surfaces, which may increase the adhesion and spreading of cells on Petri dishes and enhance implant growth. Therefore, nine different polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen and water-contact angle, or hydrophilicity, was measured after exposure. To determine whether hydrophilicity remains static after initial atomic oxygen exposure, or changes with higher fluence exposures, the contact angles between the polymer and water droplet placed on the polymer s surface were measured versus AO fluence. The polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen in a 100-W, 13.56-MHz radio frequency (RF) plasma asher, and the treatment was found to significantly alter the hydrophilicity of non-fluorinated polymers. Pristine samples were compared with samples that had been exposed to AO at various fluence levels. Minimum and maximum fluences for the ashing trials were set based on the effective AO erosion of a Kapton witness coupon in the asher. The time intervals for ashing were determined by finding the logarithmic values of the minimum and maximum fluences. The difference of these two values was divided by the desired number of intervals (ideally 10). The initial desired fluence was then multiplied by this result (2.37), as was each subsequent desired fluence. The flux in the asher was determined to be approximately 3.0 x 10(exp 15) atoms/sq cm/sec, and each polymer was exposed to a maximum fluence of 5.16 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm.

  16. The Application of Integrated Knowledge-based Systems for the Biomedical Risk Assessment Intelligent Network (BRAIN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Karin C.; Ly, Bebe; Webster, Laurie; Verlander, James; Taylor, Gerald R.; Riley, Gary; Culbert, Chris; Holden, Tina; Rudisill, Marianne

    1993-01-01

    One of NASA's goals for long duration space flight is to maintain acceptable levels of crew health, safety, and performance. One way of meeting this goal is through the Biomedical Risk Assessment Intelligent Network (BRAIN), an integrated network of both human and computer elements. The BRAIN will function as an advisor to flight surgeons by assessing the risk of in-flight biomedical problems and recommending appropriate countermeasures. This paper describes the joint effort among various NASA elements to develop BRAIN and an Infectious Disease Risk Assessment (IDRA) prototype. The implementation of this effort addresses the technological aspects of the following: (1) knowledge acquisition; (2) integration of IDRA components; (3) use of expert systems to automate the biomedical prediction process; (4) development of a user-friendly interface; and (5) integration of the IDRA prototype and Exercise Countermeasures Intelligent System (ExerCISys). Because the C Language, CLIPS (the C Language Integrated Production System), and the X-Window System were portable and easily integrated, they were chosen as the tools for the initial IDRA prototype. The feasibility was tested by developing an IDRA prototype that predicts the individual risk of influenza. The application of knowledge-based systems to risk assessment is of great market value to the medical technology industry.

  17. PEGylated gold nanorods as optical trackers for biomedical applications: an in vivo and in vitro comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrasoul, Gaser N.; Magrassi, Raffaella; Dante, Silvia; d’Amora, Marta; Scotto d’Abbusco, Marco; Pellegrino, Teresa; Diaspro, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanorods (AuNRs) are eligible for a variety of biological applications including cell imaging, sensing, and photothermal therapy thanks to their optical properties. The aim of this work is to show how AuNRs could be employed as non-photobleachable optical contrast agents for biomedical applications. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of their use as optical trackers, we employed two-photon emission confocal microscopy on cells incubated with PEGylated AuNRs. Remarkably, AuNRs were localized mostly in the perinuclear zone and microscopy characterization showed the presence of a considerable number of rods inside cell nuclei. Furthermore, we estimated the toxicity and the efficiency of cellular uptake of the PEGylated AuNRs as a function of administered dose on HeLa/3T3 cell lines and on zebrafish during development, employed as an in vivo model. Eventually, we observed good agreement between in vivo and in vitro experiments. The employed AuNRs were prepared through a photochemical protocol here improved by tuning the amount of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide for the achievement of AuNRs at two different aspect ratios. Furthermore we also investigated if the AuNR aspect ratio influenced the toxicity and the efficiency of cellular uptake of the PEGylated AuNRs in HeLa/3T3 cell lines and in zebrafish embryos.

  18. PEGylated gold nanorods as optical trackers for biomedical applications: an in vivo and in vitro comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrasoul, Gaser N; Magrassi, Raffaella; Dante, Silvia; d'Amora, Marta; d'Abbusco, Marco Scotto; Pellegrino, Teresa; Diaspro, Alberto

    2016-06-24

    Gold nanorods (AuNRs) are eligible for a variety of biological applications including cell imaging, sensing, and photothermal therapy thanks to their optical properties. The aim of this work is to show how AuNRs could be employed as non-photobleachable optical contrast agents for biomedical applications. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of their use as optical trackers, we employed two-photon emission confocal microscopy on cells incubated with PEGylated AuNRs. Remarkably, AuNRs were localized mostly in the perinuclear zone and microscopy characterization showed the presence of a considerable number of rods inside cell nuclei. Furthermore, we estimated the toxicity and the efficiency of cellular uptake of the PEGylated AuNRs as a function of administered dose on HeLa/3T3 cell lines and on zebrafish during development, employed as an in vivo model. Eventually, we observed good agreement between in vivo and in vitro experiments. The employed AuNRs were prepared through a photochemical protocol here improved by tuning the amount of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide for the achievement of AuNRs at two different aspect ratios. Furthermore we also investigated if the AuNR aspect ratio influenced the toxicity and the efficiency of cellular uptake of the PEGylated AuNRs in HeLa/3T3 cell lines and in zebrafish embryos. PMID:27176116

  19. COEUS: “semantic web in a box” for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background As the “omics” revolution unfolds, the growth in data quantity and diversity is bringing about the need for pioneering bioinformatics software, capable of significantly improving the research workflow. To cope with these computer science demands, biomedical software engineers are adopting emerging semantic web technologies that better suit the life sciences domain. The latter’s complex relationships are easily mapped into semantic web graphs, enabling a superior understanding of collected knowledge. Despite increased awareness of semantic web technologies in bioinformatics, their use is still limited. Results COEUS is a new semantic web framework, aiming at a streamlined application development cycle and following a “semantic web in a box” approach. The framework provides a single package including advanced data integration and triplification tools, base ontologies, a web-oriented engine and a flexible exploration API. Resources can be integrated from heterogeneous sources, including CSV and XML files or SQL and SPARQL query results, and mapped directly to one or more ontologies. Advanced interoperability features include REST services, a SPARQL endpoint and LinkedData publication. These enable the creation of multiple applications for web, desktop or mobile environments, and empower a new knowledge federation layer. Conclusions The platform, targeted at biomedical application developers, provides a complete skeleton ready for rapid application deployment, enhancing the creation of new semantic information systems. COEUS is available as open source at http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/coeus/. PMID:23244467

  20. An analog front-end enables electrical impedance spectroscopy system on-chip for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing number of applications of electrical bioimpedance measurements in biomedical practice, together with continuous advances in textile technology, has encouraged several researchers to make the first attempts to develop portable, even wearable, electrical bioimpedance measurement systems. The main target of these systems is personal and home monitoring. Analog Devices has made available AD5933, a new system-on-chip fully integrated electrical impedance spectrometer, which might allow the implementation of minimum-size instrumentation for electrical bioimpedance measurements. However, AD5933 as such is not suitable for most applications of electrical bioimpedance. In this work, we present a relatively simple analog front-end that adapts AD5933 to a four-electrode strategy, allowing its use in biomedical applications for the first time. The resulting impedance measurements exhibit a very good performance in aspects like load dynamic range and accuracy. This type of minimum-size, system-on-chip-based bioimpedance measurement system would lead researchers to develop and implement light and wearable electrical bioimpedance systems for home and personal health monitoring applications, a new and huge niche for medical technology development