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Sample records for cell anode catalysts

  1. Novel Anode Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Basri, S.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Daud, W. R. W.; Yaakob, Z.; Kadhum, A. A. H.

    2014-01-01

    PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe). Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), X-ray diffracti...

  2. Novel Anode Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni and iron (Fe. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, are used to characterize the kinetic parameters of the hybrid catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry (CV is used to investigate the effects of adding Fe and Ni to the catalyst on the reaction kinetics. Additionally, chronoamperometry (CA tests were conducted to study the long-term performance of the catalyst for catalyzing the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR. The binding energies of the reactants and products are compared to determine the kinetics and potential surface energy for methanol oxidation. The FESEM analysis results indicate that well-dispersed nanoscale (2–5 nm PtRu particles are formed on the MWCNTs. Finally, PtRuFeNi/MWCNT improves the reaction kinetics of anode catalysts for DMFCs and obtains a mass current of 31 A g−1 catalyst.

  3. Novel anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basri, S; Kamarudin, S K; Daud, W R W; Yaakob, Z; Kadhum, A A H

    2014-01-01

    PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe). Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), are used to characterize the kinetic parameters of the hybrid catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is used to investigate the effects of adding Fe and Ni to the catalyst on the reaction kinetics. Additionally, chronoamperometry (CA) tests were conducted to study the long-term performance of the catalyst for catalyzing the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The binding energies of the reactants and products are compared to determine the kinetics and potential surface energy for methanol oxidation. The FESEM analysis results indicate that well-dispersed nanoscale (2-5 nm) PtRu particles are formed on the MWCNTs. Finally, PtRuFeNi/MWCNT improves the reaction kinetics of anode catalysts for DMFCs and obtains a mass current of 31 A g(-1) catalyst.

  4. Characterization of proton exchange membrane fuel cell anode catalysts prepared by colloid method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, E.G.; Dantas-Filho, P.L.; Burani, G.F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IEE/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Eletrotecnica e Energia

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Anode catalysts for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) were synthesized by the colloid method and their structure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive analyses (EDS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical behavior of the anode catalyst was analyzed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and polarization curves (UxI). (author)

  5. Mixed phase Pt-Ru catalyst for direct methanol fuel cell anode by flame aerosol synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Debasish; Bischoff, H.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2005-01-01

    A spray-flame aerosol catalyzation technique was studied for producing Pt-Ru anode electrodes for the direct methanol fuel cell. Catalysts were produced as aerosol nanoparticles in a spray-flame reactor and deposited directly as a thin layer on the gas diffusion layer. The as-prepared catalyst......Ru1/Vulcan carbon. The kinetics of methanol oxidation on the mixed phase catalyst was also explored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. (c) 2005 The Electrochemical Society....

  6. Preparation and characterization of long-lived anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Yuzuru; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Sugimasa, Masatoshi; Yamada, Shinji; Itabashi, Takeyuki; Miwa, Takao; Konno, Mikio

    2006-08-01

    Entry of direct methanol fuel cells into the market requires anode catalyst with stable activity. This paper presents a novel method for stabilizing the activity by immobilizing silica on the catalytic PtRu nanoparticles. Characterization was performed by STEM-EDX, XRD, and ICP. The silica-immobilized PtRu nanoparticles showed high and stable activity toward methanol oxidation. The activity was maintained for 1000 h in sulfuric acidic solution, while the activity of the catalyst with "bare" PtRu nanoparticles decayed after 100 h, showing high durability of the silica-immobilized PtRu nanoparticles catalyst in quasi-anodic acidic environment.

  7. Reactivity descriptors for direct methanol fuel cell anode catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrin, Peter; Nilekar, Anand Udaykumar; Greeley, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the anode reaction in direct methanol fuel cells using a database of adsorption free energies for 16 intermediates on 12 close-packed transition metal surfaces calculated with periodic, self-consistent, density functional theory (DFT-GGA). This database, combined with a simple...... electrokinetic model of the methanol electrooxidation reaction, yields mechanistic insights that are consistent with previous experimental and theoretical studies on Pt, and extends these insights to a broad spectrum of other transition metals. In addition, by using linear scaling relations between...... the adsorption free energies of various intermediates in the reaction network, we find that the results determined with the full database of adsorption energies can be estimated by knowing only two key descriptors for each metal surface: the free energies of OH and CO on the surface. Two mechanisms for methanol...

  8. Effects of Nafion loading in anode catalyst inks on the miniature direct formic acid fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Robert D.; Haan, John L.; Masel, Richard I.

    Nafion, within the anode and cathode catalyst layers, plays a large role in the performance of fuel cells, especially during the operation of the direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC). Nafion affects the proton transfer in the catalyst layers of the fuel cell, and studies presented here show the effects of three different Nafion loadings, 10 wt.%, 30 wt.% and 50 wt.%. Short term voltage-current measurements using the three different loadings show that 30 wt.% Nafion loading in the anode shows the best performance in the miniature, passive DFAFC. Nafion also serves as a binder to help hold the catalyst nanoparticles onto the proton exchange membrane (PEM). The DFAFC anode temporarily needs to be regenerated by raising the anode potential to around 0.8 V vs. RHE to oxidize CO bound to the surface, but the Pourbaix diagram predicts that Pd will corrode at these potentials. We found that an anode loading of 30 wt.% Nafion showed the best stability, of the three Nafion loadings chosen, for reducing the amount of loss of electrochemically active area due to high regeneration potentials. Only 58% of the area was lost after 600 potential cycles in formic acid compared to 96 and 99% for 10 wt.% and 50 wt.% loadings, respectively. Lastly we present cyclic voltammetry data that suggest that the Nafion adds to the production of CO during oxidation of formic acid for 12 h at 0.3 V vs. RHE. The resulting data showed that an increase in CO coverage was observed with increasing Nafion content in the anode catalyst layer.

  9. Bifunctional anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Ferrin, Peter; Tritsaris, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    Using the binding energy of OH* and CO* on close-packed surfaces as reactivity descriptors, we screen bulk and surface alloy catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation activity. Using these two descriptors, we illustrate that a good methanol electro-oxidation catalyst must have three key properties...

  10. Low-Pt-Content Anode Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Whitacre, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Combinatorial experiments have led to the discovery that a nanophase alloy of Pt, Ru, Ni, and Zr is effective as an anode catalyst material for direct methanol fuel cells. This discovery has practical significance in that the electronic current densities achievable by use of this alloy are comparable or larger than those obtained by use of prior Pt/Ru catalyst alloys containing greater amounts of Pt. Heretofore, the high cost of Pt has impeded the commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells. By making it possible to obtain a given level of performance at reduced Pt content (and, hence, lower cost), the discovery may lead to reduction of the economic impediment to commercialization.

  11. Novel Anodic Catalyst Support for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell: Characterizations and Single-Cell Performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, N; Kamarudin, S K; Shyuan, L K

    2018-04-03

    This study introduces a novel titanium dioxide carbon nanofiber (TiO 2 -CNF) support for anodic catalyst in direct methanol fuel cell. The catalytic synthesis process involves several methods, namely the sol-gel, electrospinning, and deposition methods. The synthesized electrocatalyst is compared with other three electrocatalysts with different types of support. All of these electrocatalysts differ based on a number of physical and electrochemical characteristics. Experimental results show that the TiO 2 -CNF support gave the highest current density at 345.64 mA mg catalyst -1 , which is equivalent to 5.54-fold that of carbon support while the power density is almost double that of the commercial electrocatalyst.

  12. ANODE CATALYST MATERIALS FOR USE IN FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    Catalyst materials having a surface comprising a composition M¿x?/Pt¿3?/Sub; wherein M is selected from the group of elements Fe, Co, Rh and Ir; or wherein M represent two different elements selected from the group comprising Fe, CO, Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd, CU, Ag, Au and Sn; and wherein Sub represents...

  13. FeCrO Nanoparticles as Anode Catalyst for Ethane Proton Conducting Fuel Cell Reactors to Coproduce Ethylene and Electricity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Hui Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene and electrical power are cogenerated in fuel cell reactors with FeCr2O4 nanoparticles as anode catalyst, La0.7Sr0.3FeO3- (LSF as cathode material, and BaCe0.7Zr0.1Y0.2O3- (BCZY perovskite oxide as proton-conducting ceramic electrolyte. FeCr2O4, BCZY and LSF are synthesized by a sol-gel combustion method. The power density increases from 70 to 240 mW cm−2, and the ethylene yield increases from about 14.1% to 39.7% when the operating temperature of the proton-conducting fuel cell reactor increases from 650∘C to 750∘C. The FeCr2O4 anode catalyst exhibits better catalytic performance than nanosized Cr2O3 anode catalyst.

  14. Enhanced performance of a novel anodic PdAu/VGCNF catalyst for electro-oxidation in a glycerol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, N; Kamarudin, S K; Karim, N A; Masdar, M S; Loh, K S

    2017-11-25

    This study presents a novel anodic PdAu/VGCNF catalyst for electro-oxidation in a glycerol fuel cell. The reaction conditions are critical issues affecting the glycerol electro-oxidation performance. This study presents the effects of catalyst loading, temperature, and electrolyte concentration. The glycerol oxidation performance of the PdAu/VGCNF catalyst on the anode side is tested via cyclic voltammetry with a 3 mm 2 active area. The morphology and physical properties of the catalyst are examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Then, optimization is carried out using the response surface method with central composite experimental design. The current density is experimentally obtained as a response variable from a set of experimental laboratory tests. The catalyst loading, temperature, and NaOH concentration are taken as independent parameters, which were evaluated previously in the screening experiments. The highest current density of 158.34 mAcm -2 is obtained under the optimal conditions of 3.0 M NaOH concentration, 60 °C temperature and 12 wt.% catalyst loading. These results prove that PdAu-VGCNF is a potential anodic catalyst for glycerol fuel cells.

  15. Developing a Thermal- and Coking-Resistant Cobalt-Tungsten Bimetallic Anode Catalyst for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, N.; Pandey, J.; Zeng, Y.; Amirkhiz, B.S.; Hua, B.; Geels, N.J.; Luo, J.L.; Rothenberg, G.

    2016-01-01

    We report the development of a novel Co–W bimetallic anode catalyst for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) via a facile infiltration-annealing process. Using various microscopic and spectroscopic measurements, we find that the formed intermetallic nanoparticles are highly thermally stable up to 900 °C

  16. Electrocatalysis of fuel cells reaction on Pt and Pt-bimetallic anode catalysts: A selective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenković Vojislav

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review we selectively summarize recent progress, primarily from our laboratory, in the development of interrelationships between the kinetics of the fuel cells reactions and the structure/composition of anode catalysts. The focus is placed on two types of metallic surfaces: platinum single crystals and bimetallic surfaces based on Pt. In the first part it was illustrated that the hydcogen reaction is structure sensitive process, with Pt(110 being an order of magnitude more active than either of the atomically "flatter" (100 and (111 surfaces. The hydrogen reaction on Pt(hkl modified by pseudomorphic Pd (submonolayers shows the "volcano-like" behavior, having the maximum rate on Pt(111 modified by 1 ML of Pd. The Pt(111-Pd system is used to demonstrate how the energetics of intermediates formed in the hydrogen reaction is affected by interfacial bonding and energetic constraints produced between pseudomorphic Pd films and the Pt(111 substrate. In the second part it was shown that the oxidation of Ha in the presence of CO occurs concurrently with CO oxidation on Pt and Pt bimetallic surfaces. The Pt-Ru system is used to demonstrate that both the bifunctional effect and the ligand effect contribute to the influence of Ru on the CO oxidation rate and for Hz oxidation process in the presence of CO. The knowledge is then used to create the real-life catalyst with the catalytic activities which are, to the greatest extend possible similar to the tailor-made surface.

  17. Mesostructured platinum-free anode and carbon-free cathode catalysts for durable proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiangzhi; Shi, Jianlin; Wang, Yongxia; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Lingxia; Hua, Zile

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important clean energy sources, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have been a topic of extensive research focus for decades. Unfortunately, several critical technique obstacles, such as the high cost of platinum electrode catalysts, performance degradation due to the CO poisoning of the platinum anode, and carbon corrosion by oxygen in the cathode, have greatly impeded its commercial development. A prototype of a single PEMFC catalyzed by a mesostructured platinum-free WO3/C anode and a mesostructured carbon-free Pt/WC cathode catalysts is reported herein. The prototype cell exhibited 93% power output of a standard PEMFC using commercial Pt/C catalysts at 50 and 70 °C, and more importantly, CO poisoning-free and carbon corrosion-resistant characters of the anode and cathode, respectively. Consequently, the prototype cell demonstrated considerably enhanced cell operation durability. The mesostructured electrode catalysts are therefore highly promising in the future development and application of PEMFCs. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Enhanced activity of Pt/CNTs anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells using Ni2P as co-catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Luo, Lanping; Peng, Feng; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Hao

    2018-03-01

    The direct methanol fuel cell is a promising energy conversion device because of the utilization of the state-of-the-art platinum (Pt) anode catalyst. In this work, novel Pt/Ni2P/CNTs catalysts were prepared by the H2 reduction method. It was found that the activity and stability of Pt for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) could be significantly enhanced while using nickel phosphide (Ni2P) nanoparticles as co-catalyst. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the existence of Ni2P affected the particle size and electronic distribution of Pt obviously. Pt/CNTs catalyst, Pt/Ni2P/CNTs catalysts with different Ni2P amount were synthesized, among which Pt/6%Ni2P/CNTs catalyst exhibited the best MOR activity of 1400 mAmg-1Pt, which was almost 2.5 times of the commercial Pt/C-JM catalyst. Moreover, compared to other Pt-based catalysts, this novel Pt/Ni2P/CNTs catalyst also exhibited higher onset current density and better steady current density. The result of this work may provide positive guidance to the research on high efficiency and stability of Pt-based catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

  19. Pt and Ru X-ray absorption spectroscopy of PtRu anode catalysts in operating direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Chung, Eun-Hyuk; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Segre, Carlo U; Smotkin, Eugene S

    2006-05-25

    In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, ex situ X-ray fluorescence, and X-ray powder diffraction enabled detailed core analysis of phase segregated nanostructured PtRu anode catalysts in an operating direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). No change in the core structures of the phase segregated catalyst was observed as the potential traversed the current onset potential of the DMFC. The methodology was exemplified using a Johnson Matthey unsupported PtRu (1:1) anode catalyst incorporated into a DMFC membrane electrode assembly. During DMFC operation the catalyst is essentially metallic with half of the Ru incorporated into a face-centered cubic (FCC) Pt alloy lattice and the remaining half in an amorphous phase. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis suggests that the FCC lattice is not fully disordered. The EXAFS indicates that the Ru-O bond lengths were significantly shorter than those reported for Ru-O of ruthenium oxides, suggesting that the phases in which the Ru resides in the catalysts are not similar to oxides.

  20. Effect of the thickness of the anode electrode catalyst layers on the performance in direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Dean E.; Olah, George A.; Prakash, G. K. Surya

    2017-06-01

    For the large scale fuel cell manufacture, the catalyst loading and layer thickness are critical factors affecting the performance and cost of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The influence of catalyst layer thicknesses at the anode of a PEM based direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) has been investigated. Catalysts were applied with the drawdown method with varied thicknesses ranging from 1 mil to 8 mils (1 mil = 25.4 μm) with a Pt/Ru anode loading of 0.25 mg cm-2 to 2.0 mg cm-2. The MEAs with the thicker individual layers (8 mils and 4 mils) performed better overall compared to the those with the thinner layers (1 mil and painted). The peak power densities for the different loading levels followed an exponential decrease of Pt/Ru utilization at the higher loading levels. The highest power density achieved was 49 mW cm-2 with the 4 mil layers at 2.0 mg cm-2 catalyst loading whereas the highest normalized power density was 116 mW mg-1 with the 8 mil layers at 0.25 mg cm-2 loading. The 8 mil drawdowns displayed a 50% and 23% increase in normalized power density compared to the 1 mil drawdowns at 0.25 mg cm-2 and 0.5 mg cm-2 loadings, respectively.

  1. Improving the Energy Efficiency of Direct Formate Fuel Cells with a Pd/C-CeO2 Anode Catalyst and Anion Exchange Ionomer in the Catalyst Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamish Andrew Miller

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development of a high power density Direct Formate Fuel Cell (DFFC fed with potassium formate (KCOOH. The membrane electrode assembly (MEA contains no platinum metal. The cathode catalyst is FeCo/C combined with a commercial anion exchange membrane (AEM. To enhance the power output and energy efficiency we have employed a nanostructured Pd/C-CeO2 anode catalyst. The activity for the formate oxidation reaction (FOR is enhanced when compared to a Pd/C catalyst with the same Pd loading. Fuel cell tests at 60 °C show a peak power density of almost 250 mW cm−2. The discharge energy (14 kJ, faradic efficiency (89% and energy efficiency (46% were determined for a single fuel charge (30 mL of 4 M KCOOH and 4 M KOH. Energy analysis demonstrates that removal of the expensive KOH electrolyte is essential for the future development of these devices. To compensate we apply for the first time a polymeric ionomer in the catalyst layer of the anode electrode. A homopolymer is synthesized by the radical polymerization of vinyl benzene chloride followed by amination with 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO. The energy delivered, energy efficiency and fuel consumption efficiency of DFFCs fed with 4 M KCOOH are doubled with the use of the ionomer.

  2. Performance of Platinum Nanoparticles / Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes / Bacterial Cellulose Composite as Anode Catalyst for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Fonda Aritonang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Highly dispersed platinum (Pt nanoparticles / multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on bacterial cellulose (BC as anode catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC were prepared with various precursors and their electro-catalytic activities towards hydrogen oxidation at 70 oC under non-humidified conditions. The composite was prepared by deposition of Pt nanoparticles and MWCNTs on BC gel by impregnation method using a water solution of metal precursors and MWCNTs followed by reducing reaction using a hydrogen gas. The composite was characterized by using TEM (transmission electron microscopy, EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy, and XRD (X-ray diffractometry techniques. TEM images and XRD patterns both lead to the observation of spherical metallic Pt nanoparticles with mean diameter of 3-11 nm well impregnated into the BC fibrils. Preliminary tests on a single cell indicate that renewable BC is a good prospect to be explored as a membrane in fuel cell field. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 21st November 2016; Revised: 26th February 2017; Accepted: 27th February 2017 How to Cite: Aritonang, H.F., Kamu, V.S., Ciptati, C., Onggo, D., Radiman, C.L. (2017. Performance of Platinum Nanoparticles / Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes / Bacterial Cellulose Composite as Anode Catalyst for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (2: 287-292 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.2.803.287-292 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.2.803.287-292

  3. High throughput evaluation of perovskite-based anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Kishori; Mukasyan, Alexander; Varma, Arvind

    Liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) are promising candidates for portable power applications. However, owing to the problems associated with expensive Pt-based catalysts, viz., CO poisoning, a promising approach is to use complex oxides of the type ABO 3 (A = Sr, Ce, La, etc. and B = Co, Fe, Ni, Pt, Ru, etc.). In the current work, a variety of ABO 3 and A 2BO 4 type non-noble and partially substituted noble metal high surface area compounds were synthesized by an effective and rapid aqueous combustion synthesis (CS). Their catalytic activity was evaluated by using "High Throughput Screening Unit"-NuVant System, which compares up to 25 compositions simultaneously under DMFC conditions. It was found that the Sr-based perovskites showed performance comparable with the standard Pt-Ru catalyst. Further, it was observed that the method of doping SrRuO 3 with Pt influenced the activity. Specifically, platinum added during aqueous CS yielded better catalyst than when added externally at the ink preparation stage. Finally, it was also demonstrated that the presence of SrRuO 3 significantly enhanced the catalytic properties of Pt, leading to superior performance even at lower noble metal loadings.

  4. Nickel Alloy Catalysts for the Anode of a High Temperature PEM Direct Propane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Vafaeyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature polymer electrode membrane fuel cells that use hydrocarbon as the fuel have many theoretical advantages over those that use hydrogen. For example, nonprecious metal catalysts can replace platinum. In this work, two of the four propane fuel cell reactions, propane dehydrogenation and water dissociation, were examined using nickel alloy catalysts. The adsorption energies of both propane and water decreased as the Fe content of Ni/Fe alloys increased. In contrast, they both increased as the Cu content of Ni/Cu alloys increased. The activation energy for the dehydrogenation of propane (a nonpolar molecule changed very little, even though the adsorption energy changed substantially as a function of alloy composition. In contrast, the activation energy for dissociation of water (a molecule that can be polarized decreased markedly as the energy of adsorption decreased. The different relationship between activation energy and adsorption energy for propane dehydrogenation and water dissociation alloys was attributed to propane being a nonpolar molecule and water being a molecule that can be polarized.

  5. Amide group anchored glucose oxidase based anodic catalysts for high performance enzymatic biofuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yongjin; Ahn, Yeonjoo; Kim, Do-Heyoung; Kwon, Yongchai

    2017-01-01

    A new enzyme catalyst is formed by fabricating gold nano particle (GNP)-glucose oxidase (GOx) clusters that are then attached to polyethyleneimine (PEI) and carbon nanotube (CNT) with cross-linkable terephthalaldehyde (TPA) (TPA/[CNT/PEI/GOx-GNP]). Especially, amide bonds belonging to TPA play an anchor role for incorporating rigid bonding among GNP, GOx and CNT/PEI, while middle size GNP is well bonded with thiol group of GOx to form strong GNP-GOx cluster. Those bonds are identified by chemical and electrochemical characterizations like XPS and cyclic voltammogram. The anchording effect of amide bonds induces fast electron transfer and strong chemical bonding, resulting in enhancements in (i) catalytic activity, (ii) amount of immobilized GOx and (ii) performance of enzymatic biofuel cell (EBC) including the catalyst. Regarding the catalytic activity, the TPA/[CNT/PEI/GOx-GNP] produces high electron transfer rate constant (6 s-1), high glucose sensitivity (68 μA mM-1 cm-2), high maximum current density (113 μA cm-2), low charge transfer resistance (17.0 Ω cm2) and long-lasting durability while its chemical structure is characterized by XPS confirming large portion of amide bond. In EBC measurement, it has high maximum power density (0.94 mW cm-2) compatible with catalytic acitivity measurements.

  6. Theoretical study of support effect of Au catalyst for glucose oxidation of alkaline fuel cell anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimoto, Takayoshi, E-mail: ishimoto@ifrc.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Frontier Energy Research Division, INAMORI Frontier Research Center, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hamatake, Yumi [Frontier Energy Research Division, INAMORI Frontier Research Center, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kazuno, Hiroki; Kishida, Takayuki [OLYMPUS Corporation, 2-3 Kuboyama-cho, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-8512 (Japan); Koyama, Michihisa, E-mail: koyama@ifrc.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Frontier Energy Research Division, INAMORI Frontier Research Center, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The catalytic activity of Au in alkaline solution is studied theoretically. • Carbon and oxide materials are used to estimate support effect for glucose oxidation. • The glucose oxidation on SnO{sub 2}(1 1 0) supported Au catalyst shows high activity. • The charge transfer from Au catalyst to support materials is dominant. - Abstract: We theoretically analyzed the glucose oxidation reaction mechanism and reaction activity of Au catalyst supported by carbon (graphite(0 0 0 1), (101{sup ¯}0), and (112{sup ¯}0)) and oxide (ZrO{sub 2}(1 1 1) and SnO{sub 2}(1 1 0)) in alkaline solution environment by using density functional theory method. We observed large stabilization of Au catalyst on support materials due to the electron transfer in the case of graphite(112{sup ¯}0) and SnO{sub 2}(1 1 0) systems. The catalytic activity for glucose oxidation reaction over Au supported by graphite(101{sup ¯}0) and (112{sup ¯}0) is calculated to be low in comparison with those of unsupported system. We found that SnO{sub 2}(1 1 0) supported Au catalyst shows high activity toward the glucose oxidation. One of the main factors for the observed high catalytic activity is charge transfer from Au catalyst to support materials. When the atomic charge of Au catalyst becomes positive by the support effect, the activity of glucose oxidation reaction on Au catalyst is improved.

  7. FLUORINE CELL ANODE ASSEMBLY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, R.E.; Goode, W.B. Jr.; Henderson, W.K.; Montillon, G.H.

    1962-06-26

    An improved anode assembly is deslgned for use in electrolytlc cells ln the productlon of hydrogen and fluorlne from a moIten electrolyte. The anode assembly comprises a copper post, a copper hanger supported by the post, a plurality of carbon anode members, and bolt means for clamplng half of the anode members to one slde of the hanger and for clamplng the other half of the anode members to the other slde of the hanger. The heads of the clamplng bolts are recessed withln the anode members and carbon plugs are inserted ln the recesses above the bolt heads to protect the boIts agalnst corroslon. A copper washer is provided under the head of each clamplng boIt such that the anode members can be tightly clamped to the hanger with a resultant low anode jolnt resistance. (AEC)

  8. Controllable pt nanoparticle deposition on carbon nanotubes as an anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yongyan; Liang, Hanpu; Hu, Jinsong; Jiang, Li; Wan, Lijun

    2005-12-01

    We report a novel process to prepare well-dispersed Pt nanoparticles on CNTs. Pt nanoparticles, which were modified by the organic molecule triphenylphosphine, were deposited on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by the organic molecule, which acts as a cross linker. By manipulating the relative ratio of Pt nanoparticles and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in solution, Pt/CNT composites with different Pt content were achieved. The so-prepared Pt/CNT composite materials show higher electrocatalytic activity and better tolerance to poisoning species in methanol oxidation than the commercial E-TEK catalyst, which can be ascribed to the high dispersion of Pt nanoparticles on the multiwalled carbon nanotube surface.

  9. Preparation and characterization of anode catalysts for the direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC): methanol and ethanol

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of high performance electrode materials has been the key research objective in the field of direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) [1, 2, and 3]. A promising way to attain higher catalytic performance is to add a third element to the best...

  10. Anode catalysts for direct hydrazine fuel cells: from laboratory test to an electric vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, Alexey; Padilla, Monica; Roy, Aaron J; Atanassov, Plamen; Sakamoto, Tomokazu; Asazawa, Koichiro; Tanaka, Hirohisa

    2014-09-22

    Novel highly active electrocatalysts for hydrazine hydrate fuel cell application were developed, synthesized and integrated into an operation vehicle prototype. The materials show in both rotating disc electrode (RDE) and membrane electrode assembly (MEA) tests the world highest activity with peak current density of 16,000 A g(-1) (RDE) and 450 mW cm(-2) operated in air (MEA). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Cross-linked glucose oxidase clusters for biofuel cell anode catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudzik, Jonathan; Audette, Gerald F; Chang, Wen-Chi; Kannan, A M; Filipek, Slawomir; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Li, Pingzuo; Renugopalakrishnan, V

    2013-01-01

    The efficient localization of increased levels of active enzymes onto conducting scaffolds is important for the development of enzyme-based biofuel cells. Cross-linked enzyme clusters (CEC) of glucose oxidase (GOx) constrained to functionalized carbon nanotubes (CEC-CNTs) were generated in order to evaluate the potential of using CECs for developing GOx-based bioanodes functioning via direct electron transfer from the GOx active site to the CNT scaffold. CEC-CNTs generated from several weight-to-weight ratios of GOx:CNT were examined for comparable catalytic activity to free GOx into the solution, with CEC-CNTs generated from a 100% GOx solution displaying the greatest enzymatic activity. Scanning transmission electron microscopic analysis of CEC-CNTs generated from 100% GOx to CNT (wt/wt) ratios revealed that CEC clusters of ∼78 µm 2 localized to the CNT surface. Electrochemical analysis indicates that the enzyme is engaged in direct electron transfer, and biofuel cells generated using GOx CEC-CNT bioanodes were observed to have a peak power density of ∼180 µW cm −2 . These data indicate that the generation of nano-to-micro-sized active enzyme clusters is an attractive option for the design of enzyme-specific biofuel cell powered implantable devices. (paper)

  12. Fabrication and Characterization of New Composite Tio2Carbon Nanofiber Anodic Catalyst Support for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell via Electrospinning Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, N; Kamarudin, S K; Shyuan, L K; Karim, N A

    2017-12-06

    Platinum (Pt) is the common catalyst used in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). However, Pt can lead towards catalyst poisoning by carbonaceous species, thus reduces the performance of DMFC. Thus, this study focuses on the fabrication of a new composite TiO 2 carbon nanofiber anodic catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) via electrospinning technique. The distance between the tip and the collector (DTC) and the flow rate were examined as influencing parameters in the electrospinning technique. To ensure that the best catalytic material is fabricated, the nanofiber underwent several characterizations and electrochemical tests, including FTIR, XRD, FESEM, TEM, and cyclic voltammetry. The results show that D18, fabricated with a flow rate of 0.1 mLhr -1 and DTC of 18 cm, is an ultrafine nanofiber with the smallest average diameter, 136.73 ± 39.56 nm. It presented the highest catalyst activity and electrochemical active surface area value as 274.72 mAmg -1 and 226.75m 2  g -1 PtRu , respectively, compared with the other samples.

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of New Composite Tio2 Carbon Nanofiber Anodic Catalyst Support for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell via Electrospinning Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, N.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Shyuan, L. K.; Karim, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    Platinum (Pt) is the common catalyst used in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). However, Pt can lead towards catalyst poisoning by carbonaceous species, thus reduces the performance of DMFC. Thus, this study focuses on the fabrication of a new composite TiO2 carbon nanofiber anodic catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) via electrospinning technique. The distance between the tip and the collector (DTC) and the flow rate were examined as influencing parameters in the electrospinning technique. To ensure that the best catalytic material is fabricated, the nanofiber underwent several characterizations and electrochemical tests, including FTIR, XRD, FESEM, TEM, and cyclic voltammetry. The results show that D18, fabricated with a flow rate of 0.1 mLhr-1 and DTC of 18 cm, is an ultrafine nanofiber with the smallest average diameter, 136.73 ± 39.56 nm. It presented the highest catalyst activity and electrochemical active surface area value as 274.72 mAmg-1 and 226.75m2 g-1 PtRu, respectively, compared with the other samples.

  14. Effect of the Pd/MWCNTs anode catalysts preparation methods on their morphology and activity in a direct formic acid fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesiak, B., E-mail: blesiak-orlowska@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Mazurkiewicz, M.; Malolepszy, A. [Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Waryńskiego 1, 00-645 Warszawa (Poland); Stobinski, L. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Waryńskiego 1, 00-645 Warszawa (Poland); Mierzwa, B.; Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A.; Juchniewicz, K.; Borodzinski, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Zemek, J.; Jiricek, P. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162-53 Prague 6, Cukrovarnicka 10 (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Catalysts properties studied by XRD, STEM, XPS methods. • Differences in Pd particle size, content of Pd, functional groups, PdC{sub x.}. • Catalytic activity studied in a Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell. • Highest activity–catalyst prepared using a strong reducing agent (NaBH{sub 4}). - Abstract: Impact of Pd/MWCNTs catalysts preparation method on the catalysts morphology and activity in a formic acid electrooxidation reaction was investigated. Three reduction methods of Pd precursor involving reduction in a high pressure microwave reactor (Pd1), reduction with NaBH{sub 4} (Pd2) and microwave-assisted polyol method (Pd3) were used in this paper. Crystallites size and morphology were studied using the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), whereas elemental composition, Pd chemical state and functional groups content by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The prepared catalysts were tested in a direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) as an anode material. The catalytic activity was correlated with a mean fraction of the total Pd atoms exposed at the surface (FE). The value of FE was calculated from the crystallites size distribution determined by the STEM measurements. Non-linear dependence of a current density versus FE, approaching the maximum at FE≈0.25 suggests that the catalytic process proceeded at Pd nanocrystallites faces, with inactive edges and corners. Pd2 catalyst exhibited highest activity due to its smallest Pd crystallites (3.2 nm), however the absence of Pd crystallites aggregation and low content of carbon in PdC{sub x} phase, i.e. x = 4 at.% may also affect the observed.

  15. Effect of the Pd/MWCNTs anode catalysts preparation methods on their morphology and activity in a direct formic acid fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiak, B.; Mazurkiewicz, M.; Malolepszy, A.; Stobinski, L.; Mierzwa, B.; Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A.; Juchniewicz, K.; Borodzinski, A.; Zemek, J.; Jiricek, P.

    2016-11-01

    Impact of Pd/MWCNTs catalysts preparation method on the catalysts morphology and activity in a formic acid electrooxidation reaction was investigated. Three reduction methods of Pd precursor involving reduction in a high pressure microwave reactor (Pd1), reduction with NaBH4 (Pd2) and microwave-assisted polyol method (Pd3) were used in this paper. Crystallites size and morphology were studied using the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), whereas elemental composition, Pd chemical state and functional groups content by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The prepared catalysts were tested in a direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) as an anode material. The catalytic activity was correlated with a mean fraction of the total Pd atoms exposed at the surface (FE). The value of FE was calculated from the crystallites size distribution determined by the STEM measurements. Non-linear dependence of a current density versus FE, approaching the maximum at FE≈0.25 suggests that the catalytic process proceeded at Pd nanocrystallites faces, with inactive edges and corners. Pd2 catalyst exhibited highest activity due to its smallest Pd crystallites (3.2 nm), however the absence of Pd crystallites aggregation and low content of carbon in PdCx phase, i.e. x = 4 at.% may also affect the observed.

  16. Fluorescence-based high throughput screening for noble metal-free and platinum-poor anode catalysts for the direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, F G; Stöwe, K; Maier, W F

    2011-09-12

    We describe here the results of a high throughput screening study for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) anode catalysts consisting of new elemental combinations with an optical high-throughput screening method, which allows the quantitative evaluation of the electrochemical activity of catalysts. The method is based on the fluorescence of protonated quinine generated during electrooxidation of methanol. The high-throughput screening included noble-metal free binary and ternary mixed oxides of the elements Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Ta, Ti, Zn, and Zr in the oxidized form as well as after prior reduction in hydrogen. In addition 318 ternary and quaternary Pt-containing materials composed out of the mixed oxides of Bi, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ge, In, La, Mn, Mo, Nb, Nd, Ni, Pr, Sb, Sn, Ta, Te, Ti, V, Zn, and Zr with a molar Pt-ratio of 10% and 30% were screened. Validation and long time experiments of the hits were performed by cyclovoltammetry (CV). The microstructural stability of the electrode preparations of the lead compositions was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern analysis.

  17. Small-sized and contacting Pt-WC nanostructures on graphene as highly efficient anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruihong; Xie, Ying; Shi, Keying; Wang, Jianqiang; Tian, Chungui; Shen, Peikang; Fu, Honggang

    2012-06-11

    The synergistic effect between Pt and WC is beneficial for methanol electro-oxidation, and makes Pt-WC catalyst a promising anode candidate for the direct methanol fuel cell. This paper reports on the design and synthesis of small-sized and contacting Pt-WC nanostructures on graphene that bring the synergistic effect into full play. Firstly, DFT calculations show the existence of a strong covalent interaction between WC and graphene, which suggests great potential for anchoring WC on graphene with formation of small-sized, well-dispersed WC particles. The calculations also reveal that, when Pt attaches to the pre-existing WC/graphene hybrid, Pt particles preferentially grow on WC rather than graphene. Our experiments confirmed that highly disperse WC nanoparticles (ca. 5 nm) can indeed be anchored on graphene. Also, Pt particles 2-3 nm in size are well dispersed on WC/graphene hybrid and preferentially grow on WC grains, forming contacting Pt-WC nanostructures. These results are consistent with the theoretical findings. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy further confirms the intimate contact between Pt and WC, and demonstrates that the presence of WC can facilitate the crystallinity of Pt particles. This new Pt-WC/graphene catalyst exhibits a high catalytic efficiency toward methanol oxidation, with a mass activity 1.98 and 4.52 times those of commercial PtRu/C and Pt/C catalysts, respectively. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Fuel cell anode configuration for CO tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Francisco A.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.

    2004-11-16

    A polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is designed to operate on a reformate fuel stream containing oxygen and diluted hydrogen fuel with CO impurities. A polymer electrolyte membrane has an electrocatalytic surface formed from an electrocatalyst mixed with the polymer and bonded on an anode side of the membrane. An anode backing is formed of a porous electrically conductive material and has a first surface abutting the electrocatalytic surface and a second surface facing away from the membrane. The second surface has an oxidation catalyst layer effective to catalyze the oxidation of CO by oxygen present in the fuel stream where at least the layer of oxidation catalyst is formed of a non-precious metal oxidation catalyst selected from the group consisting of Cu, Fe, Co, Tb, W, Mo, Sn, and oxides thereof, and other metals having at least two low oxidation states.

  19. Improved Anode for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    A modified chemical composition has been devised to improve the performance of the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell. The main feature of the modified composition is the incorporation of hydrous ruthenium oxide into the anode structure. This modification can reduce the internal electrical resistance of the cell and increase the degree of utilization of the anode catalyst. As a result, a higher anode current density can be sustained with a smaller amount of anode catalyst. These improvements can translate into a smaller fuel-cell system and higher efficiency of conversion. Some background information is helpful for understanding the benefit afforded by the addition of hydrous ruthenium oxide. The anode of a direct methanol fuel cell sustains the electro-oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide in the reaction CH3OH + H2O--->CO2 + 6H(+) + 6e(-). An electrocatalyst is needed to enable this reaction to occur. The catalyst that offers the highest activity is an alloy of approximately equal numbers of atoms of the noble metals platinum and ruthenium. The anode is made of a composite material that includes high-surface-area Pt/Ru alloy particles and a proton-conducting ionomeric material. This composite is usually deposited onto a polymer-electrolyte (proton-conducting) membrane and onto an anode gas-diffusion/current-collector sheet that is subsequently bonded to the proton-conducting membrane by hot pressing. Heretofore, the areal density of noble-metal catalyst typically needed for high performance has been about 8 mg/cm2. However, not all of the catalyst has been utilized in the catalyzed electro-oxidation reaction. Increasing the degree of utilization of the catalyst would make it possible to improve the performance of the cell for a given catalyst loading and/or reduce the catalyst loading (thereby reducing the cost of the cell). The use of carbon and possibly other electronic conductors in the catalyst layer has been proposed for increasing the utilization of the

  20. Improvement in direct methanol fuel cell performance by treating the anode at high anodic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joghee, Prabhuram; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Wood, Kevin; Corpuz, April; Bender, Guido; Dinh, Huyen N.; O'Hayre, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the effect of a high anodic potential treatment protocol on the performance of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). DMFC membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with PtRu/C (Hi-spec 5000) anode catalyst are subjected to anodic treatment (AT) at 0.8 V vs. DHE using potentiostatic method. Despite causing a slight decrease in the electrochemical surface area (ECSA) of the anode, associated with ruthenium dissolution, AT results in significant improvement in DMFC performance in the ohmic and mass transfer regions and increases the maximum power density by ∼15%. Furthermore, AT improves the long-term DMFC stability by reducing the degradation of the anode catalyst. From XPS investigation, it is hypothesized that the improved performance of AT-treated MEAs is related to an improved interface between the catalyst and Nafion ionomer. Among potential explanations, this improvement may be caused by incorporation of the ionomer within the secondary pores of PtRu/C agglomerates, which generates a percolating network of ionomer between PtRu/C agglomerates in the catalyst layer. Furthermore, the decreased concentration of hydrophobic CF2 groups may help to enhance the hydrophilicity of the catalyst layer, thereby increasing the accessibility of methanol and resulting in better performance in the high current density region.

  1. Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owejan, Jon P; Nicotera, Paul D; Mench, Matthew M; Evans, Robert E

    2013-08-27

    A fuel cell comprises a cathode gas diffusion layer, a cathode catalyst layer, an anode gas diffusion layer, an anode catalyst layer and an electrolyte. The diffusion resistance of the anode gas diffusion layer when operated with anode fuel is higher than the diffusion resistance of the cathode gas diffusion layer. The anode gas diffusion layer may comprise filler particles having in-plane platelet geometries and be made of lower cost materials and manufacturing processes than currently available commercial carbon fiber substrates. The diffusion resistance difference between the anode gas diffusion layer and the cathode gas diffusion layer may allow for passive water balance control.

  2. Comparison between Ni-Rh/gadolinia doped ceria catalysts in reforming of propane for anode implementations in intermediate solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaro, M.; Modafferi, V.; Pappacena, A.; Llorca, J.; Baglio, V.; Frusteri, F.; Frontera, P.; Trovarelli, A.; Antonucci, P. L.

    Steam and autothermal reforming of propane over Ni-Rh/GDC catalysts prepared by coprecipitation and by Pechini method were investigated in the temperature range 873-1073 K. The weight ratio for Ni, Rh and Ce 0.8Gd 0.2O 2 (45:5:50) and the operating temperatures were chosen in order to gain propaedeutical information on fuel reactivity under typical intermediate solid oxide fuel cell (IT-SOFC) operating conditions. The Pechini synthesis allows to obtain catalysts with lower surface area, smaller nickel crystallites and a bimodal distribution of rhodium in comparison to the coprecipitation method. Despite the different methods of synthesis lead to catalysts with different morphological and structural properties, the activity of catalysts is quite similar. At reaction temperature higher than 973 K, under both steam reforming (SR) and autothermal reforming (ATR), the catalysts show high propane conversion and syngas (H 2 + CO) productivity. Deactivation of catalysts was observed at 873 and 973 K under SR conditions due to coke formation. In ATR, coke formation was almost completely depressed and the catalysts resulted to be very stable even at low reaction temperature (873 K). In SR coke formation occurs with higher rate on the catalyst having higher Ni dispersion, probably since propane cracking reaction is the pre-eminent phenomenon in promoting coke formation.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of PtRu on CNT/SnO2 composite as anode catalyst for methanol oxidation fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakati, Nitul; Maiti, Jatindranath; Jee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Seok Hee; Yoon, Young Soo

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: → CNTs are homogeneously covered by the porous SnO 2 layer which enhanced the electronic property of the catalyst support as well as the catalyst and fuel interaction. → PtRu/SnO 2 /CNT catalyst shows an electrochemically active surface area of 81.84 m 2 g Pt -1 and a mass activity of 890mAmg Pt -1 . → Hydrothermal synthesis offers small particle size as well as well dispersion of the catalyst nanoparticles. → Addition of SnO 2 with PtRu provides an additional route for OH ads formation and hence accelerates methanol oxidation. - Abstract: An electrocatalyst support comprising of carbon nanotube and tin oxide (CNT/SnO 2 ) was prepared by an ethylene glycol mediated synthesis procedure and proposed as an improved catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell. CNTs are covered by the porous SnO 2 layer which is homogeneously distributed over CNT surface. PtRu alloy nanoparticles were deposited over this composite material by a hydrothermal synthesis method. The CNT/SnO 2 composite and its supported PtRu catalyst (PtRu/SnO 2 /CNT) were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The electrocatalytic activity of PtRu/SnO 2 /CNT catalyst for methanol oxidation has been studied by cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy and chronoamperometry. The results were compared with Pt/SnO 2 /CNT and PtRu/CNT catalysts synthesized by the same procedure. PtRu/SnO 2 /CNT catalyst shows an electrochemically active surface area of 81.84 m 2 g Pt -1 and a mass activity of 890mAmg Pt -1 . The presence of SnO 2 layer over CNT can further improve the electrocatalytic activity of PtRu alloy nanoparticles for methanol oxidation.

  4. Performance evaluation of platinum-molybdenum carbide nanocatalysts with ultralow platinum loading on anode and cathode catalyst layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shibely; Cabrera Rodas, José Andrés; Tan, Shuai; Li, Dongmei

    2018-02-01

    An alternative catalyst platform, consisting of a phase-pure transition carbide (TMC) support and Pt nanoparticles (NPs) in the range of subnanometer to idealized disk electrode screening tests, few to none have been applied in a realistic fuel cell membrane electrode assembly (MEA). We recently reported that β-Mo2C hollow nanotubes modified with Pt NPs via atomic layer deposition (ALD) possess better activity and durability than 20% Pt/C. This paper presents systematic evaluation of the Pt/Mo2C catalysts in a MEA, investigating effects of different MEA preparation techniques, gas diffusion layers (GDL) and various Pt loadings in the ultralow range (hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2). Accelerated degradation tests (ADT) on Pt/Mo2C catalysts show 111% higher power density than commercial 20% Pt/C after the vigorous ADT.

  5. Fuel cell development for transportation: Catalyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doddapaneni, N. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Fuel cells are being considered as alternate power sources for transportation and stationary applications. With proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells the fuel crossover to cathodes causes severe thermal management and cell voltage drop due to oxidation of fuel at the platinized cathodes. The main goal of this project was to design, synthesize, and evaluate stable and inexpensive transition metal macrocyclic catalysts for the reduction of oxygen and be electrochemically inert towards anode fuels such as hydrogen and methanol.

  6. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...... increasing focus. Activity of the catalyst is important, but stability is essential. In the presented perspective paper, we review recent efforts to investigate fuel cell catalysts ex-situ in electrochemical half-cell measurements. Due to the amount of different studies, this review has no intention to give...

  7. New catalysts for miniaturized methanol fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christoffer Mølleskov

    . The kinetics can however be improved by using a superior catalyst. Therefore, the aim of this thesis is to identify new catalyst material for methanol fuel cells. By analysing the performance of the standard catalysts (PtRu and Pt) currently being applied in methanol fuel cells as anode and cathode......The methanol fuel cell is an interesting energy technology, capable of converting the chemical energy of methanol directly into electricity. The technology is specifically attractive for small mobile applications such as laptops, smartphones, tablets etc. since it offers almost instantaneously...... demonstrated by the Danish Technological Institute; however, for the technology to become more widely adapted, the power density of the fuel cell must be increased. It is well known that a considerable part of the energy from the methanol is lost in the fuel cell during the conversion due to poor kinetics...

  8. Halophilic starch degrading bacteria isolated from Sambhar Lake, India, as potential anode catalyst in microbial fuel cell: A promising process for saline water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Ankisha; Arora, Shivam; Gupta, Sandeep; Chhabra, Meenu

    2018-05-01

    In this study, Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) capable of treating saline starch water was developed. Sodium chloride (NaCl) concentrations ranging from 500 mM to 3000 mM were tested at the anode. Nitrate was used as an electron acceptor at the biocathode. The halophilic bacteria were isolated from Sambhar Lake, India. Results indicated successful removal of starch (1.83 kg/m 3 -d) and nitrate (0.13 kg/m 3 -d NO 3 - -N) with concomitant power output of 207.05 mW/m 2 at 1000 mM NaCl concentration. An increase in power density from 71.06 mW/m 2 to 207.05 mW/m 2 (2.92 folds) was observed when NaCl concentration was increased from 500 mM to 1000 mM. A decline in power density was observed when the salt concentrations >1000 mM were used. Concentration of 3000 mM supported power output as well as the highest starch degradation (3.2 kg/m 3 -d) and amylase activity of 2.26 IU/ml. The halophilic exoelectrogens were isolated and identified. The present study demonstrates the utility of MFC for degrading starch in saline water. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Jabbar, Mohammed Hussain

    An important issue that has limited the potential of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) for portable applications is its high operating temperatures (800-1000 ºC). Lowering the operating temperature of SOFCs to 400-600 ºC enable a wider material selection, reduced degradation and increased lifetime....... On the other hand, low-temperature operation poses serious challenges to the electrode performance. Effective catalysts, redox stable electrodes with improved microstructures are the prime requisite for the development of efficient SOFC anodes. The performance of Nb-doped SrT iO3 (STN) ceramic anodes...... at 400ºC. The potential of using WO3 ceramic as an alternative anode materials has been explored. The relatively high electrode polarization resistance obtained, 11 Ohm cm2 at 600 ºC, proved the inadequate catalytic activity of this system for hydrogen oxidation. At the end of this thesis...

  10. New anode catalyst for the negative electrode of the nickel-hydrogen battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, H.

    Hydrogen electrodes fabricated using an anode catalyst of 10-percent platinum and utilizing Vulcan XC72 carbon as support are shown to exhibit low polarization and charge/discharge characterisitcs comparable to platinum-black-based electrodes, with a tenfold reduction in platinum usage. A rolling and compacting procedure has been developed to fabricate continuous films of very thin catalyst layers, using fewer steps and resulting in greater electrode uniformity. It is found that the Gore-Tex layer can be eliminated in the prismatic design with rectangular electrodes without reducing performance. The anode catalyst has application to the Ni/H2 batteries employed in various spacecraft designs.

  11. Catalyst inks and method of application for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenay, Piotr; Davey, John; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon; Thomas, Sharon C.

    2004-02-24

    Inks are formulated for forming anode and cathode catalyst layers and applied to anode and cathode sides of a membrane for a direct methanol fuel cell. The inks comprise a Pt catalyst for the cathode and a Pt--Ru catalyst for the anode, purified water in an amount 4 to 20 times that of the catalyst by weight, and a perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer in an amount effective to provide an ionomer content in the anode and cathode surfaces of 20% to 80% by volume. The inks are prepared in a two-step process while cooling and agitating the solutions. The final solution is placed in a cooler and continuously agitated while spraying the solution over the anode or cathode surface of the membrane as determined by the catalyst content.

  12. Enhancing hybrid direct carbon fuel cell anode performance using Ag2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Ippolito, Davide; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid-direct carbon fuel cell (HDCFC), consisting of a molten slurry of solid carbon black and (Li-K)2CO3 added to the anode chamber of a solid oxide fuel cell, was characterized using current-potential-power density curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Two...... types of experimental setups were employed in this study, an anode-supported full cell configuration (two electrodes, two atmospheres setup) and a 3-electrode electrolyte-supported half-cell setup (single atmosphere). Anode processes with and without catalysts were investigated as a function...... of temperature (700-800 °C) and anode sweep gas (N2, 4-100% CO2 in N2-CO2). It was shown that the addition of silver based catalysts (Ag, Ag2O, Ag2CO3) into the carbon-carbonate slurry enhanced the performance of the HDCFC....

  13. Assembly of a Cost-Effective Anode Using Palladium Nanoparticles for Alkaline Fuel Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano-Ramos, Ileana; Casan~as-Montes, Barbara; García-Maldonado, María M.; Menendez, Christian L.; Mayol, Ana R.; Díaz-Vazquez, Liz M.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology allows the synthesis of nanoscale catalysts, which offer an efficient alternative for fuel cell applications. In this laboratory experiment, the student selects a cost-effective anode for fuel cells by comparing three different working electrodes. These are commercially available palladium (Pd) and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes, and…

  14. Thin Film Catalyst Layers for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, C. K.; Chun, W.; Ruiz, R.; Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary obstacles to the widespread use of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is the high cost of the catalyst. Therefore, reducing the catalyst loading well below the current level of 8-12 mg/cm 2 would be important to commercialization. The current methods for preparation of catalyst layers consisting of catalyst, ionomer and sometimes a hydrophobic additive are applied by either painting, spraying, decal transfer or screen printing processes. Sputter deposition is a coating technique widely used in manufacturing and therefore particularly attractive. In this study we have begun to explore sputtering as a method for catalyst deposition. Present experiments focus on Pt-Ru catalyst layers for the anode.

  15. Methanol-Tolerant Cathode Catalyst Composite For Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-03-21

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of a platinum-chromium alloy so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  16. Chemically tuned anode with tailored aqueous hydrocarbon binder for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Hyun; Lee, So Young; Lee, Young Moo; McGrath, James E

    2009-07-21

    An anode for direct methanol fuel cells was chemically tuned by tailoring an aqueous hydrocarbon catalyst (SPI-BT) binder instead of using a conventional perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer (PFSI). SPI-BT designed in triethylamine salt form showed lower proton conductivity than PFSI, but it was stable in the catalyst ink forming the aqueous colloids. The aqueous colloidal particle size of SPI-BT was much smaller than that of PFSI. The small SPI-BT colloidal particles contributed to forming small catalyst agglomerates and simultaneously reducing their pore volume. Consequently, the high filling level of binders in the pores, where Pt-Ru catalysts are mainly located on the wall and physically interconnected, resulted in increased electrochemical active surface area of the anode, leading to high catalyst utilization. In addition, the chemical affinity between the SPI-BT binder and the membrane material derived from their similar chemical structure induced a stable interface on the membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) and showed low electric resistance. Upon adding SPI-BT, the synergistic effect of high catalyst utilization, improved mass transfer behavior to Pt-Ru catalyst, and low interfacial resistance of MEA became greater than the influence of reduced proton conductivity in the electrochemical performance of single cells. The electrochemical performance of MEAs with SPI-BT anode was enhanced to almost the same degree or somewhat higher than that with PFSI at 90 degrees C.

  17. High-performance alkaline direct methanol fuel cell using a nitrogen-postdoped anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joghee, Prabhuram; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Wood, Kevin; Bender, Guido; O'Hayre, Ryan

    2014-07-01

    A commercial PtRu/C catalyst postdoped with nitrogen demonstrates a significantly higher performance (~10-20% improvement) in the anode of an alkaline direct methanol fuel cell than an unmodified commercial PtRu/C catalyst control. The enhanced performance shown herein is attributed at least partially to the increased electrochemical surface area of the PtRu/C after postdoping with nitrogen. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Releasing metal catalysts via phase transition: (NiO)0.05-(SrTi0.8Nb0.2O3)0.95 as a redox stable anode material for solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guoliang; Wang, Siwei; Lin, Ye; Zhang, Yanxiang; An, Ke; Chen, Fanglin

    2014-11-26

    Donor-doped perovskite-type SrTiO3 experiences stoichiometric changes at high temperatures in different Po2 involving the formation of Sr or Ti-rich impurities. NiO is incorporated into the stoichiometric strontium titanate, SrTi0.8Nb0.2O3-δ (STN), to form an A-site deficient perovskite material, (NiO)0.05-(SrTi0.8Nb0.2O3)0.95 (Ni-STN), for balancing the phase transition. Metallic Ni nanoparticles can be released upon reduction instead of forming undesired secondary phases. This material design introduces a simple catalytic modification method with good compositional control of the ceramic backbones, by which transport property and durability of solid oxide fuel cell anodes are largely determined. Using Ni-STN as anodes for solid oxide fuel cells, enhanced catalytic activity and remarkable stability in redox cycling have been achieved. Electrolyte-supported cells with the cell configuration of Ni-STN-SDC anode, La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.87Mg0.13O3 (LSGM) electrolyte, and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 (LSCF) cathode produce peak power densities of 612, 794, and 922 mW cm(-2) at 800, 850, and 900 °C, respectively, using H2 as the fuel and air as the oxidant. Minor degradation in fuel cell performance resulted from redox cycling can be recovered upon operating the fuel cells in H2. Such property makes Ni-STN a promising regenerative anode candidate for solid oxide fuel cells.

  19. A physical model of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell anode impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, M.; Casalegno, A.

    2014-02-01

    In the present work a physically based model of direct methanol fuel cell anode impedance has been developed and validated at different operating current densities. The proposed model includes the two-phase mass transport of both methanol and water through diffusion and catalyst layers and the methanol oxidation reaction involving CO adsorbed intermediate. Model simulations are in good quantitative agreement with experimental observations and permit to evaluate the origin of anode impedance features. Model results confirm that the high frequency 45° linear branch is caused by proton transport limitations within the catalyst layer and that the low frequency inductive behavior is due to surface coverage by CO reaction intermediate. Moreover model predictions elucidate the contribution to the impedance of mass transport phenomena through diffusion layer, that is relevant even at low current density and increases along the channel length. In particular liquid convective fluxes are considered as a process of pressure buildup and breakthrough at diffusion layer intersecting fibers, resulting in a discontinuous phenomenon. By means of this intermittent description it is possible to correctly reproduce mass transport limitations through diffusion layers, that manifest themselves as a second arch superimposed to the first one, peculiar of kinetic losses.

  20. Electrolytic Cell For Production Of Aluminum Employing Planar Anodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, Robert J. (Goldendale, WA); Mezner, Michael B. (Sandy, OR); Bradford, Donald R (Underwood, WA)

    2004-10-05

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte, the method comprising providing a molten salt electrolyte having alumina dissolved therein in an electrolytic cell. A plurality of anodes and cathodes having planar surfaces are disposed in a generally vertical orientation in the electrolyte, the anodes and cathodes arranged in alternating or interleaving relationship to provide anode planar surfaces disposed opposite cathode planar surfaces, the anode comprised of carbon. Electric current is passed through anodes and through the electrolyte to the cathodes depositing aluminum at the cathodes and forming carbon containing gas at the anodes.

  1. Preparation and Evaluation of Multi-Layer Anodes of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Diana; Farmer, Serene C.; Setlock, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an energy device with abundant energy generation, ultra-high specific power density, high stability and long life is critical for enabling longer missions and for reducing mission costs. Of all different types of fuel cells, the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is a promising high temperature device that can generate electricity as a byproduct of a chemical reaction in a clean way and produce high quality heat that can be used for other purposes. For aerospace applications, a power-to-weight of (is) greater than 1.0 kW/kg is required. NASA has a patented fuel cell technology under development, capable of achieving the 1.0 kW/kg figure of merit. The first step toward achieving these goals is increasing anode durability. The catalyst plays an important role in the fuel cells for power generation, stability, efficiency and long life. Not only the anode composition, but its preparation and reduction are key to achieving better cell performance. In this research, multi-layer anodes were prepared varying the chemistry of each layer to optimize the performance of the cells. Microstructure analyses were done to the new anodes before and after fuel cell operation. The cells' durability and performance were evaluated in 200 hrs life tests in hydrogen at 850 C. The chemistry of the standard nickel anode was modified successfully reducing the anode degradation from 40% to 8.4% in 1000 hrs and retaining its microstructure.

  2. Increasing the lifetime of fuel cell catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latsuzbaia, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I discuss a novel idea of fuel cell catalyst regeneration to increase lifetime of the PEM fuel cell electrode/catalyst operation and, therefore, reduce the catalyst costs. As many of the catalyst degradation mechanisms are difficult to avoid, the regeneration is alternative option to

  3. Pd and polyaniline nanocomposite on carbon fiber paper as an efficient direct formic acid fuel cell anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rakesh K.

    2018-03-01

    Direct formic acid fuel cells are advantageous as portable power generating devices. In the present work, an anode catalyst for direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) is presented which has good catalytic activity for formic acid oxidation. The catalyst is composed of Pd and conducting polymer polyaniline (Pd-PANI) nanocomposite. The catalyst was prepared by using a single step galvanostatic electrochemical deposition method. The Pd-PANI catalyst was electrodeposited at different time durations and a comparison of the catalytic activity at each deposition time was carried out and optimized.

  4. A conducting polymer/ferritin anode for biofuel cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamuddin; Shin, Kwang Min; Kim, Sun I.; So, Insuk; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2009-01-01

    An enzyme anode for use in biofuel cells (BFCs) was constructed using an electrically connected bilayer based on a glassy carbon (GC) electrode immobilized with the conducting polymer polypyrrole (Ppy) as electron transfer enhancer, and with horse spleen ferritin protein (Frt) as electron transfer mediator. The surface-coupled redox system of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) catalyzed with diaphorase (Di) was used for the regeneration of NAD + in the inner layer and the NAD + -dependent enzyme catalyst glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) in the outer layer. The outer layer of the GC-Ppy-Frt-Di-NADH-GDH electrode effectively catalyzes the oxidation of glucose biofuel continuously; using the NAD + generated at the inner layer of the Di-catalyzed NADH redox system mediated by Frt and Ppy provides electrical communication with enhancement in electron transport. The electrochemical characteristics of the electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). This anode provides a current density of 1.2 mA cm -2 in a 45 mM glucose solution and offers a good possibility for application in biofuel cells.

  5. Chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Vante, Nicolas [Buxerolles, FR; Zelenay, Piotr [Los Alamos, NM; Choi, Jong-Ho [Los Alamos, NM; Wieckowski, Andrzej [Champaign, IL; Cao, Dianxue [Urbana, IL

    2009-09-15

    A methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst and a membrane electrode assembly for fuel cells that includes such a cathode catalyst. The cathode catalyst includes a support having at least one transition metal in elemental form and a chalcogen disposed on the support. Methods of making the cathode catalyst and membrane electrode assembly are also described.

  6. CO-Tolerant Pt–BeO as a Novel Anode Electrocatalyst in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungjung Kwon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs requires less expensive catalysts and higher operating voltage. Substantial anodic overvoltage with the usage of reformed hydrogen fuel can be minimized by using CO-tolerant anode catalysts. Carbon-supported Pt–BeO is manufactured so that Pt particles with an average diameter of 4 nm are distributed on a carbon support. XPS analysis shows that a peak value of the binding energy of Be matches that of BeO, and oxygen is bound with Be or carbon. The hydrogen oxidation current of the Pt–BeO catalyst is slightly higher than that of a Pt catalyst. CO stripping voltammetry shows that CO oxidation current peaks at ~0.85 V at Pt, whereas CO is oxidized around 0.75 V at Pt–BeO, which confirms that the desorption of CO is easier in the presence of BeO. Although the state-of-the-art PtRu anode catalyst is dominant as a CO-tolerant hydrogen oxidation catalyst, this study of Be-based CO-tolerant material can widen the choice of PEMFC anode catalyst.

  7. PtRu/Ti anodes with varying Pt ratio: Ru ratio prepared by electrodeposition for the direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Zhu, Fuyun; Lin, Wen-Feng; Christensen, Paul A; Zhang, Huamin

    2006-06-21

    PtRu/Ti anodes with varying Pt ratio Ru ratio were prepared by electrodeposition of a thin PtRu catalyst layer onto Ti mesh for a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The morphology and structure of the catalyst layers were analyzed by SEM, EDX and XRD. The catalyst coating layer shows an alloy character. The relative activities of the PtRu/Ti electrodes were assessed and compared in half cell and single DMFC experiments. The results show that these electrodes are very active for the methanol oxidation and that the optimum Ru surface coverage was ca. 9 at.% for DMFC operating at 20 degrees C and 11 at.% at 60 degrees C. The PtRu/Ti anode shows a performance comparable to that of the conventional carbon-based anode in a DMFC operating with 0.25 M or 0.5 M methanol solution and atmosphere oxygen gas at 90 degrees C.

  8. Flexible graphite-based integrated anode plate for direct methanol fuel cells at high methanol feed concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, HaiFeng; Hsing, I.-Ming

    An integrated anode plate suitable for operating direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) at a high methanol feed concentration is reported. This anode structure which was made of flexible graphite materials not only provides dual role of liquid diffusion layer and flow field plate, but also serves as a methanol blocker by decreasing methanol flux to the interface of catalyst and membrane electrolyte. DMFCs incorporating this new anode structure exhibited a much higher open circuit voltage (OCV) (∼0.51 V) than that (∼0.42 V) of a conventional DMFC at a 10 M methanol feed. Cell polarization data show that this new anode structure significantly improves the cell performance at high methanol concentration scenarios (e.g. 12 M or above). Moreover, this new design greatly simplifies the anode structure and offers a promising approach in running passive-mode DMFC at high methanol feed concentrations.

  9. Heterotrophic Anodic Denitrification in Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Drewnowski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, pollution caused by energy production systems is a major environmental concern. Therefore, the development of sustainable energy sources is required. Amongst others, the microbial fuel cell (MFC seems to be a possible solution because it can produce clean energy at the same time that waste is stabilized. Unfortunately, mainly due to industrial discharges, the wastes could contain nitrates, or nitrates precursors such ammonia, which could lead to lower performance in terms of electricity production. In this work, the feasibility of coupling anodic denitrification process with electricity production in MFC and the effect of the nitrates over the MFC performance were studied. During the experiments, it was observed that the culture developed in the anodic chamber of the MFC presented a significant amount of denitrificative microorganisms. The MFC developed was able to denitrify up to 4 ppm, without affecting the current density exerted, of about 1 mA/cm2. Regarding the denitrification process, it must be highlighted that the maximum denitrification rate achieved with the culture was about 60 mg·NO3−·L−1·h−1. Based on these results, it can be stated that it is possible to remove nitrates and to produce energy, without negatively affecting the electrical performance, when the nitrate concentration is low.

  10. Experimental study of methane partial oxidation on Ni-YSZ anode of solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Hiroshi; Tada, Koshi; Kishimoto, Masashi; Saito, Motohiro; Yoshida, Hideo

    2017-08-01

    The effects of oxygen addition to methane directly supplied to solid oxide fuel cells were investigated. Fundamental experiments were conducted using Ni-YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia) cermet as a typical anode material, and Ni-YSZ catalysts having different streamwise lengths were fabricated on YSZ flat plates. A premixed gas of methane, oxygen, nitrogen and steam was supplied to a test catalyst set in a rectangular test channel. The exhaust gas compositions and the surface temperature distributions of the test catalysts were measured. It was found that the oxidation of methane prominently proceeded near the upstream edge of the catalyst followed by steam/dry reforming reactions downstream. This resulted in the formation of a high-temperature region, leading to a large temperature gradient in the streamwise direction.

  11. Fundamental Investigation of Si Anode in Li-Ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, James J.; Bennett, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon is a promising and attractive anode material to replace graphite for high capacity lithium ion cells since its theoretical capacity is approximately 10 times of graphite and it is an abundant element on earth. However, there are challenges associated with using silicon as Li-ion anode due to the significant first cycle irreversible capacity loss and subsequent rapid capacity fade during cycling. In this paper, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are used to build a fundamental understanding of silicon anodes. The results show that it is difficult to form the SEI film on the surface of Si anode during the first cycle, the lithium ion insertion and de-insertion kinetics for Si are sluggish, and the cell internal resistance changes with the state of lithiation after electrochemical cycling. These results are compared with those for extensively studied graphite anodes. The understanding gained from this study will help to design better Si anodes.

  12. Redox Stable Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang eXiao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs can convert chemical energy from the fuel directly to electrical energy with high efficiency and fuel flexibility. Ni-based cermets have been the most widely adopted anode for SOFCs. However, the conventional Ni-based anode has low tolerance to sulfur-contamination, is vulnerable to deactivation by carbon build-up (coking from direct oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels, and suffers volume instability upon redox cycling. Among these limitations, the redox instability of the anode is particularly important and has been intensively studied since the SOFC anode may experience redox cycling during fuel cell operations even with the ideal pure hydrogen as the fuel. This review aims to highlight recent progresses on improving redox stability of the conventional Ni-based anode through microstructure optimization and exploration of alternative ceramic-based anode materials.

  13. Development of biologically modified anodes for energy harvesting using microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, James J.; Ganguli, Rahul; Chmelka, Brad

    2012-06-01

    Biological fuel cells hold promise as an alternative energy source to batteries for unattended ground sensor applications due to the fact that they can be extremely long lived. This lifetime can be extended over batteries by scavenging fuel from the deployed environment. Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are one class of such sources that produce usable energy from small organic compounds (i.e. sugars, alcohols, organic acids, and biopolymers) which can be easily containerized or scavenged from the environment. The use of microorganisms as the anodic catalysts is what makes these systems unique from other biofuel cell designs. One of the main drawbacks of engineering a sensor system powered by an MFC is that power densities and current flux are extremely low in currently reported systems. The power density is limited by the mass transfer of the fuel source to the catalyst, the metabolism of the microbial catalysts and the electron transfer from the organism to the anode. This presentation will focus on the development of a new style of microbially-modified anodes which will increase power density to a level where a practical power source can be engineered. This is being achieved by developing a three dimensional matrix as an artificial, conductive biofilm. These artificial biofilms will allow the capture of a consortium of microbes designed for efficient metabolism of the available fuel source. Also it will keep the microbes close to the electrode allowing ready access by fuel and providing a low resistance passage of the liberated electrons from fuel oxidation.

  14. Fuel cell testing of Pt–Ru catalysts supported on differently prepared and pretreated carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarz, Wojciech; Lota, Grzegorz; Frackowiak, Elzbieta; Czerwiński, Andrzej; Piela, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) testing of Pt–Ru catalysts supported on differently prepared multiwall carbon nanotube (MCNT) supports was performed to elucidate the influence of the different supports on the operating characteristics of the catalysts under real direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) anode and H 2 -PEMFC anode conditions. The MCNTs were either thin, entangled or thick, disentangled. Pretreatment of the MCNTs was also done and it was either high-temperature KOH etching or annealing (graphitization). The performance of the catalysts was compared against the performance of a commercial Pt–Ru catalyst supported on a high-surface-area carbon black. Among the different MCNT supports, the graphitized, entangled support offered the best performance in all tests, which was equal to the performance of the commercial catalyst, despite the MCNT catalyst layer was ca. 2.2 times thicker than the carbon black catalyst layer. Even for an MCNT catalyst layer, which was almost 7 times thicker than the carbon black catalyst layer, the transport limitations were not prohibitive. This confirmed the expected potential of nanotube supports for providing superior reactant transport properties of the PEMFC catalyst layers

  15. Flow-through 3D biofuel cell anode for NAD+-dependent enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincon, Rosalba A.; Lau, Carolin; Garcia, Kristen E.; Atanassov, Plamen

    2011-01-01

    NAD + -dependent enzymes require the presence of catalysts for cofactor regeneration in order to be employed in enzymatic biofuel cells. Poly-(methylene green) catalysts have proven to help the oxidation reaction of NADH allowing for the use of such enzymes in electrocatalytic oxidation reactions. In this paper we present the development of 3D anode based on NAD + -dependent malate dehydrogenase. The 3D material chosen was reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) which was modified with poly-(MG) for NADH oxidation and it also accommodated the porous immobilization matrix for MDH consisting of MWCNTs embedded in chitosan; allowing for mass transport of the substrate to the electrode. Scanning electron microscopy was used in order to characterize the poly-(MG)-modified RVC, and electrochemical evaluation of the anode was performed.

  16. Paradox phenomena of proton exchange membrane fuel cells operating under dead-end anode mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dong; Zeng, Rong; Wang, Shumao; Jiang, Lijun; Varcoe, John R.

    2014-11-01

    By using two spatially separated reference electrodes in a single cell proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), the individual potentials of the anode and cathode are recorded under realistic operating conditions. The PEMFC is operated under dead-end anode (DEA) mode, without any humidification, to mitigate water accumulation at the anode. Although N2 crossover from cathode to anode may play an important role in PEMFCs operating under DEA mode, our results unexpectedly show that the over-potentials of both the anode and cathode concomitantly increased or decreased at the same time. The increases of over-potentials correlate to the increase of the high frequency resistance of the cell (Rhf) imply that the water content in the membrane electrode assemblies is critical. However, the subsequent H2 depletion tests suggest that water may accumulate at the interface between the surface of the catalyst and the ultrathin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer film and this contradicts the above (the increase in Rhf implies the drying out of the MEAs). This study highlights the need for further research into understanding the water transport properties of the ultrathin PFSA ionomer film (<60 nm): it is clear that these exhibit completely different properties to that of bulk proton-exchange membranes (PEM).

  17. Performance of (CoPC)n catalyst in active lithium-thionyl chloride cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pinakin M.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted with anode limited D size cells to characterize the performance of an active lithium-thionyl chloride (Li/SOCl2) system using the polymeric cobalt phthalocyanine, (CoPC)n, catalyst in carbon cathodes. The author describes the results of this experiment with respect to initial voltage delays, operating voltages, and capacities. The effectiveness of the preconditioning methods evolved to alleviate passivation effects on storage are also discussed. The results clearly demonstrated the superior high rate capability of cells with the catalyst. The catalyst did not adversely impact the performance of cells after active storage for up to 6 months, while retaining its beneficial influences.

  18. Coating for lithium anode, thionyl chloride active cathode electrochemical cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catanzarite, V.O.

    1983-01-04

    Electrochemical power cells having a cathode current collector, a combination liquid active cathode depolarizer electrolyte solvent and an anode that forms surface compounds when in intimate contact with the liquid cathode are enhanced by the addition of a passivation limiting film contiguous to said anode. The passivating film is a member of the cyanoacrilate family of organic compounds.

  19. Coating for lithium anode, thionyl chloride active cathode electrochemical cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catanzarite, V.O.

    1981-10-20

    Electrochemical power cells having a cathode current collector, a combination liquid active cathode depolarizer electrolyte solvent and an anode that forms surface compounds when in intimate contact with the liquid cathode are enhanced by the addition of a passivation limiting film contiguous to said anode. The passivating film is a member of the cyanoacrilate family of organic compounds.

  20. Carbon dioxide poisoning on proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, G.J.M.; Lebedeva, N.P. [ECN Fuel Cell Technology, Petten (Netherlands)

    2005-03-01

    Carbon dioxide, which is present in reformate fuels in concentrations up to 25%, can have a detrimental effect on the fuel cell performance that goes beyond dilution effects associated with an inert gas. The origin of these poisoning effects is the reverse water gas shift reaction, i.e in a fuel cell CO2 can be reduced by hydrogen adsorbed on the catalyst. This reaction results in an adsorbate on the anode catalyst. Fuel cell tests involving various Pt-based catalysts have shown that anode poisoning depends on the composition of the catalyst. The carbon dioxide reduction on Pt-based carbon supported catalysts as a function of the electrode potential was studied using cyclic voltammetry and chronocoulometry. The results indicate the formation of adsorbed species (most likely, carbon monoxide) on the surface of all these catalysts. Closer inspection also revealed differences between the samples. From the kinetic data analysis it is clear that, unlike Pt/C, some bimetallic (PtM/C) catalysts also catalyse the oxidation of the adsorbed species to carbon dioxide at low overpotentials. This ensures a higher equilibrium concentration of the free sites on the surface of this type of catalysts compared to that on Pt/C. Studies with a kinetic model have shown that main effect of CO2 reduction is that a large part of the catalytic surface area becomes inactive for H2 dissociation. Subsequent desorption of CO from the catalyst surface, transport down the gas channel, and subsequent re-adsorption of CO plays a minor role. The main reason for this is that a large blockage of the surface area inhibits further formation of CO in the reduction reaction. It was found that a high rate constant of this reaction increases the anode polarisation losses, as does a reduced rate constant of the hydrogen dissociation reaction. The effects are mitigated by a high ratio of the CO desorption and adsorption rate constants, as well as by a high CO electro-oxidation rate constant.

  1. IrPdRu/C as H2Oxidation Catalysts for Alkaline Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongsen; Abruña, Héctor D

    2017-05-24

    H 2 oxidation kinetics on Pt in alkaline media are very sluggish, being over 100 times slower than in acidic media, and thus, new and more active H 2 oxidation electrocatalysts must be developed in order to enable alkaline exchange membrane fuel cells (AEMFCs). In this Communication, we present a new type of catalysts-carbon-supported IrPdRu nanoparticles-as H 2 oxidation catalysts in alkaline media. These catalysts exhibit higher activity than Pt/C and Ir/C catalysts and are also quite stable. In particular, Ir 3 Ru 7 /C and Ir 3 Pd 1 Ru 6 /C catalysts are significantly more active and less expensive than Pt/C and Ir/C, and are thus promising new anode catalysts for alkaline fuel cell applications.

  2. From bio-mineralisation to fuel cells: biomanufacture of Pt and Pd nanocrystals for fuel cell electrode catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, P; Paterson-Beedle, M; Mikheenko, I P; Macaskie, L E

    2007-04-01

    Biosynthesis of nano-scale platinum and palladium was achieved via enzymatically-mediated deposition of metal ions from solution. The bio-accumulated Pt(0) and Pd(0) crystals were dried, applied onto carbon paper and tested as anodes in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell for power production. Up to 100% and 81% of the maximum power generation was achieved by the bio-Pt and bio-Pd catalysts, respectively, compared to commercial fuel cell grade Pt catalyst. Hence, biomineralisation could pave the way for economical production of fuel cell catalysts since previous studies have shown that precious metals can be biorecovered from wastes into catalytically active bionanomaterials.

  3. Fundamental Investigation of Silicon Anode in Lithium-Ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, James J.; Bennett, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon is a promising and attractive anode material to replace graphite for high capacity lithium ion cells since its theoretical capacity is 10 times of graphite and it is an abundant element on Earth. However, there are challenges associated with using silicon as Li-ion anode due to the significant first cycle irreversible capacity loss and subsequent rapid capacity fade during cycling. Understanding solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation along with the lithium ion insertion/de-insertion kinetics in silicon anodes will provide greater insight into overcoming these issues, thereby lead to better cycle performance. In this paper, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are used to build a fundamental understanding of silicon anodes. The results show that it is difficult to form the SEI film on the surface of a Si anode during the first cycle; the lithium ion insertion and de-insertion kinetics for Si are sluggish, and the cell internal resistance changes with the state of lithiation after electrochemical cycling. These results are compared with those for extensively studied graphite anodes. The understanding gained from this study will help to design better Si anodes, and the combination of cyclic voltammetry with impedance spectroscopy provides a useful tool to evaluate the effectiveness of the design modifications on the Si anode performance.

  4. Nickel-based anodic electrocatalysts for fuel cells and water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dayi

    Our world is facing an energy crisis, so people are trying to harvest and utilize energy more efficiently. One of the promising ways to harvest energy is via solar water splitting to convert solar energy to chemical energy stored in hydrogen. Another of the options to utilize energy more efficiently is to use fuel cells as power sources instead of combustion engines. Catalysts are needed to reduce the energy barriers of the reactions happening at the electrode surfaces of the water-splitting cells and fuel cells. Nickel-based catalysts happen to be important nonprecious electrocatalysts for both of the anodic reactions in alkaline media. In alcohol fuel cells, nickel-based catalysts catalyze alcohol oxidation. In water splitting cells, they catalyze water oxidation, i.e., oxygen evolution. The two reactions occur in a similar potential range when catalyzed by nickel-based catalysts. Higher output current density, lower oxidation potential, and complete substrate oxidation are preferred for the anode in the applications. In this dissertation, the catalytic properties of nickel-based electrocatalysts in alkaline medium for fuel oxidation and oxygen evolution are explored. By changing the nickel precursor solubility, nickel complex nanoparticles with tunable sizes on electrode surfaces were synthesized. Higher methanol oxidation current density is achieved with smaller nickel complex nanoparticles. DNA aggregates were used as a polymer scaffold to load nickel ion centers and thus can oxidize methanol completely at a potential about 0.1 V lower than simple nickel electrodes, and the methanol oxidation pathway is changed. Nickel-based catalysts also have electrocatalytic activity towards a wide range of substrates. Experiments show that methanol, ethanol, glycerol and glucose can be deeply oxidized and carbon-carbon bonds can be broken during the oxidation. However, when comparing methanol oxidation reaction to oxygen evolution reaction catalyzed by current nickel

  5. Direct ethanol fuel cells based on PtSn anodes: the effect of Sn content on the fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, W.J.; Song, S.Q.; Li, W.Z.; Zhou, Z.H.; Sun, G.Q.; Xin, Q. [Direct alcohol fuel cell lab, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 110, Dalian 116023 (China); Douvartzides, S.; Tsiakaras, P. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece)

    2005-01-10

    In the present work, several carbon supported PtSn catalysts with different Pt/Sn atomic ratios were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Both the results of TEM and XRD showed that all in-house prepared carbon supported Pt and PtSn catalysts had nanosized particles with narrow size distribution. According to the primary analysis of XPS results, it was confirmed that the main part of Pt of the as-prepared catalysts is in metallic state while the main part of Sn is in oxidized state. The performances of single direct ethanol fuel cells were different from each other with different anode catalysts and at different temperatures. It was found that, the single DEFC employing Pt{sub 3}Sn{sub 2}/C showed better performance at 60{sup o}C while the direct ethanol fuel cells with Pt{sub 2}Sn{sub 1}/C and Pt{sub 3}Sn{sub 2}/C exhibited similar performances at 75{sup o}C. Furthermore, at 90{sup o}C, Pt{sub 2}Sn{sub 1}/C was identified as a more suitable anode catalyst for direct ethanol fuel cells in terms of the fuel cell maximum power density. Surface oxygen-containing species, lattice parameters and ohmic effects, which are related to the Sn content, are thought as the main factors influencing the catalyst activity and consequently the performance of single direct ethanol fuel cells. (author)

  6. Impedance of vapor feed direct methanol fuel cells--polarization dependence of elementary processes at the anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunaga, Hiroshi; Ishida, Tomohiro; Teranishi, Nozomu; Arai, Chikao; Yamada, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    Membrane electrode assemblies of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) with different catalyst and ionomer loading were prepared. Anode performance and impedance spectra were measured to clarify the characteristics of vapor feed DMFCs (VF-DMFCs). The impedance spectra were deconvolved into three semi-circles with different time constants, each showing a different dependence on the anodic polarization. The middle-frequency range arc decreased as the anodic polarization increased, indicating that this process represents the oxidation reaction of methanol. The high-frequency range arc showed little dependence on the anodic polarization, but increased with the thickness of the electrode, indicating that this process might be related to proton conduction through the electrode. The low-frequency range arc was observed only when the methanol concentration was low, in contrast to liquid feed DMFCs (LF-DMFCs), for which the removal of the product gas presents a large resistance. A simpler design can therefore be used for a VF-DMFC, giving it an advantage over an LF-DMFC. A decreasing ionomer to catalyst ratio (I/C) caused the interfacial conductivity (σ E ) to increase, but it intensively decreased when I/C was below 0.25. Thus, the connection of the catalysts is important for the anode's performance

  7. Non-PGM cell catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Elvington, M. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States); Ganesan, P. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2017-09-27

    A unique approach has been developed to probe the non-PGM catalyst active site for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) for PEMFCs. Iron based functionalities have been engineered into a variety of catalysts to evaluate their impact on activity for the ORR. A series of high surface area catalysts were synthesized and the impact of the chemical structure on the electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties was investigated. Elemental and surface analyses of the prepared catalysts reveal the incorporation of iron in a targeted and controlled manner. A high surface area framework catalyst was prepared that shows exceptional activity, comparable to state-of-the-art materials. The results of this research project provided critical seed data for the newly awarded ElectroCat project, which focuses on rationally designed framework catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  8. Propitious Dendritic Cu2O-Pt Nanostructured Anodes for Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nagar, Gumaa A; Mohammad, Ahmad M; El-Deab, Mohamed S; El-Anadouli, Bahgat E

    2017-06-14

    This study introduces a novel competent dendritic copper oxide-platinum nanocatalyst (nano-Cu 2 O-Pt) immobilized onto a glassy carbon (GC) substrate for formic acid (FA) electro-oxidation (FAO); the prime reaction in the anodic compartment of direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). Interestingly, the proposed catalyst exhibited an outstanding improvement for FAO compared to the traditional platinum nanoparticles (nano-Pt) modified GC (nano-Pt/GC) catalyst. This was evaluated from steering the reaction mechanism toward the desired direct route producing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ); consistently with mitigating the other undesired indirect pathway producing carbon monoxide (CO); the potential poison deteriorating the catalytic activity of typical Pt-based catalysts. Moreover, the developed catalyst showed a reasonable long-term catalytic stability along with a significant lowering in onset potential of direct FAO that ultimately reduces the polarization and amplifies the fuel cell's voltage. The observed catalytic enhancement was believed to originate bifunctionally; while nano-Pt represented the base for the FA adsorption, nanostructured copper oxide (nano-Cu 2 O) behaved as a catalytic mediator facilitating the charge transfer during FAO and providing the oxygen atmosphere inspiring the poison's (CO) oxidation at relatively lower potential. Surprisingly, moreover, nano-Cu 2 O induced a surface retrieval of nano-Pt active sites by capturing the poisoning CO via "a spillover mechanism" to renovate the Pt surface for the direct FAO. Finally, the catalytic tolerance of the developed catalyst toward halides' poisoning was discussed.

  9. Oxidation of H2 and CO in a fuel cell with a Platinum-tin Anode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier González

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the construction and evolution of a fuel cell with a bi-metallic anode of Pt-Sn supported on carbon, as catalysts for oxidation of pure hydrogen, pure CO and a 2% CO in H2 mixture. Both, cathode and anode were made with a structure composed by a diffusive layer and a catalytic layer. The diffusive layer was made with a carbon cloth while the catalytic layer contained the platinum and tin supported on carbon. To test the performance of the catalytic mixture, a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC was developed with an original design for the gas distributation plates. The reactants were feed to ambient temperature and 3 psig in the anode side, while 5 psig pure oxygen was used in the cathode. The anode catalytic load was 0.57 mg/cm2 of platinum and 0.08 mg/cm2 of tin. The catalytic load in cathode was 0.85 mg/cm2 of pure platinum. It was found that this caralytic mixture is tolerant to CO presence.

  10. In Situ FTIR Analysis of CO-Tolerance of a Pt-Fe Alloy with Stabilized Pt Skin Layers as a Hydrogen Anode Catalyst for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ogihara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The CO-tolerance mechanism of a carbon-supported Pt-Fe alloy catalyst with two atomic layers of stabilized Pt-skin (Pt2AL–PtFe/C was investigated, in comparison with commercial Pt2Ru3/C (c-Pt2Ru3/C, by in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy in 0.1 M HClO4 solution at 60 °C. When 1% CO (H2-balance was bubbled continuously in the solution, the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR activities of both catalysts decreased severely because the active sites were blocked by COad, reaching the coverage θCO ≈ 0.99. The bands in the IR spectra observed on both catalysts were successfully assigned to linearly adsorbed CO (COL and bridged CO (COB, both of which consisted of multiple components (COL or COB at terraces and step/edge sites. The Pt2AL–PtFe/C catalyst lost 99% of its initial mass activity (MA for the HOR after 30 min, whereas about 10% of the initial MA was maintained on c-Pt2Ru3/C after 2 h, which can be ascribed to a suppression of linearly adsorbed CO at terrace sites (COL, terrace. In contrast, the HOR activities of both catalysts with pre-adsorbed CO recovered appreciably after bubbling with CO-free pure H2. We clarify, for the first time, that such a recovery of activity can be ascribed to an increased number of active sites by a transfer of COL, terrace to COL, step/edge, without removal of COad from the surface. The Pt2AL–PtFe/C catalyst showed a larger decrease in the band intensity of COL, terrace. A possible mechanism for the CO-tolerant HOR is also discussed.

  11. High-performance anode for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells by multiple-layer Pt sputter deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Sadesh Kumar; Hamelin, Jean

    We investigate the sputtering deposition as a tool for preparing Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) electrodes with improved performance and catalyst utilization. Anodes of PEMFC with ultra-low loading of Pt (0.05 mg cm -2) are developed by alternate sputtering of Pt and painting layers of carbon nanotube ink with Nafion directly on the gas diffusion layer. Sputter depositing alternate layers of Pt on carbon-Nafion layer (CNL) has increased the anode activity over single-layer Pt deposited anode due to improved porosity and the presence of Pt nanoparticles in the inner CNL. Also, we investigated the influence of Nafion content in the CNL. The optimal Nafion content giving less resistance and better performance in an anode is 29 wt.%. This is significantly lower than for standard MEA anodes, indicating sufficient interfacial contact between each CNL. We studied the anodes prepared with 50 wt.% Nafion, which revealed larger ohmic resistance and also, blocks the CNL pores reducing gas permeability. Excellent mass transfer and performance is obtained with three-layer Pt sputter deposited anode with CNL containing 29 wt.% of Nafion.

  12. Hierarchically Three-Dimensional Nanofiber Based Textile with High Conductivity and Biocompatibility As a Microbial Fuel Cell Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yifei; Liu, Qiongzhen; Chen, Jiahui; Wang, Bo; Wang, Yuedan; Liu, Ke; Li, Mufang; Jiang, Haiqing; Lu, Zhentan; Wang, Dong

    2016-07-19

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) encompass complex bioelectrocatalytic reactions that converting chemical energy of organic compounds to electrical energy. Improving the anode configuration is thought to be a critical step for enhancing MFCs performance. In present study, a hierarchically structured textile polypyrrole/poly(vinyl alcohol-co-polyethylene) nanofibers/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (referred to PPy/NFs/PET) is shown to be excellent anode for MFCs. This hierarchical PPy/NFs/PET anode affords an open porous and three-dimensional interconnecting conductive scaffold with larger surface roughness, facilitating microbial colonization and electron transfer from exoelectrogens to the anode. The mediator-less MFC equipped with PPy/NFs/PET anode achieves a remarkable maximum power density of 2420 mW m(-2) with Escherichia coli as the microbial catalyst at the current density of 5500 mA m(-2), which is approximately 17 times higher compared to a reference anode PPy/PET (144 mW m(-2)). Considering the low cost, low weight, facile fabrication, and good winding, this PPy/NFs/PET textile anode promises a great potential for high-performance and cost-effective MFCs in a large scale.

  13. Copper anode corrosion affects power generation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping

    2013-07-16

    Non-corrosive, carbon-based materials are usually used as anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In some cases, however, metals have been used that can corrode (e.g. copper) or that are corrosion resistant (e.g. stainless steel, SS). Corrosion could increase current through galvanic (abiotic) current production or by increasing exposed surface area, or decrease current due to generation of toxic products from corrosion. In order to directly examine the effects of using corrodible metal anodes, MFCs with Cu were compared with reactors using SS and carbon cloth anodes. MFCs with Cu anodes initially showed high current generation similar to abiotic controls, but subsequently they produced little power (2 mW m-2). Higher power was produced with microbes using SS (12 mW m-2) or carbon cloth (880 mW m-2) anodes, with no power generated by abiotic controls. These results demonstrate that copper is an unsuitable anode material, due to corrosion and likely copper toxicity to microorganisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Bimetallic Nickel/Ruthenium Catalysts Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition for Low-Temperature Direct Methanol Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heonjae; Kim, Jun Woo; Park, Joonsuk; An, Jihwan; Lee, Tonghun; Prinz, Fritz B; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2016-11-09

    Nickel and ruthenium bimetallic catalysts were heterogeneously synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD) for use as the anode of direct methanol solid oxide fuel cells (DMSOFCs) operating in a low-temperature range. The presence of highly dispersed ALD Ru islands over a porous Ni mesh was confirmed, and the Ni/ALD Ru anode microstructure was observed. Fuel cell tests were conducted using Ni-only and Ni/ALD Ru anodes with approximately 350 μm thick gadolinium-doped ceria electrolytes and platinum cathodes. The performance of fuel cells was assessed using pure methanol at operating temperatures of 300-400 °C. Micromorphological changes of the anode after cell operation were investigated, and the content of adsorbed carbon on the anode side of the operated samples was measured. The difference in the maximum power density between samples utilizing Ni/ALD Ru and Pt/ALD Ru, the latter being the best catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells, was observed to be less than 7% at 300 °C and 30% at 350 °C. The improved electrochemical activity of the Ni/ALD Ru anode compared to that of the Ni-only anode, along with the reduction of the number of catalytically active sites due to agglomeration of Ni and carbon formation on the Ni surface as compared to Pt, explains this decent performance.

  15. Temperature dependence of CO desorption kinetics at a novel Pt-on-Au/C PEM fuel cell anode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitois, A.; Pilenga, A.; Pfrang, A.

    2010-01-01

    techniques. The temperature dependence of the CO desorption process on this system has been investigated using isotopic exchange experiments. The CO desorption kinetics have been studied as a function of temperature and flow rate. Desorption rate constants have been measured for a temperature range between......A Pt-on-Au/C fuel cell anode catalyst has been obtained by electrochemical deposition of platinum on carbon-supported gold nanoparticles. Its composition, structure and nanoparticle size distribution have been characterised before and after the desorption experiments using microstructural......-modified catalysts, the interactions between underlayer and overlayer materials are worthy of consideration, since they can significantly modify the intrinsic properties of the active sites. The kinetics of the CO desorption process have been discussed with regard to the CO tolerance issue at the PEM fuel cell anode....

  16. Structured Ni catalysts on porous anodic alumina membranes for methane dry reforming: NiAl 2 O 4 formation and characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2015-06-29

    This communication presents the successful design of a structured catalyst based on porous anodic alumina membranes for methane dry reforming. The catalyst with a strong Ni-NiAl2O4 interaction shows both excellent activity and stability. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. A direct borohydride fuel cell with a polymer fiber membrane and non-noble metal catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Yongning; Li, Sai; Wei, Xiaozhu; Wang, Li; Chen, Yuanzhen

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) and Pt-based catalysts are two crucial components which determine the properties and price of fuel cells. Even though, PEM faces problem of fuel crossover in liquid fuel cells such as direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), which lowers power output greatly. Here, we report a DBFC in which a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) was used, and metal oxides, such as LaNiO₃ and MnO₂, were used as cathode catalysts, meanwhile CoO was used as anode catalyst. Peak power density of 663 mW·cm⁻² has been achieved at 65°C, which increases by a factor of 1.7-3.7 compared with classic DBFCs. This fuel cell structure can also be extended to other liquid fuel cells, such as DMFC.

  18. A direct borohydride fuel cell with a polymer fiber membrane and non-noble metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Yongning; Li, Sai; Wei, Xiaozhu; Wang, Li; Chen, Yuanzhen

    2012-08-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) and Pt-based catalysts are two crucial components which determine the properties and price of fuel cells. Even though, PEM faces problem of fuel crossover in liquid fuel cells such as direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), which lowers power output greatly. Here, we report a DBFC in which a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) was used, and metal oxides, such as LaNiO3 and MnO2, were used as cathode catalysts, meanwhile CoO was used as anode catalyst. Peak power density of 663 mW.cm-2 has been achieved at 65°C, which increases by a factor of 1.7-3.7 compared with classic DBFCs. This fuel cell structure can also be extended to other liquid fuel cells, such as DMFC.

  19. A direct borohydride fuel cell with a polymer fiber membrane and non-noble metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Yongning; Li, Sai; Wei, Xiaozhu; Wang, Li; Chen, Yuanzhen

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) and Pt-based catalysts are two crucial components which determine the properties and price of fuel cells. Even though, PEM faces problem of fuel crossover in liquid fuel cells such as direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), which lowers power output greatly. Here, we report a DBFC in which a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) was used, and metal oxides, such as LaNiO3 and MnO2, were used as cathode catalysts, meanwhile CoO was used as anode catalyst. Peak power density of 663 mW·cm−2 has been achieved at 65°C, which increases by a factor of 1.7–3.7 compared with classic DBFCs. This fuel cell structure can also be extended to other liquid fuel cells, such as DMFC. PMID:22880160

  20. Anode partial flooding modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Model development and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Lei; Du, Shangfeng; Chen, Rui; Mamlouk, Mohamed; Scott, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional along-the-channel CFD (computational fluid dynamic) model, coupled with a two-phase flow model of liquid water and gas transport for a PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell is described. The model considers non-isothermal operation and thus the non-uniform temperature distribution in the cell structure. Water phase-transfer between the vapour, liquid water and dissolved phase is modelled with the combinational transport mechanism through the membrane. Liquid water saturation is simulated inside the electrodes and channels at both the anode and cathode sides. Three types of models are compared for the HOR (hydrogen oxidation reaction) and ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) in catalyst layers, including Butler–Volmer (B–V), liquid water saturation corrected B–V and agglomerate mechanisms. Temperature changes in MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and channels due to electrochemical reaction, ohmic resistance and water phase-transfer are analysed as a function of current density. Nonlinear relations of liquid water saturations with respect to current densities at both the anode and cathode are regressed. At low and high current densities, liquid water saturation at the anode linearly increases as a consequence of the linear increase of liquid water saturation at the cathode. In contrast, exponential relation is found to be more accurate at medium current densities. - Highlights: • A fully coupled 2D, along-the-channel, two-phase flow, non-isothermal, CFD model is developed. • Temperature rise due to electrochemical reactions, ohmic resistance and water phase-transfer is analysed. • Mathematical expressions of liquid water saturation against current density at anode and cathode are regressed. • Relationship between the liquid water saturation at anode and cathode is built.

  1. Enhanced heat transfer with corrugated flow channel in anode side of direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidary, H.; Abbassi, A.; Kermani, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of corrugated flow channel on the heat exchange of DMFC is studied. • Corrugated boundary (except rectangular type) increase heat transfer up to 90%. • Average heat transfer in rectangular-corrugated boundary is less than straight one. • In Re > 60, wavy shape boundary has highest heat transfer. • In Re < 60, triangular shape boundary has highest heat transfer. - Abstract: In this paper, heat transfer and flow field analysis in anode side of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is numerically studied. To enhance the heat exchange between bottom cold wall and core flow, bottom wall of fluid delivery channel is considered as corrugated boundary instead of straight (flat) one. Four different shapes of corrugated boundary are recommended here: rectangular shape, trapezoidal shape, triangular shape and wavy (sinusoidal) shape. The top wall of the channel (catalyst layer boundary) is taken as hot boundary, because reaction occurs in catalyst layer and the bottom wall of the channel is considered as cold boundary due to coolant existence. The governing equations are numerically solved in the domain by the control volume approach based on the SIMPLE technique (1972). A wide spectrum of numerical studies is performed over a range of various shape boundaries, Reynolds number, triangle block number, and the triangle block amplitude. The performed parametric studies show that corrugated channel with trapezoidal, triangular and wavy shape enhances the heat exchange up to 90%. With these boundaries, cooling purpose of reacting flow in anode side of DMFCs would be better than straight one. Also, from the analogy between the heat and mass transfer problems, it is expected that the consumption of reacting species within the catalyst layer of DMFCs enhance. The present work provides helpful guidelines to the bipolar plate manufacturers of DMFCs to considerably enhance heat transfer and performance of the anode side of DMFC

  2. PtM/C (M = Sn, Ru, Pd, W) based anode direct ethanol-PEMFCs: Structural characteristics and cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiakaras, P.E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece)

    2007-09-19

    In the present work, the role of the structural characteristics of Pt-based catalysts on the single direct ethanol proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance is examined. Several PtM/C (M = Sn, Ru, Pd, W) catalysts were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) and then evaluated as anode catalysts in single direct ethanol fuel cells. XRD spectra showed that Pt lattice parameter decreases with the addition of Ru or Pd and increases with the addition of Sn or W. According to the obtained experimental results, PtSn catalysts presented better electrocatalytic activity towards ethanol electro-oxidation. Based on these results, PtSn/C catalysts with different Pt/Sn atomic ratio were tested and compared. The maximum power density values obtained were correlated with the structural characteristics of the catalysts. A volcano type behaviour between the fuel cell maximum power density and the corresponding atomic percentage of Sn (Sn%) was observed. It was also observed that Sn% affects almost linearly the Pt{sub x}Sn{sub y} catalysts' lattice parameter. (author)

  3. A review of liquid metal anode solid oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIYA TOLEUOVA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC variant that uses liquid metal electrodes (anodes with the advantage of greater fuel tolerance and the ability to operate on solid fuel. Key features of the approach are discussed along with the technological and research challenges that need to be overcome for scale-up and commercialisation.

  4. Nano-Engineered Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Nosang; Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Wiberg, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Nano-engineered catalysts, and a method of fabricating them, have been developed in a continuing effort to improve the performances of direct methanol fuel cells as candidate power sources to supplant primary and secondary batteries in a variety of portable electronic products. In order to realize the potential for high energy densities (as much as 1.5 W h/g) of direct methanol fuel cells, it will be necessary to optimize the chemical compositions and geometric configurations of catalyst layers and electrode structures. High performance can be achieved when catalyst particles and electrode structures have the necessary small feature sizes (typically of the order of nanometers), large surface areas, optimal metal compositions, high porosity, and hydrophobicity. The present method involves electrodeposition of one or more catalytic metal(s) or a catalytic-metal/polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite on an alumina nanotemplate. The alumina nanotemplate is then dissolved, leaving the desired metal or metal/polytetrafluoroethylene-composite catalyst layer. Unlike some prior methods of making fine metal catalysts, this method does not involve processing at elevated temperature; all processing can be done at room temperature. In addition, this method involves fewer steps and is more amenable to scaling up for mass production. Alumina nanotemplates are porous alumina membranes that have been fabricated, variously, by anodizing either pure aluminum or aluminum that has been deposited on silicon by electronbeam evaporation. The diameters of the pores (7 to 300 nm), areal densities of pores (as much as 7 x 10(exp 10)sq cm), and lengths of pores (up to about 100 nm) can be tailored by selection of fabrication conditions. In a given case, the catalytic metal, catalytic metal alloy, or catalytic metal/ polytetrafluoroethylene composite is electrodeposited in the pores of the alumina nanotemplate. The dimensions of the pores, together with the electrodeposition conditions

  5. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Luo, Jin; Fang, Bin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Njoki, Peter N.; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Yin, Jun

    2010-02-01

    One of the most important challenges for the ultimate commercialization of fuel cells is the preparation of active, robust, and low-cost catalysts. This review highlights some findings of our investigations in the last few years in developing advanced approaches to nanostructured catalysts that address this challenge. Emphasis is placed on nanoengineering-based fabrication, processing, and characterization of multimetallic nanoparticles with controllable size (1-10 nm), shape, composition (e.g. MlnM2100-n, M1nM2mM3100-n-m, M1@M2, where M (1 or 2) = Pt, Co, Ni, V, Fe, Cu, Pd, W, Ag, Au etc) and morphology (e.g. alloy, core@shell etc). In addition to an overview of the fundamental issues and the recent progress in fuel cell catalysts, results from evaluations of the electrocatalytic performance of nanoengineered catalysts in fuel cell reactions are discussed. This approach differs from other traditional approaches to the preparation of supported catalysts in the ability to control the particle size, composition, phase, and surface properties. An understanding of how the nanoscale properties of the multimetallic nanoparticles differ from their bulk-scale counterparts, and how the interaction between the nanoparticles and the support materials relates to the size sintering or evolution in the thermal activation process, is also discussed. The fact that the bimetallic gold-platinum nanoparticle system displays a single-phase character different from the miscibility gap known for its bulk-scale counterpart serves as an important indication of the nanoscale manipulation of the structural properties, which is useful for refining the design and preparation of the bimetallic catalysts. The insight gained from probing how nanoparticle-nanoparticle and nanoparticle-substrate interactions relate to the size evolution in the activation process of nanoparticles on planar substrates serves as an important guiding principle in the control of nanoparticle sintering on different

  6. Electrocatalyst for alcohol oxidation at fuel cell anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav [East Setauket, NY; Kowal, Andrzej [Cracow, PL

    2011-11-02

    In some embodiments a ternary electrocatalyst is provided. The electrocatalyst can be used in an anode for oxidizing alcohol in a fuel cell. In some embodiments, the ternary electrocatalyst may include a noble metal particle having a surface decorated with clusters of SnO.sub.2 and Rh. The noble metal particles may include platinum, palladium, ruthenium, iridium, gold, and combinations thereof. In some embodiments, the ternary electrocatalyst includes SnO.sub.2 particles having a surface decorated with clusters of a noble metal and Rh. Some ternary electrocatalysts include noble metal particles with clusters of SnO.sub.2 and Rh at their surfaces. In some embodiments the electrocatalyst particle cores are nanoparticles. Some embodiments of the invention provide a fuel cell including an anode incorporating the ternary electrocatalyst. In some aspects a method of using ternary electrocatalysts of Pt, Rh, and SnO.sub.2 to oxidize an alcohol in a fuel cell is described.

  7. Task 1: Modeling Study of CO Effects on Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Anodes Task 2: Study of Ac Impedance as Membrane/Electrode Manufacturing Diagnostic Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Springer

    1998-01-30

    Carbon monoxide poisoning of polymer electrolyte fuel cell anodes is a key problem to be overcome when operating a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) on reformed fuels. CO adsorbs preferentially on the precious metal surface leading to substantial performance losses. Some recent work has explored this problem, primarily using various Pt alloys in attempts to lower the degree of surface deactivation. In their studies of hydrogen oxidation on Pt and Pt alloy (Pt/Sn, Pt/Ru) rotating disk electrodes exposed to H{sub 2}/CO mixtures, Gasteiger et al. showed that a small hydrogen oxidation current is observed well before the onset of major CO oxidative stripping (ca. 0.4 V) on Pt/Ru. However, these workers concluded that such current observed at low anode overpotentials was too low to be of practical value. Nonetheless, MST-11 researchers and others have found experimentally that it is possible to run a PEFC, e.g., with a Pt/Ru anode, in the presence of CO levels in the range 10--100 ppm with little voltage loss. Such experimental results suggest that, in fact, PEFC operation at significant current densities under low anode overpotentials is possible in the presence of such levels of CO, even before resorting to air bleeding into the anode feed stream. The latter approach has been shown to be effective in elimination of Pt anode catalyst poisoning effects at CO levels of 20--50 ppm for cells operating at 80 C with low Pt catalyst loading. The effect of oxygen bleeding is basically to lower P{sub CO} down to extremely low levels in the anode plenum thanks to the catalytic (chemical) oxidation of CO by dioxygen at the anode catalyst. In this modeling work the authors do not include specific description of oxygen bleeding effects and concentrate on the behavior of the anode with feed streams of H{sub 2} or reformate containing low levels of CO. The anode loss is treated in this work as a hydrogen and carbon monoxide electrode kinetics problem, but includes the effects of

  8. Influence of carbon anode properties on performance and microbiome of Microbial Electrolysis Cells operated on urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbosa, Sónia G.; Peixoto, Luciana; Soares, Olívia S.G.P.; Pereira, Manuel Fernando R.; Heijne, Annemiek Ter; Kuntke, Philipp; Alves, Maria Madalena; Pereira, Maria Alcina

    2018-01-01

    Anode performance of Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) fed with urine using different anodes, Keynol (phenolic-based), C-Tex (cellulose-based) and PAN (polyacrylonitrile-based) was compared under cell potential control (1st assay) and anode potential control (2nd assay). In both assays, C-Tex MEC

  9. Microstructural evolution of nanograin nickel-zirconia cermet anode materials for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, Bibhuti Bhusan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to study the structure, microstructure, porosity, thermal expansion, electrical conductivity and electrochemical behavior of the anode material thus synthesized in order to find its suitability for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode application

  10. Enhancing substrate utilization and power production of a microbial fuel cell with nitrogen-doped carbon aerogel as cathode catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Gábor Márk; Lóránt, Bálint; Lóka, Máté; Nagy, Balázs; László, Krisztina

    2017-07-01

    Catalytic efficiency of a nitrogen-doped, mesoporous carbon aerogel cathode catalyst was investigated in a two-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC) applying graphite felt as base material for cathode and anode, utilizing peptone as carbon source. This mesoporous carbon aerogel containing catalyst layer on the cathode increased the maximum power density normalized to the anode volume to 2.7 times higher compared to the maximum power density obtained applying graphite felt cathode without the catalyst layer. At high (2 and 3) cathode/anode volume ratios, maximum power density exceeded 40 W m -3 . At the same time, current density and specific substrate utilization rate increased by 58% resulting in 31.9 A m -3 and 18.8 g COD m -3  h -1 , respectively (normalized to anode volume). Besides the increase of the power and the rate of biodegradation, the investigated catalyst decreased the internal resistance from the range of 450-600 to 350-370 Ω. Although Pt/C catalyst proved to be more efficient, a considerable decrease in the material costs might be achieved by substituting it with nitrogen-doped carbon aerogel in MFCs. Such cathode still displays enhanced catalytic effect.

  11. A durable PtRu/C catalyst with a thin protective layer for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Yuzuru; Hayasaka, Sho; Koyama, Tsubasa; Nagao, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Konno, Mikio

    2010-11-15

    A methanol oxidation catalyst with improved durability in acidic environments is reported. The catalyst consists of PtRu alloy nanoparticles on a carbon support that were stabilized with a silane-coupling agent. The catalyst was prepared by reducing ions of Pt and Ru in the presence of a carbon support and the silane-coupling agent. The careful choice of preparatory conditions such as the concentration of the silane-coupling agent and solution pH resulted in the preparation of catalyst in which the PtRu nanoparticles were dispersively adsorbed onto the carbon support. The catalytic activity was similar to that of a commercial catalyst and was unchanged after immersion in sulfuric acid solution for 1000 h, suggesting the high durability of the PtRu catalyst for the anode of direct methanol fuel cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Galvanic Cells: Anodes, Cathodes, Signs and Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemistry is a difficult subject for students at school and beyond and even for their teachers. This article explores the difficult "truth" that, when a current flows from a galvanic cell, positive ions within the cell electrolyte move towards the electrode labelled positive. This seems to contravene the basic rule that like charges repel…

  13. Electrochemical Partial Reforming of Ethanol into Ethyl Acetate Using Ultrathin Co3O4 Nanosheets as a Highly Selective Anode Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Qin, Qing; Zhao, Xiaojing; Xu, Chaofa; Hu, Chengyi; Mo, Shiguang; Wang, Yu Olivia; Lin, Shuichao; Tang, Zichao; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-08-24

    Electrochemical partial reforming of organics provides an alternative strategy to produce valuable organic compounds while generating H2 under mild conditions. In this work, highly selective electrochemical reforming of ethanol into ethyl acetate is successfully achieved by using ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets with exposed (111) facets as an anode catalyst. Those nanosheets were synthesized by a one-pot, templateless hydrothermal method with the use of ammonia. NH3 was demonstrated critical to the overall formation of ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets. With abundant active sites on Co3O4 (111), the as-synthesized ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activities toward water and ethanol oxidations in alkaline media. More importantly, over the Co3O4 nanosheets, the electrooxidation from ethanol to ethyl acetate was so selective that no other oxidation products were yielded. With such a high selectivity, an electrolyzer cell using Co3O4 nanosheets as the anode electrocatalyst and Ni-Mo nanopowders as the cathode electrocatalyst has been successfully built for ethanol reforming. The electrolyzer cell was readily driven by a 1.5 V battery to achieve the effective production of both H2 and ethyl acetate. After the bulk electrolysis, about 95% of ethanol was electrochemically reformed into ethyl acetate. This work opens up new opportunities in designing a material system for building unique devices to generate both hydrogen and high-value organics at room temperature by utilizing electric energy from renewable sources.

  14. Activity of platinum/carbon and palladium/carbon catalysts promoted by Ni2 P in direct ethanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqiang; Feng, Ligang; Chang, Jinfa; Wickman, Björn; Grönbeck, Henrik; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol is an alternative fuel for direct alcohol fuel cells, in which the electrode materials are commonly based on Pt or Pd. Owing to the excellent promotion effect of Ni2 P that was found in methanol oxidation, we extended the catalyst system of Pt or Pd modified by Ni2 P in direct ethanol fuel cells. The Ni2 P-promoted catalysts were compared to commercial catalysts as well as to reference catalysts promoted with only Ni or only P. Among the studied catalysts, Pt/C and Pd/C modified by Ni2 P (30 wt %) showed both the highest activity and stability. Upon integration into the anode of a homemade direct ethanol fuel cell, the Pt-Ni2 P/C-30 % catalyst showed a maximum power density of 21 mW cm(-2) , which is approximately two times higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The Pd-Ni2 P/C-30 % catalyst exhibited a maximum power density of 90 mW cm(-2) . This is approximately 1.5 times higher than that of a commercial Pd/C catalyst. The discharge stability on both two catalysts was also greatly improved over a 12 h discharge operation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Analysis of the behavior and degradation in proton exchange membrane fuel cells with a dead-ended anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianliang; Jiang, Zuwei; Hou, Ming; Liang, Dong; Xiao, Yu; Dou, Meiling; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2014-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with a dead-ended anode (DEA) can obtain high hydrogen utilization by a comparatively simple system. Nevertheless, the accumulation of the nitrogen and the water in the anode channels can lead to a local fuel starvation, which degrades the performance and durability of PEMFCs. In this paper, the behaviors of PEMFCs with a DEA are explored experimentally by detecting the current distribution and the local potentials. The results indicate that the current distribution is uneven during the DEA operation. The local current firstly decreases at the region near the anode outlet, and then extends to the inlet region along the channels with time. The complete fuel starvation near the anode outlet leads to a high local potential and carbon corrosion on the cathode side. The SEM images of the cathode electrode reveal that the significant thickness reduction and the collapse of the electrode's porous structure happen in the cathode catalyst layer, leading to the irreversible decline of the performance. The comparison of the experiments with different oxidants and fuels reveals that the nitrogen crossover from cathode to anode is the dominant factor on the performance decline under the DEA operations.

  16. Pt and PtRu catalyst bilayers increase efficiencies for ethanol oxidation in proton exchange membrane electrolysis and fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarawneh, Rakan M.; Pickup, Peter G.

    2017-10-01

    Polarization curves, product distributions, and reaction stoichiometries have been measured for the oxidation of ethanol at anodes consisting of Pt and PtRu bilayers and a homogeneous mixture of the two catalysts. These anode structures all show synergies between the two catalysts that can be attributed to the oxidation of acetaldehyde produced at the PtRu catalyst by the Pt catalyst. The use of a PtRu layer over a Pt layer produces the strongest effect, with higher currents than a Pt on PtRu bilayer, mixed layer, or either catalyst alone, except for Pt at high potentials. Reaction stoichiometries (average number of electrons transferred per ethanol molecule) were closer to the values for Pt alone for both of the bilayer configurations but much lower for PtRu and mixed anodes. Although Pt alone would provide the highest overall fuel cell efficiency at low power densities, the PtRu on Pt bilayer would provide higher power densities without a significant loss of efficiency. The origin of the synergy between the Pt and PtRu catalysts was elucidated by separation of the total current into the individual components for generation of carbon dioxide and the acetaldehyde and acetic acid byproducts.

  17. Fuel Cell Stations Automate Processes, Catalyst Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Glenn Research Center looks for ways to improve fuel cells, which are an important source of power for space missions, as well as the equipment used to test fuel cells. With Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Glenn, Lynntech Inc., of College Station, Texas, addressed a major limitation of fuel cell testing equipment. Five years later, the company obtained a patent and provided the equipment to the commercial world. Now offered through TesSol Inc., of Battle Ground, Washington, the technology is used for fuel cell work, catalyst testing, sensor testing, gas blending, and other applications. It can be found at universities, national laboratories, and businesses around the world.

  18. A membraneless microscale fuel cell using non-noble catalysts in alkaline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Woosuk; Choi, Jin-Woo

    This paper presents the development of a novel liquid-based microscale fuel cell using non-noble catalysts in an alkaline solution. The developed fuel cell is based on a membraneless structure. The operational complications of a proton exchange membrane lead the development of a fuel cell with the membraneless structure. Non-noble metals with relatively mild catalytic activity, nickel hydroxide and silver oxide, were employed as anode and cathode catalysts to minimize the effect of cross-reactions with the membraneless structure. Along with nickel hydroxide and silver oxide, methanol and hydrogen peroxide were used as a fuel at anode and an oxidant at cathode. With a fuel mixture flow rate of 200 μl min -1, a maximum output power density of 28.73 μW cm -2 was achieved. The developed fuel cell features no proton exchange membrane, inexpensive catalysts, and simple planar structure, which enables high design flexibility and easy integration of the microscale fuel cell into actual microfluidic systems and portable applications.

  19. Methane steam reforming kinetics over Ni-YSZ anode materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, David

    of internal reforming has to be carefully controlled. The objective of this thesis is to make such a careful control possible by examining the rate of internal steam reforming in SOFCs. The catalytic steam reforming activity of Ni-YSZ anode material was tested both in a packed bed reactor to determine...... energy. The overall efficiency of a fuel cell system operating on natural gas can be significantly improved by having part of the steam reforming take place inside the SOFC stack. In order to avoid large temperature gradients as a result of the highly endothermal steam reforming reaction, the amount...... accurately predict the steam reforming rate in a stack from the rate expression obtained from the packed bed experiments. During the experiments a previously unreported long term dynamic behavior of the catalyst was observed. After startup, the initial high reactivity was slowly reduced by a factor 5-10 over...

  20. Non-noble metal fuel cell catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhongwei; Zhang, Jiujun

    2014-01-01

    Written and edited by a group of top scientists and engineers in the field of fuel cell catalysts from both industry and academia, this book provides a complete overview of this hot topic. It covers the synthesis, characterization, activity validation and modeling of different non-noble metal and metalfree electrocatalysts for the reduction of oxygen, as well as their integration into acid or alkaline polymer exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and their performance validation, while also discussing those factors that will drive fuel cell commercialization. With its well-structured app

  1. Effects of anode flooding on the performance degradation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mansu; Jung, Namgee; Eom, KwangSup; Yoo, Sung Jong; Kim, Jin Young; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Hong, Bo Ki; Cho, EunAe

    2014-11-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stacks in a fuel cell vehicle can be inevitably exposed to harsh environments such as cold weather in winter, causing water flooding by the direct flow of condensed water to the electrodes. In this study, anode flooding was experimentally investigated with condensed water generated by cooling the anode gas line during a long-term operation (∼1600 h). The results showed that the performance of the PEMFC was considerably degraded. After the long-term experiment, the thickness of the anode decreased, and the ratio of Pt to carbon in the anode increased. Moreover, repeated fuel starvation of the half-cell severely oxidized the carbon surface due to the high induced potential (>1.5 VRHE). The cyclic voltammogram of the anode in the half-cell experiments indicated that the characteristic feature of the oxidized carbon surface was similar to that of the anode in the single cell under anode flooding conditions during the long-term experiment. Therefore, repeated fuel starvation by anode flooding caused severe carbon corrosion in the anode because the electrode potential locally increased to >1.0 VRHE. Consequently, the density of the tri-phase boundary decreased due to the corrosion of carbons supporting the Pt nanoparticles in the anode.

  2. Metal/ceria water-gas shift catalysts for automotive polymer electrolyte fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D. J.; Krebs, J. F.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    2002-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems are a leading candidate for replacing the internal combustion engine in light duty vehicles. One method of generating the hydrogen necessary for the PEFC is reforming a liquid fuel, such as methanol or gasoline, via partial oxidation, steam reforming, or autothermal reforming (a combination of partial oxidation and steam reforming). The H(sub 2)-rich reformate can contain as much as 10% carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide has been shown to poison the platinum-based anode catalyst at concentrations as low as 10 ppm,1 necessitating removal of CO to this level before passing the reformate to the fuel cell stack. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, CO+ H(sub 2)O(rightleftharpoons) CO(sub 2)+ H(sub 2), is used to convert the bulk of the reformate CO to CO(sub 2). Industrially, the WGS reaction is conducted over two catalysts, which operate in different temperature regimes. One catalyst is a FeCr mixed oxide, which operates at 350-450 C and is termed the high-temperature shift (HTS) catalyst. The second catalyst is a CuZn mixed oxide, which operates at 200-250 C and is termed the low-temperature shift (LTS) catalyst. Although these two catalysts are used industrially in the production of H(sub 2) for ammonia synthesis, they have major drawbacks that make them unsuitable for transportation applications. Both the LTS and the HTS catalysts must first be ''activated'' before being used. For example, the copper in the copper oxide/zinc oxide LTS catalyst must first be reduced to elemental copper in situ before it becomes active for the WGS reaction. This reduction reaction is exothermic and must be carried out under well- controlled conditions using a dilute hydrogen stream (1 vol% H(sub 2)) to prevent high catalyst temperatures, which can result in sintering (agglomeration) of the copper particles and loss of active surface area for the WGS reaction. Also, once the catalyst has been activated by reduction, it must be protected from

  3. Spontaneous oscillations of cell voltage, power density, and anode exit CO concentration in a PEM fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Rihko-Struckmann, Liisa; Sundmacher, Kai

    2011-10-28

    The spontaneous oscillations of the cell voltage and output power density of a PEMFC (with PtRu/C anode) using CO-containing H(2) streams as anodic fuels have been observed during galvanostatic operating. It is ascribed to the dynamic coupling of the CO adsorption (poisoning) and the electrochemical CO oxidation (reactivating) processes in the anode chamber of the single PEMFC. Accompanying the cell voltage and power density oscillations, the discrete CO concentration oscillations at the anode outlet of the PEMFC were also detected, which directly confirms the electrochemical CO oxidation taking place in the anode chamber during galvanostatic operating. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  4. Graphene-supported platinum catalysts for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seselj, Nedjeljko; Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Jingdong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing concerns with non-renewable energy sources drive research and development of sustainable energy technology. Fuel cells have become a central part in solving challenges associated with energy conversion. This review summarizes recent development of catalysts used for fuel cells over...... the past 15 years. It is focused on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells as an environmentally benign and feasible energy source. Graphene is used as a promising support material for Pt catalysts. It ensures high catalyst loading, good electrocatalysis and stability. Attention has been drawn...... in the field. Future perspective is given in a form of Pt-free catalysts, such as microbial fuel cells for long-term development....

  5. An in situ carbonization-replication method to synthesize mesostructured WO3/C composite as nonprecious-metal anode catalyst in PEMFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiangzhi; Hua, Zile; Wei, Chenyang; Shu, Zhu; Zhang, Liangxia; Chen, Hangrong; Shi, Jianlin

    2013-02-01

    A meostructured WO(3)/C composite with crystalline framework and high electric conductivity has been synthesized by a new in situ carbonization-replication route using the block copolymer (poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)) present in situ in the pore channels of mesoporous silica template as carbon source. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetry differential thermal analysis, and N(2) adsorption techniques were adopted for the structural characterization. Cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and single-cell test for hydrogen electrochemical oxidation were adopted to characterize the electrochemical activities of the mesoporous WO(3)/C composite. The carbon content and consequent electric conductivity of these high-surface-area (108-130 m(2) g(-1)) mesostructured WO(3)/C composite materials can be tuned by variation of the duration of heat treatment, and the composites exhibited high and stable electrochemical catalytic activity. The single-cell test results indicated that the mesostructured WO(3)/C composites showed clear electrochemical catalytic activity toward hydrogen oxidation at 25 °C, which makes them potential non-precious-metal anode catalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. The impact of anode acclimation strategy on microbial electrolysis cell treating hydrogen fermentation effluent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Zhang, Ruizhe; Qian, Yawei

    2017-01-01

    The impact of different anode acclimation methods for enhancing hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was investigated in this study. The anodes were first acclimated in microbial fuel cells using acetate, butyrate and corn stalk fermentation effluent (CSFE) as substrate before......). The current density (480 ± 11 A/m3) and hydrogen production rate (4.52 ± 0.13 m3/m3/d) with the anode pre-acclimated with butyrate were also higher that another two reactors. These results demonstrated that the anode biofilm pre-acclimated with butyrate has significant advantages in CSFE treatment and could...

  7. Electrocatalytic activity of carbon-supported catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Varela, F.J. [CINVESTAV-Unidad Saltillo, Coahuila, (Mexico). Grupo de Investigacion en Energia; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie

    2008-07-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) can be fueled with hydrogen, alcohols, hydrocarbons and acetals. Ethanol is an important fuel candidate because it can be electro-oxidized to carbon dioxide on platinum (Pt)-based electrocatalysts in a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) at relatively low temperatures. This study investigated the electrocatalytic activity of some carbon-supported electrocatalysts towards the ethanol oxidation (EOR) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the presence of ethanol. Compared to other anode catalysts such as Pt, PtRu and Pt oxide, anodes based on PtSn alloys have a higher catalytic activity for the EOR. When tested in a DEFC, the current density at 0.4V and 90 degrees C based on a PtSn/C anode and a Pt/C cathode was 2 times higher than that of a cell based on a PtRu/C-Pt/C membrane electrode assembly (MEA) configuration. In addition, cathode catalysts based on Ru/C had good catalytic activity for the ORR and exhibited high selectivity for this reaction in the presence of ethanol. The results showed that in the presence of 0.125, 0.25 or 0.5 M ethanol concentrations, a decrease in onset potential of about 60, 62 and 68 mV emerged, respectively. These values were about 10 times lower than those measured for some Pt-based cathode catalysts tested in this study in the presence of 0.125 M EtOH. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and analysis of platinum-based multiphase catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Jonathan R.

    Platinum-based particles are synthesized via the polyol process in an effort to include various metal oxides in a multi-phase catalyst for the direct ethanol fuel cell anode. Among Eu, In, La and Nb, no single metal oxide with platinum yields open circuit potentials or maximum current densities as high as tin oxide with platinum. For this reason, particles with platinum, tin oxide and the oxide of a third metal were developed. Platinum tin/indium oxide slightly outperforms platinum tin oxide. The particles are characterized by TEM, EDX, XRD and ICP. The metal oxides and the platinum are located together in one particle, uniformly 5.3 nm in diameter. ICP analysis indicates that the catalysts are 20% platinum on carbon and the metals of the oxides are on the order of 1-2% by mass. The catalytic abilities of the particles were evaluated in a single cell direct ethanol fuel cell where polarization curves were taken up to 130°C, and oxidation products were analyzed by gas chromatography. Open circuit voltages of as high as 0.82 V were obtained for platinum tin/indium oxide catalysts and current densities as high as 0.4 A cm-2 were seen. The cells produced large amounts of acetaldehyde and acetic acid, as well as small amounts of methanol and carbon dioxide. A spillover mechanism is proposed for the oxidation of ethanol to CO2 on these platinum/metal oxide catalysts.

  9. Final Report - Durable Catalysts for Fuel Cell Protection during Transient Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasoski, Radoslav [3M Company, St. Paul, MN (United States); van der Vliet, Dennis [3M Company, St. Paul, MN (United States); Cullen, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Atanasoska, Ljiljana [3M Company, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-01-26

    The objective of this project was to develop catalysts that will enable proton exchange membranes (PEM) fuel cell systems to weather the damaging conditions in the fuel cell at voltages beyond the thermodynamic stability of water during the transient periods of start-up/shut-down and fuel starvation. Such catalysts are required to make it possible for the fuel cell to satisfy the 2015 DOE targets for performance and durability. The project addressed a key issue of importance for successful transition of PEM fuel cell technology from development to pre-commercial phase. This issue is the failure of the catalyst and the other thermodynamically unstable membrane electrode assembly (MEA) components during start-up/shut-down and local fuel starvation at the anode, commonly referred to as transient conditions. During these periods the electrodes can reach potentials higher than the usual 1.23V upper limit during normal operation. The most logical way to minimize the damage from such transient events is to minimize the potential seen by the electrodes. At lower positive potentials, increased stability of the catalysts themselves and reduced degradation of the other MEA components is expected.

  10. Cu--Ni--Fe anode for use in aluminum producing electrolytic cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergsma, S. Craig; Brown, Craig W.; Bradford, Donald R; Barnett, Robert J.; Mezner, Michael B.

    2006-07-18

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte, the method comprising the steps of providing a molten salt electrolyte at a temperature of less than 900.degree. C. having alumina dissolved therein in an electrolytic cell having a liner for containing the electrolyte, the liner having a bottom and walls extending upwardly from said bottom. A plurality of non-consumable Cu--Ni--Fe anodes and cathodes are disposed in a vertical direction in the electrolyte, the cathodes having a plate configuration and the anodes having a flat configuration to compliment the cathodes. The anodes contain apertures therethrough to permit flow of electrolyte through the apertures to provide alumina-enriched electrolyte between the anodes and the cathodes. Electrical current is passed through the anodes and through the electrolyte to the cathodes, depositing aluminum at the cathodes and producing gas at the anodes.

  11. An anodic alumina supported Ni-Pt bimetallic plate-type catalysts for multi-reforming of methane, kerosene and ethanol

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2014-05-01

    An anodic alumina supported Ni-Pt bimetallic plate-type catalyst was prepared by a two-step impregnation method. The trace amount 0.08 wt% of Pt doping efficiently suppressed the nickel particle sintering and improved the nickel oxides reducibility. The prepared Ni-Pt catalyst showed excellent performance during steam reforming of methane, kerosene and ethanol under both 3000 h stationary and 500-time daily start-up and shut-down operation modes. Self-activation ability of this catalyst was evidenced, which was considered to be resulted from the hydrogen spillover effect over Ni-Pt alloy. In addition, an integrated combustion-reforming reactor was proposed in this study. However, the sintering of the alumina support is still a critical issue for the industrialization of Ni-Pt catalyst. Copyright © 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pre-coating of LSCM perovskite with metal catalyst for scalable high performance anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Boulfrad, Samir

    2013-07-01

    In this work, a highly scalable technique is proposed as an alternative to the lab-scale impregnation method. LSCM-CGO powders were pre-coated with 5 wt% of Ni from nitrates. After appropriate mixing and adequate heat treatment, coated powders were then dispersed into organic based vehicles to form a screen-printable ink which was deposited and fired to form SOFC anode layers. Electrochemical tests show a considerable enhancement of the pre-coated anode performances under 50 ml/min wet H2 flow with polarization resistance decreased from about 0.60cm2 to 0.38 cm2 at 900 C and from 6.70 cm2 to 1.37 cm2 at 700 C. This is most likely due to the pre-coating process resulting in nano-scaled Ni particles with two typical sizes; from 50 to 200 nm and from 10 to 40 nm. Converging indications suggest that the latter type of particle comes from solid state solution of Ni in LSCM phase under oxidizing conditions and exsolution as nanoparticles under reducing atmospheres. Copyright © 2013, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Solid oxide fuel cells having porous cathodes infiltrated with oxygen-reducing catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meilin; Liu, Ze; Liu, Mingfei; Nie, Lifang; Mebane, David Spencer; Wilson, Lane Curtis; Surdoval, Wayne

    2014-08-12

    Solid-oxide fuel cells include an electrolyte and an anode electrically coupled to a first surface of the electrolyte. A cathode is provided, which is electrically coupled to a second surface of the electrolyte. The cathode includes a porous backbone having a porosity in a range from about 20% to about 70%. The porous backbone contains a mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) of a first material infiltrated with an oxygen-reducing catalyst of a second material different from the first material.

  14. Study on Pt-structured anodic alumina catalysts for catalytic combustion of toluene: Effects of competitive adsorbents and competitive impregnation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Luan, Hongjuan; Li, Tao; Wu, Yongqiang; Ni, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Novel competitive impregnation methods were used to prepare high dispersion Pt-structured anodic alumina catalysts. It is found that competitive adsorbents owning different acidity result in different Pt loading amount and also exert great effects on Pt distribution, particle size and redox ability. The suitable adsorption ability of lactic acid led to its best activity for catalytic combustion of toluene. Co-competitive and pre-competitive impregnation methods were also compared and the mechanisms of two competitive methods were proposed. Co-competitive impregnation made Pt distribute more uniformly through pore channels and resulted in better catalytic activity, because of the weaker spatial constraint effect of lactic acid. Furthermore, the optimized Pt-structured anodic alumina catalyst also showed a good chlorine-resistance under moisture atmosphere, because water could promote the reaction of dichloromethane (DCM) transformation and clean chloride by-products to release more active sites.

  15. Catalyst-free synthesis of Si-SiOx core-shell nanowire anodes for high-rate and high-capacity lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kwan Woo; Lee, Jung-In; Yang, Jieun; Kim, Young-Ki; Jeong, Hu Young; Park, Soojin; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2014-05-14

    Si-SiOx core-shell nanowires (NWs) ranging from 10 to 30 nm in diameter are prepared by a simple evaporation of silicon monoxide and control of substrate temperatures without any catalyst. The Si-SiOx NWs grown at 735 and 955 °C are strongly anchored to the Cu current collector by forming copper silicide at the interface between Si and Cu, and subsequently used as anodes in lithium-ion batteries, in which no binder or conducting materials are used. The Si-SiOx NWs anodes show excellent electrochemical performances in terms of capacity retention and rate capability. In particular, the Si-SiOx NW anode grown at 955 °C shows a reversible capacity of ∼1000 mAh g(-1) even at a high-rate of 50 C. This catalyst-free synthetic route of Si-SiOx NWs that are strongly anchored to the Cu current collector opens up an effective process for fabricating other high-capacity anodes in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs).

  16. Effects of the Molybdenum Oxide/Metal Anode Interfaces on Inverted Polymer Solar Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jiang; Guo Xiao-Yang; Xie Zhi-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Inverted polymer solar cells with molybdenum oxide (MoO 3 ) as an anode buffer layer and different metals (Al or Ag) as anodes are studied. It is found that the inverted cell with a top Ag anode demonstrates enhanced charge collection and higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) compared to the cell with a top Al anode. An 18% increment of PCE is obtained by replacing Al with Ag as the top anode. Further studies show that an interfacial dipole pointing from MoO 3 to Al is formed at MoO 3 /Al interfaces due to electron transfer from Al to MoO 3 while this phenomenon cannot be observed at MoO 3 /Ag interfaces. It is speculated that the electric field at the MoO 3 /Al interface would hinder hole extraction, and hence reduce the short-circuit current

  17. On the degradation of fuel cell catalyst. From model systems to high surface area catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenz, M. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    In the presented work, as an alternative accelerated degradation tests in the form of half-cell measurements combined with identical location transmission electron microscopy (IL-TEM){sup 10,} {sup 11} are presented. It is demonstrated that for different catalysts the degradation mechanism can be scrutinized in detail. Thus this approach enables the systematic investigation of fuel cell catalyst degradation in a reduced period of time. (orig.)

  18. Convergent development of anodic bacterial communities in microbial fuel cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Yates, Matthew D

    2012-05-10

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are often inoculated from a single wastewater source. The extent that the inoculum affects community development or power production is unknown. The stable anodic microbial communities in MFCs were examined using three inocula: a wastewater treatment plant sample known to produce consistent power densities, a second wastewater treatment plant sample, and an anaerobic bog sediment. The bog-inoculated MFCs initially produced higher power densities than the wastewater-inoculated MFCs, but after 20 cycles all MFCs on average converged to similar voltages (470±20 mV) and maximum power densities (590±170 mW m(-2)). The power output from replicate bog-inoculated MFCs was not significantly different, but one wastewater-inoculated MFC (UAJA3 (UAJA, University Area Joint Authority Wastewater Treatment Plant)) produced substantially less power. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling showed a stable exoelectrogenic biofilm community in all samples after 11 cycles. After 16 cycles the predominance of Geobacter spp. in anode communities was identified using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (58±10%), fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) (63±6%) and pyrosequencing (81±4%). While the clone library analysis for the underperforming UAJA3 had a significantly lower percentage of Geobacter spp. sequences (36%), suggesting that a predominance of this microbe was needed for convergent power densities, the lower percentage of this species was not verified by FISH or pyrosequencing analyses. These results show that the predominance of Geobacter spp. in acetate-fed systems was consistent with good MFC performance and independent of the inoculum source.

  19. Ni modified ceramic anodes for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guoliang; Chen, Fanglin

    2016-01-19

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for fabricating a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The method includes synthesizing a composition having a perovskite present therein. The method further includes applying the composition on an electrolyte support to form an anode and applying Ni to the composition on the anode.

  20. Full Ceramic Fuel Cells Based on Strontium Titanate Anodes, An Approach Towards More Robust SOFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtappels, Peter; Irvine, J.T.S.; Iwanschitz, B.

    2013-01-01

    The persistent problems with Ni-YSZ cermet based SOFCs, with respect to redox stability and tolerance towards sulfur has stimulated the development of a full ceramic cell based on strontium titanate(ST)- based anodes and anode support materials, within the EU FCH JU project SCOTAS-SOFC. Three...

  1. Gold nanoparticles: novel catalyst for the preparation of direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuralkar, Mayuri; Ingle, Avinash; Gaikwad, Swapnil; Gade, Aniket; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-04-01

    The authors report the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) using plant pathogenic Phoma glomerata (MTCC 2210). The synthesis of nanoparticles was characterised by visual observation followed UV-visible spectrophotometric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Later, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) was constructed using two chambers (anodic chamber and cathodic chamber). These Au-NPs as catalysts have various advantages over the other catalysts that are used in the DMFC. Most importantly, it is cheaper as compared with other catalysts like platinum, and showed higher catalytic activity because of its effective surface structure. Being nano in size, it provides more surface area for the attachment of reactant molecules (methanol molecules). The DMFC catalysed by Au-NPs are found to be suitable to replace lithium ion battery technology in consumer electronics like cell phones, laptops and so on due to the fact that they can produce a high amount of energy in a small space. As long as fuel and air are supplied to the DMFC, it will continue to produce power, so it does not need to be recharged. The use of Au-NPs as catalyst in DMFC has not been reported in the past; it is reported here the first time.

  2. Corrosion Protection of Al/Au/ZnO Anode for Hybrid Cell Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Gymama; Stevens, Brian

    2015-11-16

    Effective protection of power sources from corrosion is critical in the development of abiotic fuel cells, biofuel cells, hybrid cells and biobateries for implantable bioelectronics. Corrosion of these bioelectronic devices result in device inability to generate bioelectricity. In this paper Al/Au/ZnO was considered as a possible anodic substrate for the development of a hybrid cell. The protective abilities of corrosive resistant aluminum hydroxide and zinc phosphite composite films formed on the surface of Al/Au/ZnO anode in various electrolyte environments were examined by electrochemical methods. The presence of phosphate buffer and physiological saline (NaCl) buffer allows for the formation of aluminum hyrdroxide and zinc phosphite composite films on the surface of the Al/Au/ZnO anode that prevent further corrosion of the anode. The highly protective films formed on the Al/Au/ZnO anode during energy harvesting in a physiological saline environment resulted in 98.5% corrosion protective efficiency, thereby demonstrating that the formation of aluminum hydroxide and zinc phosphite composite films are effective in the prevention of anode corrosion during energy harvesting. A cell assembly consisting of the Al/Au/ZnO anode and platinum cathode resulted in an open circuit voltage of 1.03 V. A maximum power density of 955.3 mW/ cm² in physiological saline buffer at a cell voltage and current density of 345 mV and 2.89 mA/ cm², respectively.

  3. Co-generation of electricity and syngas on proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cell with a perovskite layer as a precursor of a highly efficient reforming catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Tingting; Zhu, Ankang; Guo, Youmin; Wang, Chunchang; Huang, Shouguo; Chen, Huili; Yang, Guangming; Wang, Wei; Shao, Zongping

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a proton conducting solid oxide fuel cell (layered H+-SOFC) is prepared by introducing a La2NiO4perovskite oxide with a Ruddlesden-Popper structure as a catalyst layer onto a conventional NiO + BaZr0.4Ce0.4Y0.2O3-δ (NiO + BZCY4) anode for in situ CO2 dry reforming of methane. The roles of the La2NiO4 catalyst layer on the reforming activity, coking tolerance, electrocatalytic activity and operational stability of the anodes are systematically studied. The La2NiO4 catalyst layer exhibits greater catalytic performance than the NiO + BZCY4 anode during the CO2 dry reforming of methane. An outstanding coking resistance capability is also demonstrated. The layered H+-SOFC consumes H2 produced in situ at the anode and delivers a much higher power output than the conventional cell with the NiO + BZCY4 anode. The improved coking resistance of the layered H+-SOFC results in a steady output voltage of ∼0.6 V under a constant current density of 200 mA cm-2. In summary, the H+-SOFC with La2NiO4 perovskite oxide is a potential energy conversion device for CO2 conversion and utilization with co-generation of electricity and syngas.

  4. Nickel catalysts for internal reforming in molten carbonate fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, R.J.; Berger, R.J.; Doesburg, E.B.M.; Doesburg, E.B.M.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1996-01-01

    Natural gas may be used instead of hydrogen as fuel for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) by steam reforming the natural gas inside the MCFC, using a nickel catalyst (internal reforming). The severe conditions inside the MCFC, however, require that the catalyst has a very high stability. In

  5. Pt-Ni and Pt-Co Catalyst Synthesis Route for Fuel Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdosy, Samad A.; Ravi, Vilupanur A.; Valdez, Thomas I.; Kisor, Adam; Narayan, Sri R.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) at the cathode are the rate-limiting step in fuel cell performance. The ORR is 100 times slower than the corresponding hydrogen oxidation at the anode. Speeding up the reaction at the cathode will improve fuel cell efficiency. The cathode material is generally Pt powder painted onto a substrate (e.g., graphite paper). Recent efforts in the fuel cell area have focused on replacing Pt with Pt-X alloys (where X = Co, Ni, Zr, etc.) in order to (a) reduce cost, and (b) increase ORR rates. One of these strategies is to increase ORR rates by reducing the powder size, which would result in an increase in the surface area, thereby facilitating faster reaction rates. In this work, a process has been developed that creates Pt-Ni or Pt-Co alloys that are finely divided (on the nano scale) and provide equivalent performance at lower Pt loadings. Lower Pt loadings will translate to lower cost. Precursor salts of the metals are dissolved in water and mixed. Next, the salt mixtures are dried on a hot plate. Finally, the dried salt mixture is heattreated in a furnace under flowing reducing gas. The catalyst powder is then used to fabricate a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for electrochemical performance testing. The Pt- Co catalyst-based MEA showed comparable performance to an MEA fabri cated using a standard Pt black fuel cell catalyst. The main objective of this program has been to increase the overall efficiencies of fuel cell systems to support power for manned lunar bases. This work may also have an impact on terrestrial programs, possibly to support the effort to develop a carbon-free energy source. This catalyst can be used to fabricate high-efficiency fuel cell units that can be used in space as regenerative fuel cell systems, and terrestrially as primary fuel cells. Terrestrially, this technology will become increasingly important when transition to a hydrogen economy occurs.

  6. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin Yavari, S., E-mail: s.aminyavari@tudelft.nl [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Chai, Y.C. [Prometheus, Division of Skeletal Tissue Engineering, Bus 813, O& N1, Herestraat 49, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, Bus 813, O& N1, Herestraat 49, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Böttger, A.J. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Wauthle, R. [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Section Production Engineering, Machine Design and Automation (PMA), Celestijnenlaan 300B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); 3D Systems — LayerWise NV, Grauwmeer 14, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schrooten, J. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 — PB2450, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Weinans, H. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Orthopedics and Dept. Rheumatology, UMC Utrecht, Heidelberglaan100, 3584CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Zadpoor, A.A. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-06-01

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20 V anodizing time: 30 min to 3 h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500 °C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55 nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500 °C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium

  7. PEMFC catalyst layers: the role of micropores and mesopores on water sorption and fuel cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboleva, Tatyana; Malek, Kourosh; Xie, Zhong; Navessin, Titichai; Holdcroft, Steven

    2011-06-01

    The effects of carbon microstructure and ionomer loading on water vapor sorption and retention in catalyst layers (CLs) of PEM fuel cells are investigated using dynamic vapor sorption. Catalyst layers based on Ketjen Black and Vulcan XC-72 carbon blacks, which possess distinctly different surface areas, pore volumes, and microporosities, are studied. It is found that pores <20 nm diameter facilitate water uptake by capillary condensation in the intermediate range of relative humidities. A broad pore size distribution (PSD) is found to enhance water retention in Ketjen Black-based CLs whereas the narrower mesoporous PSD of Vulcan CLs is shown to have an enhanced water repelling action. Water vapor sorption and retention properties of CLs are correlated to electrochemical properties and fuel cell performance. Water sorption enhances electrochemical properties such as the electrochemically active surface area (ESA), double layer capacitance and proton conductivity, particularly when the ionomer content is very low. The hydrophilic properties of a CL on the anode and the cathode are adjusted by choosing the PSD of carbon and the ionomer content. It is shown that a reduction of ionomer content on either cathode or anode of an MEA does not necessarily have a significant detrimental effect on the MEA performance compared to the standard 30 wt % ionomer MEA. Under operation in air and high relative humidity, a cathode with a narrow pore size distribution and low ionomer content is shown to be beneficial due to its low water retention properties. In dry operating conditions, adequate ionomer content on the cathode is crucial, whereas it can be reduced on the anode without a significant impact on fuel cell performance. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Performance of lithium alloy/lithium and calcium/lithium anodes in thionyl chloride cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keister, P.; Greenwood, J.M.; Holmes, C.F.; Mead, R.T.

    1985-08-01

    A laminar composite anode construction comprising an inner metal completely surrounded by Li foil was studied as a means of obtaining an end-of-life indicator in a thionyl chloride cell. Inner metals of Ca, 14-2.9 at.% Ca in Li alloys, and 6.7-2.1 at.% Mg in Li alloys were evaluated. Discharge characteristics of cells using these sandwich anodes as well as cells containing the inner anode material alone were determined. It was concluded that cells made with inner anode materials of Ca and Ca/Li alloys containing more than 7 at.% Ca showed promise as a means of obtaining a reliable end-of-life indication. (orig.).

  9. Nanostructured platinum-free electrocatalysts in alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells: catalyst design, principles and applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ozoemena, Kenneth I

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available and anode reactions of ADAFCs. This review is an attempt to find answers to questions such as “Why should I use a particular catalyst for the ADAFC?”, “What are the underlying principles that must inform my choice in designing such a catalyst?”, and “What...

  10. Analysis of Anodes of Microbial Fuel Cells When Carbon Brushes Are Preheated at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The anode electrode is one of the most important components in all microbial electrochemical technologies (METs. Anode materials pretreatment and modification have been shown to be an effective method of improving anode performance. According to mass loss analysis during carbon fiber heating, five temperatures (300, 450, 500, 600, and 750 °C were selected as the pre-heating temperatures of carbon fiber brush anodes. Microbial fuel cell (MFC reactors built up with these pre-heated carbon brush anodes performed with different power densities and Coulombic efficiencies (CEs. Two kinds of measuring methods for power density were applied, and the numerical values of maximum power densities diverged greatly. Reactors with 450 °C anodes, using both methods, had the highest power densities, and the highest CEs were found using 500 °C anode reactors. The surface elements of heat-treated carbon fibers were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS, and C, O, and N were the main constituents of the carbon fiber. There were four forms of N1s at the surface of the polyacrylonitrile (PAN-based carbon fiber, and their concentrations were different at different temperature samples. The microbial community of the anode surface was analyzed, and microbial species on anodes from every sample were similar. The differences in anode performance may be caused by mass loss and by the surface elements. For carbon brush anodes used in MFCs or other BESs, 450–500 °C preheating was the most suitable temperature range in terms of the power densities and CEs.

  11. Altering Anode Thickness To Improve Power Production in Microbial Fuel Cells with Different Electrode Distances

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Yongtae

    2013-01-17

    A better understanding of how anode and separator physical properties affect power production is needed to improve energy and power production by microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Oxygen crossover from the cathode can limit power production by bacteria on the anode when using closely spaced electrodes [separator electrode assembly (SEA)]. Thick graphite fiber brush anodes, as opposed to thin carbon cloth, and separators have previously been examined as methods to reduce the impact of oxygen crossover on power generation. We examined here whether the thickness of the anode could be an important factor in reducing the effect of oxygen crossover on power production, because bacteria deep in the electrode could better maintain anaerobic conditions. Carbon felt anodes with three different thicknesses were examined to see the effects of thicker anodes in two configurations: widely spaced electrodes and SEA. Power increased with anode thickness, with maximum power densities (604 mW/m 2, 0.32 cm; 764 mW/m2, 0.64 cm; and 1048 mW/m2, 1.27 cm), when widely spaced electrodes (4 cm) were used, where oxygen crossover does not affect power generation. Performance improved slightly using thicker anodes in the SEA configuration, but power was lower (maximum of 689 mW/m2) than with widely spaced electrodes, despite a reduction in ohmic resistance to 10 Ω (SEA) from 51-62 Ω (widely spaced electrodes). These results show that thicker anodes can work better than thinner anodes but only when the anodes are not adversely affected by proximity to the cathode. This suggests that reducing oxygen crossover and improving SEA MFC performance will require better separators. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant with an anode recycle loop turbocharger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kazuo; Skiba, Tommy; Patel, Kirtikumar H.

    2016-09-27

    An anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) has a turbocharger turbine (102) secured in fluid communication with a compressed oxidant stream within an oxidant inlet line (218) downstream from a compressed oxidant supply (104), and the anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) also includes a turbocharger compressor (106) mechanically linked to the turbocharger turbine (102) and secured in fluid communication with a flow of anode exhaust passing through an anode exhaust recycle loop (238) of the solid oxide fuel cell power plant (200). All or a portion of compressed oxidant within an oxidant inlet line (218) drives the turbocharger turbine (102) to thereby compress the anode exhaust stream in the recycle loop (238). A high-temperature, automotive-type turbocharger (100) replaces a recycle loop blower-compressor (52).

  13. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant with an anode recycle loop turbocharger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kazuo; Skiba, Tommy; Patel, Kirtikumar H.

    2015-07-14

    An anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) has a turbocharger turbine (102) secured in fluid communication with a compressed oxidant stream within an oxidant inlet line (218) downstream from a compressed oxidant supply (104), and the anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) also includes a turbocharger compressor (106) mechanically linked to the turbocharger turbine (102) and secured in fluid communication with a flow of anode exhaust passing through an anode exhaust recycle loop (238) of the solid oxide fuel cell power plant (200). All or a portion of compressed oxidant within an oxidant inlet line (218) drives the turbocharger turbine (102) to thereby compress the anode exhaust stream in the recycle loop (238). A high-temperature, automotive-type turbocharger (100) replaces a recycle loop blower-compressor (52).

  14. Development of Nanosized/Nanostructured Silicon as Advanced Anodes for Lithium-Ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, James J.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing high energy and high capacity Li-ion cell and battery designs for future exploration missions under the NASA Advanced Space Power System (ASPS) Program. The specific energy goal is 265 Wh/kg at 10 C. center dot Part of effort for NASA advanced Li-ion cells ? Anode: Silicon (Si) as an advanced anode. ? Electrolyte: advanced electrolyte with flame-retardant additives for enhanced performance and safety (NASA JPL).

  15. Highly durable anode supported solid oxide fuel cell with an infiltrated cathode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Alfred Junio; Hjalmarsson, Per; Søgaard, Martin

    2012-01-01

    An anode supported solid oxide fuel cell with an La0.6Sr0.4Co1.05O3_δ (LSC) infiltrated-Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) cathode that shows a stable performance has been developed. The cathode was prepared by screen printing a porous CGO backbone on top of a laminated and co-fired anode supported half cell...

  16. A novel Ni/ceria-based anode for metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek-Wöckner, Veronika A.; Opitz, Alexander K.; Brandner, Marco; Mathé, Jörg; Bram, Martin

    2016-10-01

    For optimization of ageing behavior, electrochemical performance, and sulfur tolerance of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells a new anode concept is introduced, which is based on a Ni/GDC cermet replacing the established Ni/YSZ anodes. In the present work optimized processing parameters compatible with MSC substrates are specified by doing sintering studies on pressed bulk specimen and on real porous anode structures. The electrochemical performance of the Ni/GDC anodes was characterized by means of symmetrical electrolyte supported model-type cells. In this study, three main objectives are pursued. Firstly, the effective technical realization of the Ni/GDC concept is demonstrated. Secondly, the electrochemical behavior of Ni/GDC porous anodes is characterized by impedance spectroscopy and compared with the current standard Ni/YSZ anode. Further, a qualitative comparison of the sulfur poisoning behavior of both anode types is presented. Thirdly, preliminary results of a successful implementation of the Ni/GDC cermet into a metal-supported single cell are presented.

  17. Stimulated-healing of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latsuzbaia, R.; Negro, E.; Koper, G.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Platinum nanoparticles, which are used as catalysts in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC), tend to degrade after long-term operation. We discriminate the following mechanisms of the degradation: poisoning, migration and coalescence, dissolution, and electrochemical Ostwald ripening. There

  18. Effect of Nitrogen Post-Doping on a Commercial Platinum-Ruthenium/Carbon Anode Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-15

    2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Recent advancements in electrocatalysis and improvements in fuel cell components are bringing...relevant electrochemical reactions, including the hydrogen oxida- tion reaction, the methanol oxidation reaction, and the oxygen reduction reaction...17,24e31]. More recently, theoretical DFT work and experimental studies conducted on model supports (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite; HOPG) have

  19. A Membrane-Free Neutral pH Formate Fuel Cell Enabled by a Selective Nickel Sulfide Oxygen Reduction Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bing; Concannon, Nolan M; Milshtein, Jarrod D; Brushett, Fikile R; Surendranath, Yogesh

    2017-06-19

    Polymer electrolyte membranes employed in contemporary fuel cells severely limit device design and restrict catalyst choice, but are essential for preventing short-circuiting reactions at unselective anode and cathode catalysts. Herein, we report that nickel sulfide Ni 3 S 2 is a highly selective catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction in the presence of 1.0 m formate. We combine this selective cathode with a carbon-supported palladium (Pd/C) anode to establish a membrane-free, room-temperature formate fuel cell that operates under benign neutral pH conditions. Proof-of-concept cells display open circuit voltages of approximately 0.7 V and peak power values greater than 1 mW cm -2 , significantly outperforming the identical device employing an unselective platinum (Pt) cathode. The work establishes the power of selective catalysis to enable versatile membrane-free fuel cells. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Enhanced electrical power generation using flame-oxidized stainless steel anode in microbial fuel cells and the anodic community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Ishida, Mitsuyoshi; Asakawa, Shiho; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Harumi; Ogino, Akifumi; Katayose, Yuichi; Hatta, Tamao; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-based materials are commonly used as anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), whereas metal and metal-oxide-based materials are not used frequently because of low electrical output. Stainless steel is a low-cost material with high conductivity and physical strength. In this study, we investigated the power generation using flame-oxidized (FO) stainless steel anodes (SSAs) in single-chambered air-cathode MFCs. The FO-SSA performance was compared to the performance of untreated SSA and carbon cloth anode (CCA), a common carbonaceous electrode. The difference in the anodic community structures was analyzed using high-throughput sequencing of the V4 region in 16S rRNA gene. Flame oxidation of SSA produced raised node-like sites, predominantly consisting of hematite (Fe2O3), on the surface, as determined by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. The flame oxidation enhanced the maximum power density (1063 mW/m(2)) in MFCs, which was 184 and 24 % higher than those for untreated SSA and CCA, respectively. The FO-SSA exhibited 8.75 and 2.71 times higher current production than SSA and CCA, respectively, under potentiostatic testing conditions. Bacteria from the genus Geobacter were detected at a remarkably higher frequency in the biofilm formed on the FO-SSA (8.8-9.2 %) than in the biofilms formed on the SSA and CCA (0.7-1.4 %). Bacterial species closely related to Geobacter metallireducens (>99 % identity in the gene sequence) were predominant (93-96 %) among the genus Geobacter in the FO-SSA biofilm, whereas bacteria with a 100 % identity to G. anodireducens were abundant (>55 %) in the SSA and CCA biofilms. This is the first demonstration of power generation using an FO-SSA in MFCs. Flame oxidation of the SSA enhances electricity production in MFCs, which is higher than that with the common carbonaceous electrode, CCA. The FO-SSA is not only inexpensive but also can be prepared using a simple method. To our knowledge, this study reveals, for the first time, that

  1. Comparative metagenomics of anode-associated microbiomes developed in rice paddy-field microbial fuel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kouzuma

    Full Text Available In sediment-type microbial fuel cells (sMFCs operating in rice paddy fields, rice-root exudates are converted to electricity by anode-associated rhizosphere microbes. Previous studies have shown that members of the family Geobacteraceae are enriched on the anodes of rhizosphere sMFCs. To deepen our understanding of rhizosphere microbes involved in electricity generation in sMFCs, here, we conducted comparative analyses of anode-associated microbiomes in three MFC systems: a rice paddy-field sMFC, and acetate- and glucose-fed MFCs in which pieces of graphite felt that had functioned as anodes in rice paddy-field sMFC were used as rhizosphere microbe-bearing anodes. After electric outputs became stable, microbiomes associated with the anodes of these MFC systems were analyzed by pyrotag sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and Illumina shotgun metagenomics. Pyrotag sequencing showed that Geobacteraceae bacteria were associated with the anodes of all three systems, but the dominant Geobacter species in each MFC were different. Specifically, species closely related to G. metallireducens comprised 90% of the anode Geobacteraceae in the acetate-fed MFC, but were only relatively minor components of the rhizosphere sMFC and glucose-fed MFC, whereas species closely related to G. psychrophilus were abundantly detected. This trend was confirmed by the phylogenetic assignments of predicted genes in shotgun metagenome sequences of the anode microbiomes. Our findings suggest that G. psychrophilus and its related species preferentially grow on the anodes of rhizosphere sMFCs and generate electricity through syntrophic interactions with organisms that excrete electron donors.

  2. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li+Cl–), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li+Cl– catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  3. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Noramalina; Jorge, A Belen; Corà, Furio; Gibbs, Christopher; Jervis, Rhodri; McMillan, Paul F; Wang, Xiaochen; Brett, Daniel J L

    2014-04-03

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li + Cl - ), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li + Cl - catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA.

  4. Studies on PEM fuel cell noble metal catalyst dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. M.; Grahl-Madsen, L.; Skou, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of electrochemical, spectroscopic and gravimetric methods was carried out on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell electrodes with the focus on platinum and ruthenium catalysts dissolution, and the membrane degradation. In cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments, the noble metals were...... found to dissolve in 1 M sulfuric acid solution and the dissolution increased exponentially with the upper potential limit (UPL) between 0.6 and 1.6 vs. RHE. 2-20% of the Pt (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved during the experiments. Under the same conditions, 30-100% of the Ru...... (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved. The faster dissolution of ruthenium compared to platinum in the alloy type catalysts was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. The dissolution of the carbon supported catalyst was found one order of magnitude higher than the unsupported...

  5. Excellent endurance of MWCNT anode in micro-sized Microbial Fuel Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2012-08-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) are a sustainable technology for energy production using bioelectrochemical reactions from bacteria. Microfabrication of micro-sized MFCs allows rapid and precise production of devices that can be integrated into Lab-on-a-chip or other ultra low power devices. We show a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) integrated anode in a biocompatible and high power and current producing device. Long term testing of the MWCNT anode also reveals a high endurance and durable anode material that can be adapted as a long-lasting power source. © 2012 IEEE.

  6. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles as a Catalyst for High-Performance PEM Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Qayyum

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The catalyst layers for polymer-electrolyte-membrane (PEM fuel cells were fabricated by deposition of platinum directly onto the gas diffusion layer using pulsed laser deposition (PLD. This technique reduced the number of steps required to synthesize the catalyst layers and the amount of Pt loading required. PEM fuel cells with various Pt loadings for the cathode were investigated. With a cathode Pt loading of 100 μ g·cm − 2 , the current density of a single cell reached 1205 mA·cm − 2 at 0.6 V, which was close to that of a single cell using an E-TEK (trademark Pt/C electrode with a cathode Pt loading of 400 μ g·cm − 2 . Furthermore, for a PEM fuel cell with both electrodes prepared by PLD and a total anode and cathode Pt loading of 117 μ g·cm − 2 , the overall Pt mass-specific power density at 0.6 V reached 7.43 kW·g − 1 , which was five times that of a fuel cell with E-TEK Pt/C electrodes. The high mass-specific power density was due to that a very thin nanoporous Pt layer was deposited directly onto the gas diffusion layer, which made good contact with the Nafion membrane and thus resulted in a low-resistance membrane electrode assembly.

  7. Studies on PEM Fuel Cell Noble Metal Catalyst Dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Shuang; Skou, Eivind Morten

    Incredibly vast advance has been achieved in fuel cell technology regarding to catalyst efficiency, improvement of electrolyte conductivity and optimization of cell system. With breathtakingly accelerating progress, Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) is the most promising and most widely....... Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) is commonly considered as the heart of cell system [2]. Degradation of the noble metal catalysts in MEAs especially Three-Phase-Boundary (TPB) is a key factor directly influencing fuel cell durability. In this work, electrochemical degradation of Pt and Pt/Ru alloy were...

  8. Organometallic catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Fraser

    1987-01-01

    A continuing effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to improve the competitiveness of the phosphoric acid fuel cell by improving cell performance and/or reducing cell cost is discussed. Cathode improvement, both in performance and cost, available through the use of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts, the tetraazaannulenes (TAAs), was investigated. A new mixed catalyst was identified which provides improved cathode performance without the need for the use of a noble metal. This mixed catalyst was tested under load for 1000 hr. in full cell at 160 to 200 C in phosphoric acid H3PO4, and was shown to provide stable performance. The mixed catalyst contains an organometallic to catalyze electroreduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and a metal to catalyze further electroreduction of the hydrogen peroxide to water. Cathodes containing an exemplar mixed catalyst (e.g., Co bisphenyl TAA/Mn) operate at approximately 650 mV vs DHE in 160 C, 85% H3PO4 with oxygen as reactant. In developing this mixed catalyst, a broad spectrum of TAAs were prepared, tested in half-cell and in a rotating ring-disk electrode system. TAAs found to facilitate the production of hydrogen peroxide in electroreduction were shown to be preferred TAAs for use in the mixed catalyst. Manganese (Mn) was identified as a preferred metal because it is capable of catalyzing hydrogen peroxide electroreduction, is lower in cost and is of less strategic importance than platinum, the cathode catalyst normally used in the fuel cell.

  9. Graphene–sponges as high-performance low-cost anodes for microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing

    2012-01-01

    A high-performance microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode was constructed from inexpensive materials. Key components were a graphene-sponge (G-S) composite and a stainless-steel (SS) current collector. Anode fabrication is simple, scalable, and environmentally friendly, with low energy inputs. The SS current collector improved electrode conductivity and decreased voltage drop and power loss. The resulting G-S-SS composite electrode appears promising for large-scale applications. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Design criteria for stable Pt/C fuel cell catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef C. Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum and Pt alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon are the state of the art electrocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. To develop a better understanding on how material design can influence the degradation processes on the nanoscale, three specific Pt/C catalysts with different structural characteristics were investigated in depth: a conventional Pt/Vulcan catalyst with a particle size of 3–4 nm and two Pt@HGS catalysts with different particle size, 1–2 nm and 3–4 nm. Specifically, Pt@HGS corresponds to platinum nanoparticles incorporated and confined within the pore structure of the nanostructured carbon support, i.e., hollow graphitic spheres (HGS. All three materials are characterized by the same platinum loading, so that the differences in their performance can be correlated to the structural characteristics of each material. The comparison of the activity and stability behavior of the three catalysts, as obtained from thin film rotating disk electrode measurements and identical location electron microscopy, is also extended to commercial materials and used as a basis for a discussion of general fuel cell catalyst design principles. Namely, the effects of particle size, inter-particle distance, certain support characteristics and thermal treatment on the catalyst performance and in particular the catalyst stability are evaluated. Based on our results, a set of design criteria for more stable and active Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C materials is suggested.

  11. Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanotube−Textile Anode for High-Performance Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing

    2011-01-12

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) harness the metabolism of microorganisms, converting chemical energy into electrical energy. Anode performance is an important factor limiting the power density of MFCs for practical application. Improving the anode design is thus important for enhancing the MFC performance, but only a little development has been reported. Here, we describe a biocompatible, highly conductive, two-scale porous anode fabricated from a carbon nanotube-textile (CNT-textile) composite for high-performance MFCs. The macroscale porous structure of the intertwined CNT-textile fibers creates an open 3D space for efficient substrate transport and internal colonization by a diverse microflora, resulting in a 10-fold-larger anolyte-biofilm-anode interfacial area than the projective surface area of the CNT-textile. The conformally coated microscale porous CNT layer displays strong interaction with the microbial biofilm, facilitating electron transfer from exoelectrogens to the CNT-textile anode. An MFC equipped with a CNT-textile anode has a 10-fold-lower charge-transfer resistance and achieves considerably better performance than one equipped with a traditional carbon cloth anode: the maximum current density is 157% higher, the maximum power density is 68% higher, and the energy recovery is 141% greater. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. Biological capacitance studies of anodes in microbial fuel cells using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhihao; Girguis, Peter; Liang, Peng; Shi, Haifeng; Huang, Guangtuan; Cai, Lankun; Zhang, Lehua

    2015-07-01

    It is known that cell potential increases while anode resistance decreases during the start-up of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Biological capacitance, defined as the apparent capacitance attributed to biological activity including biofilm production, plays a role in this phenomenon. In this research, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was employed to study anode capacitance and resistance during the start-up period of MFCs so that the role of biological capacitance was revealed in electricity generation by MFCs. It was observed that the anode capacitance ranged from 3.29 to 120 mF which increased by 16.8% to 18-20 times over 10-12 days. Notably, lowering the temperature and arresting biological activity via fixation by 4% para formaldehyde resulted in the decrease of biological capacitance by 16.9 and 62.6%, indicating a negative correlation between anode capacitance and anode resistance of MFCs. Thus, biological capacitance of anode should play an important role in power generation by MFCs. We suggest that MFCs are not only biological reactors and/or electrochemical cells, but also biological capacitors, extending the vision on mechanism exploration of electron transfer, reactor structure design and electrode materials development of MFCs.

  13. Effects of Fe, Ni, and Fe/Ni metallic nanoparticles on power production and biosurfactant production from used vegetable oil in the anode chamber of a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Vipulanandan, Cumaraswamy

    2017-08-01

    In this study, metallic nanoparticles (Fe, Ni, and Fe/Ni) were used as cathode catalysts to enhance power production and to improve the anode performance of a two-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC). The metallic nanoparticles were rod-shaped and produced by the precipitation/co-precipitation method. A biosurfactant was produced in the anode chamber of the MFC from used vegetable oil by the bacteria Serratia sp. Overall cell voltage, power density, bacterial growth, and biosurfactant production were studied by applying different types of metallic nanoparticles to the cathode electrode. The influence of various types of nanoparticles on the impedance of the MFC was also investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), including analyses of anode impedance, cathode impedance, anode solution resistance, cathode solution resistance, and membrane resistance. The nanoparticles improved MFC performance in the following order: Fe>Ni>Fe/Ni. The addition of 1.5mg/cm 2 Fe nanoparticles to the cathode surface enhanced power production by over 500% to 66.4mW/m 3 , promoted bacterial growth and biosurfactant production in the anode solution by 132.5% and 32.0%, respectively, and reduced anode impedance, cathode impedance, and membrane resistance by 26.8%, 81.6%, and 33.8% to 159.00Ω, 7.69Ω, and 261.09Ω, respectively. For the first time, biosurfacant production in the anode chamber of the MFC was promoted by using the metallic nanoparticles as cathode catalysts. By improving the cathode properties, this study showed a new way to manipulated the performance of the anode chamber of the MFC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Advanced anodes for high-temperature fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, A.; Barnett, S.; Gorte, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    or anode. In terms of mitigating global warming, the ability of the SOFC to use commonly available fuels at high efficiency, promises an effective and early reduction in carbon dioxide emissions, and hence is one of the lead new technologies for improving the environment. Here, we discuss recent...

  15. Electrochemical Impedance Modeling of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, R.; Søgaard, Martin; Ramos, Tania

    2014-01-01

    A simulation package for the impedance response of SOFC anodes is presented here. The model couples the gas transport in gas channels and within a porous electrode with the electrochemical kinetics. The gas phase mass transport is modeled using mass conservation equations. A transmission line mod...

  16. Methane Steam Reforming over an Ni-YSZ Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode in Stack Configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, David; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of catalytic steam reforming of methane over an Ni-YSZ anode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) have been investigated with the cell placed in a stack configuration. In order to decrease the degree of conversion, a single cell stack with reduced area was used. Measurements were...

  17. Effect of Slotted Anode on Gas Bubble Behaviors in Aluminum Reduction Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meijia; Li, Baokuan; Li, Linmin; Wang, Qiang; Peng, Jianping; Wang, Yaowu; Cheung, Sherman C. P.

    2017-12-01

    In the aluminum reduction cells, gas bubbles are generated at the bottom of the anode which eventually reduces the effective current contact area and the system efficiency. To encourage the removal of gas bubbles, slotted anode has been proposed and increasingly adopted by some industrial aluminum reduction cells. Nonetheless, the exact gas bubble removal mechanisms are yet to be fully understood. A three-dimensional (3D) transient, multiphase flow mathematical model coupled with magnetohydrodynamics has been developed to investigate the effect of slotted anode on the gas bubble movement. The Eulerian volume of fluid approach is applied to track the electrolyte (bath)-molten aluminum (metal) interface. Meanwhile, the Lagrangian discrete particle model is employed to handle the dynamics of gas bubbles with considerations of the buoyancy force, drag force, virtual mass force, and pressure gradient force. The gas bubble coalescence process is also taken into account based on the O'Rourke's algorithm. The two-way coupling between discrete bubbles and fluids is achieved by the inter-phase momentum exchange. Numerical predictions are validated against the anode current variation in an industrial test. Comparing the results using slotted anode with the traditional one, the time-averaged gas bubble removal rate increases from 36 to 63 pct; confirming that the slotted anode provides more escaping ways and shortens the trajectories for gas bubbles. Furthermore, the slotted anode also reduces gas bubble's residence time and the probability of coalescence. Moreover, the bubble layer thickness in aluminum cell with slotted anode is reduced about 3.5 mm (17.4 pct), so the resistance can be cut down for the sake of energy saving and the metal surface fluctuation amplitude is significantly reduced for the stable operation due to the slighter perturbation with smaller bubbles.

  18. Direct methanol feed fuel cell with reduced catalyst loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Improvements to direct feed methanol fuel cells include new protocols for component formation. Catalyst-water repellent material is applied in formation of electrodes and sintered before application of ionomer. A membrane used in formation of an electrode assembly is specially pre-treated to improve bonding between catalyst and membrane. The improved electrode and the pre-treated membrane are assembled into a membrane electrode assembly.

  19. Evaluation of multi-brush anode systems in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Lanas, Vanessa

    2013-11-01

    The packing density of anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was examined here using four different graphite fiber brush anode configurations. The impact of anodes on performance was studied in terms of carbon fiber length (brush diameter), the number of brushes connected in parallel, and the wire current collector gage. MFCs with different numbers of brushes (one, three or six) set perpendicular to the cathode all produced similar power densities (1200±40mW/m2) and coulombic efficiencies (60%±5%). Reducing the number of brushes by either disconnecting or removing them reduced power, demonstrating the importance of anode projected area covering the cathode, and therefore the need to match electrode projected areas to maintain high performance. Multi-brush reactors had the same COD removal as single-brush systems (90%). The use of smaller Ti wire gages did not affect power generation, which will enable the use of less metal, reducing material costs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Synthesis of low cost organometallic-type catalysts for their application in microbial fuel cell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerrouki, A; Salar-García, M J; Ortiz-Martínez, V M; Guendouz, S; Ilikti, H; de Los Ríos, A P; Hernández-Fernández, F J; Kameche, M

    2018-03-05

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising technology that generates electricity from several biodegradable substrates and wastes. The main drawback of these devices is the need of using a catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction at the cathode, which makes the process relatively expensive. In this work, two low cost materials are tested as catalysts in MFCs. A novel iron complex based on the ligand n-phenyledenparaethoxy aniline has been synthesized and its performance as catalyst in single chamber MFCs containing ionic liquids has been compared with a commercial inorganic material such as Raney nickel. The results show that both materials are suitable for bioenergy production and wastewater treatment in the systems. Raney nickel cathodes allow MFCs to reach a maximum power output of 160 mW.m -3 anode , while the iron complex offers lower values. Regarding the wastewater treatment capacity, MFCs working with Raney nickel-based cathodes reach higher values of chemical oxygen demand removal (76%) compared with the performance displayed by the cathodes based on Fe-complex (56%).

  1. Manganese dioxide as a new cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Hu, Boxun; Suib, Steven; Lei, Yu; Li, Baikun

    This study focused on manganese oxides with a cryptomelane-type octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) structure to replace platinum as a cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Undoped (ud-OSM-2) and three catalysts doped with cobalt (Co-OMS-2), copper (Cu-OMS-2), and cerium (Ce-OMS-2) to enhance their catalytic performances were investigated. The novel OMS-2 cathodes were examined in granular activated carbon MFC (GACMFC) with sodium acetate as the anode reagent and oxygen in air as the cathode reagent. The results showed that after 400 h of operation, the Co-OMS-2 and Cu-OMS-2 exhibited good catalytic performance in an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The voltage of the Co-OMS-2 GACMFC was 217 mV, and the power density was 180 mW m -2. The voltage of the Cu-OMS-2 GACMFC was 214 mV and the power density was 165 mW m -2. The internal resistance (R in) of the OMS-2 GACMFCs (18 ± 1 Ω) was similar to that of the platinum GACMFCs (17 Ω). Furthermore, the degradation rates of organic substrates in the OMS-2 GACMFCs were twice those in the platinum GACMFCs, which enhance their wastewater treatment efficiencies. This study indicated that using OMS-2 manganese oxides to replace platinum as a cathodic catalyst enhances power generation, increases contaminant removal, and substantially reduces the cost of MFCs.

  2. Performance of an Active Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Using Reduced Catalyst Loading MEAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Falcão

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The micro direct methanol fuel cell (MicroDMFC is an emergent technology due to its special interest for portable applications. This work presents the results of a set of experiments conducted at room temperature using an active metallic MicroDMFC with an active area of 2.25 cm2. The MicroDMFC uses available commercial materials with low platinum content in order to reduce the overall fuel cell cost. The main goal of this work is to provide useful information to easily design an active MicroDMFC with a good performance recurring to cheaper commercial Membrane Electrode Assemblies MEAs. A performance/cost analysis for each MEA tested is provided. The maximum power output obtained was 18.1 mW/cm2 for a hot-pressed MEA with materials purchased from Quintech with very low catalyst loading (3 mg/cm2 Pt–Ru at anode side and 0.5 mg/cm2 PtB at the cathode side costing around 15 euros. Similar power values are reported in literature for the same type of micro fuel cells working at higher operating temperatures and substantially higher cathode catalyst loadings. Experimental studies using metallic active micro direct methanol fuel cells operating at room temperature are very scarce. The results presented in this work are, therefore, very useful for the scientific community.

  3. Pt/C Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zana, Alessandro

    This thesis investigates the degradation behavior of Pt/C catalysts under simulated automotive conditions. By using the “tool box” synthesis method the Pt loading has been changed from low to high Pt loadings, therefore permitting to study the role of Pt on the degradation of high surface area (H...

  4. Hybrid Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Performance with Anode Current Collector Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the current collector on the performance of a hybrid direct carbon fuel cell (HDCFC), consisting of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a molten carbonate-carbon slurry in contact with the anode, has been investigated using current-voltage curves. Four different anode current...... collectors were studied: Au, Ni, Ag, and Pt. It was shown that the performance of the direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) is dependent on the current collector materials, Ni and Pt giving the best performance, due to their catalytic activity. Gold is suggested to be the best material as an inert current collector...

  5. Power output of microbial fuel cell emphasizing interaction of anodic binder with bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongying; Liao, Bo; Xiong, Juan; Zhou, Xingwang; Zhi, Huozhen; Liu, Xiang; Li, Xiaoping; Li, Weishan

    2018-03-01

    Electrochemically active biofilm is necessary for the electron transfer between bacteria and anodic electrode in microbial fuel cells and selecting the type of anodic electrode material that favours formation of electrochemically active biofilm is crucial for the microbial fuel cell operation. We report a new finding that the interaction of anodic binder with bacteria plays more important role than its hydrophilicity for forming an electrochemically active biofilm, which is emphasized by applying poly(bisphenol A-co-epichorohydrin) as an anodic binder of the microbial fuel cell based on carbon nanotubes as anodic electrode and Escherichia coli as bacterium. The physical characterizations and electrochemical measurements demonstrate that poly(bisphenol A-co-epichorohydrin) exhibits a strong interaction with bacteria and thus provides the microbial fuel cell with excellent power density output. The MFC using poly(bisphenol A-co-epichorohydrin) reaches a maximum power density output of 3.8 W m-2. This value is larger than that of the MFCs using polytetrafluoroethylene that has poorer hydrophilicity, or polyvinyl alcohol that has better hydrophilicity but exhibits weaker interaction with bacteria than poly(bisphenol A-co-epichorohydrin).

  6. Effect of interlayer on structure and performance of anode-supported SOFC single cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Tae Wook; Yang, Hae Kwang; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Yoon, Hyon Hee; Kim, Jong Sung; Park, Sang Joon

    2008-01-01

    To lower the operating temperatures in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operations, anode-supported SOFC single cells with a single dip-coated interlayer were fabricated and the effect of the interlayer on the electrolyte structure and the electrical performance was investigated. For the preparation of SOFC single cells, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, NiO-YSZ anode, and 50% YSZ-50% strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) cathode were used. In order to characterize the cells, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were utilized and the gas (air) permeability measurements were conducted for gas tightness estimation. When the interlayer was inserted onto NiO-YSZ anode, the surface roughness of anode was diminished by about 40% and dense crack-free electrolytes were obtained. The electrical performance was enhanced remarkably and the maximum power density was 0.57 W/cm 2 at 800 deg. C and 0.44 W/cm 2 at 700 deg. C. On the other hand, the effect of interlayer on the gas tightness was negligible. The characterization study revealed that the enhancement in the electrical performance was mainly attributed to the increase of ion transmission area of anode/electrolyte interface and the increase of ionic conductivity of dense crack-free electrolyte layer

  7. Fuel cell: new electrocatalysts for SOFC (Solid Oxide Fuel Cells) anodes and regulation between cell performance and catalytic activity; Celula a combustivel: novos eletrocatalisadores para anodos de SOFC (Celulas a Combustivel de Oxido Solido) e correlacao entre desempenho da celula e atividade catalitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boaventura, Jaime S.; Aguiar, Aurinete B.; Brandao, Soraia T. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Frank, Maria Helena Troise; Campos, Michel F. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Electro-catalysts were prepared using new routes. Chemical Ultrasound Deposition (CUD) method: aqueous solution of nickel nitrate and citric acid was ultrasound vaporized and deposited on heated Ytria-stabilized Zirconia (YSZ). Resin impregnation (IPR) method: nickel oxide and YSZ were mixed, added to phenolic resins, precipitated in acidic water and milled. Wet impregnation method (IMP) was used for comparison: YSZ and an aqueous solution of nickel nitrate and citric acid were mixed, followed by evaporation, drying and calcination. The catalysts were evaluated for methane steam reforming in a quartz reactor. The reactions were conducted for one hour with no significant catalytic activity loss. In reactions with 100 mg of catalyst and a mixture consisting of methane and steam (3:1), IPR catalyst showed activity higher and better stability than those by IMP. On other tests, the reform was conducted with 100 mg of catalyst and methane to steam of 10. The IPR catalyst activity was so high that the reaction approached equilibrium conditions. Anode/electrolyte/cathode units (A/E/C) were prepared with the above catalysts as follows: the anode was a catalyst porous layer; the electrolyte an YSZ dense layer; and the cathode an LSM porous layer; graphite powder formed the material porosity. The two first layers, in powder form, were put in a stainless steel cast, pressed to 4000 bars and sinterized. The cathode layer was subsequently added using tape-casting techniques followed by sintering. A/E/C units showed 40% linear contraction and porosity higher than 20%. For fuel cell tests, A/E/C was mounted in alumina plates with platinum current collectors. Unitary SOF cells were loaded with hydrogen diluted in nitrogen showing opened circuit voltage from circa 700 mV, for the CUD anode, to 350 mV, for the IPR anode. The unitary SOFC was loaded with methane for 15 minutes or longer, with no noticeable voltage loss. At 1300 K the SOFC made with IPR or IMP catalysts showed opened

  8. The impact of anode design on fuel crossover of direct ethanol fuel cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    advantageous owing to its low toxicity, high-energy density and renewable nature [5]. Furthermore, direct-ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) is a subset of proton exchange membrane fuel cells and retains all its benefits. The electrochemical reac- tion of DEFC, is that the ethanol is electro-oxidized at the anode and oxygen is reduced ...

  9. The impact of anode design on fuel crossover of direct ethanol fuel cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fuel cell; PEM; ethanol; anode design; fuel crossover; characterization. Abstract. Direct-ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) hold a promising future owing to its simple balance of plant operation and potential high-energy density. The significant challenges associated with it is the fuel crossover, which limits its performance and ...

  10. Comparison in performance of sediment microbial fuel cells according to depth of embedded anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Junyeong; Kim, Bongkyu; Nam, Jonghyeon; Ng, How Yong; Chang, In Seop

    2013-01-01

    Five rigid graphite plates were embedded in evenly divided sections of sediment, ranging from 2 cm (A1) to 10 cm (A5) below the top sediment layer. The maximum power and current of the MFCs increased in depth order; however, despite the increase in the internal resistance, the power and current density of the A5 MFC were 2.2 and 3.5 times higher, respectively, than those of the A1 MFC. In addition, the anode open circuit potentials (OCPs) of the sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) became more negative with sediment depth. Based on these results, it could be then concluded that as the anode-embedding depth increases, that the anode environment is thermodynamically and kinetically favorable to anodophiles or electrophiles. Therefore, the anode-embedding depth should be considered an important parameter that determines the performance of SMFCs, and we posit that the anode potential could be one indicator for selecting the anode-embedding depth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Graphene-Graphene Oxide Modified Anode on the Performance of Microbial Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Na; Ren, Yueping; Li, Xiufen; Wang, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    The inferior hydrophilicity of graphene is an adverse factor to the performance of the graphene modified anodes (G anodes) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this paper, different amounts of hydrophilic graphene oxide (GO) were doped into the modification layers to elevate the hydrophilicity of the G anodes so as to further improve their performance. Increasing the GO doped ratio from 0.15 mg·mg−1 to 0.2 mg·mg−1 and 0.25 mg·mg−1, the static water contact angle (θc) of the G-GO anodes decreased from 74.2 ± 0.52° to 64.6 ± 2.75° and 41.7 ± 3.69°, respectively. The G-GO0.2 anode with GO doped ratio of 0.2 mg·mg−1 exhibited the optimal performance and the maximum power density (Pmax) of the corresponding MFC was 1100.18 mW·m−2, 1.51 times higher than that of the MFC with the G anode. PMID:28335302

  12. Percolation in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Catalyst Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacy, Stephen; Allen, Jeffrey

    2012-07-01

    Water management in the catalyst layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is confronted by two issues, flooding and dry out, both of which result in improper functioning of the fuel cell and lead to poor performance and degradation. At the present time, the data that has been reported about water percolation and wettability within a fuel cell catalyst layer is limited. A method and apparatus for measuring the percolation pressure in the catalyst layer has been developed based upon an experimental apparatus used to test water percolation in porous transport layers (PTL). The experimental setup uses a pseudo Hele-Shaw type testing where samples are compressed and a fluid is injected into the sample. Testing the samples gives percolation pressure plots which show trends in increasing percolation pressure with an increase in flow rate. A decrease in pressure was seen as percolation occurred in one sample, however the pressure only had a rising effect in the other sample.

  13. Effects of Li4Ti5O12 Anode Electrode Thickness on the Cell Balancing of Hybrid Super Capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Kyu; Yoon, Jung-Rag

    2015-03-01

    The hybrid super capacitor was prepared by controlling the anode electrode thickness to optimize cell balancing. With an increasing anode electrode thickness, the internal resistance increased, while the capacitance was not changed remarkably. The potential of the cathode increased and that of the anode was decreased with the working voltage. However, the potential variation of the cathode was larger than that of the anode due to the difference in the reaction mechanism of the cathode and anode. The discharge capacity retention as a function of the current rates increased and the cycle performance was improved with an increasing anode electrode thickness. The effects of the anode electrode thickness on the electrode potential are also discussed.

  14. Electrochemical performance and interfacial investigation on Si composite anode for lithium ion batteries in full cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobukawa, Hitoshi; Alvarado, Judith; Yang, Yangyuchen; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2017-08-01

    Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) containing silicon (Si) as a negative electrode have gained much attention recently because they deliver high energy density. However, the commercialization of LIBs with Si anode is limited due to the unstable electrochemical performance associated with expansion and contraction during electrochemical cycling. This study investigates the electrochemical performance and degradation mechanism of a full cell containing Si composite anode and LiFePO4 (lithium iron phosphate (LFP)) cathode. Enhanced electrochemical cycling performance is observed when the full cell is cycled with fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) additive compared to the standard electrolyte. To understand the improvement in the electrochemical performance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used. Based on the electrochemical behavior, FEC improves the reversibility of lithium ion diffusion into the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the Si composite anode. Moreover, XPS analysis demonstrates that the SEI composition generated from the addition of FEC consists of a large amount of LiF and less carbonate species, which leads to better capacity retention over 40 cycles. The effective SEI successively yields more stable capacity retention and enhances the reversibility of lithium ion diffusion through the interphase of the Si anode, even at higher discharge rate. This study contributes to a basic comprehension of electrochemical performance and SEI formation of LIB full cells with a high loading Si composite anode.

  15. Layer-by-layer graphene/TCNQ stacked films as conducting anodes for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chang-Lung; Lin, Cheng-Te; Huang, Jen-Hsien; Chu, Chih-Wei; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Li, Lain-Jong

    2012-06-26

    Large-area graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising candidate for transparent conducting electrode applications in flexible optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes or organic solar cells. However, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the polymer photovoltaic devices using a pristine CVD graphene anode is still not appealing due to its much lower conductivity than that of conventional indium tin oxide. We report a layer-by-layer molecular doping process on graphene for forming sandwiched graphene/tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ)/graphene stacked films for polymer solar cell anodes, where the TCNQ molecules (as p-dopants) were securely embedded between two graphene layers. Poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM) bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells based on these multilayered graphene/TCNQ anodes are fabricated and characterized. The P3HT/PCBM device with an anode structure composed of two TCNQ layers sandwiched by three CVD graphene layers shows optimum PCE (∼2.58%), which makes the proposed anode film quite attractive for next-generation flexible devices demanding high conductivity and transparency.

  16. Phase III Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Utilized in Energy Efficient Aluminum Production Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Christini; R.K. Dawless; S.P. Ray; D.A. Weirauch, Jr.

    2001-11-05

    During Phase I of the present program, Alcoa developed a commercial cell concept that has been estimated to save 30% of the energy required for aluminum smelting. Phase ii involved the construction of a pilot facility and operation of two pilots. Phase iii of the Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Program was aimed at bench experiments to permit the resolution of certain questions to be followed by three pilot cells. All of the milestones related to materials, in particular metal purity, were attained with distinct improvements over work in previous phases of the program. NiO additions to the ceramic phase and Ag additions to the Cu metal phase of the cermet improved corrosion resistance sufficiently that the bench scale pencil anodes met the purity milestones. Some excellent metal purity results have been obtained with anodes of the following composition: Further improvements in anode material composition appear to be dependent on a better understanding of oxide solubilities in molten cryolite. For that reason, work was commissioned with an outside consultant to model the MeO - cryolite systems. That work has led to a better understanding of which oxides can be used to substitute into the NiO-Fe2O3 ceramic phase to stabilize the ferrites and reduce their solubility in molten cryolite. An extensive number of vertical plate bench electrolysis cells were run to try to find conditions where high current efficiencies could be attained. TiB2-G plates were very inconsistent and led to poor wetting and drainage. Pure TiB2 did produce good current efficiencies at small overlaps (shadowing) between the anodes and cathodes. This bench work with vertical plate anodes and cathodes reinforced the importance of good cathode wetting to attain high current efficiencies. Because of those conclusions, new wetting work was commissioned and became a major component of the research during the third year of Phase III. While significant progress was made in several areas, much work needs to be

  17. A Review of RedOx Cycling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faes, Antonin; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Zryd, Amédée; Van Herle, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells are able to convert fuels, including hydrocarbons, to electricity with an unbeatable efficiency even for small systems. One of the main limitations for long-term utilization is the reduction-oxidation cycling (RedOx cycles) of the nickel-based anodes. This paper will review the effects and parameters influencing RedOx cycles of the Ni-ceramic anode. Second, solutions for RedOx instability are reviewed in the patent and open scientific literature. The solutions are described from the point of view of the system, stack design, cell design, new materials and microstructure optimization. Finally, a brief synthesis on RedOx cycling of Ni-based anode supports for standard and optimized microstructures is depicted. PMID:24958298

  18. High pressure anode operation of direct methanol fuel cells for carbon dioxide management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Michael D.; McCready, Mark J.

    Experiments with independent pressurization of the direct methanol fuel cell anode and cathode allow for the observation of DMFC operation with carbon dioxide gas formation suppressed. Results indicate that the limiting current density is strongly related to the applied pressure, and, therefore, to the presence of CO 2 in the liquid phase. An additional experiment where CO 2 is allowed to accumulate in recycled anode fuel solution over a period of time and is then stripped from solution using nitrogen gas indicates that the presence of CO 2 in anode fuel solution at any pressure contributes to significant decreases in power and current density. Because CO 2 bubbles are ubiquitous in direct methanol fuel cells, this finding is key to the optimization of these systems.

  19. A Review of RedOx Cycling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Anode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Van herle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Solid oxide fuel cells are able to convert fuels, including hydrocarbons, to electricity with an unbeatable efficiency even for small systems. One of the main limitations for long-term utilization is the reduction-oxidation cycling (RedOx cycles of the nickel-based anodes. This paper will review the effects and parameters influencing RedOx cycles of the Ni-ceramic anode. Second, solutions for RedOx instability are reviewed in the patent and open scientific literature. The solutions are described from the point of view of the system, stack design, cell design, new materials and microstructure optimization. Finally, a brief synthesis on RedOx cycling of Ni-based anode supports for standard and optimized microstructures is depicted.

  20. Parasitic corrosion-resistant anode for use in metal/air or metal/O/sub 2/ cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, R.W.; Smith, D.F.

    1982-09-20

    A consumable metal anode is described which is used in refuelable electrochemical cells and wherein at least a peripheral edge portion of the anode is protected against a corrosive alkaline environment of the cell by the application of a thin metal coating, the coating being formed of metals such as nickel, silver, and gold.

  1. The impact of anode acclimation strategy on microbial electrolysis cell treating hydrogen fermentation effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohu; Zhang, Ruizhe; Qian, Yawei; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-07-01

    The impact of different anode acclimation methods for enhancing hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was investigated in this study. The anodes were first acclimated in microbial fuel cells using acetate, butyrate and corn stalk fermentation effluent (CSFE) as substrate before moving into MECs, respectively. Subsequently, CSFE was used as feedstock in all the three MECs. The maximum hydrogen yield with the anode pre-acclimated with butyrate (5.21±0.24L H 2 /L CSFE) was higher than that pre-acclimated with acetate (4.22±0.19L H 2 /L CSFE) and CSFE (4.55±0.14L H 2 /L CSFE). The current density (480±11A/m 3 ) and hydrogen production rate (4.52±0.13m 3 /m 3 /d) with the anode pre-acclimated with butyrate were also higher that another two reactors. These results demonstrated that the anode biofilm pre-acclimated with butyrate has significant advantages in CSFE treatment and could improve the performance of hydrogen production in MEC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of active, and stable water-gas-shift reaction catalysts for fuel cell applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azzam, K.G.H.; Babich, Igor V.; Seshan, Kulathu Iyer; Lefferts, Leon

    2006-01-01

    Water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction CO + H2O = CO2 + H2, is a key step in the generation of H2 for fuel cells. Noble metal-based catalysts are promising single stage WGS catalysts because they less sensitive than LTS catalysts (Cu based) and more active than the HTS (Ni) catalysts. High activity in CO

  3. Comparison of microbial electrolysis cells operated with added voltage or by setting the anode potential

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2011-08-01

    Hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) can be achieved by either setting the anode potential with a potentiostat, or by adding voltage to the circuit with a power source. In batch tests the largest total gas production (46 ± 3 mL), lowest energy input (2.3 ± 0.3 kWh/m 3 of H2 generated), and best overall energy recovery (E+S = 58 ± 6%) was achieved at a set anode potential of EAn = -0.2 V (vs Ag/AgCl), compared to set potentials of -0.4 V, 0 V and 0.2 V, or an added voltage of Eap = 0.6 V. Gas production was 1.4 times higher with EAn = -0.2 V than with Eap = 0.6 V. Methane production was also reduced at set anode potentials of -0.2 V and higher than the other operating conditions. Continuous flow operation of the MECs at the optimum condition of EAn = -0.2 V initially maintained stable hydrogen gas production, with 68% H2 and 21% CH4, but after 39 days the gas composition shifted to 55% H2 and 34% CH 4. Methane production was not primarily anode-associated, as methane was reduced to low levels by placing the anode into a new MEC housing. These results suggest that MEC performance can be optimized in terms of hydrogen production rates and gas composition by setting an anode potential of -0.2 V, but that methanogen proliferation must be better controlled on non-anodic surfaces. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of Large-Format Lithium-Ion Cells with Silicon Anode and Low Flammable Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, James J.; Hernandez-Lugo, D. M.; Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Miller, T. B.; Lvovich, V. F.; Lytle, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing safe, high energy and high capacity lithium-ion cell designs and batteries for future missions under NASAs Advanced Space Power System (ASPS) project. Advanced cell components, such as high specific capacity silicon anodes and low-flammable electrolytes have been developed for improving the cell specific energy and enhancing safety. To advance the technology readiness level, we have developed large-format flight-type hermetically sealed battery cells by incorporating high capacity silicon anodes, commercially available lithium nickel, cobalt, aluminum oxide (NCA) cathodes, and low-flammable electrolytes. In this report, we will present the performance results of these various battery cells. In addition, we will also discuss the post-test cell analysis results as well.

  5. Investigation of a deoxyribozyme as a biofuel cell catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mi; Xu, Shuai; Minteer, Shelley D; Baum, Dana A

    2011-10-12

    We examined the ability of a previously identified peroxidase deoxyribozyme to be employed as a catalyst in biofuel cells, as a possible replacement for oxidoreductase proteins. We constructed a biocathode using a covalently linked version of the peroxidase deoxyribozyme-hemin complex and successfully paired it with a glucose dehydrogenase-modified bioanode for power production.

  6. High performance, high durability non-precious metal fuel cell catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Thomas E.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Schmoeckel, Alison K.

    2016-03-15

    This invention relates to non-precious metal fuel cell cathode catalysts, fuel cells that contain these catalysts, and methods of making the same. The fuel cell cathode catalysts are highly nitrogenated carbon materials that can contain a transition metal. The highly nitrogenated carbon materials can be supported on a nanoparticle substrate.

  7. Reactive co-sputter deposition of nanostructured cermet anodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, Igor V.; Solovyev, Andrey A.; Shipilova, Anna V.; Lebedynskiy, Alexey M.; Smolyanskiy, Egor A.; Lauk, Alexander L.; Semenov, Vyacheslav A.

    2018-01-01

    The impact of a nanostructured NiO/yttria-stabilized zirconia (NiO/YSZ) and NiO/gadolinia-doped ceria (NiO/GDC) anode functional layers on low- and intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) performance is investigated. NiO/YSZ and NiO/GDC thin films were reactively sputter-deposited by pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering from the Ni, Zr–Y, and Ce–Gd targets onto commercial NiO/YSZ substrates. Anode-supported SOFCs based on magnetron sputtered YSZ and GDC electrolytes (∼4 µm) with and without the nanostructured anode layers are fabricated. A direct comparison of the YSZ- and GDC-based SOFCs in temperature range of 600–800 and 400–600 °C is made. The performance of cells with the nanostructured anode layers significantly increases as compared to that of the cell without it, especially at lower temperatures. Increase of cells performance was achieved by reduction of the total area-specific resistance by 26–30%.

  8. Physical Properties of Mixed Conductor Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes of Doped CeO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Lindegaard, Thomas; Hansen, Uffe Rud

    1994-01-01

    conductivity vs. oxygen partial pressure. For both typesof conductivity a dependence on dopant valency was observed. The electronic conductivity was independent of dopantradius in contrast to the ionic which was highly dependent. These measured physical properties are compared with the idealrequirements...... for solid oxide fuel cell anodes. Not all requirements are fulfilled. Measures to compensate for this arediscussed....

  9. Anode-Engineered Protonic Ceramic Fuel Cell with Excellent Performance and Fuel Compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, B.; Yan, N.; Li, M.; Sun, Y.-F.; Zhang, Y.-Q.; Li, J.; Etsell, T.; Sarkar, P.; Luo, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Directly utilizing hydrocarbon fuels, particularly methane, is advantageous yet challenging in high-performance protonic ceramic fuel cells. In this work, this technological hurdle is well addressed by selective deposition of secondary electrocatalysts within the porous Ni-cermet anode. This novel

  10. Inocula selection in microbial fuel cells based on anodic biofilm abundance of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Guotao; Rodrigues, Diogo De Sacadura; Thygesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) rely on microbial conversion of organic substrates to electricity. The optimal performance depends on the establishment of a microbial community rich in electrogenic bacteria. Usually this microbial community is established from inoculation of the MFC anode chamber...

  11. Simultaneous interaction of bacteria and tissue cells with photocatalytically activated, anodized titanium surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yue, Chongxia; Kuijer, Roelof; Kaper, H. J.; van der Mei, Henderina; Busscher, Hendrik; Kuijer, Roelof

    Photocatalytic-activation of anodized TiO2-surfaces has been demonstrated to yield antibacterial and tissue integrating effects, but effects on simultaneous growth of tissue cells and bacteria in co-culture have never been studied. Moreover, it is unknown how human-bone-marrow-mesenchymal-stem

  12. Ni/YSZ anode – Effect of pre-treatments on cell degradation and microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Brodersen, Karen

    2011-01-01

    .75Acm−2. Oxygen was supplied to the cathode and the anode inlet gas mixture had a high p(H2O)/p(H2) ratio of 0.4/0.6. Commercially available gasses were applied. The effect of different types of pre-treatments on the Ni/YSZ electrode degradation during subsequent fuel cell testing was investigated. Pre......-treatments included operating at OCV (4% and 40% H2O in H2) prior to fuel cell testing, cleaning of the inlet H2 gas at 700°C and processing the anode half cell via multilayer tape casting. Analyses of impedance spectra showed that the increase in the charge transfer reaction resistance in the Ni/YSZ (RNi......Anode supported (Ni/YSZ–YSZ–LSM/YSZ) solid oxide fuel cells were tested and the degradation over hundreds of hours was monitored and analyzed by impedance spectroscopy. Test conditions were chosen to focus on the Ni/YSZ anode degradation and all tests were operated at 750°C, a current density of 0...

  13. The impact of anode design on fuel crossover of direct ethanol fuel cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fuel cell; PEM; ethanol; anode design; fuel crossover; characterization. 1. Introduction. The upsurge in the use of internal combustion (IC) engine vehicles is causing considerable pollution problems in our urban conurbations [1] and as a consequence finding a clean and reliable power system for the forthcoming generation ...

  14. Cell adhesion and in vivo osseointegration of sandblasted/acid etched/anodized dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mu-Hyon; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Se Eun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-05-06

    The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti) implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO) Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA), and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control), SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20%±10.89%) was much greater than those of machined (33.58%±8.63%), SLA (58.47%±12.89), or ANO Ti (59.62%±18.30%). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant.

  15. Cell Adhesion and in Vivo Osseointegration of Sandblasted/Acid Etched/Anodized Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu-Hyon Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA, and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control, SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20% ± 10.89% was much greater than those of machined (33.58% ± 8.63%, SLA (58.47% ± 12.89, or ANO Ti (59.62% ± 18.30%. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant.

  16. Hybrid direct carbon fuel cell anode processes investigated using a 3-electrode half-cell setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Arenillas, A.; Menendez, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    A 3-electrode half-cell setup consisting of a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte support was employed to investigate the chemical and electrochemical processes occurring in the vicinity of a model hybrid direct carbon fuel cell (HDCFC) anode (Ni-YSZ) in contact with a molten carbon......-alkali carbonate slurry. Electrochemical testing, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), with and without the Ni-YSZ layer highlighted the promotional effect of the Ni-YSZ anode layer, and revealed the contributions of Ni/NiO, and potentially K/K2O, redox couple(s). Treated...... anthracite and bituminous coals, as well as carbon black, were tested, revealing similar open circuit potential and activation energies in mixed 96-4vol% N2-CO2 and 50-50vol% CO-CO2 environments between 700 and 800°C. Bituminous coal showed the highest activity, likely associated to a high O/C ratio...

  17. Design of Transparent Anodes for Resonant Cavity Enhanced Light Harvesting in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sergeant, Nicholas P.

    2012-01-03

    The use of an ITO-free MoO 3/Ag/MoO 3 anode to control the photon harvesting in PCDTBT:PC 70BM solar cells is proposed. At first sight, the fact that these anodes possess reduced far-field transmission compared to ITO may seem to be a disadvantage. But, despite this, we show that by carefully tuning the resonant optical cavity we can enhance the external quantum efficiency close to the band edge of PCDTBT, resulting in high photocurrent and power conversion efficiency on par with ITO. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Effect of nitrogen addition on the performance of microbial fuel cell anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Saito, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Carbon cloth anodes were modified with 4(N,N-dimethylamino)benzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate to increase nitrogen-containing functional groups at the anode surface in order to test whether the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) could be improved by controllably modifying the anode surface chemistry. Anodes with the lowest extent of functionalization, based on a nitrogen/carbon ratio of 0.7 as measured by XPS, achieved the highest power density of 938mW/m2. This power density was 24% greater than an untreated anode, and similar to that obtained with an ammonia gas treatment previously shown to increase power. Increasing the nitrogen/carbon ratio to 3.8, however, decreased the power density to 707mW/m2. These results demonstrate that a small amount of nitrogen functionalization on the carbon cloth material is sufficient to enhance MFC performance, likely as a result of promoting bacterial adhesion to the surface without adversely affecting microbial viability or electron transfer to the surface. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. In situ formation of graphene layers on graphite surfaces for efficient anodes of microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiahuan; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Cai, Xixi; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-09-15

    Graphene can be used to improve the performance of the anode in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) due to its good biocompatibility, high electrical conductivity and large surface area. However, the chemical production and modification of the graphene on the anode are environmentally hazardous because of the use of various harmful chemicals. This study reports a novel method based on the electrochemical exfoliation of a graphite plate (GP) for the in situ formation of graphene layers on the surface of a graphite electrode. When the resultant graphene-layer-based graphite plate electrode (GL/GP) was used as an anode in an MFC, a maximum power density of 0.67 ± 0.034 W/m(2) was achieved. This value corresponds to 1.72-, 1.56- and 1.26-times the maximum power densities of the original GP, exfoliated-graphene-modified GP (EG/GP) and chemically-reduced-graphene-modified GP (rGO/GP) anodes, respectively. Electrochemical measurements revealed that the high performance of the GL/GP anode was attributable to its macroporous structure, improved electron transfer and high electrochemical capacitance. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is a facile and environmentally friendly synthesis technique for the fabrication of high-performance graphene-based electrodes for use in microbial energy harvesting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The performance analysis of direct methanol fuel cells with different hydrophobic anode channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hung-Chun; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Luo, Win-Jet; Jiang, Jia-You; Kuan, Yean-Der; Lin, Xin-Quan

    In order to enhance the performance of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), the product of CO 2 bubble has to be efficiently removed from the anode channel during the electrochemical reaction. In this study, the materials of Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) with hydrophilic property and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with hydrophobic property are used to form the anode cannel. The channel is fabricated through a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) manufacture process of the DMFCs. In addition, some particles with high hydrophobic properties are added into the PDMS materials in order to further reduce the hydro-resistance in the anode channel. The performance of the DMFCs is investigated under the influence of operation conditions, including operation temperature, flow rate, and methanol concentration. It is found that the performance of the DMFC, which is made of PDMS with high hydrophobic particles, can be greatly enhanced and the hydrophobic property of the particles can be unaffected by different operation conditions.

  1. Hierarchical micro/nano structures of carbon composites as anodes for microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Watanabe, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2011-09-07

    We demonstrate the utility of hierarchical micro/nano structures of electrically conductive carbon composites as anodes for microbial fuel cells (MFCs). To construct the hierarchical structures, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were directly grown on micro-porous graphite felts at high densities. Using the CNT-modified felts as anodes, power outputs from MFCs were increased ∼7 fold compared to those with bare graphite-felt anodes. We also show that this power improvement is sustainable even in MFCs operated with naturally occurring microbial communities. These results suggest the wide utility of the hierarchical micro/nano structures of conductive carbon composites for bio-electrochemical processes. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  2. Catalytically graphitized glass-like carbon examined as anode for lithium-ion cell performing at high charge/discharge rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skowronski, Jan M.; Knofczynski, Krzysztof [Poznan University of Technology, Institute of Chemistry and Technical Electrochemistry, ul. Piotrowo 3, 60-965 Poznan (Poland)

    2009-10-20

    The influence of a long-time heat treatment of hard carbon in the presence of iron catalyst on its structural properties and electrochemical performance is concerned in terms of potential application as anode material for lithium-ion cell. Glass-like carbon spheres obtained by carbonization of phenol resin were catalytically graphitized by heat treatment at temperature 1000 C in argon atmosphere for 20 h and 100 h. After this process iron was completely removed from the product of reaction. The original carbon was entirely useless as anode for Li-ion cell because of its extremely poor reversible capacity (54 mAh g{sup -1}). Due to heat treatment composite materials consisting of microcrystalline graphite admixed with turbostratic carbon were produced. Modified carbons were tested as anode materials using gradually increasing current density. Based on electrochemical measurements a mixed intercalation/insertion mechanism for storage of lithium ions was concluded. Discharge capacity of carbon heat treated for 100 h attained value of 276 mAh g{sup -1} and its reversible capacity appeared to be better than that of flaky graphite upon discharging at current density in the range 50-250 mA g{sup -1}. (author)

  3. Durable Catalysts for High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    significant attention in recent years because of its potential advantages such as high CO tolerance, easy cooling, better heat utilization and possible integration with fuel processing units. However, the high temperature obviously aggravates the carbon corrosion and catalyst degradation. Based on thermally......Durability of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is recognized as one of the most important issues to be addressed before the commercialization. The failure mechanisms are not well understood, however, degradation of carbon supported noble metal catalysts is identified as a major failure...... corrosion, in turn, triggers the agglomeration of platinum particles resulting in reduction of the active surface area and catalytic activity. This is a major mechanism of the catalyst degradation and a key challenge to the PEMFC long-term durability. High temperature PEMFC, on the other hand, has attached...

  4. Manufacturing process of electrode catalyst layer for fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomoto, Hideyuki; Sakurai, Masahiro

    1988-10-17

    In order to make the electrochemical reaction of the fuel cell efficient, it is necessary that fine catalyst particles in the electrode catalyst layer and fine fluororesin particles are well dispersed and mixed uniformly and the three phase interface is big. In order to achieve this, there is a method to make an aggregate by applying a water soluble organic solvent to the dispersed system of these particles, but it has problems including a high danger of fire due to inflamation of the organic solvent. In view of this, this invention offers a method to remove the solvent of the dispersed system without using the aggregation method. In other words, this invention is composed of a process to disperse fine catalyst particles and fluororesin dispersion by adding them to the aqueous solution including a predetermined amount of interfacial active agent, a process to obtain the viscous mixed concentrate of fine catalyst particles and fine fluororesin particles by concentrating or drying the above dispersed system and then adding the water, a process to make the fine fluororesin particles fibrous and paste by kneading the above mixed concentrate, and a process to form electrode catalyst layers by rolling the above paste. 3 figures.

  5. A direct carbon solid oxide fuel cell operated on a plant derived biofuel with natural catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Weizi; Zhou, Qian; Xie, Yongmin; Liu, Jiang; Long, Guohui; Cheng, Shuang; Liu, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A plant-derived biochar, with biologically accumulated chemical elements as catalyst for the Boudouard reaction, is a superior fuel to the all-solid-state direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells (DC-SOFCs), and, it enables DC-SOFCs to be a novel technology, of high efficient, low cost and environmental friendliness, for distributed power generation. - Highlights: • Orchid leaf char is a good fuel of all-solid-state DC-SOFCs. • Performance of DC-SOFC with leaf char is better than that with Fe-loaded carbon. • Biologically accumulated Ca in leaf char acts as catalyst for Boudouard reaction. • Leaf char with natural Ca performs better than C with Ca added by mechanical mixing. • Biochar with natural catalyst provides low cost and low pollutant fuel to DC-SOFCs. - Abstract: Biochar derived from orchid tree leaves is utilised as the fuel of a direct carbon solid oxide fuel cell (DC-SOFC), with yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as electrolyte and cermet of silver and gadolinium doped ceria (Ag-GDC) as the material of both cathode and anode, operating without any liquid medium or feeding gas. The performance of the DC-SOFC operated on the leaf char is higher than that operated on the best reported carbon fuel for DC-SOFCs, Fe-loaded activated carbon. XRD, Raman spectroscopy, SEM and EDX are applied to characterize the leaf char. It turns out that the leaf char is with porous structure and there is much Ca along with some K and Mg uniformly distributing in the leaf char. The effects of the naturally existing alkaline earth metal and alkaline metal and their distribution on the performance of the DC-SOFCs operated on the leaf char are analyzed in detail.

  6. Increased Power in Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell: Facilitated Mass Transfer via a Water-Layer Anode Embedded in Sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yoo Seok; An, Junyeong; Kim, Bongkyu; Park, HyunJun; Kim, Jisu; Chang, In Seop

    2015-01-01

    We report a methodology for enhancing the mass transfer at the anode electrode of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs), by employing a fabric baffle to create a separate water-layer for installing the anode electrode in sediment. The maximum power in an SMFC with the anode installed in the separate water-layer (SMFC-wFB) was improved by factor of 6.6 compared to an SMFC having the anode embedded in the sediment (SMFC-woFB). The maximum current density in the SMFC-wFB was also 3.9 times highe...

  7. Mass-produced multi-walled carbon nanotubes as catalyst supports for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, In Young; Park, Ki Chul; Jung, Yong Chae; Lee, Sun Hyung; Song, Sung Moo; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Kim, Yong Jung; Endo, Morinobu

    2011-01-01

    Commercially mass-produced multi-walled carbon nanotubes, i.e., VGNF (Showa Denko Co.), were applied to support materials for platinum-ruthenium (PtRu) nanoparticles as anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells. The original VGNFs are composed of high-crystalline graphitic shells, which hinder the favorable surface deposition of the PtRu nanoparticles that are formed via borohydride reduction. The chemical treatment of VGNFs with potassium hydroxide (KOH), however, enables highly dispersed and dense deposition of PtRu nanoparticles on the VGNF surface. This capability becomes more remarkable depending on the KOH amount. The electrochemical evaluation of the PtRu-deposited VGNF catalysts showed enhanced active surface areas and methanol oxidation, due to the high dispersion and dense deposition of the PtRu nanoparticles. The improvement of the surface deposition states of the PtRu nanoparticles was significantly due to the high surface area and mesorporous surface structure of the KOH-activated VGNFs.

  8. Hydrogen production with nickel powder cathode catalysts in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.

    2010-01-01

    Although platinum is commonly used as catalyst on the cathode in microbial electrolysis cells (MEC), non-precious metal alternatives are needed to reduce costs. Cathodes were constructed using a nickel powder (0.5-1 μm) and their performance was compared to conventional electrodes containing Pt (0.002 μm) in MECs and electrochemical tests. The MEC performance in terms of coulombic efficiency, cathodic, hydrogen and energy recoveries were similar using Ni or Pt cathodes, although the maximum hydrogen production rate (Q) was slightly lower for Ni (Q = 1.2-1.3 m3 H2/m3/d; 0.6 V applied) than Pt (1.6 m3 H2/m3/d). Nickel dissolution was minimized by replacing medium in the reactor under anoxic conditions. The stability of the Ni particles was confirmed by examining the cathodes after 12 MEC cycles using scanning electron microscopy and linear sweep voltammetry. Analysis of the anodic communities in these reactors revealed dominant populations of Geobacter sulfurreduces and Pelobacter propionicus. These results demonstrate that nickel powder can be used as a viable alternative to Pt in MECs, allowing large scale production of cathodes with similar performance to systems that use precious metal catalysts. © 2009 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu.

  9. Effects of nanoporous anodic titanium oxide on human adipose derived stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malec, Katarzyna; Góralska, Joanna; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Głowacz, Paulina; Jarosz, Magdalena; Brzewski, Pawel; Sulka, Grzegorz D; Jaskuła, Marian; Wybrańska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    The aim of current bone biomaterials research is to design implants that induce controlled, guided, successful, and rapid healing. Titanium implants are widely used in dental, orthopedic, and reconstructive surgery. A series of studies has indicated that cells can respond not only to the chemical properties of the biomaterial, but also, in particular, to the changes in surface topography. Nanoporous materials remain in focus of scientific queries due to their exclusive properties and broad applications. One such material is nanostructured titanium oxide with highly ordered, mutually perpendicular nanopores. Nanoporous anodic titanium dioxide (TiO2) films were fabricated by a three-step anodization process in propan-1,2,3-triol-based electrolyte containing fluoride ions. Adipose-derived stem cells offer many interesting opportunities for regenerative medicine. The important goal of tissue engineering is to direct stem cell differentiation into a desired cell lineage. The influence of nanoporous TiO2 with pore diameters of 80 and 108 nm on cell response, growth, viability, and ability to differentiate into osteoblastic lineage of human adipose-derived progenitors was explored. Cells were harvested from the subcutaneous abdominal fat tissue by a simple, minimally invasive, and inexpensive method. Our results indicate that anodic nanostructured TiO2 is a safe and nontoxic biomaterial. In vitro studies demonstrated that the nanotopography induced and enhanced osteodifferentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells from the abdominal subcutaneous fat tissue. PMID:27789947

  10. Performance Factors and Sulfur Tolerance of Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Nanostructured Ni:GDC Infiltrated Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Hagen, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Two metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (active area 16 cm2) with nanostructured Ni:GDC infiltrated anodes, possessing different anode and support microstructures were studied in respect to sulfur tolerance at an operating temperature of 650°C. The studied MS-SOFCs are based on ferretic...

  11. Performance Factors and Sulfur Tolerance of Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Nanostructured Ni:GDC Infiltrated Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Hagen, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Two metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (active area 16 cm2) with nanostructured Ni:GDC infiltrated anodes, but different anode and support microstructures were studied in respect to sulfur tolerance at the aimed operating temperature of 650ºC. The studied MS-SOFCs are based on ferretic...

  12. Flow maldistribution in the anode of a polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysis cell employing interdigitated channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2014-01-01

    In this work a macroscopic, steady-state, three-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics model of the anode of a high-pressure polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysis cell (PEMEC) is presented. The developed model is used for studying the effect of employing an interdigitated, planar-circular ......In this work a macroscopic, steady-state, three-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics model of the anode of a high-pressure polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysis cell (PEMEC) is presented. The developed model is used for studying the effect of employing an interdigitated, planar....... While interdigitated channels have been examined for planar-square cells in detail, less is known for planar-circular cells. To examine the extent of flow maldistribution, a base case is defined and a parameter variation is conducted relative to it. In the study, the following parameters are examined...

  13. Performance of two different types of anodes in membrane electrode assembly microbial fuel cells for power generation from domestic wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Hays, Sarah

    2011-10-01

    Graphite fiber brush electrodes provide high surface areas for exoelectrogenic bacteria in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but the cylindrical brush format limits more compact reactor designs. To enable MFC designs with closer electrode spacing, brush anodes were pressed up against a separator (placed between the electrodes) to reduce the volume occupied by the brush. Higher maximum voltages were produced using domestic wastewater (COD = 390 ± 89 mg L-1) with brush anodes (360 ± 63 mV, 1000 Ω) than woven carbon mesh anodes (200 ± 81 mV) with one or two separators. Maximum power densities were similar for brush anode reactors with one or two separators after 30 days (220 ± 1.2 and 240 ± 22 mW m-2), but with one separator the brush anode MFC power decreased to 130 ± 55 mW m-2 after 114 days. Power densities in MFCs with mesh anodes were very low (<45 mW m-2). Brush anodes MFCs had higher COD removals (80 ± 3%) than carbon mesh MFCs (58 ± 7%), but similar Coulombic efficiencies (8.6 ± 2.9% brush; 7.8 ± 7.1% mesh). These results show that compact (hemispherical) brush anodes can produce higher power and more effective domestic wastewater treatment than flat mesh anodes in MFCs. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Methane Steam Reforming over an Ni-YSZ Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode in Stack Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mogensen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of catalytic steam reforming of methane over an Ni-YSZ anode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC have been investigated with the cell placed in a stack configuration. In order to decrease the degree of conversion, a single cell stack with reduced area was used. Measurements were performed in the temperature range 600–800°C and the partial pressures of all reactants and products were varied. The obtained rates could be well fitted with a power law expression (r ∝PCH40.7. A simple model is presented which is capable of predicting the methane conversion in a stack configuration from intrinsic kinetics of the anode support material. The predictions are compared with the stack measurements presented here, and good agreement is observed.

  15. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Mansor, N.; Jorge, A. B.; Corà, F.; Gibbs, C.; Jervis, R.; McMillan, P. F.; Wang, X.; Brett, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li(+)Cl(-)), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion...

  16. Microstructural degradation of Ni-YSZ anodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thyden, K.

    2008-03-15

    Ni-YSZ cermets have been used as anode materials in SOFCs for more than 20 years. Despite this fact, the major cause of degradation within the Ni-YSZ anode, namely Ni sintering / coarsening, is still not fully understood. Even if microstructural studies of anodes in tested cells are of technological relevance, it is difficult to identify the effect from isolated parameters such as temperature, fuel gas composition and polarization. Model studies of high temperature aged Ni-YSZ cermets are generally performed in atmospheres containing relatively low concentrations of H2O. In this work, the microstructural degradation in both electrochemically longterm tested cells and high-temperature aged model materials are studied. Since Ni particle sintering / coarsening is attributed to be the major cause of anode degradation, this subject attains the primary focus. A large part of the work is focused on improving microstructural techniques and shows that the application of low acceleration voltages (<= 1 kV) in a FE-SEM makes it possible to obtain two useful types of contrast between the phases in Ni-YSZ composites. By changing between the ordinary lateral SE detector and the inlens detector, using similar microscope settings, two very different sample characteristics are probed: 1) The difference in secondary emission coefficient, delta, between the percolating and non-percolating Ni is maximized in the low-voltage range due to a high delta for the former and the suppression of delta by a positive charge for the latter. This difference yields a contrast between the two phases which is picked up by an inlens secondary electron detector. 2) The difference in backscatter coefficient, eta, between Ni and YSZ is shown to increase with decreasing voltage. The contrast is illustrated in images collected by the normal secondary detector since parts of the secondary signals are generated by backscattered electrons. High temperature aging experiments of model Ni-YSZ anode cermets show

  17. Fabrication and characterization of anode-supported micro-tubular solide oxide fuel cell by phase inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Cong

    Nowadays, the micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs), especially the anode supported MT-SOFCs have been extensively developed to be applied for SOFC stacks designation, which can be potentially used for portable power sources and vehicle power supply. To prepare MT-SOFCs with high electrochemical performance, one of the main strategies is to optimize the microstructure of the anode support. Recently, a novel phase inversion method has been applied to prepare the anode support with a unique asymmetrical microstructure, which can improve the electrochemical performance of the MT-SOFCs. Since several process parameters of the phase inversion method can influence the pore formation mechanism and final microstructure, it is essential and necessary to systematically investigate the relationship between phase inversion process parameters and final microstructure of the anode supports. The objective of this study is aiming at correlating the process parameters and microstructure and further preparing MT-SOFCs with enhanced electrochemical performance. Non-solvent, which is used to trigger the phase separation process, can significantly influence the microstructure of the anode support fabricated by phase inversion method. To investigate the mechanism of non-solvent affecting the microstructure, water and ethanol/water mixture were selected for the NiO-YSZ anode supports fabrication. The presence of ethanol in non-solvent can inhibit the growth of the finger-like pores in the tubes. With the increasing of the ethanol concentration in the non-solvent, a relatively dense layer can be observed both in the outside and inside of the tubes. The mechanism of pores growth and morphology obtained by using non-solvent with high concentration ethanol was explained based on the inter-diffusivity between solvent and non-solvent. Solvent and non-solvent pair with larger Dm value is benefit for the growth of finger-like pores. Three cells with different anode geometries was

  18. Integrated anode structure for passive direct methanol fuel cells with neat methanol operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huijuan; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Peng; Guo, Jing; Yuan, Ting; Zheng, Junwei; Yang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    A microporous titanium plate based integrated anode structure (Ti-IAS) suitable for passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) fueled with neat methanol is reported. This anode structure incorporates a porous titanium plate as a methanol mass transfer barrier and current collector, pervaporation film for passively vaporizing methanol, vaporous methanol cavity for evenly distributing fuel, and channels for carbon dioxide venting. With the effective control of methanol delivery rate, the Ti-IAS based DMFC allows the direct use of neat methanol as the fuel source. In the meantime, the required water for methanol-oxidation reaction at the anode can also be fully recovered from the cathode with the help of the highly hydrophobic microporous layer in the cathode. DMFCs incorporating this new anode structure exhibit a power density as high as 40 mW cm-2 and a high volumetric energy density of 489 Wh L-1 operating with neat methanol and at 25 °C. Importantly, no obvious performance degradation of the passive DMFC system is observed after more than 90 h of continuous operation. The experimental results reveal that the compact DMFC based on the Ti-IAS exhibits a substantial potential as power sources for portable applications.

  19. Analysis of carbon fiber brush loading in anodes on startup and performance of microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hutchinson, Adam J.

    2011-11-01

    Flat carbon anodes placed near a cathode in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) are adversely affected by oxygen crossover, but graphite fiber brush anodes placed near the cathode produce high power densities. The impact of the brush size and electrode spacing was examined by varying the distance of the brush end from the cathode and solution conductivity in multiple MFCs. The startup time was increased from 8 ± 1 days with full brushes (all buffer concentrations) to 13 days (50 mM), 14 days (25 mM) and 21 days (8 mM) when 75% of the brush anode was removed. When MFCs were all first acclimated with a full brush, up to 65% of the brush material could be removed without appreciably altering maximum power. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed that the main source of internal resistance (IR) was diffusion resistance, which together with solution resistance reached 100 Ω. The IR using EIS compared well with that obtained using the polarization data slope method, indicating no major components of IR were missed. These results show that using full brush anodes avoids adverse effects of oxygen crossover during startup, although brushes are much larger than needed to sustain high power. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Controlling the occurrence of power overshoot by adapting microbial fuel cells to high anode potentials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping

    2013-04-01

    Power density curves for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) often show power overshoot, resulting in inaccurate estimation of MFC performance at high current densities. The reasons for power overshoot are not well understood, but biofilm acclimation and development are known factors. In order to better explore the reasons for power overshoot, exoelectrogenic biofilms were developed at four different anode potentials (-0.46 V, -0.24 V, 0 V, and 0.50 V vs. Ag/AgCl), and then the properties of the biofilms were examined using polarization tests and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The maximum power density of the MFCs was 1200±100 mW/m2. Power overshoot was observed in MFCs incubated at -0.46 V, but not those acclimated atmore positive potentials, indicating that bacterial activitywas significantly influenced by the anode acclimation potential. CV results further indicated that power overshoot of MFCs incubated at the lowest anode potential was associatedwith a decreasing electroactivity of the anodic biofilm in the high potential region,which resulted from a lack of sufficient electron transfer components to shuttle electrons at rates needed for these more positive potentials. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Continuous power generation and microbial community structure of the anode biofilms in a three-stage microbial fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kyungmi; Okabe, Satoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Dept. of Urban and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-15

    A mediator-less three-stage two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) system was developed and operated continuously for more than 1.5 years to evaluate continuous power generation while treating artificial wastewater containing glucose (10 mM) concurrently. A stable power density of 28 W/m3 was attained with an anode hydraulic retention time of 4.5 h and phosphate buffer as the cathode electrolyte. An overall dissolved organic carbon removal ratio was about 85%, and coulombic efficiency was about 46% in this MFC system. We also analyzed the microbial community structure of anode biofilms in each MFC. Since the environment in each MFC was different due to passing on the products to the next MFC in series, the microbial community structure was different accordingly. The anode biofilm in the first MFC consisted mainly of bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria, identified as Aeromonas sp., while the Firmicutes dominated the anode biofilms in the second and third MFCs that were mainly fed with acetate. Cyclic voltammetric results supported the presence of a redox compound(s) associated with the anode biofilm matrix, rather than mobile (dissolved) forms, which could be responsible for the electron transfer to the anode. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the anode biofilms were comprised of morphologically different cells that were firmly attached on the anode surface and interconnected each other with anchor-like filamentous appendages, which might support the results of cyclic voltammetry. (orig.)

  2. Quantitative analysis of solid oxide fuel cell anode microstructure change during redox cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Takaaki; Jiao, Zhenjun; Hara, Shotaro; Shikazono, Naoki

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, correlation between solid oxide fuel cell anode microstructure and electrochemical performance during redox cycles was investigated. Electrolyte-support cell with nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia composite anode was prepared and tested under discharge process with redox cycles. Redox treatment was basically conducted every 20 h during discharge process. Polarization resistance decreased just after redox treatment and increased during discharge process. Enhancement of cell performance after every redox cycles and faster degradation in the following discharge process were observed. Polarization resistance gradually increased as redox cycles were repeated. Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) observation was conducted for reconstructing the three dimensional microstructures of the tested samples. From the three dimensional microstructure reconstruction, it is found that the shape of nickel particle got thinner and complicated after redox cycles. Triple phase boundary (TPB) length increased after redox treatment and decreased after discharge process. This TPB change was highly associated with Ni connectivity and Ni specific surface area. These microstructure changes are consistent with the change of cell performance enhancement after redox treatment and degradation after discharge process. However, TPB length density kept on increasing as redox cycles are repeated, which is inconsistent with the gradual degradation of anode performance.

  3. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  4. Performance of PtPd electrocatalysts in direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Tae; Choi, Mahnsoo; An, Jung-Chul; Lee, Hong-Ki; Shim, Joongpyo

    2010-05-01

    PtPd nanoparticles on carbon black were prepared to investigate the role of Pd in the anode and cathode of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The PtPd catalysts in the anode showed a significantly lower performance than the PtRu catalyst. However, the cell performances of these catalysts in the cathode were comparable to that of the Pt catalyst. From cyclic voltammetry, it was observed that the Pd with the Pt catalyst lowered the peak potential and increased the coulombic charge for oxide reduction on the surface of the catalyst. Also, the Pd catalyst without Pt showed relatively high activity for oxygen reduction reaction.

  5. Electrodeposition of nickel onto steel, using a thermostatic cell and movable anode by a variable current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega G, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, metallic coatings of nickel was made over carbon steel using two different electrolytic solutions: The Watts's bath and the nickel sulfamate bath, using a pulse variable current. The method use was the traditional method, its means a thermostatic cell and one movable anode, which is a few know technique nowadays, it allow realize depositions away from any laboratory or special workshop, it has the advantage to be a portable dispositive. At last of all the electro depositions the coatings quality was valuable by them physical properties like: adhesion, hardness, wrinkled and thickness. The best results was obtain by the Nickel sulfamate bath and movable anode, less in the thickness, which has higher on the thermostatic cell. The variable current was obtain by a Pulse Generator and a Cathodic galvanometer. (Author)

  6. New catalysts for miniaturized methanol fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Christoffer Mølleskov; Chorkendorff, Ib; Stephens, Ifan

    2016-01-01

    The methanol fuel cell is an interesting energy technology, capable of converting the chemical energy of methanol directly into electricity. The technology is specifically attractive for small mobile applications such as laptops, smartphones, tablets etc. since it offers almost instantaneously recharging by simply replacing the methanol liquid. The technology is currently being developed for hearing instruments in order to ease the handling of the device for users complaining about difficulti...

  7. Development of Biologically Modified Anodes for Energy Harvesting Using Microbial Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    transport to the cathode. The main products of the anode reaction are carbon dioxide, protons and electrons. The cathode is kept aerobic to allow...efficiencies. Enzyme based fuel cells use catalytic proteins which have been purified from organisms and immobilized on the electrode surfaces... chitin , cellulose, and carbohydrates. Efficiencies of MFCs operating on these complex fuels has been reported to be as high as 65% for consortia and

  8. LOW-TEMPERATURE, ANODE-SUPPORTED HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS WITH NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Anil V. Virkar

    2003-05-23

    This report summarizes the work done during the entire project period, between October 1, 1999 and March 31, 2003, which includes a six-month no-cost extension. During the project, eight research papers have, either been, published, accepted for publication, or submitted for publication. In addition, several presentations have been made in technical meetings and workshops. The project also has provided support for four graduate students working towards advanced degrees. The principal technical objective of the project was to analyze the role of electrode microstructure on solid oxide fuel cell performance. Prior theoretical work conducted in our laboratory demonstrated that the particle size of composite electrodes has a profound effect on cell performance; the finer the particle size, the lower the activation polarization, the better the performance. The composite cathodes examined consisted of electronically conducting perovskites such as Sr-doped LaMnO{sub 3} (LSM) or Sr-doped LaCoO{sub 3} (LSC), which is also a mixed conductor, as the electrocatalyst, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) or rare earth oxide doped CeO{sub 2} as the ionic conductor. The composite anodes examined were mixtures of Ni and YSZ. A procedure was developed for the synthesis of nanosize YSZ by molecular decomposition, in which unwanted species were removed by leaching, leaving behind nanosize YSZ. Anode-supported cells were made using the as-synthesized powders, or using commercially acquired powders. The electrolyte was usually a thin ({approx}10 microns), dense layer of YSZ, supported on a thick ({approx}1 mm), porous Ni + YSZ anode. The cathode was a porous mixture of electrocatalyst and an ionic conductor. Most of the cell testing was done at 800 C with hydrogen as fuel and air as the oxidant. Maximum power densities as high as 1.8 W/cm{sup 2} were demonstrated. Polarization behavior of the cells was theoretically analyzed. A limited amount of cell testing was done using liquid

  9. Instrument for layer-by-layer deposition of catalyst layers directly on proton exchange membrane for direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Wang, L; Liang, J; Liu, C

    2012-09-01

    A catalyst layer (CL) layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition instrument, consisting of an electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) device and a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fixing device, has been developed. It has been used to deposit anode CL on Nafion membrane under different working distances of 4, 5, and 6 mm. The incorporation of EHDA LbL deposition allowed the generation of the CLs with different structures, where the higher working distance produced more porous CL structure. A catalyst-coated membrane (CCM) was also produced using this EHDA LbL deposition and PEM fixing device. It was observed that the catalyst has been uniformly coated on the Nafion membrane and the CCM presents an uniform surface feature. The performance of a single direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) assembled with the deposited CCM at different working temperatures was analysed. The cell performance increased when the temperature rose. This instrument has the potential of being developed into a powerful device for controlling the deposition of CL of desired structures directly on PEM for DMFCs.

  10. Thermal Cyclability of Reactive Air Braze Seals in Anode Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, John S.; Darsell, Jens T.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Weil, K. Scott

    2004-12-31

    The popularity of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) has increased in tandem with the ability to fabricate thinner gas-tight yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte layers, which can now be routinely produced on the order of 7 to 10 μm thick. While this has significantly improved power output and decreased the required fuel cell operating temperatures, the ability to reliably seal fuel cells remains a concern. The seals must be hermetic and be robust enough to retain their hermeticity even under the extreme operating conditions of SOFCs. Perhaps the largest contributor to stresses experienced by the seal is the fact that the SOFC is an assembly of many different materials with different thermal expansion properties. Although every effort is made to minimize thermal expansion mismatches across the seals, the stresses developed during thermal cycling still jeopardize seal integrity. Reactive air brazing (RAB), a method of joining that employs a metallic, and therefore non-brittle, seal material has been used to seal electrolyte/anode bilayers, such as those in anode-supported SOFCs, to Crofer-22 alloy. The results of rupture strength testing will be reported for as-brazed and thermally cycled samples and the effect of thermal cycling on the RAB seal microstructure will be shown

  11. Photocatalytic effect of anodic titanium oxide nanotubes on various cell culture media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chun-Kang; Hu, Kan-Hung; Wang, Shing-Hoa [National Taiwan Ocean University, Center for Marine Bioenvironment and Biotechnology, Keelung (China); National Taiwan Ocean University, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, Keelung (China); Hsu, Todd [National Taiwan Ocean University, Center for Marine Bioenvironment and Biotechnology, Keelung (China); National Taiwan Ocean University, Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Keelung (China); Tsai, Huei-Ting [National Taiwan Ocean University, Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Keelung (China); Chen, Chien-Chon [National United University, Department of Energy and Resources, Miaoli (China); Liu, Shiu-Mei [National Taiwan Ocean University, Center for Marine Bioenvironment and Biotechnology, Keelung (China); National Taiwan Ocean University, Institute of Marine Biology, Keelung (China); Lin, Tai-Yuan [National Taiwan Ocean University, Institute of Optoelectronic Sciences, Keelung (China); Chen, Chin-Hsing [National Chiao Tong University, Department of Applied Chemistry, Hsinchu (China)

    2011-02-15

    The use of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) in photodynamic therapy for the treatment of cancer cells has been proposed following studies of cultured cancer cells. In this work, an ordered channel array of anodic titanium oxide (ATO) was fabricated by anodizing titanium foil. The ATO layer of nanotubes with diameters of 100 nm was made in NH{sub 4}F electrolyte by anodization. The photocatalytic effect of ATO was examined on various culture media by ultraviolet A (UV-A) (366 nm) irradiation. After UV-A irradiation of the ATO layer, redox potential of Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.5) and dilute acrylamide solution increased instantaneously. The redox potential of the serum-containing RPMI1640 medium also increased dramatically, while that of serum-containing MEM and DMEM media increased slightly. The UVA-induced high redox potential was correlated with the greater ability to break down plasmid DNA strands. These phenomena suggest that a culture medium, such as RPMI1640, with a greater ability to produce free radical may be associated with a stronger photocatalytic effect of ATO on cultured cancer cells reported previously. (orig.)

  12. Reforming results of a novel radial reactor for a solid oxide fuel cell system with anode off-gas recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Timo; Carré, Maxime; Heinzel, Angelika; Steffen, Michael; Lapicque, François

    2017-12-01

    A novel reactor of a natural gas (NG) fueled, 1 kW net power solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system with anode off-gas recirculation (AOGR) is experimentally investigated. The reactor operates as pre-reformer, is of the type radial reactor with centrifugal z-flow, has the shape of a hollow cylinder with a volume of approximately 1 L and is equipped with two different precious metal wire-mesh catalyst packages as well as with an internal electric heater. Reforming investigations of the reactor are done stand-alone but as if the reactor would operate within the total SOFC system with AOGR. For the tests presented here it is assumed that the SOFC system runs on pure CH4 instead of NG. The manuscript focuses on the various phases of reactor operation during the startup process of the SOFC system. Startup process reforming experiments cover reactor operation points at which it runs on an oxygen to carbon ratio at the reactor inlet (ϕRI) of 1.2 with air supplied, up to a ϕRI of 2.4 without air supplied. As confirmed by a Monte Carlo simulation, most of the measured outlet gas concentrations are in or close to equilibrium.

  13. Biogas Catalytic Reforming Studies on Nickel-Based Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Gregory B.; Hjalmarsson, Per; Norrman, Kion

    2016-01-01

    of experiments were performed to study catalytic activity and effect of sulfur poisoning: (i) CH4 and CO2 dissociation; (ii) biogas (60% CH4 and 40% CO2) temperature-programmed reactions (TPRxn); and (iii) steady-state biogas reforming reactions followed by postmortem catalyst characterization by temperature......-programmed oxidation and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Results showed thatNi/ScYSZ/Pd-CGO was more active for catalytic dissociation of CH4 at 750°C and subsequent reactivity of deposited carbonaceous species. Sulfur deactivated most catalytic reactions except CO2 dissociation at 750°C. The presence...... of Pd-CGO helped to mitigate sulfur deactivation effect; e.g. lowering the onset temperature (up to 190°C) for CH4 conversion during temperature-programmed reactions. Both Ni/ScYSZ and Ni/ScYSZ/Pd-CGO anode catalysts were more active for dry reforming of biogas than they were for steam reforming...

  14. Intermittent contact of fluidized anode particles containing exoelectrogenic biofilms for continuous power generation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jia

    2014-09-01

    Current generation in a microbial fuel cell can be limited by the amount of anode surface area available for biofilm formation, and slow substrate degradation kinetics. Increasing the anode surface area can increase the amount of biofilm, but performance will improve only if the anode material is located near the cathode to minimize solution internal resistance. Here we demonstrate that biofilms do not have to be in constant contact with the anode to produce current in an MFC. Granular activated carbon particles enriched with exoelectrogenic biofilm are fluidized (by stirring) in the anode chamber of the MFC, resulting in only intermittent contact between the particles and the anode current collector. The maximum power density generated is 951 ± 10 mW m-2, compared to 813 ± 2 mW m-2 for the control without stirring (packed bed), and 525 ± 1 mW m-2 in the absence of GAC particles and without stirring. GAC-biofilm particles demonstrate capacitor-like behavior, but achieve nearly constant discharge conditions due to the large number of particles that contact the current collector. These results provide proof of concept for the development of flowable electrode reactors, where anode biofilms can be electrically charged in a separate storage tank and then rapidly discharged in compact anode chambers. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Thomas

    2012-01-26

    This SBIR program will result in improved LTA cell technology which is the fundamental building block of the Direct Coal ECL concept. As described below, ECL can make enormous efficiency and cost contributions to utility scale coal power. This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

  16. A solvent approach to the size-controllable synthesis of ultrafine Pt catalysts for methanol oxidation in direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Feng, Yan; Li, Jianling; Wang, Xindong; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An ethylene glycol-based approach for the synthesis of Pt/C catalysts with uniform Pt nanoparticles. • Superior catalytic activity of Pt/C catalysts synthesized at EG/water volume ratio of 1/1 for methanol oxidation reaction. • High performance of MEA for DMFC using Pt/C catalysts synthesized at EG/water volume ratio of 1/1 at anode. - Abstract: An ethylene glycol (EG)-based approach has been developed for the synthesis of Pt/C catalysts with uniform Pt nanoparticles. A number of characterization techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electrochemical measurements are used to characterize the as-prepared Pt catalysts. The well-dispersed Pt nanoparticles with average size of approximate 2 nm could be obtained in the EG/water mixture with volume ratio of 1/1, which display higher activity for methanol oxidation than that of the Pt/C products prepared at other EG/water volume ratios (0:1, 2:1, and 1:0). In particular, the performance of the Pt nanoparticles prepared at EG/water volume ratio of 1/1 in the membrane electrode assembly for direct methanol fuel cells has also been evaluated and benchmarked by commercial Pt/C catalysts. This study offers a vivid example to synthesize Pt nanoparticles with fine size and good catalytic activity by simply tuning the solvent ratio in colloidal chemistry methods

  17. An air-breathing micro direct methanol fuel cell stack employing a single shared anode using silicon microfabrication technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Zhou, Yan'an; Zhang, Qian; Zhu, Yiming; Liu, Litian

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents a silicon-based air-breathing micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) stack with a shared anode plate and two air-breathing cathode plates. Three kinds of anode plates featured by different methanol transport methods are designed and simulated. Microfabrication technologies, including double-side lithography and bulk-micromachining, are used to fabricate both anode and cathode silicon plates on the same wafer simultaneously. Three μDMFC stacks with different kinds of anodes are assembled, and characterized with a single cell together. Simulation and experimental results show that the μDMFC stack with fuel transport in a shared model has the best performance, and this stack achieves a power of 2.52 mW which is almost double that of a single cell of 1.28 mW.

  18. Silver/iron oxide/graphitic carbon composites as bacteriostatic catalysts for enhancing oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; You, Shijie; Gong, Xiaobo; Dai, Ying; Zou, Jinlong; Fu, Honggang

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms from anode heterotrophic bacteria are inevitably formed over cathodic catalytic sites, limiting the performances of single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Graphitic carbon (GC) - based nano silver/iron oxide (AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC) composites are prepared from waste pomelo skin and used as antibacterial oxygen reduction catalysts for MFCs. AgNPs and Fe3O4 are introduced in situ into the composites by one-step carbothermal reduction, enhancing their conductivity and catalytic activity. To investigate the effects of Fe species on the antibacterial and catalytic properties, AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC is washed with sulfuric acid (1 mol L-1) for 0.5 h, 1 h, and 5 h and marked as AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-x (x = 0.5 h, 1 h and 5 h, respectively). A maximum power density of 1712 ± 35 mW m-2 is obtained by AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-1 h, which declines by 4.12% after 17 cycles. Under catalysis of all AgNP-containing catalysts, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) proceeds via the 4e- pathway, and no toxic effects to anode microorganisms result from inhibiting the cathodic biofilm overgrowth. With the exception of AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-5 h, the AgNPs-containing composites exhibit remarkable power output and coulombic efficiency through lowering proton transfer resistance and air-cathode biofouling. This study provides a perspective for the practical application of MFCs using these efficient antibacterial ORR catalysts.

  19. Segregation of the anodic microbial communities in a microbial fuel cell cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas eHodgson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic interactions within microbial communities are essential for the efficient degradation of complex organic compounds, and underpin natural phenomena driven by microorganisms, such as the recycling of carbon-, nitrogen-, and sulphur-containing molecules. These metabolic interactions ultimately determine the function, activity and stability of the community, and therefore their understanding would be essential to steer processes where microbial communities are involved. This is exploited in the design of microbial fuel cells (MFCs, bioelectrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy present in substrates into electrical energy through the metabolic activity of microorganisms, either single species or communities. In this work, we analysed the evolution of the microbial community structure in a cascade of microbial fuel cells (MFCs inoculated with an anaerobic microbial community and continuously fed with a complex medium. The analysis of the composition of the anodic communities revealed the establishment of different communities in the anodes of the hydraulically connected MFCs, with a decrease in the abundance of fermentative taxa and a concurrent increase in respiratory taxa along the cascade. The analysis of the metabolites in the anodic suspension showed a metabolic shift between the first and last MFC, confirming the segregation of the anodic communities. Those results suggest a metabolic interaction mechanism between the predominant fermentative bacteria at the first stages of the cascade and the anaerobic respiratory electrogenic population in the latter stages, which is reflected in the observed increase in power output. We show that our experimental system represents an ideal platform for optimization of processes where the degradation of complex substrates is involved, as well as a potential tool for the study of metabolic interactions in complex microbial communities.

  20. LIQUID HYDROCARBON FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compound anode consists of a reforming catalyst bed in direct contact with a palladium-silver fuel cell anode. The objective of this study was to...prove the feasibility of operating a compound anode fuel cell on a liquid hydrocarbon and to define the important parameters that influence cell...performance. Both reformer and fuel cell tests were conducted with various liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Included in this report is a description of the

  1. A modified anode/electrolyte structure for a solid oxide electrochemical cell and a method for making said structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A novel modified anode/electrolyte structure for a solid oxide electrochemical cell is an assembly comprising (a) an anode consisting of a backbone of electronically conductive perovskite oxides selected from the group of doped strontium titanates and mixtures thereof, (b) a scandia and yttria...... treatments resulted in a distribution of the metallic and/or ceramic interlayers in the electrolyte/anode backbone junction taking place. The structure is prepared by (a) depositing a ceramic interlayer onto one side of the electrolyte, (b) optionally applying a metallic interlayer thereon, (c) repeating...

  2. Fracture properties of nickel-based anodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutianos, Stergios; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2010-01-01

    Reliable assessment of structural integrity of fuel cells requires the knowledge of the mechanical properties of their individual components, in particular the fracture toughness. A technique is presented to measure the critical energy-release rate/fracture toughness of thin ceramic layers...... such as the anode material (NiO–YSZ) in a fuel cell. The approach involves a new specimen geometry which consists of a thin ceramic glued onto thick steel beams to form a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen. The fracture toughness values, measured from truly sharp cracks, are obtained over a range of applied...

  3. Solid-state electrochromic cell with anodic iridium oxide film electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dautremont-Smith, W.C.; Beni, G.; Schiavone, L.M.; Shay, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    A new solid-state electrochromic cell has been fabricated using an anodic iridium oxide film (AIROF) display electrode. The cell has the symmetric sandwich structure AIROFvertical-barNafionvertical-barAIROF, with the Nafion solid electrolyte opacified by an in situ precipitation technique. A symmetric square-wave voltage of 1.5 V amplitude produces clearly perceivable color changes from pale to dark blue-gray in approx. =1 sec when viewed in diffuse reflection. Good open-circuit optical memory is exhibited:

  4. High-performance Platinum-free oxygen reduction reaction and hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Priji; Ghosh, Arpita; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2018-02-26

    The integration of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack into vehicles necessitates the replacement of high-priced platinum (Pt)-based electrocatalyst, which contributes to about 45% of the cost of the stack. The implementation of high-performance and durable Pt metal-free catalyst for both oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) could significantly enable large-scale commercialization of fuel cell-powered vehicles. Towards this goal, a simple, scalable, single-step synthesis method was adopted to develop palladium-cobalt alloy supported on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (Pd 3 Co/NG) nanocomposite. Rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) studies for the electrochemical activity towards ORR indicates that ORR proceeds via nearly four-electron mechanism. Besides, the mass activity of Pd 3 Co/NG shows an enhancement of 1.6 times compared to that of Pd/NG. The full fuel cell measurements were carried out using Pd 3 Co/NG at the anode, cathode in conjunction with Pt/C and simultaneously at both anode and cathode. A maximum power density of 68 mW/cm 2 is accomplished from the simultaneous use of Pd 3 Co/NG as both anode and cathode electrocatalyst with individual loading of 0.5 mg/cm 2 at 60 °C without any backpressure. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first of its kind of a fully non-Pt based PEM full cell.

  5. Suitability of granular carbon as an anode material for sediment microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arends, Jan B.A.; Blondeel, Evelyne; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Faculty of Bioscience Engineering; Tennison, Steve R. [Mast Carbon International Ltd., Basingstoke, Hampshire (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Sediment microbial fuel cells (S-MFCs) are bio-electrochemical devices that are able to oxidize organic matter directly into harvestable electrical power. The flux of organic matter into the sediment is rather low; therefore, other researchers have introduced plants for a continuous supply of organic matter to the anode electrode. Until now only interconnected materials have been considered as anode materials in S-MFCs. Here, granular carbon materials were investigated for their suitability as an anode material in S-MFCs. Materials and methods: Laboratory microcosms with eight different electrode materials (granules, felts and cloths) were examined with controlled organic matter addition under brackish conditions. Current density, organic matter removal and microbial community composition were monitored using 16S rRNA gene PCR followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The main parameters investigated were the influence of the amount of electrode material applied to the sediment, the size of the granular material and the electrode configuration. Results and discussion: Felt material had an overall superior performance in terms of current density per amount of applied electrode material; felt and granular anode obtained similar current densities (approx. 50-60 mA m{sup -2}), but felt materials required 29 % less material to be applied. Yet, when growing plants, granular carbon is more suited because it is considered to restore, upon disturbance, the electrical connectivity within the anode compartment. Small granules (0.25-0.5 mm) gave the highest current density compared to larger granules (1-5 mm) of the same material. Granules with a rough surface had a better performance compared to smooth granules of the same size. The different granular materials lead to a selection of distinct microbial communities for each material, as shown by DGGE. Conclusions: Granular carbon is suitable as an anode material for S-MFCs. This opens the possibility

  6. Functionalized Graphitic Supports for Improved Fuel Cell Catalyst Stability, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) together with the University of Connecticut (UCONN) proposes to demonstrate the improved fuel cell catalyst support durability offered...

  7. Stability and reliability of anodic biofilms under different feedstock conditions: Towards microbial fuel cell sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiseon You

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stability and reliability of microbial fuel cell anodic biofilms, consisting of mixed cultures, were investigated in a continuously fed system. Two groups of anodic biofilm matured with different substrates, acetate and casein for 20–25 days, reached steady states and produced 80–87 μW and 20–29 μW consistently for 3 weeks, respectively. When the substrates were swapped, the casein-enriched group showed faster response to acetate and higher power output, compared to the acetate-enriched group. Also when the substrates were switched back to their original groups, the power output of both groups returned to the previous levels more quickly than when the substrates were swapped the first time. During the substrate change, both MFC groups showed stable power output once they reached their steady states and the output of each group with different substrates was reproducible within the same group. Community level physiological profiling also revealed the possibility of manipulating anodic biofilm metabolisms through exposure to different feedstock conditions.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation of anode exhaust of direct methanol fuel cells without isotope enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Young Seok; Hwang, Reo Yun; Han, Ochee [Western Seoul Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Fuel cells are devices that electrochemically convert the chemical energy of fuels such as natural gas, gasoline, and methanol, into electricity. Fuel cells more efficiently use energy than internal combustion engines and do not produce undesirable pollutants, such as NO{sub x} ,SO{sub x} and particulates. Fuel cells can be distinguished from one another by their electrolytes. Among the various direct alcohol fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have been developed most. However, DMFCs have several practical problems such as methanol crossove r from an anode to a cathode and slow methanol oxidation reaction rates. Therefore, understanding the electrochemical reaction mechanisms of DMFCs may provide clues to solve these problems, and various analytical methods have been employed to examine these mechanisms. We demonstrated that {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy can be used for analyzing anode exhausts of DMFCs operated with methanol without any isotope enrichment. However, the low sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy hindered our efforts to detect minor reaction intermediates. Therefore, sensitivity enhancement techniques such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR methods and/or presaturation methods to increase the dynamic range of the proton spectra by pre-saturating large water signals, are expected to be useful to detect low-concentration species.

  9. Sustainable Hypersaline Microbial Fuel Cells: Inexpensive Recyclable Polymer Supports for Carbon Nanotube Conductive Paint Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattieri, Matteo; Shivel, Nelson D; Sifat, Iram; Bestetti, Massimiliano; Minteer, Shelley D

    2017-05-09

    Microbial fuel cells are an emerging technology for wastewater treatment, but to be commercially viable and sustainable, the electrode materials must be inexpensive, recyclable, and reliable. In this study, recyclable polymeric supports were explored for the development of anode electrodes to be applied in single-chamber microbial fuel cells operated in field under hypersaline conditions. The support was covered with a carbon nanotube (CNT) based conductive paint, and biofilms were able to colonize the electrodes. The single-chamber microbial fuel cells with Pt-free cathodes delivered a reproducible power output after 15 days of operation to achieve 12±1 mW m -2 at a current density of 69±7 mA m -2 . The decrease of the performance in long-term experiments was mostly related to inorganic precipitates on the cathode electrode and did not affect the performance of the anode, as shown by experiments in which the cathode was replaced and the fuel cell performance was regenerated. The results of these studies show the feasibility of polymeric supports coated with CNT-based paint for microbial fuel cell applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Fabrication of biofuel cell containing enzyme catalyst immobilized by layer-by-layer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Kyu Hwan; Han, Sang Won; Koh, Won-Gun; Kwon, Yongchai

    2015-07-01

    Enzymatic biofuel cell (EBC) employing a layer-by-layer (LbL) structure consisting of multiple layers of glucose oxidase (GOx) and poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) at carbon nanotube (CNT) ([GOx/PEI]n/CNT) is fabricated. The [GOx/PEI]n/CNT serves as anode catalyst for promoting glucose reaction, while Pt is employed as cathode catalyst. To evaluate effect of [GOx/PEI]n/CNT on EBC performance and stability, several characterizations are conducted. The optimal GOx/PEI layer is determined electrochemically, and it turns out that [GOx/PEI]2/CNT is the best. Electron transfer rate constant of the optimal layer is 11.3 s-1, its glucose sensitivity is 83 μAmM-1cm-2, and maximum power density of EBC adopting [GOx/PEI]2/CNT is 1.34 mWcm-2. The values are superior to those of other reference structures, indicating that the [GOx/PEI]2/CNT can produce excellent reactivity, followed by improved EBC performance. In terms of redox reaction mechanism of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) within [GOx/PEI]2/CNT, glucose does not affect the redox reaction of FAD, while oxygen serves as mediator in transferring electrons and protons produced by glucose oxidation into those for reduction reaction of FAD. It is also found that the [GOx/PEI]2/CNT is confined by surface reaction and the reaction is quasi-reversible. Regarding long-term stability, [GOx/PEI]2/CNT maintains ∼83% of initial activity even after two weeks.

  11. A comparison of bioelectricity in microbial fuel cells with aerobic and anaerobic anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2014-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can, besides running on wastewater, also derive energy directly from certain aquatic plants. However, few studies have focussed on electricity generation using aerobic anodes. This study presents a comparison of the MFC performances of an anaerobic-anode MFC (ana-MFC) and an aerobic-anode MFC (aa-MFC), and shows their individual conditions for optimal operation. Results show that the maximum power density of 7.07 +/- 0.45 mW/m2 for the ana-MFC occurred at 500 omega, whereas the aa-MFC had a maximum power density of 2.34 +/- 0.16 mW/m2 at 2200 omega. The ana-MFC generally achieved high electricity generation, and the aa-MFC achieved relatively high electricity generation when fed with a diluted substrate. In the ana-MFC, the optimal substrate for electricity generation was glucose (fermentable substrate); however, glucose and acetic acid (non-fermentable substrate) were both suitable substrates for the aa-MFC. The optimal gas retention times of the ana-MFC and the aa-MFC were 9 and 120 s, respectively. This retention time is an important limiting factor of electricity generation for the ana-MFC. The aa-MFCs fed with different substrates exhibited non-significant differences between bacterial communities. We observed the relative diversities of bacterial communities in the ana-MFC fed with various substrates. The results of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis suggest that Ochrobactrum intermedium, Delftia acidovorans, and Citrobacterfreundii may be potential electrogenic bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing the MFC performances of anaerobic and aerobic anodes.

  12. Improved performance of the microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell with enlarged anode and high applied voltages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bo; Luo, Haiping; Lu, Yaobin; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Li, Xiao

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to improve performance of the microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC) using enlarged anode and high applied voltages. MEDCCs with anode lengths of 9 and 48cm (i.e., the 9cm-anode MEDCC and 48cm-anode MEDCC, respectively) were tested under different voltages (1.2-3.0V). Our results demonstrated for the first time that the MEDCC could maintain high performance even under the applied voltage higher than that for water dissociation (i.e., 1.8V). Under the applied voltage of 2.5V, the maximum current density in the 48cm-anode MEDCC reached 32.8±2.6A/m 2 , which is one of the highest current densities reported so far in the bioelectrochemical system (BES). The relative abundance of Geobacter was changed along the anode length. Our results show the great potential of the BES with enlarged anode and high applied voltages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced electrical contact of microbes using Fe(3)O(4)/CNT nanocomposite anode in mediator-less microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Ho; Christy, Maria; Kim, Pil; Nahm, Kee Suk

    2014-08-15

    A novel Fe(3)O(4)/CNT nanocomposite was synthesized and employed for the modification of carbon paper anode in a mediator-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) to enhance its performance. The Fe(3)O(4)/CNT composite modified anodes with various Fe(3)O(4) contents were investigated to find the optimum ratio of the nanocomposite for the best MFC performance. The Fe(3)O(4)/CNT modified anodes produced much higher power densities than unmodified carbon anode and the 30wt% Fe3O4/CNT modified anode exhibited a maximum power density of 830mW/m(2). In the Fe(3)O(4)/CNT composite modified anode, Fe(3)O(4) helps to attach the CNT on anode surface by its magnetic attraction and forms a multi layered network, whereas CNT offers a better nanostructure environment for bacterial growth and helps electron transfer from E.coli to electrode resulting in the increase in the current production with the catalytic activity of bacteria. The electrocatalytic behavior and all possible mechanism for their better performance are discussed in detail with the help of various structural and electrochemical techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Spatial distribution of bacterial communities on volumetric and planar anodes in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Vargas, Ignacio T.

    2013-05-29

    Pyrosequencing was used to characterize bacterial communities in air-cathode microbial fuel cells across a volumetric (graphite fiber brush) and a planar (carbon cloth) anode, where different physical and chemical gradients would be expected associated with the distance between anode location and the air cathode. As expected, the stable operational voltage and the coulombic efficiency (CE) were higher for the volumetric anode than the planar anode (0.57V and CE=22% vs. 0.51V and CE=12%). The genus Geobacter was the only known exoelectrogen among the observed dominant groups, comprising 57±4% of recovered sequences for the brush and 27±5% for the carbon-cloth anode. While the bacterial communities differed between the two anode materials, results showed that Geobacter spp. and other dominant bacterial groups were homogenously distributed across both planar and volumetric anodes. This lends support to previous community analysis interpretations based on a single biofilm sampling location in these systems. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Diffusion-free mediator based miniature biofuel cell anode fabricated on a carbon-MEMS electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Gobind S; Holmberg, Sunny; Kulinsky, Lawrence; Madou, Marc

    2012-10-02

    concentration of the enzyme on the electrode surface during incubation. The electrodes were finally protected with a gelatin based hydrogel film. The anode half-cell was tested using cyclic voltammetry in deoxygenated phosphate buffer saline solution pH 7.4 to minimize oxygen interference and to simulate the pH environment of the body. The electrodes that yielded the highest anodic current were prepared by enzyme attachment method with dry spotting incubation. A polarization response was generated for this anodic half-cell and exhibits operation close to maximum efficiency that is limited by the mass transport of glucose to the electrode.

  16. Printed biofuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joseph; Windmiller, Joshua Ray; Jia, Wenzhao

    2016-11-22

    Methods, systems, and devices are disclosed for implementing a biofuel cell device for extracting energy from a biofuel. In one aspect, a biofuel cell device includes a substrate, an anode including a catalyst to facilitate the conversion of a fuel in a biological fluid in an oxidative process that releases electrons captured at the anode, thereby extracting energy from the fuel substance, a cathode configured on the substrate adjacent to the anode and separated from the anode by a spacing region, and a load electrically coupled to the anode and cathode via electrical interconnects to obtain the extracted energy as electrical energy.

  17. Effect of the ethanol concentration in the anode on the direct ethanol fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belchor, Pablo Martins; Loeser, Neiva; Forte, Maria Madalena de Camargo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Carpenter, Deyse [Fundacao Universidade Regional de Blumenau (FURB), Blumenau, SC (Brazil)], Email: rafarstv@hotmail.com

    2010-07-01

    Changes in the climate, sources and development of renewable energy are issues that have gain greater importance, and fuel cells have been investigated as an alternative source to produce energy through electrochemical reactions. Among the fuel cells types the Proton Exchange Membrane (PEMFC), fed with pure hydrogen at the anode and oxygen at the cathode, seen be the more promising ones as an electrolyte for portable, mobile and stationary applications due to its low emissions, low operating temperature, high power density and quick configuration. To avoid inconvenience of storage and transportation of pure hydrogen a PEMFC fed with alcohols has been developed, named Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells (DAFC). One way to increase the performance of DAFC is added water in the alcohol inserted into the anode, because the water keeps the membrane hydrated. In this work, the performance of a DAFC was evaluated by following the loss in the polarization curve and cell power by varying the ethanol/water ratio. The aim of this study was determine the optimal water/ethanol ratio to be feed in a DEFC prototype mounted in the lab. By the results it was possible to point that the best concentration of ethanol aqueous solution for the DEFC tested was around 1 mol.L-1. (author)

  18. Solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire anodes for organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ian E.; Rathmell, Aaron R.; Yan, Liang; Ye, Shengrong; Flowers, Patrick F.; You, Wei; Wiley, Benjamin J.

    2014-05-01

    This work describes a process to make anodes for organic solar cells from copper-nickel nanowires with solution-phase processing. Copper nanowire films were coated from solution onto glass and made conductive by dipping them in acetic acid. Acetic acid removes the passivating oxide from the surface of copper nanowires, thereby reducing the contact resistance between nanowires to nearly the same extent as hydrogen annealing. Films of copper nanowires were made as oxidation resistant as silver nanowires under dry and humid conditions by dipping them in an electroless nickel plating solution. Organic solar cells utilizing these completely solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire films exhibited efficiencies of 4.9%.This work describes a process to make anodes for organic solar cells from copper-nickel nanowires with solution-phase processing. Copper nanowire films were coated from solution onto glass and made conductive by dipping them in acetic acid. Acetic acid removes the passivating oxide from the surface of copper nanowires, thereby reducing the contact resistance between nanowires to nearly the same extent as hydrogen annealing. Films of copper nanowires were made as oxidation resistant as silver nanowires under dry and humid conditions by dipping them in an electroless nickel plating solution. Organic solar cells utilizing these completely solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire films exhibited efficiencies of 4.9%. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01024h

  19. Development and characterization of membrane electrode assembly of direct methanol fuel cells using hydrocarbon membranes and supported catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoming

    Direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an attractive power source for portable applications in the near future, due to the high energy density of liquid methanol. Towards commercialization of the DMFC, several technical and economic challenges need to be addressed though. The present study aims at developing and characterizing high performance membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for the DMFCs by using a hydrocarbon type membrane (PolyFuel 62) and supported catalysts (PtRu/C). First, methanol and water transport properties in the PolyFuel 62 membrane were examined by various material characterization methods. Compared with the currently used perflurosulfonated Nafion 212 membrane, the PolyFuel membrane has lower methanol crossover, especially at high testing temperature. In addition, based on results of water diffusivity test, water diffusion through the PolyFuel membrane was also lower compared with the Nafion membrane. In order to check the possible impacts of the low methanol and water diffusivities in the PolyFuel membrane, a MEA with this new type of membrane was developed and its performance was compared with a Nafion MEA with otherwise identical electrodes and GDLs. The results showed anode performance was identical, while cathode performance of the PolyFuel MEA was lower. More experiments combined with a transmission line model revealed that low water transport through the PolyFuel membrane resulted in a higher proton resistance in the cathode electrode and thus, leading to a low cathode performance. Thus increasing the water content in the cathode electrode is critical for using the PolyFuel membrane in the DMFC MEA. Then, a low loading carbon supported catalyst, PtRu/C, was prepared and tested as the anode electrode in a MEA of the DMFC. Compared with performance of an unsupported MEA, we could find that lower performance in the supported MEA was due to methanol transport limitation because of the denser and thicker supported catalyst layer. Accordingly, an

  20. New anode material for lithium-ion cells produced by catalytic graphitization of glassy carbon at 1000 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skowronski, J.M. [Poznan Univ. of Technology, Poznan (Poland). Inst. of Chemistry and Technical Electrochemistry; Central Lab. of Batteries and Cells, Poznan (Poland); Knofczynski, K. [Central Lab. of Batteries and Cells, Poznan (Poland)

    2006-10-15

    This study investigated the conversion of glassy carbon into graphite at relatively low temperature of 1000 degrees C under ambient pressure using iron powder as the catalyst. The composite product of reaction was a graphite and turbostratic carbon whose use was then examined in terms of application in lithium-ion cells. Glassy, hard carbon spheres of 10 to 15 {iota}m were prepared from phenolic resin in a nitrogen atmosphere and then subjected to heat treatment with an iron powder mixture. After cooling down to ambient temperature, the carbon/iron mixture was treated with diluted HCl solution to remove metallic additives. The modified carbon was then washed with distilled water until chloride ions disappeared in a filtrate. All samples were characterized using XRD analysis. Working electrodes for electrochemical measurements were made by mixing carbons with PVDF. Cyclic voltammograms recorded for unmodified and modified carbons were consistent with XRD measurements. SEM analysis revealed that the process of graphitization begins at the external regions of glassy carbon spheres where erosion occurs when the carbon reacts with iron particles. The surface destruction of carbon spheres progresses into the interior of the spheres, resulting in their collapse followed by the transformation into pallets resembling a stack of graphite sheets. It was noted that not all unorganized carbon was conversed to graphite. Rather, only 50 per cent of turbostratic carbon existed in the product of heat treatment. The product of graphitization appeared to be a promising material for the preparation of anodes for lithium-ion cells. The discharge capacity for carbon produced by catalytic treatment was found to be approximately 5 times higher, while the discharge/charge reversibility was 23 per cent higher than values obtained for untreated carbon. The study showed that the uptake of lithium ions by the original carbon depends on the insertion/deinsertion mechanism of hard carbon as well

  1. Fabrication and impedance studies of DMFC anode incorporated with CNT-supported high-metal-content electrocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, King-Tsai; Chien, Chun-Ching; Hsu, Ning-Yih; Huang, Wan-Min; Chiou, Shean-Du; Lin, Su-Hsine

    In this study, the fabrication of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) anode with the incorporation of a multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT)-supported high-metal-content Pt/Ru electrocatalyst, i.e., 40 wt%Pt-20 wt%Ru/CNT, using a novel approach and the resultant DMFC performances were investigated. Employing a vacuum filtration method, we were able to successfully fabricate the DMFC anode with a good electrode structure using an in-house prepared Pt-Ru/CNT electrocatalyst. The catalyst layer was formed directly on a Teflon-treated carbon cloth having a buckypaper texture with a catalyst loading of 4.0 mg cm -2. From single-cell tests, excellent cell performances were obtained. At 80 °C, the power density was found to be as high as >100 mW cm -2. This can be attributed to a thinner catalyst layer formed with a more efficient utilization of the catalyst than that using a low-metal-content counterpart, i.e., 20 wt%Pt-10 wt%Ru/CNT, as reported in an earlier study. However, the Nafion ® ionomer content in the catalyst layer played a key role in the anode fabrication to obtain a good cell performance. In addition, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with a constant phase element (CPE)-based equivalent-circuit model was employed to analyze the fabricated anode. It distinctively revealed some specific characteristics in the resistances and the interface properties. Overall, the obtained impedance results are somewhat different from those of a conventional DMFC anode with the catalyst layer coated onto a porous gas diffusion layer (GDL) on a carbon backing material. Based on the experimental results and the impedance analyses, the high-metal-content Pt-Ru/CNT catalyst was found to be much more favorable and suitable for use as a DMFC anode catalyst.

  2. Study and development of membrane electrode assemblies for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) with palladium based catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonifacio, Rafael Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    PEMFC systems are capable of generating electricity with high efficiency and low or no emissions, but durability and cost issues prevent its large commercialization. In this work MEA with palladium based catalysts were developed, Pd/C, Pt/C and alloys PdPt/C catalysts with different ratios between metals and carbon were synthesized and characterized. A study of the ratio between catalyst and Nafion Ionomer for formation of high performance triple-phase reaction was carried out, a mathematical model to implement this adjustment to catalysts with different relations between metal and support taking into account the volumetric aspects of the catalyst layer was developed and then a study of the catalyst layer thickness was performed. X-ray diffraction, Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Energy Dispersive, Gas Pycnometry, Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry, Gas adsorption according to the BET and BJH equations, and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis techniques were used for characterization and particle size, specific surface areas and lattice parameters determinations were also carried out. All catalysts were used on MEAs preparation and evaluated in 5 cm 2 single cell from 25 to 100 °C at 1 atm and the best composition was also evaluated at 3 atm. In the study of metals for reactions, to reduce the platinum applied to the electrodes without performance losses, Pd/C and PdPt/C 1:1 were selected for anodes and cathodes, respectively. The developed MEA structure used 0,25 mgPt.cm -2 , showing power densities up to 550 mW.cm -2 and power of 2.2 kW net per gram of platinum. The estimated costs showed that there was a reduction of up to 64.5 %, compared to the MEA structures previously known. Depending on the temperature and operating pressure, values from US$ 1,475.30 to prepare MEAs for each installed kilowatt were obtained. Taking into account recent studies, it was concluded that the cost of the developed MEA is compatible with PEMFC stationary application

  3. Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous CuO/CeO2 Composite Frameworks as Anode Catalysts for Water Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki Markoulaki Ι

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cerium-rich metal oxide materials have recently emerged as promising candidates for the photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction (OER. In this article, we report the synthesis of ordered mesoporous CuO/CeO2 composite frameworks with different contents of copper(II oxide and demonstrate their activity for photocatalytic O2 production via UV-Vis light-driven oxidation of water. Mesoporous CuO/CeO2 materials have been successfully prepared by a nanocasting route, using mesoporous silica as a rigid template. X-ray diffraction, electron transmission microscopy and N2 porosimetry characterization of the as-prepared products reveal a mesoporous structure composed of parallel arranged nanorods, with a large surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. The molecular structure and optical properties of the composite materials were investigated with Raman and UV-Vis/NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Catalytic results indicated that incorporation of CuO clusters in the CeO2 lattice improved the photochemical properties. As a result, the CuO/CeO2 composite catalyst containing ~38 wt % CuO reaches a high O2 evolution rate of ~19.6 µmol·h−1 (or 392 µmol·h−1·g−1 with an apparent quantum efficiency of 17.6% at λ = 365 ± 10 nm. This OER activity compares favorably with that obtained from the non-porous CuO/CeO2 counterpart (~1.3 µmol·h−1 and pure mesoporous CeO2 (~1 µmol·h−1.

  4. Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous CuO/CeO2 Composite Frameworks as Anode Catalysts for Water Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoulaki, Vassiliki Ι.; Papadas, Ioannis T.; Kornarakis, Ioannis; Armatas, Gerasimos S.

    2015-01-01

    Cerium-rich metal oxide materials have recently emerged as promising candidates for the photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction (OER). In this article, we report the synthesis of ordered mesoporous CuO/CeO2 composite frameworks with different contents of copper(II) oxide and demonstrate their activity for photocatalytic O2 production via UV-Vis light-driven oxidation of water. Mesoporous CuO/CeO2 materials have been successfully prepared by a nanocasting route, using mesoporous silica as a rigid template. X-ray diffraction, electron transmission microscopy and N2 porosimetry characterization of the as-prepared products reveal a mesoporous structure composed of parallel arranged nanorods, with a large surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. The molecular structure and optical properties of the composite materials were investigated with Raman and UV-Vis/NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Catalytic results indicated that incorporation of CuO clusters in the CeO2 lattice improved the photochemical properties. As a result, the CuO/CeO2 composite catalyst containing ~38 wt % CuO reaches a high O2 evolution rate of ~19.6 µmol·h−1 (or 392 µmol·h−1·g−1) with an apparent quantum efficiency of 17.6% at λ = 365 ± 10 nm. This OER activity compares favorably with that obtained from the non-porous CuO/CeO2 counterpart (~1.3 µmol·h−1) and pure mesoporous CeO2 (~1 µmol·h−1). PMID:28347106

  5. A genetically optimized kinetic model for ethanol electro-oxidation on Pt-based binary catalysts used in direct ethanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Monreal, Juan; García-Salaberri, Pablo A.; Vera, Marcos

    2017-09-01

    A one-dimensional model is proposed for the anode of a liquid-feed direct ethanol fuel cell. The complex kinetics of the ethanol electro-oxidation reaction is described using a multi-step reaction mechanism that considers free and adsorbed intermediate species on Pt-based binary catalysts. The adsorbed species are modeled using coverage factors to account for the blockage of the active reaction sites on the catalyst surface. The reaction rates are described by Butler-Volmer equations that are coupled to a one-dimensional mass transport model, which incorporates the effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde crossover. The proposed kinetic model circumvents the acetaldehyde bottleneck effect observed in previous studies by incorporating CH3CHOHads among the adsorbed intermediates. A multi-objetive genetic algorithm is used to determine the reaction constants using anode polarization and product selectivity data obtained from the literature. By adjusting the reaction constants using the methodology developed here, different catalyst layers could be modeled and their selectivities could be successfully reproduced.

  6. Mechanical behaviour of PEM fuel cell catalyst layers during regular cell operation

    OpenAIRE

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2010-01-01

    Damage mechanisms in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell are accelerated by mechanical stresses arising during fuel cell assembly (bolt assembling), and the stresses arise during fuel cell running, because it consists of the materials with different thermal expansion and swelling coefficients. Therefore, in order to acquire a complete understanding of the mechanical behaviour of the catalyst layers during regular cell operation, mechanical response under steady-state hygro-thermal stresses s...

  7. Analysis of equilibrium and kinetic models of internal reforming on solid oxide fuel cell anodes: Effect on voltage, current and temperature distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khaliq; Fӧger, Karl

    2017-03-01

    The SOFC is well-established as a high-efficiency energy conversion technology with demonstrations of micro-CHP systems delivering 60% net electrical efficiency [1]. However, there are key challenges in the path to commercialization. Foremost among them is stack durability. Operating at high temperatures, the SOFC invariably suffers from thermally induced material degradation. This is compounded by thermal stresses within the SOFC stack which are generated from a number of interacting factors. Modelling is used as a tool for predicting undesirable temperature and current density gradients. For an internal reforming SOFC, fidelity of the model is strongly linked to the representation of the fuel reforming reactions, which dictate species concentrations and net heat release. It is critical for simulation of these profiles that the set of reaction rate expressions applicable for the particular anode catalyst are chosen in the model. A relatively wide spectrum of kinetic correlations has been reported in the literature. This work presents a comparative analysis of the internal distribution of temperature, current, voltage and compositions on a SOFC anode, using various combinations of reaction kinetics and equilibrium expressions for the reactions. The results highlight the significance of the fuel reforming chemistry and kinetics in the prediction of cell performance.

  8. Pd-Pt loaded graphene aerogel on nickel foam composite as binder-free anode for a direct glucose fuel cell unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Chi Him A.; Leung, D. Y. C.

    2017-09-01

    Fabrication of electrocatalyst for direct glucose fuel cell (DGFC) operation involves destructive preparation methods with the use of stabilizer like binder, which may cause activity depreciation. Binder-free electrocatalytic electrode becomes a possible solution to the above problem. Binder-free bimetallic Pd-Pt loaded graphene aerogel on nickel foam plates with different Pd/Pt ratios (1:2.32, 1:1.62, and 1:0.98) are successfully fabricated through a green one-step mild reduction process producing a Pd-Pt/GO/nickel form plate (NFP) composite. Anode with the binder-free electrocatalysts exhibit a strong activity in a batch type DGFC unit under room temperature. The effects of glucose and KOH concentrations, and the Pd/Pt ratios of the electrocatalyst on the DGFC performance are also studied. Maximum power density output of 1.25 mW cm-2 is recorded with 0.5 M glucose/3 M KOH as the anodic fuel, and Pd1Pt0.98/GA/NFP as catalyst, which is the highest obtained so far among other types of electrocatalyst.

  9. Preliminary design and analysis of aluminum-air cells providing for continuous feed and full utilization of anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. F.

    1981-08-01

    The advantages, disadvantages, and engineering problem areas of the wedge shaped cells in anodes utilization are reviewed. The importance of solution side current collection to the practicality of this approach when used with alkaline electrolytes is identified. The relationship between cell height and total anode mass is derived for this and corresponding cells of the M1 design. It is concluded that the M1-CF design may provide the basis for an automotive battery of greater simplicity, reliability, and economy than earlier designs.

  10. Simple solution-processed CuOX as anode buffer layer for efficient organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Wenfei; Yang, Chunpeng; Bao, Xichang; Sun, Liang; Wang, Ning; Tang, Jianguo; Chen, Weichao; Yang, Renqiang

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Simple solution-processed CuO X hole transport layer for efficient organic solar cell. • Good photovoltaic performances as hole transport layer in OSCs with P3HT and PBDTTT-C as donor materials. • The device with CuO X as hole transport layer shows great improved stability compared with that of device with PEDOT:PSS as hole transport layer. - Abstract: A simple, solution-processed ultrathin CuO X anode buffer layer was fabricated for high performance organic solar cells (OSCs). XPS measurement demonstrated that the CuO X was the composite of CuO and Cu 2 O. The CuO X modified ITO glass exhibit a better surface contact with the active layer. The photovoltaic performance of the devices with CuO X layer was optimized by varying the thickness of CuO X films through changing solution concentration. With P3HT:PC 61 BM as the active layer, we demonstrated an enhanced PCE of 4.14% with CuO X anode buffer layer, compared with that of PEDOT:PSS layer. The CuO X layer also exhibits efficient photovoltaic performance in devices with PBDTTT-C:PC 71 BM as the active layer. The long-term stability of CuO X device is better than that of PEDOT:PSS device. The results indicate that the easy solution-processed CuO X film can act as an efficient anode buffer layer for high-efficiency OSCs

  11. Porphyrin Dye-Sensitized Zinc Oxide Aggregated Anodes for Use in Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Kai Syu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Porphyrin YD2-o-C8-based dyes were employed to sensitize room-temperature (RT chemical-assembled ZnO aggregated anodes for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs. To reduce the acidity of the YD2-o-C8 dye solution, the proton in the carboxyl group of a porphyrin dye was replaced with tetrabuthyl ammonium (TBA+ in this work. The short-circuit current density (Jsc of the YD2-o-C8-TBA-sensitized ZnO DSSCs is higher than that of the YD2-o-C8-sensitized cells, resulting in the improvement of the efficiency of the YD2-o-C8-based ZnO DSSCs. With an appropriate incorporation of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA as coadsorbate, the Jsc and efficiency of the YD2-o-C8-TBA-sensitized ZnO DSSC are enhanced due to the improvement of the incident-photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE values in the wavelength range of 400–450 nm. Moreover, a considerable increase in Jsc is achieved by the addition of a light scattering layer in the YD2-o-C8-TBA-sensitized ZnO photoanodes. Significant IPCE enhancement in the range 475–600 nm is not attainable by tuning the YD2-o-C8-TBA sensitization processes for the anodes without light scattering layers. Using the RT chemical-assembled ZnO aggregated anode with a light scattering layer, an efficiency of 3.43% was achieved in the YD2-o-C8-TBA-sensitized ZnO DSSC.

  12. New Catalysts for Direct Methanol Oxidation Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adzic, Radoslav

    1998-08-01

    A new class of efficient electrocatalytic materials based on platinum - metal oxide systems has been synthetized and characterized by several techniques. Best activity was found with NiWO{sub 4}-, CoWO{sub 4}-, and RuO{sub 2}- sr¡pported platinum catalysts. A very similar activity at room temperature was observed with the electrodes prepared with the catalyst obtained from International Fuel Cells Inc. for the same Pt loading. Surprisingly, the two tungstates per se show a small activity for methanol oxidation without any Pt loading. Synthesis of NiWO{sub 4} and CoWO{sub 4} were carried out by solid-state reactions. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the tungstates contain a certain amount of physically adsorbed water even after heating samples at 200{degrees}C. A direct relationship between the activity for methanol oxidation and the amount of adsorbed water on those oxides has been found. The Ru(0001) single crystal shows a very small activity for CO adsorption and oxidation, in contrast to the behavior of polycrystalline Ru. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that the OH adsorption on Ru in the Pt-Ru alloy appears to be the limiting step in methanol oxidation. This does not occur for Pt-RuO{SUB 2} electrocatalyst, which explains its advantages over the Pt-Ru alloys. The IFCC electrocatalyst has the properties of the Pt-Ru alloy.

  13. Redox cycling performance of inert-substrate-supported tubular single cells with nickel anode current collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Kim, Bok-Hee; Xu, Qing; Du, Yanhai; Ahn, Byung-Guk

    2015-10-01

    An inert-substrate-supported tubular single cell, with a configuration of porous yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) supporter/Ni anode current collector/Ni-Ce0.8Sm0.2O1.9 anode/YSZ/Ce0.8Sm0.2O1.9 bi-layer electrolyte/La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ cathode, has been fabricated by extrusion and dip-coating techniques. Thickness of the Ni layer is modified by controlling the number of dip-coatings from one to four. Electrochemical performance and redox cycling stability of the single cell are investigated with respect to the microstructure of the Ni layer. Increasing the thickness of the Ni layer enhances the maximum power density of the cell, while it is unfavorable for the redox cycling stability. Considering the trade-off between these two aspects, an optimum dip-coating time is determined to be two. The cell shows a reasonable maximum power density of 453 mW cm-2 at 800 °C, as well as good redox cycling stability within eight redox cycles. Additionally, 10 vol.% Ce0.8Sm0.2O1.9 ceramic particle is incorporated into the Ni layer to further improve the redox cycling stability. The cell exhibits enhanced redox cycling performance after the Ce0.8Sm0.2O1.9 incorporation. Within seven redox cycles, the cell voltage loss is less than 1% at a current density of 400 mA cm-2, and it maintains 93% of its initial performance after 11 redox cycles.

  14. Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation by synthetic catalysts in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coverdale, James P. C.; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Clarkson, Guy J.; Habtemariam, Abraha; Wills, Martin; Sadler, Peter J.

    2018-03-01

    Catalytic anticancer metallodrugs active at low doses could minimize side-effects, introduce novel mechanisms of action that combat resistance and widen the spectrum of anticancer-drug activity. Here we use highly stable chiral half-sandwich organometallic Os(II) arene sulfonyl diamine complexes, [Os(arene)(TsDPEN)] (TsDPEN, N-(p-toluenesulfonyl)-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine), to achieve a highly enantioselective reduction of pyruvate, a key intermediate in metabolic pathways. Reduction is shown both in aqueous model systems and in human cancer cells, with non-toxic concentrations of sodium formate used as a hydride source. The catalytic mechanism generates selectivity towards ovarian cancer cells versus non-cancerous fibroblasts (both ovarian and lung), which are commonly used as models of healthy proliferating cells. The formate precursor N-formylmethionine was explored as an alternative to formate in PC3 prostate cancer cells, which are known to overexpress a deformylase enzyme. Transfer-hydrogenation catalysts that generate reductive stress in cancer cells offer a new approach to cancer therapy.

  15. Evaluation of Kefir as a New Anodic Biocatalyst Consortium for Microbial Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Gustavo; Schneedorf, José Maurício

    2018-02-21

    Kefir, a combined consortium of bacteria and yeast encapsulated by a polymeric matrix of exopolysaccharides, was used as anodic biocatalyst in a two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC). Fermentation was followed during 72 h and polarization curves were obtained from linear sweep voltammetry. The effect of methylene blue as charge-transfer mediator in the kefir metabolism was evaluated. UV/Vis spectrophotometry and cyclic voltammetry were applied to evaluate the redox state of the mediator and to characterize the electrochemical activity, whereas current interruption was used for internal resistance determination. Aiming to establish a relationship between the microbial development inside the anodic chamber with the generated power in the MFC, total titratable acidity, pH, viscosity, carbohydrate assimilation, and microbial counting were assayed. The kefir-based MFC demonstrated a maximum power density of 54 mW m -2 after 24 h fermentation, revealing the potential use of kefir as a biocatalyst for microbial fuel cells.

  16. Improving startup performance with carbon mesh anodes in separator electrode assembly microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Xia, Xue; Luo, Yong; Sun, Dan; Call, Douglas F; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-04-01

    In a separator electrode assembly microbial fuel cell, oxygen crossover from the cathode inhibits current generation by exoelectrogenic bacteria, resulting in poor reactor startup and performance. To determine the best approach for improving startup performance, the effect of acclimation to a low set potential (-0.2V, versus standard hydrogen electrode) was compared to startup at a higher potential (+0.2 V) or no set potential, and inoculation with wastewater or pre-acclimated cultures. Anodes acclimated to -0.2 V produced the highest power of 1330±60 mW m(-2) for these different anode conditions, but unacclimated wastewater inocula produced inconsistent results despite the use of this set potential. By inoculating reactors with transferred cell suspensions, however, startup time was reduced and high power was consistently produced. These results show that pre-acclimation at -0.2 V consistently improves power production compared to use of a more positive potential or the lack of a set potential. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Improving startup performance with carbon mesh anodes in separator electrode assembly microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2013-04-01

    In a separator electrode assembly microbial fuel cell, oxygen crossover from the cathode inhibits current generation by exoelectrogenic bacteria, resulting in poor reactor startup and performance. To determine the best approach for improving startup performance, the effect of acclimation to a low set potential (-0.2V, versus standard hydrogen electrode) was compared to startup at a higher potential (+0.2V) or no set potential, and inoculation with wastewater or pre-acclimated cultures. Anodes acclimated to -0.2V produced the highest power of 1330±60mWm-2 for these different anode conditions, but unacclimated wastewater inocula produced inconsistent results despite the use of this set potential. By inoculating reactors with transferred cell suspensions, however, startup time was reduced and high power was consistently produced. These results show that pre-acclimation at -0.2V consistently improves power production compared to use of a more positive potential or the lack of a set potential. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Surface patterned dielectrics by direct writing of anodic oxides using scanning droplet cell microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siket, Christian M.; Mardare, Andrei Ionut; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Bauer, Siegfried; Hassel, Achim Walter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Scanning droplet cell microscopy was applied for local gate oxide writing. • Sharp lines are obtained at the highest writing speed of 1 mm min −1 . • 13.4 kC cm −3 was found as charge per volume for aluminium oxide. • High field constant of 24 nm V −1 and dielectric constant of 12 were determined for Al 2 O 3 by CV and EIS. -- Abstract: Scanning droplet cell microscopy was used for patterning of anodic oxide lines on the surface of Al thin films by direct writing. The structural modifications of the written oxide lines as a function of the writing speed were studied by analyzing the relative error of the line widths. Sharper lines were obtained for writing speeds faster than 1 mm min −1 . An increase in sharpness was observed for higher writing speeds. A theoretical model based on the Faraday law is proposed to explain the constant anodisation current measured during the writing process and yielded a charge per volume of 13.4 kC cm −3 for Al 2 O 3 . From calculated oxide film thicknesses the high field constant was found to be 24 nm V −1 . Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed an increase of the electrical permittivity up to ε = 12 with the decrease of the writing speed of the oxide line. Writing of anodic oxide lines was proven to be an important step in preparing capacitors and gate dielectrics in plastic electronics

  19. Multidimensional Anodized Titanium Foam Photoelectrode for Efficient Utilization of Photons in Mesoscopic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Soo; Choi, Hyelim; Kim, Jin; Park, Hyeji; Kim, Jae-Yup; Choi, Jung-Woo; Yu, Seung-Ho; Lee, Kyung Jae; Kang, Yun Sik; Park, Sun Ha; Cho, Yong-Hun; Yum, Jun-Ho; Dunand, David C; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2017-09-01

    Mesoscopic solar cells based on nanostructured oxide semiconductors are considered as a promising candidates to replace conventional photovoltaics employing costly materials. However, their overall performances are below the sufficient level required for practical usages. Herein, this study proposes an anodized Ti foam (ATF) with multidimensional and hierarchical architecture as a highly efficient photoelectrode for the generation of a large photocurrent. ATF photoelectrodes prepared by electrochemical anodization of freeze-cast Ti foams have three favorable characteristics: (i) large surface area for enhanced light harvesting, (ii) 1D semiconductor structure for facilitated charge collection, and (iii) 3D highly conductive metallic current collector that enables exclusion of transparent conducting oxide substrate. Based on these advantages, when ATF is utilized in dye-sensitized solar cells, short-circuit photocurrent density up to 22.0 mA cm -2 is achieved in the conventional N719 dye-I 3 - /I - redox electrolyte system even with an intrinsically inferior quasi-solid electrolyte. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Increased Power in Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell: Facilitated Mass Transfer via a Water-Layer Anode Embedded in Sediment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Seok Lee

    Full Text Available We report a methodology for enhancing the mass transfer at the anode electrode of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs, by employing a fabric baffle to create a separate water-layer for installing the anode electrode in sediment. The maximum power in an SMFC with the anode installed in the separate water-layer (SMFC-wFB was improved by factor of 6.6 compared to an SMFC having the anode embedded in the sediment (SMFC-woFB. The maximum current density in the SMFC-wFB was also 3.9 times higher (220.46 mA/m2 than for the SMFC-woFB. We found that the increased performance in the SMFC-wFB was due to the improved mass transfer rate of organic matter obtained by employing the water-layer during anode installation in the sediment layer. Acetate injection tests revealed that the SMFC-wFB could be applied to natural water bodies in which there is frequent organic contamination, based on the acetate flux from the cathode to the anode.

  1. Increased Power in Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell: Facilitated Mass Transfer via a Water-Layer Anode Embedded in Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoo Seok; An, Junyeong; Kim, Bongkyu; Park, HyunJun; Kim, Jisu; Chang, In Seop

    2015-01-01

    We report a methodology for enhancing the mass transfer at the anode electrode of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs), by employing a fabric baffle to create a separate water-layer for installing the anode electrode in sediment. The maximum power in an SMFC with the anode installed in the separate water-layer (SMFC-wFB) was improved by factor of 6.6 compared to an SMFC having the anode embedded in the sediment (SMFC-woFB). The maximum current density in the SMFC-wFB was also 3.9 times higher (220.46 mA/m2) than for the SMFC-woFB. We found that the increased performance in the SMFC-wFB was due to the improved mass transfer rate of organic matter obtained by employing the water-layer during anode installation in the sediment layer. Acetate injection tests revealed that the SMFC-wFB could be applied to natural water bodies in which there is frequent organic contamination, based on the acetate flux from the cathode to the anode.

  2. Improving the performance of microbial fuel cells by reducing the inherent resistivity of carbon fiber brush anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yang'en; Ma, Zhaokun; Song, Huaihe; Wang, Huiyao; Xu, Pei

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of carbon fibers as brush anode materials on the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Two types of carbon fibers with different electrical resistivity and functionality - polyacrylonitrile (PAN) (ρ: 28.0 μΩ m) and pitch (ρ: 2.05 μΩ m) were investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that the PAN- and pitch-based carbon fibers presented almost the same surface elements and functional groups, and there was no significant difference in microbial growth on the brush anodes. Current interrupt and steady discharging methods demonstrated the pitch-based carbon brush anodes had lower ohmic resistance and generated higher power density. After nitric acid treatment, the power density generated by the PAN- and pitch-based anodes increased by 29.3% and 26.7%, achieving 816 and 895 mW m-2, respectively. Using pitch-based carbon fiber brush as anode attained better performance than the widely used PAN-based carbon brush. The acid treated pitch-based carbon fibers provide a promising alternative to highly efficient anode materials for the extensive application of MFCs.

  3. Advanced redox flow fuel cell using ferric chloride as main catalyst for complete conversion from carbohydrates to electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Li, Huan; Liu, Yueling; Jing, Qi

    2017-07-11

    Liquid catalyzed fuel cell (LCFC) is a kind of redox flow fuel cell directly converting carbohydrates to electricity. To improve its efficiency, ferric chloride (FeCl 3 ) was introduced as main catalyst. As mono catalyst, phosphomolybdic acid (PMo 12 ) was much better than phosphotungstic acid (PW 12 ) and FeCl 3 was intermediate between them. Compared with PMo 12 at the optimal dose of 0.30 mol/L, the combination of FeCl 3 (1.00 mol/L) and PW 12 (0.06 mol/L) achieved similar power output from glucose (2.59 mW/cm 2 ) or starch (1.57 mW/cm 2 ), and even improved the maximum power density by 57% from 0.46 to 0.72 mW/cm 2 when using cellulose as the fuel. Long-term continuous operation of the LCFC indicated that carbohydrates can be hydrolyzed to glucose and then oxidized stepwise to carbon dioxide. At the latter stage, there was a linear relationship between the electron transfer number from glucose to catalyst and the subsequent cell performance. Based on these findings, the contribution of FeCl 3 to LCFC should be derived from the accelerated hydrolysis and oxidation of carbohydrates and the enhanced electron transfer from glucose to anode. The addition of FeCl 3 reduced the usage of polyoxometalates by 80%, and the replacement implied that LCFC can be operated less toxically and more economically.

  4. Evaluation of performance enhancement by condensing the anode moisture in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shouzhen; Chen, Ben; Shu, Peng; Luo, Maji; Xie, Changjun; Quan, Shuhai; Tu, Zhengkai; Yu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Anode Moisture condensing is introduced into a PEMFC stack. • Performance improves at high current density and high stack temperature after AMC. • MEA is dehydrated and poor performance occurs at low current density during AMC. - Abstract: Water management is an important issue for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Back-diffusion of water from cathode to anode often occurs due to the differences in concentration and pressure during operation of fuel cell, resulting in the flooding and severe carbon corrosion in the cathode. Herein, we report a novel method of anode moisture condensing (AMC) in which a condenser is set at the outlet of the anode to cool down the anode moisture. With the help of AMC, liquid water is condensed from the moisture due to the variation of the saturated pressure of water vapor, which can accelerate the evaporating of the liquid water inside the anode and mitigate the probability of water flooding. A ten-cell stack with a condenser at the outlet of the anode is fabricated to systematically investigate the effects of the stack temperature and flow rate on the stack performance. The result shows that the PEMFC performance can be greatly improved at high current density and high operation temperature under the condition of AMC. The stack exhibits very similar performance before and after application of AMC below 500 mA cm −2 , whereas the output power increases from 405 W to 436 W at 600 mA cm −2 at 65 °C. With further increase in operation temperature to 80 °C, the average voltage increases from 0.598 V to 0.641 V even at 500 mA cm −2 . Moreover, the application of AMC can speed up the water evaporation, leading to the dehydration of the membrane and thus poor performance of PEMFC at low current density.

  5. Diversity and function of the microbial community on anodes of sediment microbial fuel cells fueled by root exudates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabezas da Rosa, Angela

    2010-11-26

    Anode microbial communities are essential for current production in microbial fuel cells. Anode reducing bacteria are capable of using the anode as final electron acceptor in their respiratory chain. The electrons delivered to the anode travel through a circuit to the cathode where they reduce oxygen to water generating an electric current. A novel type of sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) harvest energy from photosynthetically derived compounds released through the roots. Nothing is known about anode microbial communities of this type of microbial fuel cell. This work consists of three parts. The first part focuses on the study of bacterial and archaeal community compositions on anodes of SMFCs fueled by rice root exudates. By using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), a profiling technique, and cloning / sequencing of 16S rRNA, we determined that the support type used for the plant (vermiculite, potting soil or rice field soil) is an important factor determining the composition of the microbial community. Finally, by comparing microbial communities of current producing anodes and non-current producing controls we determined that Desulfobulbus- and Geobacter-related populations were probably most important for current production in potting soil and rice field soil SMFCs, respectively. However, {delta}-proteobacterial Anaeromyxobacter spp., unclassified {delta}-proteobacteria and Anaerolineae were also part of the anode biofilm in rice field soil SMFCs and these populations might also play a role in current production. Moreover, distinct clusters of Geobacter and Anaeromyxobacter populations were stimulated by rice root exudates. Regarding Archaea, uncultured Euryarchaea were abundant on anodes of potting soil SMFCs indicating a potential role in current production. In both, rice field soil and potting soil SMFCs, a decrease of Methanosaeta, an acetotrophic methanogen, was detected on current producing anodes. In the second part we focused

  6. Experimental Studies of the Effects of Anode Composition and Process Parameters on Anode Slime Adhesion and Cathode Copper Purity by Performing Copper Electrorefining in a Pilot-Scale Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Weizhi; Wang, Shijie; Free, Michael L.

    2016-10-01

    Copper electrorefining tests were conducted in a pilot-scale cell under commercial tankhouse environment to study the effects of anode compositions, current density, cathode blank width, and flow rate on anode slime behavior and cathode copper purity. Three different types of anodes (high, mid, and low impurity levels) were used in the tests and were analyzed under SEM/EDS. The harvested copper cathodes were weighed and analyzed for impurities concentrations using DC Arc. The adhered slimes and released slimes were collected, weighed, and analyzed for compositions using ICP. It was shown that the lead-to-arsenic ratio in the anodes affects the sintering and coalescence of slime particles. High current density condition can improve anode slime adhesion and cathode purity by intensifying slime particles' coalescence and dissolving part of the particles. Wide cathode blanks can raise the anodic current densities significantly and result in massive release of large slime particle aggregates, which are not likely to contaminate the cathode copper. Low flow rate can cause anode passivation and increase local temperatures in front of the anode, which leads to very intense sintering and coalescence of slime particles. The results and analyses of the tests present potential solutions for industrial copper electrorefining process.

  7. The effect of H2S on the performance of Ni-YSZ anodes in solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens Foldager Bregnballe; Hagen, Anke

    2009-01-01

    Biomass-derived fuel, e.g. biogas, is a potential fuel for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). At operating temperature (850 °C) reforming of the carbon-containing biogas takes place over the Ni-containing anode. However, impurities in the biogas, e.g. H2S, can poison both the reforming...... and the electrochemical activity of the anode. Tests of single anode-supported planar SOFCs were carried out in the presence of H2S under current load at 850 °C. The cell voltage dropped as we periodically added 2–100 ppm H2S to an H2-containing fuel in 24 h intervals, but it regenerated to the initial value after we...... turned off the H2S. Evaluation of the changes of the cell voltage suggests that saturation coverage was reached at approximately 40 ppm H2S. A front-like movement of S-poisoning over the anode was seen by monitoring the in-plane voltage in the anode. Furthermore, impedance spectra showed that mainly...

  8. Atomic Layer Deposited Catalysts for Fuel Cell Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta

    The micro direct methanol fuel cell (µDMFC) has been proposed as a candidate to power portable applications. The device can operate at room temperature on inexpensive, energy-dense methanol fuel, and it can be easily "recharged" by fuel refilling. Microfabrication techniques could be one route...... for the realization of such tiny devices. It is a mature technology, suitable for mass production, where versatile structuring is available at the micro and nano regime. Carbon black supported catalysts synthesized by wet chemistry methods are not readily applicable for standard microfabrication techniques. Atomic...... on the sample surface. Its unique growth characteristic enables conformal and uniform lms of controlled thickness and composition. In certain conditions ALD commences by island growth, resulting in discrete nanoparticle formation, which is generally preferred for catalytic applications. Pt-Ru is the best...

  9. Direct ethanol fuel cell, CO and ethanol oxidation on core-shell C/Ni-Au-[Pt and (Pt- Ir)] catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, C.A.D.; Tremiliosi-Filho, G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica], Email: cesaraug@sc.usp.br; Kokoh, K.B.; Coutanceau, C.; Baranton, S. [Universite de Poitiers (France). Lab. de Catalyse en Chimie Organique (LACCO). Equipe Electrocatalyse

    2010-07-01

    In this paper presents to study of the Pt and Pt-Ir monolayer that were deposited on core-shell Ni-Au nanoparticles supported on carbon. Catalysts with the following molar ratios were prepared: Pt and Pt{sub 65}Ir{sub 35}, Pt{sub 75}Ir{sub 2}5, Pt{sub 80}Ir{sub 20} and Pt{sub 85}Ir{sub 15}. The means particle sizes were in the range of 2 - 6 nm for all catalysts. The electrochemical properties examined in the ethanol and CO oxidation by cyclic voltammetry, and In situ IR spectroscopy measurements (SPAIRS) enabled to determine intermediates and reaction products as a function of the metallic compositions of catalysts. All of the catalysts were tested as anodes of a single direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) tests in 1.0 M ethanol solution. As a result, higher power densities were obtained with the core-shell particles in comparison to those issued from the commercial catalyst (Pt-ETEK). Thus, the maximum power densities at 90 deg C for the different systems are: (i) commercial C/Pt catalyst (E-TEK): ca. 0.010 W cm{sup -2}, C/Ni-Au-(Pt{sub 85}Ir{sub 15}): ca. 0.013 W cm{sup -2} and C/Ni-Au-Pt: ca. 0.018 W cm{sup -2} (all core-shell systems were normalization by Pt load). As a result, the performance of the core-shell nanoparticles is much better than that produced for the commercial catalyst and the C/Ni-Au-Pt system showed the best performance. (author)

  10. A tapered serpentine flow field for the anode of micro direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Zhenyu; He, Hong; Zhao, Youran; Liu, Xiaowei

    2011-03-01

    We develop a self-breathing micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) characterized by a new anode structure with tapered single serpentine flow fields to improve cell performance. Compared with the conventional single serpentine flow field, this new design enhances the methanol mass transport efficiency and the exhaust resultant (CO2) rate due to the increasing pressure difference between adjacent flow channels. The μDMFCs with two single serpentine flow fields are fabricated using silicon-based micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technologies and are tested at room temperature. The experimental results reveal that the new tapered single serpentine flow field exhibits a significantly higher peak power density than that of the conventional flow field, demonstrating a substantial increase of 17.9% in mass transport coefficients.

  11. Ceria-Based Anodes for Next Generation Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirfakhraei, Behzad

    Mixed ionic and electronic conducting materials (MIECs) have been suggested to represent the next generation of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes, primarily due to their significantly enhanced active surface area and their tolerance to fuel components. In this thesis, the main focus has been on determining and tuning the physicochemical and electrochemical properties of ceria-based MIECs in the versatile perovskite or fluorite crystal structures. In one direction, BaZr0.1Ce0.7Y0.1 M0.1O3-delta (M = Fe, Ni, Co and Yb) (BZCY-M) perovskites were synthesized using solid-state or wet citric acid combustion methods and the effect of various transition metal dopants on the sintering behavior, crystal structure, chemical stability under CO2 and H 2S, and electrical conductivity, was investigated. BZCY-Ni, synthesized using the wet combustion method, was the best performing anode, giving a polarization resistance (RP) of 0.4 O.cm2 at 800 °C. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis showed that this was due to the exsolution of catalytic Ni nanoparticles onto the oxide surface. Evolving from this promising result, the effect of Mo-doped CeO 2 (nCMO) or Ni nanoparticle infiltration into a porous Gd-doped CeO 2 (GDC) anode (in the fluorite structure) was studied. While 3 wt. % Ni infiltration lowered RP by up to 90 %, giving 0.09 O.cm2 at 800 °C and exhibiting a ca. 5 times higher tolerance towards 10 ppm H2, nCMO infiltration enhanced the H2 stability by ca. 3 times, but had no influence on RP. In parallel work, a first-time study of the Ce3+ and Ce 4+ redox process (pseudocapacitance) within GDC anode materials was carried out using cyclic voltammetry (CV) in wet H2 at high temperatures. It was concluded that, at 500-600 °C, the Ce3+/Ce 4+ reaction is diffusion controlled, probably due to O2- transport limitations in the outer 5-10 layers of the GDC particles, giving a very high capacitance of ca. 70 F/g. Increasing the temperature ultimately

  12. Silicon Derived from Glass Bottles as Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Full Cell Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changling; Liu, Chueh; Wang, Wei; Mutlu, Zafer; Bell, Jeffrey; Ahmed, Kazi; Ye, Rachel; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2017-04-19

    Every year many tons of waste glass end up in landfills without proper recycling, which aggravates the burden of waste disposal in landfill. The conversion from un-recycled glass to favorable materials is of great significance for sustainable strategies. Recently, silicon has been an exceptional anode material towards large-scale energy storage applications, due to its extraordinary lithiation capacity of 3579 mAh g -1 at ambient temperature. Compared with other quartz sources obtained from pre-leaching processes which apply toxic acids and high energy-consuming annealing, an interconnected silicon network is directly derived from glass bottles via magnesiothermic reduction. Carbon-coated glass derived-silicon (gSi@C) electrodes demonstrate excellent electrochemical performance with a capacity of ~1420 mAh g -1 at C/2 after 400 cycles. Full cells consisting of gSi@C anodes and LiCoO 2 cathodes are assembled and achieve good initial cycling stability with high energy density.

  13. Realization of tin oxide like anode for the manufacture of the organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khelil A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The transparent oxides such as SnO2, In2O3 and ZnO continue to arouse a private interest for their various applications. The objective of the various studies being to carry out the layers which are simultaneously most transparent and most conducting possible. Thus in the field of the solar spectrum, the transmission of the layers must be higher than 80% and their conductivity exceeding 103 (Ohm.cm-1. Their transparency which is related to the value of their forbidden band must be higher than 3.7 e V. Their electric properties as for them depend on the composition of the layers and a possible doping. In this work, one characterized layers of SnO2 deposited by chemical pulverization, one carried out measurements by, electronic scan microscopy, diffraction of x-rays and also of the optical measurements and electronic. It results from it that the layers are conducting and transparent in the visible one but they are relatively rough, following its characterizations, one carried out organic photovoltaic cells using these layers of SnO2 and also of the commercial ITO like anode in these components. More particularly one was interested in the influence of the presence of a fine layer of gold between the anode and organic material.

  14. A novel biosensor for p-nitrophenol based on an aerobic anode microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengjun; Niu, Yongyan; Zhao, Shuai; Khan, Aman; Ling, Zhenmin; Chen, Yong; Liu, Pu; Li, Xiangkai

    2016-11-15

    P-nitrophenol is one of the most common contaminants in chemical industrial wastewater, and in situ real-time monitoring of PNP cannot be achieved by conventional analytical techniques. Here, a two-chamber microbial fuel cell with an aerobic anode chamber was tested as a biosensor for in situ real-time monitoring of PNP. Pseudomonas monteilii LZU-3, which was used as the biological recognition element, can form a biofilm on the anode electrode using PNP as a sole substrate. The optimal operation parameters of the biosensor were as follows: external resistance 1000Ω, pH 7.8, temperature 30°C, and maximum PNP concentration 50mgL(-1). Under these conditions, the maximum voltages showed a linear relationship with PNP concentrations ranging from 15±5 to 44±4.5mgL(-1). Furthermore, we developed a novel portable device for in situ real-time monitoring of PNP. When the device was applied to measure PNP in wastewater containing various additional aromatic compounds and metal ions, the performance of the biosensor was not affected and the correlation between the maximum voltages and the PNP concentrations ranging from 9±4mgL(-1) to 36 ± 5mgL(-1) was conserved. The results demonstrated that the MFC biosensor provides a rapid and cost-efficient analytical method for real-time monitoring of toxic and recalcitrant pollutants in environmental samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Bacterial Diversity Associated with Anodic Biofilms in Microbial Fuel Cells Fed with Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mora Collazos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the bacterial diversity associated with biofilms formed on the anode of microbial fuel cells (MFC, by analyzing the 16S rRNA gene and observations by scanning electron microscopy. Single chambered MFC were constructed and kept in operation for 30 days using environmental samples as inoculum and sole energy substrate; the MFC were monitored as a function of energy production in the course of the experiment; at endpoint, molecular characterization and observations using scanning electron microscopy was performed to the formed biofilms. Values of maximum power density of 4.85 mW/m2 for domestic wastewater and 1.85 mW/m2 in the case of industrial wastewater are reported, with declines of 71 % of the BOD for domestic wastewater and 59 % of the BOD in the case of industrial wastewater. Recovery of 15 unique sequences from the amplification of 16S rRNA gene obtained from the biofilms formed on the anodes was accomplished. Phylogenetic analysis placed these sequences in the Deltaproteobacteria class. The two environmental substrates contain an important and interesting microbial diversity, showing them very promising for the construction and operation of MFC and implementing biodegradation of organic material.

  16. Alloy catalysts for fuel cell-based alcohol sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavidel, Mohammadreza Zamanzad

    Direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) are attractive from both economic and environmental standpoints for generating renewable energy and powering vehicles and portable electronic devices. There is a great interest recently in developing DEFC systems. The cost and performance of the DEFCs are mainly controlled by the Pt-base catalysts used at each electrode. In addition to energy conversion, DEFC technology is commonly employed in the fuel-cell based breath alcohol sensors (BrAS). BrAS is a device commonly used to measure blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and enforce drinking and driving laws. The BrAS is non-invasive and has a fast respond time. However, one of the most important drawback of the commercially available BrAS is the very high loading of Pt employed. One well-known and cost effective method to reduce the Pt loading is developing Pt-alloy catalysts. Recent studies have shown that Pt-transition metal alloy catalysts enhanced the electroactivity while decreasing the required loadings of the Pt catalysts. In this thesis, carbon supported Pt-Mn and Pt-Cu electrocatalysts were synthesized by different methods and the effects of heat treatment and structural modification on the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) activity, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and durability of these samples were thoroughly studied. Finally, the selected Pt-Mn and Pt-Cu samples with the highest EOR activity were examined in a prototype BrAS system and compared to the Pt/C and Pt 3Sn/C commercial electrocatalysts. Studies on the Pt-Mn catalysts produced with and without additives indicate that adding trisodium citrate (SC) to the impregnation solution improved the particle dispersion, decreased particle sizes and reduced the time required for heat treatment. Further studies show that the optimum weight ratio of SC to the metal loading in the impregnation solution was 2:1 and optimum results achieved at pH lower than 4. In addition, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicate

  17. Performance of metal alloys as hydrogen evolution reaction catalysts in a microbial electrolysis cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeremiasse, A.W.; Bergsma, J.; Kleijn, J.M.; Saakes, M.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Hamelers, H.V.M.

    2011-01-01

    H2 can be produced from organic matter with a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). To decrease the energy input and increase the H2 production rate of an MEC, a catalyst is used at the cathode. Platinum is an effective catalyst, but its high costs stimulate searching for alternatives, such as

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy for characterisation of catalysts for PEM fuel cells; Roentgenabsorptionsspektroskopie zur Charakterisierung von Katalysatoren fuer die PEM-Brennstoffzelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehl, G.

    2001-10-01

    The investigation of bimetallic nanoparticles is of great interest for the development of powerful anode catalysts in PEM fuel cells. The determination of their electronic and geometric structure is crucial for the optimization of the activity and selectivity in the fuel cell. Especially carbon supported PtRu particles have shown superior activity as anode catalysts due to their high CO tolerance. To state the reason on an atomic level, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with synchrotron radiation has been used to examine several Pt and PtRu nanoparticle systems. They were either prepared on the basis of preformed PtRu alloy colloids stabilized by different surfactants or by chemical reduction of precursors, Na{sub 6}Pt(SO{sub 3}){sub 4} and Na{sub 6}Ru(SO{sub 3}){sub 4}. Although a PtRu interaction was observed in all systems, a nonstatistical distribution of Pt and Ru atoms in the nanoparticles could be verified. In additional investigations the reaction mechanism during the synthesis of an organometallic stabilized Pt colloid was examined. In-situ measurements revealed the formation of an hitherto unknown Pt complex as intermediate state prior to the nucleation of the particles. (orig)

  19. Immobilization of anode-attached microbes in a microbial fuel cell.

    KAUST Repository

    Wagner, Rachel C

    2012-01-03

    Current-generating (exoelectrogenic) bacteria in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) may not be culturable using standard in vitro agar-plating techniques, making isolation of new microbes a challenge. More in vivo like conditions are needed where bacteria can be grown and directly isolated on an electrode. While colonies can be developed from single cells on an electrode, the cells must be immobilized after being placed on the surface. Here we present a proof-of-concept immobilization approach that allows exoelectrogenic activity of cells on an electrode based on applying a layer of latex to hold bacteria on surfaces. The effectiveness of this procedure to immobilize particles was first demonstrated using fluorescent microspheres as bacterial analogs. The latex coating was then shown to not substantially affect the exoelectrogenic activity of well-developed anode biofilms in two different systems. A single layer of airbrushed coating did not reduce the voltage produced by a biofilm in a microbial fuel cell (MFC), and more easily applied dip-and-blot coating reduced voltage by only 11% in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). This latex immobilization procedure will enable future testing of single cells for exoelectrogenic activity on electrodes in BESs.

  20. Power generation in microbial fuel cells using platinum group metal-free cathode catalyst: Effect of the catalyst loading on performance and costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Carlo; Kodali, Mounika; Herrera, Sergio; Serov, Alexey; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Atanassov, Plamen

    2018-02-01

    Platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) catalyst with different loadings was investigated in air breathing electrodes microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Firstly, the electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of the catalyst was investigated by rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) setup with different catalyst loadings. The results showed that higher loading led to an increased in the half wave potential and the limiting current and to a further decrease in the peroxide production. The electrons transferred also slightly increased with the catalyst loading up to the value of ≈3.75. This variation probably indicates that the catalyst investigated follow a 2x2e- transfer mechanism. The catalyst was integrated within activated carbon pellet-like air-breathing cathode in eight different loadings varying between 0.1 mgcm-2 and 10 mgcm-2. Performance were enhanced gradually with the increase in catalyst content. Power densities varied between 90 ± 9 μWcm-2 and 262 ± 4 μWcm-2 with catalyst loading of 0.1 mgcm-2 and 10 mgcm-2 respectively. Cost assessments related to the catalyst performance are presented. An increase in catalyst utilization led to an increase in power generated with a substantial increase in the whole costs. Also a decrease in performance due to cathode/catalyst deterioration over time led to a further increase in the costs.

  1. Power generation in microbial fuel cells using platinum group metal-free cathode catalyst: Effect of the catalyst loading on performance and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Carlo; Kodali, Mounika; Herrera, Sergio; Serov, Alexey; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Atanassov, Plamen

    2018-02-28

    Platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) catalyst with different loadings was investigated in air breathing electrodes microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Firstly, the electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of the catalyst was investigated by rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) setup with different catalyst loadings. The results showed that higher loading led to an increased in the half wave potential and the limiting current and to a further decrease in the peroxide production. The electrons transferred also slightly increased with the catalyst loading up to the value of ≈3.75. This variation probably indicates that the catalyst investigated follow a 2x2e - transfer mechanism. The catalyst was integrated within activated carbon pellet-like air-breathing cathode in eight different loadings varying between 0.1 mgcm -2 and 10 mgcm -2 . Performance were enhanced gradually with the increase in catalyst content. Power densities varied between 90 ± 9 μWcm -2 and 262 ± 4 μWcm -2 with catalyst loading of 0.1 mgcm -2 and 10 mgcm -2 respectively. Cost assessments related to the catalyst performance are presented. An increase in catalyst utilization led to an increase in power generated with a substantial increase in the whole costs. Also a decrease in performance due to cathode/catalyst deterioration over time led to a further increase in the costs.

  2. Solid oxide fuel cell bi-layer anode with gadolinia-doped ceria for utilization of solid carbon fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Isaiah D.; Koylu, Umit O.; Dogan, Fatih

    Pyrolytic carbon was used as fuel in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and a bi-layer anode composed of nickel oxide gadolinia-doped ceria (NiO-GDC) and NiO-YSZ. The common problems of bulk shrinkage and emergent porosity in the YSZ layer adjacent to the GDC/YSZ interface were avoided by using an interlayer of porous NiO-YSZ as a buffer anode layer between the electrolyte and the NiO-GDC primary anode. Cells were fabricated from commercially available component powders so that unconventional production methods suggested in the literature were avoided, that is, the necessity of glycine-nitrate combustion synthesis, specialty multicomponent oxide powders, sputtering, or chemical vapor deposition. The easily-fabricated cell was successfully utilized with hydrogen and propane fuels as well as carbon deposited on the anode during the cyclic operation with the propane. A cell of similar construction could be used in the exhaust stream of a diesel engine to capture and utilize soot for secondary power generation and decreased particulate pollution without the need for filter regeneration.

  3. Electrodeposited gold nanoparticles on carbon nanotube-textile: Anode material for glucose alkaline fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Pasta, Mauro

    2012-06-01

    In the present paper we propose a new anode material for glucose-gluconate direct oxidation fuel cells prepared by electrodepositing gold nanoparticles onto a conductive textile made by conformally coating single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) on a polyester textile substrate. The electrodeposition conditions were optimized in order to achieve a uniform distribution of gold nanoparticles in the 3D porous structure of the textile. On the basis of previously reported studies, the reaction conditions (pH, electrolyte composition and glucose concentration) were tuned in order to achieve the highest oxidation rate, selectively oxidizing glucose to gluconate. The electrochemical characterization was carried out by means of cyclic voltammetry. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. In situ redox cycle of a nickel–YSZ fuel cell anode in an environmental transmission electron microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeangros, Quentin; Faes, Antonin; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2010-01-01

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy is used in combination with density functional theory calculations to study the redox stability of a nickel/yttria-stabilized zirconia solid oxide fuel cell anode. The results reveal that the transfer of oxygen from NiO to yttria-stabilized zirconia...... triggers the reduction reaction. During Ni reoxidation, the creation of a porous structure, due to mass transport, accounts for the redox instability of the Ni-based anode. Both the expansion of NiO during a redox cycle and the presence of stress in the yttria-stabilized zirconia grains are observed...

  5. Optimization of fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies for transition metal ion-chelating ordered mesoporous carbon cathode catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna K. Dombrovskis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ion-chelating ordered mesoporous carbon (TM-OMC materials were recently shown to be efficient polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC catalysts. The structure and properties of these catalysts are largely different from conventional catalyst materials, thus rendering membrane electrode assembly (MEA preparation parameters developed for conventional catalysts not useful for applications of TM-OMC catalysts. This necessitates development of a methodology to incorporate TM-OMC catalysts in the MEA. Here, an efficient method for MEA preparation using TM-OMC catalyst materials for PEMFC is developed including effects of catalyst/ionomer loading and catalyst/ionomer-mixing and application procedures. An optimized protocol for MEA preparation using TM-OMC catalysts is described.

  6. Innovative anode materials and architectured cells for high temperature steam electrolysis operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogier, Tiphaine

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the electrochemical performances of cells for high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), innovative oxygen electrode materials have been studied. The compounds Ln 2 NiO 4+δ (Ln = La, Pr or Nd), Pr 4 Ni 3 O 10±δ and La 0,6 S r 0 ,4 Fe 0,8 Co 0,2 O 3-δ have been selected for their mixed electronic and ionic conductivity. First, their physical and chemical properties have been investigated. Then, the electrodes were shaped on symmetrical half cells,adding a thin ceria-based interlayer between the electrode and the yttria doped zirconia-based electrolyte. These architectured cells lead to low polarization resistances (RP≤ 0.1 Ω.cm 2 at 800 C) as well as reduced anodic over potentials. An electrochemical model has been developed in order to describe and analyze the experimental polarization curves.The electrode with the lower overpotential, i.e. Pr 2 NiO 4+ δ, has been selected and characterized into complete cermet-supported cells. Under HTSE operation, at 800 C, a high current density was measured, close to i = -0.9 A.cm -2 for a cell voltage equals to 1.3 V, the conversion rate being about 60%. (author) [fr

  7. Improved Reliability of Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells by Double Anode Buffer Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Hsun Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimized hybrid planar heterojunction (PHJ of small molecule organic solar cells (SM-OSCs based on copper phthalocyanine (CuPc as donor and fullerene (C60 as acceptor was fabricated, which obviously enhanced the performance of device by sequentially using both MoO3 and pentacene as double anode buffer layers (ABL, also known as hole extraction layer (HEL. A series of the vacuum-deposited ABL, acting as an electron and exciton blocking layer, were examined for their characteristics in SM-OSCs. The performance and reliability were compared between conventional ITO/ABL/CuPc/C60/BCP/Ag cells and the new ITO/double ABL/CuPc/C60/BCP/Ag cells. The effect on the electrical properties of these materials was also investigated to obtain the optimal thickness of ABL. The comparison shows that the modified cell has an enhanced reliability compared to traditional cells. The improvement of lifetime was attributed to the idea of double layers to prevent humidity and oxygen from diffusing into the active layer. We demonstrated that the interfacial extraction layers are necessary to avoid degradation of device. That is to say, in normal temperature and pressure, a new avenue for the device within double buffer layers has exhibited the highest values of open circuit voltage (Voc, fill factor (FF, and lifetime in this work compared to monolayer of ABL.

  8. Polydopamine as a new modification material to accelerate startup and promote anode performance in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qing; An, Jingkun; Li, Junhui; Zhou, Lean; Li, Nan; Wang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    The bacterial anode material is important to the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) because its characteristics affect the biofilm formation and extracellular electron transfer. Here we find that a superhydrophilic semiconductor, polydopamine (PDA), is an effective modification material for the anode to accelerate startup and improve power density. When the activated carbon anode is added with 50% (wt.) PDA, the startup time is 14% shorter than the control (from 88 h to 76 h), with a 31% increase in maximum power density from 613 ± 9 to 803 ± 6 mW m-2, and the Columbic efficiency increases from 19% to 48%. These can be primarily attributed to the abundant functional groups (such as amino group, and catechol functions) introduced by PDA that improve hydrophilicity and extracellular electron transfer. PDA also increases proportions of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes families, indicating that PDA has a selective effect on anode microbial community. Our findings provide a new approach to accelerate anode biofilm formation and enhance MFC power output by modification of biocompatible PDA.

  9. Porous graphite: A facile synthesis from ferrous gluconate and excellent performance as anode electrocatalyst of microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Juan; Hu, Meihua; Li, Xiaoping; Li, Hongying; Li, Xin; Liu, Xiang; Cao, Guozhong; Li, Weishan

    2018-06-30

    A porous graphite (PG) is proposed as anode electrocatalyst of microbial fuel cell (MFC), which is synthesized by thermally decomposing ferrous gluconate followed by leaching iron. The physical characterizations from scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, indicate that the resulting PG is mesopore-rich and exhibits high graphitization with oxygen-containing functional groups. When evaluated on a naked carbon felt (NCF) anode, the resulting PG provides the MFC based on Escherichia coli with excellent power output. The MFC using the carbon felt anode loaded with 3.0 mg cm -2 PG delivers a maximum power density of 2.6 W m -2 , compared to the 0.2 W m -2 for the MFCs using NCF anode. This excellent performance is attributed to the electronically conductive graphite and porous structure of the resulting PG. The former provides the anode with high activity towards redox reactions of c-type cytochromes in bacteria, the latter stimulates bacteria to produce their flagella that help bacteria to firmly bond each other. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Design, fabrication and testing of an air-breathing micro direct methanol fuel cell with compound anode flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luwen; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhao, Youran; An, Zijiang; Zhou, Zhiping; Liu, Xiaowei

    2011-10-01

    An air-breathing micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) with a compound anode flow field structure (composed of the parallel flow field and the perforated flow field) is designed, fabricated and tested. To better analyze the effect of the compound anode flow field on the mass transfer of methanol, the compound flow field with different open ratios (ratio of exposure area to total area) and thicknesses of current collectors is modeled and simulated. Micro process technologies are employed to fabricate the end plates and current collectors. The performances of the μDMFC with a compound anode flow field are measured under various operating parameters. Both the modeled and the experimental results show that, comparing the conventional parallel flow field, the compound one can enhance the mass transfer resistance of methanol from the flow field to the anode diffusion layer. The results also indicate that the μDMFC with an anode open ratio of 40% and a thickness of 300 µm has the optimal performance under the 7 M methanol which is three to four times higher than conventional flow fields. Finally, a 2 h stability test of the μDMFC is performed with a methanol concentration of 7 M and a flow velocity of 0.1 ml min-1. The results indicate that the μDMFC can work steadily with high methanol concentration.

  11. Effects of carbon brush anode size and loading on microbial fuel cell performance in batch and continuous mode

    KAUST Repository

    Lanas, Vanessa

    2014-02-01

    Larger scale microbial fuel cells (MFCs) require compact architectures to efficiently treat wastewater. We examined how anode-brush diameter, number of anodes, and electrode spacing affected the performance of the MFCs operated in fed-batch and continuous flow mode. All anodes were initially tested with the brush core set at the same distance from the cathode. In fed-batch mode, the configuration with three larger brushes (25 mm diameter) produced 80% more power (1240 mW m-2) than reactors with eight smaller brushes (8 mm) (690 mW m-2). The higher power production by the larger brushes was due to more negative and stable anode potentials than the smaller brushes. The same general result was obtained in continuous flow operation, although power densities were reduced. However, by moving the center of the smaller brushes closer to the cathode (from 16.5 to 8 mm), power substantially increased from 690 to 1030 mW m-2 in fed batch mode. In continuous flow mode, power increased from 280 to 1020 mW m-2, resulting in more power production from the smaller brushes than the larger brushes (540 mW m-2). These results show that multi-electrode MFCs can be optimized by selecting smaller anodes, placed as close as possible to the cathode. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Set anode potentials affect the electron fluxes and microbial community structure in propionate-fed microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Hari Ananda

    2016-12-09

    Anode potential has been shown to be a critical factor in the rate of acetate removal in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), but studies with fermentable substrates and set potentials are lacking. Here, we examined the impact of three different set anode potentials (SAPs; −0.25, 0, and 0.25 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode) on the electrochemical performance, electron flux to various sinks, and anodic microbial community structure in two-chambered MECs fed with propionate. Electrical current (49–71%) and CH4 (22.9–41%) were the largest electron sinks regardless of the potentials tested. Among the three SAPs tested, 0 V showed the highest electron flux to electrical current (71 ± 5%) and the lowest flux to CH4 (22.9 ± 1.2%). In contrast, the SAP of −0.25 V had the lowest electron flux to current (49 ± 6%) and the highest flux to CH4 (41.1 ± 2%). The most dominant genera detected on the anode of all three SAPs based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing were Geobacter, Smithella and Syntrophobacter, but their relative abundance varied among the tested SAPs. Microbial community analysis implies that complete degradation of propionate in all the tested SAPs was facilitated by syntrophic interactions between fermenters and Geobacter at the anode and ferementers and hydrogenotrophic methanogens in suspension.

  13. Macroporous graphitic carbon foam decorated with polydopamine as a high-performance anode for microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongmei; Yang, Lu; Deng, Wenfang; Tan, Yueming; Xie, Qingji

    2017-09-01

    Herein, a macroporous graphitic carbon foam (MGCF) electrode decorated with polydopamine (PDA) is used as a high-performance anode for microbial fuel cell (MFC) applications. The MGCF is facilely prepared by pyrolysis of a powder mixture comprising maltose, nickel nitrate, and ammonia chloride, without using solid porous template. The MGCF is coated with PDA by self-polymerization of dopamine in a basic solution. The MGCF can provide a large surface area for bacterial attachment, and PDA coated on the MGCF electrode can further promote bacterial adhesion resulting from the improved hydrophility, so the MGCF-PDA electrode as an anode in a MFC can show ultrahigh bacterial loading capacity. Moreover, the electrochemical oxidation of flavins at the MGCF-PDA electrode is greatly accelerated, so the extracellular electron transfer mediated by flavins is improved. As a result, the MFC equipped with a MGCF-PDA anode can show a maximum power density of 1735 mW cm-2, which is 6.7 times that of a MFC equipped with a commercial carbon felt anode, indicating a promising anode for MFC applications.

  14. A novel catalyst layer structure based surface-patterned Nafion® membrane for high-performance direct methanol fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Meng; Ding, Xianan

    2018-01-01

    Conventional catalyst layer with a smooth surface exists the larger area of“catalytic dead zone” and reduces the utilization of catalyst. Based on this, a novel catalyst layer structure based surface-patterned Nafion® membrane was designed to achieve more efficient electrochemical reaction...... to prepare the novel catalyst layer, and the effect of pressure on the performance of MEA was investigated. The results suggested that the peak power density of DMFC with optimal novel catalyst layer structure increased by 28.84%, the charge transfer resistances of anode and cathode reduced by 28.8% and 26.......5% respectively, compared with the conventional catalyst layer. Performance improvement is attributed to the fact that the novel catalyst layer structure optimizes the electrolyte membrane/catalyst layer and gas diffusion layer/catalyst layer interfacial structure, which increases the electrochemical reaction...

  15. Electrospun fibers for high performance anodes in microbial fuel cells. Optimizing materials and architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shuiliang

    2010-04-15

    A novel porous conducting nanofiber mat (PCNM) with nanostructured polyaniline (nanoPANi) on the fiber surface was successfully prepared by simple oxidative polymerization. The composite PCNM displayed a core/shell structure with highly rough surface. The thickness and the morphology of PANi layer on the electrospun polyamide (PA) fiber surface could be controlled by varying aniline concentration and temperature. The combination of the advantages of electrospinning technique and nanostructured PANi, let the PA/PANi composite PCNM possess more than five good properties, i.e. high conductivity of 6.759 S.m{sup -1}, high specific surface area of 160 m2.g{sup -1}, good strength of 82.88 MPa for mat and 161.75 MPa for highly aligned belts, good thermal properties with 5% weight loss temperature up to 415 C and excellent biocompatibility. In the PA/PANi composite PCNM, PANi is the only conducting component, its conductivity of 6.759 S.m{sup -1} which is measured in dry-state, is not enough for electrode. Moreover, the conductivity decreases in neutral pH environment due to the de-doping of proton. However, the method of spontaneous growth of nanostructured PANi on electrospun fiber mats provides an effective method to produce porous electrically conducting electrospun fiber mats. The combination advantages of nanostructured PANi with the electrospun fiber mats, extends the applications of PANi and electrospun nanofibers, such as chemical- and bio-sensors, actuators, catalysis, electromagnetic shielding, corrosion protection, separation membranes, electro-optic devices, electrochromic devices, tissue engineering and many others. The electrical conductivity of electrospun PCNM with PANi as the only conducting component is too low for application of as anode in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). So, we turn to electrospun carbon fiber due to its high electrical conductivity and environmental stability. The current density is greatly dependent on the microorganism density of anode

  16. Low Pt content direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst: nanophase PtRuNiZr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Whitacre, Jay F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for the preparation of a metallic material having catalytic activity that includes synthesizing a material composition comprising a metal content with a lower Pt content than a binary alloy containing Pt but that displays at least a comparable catalytic activity on a per mole Pt basis as the binary alloy containing Pt; and evaluating a representative sample of the material composition to ensure that the material composition displays a property of at least a comparable catalytic activity on a per mole Pt basis as a representative binary alloy containing Pt. Furthermore, metallic compositions are disclosed that possess substantial resistance to corrosive acids.

  17. A combinatorial study on catalytic synergism in supported metal catalysts for fuel cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuhiko; Ueda, Atsushi; Yamada, Yusuke; Shioyama, Hiroshi

    2004-02-01

    In order to accelerate the catalyst development for the increasing demand on the fuel cell technology, it has been attempted to adopt a combinatorial approach. The catalytic synergism, often observed on the supported metal catalysts for the fuel cell utilization, has been subjected to study. It is proposed herein that not only a comparison of catalysts in one reaction, but also the comparison of interrelated reactions by use of a common catalyst library brings about important information to elucidate the catalytic synergism. Preliminary results of the comparison between the water-gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of MeOH on a given set of catalyst library are presented. An important indicator to predict the serendipitous synergism is expected to be obtained from such information by use of artificial intelligence.

  18. Ethylene glycol as a new sustainable fuel for solid oxide fuel cells with conventional nickel-based anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Jifa; Wang, Wei; Chen, Yubo; Wang, Feng; Ran, Ran; Shao, Zongping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ethylene glycol could be used as a sustainable fuel for solid oxide fuel cells. • Ethylene glycol was beneficial in suppressing coke formation on Ni anode. • A high power output of 1200 mW cm −2 was obtained with ethylene glycol at 750 °C. • An excellent operational stability was obtained with ethylene glycol fuel. - Abstract: In this study, renewable ethylene glycol (EG) was exploited as a potential fuel for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with conventional nickel yttria-stabilized zirconia (Ni–YSZ) cermet anodes for sustainable electric power generation. Carbon deposition behaviors over Ni–YSZ anodes under different carbon-containing atmospheres such as EG, glycerol, ethanol and methane were characterized through thermodynamic prediction, oxygen-temperature programmed oxidation and SEM–EDX analysis. EG was observed to be better than acetic acid and glycerol and much better than methane and ethanol in terms of carbon deposition. A calculation of the open-circuit voltages of EG-fueled SOFCs suggested that EG is a suitable fuel for SOFCs. A maximum power output of 1200 mW cm −2 at 750 °C was obtained from a cell operating on EG-steam fuel, which is only a little lower than that from a cell based on hydrogen fuel. The cell was further operated stably on an EG-steam gas mixture for 200 h with no apparent performance degradation, carbon deposition over the anode, Ni agglomeration, or change in the morphology of the anodes. The current study confirmed the practical applicability of EG as a direct fuel for SOFCs, which may have a great effect on future energy systems

  19. Graphite anode surface modification with controlled reduction of specific aryl diazonium salts for improved microbial fuel cells power output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot, Matthieu; Lapinsonnière, Laure; Rothballer, Michael; Barrière, Frédéric

    2011-10-15

    Graphite electrodes were modified with reduction of aryl diazonium salts and implemented as anodes in microbial fuel cells. First, reduction of 4-aminophenyl diazonium is considered using increased coulombic charge density from 16.5 to 200 mC/cm(2). This procedure introduced aryl amine functionalities at the surface which are neutral at neutral pH. These electrodes were implemented as anodes in "H" type microbial fuel cells inoculated with waste water, acetate as the substrate and using ferricyanide reduction at the cathode and a 1000 Ω external resistance. When the microbial anode had developed, the performances of the microbial fuel cells were measured under acetate saturation conditions and compared with those of control microbial fuel cells having an unmodified graphite anode. We found that the maximum power density of microbial fuel cell first increased as a function of the extent of modification, reaching an optimum after which it decreased for higher degree of surface modification, becoming even less performing than the control microbial fuel cell. Then, the effect of the introduction of charged groups at the surface was investigated at a low degree of surface modification. It was found that negatively charged groups at the surface (carboxylate) decreased microbial fuel cell power output while the introduction of positively charged groups doubled the power output. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the microbial anode modified with positively charged groups was covered by a dense and homogeneous biofilm. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses showed that this biofilm consisted to a large extent of bacteria from the known electroactive Geobacter genus. In summary, the extent of modification of the anode was found to be critical for the microbial fuel cell performance. The nature of the chemical group introduced at the electrode surface was also found to significantly affect the performance of the microbial fuel cells. The method used for

  20. Long-Life MEAs and Catalysts for PEM Electrolyzers/Fuel Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nanostructured Thin Films (NSTF), used as substrates for catalysts, have proven to be highly active for oxygen reduction in fuel cells. This improvement in activity...

  1. Tunable synthetic approaches for the optimization of nanostructured fuel cell catalysts: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bönnemann H.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly active nanostructured pluri-metal catalysts for fuel cell applications can be obtained by designing synthetic protocol where the particle size, metal composition and morphology can be readily tailored. Tunable synthesis relates to combining the various synthetic methodologies available for generating nanostructured metal catalysts with desired catalytic properties. Herein, we discuss some of these synthetic methodologies which were developed to combine the advantages of each pathway in generating efficient fuel cell catalysts and to learn how the composition and morphology of the metals be fine tuned.

  2. Preconditioning of the YSZ-NiO Fuel Cell Anode in Hydrogenous Atmospheres Containing Water Vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyliv, Bogdan; Podhurska, Viktoriya; Ostash, Orest

    2017-12-01

    The YSZ-NiO ceramics for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) anode have been investigated. A series of specimens were singly reduced in a hydrogenous atmosphere (Ar-5 vol% H 2 mixture) at 600 °C under the pressure of 0.15 MPa or subjected to 'reduction in the mixture-oxidation in air' (redox) cycling at 600 °C. The YSZ-Ni cermets formed in both treatment conditions were then aged in 'water vapor in Ar-5 vol% H 2 mixture' atmosphere at 600 °C under the pressure of 0.15 MPa. Additionally, the behaviour of the as-received material in this atmosphere was studied. It was revealed that small amount of water vapor in Ar-5 vol% H 2 mixture (water vapor pressure below 0.03 MPa) does not affect the reduction of the nickel phase in the YSZ-NiO ceramics, but causes some changes in the YSZ-Ni cermet structure. In particular, nanopore growth in tiny Ni particles takes place. At higher concentration of water vapor in the mixture (water vapor pressure above 0.03-0.05 MPa), converse changes in the kinetics of reduction occur. The best physical and mechanical properties were revealed for the material treated by redox cycling after holding at 600 °C in water depleted gas mixture. The dual effect of water vapor on nickel-zirconia anode behaviour is discussed basing on scanning electron microscopy analysis data, material electrical conductivity, and strength.

  3. Comparison of the Degradation of the Polarization Resistance of Symmetrical LSM-YSZ Cells, with Anode Supported Ni-YSZ/YSZ/LSM-YSZ SOFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres da Silva, Iris Maura; Nielsen, Jimmi; Hjelm, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Impedance spectra of a symmetrical cell with SOFC cathodes (LSM-YSZ/YSZ/LSM-YSZ) and an anode supported planar SOFC (Ni-YSZ/YSZ/LSM-YSZ) were collected at OCV at 650{degree sign}C in air (cathode) and humidified (4%) hydrogen (anode), over 155 hours. The impedance was affected by degradation over...

  4. A solid oxide fuel cell with a gadolinia-doped ceria anode: Preparation and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marina, O.A.; Bagger, C.; Primdahl, S.

    1999-01-01

    ) electrolyte without detrimental reaction. Single SOFCs comprising the CG4 anode, a composite strontium-doped lanthanum manganite-based cathode and the YSZ electrolyte were manufactured and tested in H-2/H2O and CH4/H2O atmospheres vs. air in the temperature range of 800-1015 degrees C, An area specific...... internal resistance of 0.39 Ohm cm(2) at 0.71 V cell voltage and a power density of 470 mW/cm(2) was obtained at 1000 degrees C using H-2/H2O/N-2 = 9/1.2/89.8 as the fuel and air as oxidant. A current density of 0.25 A/cm(2) at an area specific internal resistance of 2 Ohm cm(2) was obtained with CH4/H2O....../N-2 = 33/3/64. No carbon deposition was found on CG4 after cell operation at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 0.3 for 1000 h. Cells sustained several rapid thermal cycles in the temperature interval 200-1000 degrees C and a full redox cycle without degradation. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights...

  5. Low-cost stainless-steel wool anodes modified with polyaniline and polypyrrole for high-performance microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, Jayesh M.; Patil, Sunil A.; Ghosh, Prakash C.; Adeloju, Samuel B.

    2018-03-01

    A conducting polymer coated stainless-steel wool (SS-W) is proposed for use as a low-cost anode for microbial fuel cells (MFCs). When coated with polyaniline (PANi) and polypyrrole (PPy), the pristine SS-W, SS/PANi-W and SS/PPy-W anodes produced maximum current densities of 0.30 ± 0.04, 0.67 ± 0.05, 0.56 ± 0.07 mA cm-2, respectively, in air-cathode MFCs. Also, based on achieved power density, both SS/PANi-W and SS/PPy-W achieved 0.288 ± 0.036 mW cm-2 and 0.187 ± 0.017 mW cm-2, respectively, which were superior to 0.127 ± 0.011 mW cm-2 obtained with pristine SS-W. Further, in comparison with SS-P based anodes, all SS-W based anodes gave improved power densities under similar experimental conditions by at least 70%. Moreover, the charge transfer resistance of the SS-W was much lower (240 ± 25 Ω cm-2) than for the SS-P (3192 ± 239 Ω cm-2). The j0(apparent) values obtained for SS/PANi-W (0.098 ± 0.007 mA cm-2) and SS/PPy-W (0.036 ± 0.004 mA cm-2) anodes were also much higher than that of the pristine SS-W (0.020 ± 0.005 mA cm-2), as well as than those of all SS-P based anodes. The observed enhancement of the bioelectrocatalytic performances were well supported by physicochemical and electrochemical characterisation.

  6. Neutral hydrophilic cathode catalyst binders for microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Saito, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Improving oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes requires a better understanding of the effects of the catalyst binder chemistry and properties on performance. A series of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) polymers with systematically varying hydrophilicity were designed to determine the effect of the hydrophilic character of the binder on cathode performance. Increasing the hydrophilicity of the PS-b-PEO binders enhanced the electrochemical response of the cathode and MFC power density by ∼15%, compared to the hydrophobic PS-OH binder. Increased cathode performance was likely a result of greater water uptake by the hydrophilic binder, which would increase the accessible surface area for oxygen reduction. Based on these results and due to the high cost of PS-b-PEO, the performance of an inexpensive hydrophilic neutral polymer, poly(bisphenol A-co-epichlorohydrin) (BAEH), was examined in MFCs and compared to a hydrophilic sulfonated binder (Nafion). MFCs with BAEH-based cathodes with two different Pt loadings initially (after 2 cycles) had lower MFC performance (1360 and 630 mW m-2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2) than Nafion cathodes (1980 and 1080 mW m -2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2). However, after long-term operation (22 cycles, 40 days), power production of each cell was similar (∼1200 and 700-800 mW m-2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2) likely due to cathode biofouling that could not be completely reversed through physical cleaning. While binder chemistry could improve initial electrochemical cathode performance, binder materials had less impact on overall long-term MFC performance. This observation suggests that long-term operation of MFCs will require better methods to avoid cathode biofouling. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Effect of composites based nickel foam anode in microbial fuel cell using Acetobacter aceti and Gluconobacter roseus as a biocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Rengasamy; Krishnaraj, Navanietha; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan Woon-Chung; Lee, Patrick K H; Leung, Michael K H; Berchmans, Sheela

    2016-10-01

    This study explores the use of materials such as chitosan (chit), polyaniline (PANI) and titanium carbide (TC) as anode materials for microbial fuel cells. Nickel foam (NF) was used as the base anode substrate. Four different types of anodes (NF, NF/PANI, NF/PANI/TC, NF/PANI/TC/Chit) are thus prepared and used in batch type microbial fuel cells operated with a mixed consortium of Acetobacter aceti and Gluconobacter roseus as the biocatalysts and bad wine as a feedstock. A maximum power density of 18.8Wm(-3) (≈2.3 times higher than NF) was obtained in the case of the anode modified with a composite of PANI/TC/Chit. The MFCs running under a constant external resistance of (50Ω) yielded 14.7% coulombic efficiency with a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of 87-93%. The overall results suggest that the catalytic materials embedded in the chitosan matrix show the best performance and have potentials for further development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Ni/SDC as anode material for dry CH4 fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiming; Li, Yongdan; Schwank, Johannes W.

    2014-02-01

    A Ni/Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (SDC) composite was employed as anode material for direct electrochemical oxidation (DEO) of dry CH4 in a solid oxide fuel cell. The anodic performance was investigated at temperatures between 600 °C and 700 °C using SDC as electrolyte material and Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF) as cathode material. The single cell exhibited maximum power densities of 671 mW cm-2, 494 mW cm-2 and 305 mW cm-2 in dry CH4 at 700 °C, 650 °C and 600 °C, respectively. Remarkably, at 700 °C the power density in CH4 was higher than in H2, thanks to the carbon tolerance of the anode. Durability tests under constant 300 mA output current showed only 3.7% performance loss after 72 h operation. The results demonstrate that Ni/SDC can be used as anode for the DEO of dry CH4 even at temperatures as low as 600 °C.

  9. Investigation of sulfur interactions on a conventional nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell anode during methane steam and dry reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Whitney S.

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are an attractive energy source because they do not have undesirable emissions, are scalable, and are feedstock flexible, which means they can operate using a variety of fuel mixtures containing H2 and hydrocarbons. In terms of fuel flexibility, most potential fuel sources contain sulfur species, which severely poison the nickel-based anode. The main objective of this thesis is to systematically evaluate sulfur interactions on a conventional Ni/YSZ anode and compare sulfur poisoning during methane steam and dry reforming (SMR and DMR) to a conventional catalyst (Sud Chemie, Ni/K2O-CaAl2O4). Reforming experiments (SMR and DMR) were carried out in a packed bed reactor (PBR), and it was demonstrated that Ni/YSZ is much more sensitive to sulfur poisoning than Ni/K2O-CaAl2O4 as evidenced by the decline in activity to zero in under an hour for both SMR and DMR. Adsorption and desorption of H2S and SO2 on both catalysts was evaluated, and despite the low amount of accessible nickel on Ni/YSZ (14 times lower than Ni/K2O-CaAl2O4), it adsorbs 20 times more H2S and 50 times more SO2 than Ni/K 2O-CaAl2O4. A one-dimensional, steady state PBR model (DetchemPBED) was used to evaluate SMR and DMR under poisoning conditions using the Deutschmann mechanism and a recently published sulfur sub-mechanism. To fit the observed deactivation in the presence of 1 ppm H2S, the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant was increased by a factor 16,000 for Ni/YSZ and 96 for Ni/K2O-CaAl2O4. A tubular SAE reactor was designed and fabricated for evaluating DMR in a reactor that mimics an SOFC. Evidence of hydrogen diffusion through a supposedly impermeable layer indicated that the tubular SAE reactor has a major flaw in which gases diffuse to unintended parts of the tube. It was also found to be extremely susceptible to coking which leads to cell failure even in operating regions that mimic real biogas. These problems made it impossible to validate the tubular SAE

  10. Membrane-electrode structures for molecular catalysts for use in fuel cells and other electrochemical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, John B.; Zhu, Xiaobing; Hwang, Gi Suk; Martin, Zulima; He, Qinggang; Driscoll, Peter; Weber, Adam; Clark, Kyle

    2016-09-27

    Water soluble catalysts, (M)meso-tetra(N-Methyl-4-Pyridyl)Porphinepentachloride (M=Fe, Co, Mn & Cu), have been incorporated into the polymer binder of oxygen reduction cathodes in membrane electrode assemblies used in PEM fuel cells and found to support encouragingly high current densities. The voltages achieved are low compared to commercial platinum catalysts but entirely consistent with the behavior observed in electroanalytical measurements of the homogeneous catalysts. A model of the dynamics of the electrode action has been developed and validated and this allows the MEA electrodes to be optimized for any chemistry that has been demonstrated in solution. It has been shown that improvements to the performance will come from modifications to the structure of the catalyst combined with optimization of the electrode structure and a well-founded pathway to practical non-platinum group metal catalysts exists.

  11. Niobium Doped Lanthanum Strontium Ferrite as A Redox-Stable and Sulfur-Tolerant Anode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwei; Wei, Bo; Cao, Zhiqun; Yue, Xing; Zhang, Yaxin; Lü, Zhe

    2018-01-10

    The Nb-doped lanthanum strontium ferrite perovskite oxide La 0.8 Sr 0.2 Fe 0.9 Nb 0.1 O 3-δ (LSFNb) is evaluated as an anode material in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The effects of Nb partial substitution in the crystal structure, the electrical conductivity, and the valence of Fe ions are studied. LSFNb exhibits good structural stability in a severe reducing atmosphere at 800 °C, suggesting that high-valent Nb can effectively promote the stability of the lattice structure. The concentration of Fe 2+ increases after Nb doping, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The maximum power density of a thick Sc-stabilized zirconia (ScSZ) electrolyte-supported single cell reached 241.6 mW cm -2 at 800 °C with H 2 as fuel. The cell exhibited excellent stability for 100 h continuous operation without detectable degeneration. Scanning electron microscopy clearly revealed exsolution on the LSFNb surface after operation. Meanwhile, LSFNb particles agglomerated significantly during long-term stability testing. Impedance spectra suggested that both the LSFNb anode and the (La 0.75 Sr 0.25 ) 0.95 MnO 3-δ /ScSZ cathode underwent an activation process during long-term testing, through which the charge transfer ability increased significantly. Meanwhile, low-frequency resistance (R L ) mainly attributed to the anode (80 %) significantly increased, probably due to the agglomeration of LSFNb particles. The LSFNb anode exhibits excellent anti-sulfuring poisoning ability and redox stability. These results demonstrate that LSFNb is a promising anode material for SOFCs. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Anode microbial communities produced by changing from microbial fuel cell to microbial electrolysis cell operation using two different wastewaters

    KAUST Repository

    Kiely, Patrick D.

    2011-01-01

    Conditions in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) differ from those in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) due to the intrusion of oxygen through the cathode and the release of H2 gas into solution. Based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, anode communities in reactors fed acetic acid decreased in species richness and diversity, and increased in numbers of Geobacter sulfurreducens, when reactors were shifted from MFCs to MECs. With a complex source of organic matter (potato wastewater), the proportion of Geobacteraceae remained constant when MFCs were converted into MECs, but the percentage of clones belonging to G. sulfurreducens decreased and the percentage of G. metallireducens clones increased. A dairy manure wastewater-fed MFC produced little power, and had more diverse microbial communities, but did not generate current in an MEC. These results show changes in Geobacter species in response to the MEC environment and that higher species diversity is not correlated with current. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. In vitro investigation of anodization and CaP deposited titanium surface using MG63 osteoblast-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.M.; Lee, J.I.; Lim, Y.J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate surface characteristics in four different titanium surfaces (AN: anodized at 270 V; AN-CaP: anodic oxidation and CaP deposited; SLA: sandblasted and acid etched; MA: machined) and to evaluate biological behaviors such as cell adhesion, cell proliferation, cytoskeletal organization, and osteogenic protein expression of MG63 osteoblast-like cells at the early stage. Surface analysis was performed using scanning electron microscopy, thin-film X-ray diffractometry, and a confocal laser scanning microscope. In order to evaluate cellular responses, MG63 osteoblast-like cells were used. The cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. Immunofluorescent analyses of actin, type I collagen, osteonectin and osteocalcin were performed. The anodized and CaP deposited specimen showed homogeneously distributed CaP particles around micropores and exhibited anatase type oxides, titanium, and HA crystalline structures. This experiment suggests that CaP particles on the anodic oxidation surface affect cellular attachment and spreading. When designing an in vitro biological study for CaP coated titanium, it must be taken into account that preincubation in medium prior to cell seeding and the cell culture medium may affect the CaP coatings. All these observations illustrate the importance of the experimental conditions and the physicochemical parameters of the CaP coating. It is considered that further evaluations such as long-term in vitro cellular assays and in vivo experiments should be necessary to figure out the effect of CaP deposition to biological responses.

  14. Sulfur poisoning of Ni/Gadolinium-doped ceria anodes: A long-term study outlining stable solid oxide fuel cell operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegraf, Matthias; Zekri, Atef; Knipper, Martin; Costa, Rémi; Schiller, Günter; Friedrich, K. Andreas

    2018-03-01

    This work presents an analysis of the long-term behavior of nickel/gadolinium-doped ceria (CGO) anode-based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under sulfur poisoning conditions. A parameter study of sulfur-induced irreversible long-term degradation of commercial, high-performance single cells was carried out at 900 °C for different H2/N2/H2S fuel gas atmospheres, current densities and Ni/CGO anodes. The poisoning periods of the cells varied from 200 to 1500 h. The possibility of stable long-term Ni/CGO anode operation under sulfur exposure is established and the critical operating regime is outlined. Depending on the operating conditions, two degradation phenomena can be observed. Small degradation of the ohmic resistance was witnessed for sulfur exposure times of approximately 1000 h. Moreover, degradation of the anode charge transfer resistance was observed to be triggered by the combination of a small anodic potential step and high sulfur coverage on Ni. The microstructural evolution of altered Ni/CGO anodes was examined post-mortem by means of SEM and FIB/SEM, and is correlated to the anode performance degradation under critical operating conditions, establishing Ni depletion, porosity increase and a tripe phase boundary density decrease in the anode functional layer. It is shown that short-term sulfur poisoning behavior can be used to assess long-term stability.

  15. Transient Response and Steady-State Analysis of the Anode of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Based on Dual-Site Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xing

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An intrinsic time-dependent one-dimensional (1D model and a macro two-dimensional (2D model for the anode of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC are presented. The two models are based on the dual-site mechanism, which includes the coverage of intermediate species of methanol, OH, and CO (θM, θOH,Ru, and θCO,Pt on the surface of Pt and Ru. The intrinsic 1D model focused on the analysis of the effects of operating temperature, methanol concentration, and overpotential on the transient response. The macro 2D model emphasises the dimensionless distributions of methanol concentration, overpotential and current density in the catalyst layer which were affected by physical parameters such as thickness, specific area, and operating conditions such as temperature, bulk methanol concentration, and overpotential. The models were developed and solved in the PDEs module of COMSOL Multiphysics, giving good agreement with experimental data. The dimensionless distributions of methanol concentration, overpotential, and current density and the efficiency factor were calculated quantitatively. The models can be used to give accurate simulations for the polarisations of methanol fuel cell.

  16. N-doped carbon nanomaterials are durable catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Jianglan; Wang, Min; Du, Feng; Dai, Liming

    2015-02-01

    The availability of low-cost, efficient, and durable catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a prerequisite for commercialization of the fuel cell technology. Along with intensive research efforts of more than half a century in developing nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) to replace the expensive and scarce platinum-based catalysts, a new class of carbon-based, low-cost, metal-free ORR catalysts was demonstrated to show superior ORR performance to commercial platinum catalysts, particularly in alkaline electrolytes. However, their large-scale practical application in more popular acidic polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells remained elusive because they are often found to be less effective in acidic electrolytes, and no attempt has been made for a single PEM cell test. We demonstrated that rationally designed, metal-free, nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes and their graphene composites exhibited significantly better long-term operational stabilities and comparable gravimetric power densities with respect to the best NPMC in acidic PEM cells. This work represents a major breakthrough in removing the bottlenecks to translate low-cost, metal-free, carbon-based ORR catalysts to commercial reality, and opens avenues for clean energy generation from affordable and durable fuel cells.

  17. Three-Phase Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode Microstructure Realization Using Two-Point Correlation Functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baniassadi, Majid; Garmestani, Hamid; Li, Dongsheng; Ahzi, Said; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Sun, Xin

    2011-01-01

    A Monte Carlo methodology is developed as a means for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the microstructure of a three-phase anode used in solid oxide fuel cells, based on two-point statistical functions. The salient feature of the presented reconstruction methodology is the ability to realize the 3D microstructure from its 2D SEM image for a three-phase medium extendable to n-phase media. In the realization procedure, different phases of the heterogeneous medium are represented by different cells which are allowed to grow. The growth of cells, however, are controlled via several optimization parameters related to rotation, shrinkage, translation, distribution and growth rates of the cells. Indeed, the proposed realization algorithm can be categorized as a member of dynamic programming methods and is designed so comprehensive that can realize any desired microstructure. To be more specific, at first the initial 2D image is successfully reconstructed and then the final optimization parameters are used as the initial values for the initiation of the 3D reconstruction algorithm. This paper presents a novel hybrid stochastic methodology based on the colony and kinetic algorithm for the simulation of the virtual microstructure. The simulation procedure involves repeated realizations where each realization in turn consists of nucleation and growth of cells. For each of the subsequent realizations, the controlling parameters get updated by minimization of an objective function at the end of the preceding realization. Here, the objective function is defined based on the two-point correlation functions from the simulated and real microstructures. The kinetic growth algorithm is established on the cellular automata approach which facilitates the simulation procedure. Comparison of the two-point correlation functions from different sections of the final 3D reconstructed microstructure with the initial real microstructure shows a satisfactory agreement which confirms the

  18. Raoultella electrica sp. nov., isolated from anodic biofilms of a glucose-fed microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Zen-ichiro; Chung, Kyung Mi; Itoh, Hiroaki; Hiraishi, Akira; Okabe, Satoshi

    2014-04-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain 1GB(T), was isolated from anodic biofilms of a glucose-fed microbial fuel cell. Strain 1GB(T) was facultatively anaerobic and chemo-organotrophic, having both a respiratory and a fermentative type of metabolism, and utilized a wide variety of sugars as carbon and energy sources. Cells grown aerobically contained Q-8 as the major quinone, but excreted Q-9 and a small amount of Q-10 when cultured with an electrode serving as the sole electron acceptor. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of 1GB(T) was 54.5 mol%. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis showed that strain 1GB(T) represented a distinct lineage within the genus Raoultella (98.5-99.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and 94.0-96.5 % sequence similarity based on the three concatenated housekeeping genes gyrA, rpoB and parC. Strain 1GB(T) exhibited DNA-DNA hybridization relatedness of 7-43 % with type strains of all established species of the genus Raoultella. On the basis of these phenotypic, phylogenetic and genotypic data, the name Raoultella electrica sp. nov. is proposed for strain 1GB(T). The type strain is 1GB(T) ( = NBRC 109676(T) = KCTC 32430(T)).

  19. A comprehensive CFD model of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Dong Hyup

    2009-01-01

    The two-dimensional comprehensive CFD model of anode-supported SOFCs operating at intermediate temperature has been presented. This model provides transport phenomena of gas species with electrochemical characteristics and micro-structural properties, and predicts SOFC performance. The mathematical model solves conservation of electrons and ions, continuity equation, conservation of momentum, conservation of mass, and conservation of energy. A continuum micro-scale model based on statistical properties together with a mole-based conservation model was employed. CFD technique was used to solve the set of governing equations. The cell performance was decomposed with contributions of each overpotential and was presented at several operating temperatures with analysis of effective diffusivity. It was found that the contribution of potential gain due to temperature rising was considerably high. However it became non-significant at high operating temperature due to decreasing of effective diffusivity in AFL. These results showed that the performance and the distributions of current density, overpotentials, and mole fractions of gas species have a strong dependence upon temperature. From these results, it was concluded that the conservation of energy should be accommodated in comprehensive SOFC model. Also the useful information for the effect of parameters on cell performance and transport phenomena was provided

  20. Degradation analysis of anode-supported intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells under various failure modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Hee; Park, Ka-Young; Kim, Ji-Tae; Seo, Yongho; Kim, Ki Buem; Song, Sun-Ju; Park, Byoungnam; Park, Jun-Young

    2015-02-01

    This study focuses on mechanisms and symptoms of several simulated failure modes, which may have significant influences on the long-term durability and operational stability of intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs), including fuel/oxidation starvation by breakdown of fuel/air supply components and wet and dry cycling atmospheres. Anode-supported IT-SOFCs consisting of a Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF)-Nd0.1Ce0.9O2-δ (NDC) composite cathode with an NDC electrolyte on a Ni-NDC anode substrate are fabricated via dry-pressings followed by the co-firing method. Comprehensive and systematic research based on the failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) of anode-supported IT-SOFCs is conducted using various electrochemical and physiochemical analysis techniques to extend our understanding of the major mechanisms of performance deterioration under SOFC operating conditions. The fuel-starvation condition in the fuel-pump failure mode causes irreversible mechanical degradation of the electrolyte and cathode interface by the dimensional expansion of the anode support due to the oxidation of Ni metal to NiO. In contrast, the BSCF cathode shows poor stability under wet and dry cycling modes of cathode air due to the strong electroactivity of SrO with H2O. On the other hand, the air-depletion phenomena under air-pump failure mode results in the recovery of cell performance during the long-term operation without the visible microstructural transformation through the reduction of anode overvoltage.

  1. Use of Carbon Mesh Anodes and the Effect of Different Pretreatment Methods on Power Production in Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xin

    2009-09-01

    Flat electrodes are useful in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as close electrode spacing improves power generation. Carbon cloth and carbon paper materials typically used in hydrogen fuel cells, however, are prohibitively expensive for use in MFCs. An inexpensive carbon mesh material was examined here as a substantially less expensive alternative to these materials for the anode in an MFC. Pretreatment of the carbon mesh was needed to ensure adequate MFC performance. Heating the carbon mesh in a muffle furnace (450°C for 30 min) resulted in a maximum power density of 922 mW/m2 (46 W/m3) with this heat-treated anode, which was 3% more power than that produced using a mesh anode cleaned with acetone (893 mW/m2; 45 W/m3). This power density with heating was only 7% less than that achieved with carbon cloth treated by a high temperature ammonia gas process (988 mW/m2; 49 W/m3). When the carbon mesh was treated by the ammonia gas process, powerincreased to 1015 mW/m2 (51 W/m3). Analysis of the cleaned or heated surfaces showed these processes decreased atomic O/C ratio, indicating removal of contaminants that interfered with charge transfer. Ammonia gas treatment also increased the atomic N/C ratio, suggesting that this process produced nitrogen related functional groups that facilitated electron transfer. These results show that low cost heat-treated carbon mesh materials can be used as the anode in an MFC, providing good performance and even exceeding performance of carbon cloth anodes. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  2. Microstructural observation of fuel cell catalyst inks by Cryo-SEM and Cryo-TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimanuki, Junichi; Takahashi, Shinichi; Tohma, Hajime; Ohma, Atsushi; Ishihara, Ayumi; Ito, Yoshiko; Nishino, Yuri; Miyazawa, Atsuo

    2017-06-01

    In order to improve the electricity generation performance of fuel cell electric vehicles, it is necessary to optimize the microstructure of the catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. The catalyst layer is formed by a wet coating process using catalyst inks. Therefore, it is very important to observe the microstructure of the catalyst ink. In this study, the morphology of carbon-supported platinum (Pt/C) particles in catalyst inks with a different solvent composition was investigated by cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). In addition, the morphology of the ionomer, which presumably influences the formation of agglomerated Pt/C particles in a catalyst ink, was investigated by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). The results of a cryo-SEM observation revealed that the agglomerated Pt/C particles tended to become coarser with a higher 1-propanol (NPA) weight fraction. The results of a cryo-TEM observation indicated that the actual ionomer dispersion in a catalyst ink formed a network structure different from that of the ionomer in the solvent. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Anodized dental implant surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. Materials and Methods: A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. Results: The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. Conclusions: The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  4. Voltage Oscillations in a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell with Pd-Pt/C and Pd/C Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Jéssica Alves; Varela, Hamilton

    2017-10-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) fed with H 2 contaminated with CO may exhibit oscillatory behavior when operated galvanostatically. The self-organization of the anodic overpotential is interesting because it can be accompanied by an increase in the average performance. Herein we report experimental studies of voltage oscillations that emerge in a PEMFC equipped with a Pd/C or PdPt/C anode and fed with H 2 contaminated with CO (100 ppm). We used on-line mass spectrometry to investigate how the mass fragments associated with CO 2 and CO ( m / z 44 and 28, respectively) varied with the voltage oscillations. Overall, we observed that oscillations in the anodic overpotential are in phase with that of the CO and CO 2 signals. This fact is consistent with an autonomous adsorption-oxidation cyclic process. For both anodes, it has been observed that, in general, an increase in current density implies an increase in oscillatory frequency. By using CO stripping, we also discuss how the onset of CO oxidation is related to the maximum overpotential reached during a cycle, whereas the minimum overpotential can be associated with the catalytic activity of the electrode for H 2 oxidation.

  5. Nanoporous Mo2C functionalized 3D carbon architecture anode for boosting flavins mediated interfacial bioelectrocatalysis in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Long; Lu, Zhisong; Huang, Yunhong; Long, Zhong-er; Qiao, Yan

    2017-08-01

    An efficient microbial electrocatalysis in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) needs both high loading of microbes (biocatalysts) and robust interfacial electron transfer from microbes to electrode. Herein a nanoporous molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) functionalized carbon felt electrode with rich 3D hierarchical porous architecture is applied as MFC anode to achieve superior electrocatalytic performance. The nanoporous Mo2C functionalized anode exhibits strikingly improved microbial electrocatalysis in MFCs with 5-fold higher power density and long-term stability of electricity production. The great enhancement is attributed to the introduction of rough Mo2C nanostructural interface into macroporous carbon architecture for promoting microbial growth with great excretion of endogenous electron shuttles (flavins) and rich available nanopores for enlarging electrochemically active surface area. Importantly, the nanoporous Mo2C functionalized anode is revealed for the first time to have unique electrocatalytic activity towards redox reaction of flavins with more negative redox potential, indicating a more favourable thermodynamic driving force for anodic electron transfer. This work not only provides a promising electrode for high performance MFCs but also brings up a new insight into the effect of nanostructured materials on interfacial bioelectrocatalysis.

  6. On direct internal methane steam reforming kinetics in operating solid oxide fuel cells with nickel-ceria anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallam Thattai, A.; van Biert, L.; Aravind, P. V.

    2017-12-01

    Major operating challenges remain to safely operate methane fuelled solid oxide fuel cells due to undesirable temperature gradients across the porous anode and carbon deposition. This article presents an experimental study on methane steam reforming (MSR) global kinetics for single operating SOFCs with Ni-GDC (gadolinium doped ceria) anodes for low steam to carbon (S/C) ratios and moderate current densities. The study points out the hitherto insufficient research on MSR global and intrinsic kinetics for operating SOFCs with complete Ni-ceria anodes. Further, it emphasizes the need to develop readily applicable global kinetic models as a subsequent step from previously reported state-of-art and complex intrinsic models. Two rate expressions of the Power law (PL) and Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) type have been compared and based on the analysis, limitations of using previously proposed rate expressions for Ni catalytic beds to study MSR kinetics for complete cermet anodes have been identified. Firstly, it has been shown that methane reforming on metallic (Ni) current collectors may not be always negligible, contrary to literature reports. Both PL and LH kinetic models predict significantly different local MSR reaction rate and species partial pressure distributions along the normalized reactor length, indicating a strong need for further experimental verifications.

  7. Highly Durable Direct Methanol Fuel Cell with Double-Layered Catalyst Cathode

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Chun-Tao; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Zhen-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) is one of the key components in direct methanol fuel cells. However, the PEM usually gets attacked by reactive oxygen species during the operation period, resulting in the loss of membrane integrity and formation of defects. Herein, a double-layered catalyst cathode electrode consisting of Pt/CeO2-C as inner catalyst and Pt/C as outer catalyst is fabricated to extend the lifetime and minimize the performance loss of DMFC. Although the maximum power density o...

  8. A Study of Iron-Nitrogen-Carbon Fuel Cell Catalysts: Chemistry - Nanostructure - Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Michael J., Jr.

    Fuel cells have the potential to be a pollution-free, low-cost, and energy efficient alternative to the internal combustion engine for transportation and small-scale stationary power applications. The current state of fuel cell technology has already achieved two of these three lofty goals. The remaining barrier to wide-scale deployment is the high cost, which is primarily caused by dependence on large amounts of platinum to catalyze the energy conversion reactions. To overcome this barrier and facilitate the integration of fuel cells into mainstream applications, research into a new class of catalyst materials that do not require platinum is needed. There has been a significant amount of research effort directed toward the development of platinum-group metal free (PGM-free) catalysts, yet there is a lack of consensus on both the engineering parameters necessary to improve the technology and the fundamental science that would facilitate rational design. I have engaged in research on PGM-free catalysts based on inexpensive and abundant reagents, specifically: nicarbazin and iron. Catalysts made from these precursors have previously proven to be among the best PGM-free catalysts, but their continued advancement suffered from the same lack of understanding that besets all catalysts in this class. The work I have performed address both engineering concerns and fundamental underlying principles. I present results demonstrating correlations between physical structure, chemical speciation, and synthesis parameters, as well as addressing active site chemistry and likely locations. My research presented herein introduces new morphology analysis techniques and elucidates several key structure-to-property characteristics of catalysts derived from iron and nicarbazin. I discuss the development and application of a new length-scale specific surface analysis technique that allows for analysis of well-defined size ranges from a few nm to several microns. The existing technique of

  9. Self-ordering anodized nanotubes: Enhancing the performance by surface plasmon for dye-sensitized solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwala, S.; Ho, G.W.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, electrochemical anodization has been used to prepare uniform TiO 2 nanotube array photoelectrode. The average internal diameter, tube length and wall thickness of the optimized morphology is ∼180 nm, 14 μm and 10 nm, respectively. It was found that the tube diameter increases with the anodization voltage. Diffraction data reveals that the nanotubes consist solely of anatase phase. Back illuminated geometry of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), with nanotubes grown at 60 V for 2 h, gave a cell performance of 4.5%. TiO 2 nanotubes are loaded with silver (Ag) nanoparticles synthesized by a hydrothermal route. The Ag particle size is controlled resulting in solar conversion efficiency to increase by 22%. The DSSC based on TiO 2 nanotube with Ag nanoparticles shows power conversion efficiency of 5.5%. Detailed characterization are performed, presented and discussed. - Graphical abstract: Enhanced solar conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells by decorating TiO 2 nanotube array with Ag nanoparticles. Highlights: ► Uniform array of TiO 2 nanotubes synthesized via electrochemical anodization. ► Back illuminated DSSC gave a cell performance of 4.5%. ► TiO 2 nanotubes are loaded with Ag nanoparticles, which increased the power conversion efficiency to 5.5%.

  10. Catalyst Degradation in High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Buazar, F.; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    confirmed by the post TEM and XRD analysis. A strong dependence of the fuel cell performance degradation on the catalyst supports was observed. Graphitization of the carbon blacks improved the stability and catalyst durability though at the expense of a significant decrease in the specific surface area......Degradation of carbon supported platinum catalysts is a major failure mode for the long term durability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells based on phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes. With Vulcan carbon black as a reference, thermally treated carbon black...... and multi‐walled carbon nanotubes were used as supports for electrode catalysts and evaluated in accelerated durability tests under potential cycling at 150 °C. Measurements of open circuit voltage, area specific resistance and hydrogen permeation through the membrane were carried out, indicating little...

  11. A direct borohydride fuel cell with a polymer fiber membrane and non-noble metal catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Yongning; Li, Sai; Wei, Xiaozhu; Wang, Li; Chen, Yuanzhen

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) and Pt-based catalysts are two crucial components which determine the properties and price of fuel cells. Even though, PEM faces problem of fuel crossover in liquid fuel cells such as direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), which lowers power output greatly. Here, we report a DBFC in which a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) was used, and metal oxides, such as LaNiO3 and MnO2, were used as cathode catalysts, meanwhile CoO was us...

  12. Conductive polymer layers to limit transfer of fuel reactants to catalysts of fuel cells to reduce reactant crossover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanis, Ronald J.; Lambert, Timothy N.

    2016-12-06

    An apparatus of an aspect includes a fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell catalyst layer is operable to catalyze a reaction involving a fuel reactant. A fuel cell gas diffusion layer is coupled with the fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell gas diffusion layer includes a porous electrically conductive material. The porous electrically conductive material is operable to allow the fuel reactant to transfer through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer to reach the fuel cell catalyst layer. The porous electrically conductive material is also operable to conduct electrons associated with the reaction through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. An electrically conductive polymer material is coupled with the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. The electrically conductive polymer material is operable to limit transfer of the fuel reactant to the fuel cell catalyst layer.

  13. The synthesis of carbon nanocomposites as fuel cell catalyst support and the characterization of fuel cell catalysts by spatially resolved scanning mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Nan

    2007-07-01

    Ammonia decomposition over Ni/SiO{sub 2} and Ni/MgO was investigated by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) in order to produce CO{sub x} free hydrogen fuel for fuel cell application. A highly efficient route for the synthesis of carbon nanocomposites based on electrochemical deposition and iron catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed in order to obtain a promising substrate for fuel cell catalysts. The duration of electrochemical deposition, temperature and time for the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) growth had been optimized to achieve higher surface area after the growth. Hierarchically structured CNTs composites had been synthesized and electrochemical studies provided evidence for the strong interaction among the substrate and grown CNTs, which are essential for the application in fuel cells. A straightforward strategy was developed to synthesize well dispersed gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 4 to 6 nm on the sidewall of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). A gas flow set-up was developed for the evaluation of fuel cell catalysts by performing scanning mass spectrometry with integrated constant-distance positioning. Methanol oxidation was identified as a suitable test reaction. The diameter of scanning probe was reduced in order to achieve higher spatial resolution. Spatially resolved scanning mass spectrometry was successfully applied to visualize the catalytic activity over Pt-based catalysts and monitor the local activity of a catalysts coated membrane (CCM). The gas-solid phase reaction results were proved to be accurate, reliable and independent of the sample topography. This analytical method opens the way for fast quality control of the catalyst coating with respect to even coating and absence of damages, and for a better understanding of the CCM degradation in polymer membrane electrolyte fuel cells (PEMFCs). (orig.)

  14. Self-ordering anodized nanotubes: Enhancing the performance by surface plasmon for dye-sensitized solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwala, S.; Ho, G. W.

    2012-05-01

    In the present work, electrochemical anodization has been used to prepare uniform TiO2 nanotube array photoelectrode. The average internal diameter, tube length and wall thickness of the optimized morphology is ˜180 nm, 14 μm and 10 nm, respectively. It was found that the tube diameter increases with the anodization voltage. Diffraction data reveals that the nanotubes consist solely of anatase phase. Back illuminated geometry of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), with nanotubes grown at 60 V for 2 h, gave a cell performance of 4.5%. TiO2 nanotubes are loaded with silver (Ag) nanoparticles synthesized by a hydrothermal route. The Ag particle size is controlled resulting in solar conversion efficiency to increase by 22%. The DSSC based on TiO2 nanotube with Ag nanoparticles shows power conversion efficiency of 5.5%. Detailed characterization are performed, presented and discussed.

  15. Polymeric anodes from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) for 3.5% efficient organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Hung; Reinhard, Manuel; Vogeler, Henry; Puetz, Andreas; Klein, Michael F.G.; Schabel, Wilhelm; Colsmann, Alexander; Lemmer, Uli

    2009-01-01

    We present highly efficient indium tin oxide free polymer solar cells based on poly-(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) and C 61 -bis-butric-acid-methyl-ester (P3HT:bisPCBM) comprising a polymeric anode from highly conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) formulations. The film conductivity was optimized by various additives. We found conductivities of almost 600 S/cm upon the addition of dimethylsulfoxide. The wetting properties of different PEDOT:PSS formulations were investigated by contact angle measurements. The optimized high conductivity in combination with the good film forming properties allow for the fabrication of highly efficient organic solar cells with an external power conversion efficiency of 3.5% with PEDOT:PSS as polymeric anode.

  16. Modeling of Ultrathin Catalyst Layers in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells: Proton Transport and Water Management

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Karen Ka Wing

    2013-01-01

    Ultrathin catalyst layers (UTCLs) are emerging as a promising alternative to conventional catalyst layers in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. In comparison, UTCLs have dramatically reduced Pt loading and thicknesses and are ionomer–free. We explore two open questions in the theory of UTCLs (1) the proton transport mechanism within the ionomer–free layer and (2) water management in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with UTCLs. To investigate (1), we present a UTCL model, which assumes the pr...

  17. Enzymatic fuel cells with an oxygen resistant variant of pyranose-2-oxidase as anode biocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Samet; Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Chuaboon, Litavadee; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Yu, Eileen Hao

    2018-06-01

    In enzymatic fuel cells (EnFCs), hydrogen peroxide formation is one of the main problems when enzymes, such as, glucose oxidase (GOx) is used due to the conversion of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide in the catalytic reaction. To address this problem, we here report the first demonstration of an EnFC using a variant of pyranose-2-oxidase (P2O-T169G) which has been shown to have low activity towards oxygen. A simple and biocompatible immobilisation approach incorporating multi-walled-carbon nanotubes within ferrocene (Fc)-Nafion film was implemented to construct EnFCs. Successful immobilisation of the enzymes was demonstrated showing 3.2 and 1.7-fold higher current than when P2O-T169G and GOx were used in solution, respectively. P2O-T169G showed 25% higher power output (maximum power density value of 8.45 ± 1.6 μW cm -2 ) and better stability than GOx in aerated glucose solutions. P2O-T169G maintained > 70% of its initial current whereas GOx lost activity > 90% during the first hour of 12 h operation at 0.15 V (vs Ag/Ag + ). A different fuel cell configuration using gas-diffusion cathode and carbon paper electrodes were used to improve the power output of the fuel cell to 29.8 ± 6.1 µW cm -2 . This study suggests that P2O-T169G with low oxygen activity could be a promising anode biocatalyst for EnFC applications. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Hydrogen Oxidation Reaction at the Ni/YSZ Anode of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Clotilde S.; Bernasconi, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-11-01

    By means of ab initio simulations we here provide a comprehensive scenario for hydrogen oxidation reactions at the Ni/zirconia anode of solid oxide fuel cells. The simulations have also revealed that in the presence of water chemisorbed at the oxide surface, the active region for H oxidation actually extends beyond the metal/zirconia interface unraveling the role of water partial pressure in the decrease of the polarization resistance observed experimentally.

  19. The effects of silicon doping on the performance of PMAN carbon anodes in Li-ion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidotti, R.A.; Johnson, B.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Even, W. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Carbons derived from polymethylacrylonitrile (PMAN) have been studied for use as intercalation anodes in Li-ion cells. The effect of Si doping upon the electrochemical performance of PMAN carbons was studied using tetravinylsilane (TVS) and tetramethysilane (TMS) as sources of Si during the formation of the PMAN precursors. The carbons were characterized by galvanostatic cycling, cyclic voltammetry, and complex impedance. The presence of 9 to 11 w/o Si in the PMAN lattice greatly increased the irreversible capacity of these materials.

  20. Effects of Anodic Buffer Layer in Top-Illuminated Organic Solar Cell with Silver Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Lung Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient ITO-free top-illuminated organic photovoltaic (TOPV based on small molecular planar heterojunction was achieved by spinning a buffer layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(styrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS, on the Ag-AgOx anode. The PEDOT:PSS thin film separates the active layer far from the Ag anode to prevent metal quenching and redistributes the strong internal optical field toward dissociated interface. The thickness and morphology of this anodic buffer layer are the key factors in determining device performances. The uniform buffer layer contributes a large short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage, benefiting the final power conversion efficiency (PCE. The TOPV device with an optimal PEDOT:PSS thickness of about 30 nm on Ag-AgOx anode exhibits the maximum PCE of 1.49%. It appreciates a 1.37-fold enhancement in PCE over that of TOPV device without buffer layer.

  1. Characteristics of anodic polarization of solid oxide fuel cells under pressurized conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Ryuji; Yano, Tatsuya; Eguchi, Koichi [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Takeguchi, Tatsuya [Catalysis Research Center, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan)

    2004-10-29

    AC impedance measurements were carried out under pressurized conditions by using a Ni-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/YSZ half cell in order to investigate anodic polarization at high-pressure conditions. AC impedance spectra were measured at 900 and 1000C in H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system with a constant H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ratio, or a constant partial pressure of H{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O for different total pressures of 1 to 10 atm. At high pressures, the resistance characterized by the semicircle at high frequency was lowered, whereas that at low frequency was raised. A model based on one-dimensional diffusion was developed to estimate concentration polarization based on the impedance measurements, and activation polarization was evaluated using a linear current-potential relation derived from the Butler-Volmer equation. The activation overvoltage was at most 40 mV at 10 mA/cm{sup 2}, irrespective of the total pressure. Concentration polarization was computed to increase as the total pressure was raised, whereas it was almost constant for temperature change. Large voltage drop at small current densities was calculated for the system with low partial pressure of oxygen.

  2. Visualization of Si Anode Reactions in Coin-Type Cells via Operando Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yao; Sawamura, Amane; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Uchida, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masashi; Kuwabata, Susumu

    2017-10-18

    Understanding the electrochemical behavior and controlling the morphological variations of electrodes are critical for the design of high-capacity batteries. In this article, we describe a newly established operando scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to visualize the battery reactions in a modified coin cell, which allowed the simultaneous collection of electrochemical data and time-resolved images. The investigated silicon (Si)-polyimide-binder electrode exhibited a high capacity (∼1500 mAh g -1 ) and a desirable cyclability. Operando SEM revealed that the morphology of the Si anode drastically changed and cracks formed on the electrode because of the lithiation-induced volume expansion of the Si particles during the first charge process. Interestingly, the thickness variation in the Si composite layer was moderated in subsequent cycles. This strongly suggested that cracking caused by the breakage of the stiff binder alleviated the internal stress experienced by Si. On the basis of this finding by the operando SEM technique, patterned Si electrodes with controlled spacing were successfully fabricated, and their improved performance was confirmed.

  3. Preparation and study of IrO2/SiC–Si supported anode catalyst for high temperature PEM steam electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Tomás García, Antonio Luis; Petrushina, Irina

    2011-01-01

    A novel catalyst material for oxygen evolution electrodes was prepared and characterised by different techniques. IrO2 supported on a SiC–Si composite was synthesised by the Adams fusion method. XRD and nitrogen adsorption experiments showed an influence of the support on the surface properties...... of the IrO2 particles, affecting the IrO2 particle size. The prepared catalysts were electrochemically characterised by cyclic voltammetry experiments at 25,80,120 and 150 °C. In accordance with the observed variation in particle size, a support loading of up to 20% improved the activity of the catalyst....... Powder conductivity measurements were also performed, which showed the influence of the support particles in the packing of IrO2 particles, perhaps favouring the formation of channels and pores between particles, thus increasing the catalyst utilisation....

  4. Platinum Group Metal-free Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Microbial Electrolysis Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Heyang; He, Zhen

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen gas is a green energy carrier with great environmental benefits. Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can convert low-grade organic matter to hydrogen gas with low energy consumption and have gained a growing interest in the past decade. Cathode catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) present a major challenge for the development and future applications of MECs. An ideal cathode catalyst should be catalytically active, simple to synthesize, durable in a complex environment, and cost-effective. A variety of noble-metal free catalysts have been developed and investigated for HER in MECs, including Nickel and its alloys, MoS 2 , carbon-based catalysts and biocatalysts. MECs in turn can serve as a research platform to study the durability of the HER catalysts. This personal account has reviewed, analyzed, and discussed those catalysts with an emphasis on synthesis and modification, system performance and potential for practical applications. It is expected to provide insights into the development of HER catalysts towards MEC applications. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Durable platinum/graphene catalysts assisted with polydiallyldimethylammonium for proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, M.; Liang, C.; Wang, Y.J.; Huang, K.; Ye, C.X.; Liu, G.; Wang, W.J.; Jin, S.F.; Zhang, R.; Fan, D.Y.; Yang, H.J.; Wang, Y.G.

    2013-01-01

    High performance and electrochemically stable Pt/graphene catalysts assisted with polydiallyldimethylammonium (PDDA) have been synthesized for PEM fuel cells. The preparation procedure and properties of the catalysts are investigated in detail. With the introduction of PDDA molecules, Pt nanoparticles can be well-dispersed on graphene support, resulting in improved electrochemical surface area and enhanced electrocatalytic activity. The corresponding electrochemical surface areas (ECSA) of catalyst layers calculated from the hydrogen desorption peak on cyclic voltammogram curves are 78.3, 72.5 and 73.6 cm 2 g −1 for catalyst layers with Pt/graphene, Pt-PDDA/graphene, and Pt/graphene-PDDA catalysts, respectively. Both PDDA modified Pt nanoparticles and PDDA modified graphene supports also exhibit high durability toward electrochemical oxidation cycles compared with the conventional produced Pt/graphene catalyst at the same conditions. After 3000 cycles, only 23.52% of the initial ECSA remains for Pt/graphene electrocatalyst whereas 43.04% and 37.7% of the initial ECSA for the Pt/graphene-PDDA and Pt-PDDA/graphene catalysts remain, respectively

  6. SiC nanocrystals as Pt catalyst supports for fuel cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhiman, Rajnish; Morgen, Per; Skou, E.M.

    2013-01-01

    A robust catalyst support is pivotal to Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) to overcome challenges such as catalyst support corrosion, low catalyst utilization and overall capital cost. SiC is a promising candidate material which could be applied as a catalyst support in PEMFCs. Si......C nanocrystals are here synthesized using nano-porous carbon black (Vulcan XC-72) as a template using two different reactions, which result in particle sizes in the ranges of 50-150 nm (SiC-SPR) and 25-35 nm (SiC-NS). Pt nano-catalysts of size 5-8 nm and 4-5 nm have successfully been uniformly deposited...... on the nanocrystals of SiC-SPR and SiC-NS by the polyol method. The SiC substrates are subjected to an acid treatment to introduce the surface groups, which help to anchor the Pt nano-catalysts. These SiC based catalysts have been found to have a higher electrochemical activity than commercially available Vulcan...

  7. Preparation of Pt-Re/Vulcan carbon nanocomposites using a single-source molecular precursor and relative performance as a direct methanol fuel cell electrooxidation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Angela D; Deluga, Gregg A; Moore, Joshua T; Vergne, Matthew J; Hercules, David M; Kenik, Edward A; Lukehart, C M

    2004-09-01

    Pt-Re/Vulcan carbon powder nanocomposites have been prepared with total metal loadings of 18 wt.% and 40 wt.% using a new non-cluster (1:1)-PtRe bimetallic precursor as the source of metal. Pt-Re nanoparticles having an average diameter of ca. 6 nm and atomic stoichiometry near 1:1 are formed. TEM, on-particle HR-EDS, and powder XRD data are consistent with the formation of Pt-Re alloy nanoparticles having a hexagonal unit cell with cell constants of a = 2.77 A and c = 4.47 A. A nanocomposite prepared at higher total metal loading under more rigorous thermal treatment also contains Pt-Re alloy nanoparticles having a fcc unit cell structure (a = 3.95 A). The precise dependence of Pt-Re nanocrystal structure on the thermal history of the nanocomposite specimen has not been investigated in detail. While these Pt-Re/carbon nanocomposites are active as anode catalysts in operating direct methanol fuel cells, the measured performance is less than that of commercial Pt-Ru/carbon catalysts and has marginal practical importance.

  8. Electrode design for low temperature direct-hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanglin; Zhao, Fei; Liu, Qiang

    2015-10-06

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  9. Electrode Design for Low Temperature Direct-Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanglin (Inventor); Zhao, Fei (Inventor); Liu, Qiang (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  10. Prediction of overpotential and effective thickness of Ni/YSZ anode for solid oxide fuel cell by improved species territory adsorption model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Tsuyoshi; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2017-06-01

    The reliability of analytical model for hydrogen oxidation at Ni/YSZ anode in solid oxide fuel cell named as species territory adsorption model has been improved by introducing referenced thermodynamic and kinetic parameters predicted by density function theory calculations. The model can explicitly predict anode overpotential using unknown values of quantities of state for oxygen migration process in YSZ near a triple phase boundary (TPB), frequency factor for hydrogen oxidation, and effective anode thickness. The former two are determined through careful fitting process between the predicted and experimental results of Ni/YSZ cermet and Ni-patterned anodes. This makes it possible to estimate effective anode thickness, which tends to increase with temperature in six kinds of Ni/YSZ anodes in references. In addition, the comparison between the proposed model and a published numerical simulation indicates that the model can predict more precise dependence of anode overpotential on steam partial pressure than that by Butler-Volmer equation with empirical exchange current density. The introduction of present model into numerical simulation instead of Butler-Volmer equation can give more accurate prediction of anode polarization.

  11. Combined carbon mesh and small graphite fiber brush anodes to enhance and stabilize power generation in microbial fuel cells treating domestic wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shijia; He, Weihua; Yang, Wulin; Ye, Yaoli; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E.

    2017-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) need to have a compact architecture, but power generation using low strength domestic wastewater is unstable for closely-spaced electrode designs using thin anodes (flat mesh or small diameter graphite fiber brushes) due to oxygen crossover from the cathode. A composite anode configuration was developed to improve performance, by joining the mesh and brushes together, with the mesh used to block oxygen crossover to the brushes, and the brushes used to stabilize mesh potentials. In small, fed-batch MFCs (28 mL), the composite anode produced 20% higher power densities than MFCs using only brushes, and 150% power densities compared to carbon mesh anodes. In continuous flow tests at short hydraulic retention times (HRTs, 2 or 4 h) using larger MFCs (100 mL), composite anodes had stable performance, while brush anode MFCs exhibited power overshoot in polarization tests. Both configurations exhibited power overshoot at a longer HRT of 8 h due to lower effluent CODs. The use of composite anodes reduced biomass growth on the cathode (1.9 ± 0.2 mg) compared to only brushes (3.1 ± 0.3 mg), and increased coulombic efficiencies, demonstrating that they successfully reduced oxygen contamination of the anode and the bio-fouling of cathode.

  12. Nanoporous PdCo Catalyst for Microfuel Cells: Electrodeposition and Dealloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Tominaka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PdCo alloy is a promising catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction of direct methanol fuel cells because of its high activity and the tolerance to methanol. We have applied this catalyst in order to realize on-chip fuel cell which is a membraneless design. The novel design made the fuel cells to be flexible and integratable with other microdevices. Here, we summarize our recent research on the synthesis of nanostructured PdCo catalyst by electrochemical methods, which enable us to deposit the alloy onto microelectrodes of the on-chip fuel cells. First, the electrodeposition of PdCo is discussed in detail, and then, dealloying for introducing nanopores into the electrodeposits is described. Finally, electrochemical response and activities are fully discussed.

  13. Synthesis of porous CoMoO4 nanorods as a bifunctional cathode catalyst for a Li-O2 battery and superior anode for a Li-ion battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangjun; Cui, Xinhang; Gong, Lili; Lyu, Zhiyang; Zhou, Yin; Dong, Wenhao; Liu, Jia; Lai, Min; Huo, Fengwei; Huang, Wei; Lin, Ming; Chen, Wei

    2017-03-17

    We report the synthesis of porous CoMoO 4 nanorods and their applications in lithium oxygen (Li-O 2 ) and lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. The unique porous structures of CoMoO 4 nanorods can promote the permeation of electrolyte and benefit the transport of lithium ion. When employed as the cathode catalyst for a Li-O 2 battery, CoMoO 4 nanorods deliver an improved discharge capacity (4680 mA h g -1 ), lower charge potential and better cycle stability (41 cycles at 500 mA h g -1 capacity limit) compared with the bare carbon. When employed as an anode in Li-ion batteries, CoMoO 4 nanorods can retain a capacity of 603 mA h g -1 after 300 cycles (400 mA g -1 ) and exhibit excellent rate capability.

  14. Degradation of some ceria electrolytes under hydrogen contact nearby anode in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malta Luiz Fernando Brum

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with thermodynamic analysis of the stability of some ceria electrolytes under contact with hydrogen gas nearby anode in fuel cells. It was considered the following types of ceria-electrolytes: pure ceria, strontium-doped ceria, calcium-doped ceria and calcium-bismuth-doped ceria. The equilibrium Log (pH2O/pH2 vs. T diagrams were constructed for x = 0.1 and 0.01, where x is the fraction of initial ceria converted to Ce2O3 (proportional to the ratio between activities of Ce3+ and Ce4+ in the ceria electrolyte, which is proportional to the fraction of electronic conduction in the electrolyte at a given temperature. The predictions of the diagrams are as follows: (a Ce1.9Ca0.1Bi0.8O5.1 and Ce0.9Sr0.1O1.9 are less stable than pure ceria for the whole temperature range (from 0 to 1000 °C; (b Ce0.9Ca0.1O1.9 is more stable than pure ceria below about 650 °C for x = 0.1 and below about 400 °C for x = 0.01; (c at each temperature in the considered range the pressure ratio pH2O(g/pH2(g has to be higher than thermodynamically predicted in order to keep CeO2 stable in the electrolyte contacting hydrogen gas. Thermodynamic predictions are entirely capable of explaining experimental data published on the subject (irreversible cell degradation in the case of SrO-doped ceria; weight loss from doped-ceria electrolyte above 700 °C; oxygen gas release during sintering of ceria.

  15. Platinum and palladium nano-structured catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Thi, Cao Minh; Yong, Yang; Nogami, Masayuki; Ohtaki, Michitaka

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we present the synthesis and characterization of Pt, Pd, Pt based bimetallic and multi-metallic nanoparticles with mixture, alloy and core-shell structure for nano-catalysis, energy conversion, and fuel cells. Here, Pt and Pd nanoparticles with modified nanostructures can be controllably synthesized via chemistry and physics for their uses as electro-catalysts. The cheap base metal catalysts can be studied in the relationship of crystal structure, size, morphology, shape, and composition for new catalysts with low cost. Thus, Pt based alloy and core-shell catalysts can be prepared with the thin Pt and Pt-Pd shell, which are proposed in low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). We also present the survey of the preparation of Pt and Pd based catalysts for the better catalytic activity, high durability, and stability. The structural transformations, quantum-size effects, and characterization of Pt and Pd based catalysts in the size ranges of 30 nm (1-30 nm) are presented in electro-catalysis. In the size range of 10 nm (1-10 nm), the pure Pt catalyst shows very large surface area for electro-catalysis. To achieve homogeneous size distribution, the shaped synthesis of the polyhedral Pt nanoparticles is presented. The new concept of shaping specific shapes and morphologies in the entire nano-scale from nano to micro, such as polyhedral, cube, octahedra, tetrahedra, bar, rod, and others of the nanoparticles is proposed, especially for noble and cheap metals. The uniform Pt based nanosystems of surface structure, internal structure, shape, and morphology in the nanosized ranges are very crucial to next fuel cells. Finally, the modifications of Pt and Pd based catalysts of alloy, core-shell, and mixture structures lead to find high catalytic activity, durability, and stability for nano-catalysis, energy conversion, fuel cells, especially the next large-scale commercialization of next

  16. A mathematical model and optimization of the cathode catalyst layer structure in PEM fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qianpu; Song Datong; Navessin, Titichai; Holdcroft, Steven; Liu Zhongsheng

    2004-01-01

    A spherical flooded-agglomerate model for the cathode catalyst layer of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, which includes the kinetics of oxygen reduction, at the catalyst vertical bar electrolyte interface, proton transport through the polymer electrolyte network, the oxygen diffusion through gas pore, and the dissolved oxygen diffusion through electrolyte, is considered. Analytical and numerical solutions are obtained in various control regimes. These are the limits of (i) oxygen diffusion control (ii) proton conductivity control, and (iii) mixture control. The structure and material parameters, such as porosity, agglomerate size, catalyst layer thickness and proton conductivity, on the performance are investigated under these limits. The model could help to characterize the system properties and operation modes, and to optimize catalyst layer design

  17. Nitrogen-Coordinated Single Cobalt Atom Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Cullen, David A; Pan, Yung-Tin; Hwang, Sooyeon; Wang, Maoyu; Feng, Zhenxing; Wang, Jingyun; Engelhard, Mark H; Zhang, Hanguang; He, Yanghua; Shao, Yuyan; Su, Dong; More, Karren L; Spendelow, Jacob S; Wu, Gang

    2018-03-01

    Due to the Fenton reaction, the presence of Fe and peroxide in electrodes generates free radicals causing serious degradation of the organic ionomer and the membrane. Pt-free and Fe-free cathode catalysts therefore are urgently needed for durable and inexpensive proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Herein, a high-performance nitrogen-coordinated single Co atom catalyst is derived from Co-doped metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) through a one-step thermal activation. Aberration-corrected electron microscopy combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy virtually verifies the CoN 4 coordination at an atomic level in the catalysts. Through investigating effects of Co doping contents and thermal activation temperature, an atomically Co site dispersed catalyst with optimal chemical and structural properties has achieved respectable activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in challenging acidic media (e.g., half-wave potential of 0.80 V vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE). The performance is comparable to Fe-based catalysts and 60 mV lower than Pt/C -60 μg Pt cm -2 ). Fuel cell tests confirm that catalyst activity and stability can translate to high-performance cathodes in PEMFCs. The remarkably enhanced ORR performance is attributed to the presence of well-dispersed CoN 4 active sites embedded in 3D porous MOF-derived carbon particles, omitting any inactive Co aggregates. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Core-shell rhodium sulfide catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction / hydrogen oxidation reaction in hydrogen-bromine reversible fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanchao; Nguyen, Trung Van

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis and characterization of high electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) core-shell RhxSy catalysts for hydrogen evolution oxidation (HER)/hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) in H2-Br2 fuel cell are discussed. Catalysts with RhxSy as shell and different percentages (5%, 10%, and 20%) of platinum on carbon as core materials are synthesized. Cyclic voltammetry is used to evaluate the Pt-equivalent mass specific ECSA and durability of these catalysts. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) techniques are utilized to characterize the bulk and surface compositions and to confirm the core-shell structure of the catalysts, respectively. Cycling test and polarization curve measurements in the H2-Br2 fuel cell are used to assess the catalyst stability and performance in a fuel cell. The results show that the catalysts with core-shell structure have higher mass specific ECSA (50 m2 gm-Rh-1) compared to a commercial catalyst (RhxSy/C catalyst from BASF, 6.9 m2 gm-Rh-1). It also shows better HOR/HER performance in the fuel cell. Compared to the platinum catalyst, the core-shell catalysts show more stable performance in the fuel cell cycling test.

  19. A novel Nickel-Aluminum alloy with Titanium for improved anode performance and properties in Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattini, Domenico; Accardo, Grazia; Moreno, Angelo; Yoon, Sung Pil; Han, Jong Hee; Nam, Suk Woo

    2017-06-01

    The anode materials of MCFC require more investigations in order to boost performances at long term. In literature, many NiAl modified alloys have been proposed but not always enhanced cell performance and improved mechanical properties are achieved together. In this work, differently from previous literature, the use of Ti in a NiAl/Ti system is proposed as an effective strategy to enhance both mechanical and electrochemical properties. Results show that bending strength and stiffness increase whereas creep deformation under high pressure-temperature is lower, i.e. around 5-6%, compared to 7.5% of the standard benchmark. The preliminary cell tests carried out show also how the performance, in terms of current and voltage output, is better for anodes with Ti addition with a maximum power density of 165 mW cm-2 at 300 mA cm-2 for Ti 5% compared to 149 mW cm-2 of Ni5Al at the same current density. Finally, the best electrochemical behavior is found for the Ti 5% sample as it achieved the lowest internal and charge transfer resistance at the end of tests. These results suggest that NiAl/Ti systems can be eligible anode materials and are worthy to be investigated more in order to attract a renewed interest for development of MCFCs.

  20. Novel Mg-Doped SrMoO3 Perovskites Designed as Anode Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cascos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available SrMo1−xMxO3−δ (M = Fe and Cr, x = 0.1 and 0.2 oxides have been recently described as excellent anode materials for solid oxide fuel cells at intermediate temperatures (IT-SOFC with LSGM as the electrolyte. In this work, we have improved their properties by doping with aliovalent Mg ions at the B-site of the parent SrMoO3 perovskite. SrMo1−xMgxO3−δ (x = 0.1, 0.2 oxides have been prepared, characterized and tested as anode materials in single solid-oxide fuel cells, yielding output powers near 900 mW/cm−2 at 850 °C using pure H2 as fuel. We have studied its crystal structure with an “in situ” neutron power diffraction (NPD experiment at temperatures as high as 800 °C, emulating the working conditions of an SOFC. Adequately high oxygen deficiencies, observed by NPD, together with elevated disk-shaped anisotropic displacement factors suggest a high ionic conductivity at the working temperatures. Furthermore, thermal expansion measurements, chemical compatibility with the LSGM electrolyte, electronic conductivity and reversibility upon cycling in oxidizing-reducing atmospheres have been carried out to find out the correlation between the excellent performance as an anode and the structural features.

  1. Scalable air cathode microbial fuel cells using glass fiber separators, plastic mesh supporters, and graphite fiber brush anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    The combined use of brush anodes and glass fiber (GF1) separators, and plastic mesh supporters were used here for the first time to create a scalable microbial fuel cell architecture. Separators prevented short circuiting of closely-spaced electrodes, and cathode supporters were used to avoid water gaps between the separator and cathode that can reduce power production. The maximum power density with a separator and supporter and a single cathode was 75±1W/m3. Removing the separator decreased power by 8%. Adding a second cathode increased power to 154±1W/m3. Current was increased by connecting two MFCs connected in parallel. These results show that brush anodes, combined with a glass fiber separator and a plastic mesh supporter, produce a useful MFC architecture that is inherently scalable due to good insulation between the electrodes and a compact architecture. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. High-activity PtRuPd/C catalyst for direct dimethyl ether fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Wen, Xiaodong; Wu, Gang; Chung, Hoon T; Gao, Rui; Zelenay, Piotr

    2015-06-22

    Dimethyl ether (DME) has been considered as a promising alternative fuel for direct-feed fuel cells but lack of an efficient DME oxidation electrocatalyst has remained the challenge for the commercialization of the direct DME fuel cell. The commonly studied binary PtRu catalyst shows much lower activity in DME than methanol oxidation. In this work, guided by density functional theory (DFT) calculation, a ternary carbon-supported PtRuPd catalyst was designed and synthesized for DME electrooxidation. DFT calculations indicated that Pd in the ternary PtRuPd catalyst is capable of significantly decreasing the activation energy of the CO and CH bond scission during the oxidation process. As evidenced by both electrochemical measurements in an aqueous electrolyte and polymer-electrolyte fuel cell testing, the ternary catalyst shows much higher activity (two-fold enhancement at 0.5 V in fuel cells) than the state-of-the-art binary Pt50 Ru50 /C catalyst (HiSPEC 12100). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Elementary kinetic modelling applied to solid oxide fuel cell pattern anodes and a direct flame fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogler, Marcel

    2009-05-27

    In the course of this thesis a model for the prediction of polarisation characteristics of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) was developed. The model is based on an elementary kinetic description of electrochemical reactions and the fundamental conservation principles of mass and energy. The model allows to predict the current-voltage relation of an SOFC and offers ideal possibilities for model validation. The aim of this thesis is the identification of rate-limiting processes and the determination of the elementary pathway during charge transfer. The numerical simulation of experiments with model anodes allowed to identify a hydrogen transfer to be the most probable charge-transfer reaction and revealed the influence of diffusive transport. Applying the hydrogen oxidation kinetics to the direct flame fuel cell system (DFFC) showed that electrochemical oxidation of CO is possible based on the same mechanism. Based on the quantification of loss processes in the DFFC system, improvements on cell design, predicting 80% increase of efficiency, were proposed. (orig.)

  4. Catalysts, Protection Layers, and Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chorkendorff, Ib

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest solar fuel to produce and in this presentation we shall give a short overview of the pros and cons of various tandem devices [1]. The large band gap semiconductor needs to be in front, but apart from that we can chose to have either the anode in front or back using either...... acid or alkaline conditions. Since most relevant semiconductors are very prone to corrosion the advantage of using buried junctions and using protection layers offering shall be discussed [2-4]. Next we shall discuss the availability of various catalysts for being coupled to these protections layers...... and how their stability may be evaluated [5, 6]. Examples of half-cell reaction using protection layers for both cathode and anode will be discussed though some of recent examples under both alkaline and acidic conditions. Si is a very good low band gap semiconductor and by using TiO2 as a protection...

  5. Inhibition of microbial growth on air cathodes of single chamber microbial fuel cells by incorporating enrofloxacin into the catalyst layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weifeng; Cheng, Shaoan; Sun, Dan; Huang, Haobin; Chen, Jie; Cen, Kefa

    2015-10-15

    The inevitable growth of aerobic bacteria on the surface of air cathodes is an important factor reducing the performance stability of air cathode single-chamber membrane-free microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Thus searching for effective methods to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth is critical for the practical application of MFCs. In this study, enrofloxacin (ENR), a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic, was incorporated into the catalyst layer of activated carbon air cathodes (ACACs) to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth. The biomass content on ACACs was substantially reduced by 60.2% with ENR treatment after 91 days of MFCs operation. As a result of the inhibited microbial growth, the oxygen reduction catalytic performance of the ENR treated ACACs was much stable compared to the fast performance decline of the untreated control. Consequently, a quite stable electricity production was obtained for the MFCs with the ENR treated ACACs, in contrast with a 22.5% decrease in maximum power density of the MFCs with the untreated cathode. ENR treatment of ACACs showed minimal effects on the anode performance. These results indicate that incorporating antibiotics into ACACs should be a simple and effective strategy to inhibit the microbial growth and improve the long-term stability of the performance of air cathode and the electricity production of MFCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sustainable design of high-performance microsized microbial fuel cell with carbon nanotube anode and air cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mink, Justine E; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2013-08-27

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising alternative energy source that both generates electricity and cleans water. Fueled by liquid wastes such as wastewater or industrial wastes, the microbial fuel cell converts waste into energy. Microsized MFCs are essentially miniature energy harvesters that can be used to power on-chip electronics, lab-on-a-chip devices, and/or sensors. As MFCs are a relatively new technology, microsized MFCs are also an important rapid testing platform for the comparison and introduction of new conditions or materials into macroscale MFCs, especially nanoscale materials that have high potential for enhanced power production. Here we report a 75 μL microsized MFC on silicon using CMOS-compatible processes and employ a novel nanomaterial with exceptional electrochemical properties, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), as the on-chip anode. We used this device to compare the usage of the more commonly used but highly expensive anode material gold, as well as a more inexpensive substitute, nickel. This is the first anode material study done using the most sustainably designed microsized MFC to date, which utilizes ambient oxygen as the electron acceptor with an air cathode instead of the chemical ferricyanide and without a membrane. Ferricyanide is unsustainable, as the chemical must be continuously refilled, while using oxygen, naturally found in air, makes the device mobile and is a key step in commercializing this for portable technology such as lab-on-a-chip for point-of-care diagnostics. At 880 mA/m(2) and 19 mW/m(2) the MWCNT anode outperformed the others in both current and power densities with between 6 and 20 times better performance. All devices were run for over 15 days, indicating a stable and high-endurance energy harvester already capable of producing enough power for ultra-low-power electronics and able to consistently power them over time.

  7. Sustainable design of high-performance microsized microbial fuel cell with carbon nanotube anode and air cathode

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2013-08-27

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising alternative energy source that both generates electricity and cleans water. Fueled by liquid wastes such as wastewater or industrial wastes, the microbial fuel cell converts waste into energy. Microsized MFCs are essentially miniature energy harvesters that can be used to power on-chip electronics, lab-on-a-chip devices, and/or sensors. As MFCs are a relatively new technology, microsized MFCs are also an important rapid testing platform for the comparison and introduction of new conditions or materials into macroscale MFCs, especially nanoscale materials that have high potential for enhanced power production. Here we report a 75 μL microsized MFC on silicon using CMOS-compatible processes and employ a novel nanomaterial with exceptional electrochemical properties, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), as the on-chip anode. We used this device to compare the usage of the more commonly used but highly expensive anode material gold, as well as a more inexpensive substitute, nickel. This is the first anode material study done using the most sustainably designed microsized MFC to date, which utilizes ambient oxygen as the electron acceptor with an air cathode instead of the chemical ferricyanide and without a membrane. Ferricyanide is unsustainable, as the chemical must be continuously refilled, while using oxygen, naturally found in air, makes the device mobile and is a key step in commercializing this for portable technology such as lab-on-a-chip for point-of-care diagnostics. At 880 mA/m2 and 19 mW/m2 the MWCNT anode outperformed the others in both current and power densities with between 6 and 20 times better performance. All devices were run for over 15 days, indicating a stable and high-endurance energy harvester already capable of producing enough power for ultra-low-power electronics and able to consistently power them over time. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Methodology study for the catalyst obtention to low temperature fuel cells (DEFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Emilia Lucena de; Korb, Matias De Angelis; Correa, Patricia dos Santos; Radtke, Claudio; Malfatti, Celia de Fraga; Rieder, Ester

    2010-01-01

    Different methods to elaboration of catalysts in direct ethanol fuel cells (low temperature fuel cells) have been proposed in the literature. The present work aims to study a simplified methodology to obtain Pt-Sn-Ni alloys, used as catalysts in low temperature fuel cells. Impregnation/reduction method was employed to obtain Pt- Sn-Ni alloys supported on carbon, using ethylenoglycol as reductor agent and carbon Vulcan XC72R as support. Different amounts of Pt, Sn e Ni were studied, with the intent to obtain the maximum catalytic effect. The catalysts were obtained in an alkaline range, at 130 deg C, using the proportion ethylenoglycol:water 75/25 v/v. The analytical techniques used in this study was RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy), X Ray Diffraction and Cyclic Voltammetry. (author)

  9. Thin Solid Oxide Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material, at least one metal and a catalyst...... material, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same. The present invention also relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous...... cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material and a catalyst material, wherein the electrolyte material is doper zirconia, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same...

  10. Quantum Mechanics Studies of Fuel Cell Catalysts and Proton Conducting Ceramics with Validation by Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ho-Cheng

    We carried out quantum mechanics (QM) studies aimed at improving the performance of hydrogen fuel cells. In part I, The challenge was to find a replacement for the Pt cathode that would lead to improved performance for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) while remaining stable under operational conditions and decreasing cost. Our design strategy was to find an alloy with composition Pt3M that would lead to surface segregation such that the top layer would be pure Pt, with the second and subsequent layers richer in M. Under operating conditions we expect the surface to have significant O and/or OH chemisorbed on the surface; we searched for M that would remain segregated under these conditions. Using QM we examined surface segregation for 28 Pt3M alloys, where M is a transition metal. We found that only Pt3Os and Pt3Ir showed significant surface segregation when O and OH are chemisorbed on the catalyst surfaces. This result indicates that Pt3Os and Pt 3Ir favor formation of a Pt-skin surface layer structure that would resist the acidic electrolyte corrosion during fuel cell operation environments. We chose to focus on Os because the phase diagram for Pt-Ir indicated that Pt-Ir could not form a homogeneous alloy at lower temperature. To determine the performance for ORR, we used QM to examine intermediates, reaction pathways, and reaction barriers involved in the processes for which protons from the anode reactions react with O2 to form H2O. These QM calculations used our Poisson-Boltzmann implicit solvation model include the effects of the solvent (water with dielectric constant 78 with pH 7 at 298K). We also carried out similar QM studies followed by experimental validation for the Os/Pt core-shell catalyst fabricated by the underpotential deposition (UPD) method. The QM results indicated that the RDS for ORR is a compromise between the OOH formation step (0.37 eV for Pt, 0.23 eV for Pt2ML/Os core-shell) and H2O formation steps (0.32 eV for Pt, 0.22 eV for Pt2ML

  11. Preparation of mesoporous titanium dioxide anode by a film- and pore-forming agent for the dye-sensitized solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Wenjing; Xiao, Yaoming, E-mail: ymxiao@sxu.edu.cn; Han, Gaoyi, E-mail: han_gaoyis@sxu.edu.cn; Zhou, Haihan; Chang, Yunzhen; Zhang, Ying

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • PVP is used as a film- and pore-forming agent to prepare the mesoporous TiO{sub 2} anode. • The TiO{sub 2} anode supplies high surface area for the dye adsorption. • The DSSC efficiency is strongly dependent on the pore properties of the TiO{sub 2} anode. • The DSSC efficiency with the TiO{sub 2} anode prepared by 20 wt% PVP reaches 8.39%. - Abstract: A novel mean of generating mesoporous titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) anodes by employing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as the film- and pore-forming agent are proposed for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The influences on the morphology and photovoltaic performances of the TiO{sub 2} anodes are investigated by adjusting the PVP content in synthesizing the mesoporous TiO{sub 2} anodes. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of the DSSC is found to be strongly dependent on the pore properties of the TiO{sub 2} anode. After the sintering process, the removal of the PVP leaves porously interconnected channel structures inside the TiO{sub 2} anode, supplying enhanced specific surface area for the dye adsorption as well as the efficient electron transmission. As a result, the TiO{sub 2} anode prepared by 20 wt% PVP presents the highest performances, based on which the DSSC achieves the highest conversion efficiency of 8.39%, approximately increased by 56.53% than that of the DSSC fabricated without PVP (5.36%).

  12. Nano-stuctured Pt-Fe/C as cathode catalyst in direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenzhen; Zhou Weijiang; Li Huanqiao; Zhou Zhenhua; Zhou Bing; Sun Gongquan; Xin Qin

    2004-01-01

    Pt-Fe/C catalysts were prepared by a modified polyol synthesis method in an ethylene glycol (EG) solution, and then were heat-treated under H 2 /Ar (10 vol.%) at moderate temperature (300 deg. C, Pt-Fe/C300) or high temperature (900 deg. C, Pt-Fe/C900). As comparison, Pt-Fe/C alloy catalyst was prepared by a two-step method (Pt-Fe/C900B). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that particles size of the catalyst increases with the increase of treatment temperatures. Pt-Fe/C300 catalyst has a mean particle size of 2.8 nm (XRD), 3.6 nm (TEM) and some Pt-Fe alloy was partly formed in this sample. Pt-Fe/C900B catalyst has the biggest particle size of 6.2 nm (XRD) and the best Pt-Fe alloy form. Cyclicvoltammetry (CV) shows that Pt-Fe/C300 has larger electrochemical surface area than other Pt-Fe/C and the highest utilization ratio of 76% among these Pt-based catalysts. Rotating disk electrode (RDE) cathodic curves show that Pt-Fe/C300 has the highest oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mass activity (MA) and specific activity (SA), as compared with Pt/C catalyst in 1.0 M HClO 4 . However, Pt-Fe/C catalyst does not appears to be a more active catalyst than Pt/C for ORR in 1.0 M HClO 4 + 0.1 M CH 3 OH. Pt-Fe/C300 exhibits higher ORR activity and better performance than other Pt-Fe/C or Pt/C catalysts when employed for cathode in direct methanol single cell test, the enhancement of the cell performance is logically attributed to its higher ORR activity, which is probably attributed to more Pt 0 species existing and Fe ion corrosion from the catalyst

  13. Detailed impedance characterization of a well performing and durable Ni:CGO infiltrated cermet anode for metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Klemensø, Trine; Blennow Tullmar, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Further knowledge of the novel, well performing and durable Ni:CGO infiltrated cermet anode for metal supported fuel cells has been acquired by means of a detailed impedance spectroscopy study. The anode impedance was shown to consist of three arcs. Porous electrode theory (PET) represented as a ...... of the infiltrated submicron sized particles was surprisingly robust. TEM analysis revealed the nano sized Ni particles to be trapped within the CGO matrix, which along the self limiting grain growth of the CGO seem to be able to stabilize the submicron structured anode....

  14. In situ Raman spectra of the discharge products of calcium and lithium-anoded thionyl chloride cells — sulphur dioxide generation in oxyhalide systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, W. P.; Sargeant, D. G.

    A cell has been constructed that allows a calcium or lithium-anoded oxyhalide cell of conventional composition to be analysed for catholyte-soluble discharge products using laser Raman spectroscopy. Both cells showed the presence of sulphur dioxide solvated by thionyl chloride. Species of the type M(SOCl 2)(SO 2) n+ (AlCl 4) n- could only be detected in cells having calcium or lithium anodes with LiAlCl 4 as the supporting electrolyte in thionyl chloride. Vapour pressure measurements of discharging cells confirmed that Ca(AlCl 4) 2 was less likely to form a complex with sulphur dioxide than the analogous lithium salt.

  15. A review of heat-treatment effects on activity and stability of PEM fuel cell catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, Cicero W.B. [Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, National Research Council of Canada, Vancouver, BC V6T 1W5 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Av. dos Portugueses, S/N 65.080-040 Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Zhang, Lei; Liu, Hansan; Lee, Kunchan; Wang, Haijiang; Zhang, Jiujun [Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, National Research Council of Canada, Vancouver, BC V6T 1W5 (Canada); Marques, Aldalea L.B. [Department of Technology Chemistry, Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Marques, Edmar P. [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Av. dos Portugueses, S/N 65.080-040 Sao Luis, MA (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    This paper reviews over 120 papers regarding the effect of heat treatment on the catalytic activity and stability of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell catalysts. These catalysts include primarily unsupported and carbon-supported platinum (Pt), Pt alloys, non-Pt alloys, and transition metal macrocycles. The heat treatment can induce changes in catalyst properties such as particle size, morphology, dispersion of the metal on the support, alloying degree, active site formation, catalytic activity, and catalytic stability. The optimum heat-treatment temperature and time period are strongly dependent on the individual catalyst. With respect to Pt-based catalysts, heat treatment can induce particle-size growth, better alloying degree, and changes in the catalyst surface morphology from amorphous to more ordered states, all of which have a remarkable effect on oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and stability. However, heat treatment of the catalyst carbon supports can also significantly affect the ORR catalytic activity of the supported catalyst. Regarding non-noble catalysts, in particular transition metal macrocycles, heat treatment is also important in ORR activity and stability improvement. In fact, heat treatment is a necessary step for introducing more active catalytic sites. For metal chalcogenide catalysts, it seems that heat treatment may not be necessary for catalytic activity and stability improvement. More research is necessary to improve our fundamental understanding and to develop a new strategy that includes innovative heat-treatment processes for enhancing fuel cell catalyst activity and stability. (author)

  16. A review of heat-treatment effects on activity and stability of PEM fuel cell catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Cicero W. B.; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Hansan; Lee, Kunchan; Marques, Aldaléa L. B.; Marques, Edmar P.; Wang, Haijiang; Zhang, Jiujun

    This paper reviews over 120 papers regarding the effect of heat treatment on the catalytic activity and stability of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell catalysts. These catalysts include primarily unsupported and carbon-supported platinum (Pt), Pt alloys, non-Pt alloys, and transition metal macrocycles. The heat treatment can induce changes in catalyst properties such as particle size, morphology, dispersion of the metal on the support, alloying degree, active site formation, catalytic activity, and catalytic stability. The optimum heat-treatment temperature and time period are strongly dependent on the individual catalyst. With respect to Pt-based catalysts, heat treatment can induce particle-size growth, better alloying degree, and changes in the catalyst surface morphology from amorphous to more ordered states, all of which have a remarkable effect on oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and stability. However, heat treatment of the catalyst carbon supports can also significantly affect the ORR catalytic activity of the supported catalyst. Regarding non-noble catalysts, in particular transition metal macrocycles, heat treatment is also important in ORR activity and stability improvement. In fact, heat treatment is a necessary step for introducing more active catalytic sites. For metal chalcogenide catalysts, it seems that heat treatment may not be necessary for catalytic activity and stability improvement. More research is necessary to improve our fundamental understanding and to develop a new strategy that includes innovative heat-treatment processes for enhancing fuel cell catalyst activity and stability.

  17. Conical nano-structure arrays of Platinum cathode catalyst for enhanced cell performance in PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Aziz; Nath, Bhabesh Kumar; Chutia, Joyanti

    2015-01-01

    Conical nanostructure arrays of Pt (Platinum) as cathode catalyst are developed using a novel integrated plasma sputtering technique. The integration method involves successive deposition of Pt catalyst arrays one upon another maintaining a uniform time gap. Deposition by integrated approach results in the formation of dense arrays of Pt nanostructure as compared to continuous deposition. These high number density integrated arrays with low Pt loading of 0.10 mg cm −2 at the cathode provide enhanced performance compared to non-integrated cathode catalyst prepared by continuous deposition and standard commercial electrodes with Pt loadings of 1 mg cm −2 . The performance is compared on the basis of polarization curve measurements and the calculated power density values. PEM fuel cell with dual integrated cathode showed an improved power density of 0.90 W cm −2 , which is higher than continuously deposited cathode catalyst with maximum power density of 0.67 W cm −2 for the same Pt loading of 0.10 mg cm −2 . - Highlights: • Conical nanostructures with high number density are prepared by a novel integrated deposition technique. • Electrode with such catalyst shows maximum performance of 0.9 W cm −2 . • Integrated catalyst performs better than continuously prepared nanostructure catalyst.

  18. Investigation of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell catalyst layer with bidirectionally-graded composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinbas, Firat C.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2014-12-01

    The catalyst layer (CL) of the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell must be modeled accurately in order to resolve the effects of complex interactions between charge and mass transport on the fuel cell's electrochemical reactions. In previous work, we developed an agglomerate model [1] which correctly accounts for variations in the agglomerate surface area as the CL constituents are varied to provide a better estimate of diffusion losses. Here, this improved agglomerate model is employed to investigate a PEM fuel cell catalyst layer with a functionally-graded composition. We present results for varying catalyst and ionomer loadings in both the through-thickness and in-plane directions. In agreement with experimental observations, we find that a higher catalyst and/or ionomer loading at the membrane/CL interface improves performance especially in the ohmic loss regime. Similarly, improved performance is observed for higher catalyst and/or ionomer loadings under the channel in the mass transport loss regime. In addition, we investigated bidirectionally graded CLs for the first time. It is observed that higher performance can be obtained with bidirectionally graded CLs in both ohmic and mass transport loss regimes.

  19. Development of materials for use in solid oxid fuel cells anodes using renewable fuels in direct operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, D.B.P.L. de; Florio, D.Z. de; Bezerra, M.E.O.

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells produce electrical current from the electrochemical combustion of a gas or liquid (H2, CH4, C2H5OH, CH3OH, etc.) inserted into the anode cell. An important class of fuel cells is the SOFC (Solid Oxide Cell Fuel). It has a ceramic electrolyte that transports protons (H +) or O-2 ions and operating at high temperatures (500-1000 °C) and mixed conductive electrodes (ionic and electronic) ceramics or cermets. This work aims to develop anodes for fuel cells of solid oxide (SOFC) in order to direct operations with renewable fuels and strategic for the country (such as bioethanol and biogas). In this context, it becomes important to study in relation to the ceramic materials, especially those that must be used in high temperatures. Some types of double perovskites such as Sr2MgMoO6 (or simply SMMO) have been used as anodes in SOFC. In this study were synthesized by the polymeric precursor method, analyzed and characterized different ceramic samples of families SMMO, doped with Nb, this is: Sr2 (MgMo)1-xNbxO6 with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2. The materials produced were characterized by various techniques such as, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, and electrical properties determined by dc and ac measurements in a wide range of temperature, frequency and partial pressure of oxygen. The results of this work will contribute to a better understanding of advanced ceramic properties with mixed driving (electronic and ionic) and contribute to the advancement of SOFC technology operating directly with renewable fuels. (author)

  20. Co-extrusion of electrolyte/anode functional layer/anode triple-layer ceramic hollow fibres for micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells-electrochemical performance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Wu, Zhentao; Li, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of an anode functional layer (AFL) with controlled thickness on physical and electrochemical properties of a micro-tubular SOFC have been systematically studied. A series of electrolyte/AFL/anode triple-layer hollow fibres with controllable AFL thicknesses (16.9-52.7 μm) have been fabricated via a single-step phase-inversion assisted co-extrusion technique. Both robustness of the cell and gas-tightness of the electrolyte layer are considerably improved by introducing the AFL of this type. The fracture force of the sample with the thickest AFL (9.67 N) almost doubles when compared to the electrolyte/anode dual-layer counterpart (5.24 N). Gas-tightness of the electrolyte layer is also considerably increased as AFL contributes to better-matched sintering behaviours between different components. Moreover, the formation of an AFL simultaneously with electrolyte and anode significantly improves the cell performances. The sample with the thinnest AFL (approximately 16.9 μm, 6% of the total anode thickness) leads to a 30% (from 0.89 to 1.21 W cm-2) increase in maximum power density, due to increased triple-phase boundaries (TPB). However, further increase in TPB from a thicker AFL is less effective for improving the cell performance, due to the substantially increased fuel diffusion resistance and subsequently higher concentration polarization. This indicates that the control over the AFL thickness is critically important in avoiding offsetting the benefits of extended TPB and consequently decreased cell performances.

  1. Highly Durable Direct Methanol Fuel Cell with Double-Layered Catalyst Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM is one of the key components in direct methanol fuel cells. However, the PEM usually gets attacked by reactive oxygen species during the operation period, resulting in the loss of membrane integrity and formation of defects. Herein, a double-layered catalyst cathode electrode consisting of Pt/CeO2-C as inner catalyst and Pt/C as outer catalyst is fabricated to extend the lifetime and minimize the performance loss of DMFC. Although the maximum power density of membrane electrode assembly (MEA with catalyst cathode is slightly lower than that of the traditional one, its durability is significantly improved. No obvious degradation is evident in the MEA with double-layered catalyst cathode within durability testing. These results indicated that Pt/CeO2-C as inner cathode catalyst layer greatly improved the stability of MEA. The significant reason for the improved stability of MEA is the ability of CeO2 to act as free-radical scavengers.

  2. Electrochemical characterization of nano-sized Pd-based catalysts as cathode materials in direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M; Han, C; Kim, I T; An, J C; Lee, J J; Lee, H K; Shim, J

    2011-01-01

    To improve the catalytic activity of palladium (Pd) as a cathode catalyst in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), we prepared palladium-titanium oxide (Pd-TiO2) catalysts which the Pd and TiO2 nanoparticles were simultaneously impregnated on carbon. We selected Pd and TiO2 as catalytic materials because of their electrochemical stability in acid solution. The crystal structure and the loading amount of Pd and TiO2 on carbon were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). The electrochemical characterization of Pd-TiO2/C catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction was carried out in half and single cell systems. The catalytic activities of the Pd-TiO2 catalysts were strongly influenced by the TiO2 content. In the single cell test, the Pd-TiO2 catalysts showed very comparable performance to the Pt catalyst.

  3. Stimulation of electro-fermentation in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells driven by genetically engineered anode biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awate, Bhushan; Steidl, Rebecca J.; Hamlischer, Thilo; Reguera, Gemma

    2017-07-01

    Unwanted metabolites produced during fermentations reduce titers and productivity and increase the cost of downstream purification of the targeted product. As a result, the economic feasibility of otherwise attractive fermentations is low. Using ethanol fermentation by the consolidated bioprocessing cellulolytic bacterium Cellulomonas uda, we demonstrate the effectiveness of anodic electro-fermentations at maximizing titers and productivity in a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell (SCMEC) without the need for metabolic engineering of the fermentative microbe. The performance of the SCMEC platform relied on the genetic improvements of anode biofilms of the exoelectrogen Geobacter sulfurreducens that prevented the oxidation of cathodic hydrogen and improved lactate oxidation. Furthermore, a hybrid bioanode was designed that maximized the removal of organic acids in the fermentation broth. The targeted approach increased cellobiose consumption rates and ethanol titers, yields, and productivity three-fold or more, prevented pH imbalances and reduced batch-to-batch variability. In addition, the sugar substrate was fully consumed and ethanol was enriched in the broth during the electro-fermentation, simplifying its downstream purification. Such improvements and the possibility of scaling up SCMEC configurations highlight the potential of anodic electro-fermentations to stimulate fermentative bacteria beyond their natural capacity and to levels required for industrial implementation.

  4. One-step pyrolysis route to three dimensional nitrogen-doped porous carbon as anode materials for microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Linlin; Ci, Suqin; Cai, Pingwei; Li, Hao; Wen, Zhenhai

    2018-01-01

    The design and synthesis of low-cost and favourable anode materials is crucial to both power production efficiency and overall performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Herein, we reported the preparation of three dimensional (3D) nitrogen-doped porous carbons (N/PCs) by one-step pyrolysis of solid mixture of sodium citrate and melamine. a variety of techniques, including electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), etc., were applied to characterize the surface physicochemical properties of the products, featuring macroporous structure with rich nitrogen doping on the as-prepared N/PCs. When applied as anode materials of MFC, the N/PCs exhibits a maximum power density of 2777.7 mW m-2, approximately twice higher than that of the MFCs with the commercial carbon cloth (CC) as anode. The significantly improved performance of the N/PCs was attributed to the unique structure and properties, such as favourable porous structure, good electrical conductivity, and large pore volume (0.7 cm3 g-1) in the present N/PCs. Nitrogen dopant on the surface of porous carbon contributed to an increasing in biocompatibility, resulting in a suitable micro-environment for microbial growth and thus helps to decrease charge transfer resistance at the electrode interface.

  5. Polyelectrolyte microparticles for enhancing anode performance in an air–cathode μ-Liter microbial fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yan-Yu; Wang, Hsiang-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Microparticles with high consistency and surface area per volume are fabricated. • P(DADMAC) microparticles facilitate microorganism accumulation and charge transfer. • Microbes in microparticles are capable of proliferation and electricity generation. • Microparticles increase limiting current/power output to more than 200% of biofilm. • Microparticles decrease the anode charge-transfer resistance to 44% of biofilm. - Abstract: Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is considered an environmentally friendly energy source because it generates electrical power by digesting organic substrates in the wastewater. However, it is still challenging for MFC to become an economically affordable and highly efficient energy source due to its relatively low power output and coulombic efficiency. The aim of this study is to increase the performance of anode by using polyelectrolyte microparticles to facilitate the accumulation of microorganisms and the collection of electrons. The polyelectrolyte microparticle is subjected to microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and continuous electricity generation in an air–cathode μ-Liter MFC (μMFC) to validate its biocompatibility, ability in retaining redox species, reduced electron transfer resistance, and sustained energy generation. During the 168-hour operation, microorganisms proliferate inside the microparticle and generate around 250% power output and 200% limiting current of those from microorganism biofilm. The polyelectrolyte microparticle also decreased charge-transfer resistance of anode electrode in air–cathode μMFC by 56% compared with biofilm.

  6. Solution processed transition metal oxide anode buffer layers for efficiency and stability enhancement of polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameen, M. Yoosuf; Shamjid, P.; Abhijith, T.; Reddy, V. S.

    2018-01-01

    Polymer solar cells were fabricated with solution-processed transition metal oxides, MoO3 and V2O5 as anode buffer layers (ABLs). The optimized device with V2O5 ABL exhibited considerably higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) compared to the devices based on MoO3 and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) ABLs. The space charge limited current measurements and impedance spectroscopy results of hole-only devices revealed that V2O5 provided a very low charge transfer resistance and high hole mobility, facilitating efficient hole transfer from the active layer to the ITO anode. More importantly, incorporation of V2O5 as ABL resulted in substantial improvement in device stability compared to MoO3 and PEDOT:PSS based devices. Unencapsulated PEDOT:PSS-based devices stored at a relative humidity of 45% have shown complete failure within 96 h. Whereas, MoO3 and V2O5 based devices stored in similar conditions retained 22% and 80% of their initial PCEs after 96 h. Significantly higher stability of the V2O5-based device is ascribed to the reduction in degradation of the anode/active layer interface, as evident from the electrical measurements.

  7. Submersible microbial fuel cell sensor for monitoring microbial activity and BOD in groundwater: Focusing on impact of anodic biofilm on sensor applicability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    A sensor, based on a submersible microbial fuel cell (SUMFC), was developed for in situ monitoring of microbial activity and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in groundwater. Presence or absence of a biofilm on the anode was a decisive factor for the applicability of the sensor. Fresh anode was req....../L (∼233 ± 1 mA/m2), with a response time of...

  8. Bacterial electroactivity and viability depends on the carbon nanotube-coated sponge anode used in a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hanyue; Xia, Tian; Bian, Congcong; Sun, Huihui; Liu, Zhuang; Wu, Chao; Wang, Xia; Xu, Ping

    2018-02-27

    The anode material is vital to improve the power generation of a microbial fuel cell (MFC). In this study, a carbon nanotube (CNT)-coated sponge with macro-porous structure, high surface area, and high conductivity was constructed as an anode to encapsulate Escherichia coli K12 (E. coli K12) cells. To achieve high power generation of the MFC, the optimal concentration of the CNT coating the sponge was found to be 30mgmL -1 . At this concentration, a maximum power density of 787Wm -3 and a chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of 80.9% were obtained with a long stable electricity generation process in batch mode. This indicates that the biofilm on the CNT (30mgmL -1 )-coated sponge possessed excellent electroactivity and stability. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images confirmed that the CNT-coated sponge provided a suitable microenvironment for E. coli K12 cells to maintain their attachment and colonization. Additionally, a CNT-dependent viability phenomenon of the E. coli K12 cells was discovered after electricity generation. This CNT-dependent viability of the E. coli K12 cells was stable and sustainable after storage at -20°C in a milk tube for one year. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Experimental Measurement of Local and Bulk Oxygen Transport Resistances in the Catalyst Layer of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Cheng, Xiaojing; Lu, Jiabin; Shen, Shuiyun; Yan, Xiaohui; Yin, Jiewei; Wei, Guanghua; Zhang, Junliang

    2017-12-07

    Remarkable progress has been made in reducing the cathodic Pt loading of PEMFCs; however, a huge performance loss appears at high current densities, indicating the existence of a large oxygen transport resistance associated with the ultralow Pt loading catalyst layer. To reduce the Pt loading without sacrificing cell performance, it is essential to illuminate the oxygen transport mechanism in the catalyst layer. Toward this goal, an experimental approach to measure the oxygen transport resistance in catalyst layers is proposed and realized for the first time in this study. The measuring approach involves a dual-layer catalyst layer design, which consists of a dummy catalyst layer and a practical catalyst layer, followed by changing the thickness of dummy layer to respectively quantify the local and bulk resistances via limiting current measurements combined with linear extrapolation. The experimental results clearly reveal that the local resistance dominates the total resistance in the catalyst layer.

  10. Post-mortem analysis on LiFePO4|Graphite cells describing the evolution & composition of covering layer on anode and their impact on cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewerenz, Meinert; Warnecke, Alexander; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2017-11-01

    During cyclic aging of lithium-ion batteries the formation of a μm-thick covering layer on top of the anode facing the separator is found on top of the anode. In this work several post-mortem analyses of cyclic aged cylindrical LFP|Graphite cells are evaluated to give a detailed characterization of the covering layer and to find possible causes for the evolution of such a layer. The analyses of the layer with different methods return that it consists to high percentage of plated active lithium, deposited Fe and products of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI). The deposition is located mainly in the center of the cell symmetrical to the coating direction. The origin of these depositions is assumed in locally overcharged particles, Fe deposition or inhomogeneous distribution of capacity density. As a secondary effect the deposition on one side increases the thickness locally; thereafter a pressure-induced overcharging due to charge agglomeration of the back side of the anode occurs. Finally a compact and dense covering layer in a late state of aging leads to deactivation of the covered parts of the anode and cathode due to suppressed lithium-ion conductivity. This leads to increasing slope of capacity fade and increase of internal resistance.

  11. Co-Mn-Al Mixed Oxides on Anodized Aluminum Supports and Their Use as Catalysts in the Total Oxidation of Ethanol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovanda, F.; Jirátová, Květa; Ludvíková, Jana; Raabová, H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 464, AUG 15 (2013), s. 181-190 ISSN 0926-860X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/10/1762 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : layered double hydroxides * hydrothermal reaction * mixed oxides * supported catalysts * ethanol total oxidation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.674, year: 2013

  12. An in situ near-ambient pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy study of Mn polarised anodically in a cell with solid oxide electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzini, Benedetto; Amati, Matteo; Bocchetta, Patrizia; Dal Zilio, Simone; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Vesselli, Erik; Kiskinova, Maya

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an in situ study of the anodic behavior of a model solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) by means of near-ambient pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) combined with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) measurements. The focus is on the anodic surface chemistry of MnO x , a model anodic material already considered in cognate SOFC-related studies, during electrochemical operation in CO 2 , CO 2 /H 2 O and H 2 O ambients. The XPS and NEXAFS results we obtained, complemented by electrochemical measurements and SEM characterisation, reveal the chemical evolution of Mn under electrochemical control. MnO is the stable chemical form at open-circuit potential (OCP), while Mn 3 O 4 forms under anodic polarisation in all the investigated gas ambients. Carbon deposits are present on the Mn electrode at OCP, but they are readily oxidised under anodic conditions. Prolonged operation of the MnO x anode leads to pitting of the Mn films, damaging of the triple-phase boundary region and also to formation of discontinuities in the Mn patch. This is accompanied by chemical transformations of the electrolyte and formation of ZrC without impact on the surface chemistry of the Mn-based anode

  13. The performance of 3-D graphite doped anodes in microbial electrolysis cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasri, Nael G.; Nakhla, George

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the use of granular activated carbon (GAC) as high surface area 3-dimensional (3-D) anode in MECs systems. The interfacial anodes' charge transfer resistance of the doped GAC did not impact the overall performance of MECs. Based on our finding, the 3-D anode packed with GAC-doped with nonconductive calcium sulfide (CaS) outperformed the more conductive iron (II) sulfide (FeS), magnetite (Fe3O4), or GAC without doping. The results showed higher current densities for 3-D CaS (40.1 A/m3), as compared with 3-D FeS (34.4 A/m3), 3-D Fe3O4 (29.8 A/m3), and 3-D GAC (23.1 A/m3). The higher current density in the 3-D CaS translated to higher coulombic efficiency (96.7%), hydrogen yield (3.6 mol H2/mol acetate), and attached biomass per anode mass (54.01 mg COD biomass/g GAC). Although the 3-D MEC achieved similar hydrogen yield, hydrogen recovery efficiency, and COD removal rate to a conventional sandwich type MEC, the current density, coulombic efficiency, and overall energy efficiency were higher.

  14. Graphitic Carbon Nitride as a Catalyst Support in Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansor, Noramalina; Miller, Thomas S.; Dedigama, Ishanka; Jorge, Ana Belen; Jia, Jingjing; Brázdová, Veronika; Mattevi, Cecilia; Gibbs, Chris; Hodgson, David; Shearing, Paul R.; Howard, Christopher A.; Corà, Furio; Shaffer, Milo; Brett, Daniel J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphitic carbon nitride (gCN) describes many materials with different structures. • gCNs can exhibit excellent mechanical, chemical and thermal resistance. • A major obstacle for pure gCN catalyst supports is limited electronic conductivity. • Composite/Hybrid gCN structures show excellent performance as catalyst supports. • gCNs have great potential for use in fuel calls and water electrolyzers. - Abstract: Electrochemical power sources, such as polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), require the use of precious metal catalysts which are deposited as nanoparticles onto supports in order to minimize their mass loading and therefore cost. State-of-the-art/commercial supports are based on forms of carbon black. However, carbon supports present disadvantages including corrosion in the operating fuel cell environment and loss of catalyst activity. Here we review recent work examining the potential of different varieties of graphitic carbon nitride (gCN) as catalyst supports, highlighting their likely benefits, as well as the challenges associated with their implementation. The performance of gCN and hybrid gCN-carbon materials as PEMFC electrodes is discussed, as well as their potential for use in alkaline systems and water electrolyzers. We illustrate the discussion with examples taken from our own recent studies.

  15. A High-Performing Direct Carbon Fuel Cell with a 3D Architectured Anode Operated Below 600 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yunya; Ding, Dong; He, Ting

    2018-01-01

    Direct carbon fuel cells (DCFCs) are highly efficient power generators fueled by abundant and cheap solid carbons. However, the limited triple-phase boundaries (TPBs) in the fuel electrode, due to the lack of direct contact among carbon, electrode, and electrolyte, inhibit the performance and result in poor fuel utilization. To address the challenges of low carbon oxidation activity and low carbon utilization, a highly efficient, 3D solid-state architected anode is developed to enhance the performance of DCFCs below 600 °C. The cell with the 3D textile anode framework, Gd:CeO 2 -Li/Na 2 CO 3 composite electrolyte, and Sm 0.5 Sr 0.5 CoO 3 cathode demonstrates excellent performance with maximum power densities of 143, 196, and 325 mW cm -2 at 500, 550, and 600 °C, respectively. At 500 °C, the cells can be operated steadily with a rated power density of ≈0.13 W cm -2 at a constant current density of 0.15 A cm -2 with a carbon utilization over 85.5%. These results, for the first time, demonstrate the feasibility of directly electrochemical oxidation of solid carbon at 500-600 °C, representing a promising strategy in developing high-performing fuel cells and other electrochemical systems via the integration of 3D architected electrodes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Anodic oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sidney D; Rudd, Eric J; Blomquist, Alfred T; Wasserman, Harry H

    2013-01-01

    Anodic Oxidation covers the application of the concept, principles, and methods of electrochemistry to organic reactions. This book is composed of two parts encompassing 12 chapters that consider the mechanism of anodic oxidation. Part I surveys the theory and methods of electrochemistry as applied to organic reactions. These parts also present the mathematical equations to describe the kinetics of electrode reactions using both polarographic and steady-state conditions. Part II examines the anodic oxidation of organic substrates by the functional group initially attacked. This part particular

  17. Pressure pyrolysed non-precious oxygen reduction catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallathambi, Vijayadurga

    2011-12-01

    Worldwide energy demand has driven long-term efforts towards developing a clean, hydrogen-based energy economy. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are low emissions and high efficiency devices that utilize the power of hydrogen and are a key enabling technology for the hydrogen economy. Carbon supported platinum-black is the state-of the art catalyst for oxygen reduction in a PEMFC because it can withstand the acidic environment. However, the high cost and low abundance of this precious metal has limited large-scale commercialization of PEMFCs. Current efforts focus on developing alternative inexpensive, non-noble metal-based catalysts for oxygen reduction with performance comparable to conventional platinum based electrocatalysts. In this work, inexpensive metal-nitrogen-carbon (MNC) catalysts have been synthesized by pyrolyzing transition metal and nitrogen precursors together with high surface area carbon materials in a closed, constant-volume quartz tube. High pressure generated due to nitrogen precursor evaporation lead to increased surface nitrogen content in the catalysts post-pyrolysis. Electrochemical oxygen reduction activity of MNC catalysts was analyzed using half-cell Rotating Ring Disc Electrode (RRDE) studies. The effect of nitrogen precursor morphology on the generation of active sites has been explored in detail. By increasing the Nitrogen/Carbon ratio of the nitrogen precursor, the accessible active site density increased by reducing carbon deposition in the pores of the carbon support during pyrolysis. The most active catalysts were obtained using melamine, having a N/C ratio of 2. Single PEMFC measurements employing MNC catalysts as cathodes indicated kinetic current density as high as 15 A cm-3 at 0.8 ViR-free and over 100 h of stable current at 0.5 V were observed. Effects of carbon free ammonia generating solid nitrogen precursors such as urea and ammonium carbamate were also studied. These precursors etched the carbon support

  18. Effects of catalyst-support materials on the performance of fuel cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ejikeme, PM

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available of the historically significant work on various catalyst supports for Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells (DAFCs), as far as possible, the most recent developments are accentuated. References are made to other reports that have reviewed similar subject matter for specific cases...

  19. Development of Ultra-Low Platinum Alloy Cathode Catalysts for PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Branko N. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Weidner, John [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-01-07

    The goal of this project is to synthesize a low cost PEM fuel cell cathode catalyst and support with optimized average mass activity, stability of mass activity, initial high current density performance under H2/air (power density), and catalyst and support stability able to meet 2017 DOE targets for electrocatalysts for transportation applications. Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst was synthesized according to a novel methodology developed at USC through: (i) surface modification, (ii) metal catalyzed pyrolysis and (iii) chemical leaching to remove excess meal used to dope the support. Pt* stands for suppressed platinum catalyst synthesized with Co doped platinum. The procedure results in increasing carbon graphitization, inclusion of cobalt in the bulk and formation of non-metallic active sites on the carbon surface. Catalytic activity of the support shows an onset potential of 0.86 V for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with well-defined kinetic and mass transfer regions and 2.5% H2O2 production. Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst durability under 0.6-1.0 V potential cycling and support stability under 1.0-1.5 V potential cycling was evaluated. The results indicated excellent catalyst and support performance under simulated start-up/shut down operating conditions (1.0 – 1.5 V, 5000 cycles) which satisfy DOE 2017 catalyst and support durability and activity. The 30% Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst showed high initial mass activity of 0.34 A/mgPGM at 0.9 ViR-free and loss of mass activity of 45% after 30,000 cycles (0.6-1.0 V). The catalyst performance under H2-air fuel cell operating conditions showed only 24 mV (iR-free) loss at 0.8 A/cm2 with an ECSA loss of 42% after 30,000 cycles (0.6-1.0 V). The support stability under 1.0-1.5 V potential cycling showed mass activity loss of 50% and potential loss of 8 mV (iR-free) at 1.5 A/cm2. The ECSA loss was 22% after 5,000 cycles. Furthermore, the Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst showed an

  20. Bimetallic Ag–Ni/C particles as cathode catalyst in AFCs (alkaline fuel cells)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Xingjuan; Zhang, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    AFCs (alkaline fuel cells) is one of the promising fuel cells, due to their low working temperature and less corrosive environment. However, decreasing the catalyst cost and improving its performance are still the challenges in its application. Transition metal as the catalyst for AFCs not only can reduce its cost, but also has great electro-catalytic efficiency. In this paper, Carbon supported Ag–Ni bimetallic catalysts with differential Ag/Ni atomic ratios were prepared by chemically reducing silver and nickel salts. Ag 3 Ni/C shows the relatively higher ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) activity among the differential Ag/Ni bimetallic particles. In order to improve the activity and stability, the catalysts were heat-treated at the temperature of 500 °C. The results indicate that the limiting current density has been improved greatly for Ag 3 Ni/C-500 °C, which is as high as 2.5× that of Ag/C. The microstructure investigation show that the non-equilibrium state of Ag–Ni alloy by heat treatment is confirmed by HRTEM (high-resolution transmission electron microscopy) images, and Ag(111) surfaces are decreased in XRD pattern, which results in the ORR activity improved and overpotential decreased. Heat treatment also has contributed to Ag–Ni/C electrochemistry stability in some degree. - Highlights: • Ag–Ni/C is applied as cathode catalyst for AFCs (alkaline fuel cells). • Ag 3 Ni/C-500 °C shows the best performance. • Non-equilibrium state of Ag–Ni alloy by heat treatment is observed. • The decreased Ag(111) surfaces are favor to improve the catalyst activity

  1. Platinum/tin oxide/carbon cathode catalyst for high temperature PEM fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrondo, Javier; Mijangos, Federico; Rambabu, B.

    The performance of high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) using platinum supported over tin oxide and Vulcan carbon (Pt/SnOx/C) as cathode catalyst was evaluated at 160-200 °C and compared with Pt/C. This paper reports first time the Pt/SnOx/C preparation, fuel cell performance, and durability test up to 200 h. Pt/SnOx/C of varying SnO compositions were characterized using XRD, SEM, TEM, EDX and EIS. The face-centered cubic structure of nanosized Pt becomes evident from XRD data. TEM and EDX measurements established that the average size of the Pt nanoparticles were ∼6 nm. Low ionic resistances were derived from EIS, which ranged from 0.5 to 5 Ω-cm 2 for cathode and 0.05 to 0.1 Ω-cm 2 for phosphoric acid, doped PBI membrane. The addition of the SnOx to Pt/C significantly promoted the catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The 7 wt.% SnO in Pt/SnO 2/C catalyst showed the highest electro-oxidation activity for ORR. High temperature PEMFC measurements performed at 180 °C under dry gases (H 2 and O 2) showed 0.58 V at a current density of 200 mA cm -2, while only 0.40 V was obtained in the case of Pt/C catalyst. When the catalyst contained higher concentrations of tin oxide, the performance decreased as a result of mass transport limitations within the electrode. Durability tests showed that Pt/SnOx/C catalysts prepared in this work were stable under fuel cell working conditions, during 200 h at 180 °C demonstrate as potential cathode catalyst for HT-PEMFCs.

  2. Platinum/tin oxide/carbon cathode catalyst for high temperature PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrondo, Javier; Rambabu, B. [Solid State Ionics and Surface Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Southern University and A and M College, Baton Rouge, LA 70813 (United States); Mijangos, Federico [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, Vizcaya 48940 (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    The performance of high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) using platinum supported over tin oxide and Vulcan carbon (Pt/SnOx/C) as cathode catalyst was evaluated at 160-200 C and compared with Pt/C. This paper reports first time the Pt/SnOx/C preparation, fuel cell performance, and durability test up to 200 h. Pt/SnOx/C of varying SnO compositions were characterized using XRD, SEM, TEM, EDX and EIS. The face-centered cubic structure of nanosized Pt becomes evident from XRD data. TEM and EDX measurements established that the average size of the Pt nanoparticles were {proportional_to}6 nm. Low ionic resistances were derived from EIS, which ranged from 0.5 to 5 {omega}-cm{sup 2} for cathode and 0.05 to 0.1 {omega}-cm{sup 2} for phosphoric acid, doped PBI membrane. The addition of the SnOx to Pt/C significantly promoted the catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The 7 wt.% SnO in Pt/SnO{sub 2}/C catalyst showed the highest electro-oxidation activity for ORR. High temperature PEMFC measurements performed at 180 C under dry gases (H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}) showed 0.58 V at a current density of 200 mA cm{sup -2}, while only 0.40 V was obtained in the case of Pt/C catalyst. When the catalyst contained higher concentrations of tin oxide, the performance decreased as a result of mass transport limitations within the electrode. Durability tests showed that Pt/SnOx/C catalysts prepared in this work were stable under fuel cell working conditions, during 200 h at 180 C demonstrate as potential cathode catalyst for HT-PEMFCs. (author)

  3. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev [Latham, NY

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  4. Vertically grown multiwalled carbon nanotube anode and nickel silicide integrated high performance microsized (1.25 μl) microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2012-02-08

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are an environmentally friendly method for water purification and self-sustained electricity generation using microorganisms. Microsized MFCs can also be a useful power source for lab-on-a-chip and similar integrated devices. We fabricated a 1.25 μL microsized MFC containing an anode of vertically aligned, forest type multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with a nickel silicide (NiSi) contact area that produced 197 mA/m 2 of current density and 392 mW/m 3 of power density. The MWCNTs increased the anode surface-to-volume ratio, which improved the ability of the microorganisms to couple and transfer electrons to the anode. The use of nickel silicide also helped to boost the output current by providing a low resistance contact area to more efficiently shuttle electrons from the anode out of the device. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  5. UV-treated graphene oxide as anode interfacial layers for P3HT : PCBM solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng-En; Tsai, Cheng-Wei; Pei, Zingway; Lin, Tsung-Wu; Chang, Chen-Shiung; Shih-Sen Chien, Forest

    2015-06-01

    Solution-processable graphene oxide (GO) ultrathin films were introduced as anode interfacial layers (AILs) for polymer solar cells (PSCs). The photovoltaic performance of PSCs containing thermal- and UV-treated GO was comparable to that of PSCs with conventional poly(3,4-ethyledioxythiphene):poly(styrenesulfonate) AILs. UV treatment induced the surface activation of GO; an increase in the work function of UV-treated GO improved the energy band alignment at the GO/poly(3-hexylthiophene) interface, which accounted for the efficient hole collection and photovoltaic performance of PSCs with treated GO.

  6. Lamellar titanates: a breakthrough in the search for new solid oxide fuel cell anode materials operating on methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perillat-Merceroz, Cedric; Rosini, Sebastien; Gauthier, Gilles [CEA/LITEN, Laboratoire d' innovation technologique et des, energies nouvelles 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Roussel, Pascal; Vannier, Rose-Noelle [Universite Lille Nord de France, CNRS, UMR8181, UCCS, Unite de catalyse et de chimie du solide ENSCL-USTL, BP90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Gelin, Patrick [Universite Lyon1, CNRS, UMR5256, IRCELYON, Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l' environnement, de Lyon 2 avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne (France)

    2011-07-15

    Decreasing the dimensionality of the La{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3+{delta}} family structure from 3D to 2D by increasing the La content greatly enhances the electrochemical performance of the material as an SOFC anode. This is attested to by the strong decrease in the polarization resistance values deduced from the complex impedance spectra (Nyquist plot) recorded at 900 C in H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O(3%) on a symmetrical cell. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Formation of Platinum Catalyst on Carbon Black Using an In‐Liquid Plasma Method for Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Show

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum (Pt catalyst was formed on the surface of carbon black using an in‐liquid plasma method. The formed Pt catalyst showed the average particle size of 4.1 nm. This Pt catalyst was applied to a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. The PEMFC showed an open voltage of 0.85 V and a maximum output power density of 216 mW/cm2.

  8. A High-Performing Sulfur-Tolerant and Redox-Stable Layered Perovskite Anode for Direct Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hanping; Tao, Zetian; Liu, Shun; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-01-01

    Development of alternative ceramic oxide anode materials is a key step for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Several lanthanide based layered perovskite-structured oxides demonstrate outstanding oxygen diffusion rate, favorable electronic conductivity, and good oxygen surface exchange kinetics, owing to A-site ordered structure in which lanthanide and alkali-earth ions occupy alternate (001) layers and oxygen vacancies are mainly located in [LnOx] planes. Here we report a nickel-free cation deficient layered perovskite, (PrBa)0.95(Fe0.9Mo0.1)2O5 + δ (PBFM), for SOFC anode, and this anode shows an outstanding performance with high resistance against both carbon build-up and sulfur poisoning in hydrocarbon fuels. At 800 °C, the layered PBFM showed high electrical conductivity of 59.2 S cm−1 in 5% H2 and peak power densities of 1.72 and 0.54 W cm−2 using H2 and CH4 as fuel, respectively. The cell exhibits a very stable performance under a constant current load of 1.0 A cm−2. To our best knowledge, this is the highest performance of ceramic anodes operated in methane. In addition, the anode is structurally stable at various fuel and temperature conditions, suggesting that it is a feasible material candidate for high-performing SOFC anode. PMID:26648509

  9. Effect of tar fractions from coal gasification on nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia and nickel-gadolinium doped ceria solid oxide fuel cell anode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, E.; Berrueco, C.; Millan, M.; Brandon, N. P.

    2013-11-01

    The allowable tar content in gasification syngas is one of the key questions for the exploitation of the full potential of fuel cell concepts with integrated gasification systems. A better understanding of the interaction between tars and the SOFC anodes which leads to carbon formation and deposition is needed in order to design systems where the extent of gas cleaning operations is minimized. Model tar compounds (toluene, benzene, naphthalene) have been used in experimental studies to represent those arising from biomass/coal gasification. However, the use of toluene as a model tar overestimates the negative impact of a real gasification tar on SOFC anode degradation associated with carbon formation. In the present work, the effect of a gasification tar and its distillation fractions on two commercially available fuel cell anodes, Ni/YSZ (yttria stabilized zirconia) and Ni/CGO (gadolinium doped ceria), is reported. A higher impact of the lighter tar fractions was observed, in terms of more carbon formation on the anodes, in comparison with the whole tar sample. The characterization of the recovered tars after contact with the anode materials revealed a shift towards a heavier molecular weight distribution, reinforcing the view that these fractions have reacted on the anode.

  10. Effect of catalysts on lithium passivation in thionyl chloride electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanevskii, L.S.; Avdalyan, M.B.; Kulova, T.L. [Frumkin Institute of Electrochemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-04-01

    The effect that various catalysts added to the electrolyte or the cathode of lithium-thionyl chloride cells for promoting the cathodic process exert on lithium anodes is studied. It is shown that, in the presence of platinum, the lithium anode is subjected to intense corrosion, and this leads to the appearance of a great voltage delay. Macrocyclic complexes activate lithium electrodes. Impedance measurements showed that the introduction of such complexes in the system is accompanied by changes in the passive film characteristics, and this leads to a decrease in the corrosion rate of lithium and a noticeable reduction of the voltage delay.

  11. Initialization of a methane-fueled single-chamber solid-oxide fuel cell with NiO + SDC anode and BSCF + SDC cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunming; Zheng, Yao; Ran, Ran; Shao, Zongping; Jin, Wanqin; Xu, Nanping; Ahn, Jeongmin

    2008-05-01

    The initialization of an anode-supported single-chamber solid-oxide fuel cell, with NiO + Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9 anode and Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ + Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9 cathode, was investigated. The initialization process had significant impact on the observed performance of the fuel cell. The in situ reduction of the anode by a methane-air mixture failed. Although pure methane did reduce the nickel oxide, it also resulted in severe carbon coking over the anode and serious distortion of the fuel cell. In situ initialization by hydrogen led to simultaneous reduction of both the anode and cathode; however, the cell still delivered a maximum power density of ∼350 mW cm-2, attributed to the re-formation of the BSCF phase under the methane-air atmosphere at high temperatures. The ex situ reduction method appeared to be the most promising. The activated fuel cell showed a peak power density of ∼570 mW cm-2 at a furnace temperature of 600 °C, with the main polarization resistance contributed from the electrolyte.

  12. Effect of H{sub 2}S on the thermodynamic stability and electrochemical performance of Ni cermet-type of anodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkateswara Rao, M.

    2006-11-15

    For SOFCs to be main means of power generation, they should be able to exploit wide variety of fuels. Among Ni-cermets, Ni-YSZ is the state-of-the-art materials for SOFC-anode which is the fuel electrode. But sulphur impurity present in different gaseous fuels (e.g Biogas), depending on its concentration, is highly poisonous to the stability and electrochemical performance of the Ni catalyst in the cermet anodes. Thus in this study the microstructural stability of Ni-YSZ, Ni-CGO and Ni-LSGM cermets in H{sub 2}S-containing hydrogen gas is studied in the intermediate temperature range of SOFC operation. Thermodynamic modelling of Ni-S-O-H quaternary system was performed for the calculation of thermodynamic stability and sulphur-tolerance limit of Ni in the gaseous atmosphere made up of H, O and S. The effect of presence H{sub 2}S in fuel gas, in the concentrations well below the thermodynamic tolerance limit, on the electrochemical performance of the anodes is studied by using model Ni-patterned electrodes on YSZ and LSGM. Thermodynamic modelling of the Ni-S-O-H quaternary was performed by employing CALPHAD methodology. The modelling of Ni-S binary phase diagram was performed by using sublattice models for the non-stoichiometric phases. The optimised binaries of Ni-O, and Ni-H were taken from the literature. The Ni-O-S and Ni-O-H ternaries were extrapolated from the lower order binaries. In Ni-O-S ternary, NiSO{sub 4} is the only ternary compound present. The ternary compounds, Ni(OH){sub 2} and NiOOH in the Ni-O-H ternary were considered as stoichiometric line compounds. The model parameters of the ternary compounds were optimised using the experimental data. The Ni-S-O-H quaternary was calculated by extrapolation method as employed in the CALPHAD methodology. Inorder to understand the H{sub 2}-oxidation mechanism and the role played by the electrolyte in the reaction mechanism, symmetrical cells of Ni-patterned YSZ single crystals with different crystallographic

  13. Development of Fe-Ni/YSZ-GDC electro-catalysts for application as SOFC anodes. XRD and TPR characterization, and evaluation in ethanol steam reforming reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz Fiuza, Raigenis da; Silva, Marcos Aurelio da; Boaventura, Jaime Soares [UFBA, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil). Energy and Materials Science Group

    2010-07-01

    Electro-catalysts based on Fe-Ni alloys were prepared using physical mixture and modified Pechini methods; they were supported on a composite of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) and Gadolinia Doped Ceria (GDC). The composites had compositions of 35% metal load and 65% support (70% wt. YSZ and 30% wt. GDC mixture) (cermets). The samples were characterized by Temperature-Programmed Reduction (TPR) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and evaluated in ethanol steam reforming at 650 C for six hours and in the temperature range 300 - 900 C. The XRD results showed that the bimetallic sample calcined at 800 C formed a mixed oxide (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) in spinel structure; after reducing the sample in hydrogen, Ni-Fe alloys were formed. The presence of Ni decreased the final reduction temperature of the NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} species. The addition of Fe to Ni anchored to YSZ-GDC increased the hydrogen production and inhibits the carbon deposition. The bimetallic 30Fe5Ni samples reached an ethanol conversion of about 95%, and a hydrogen yield up to 48% at 750 C. In general, the ethanol conversion and hydrogen production were independent of the metal content in the electro-catalyst. However, the substitution of Ni for Fe significantly reduced the carbon deposition on the electro-catalyst: 74, 31 and 9 wt. % in the 35Ni, 20Fe15Ni, and 30Fe5Ni samples, respectively. (orig.)

  14. Formic acid oxidation at platinum-bismuth catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Ksenija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of heterogeneous catalysis, specifically catalysis on bimetallic surfaces, has seen many advances over the past few decades. Bimetallic catalysts, which often show electronic and chemical properties that are distinct from those of their parent metals, offer the opportunity to obtain new catalysts with enhanced selectivity, activity, and stability. The oxidation of formic acid is of permanent interest as a model reaction for the mechanistic understanding of the electrooxidation of small organic molecules and because of its technical relevance for fuel cell applications. Platinum is one of the most commonly used catalysts for this reaction, despite the fact that it shows a few significant disadvantages: high cost and extreme susceptibility to poisoning by CO. To solve this problem, several approaches have been used, but generally, they all consist in the modification of platinum with a second element. Especially, bismuth has received significant attention as Pt modifier. According to the results presented in this survey dealing with the effects influencing the formic acid oxidation it was found that two types of Pt-Bi bimetallic catalysts (bulk and low loading deposits on GC showed superior catalytic activity in terms of the lower onset potential and oxidation current density, as well as exceptional stability compared to Pt. The findings in this report are important for the understanding of mechanism of formic acid electrooxidation on a bulk alloy and decorated surface, for the development of advanced anode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells, as well as for the synthesis of novel low-loading bimetallic catalysts. The use of bimetallic compounds as the anode catalysts is an effective solution to overcoming the problems of the formic acid oxidation current stability for long term applications. In the future, the tolerance of both CO poisoning and electrochemical leaching should be considered as the key factors in the development

  15. Degradation of cathode current-collecting materials for anode-supported flat-tube solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hee; Song, Rak-Hyun; Chung, Dong-You; Hyun, Sang-Hoon; Shin, Dong-Ryul

    Different types of cathode current-collecting material for anode-supported flat-tube solid oxide fuel cells are fabricated and their electrochemical properties are characterized. Current collection for the cathode is achieved by winding Ag wire and by painting different conductive pastes of Ag-Pd, Pt, La 0.6Sr 0.4CoO 3 (LSCo), and La 0.6Sr 0.4Co 0.2Fe 0.8O 3 (LSCF) on the wire. Cell performance at the initial operation time is in the order of Pt > LSCo > LSCF > Ag-Pd. On the other hand, the performance degradation rate is in the order of LSCo Ag-Pd. LSCo paste as a cathode current-collector shows the most stable long-term performance of 0.8 V, 300 mA cm -2 at 750 °C, even under a thermal cycle condition with heating and cooling rates of 150 °C h -1. The performance degradation of the Ag-Pd and Pt pastes is caused by increased polarization resistance due to metal particle sintering. From these results, it is concluded that a cathode current-collector composed of wound silver wire with LSCo paste is useful for anode-supported flat-tube cells as it does not experience any significant degradation during a long operation time.

  16. Carbon nanostructures as catalyst support for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, S.K.; Hamelin, J. [Quebec Univ., Trois Rivieres, PQ (Canada). Inst. de recherche sur l' hydrogene

    2008-07-01

    This paper reported on a study that investigated potential alternatives to Vulcan XC-72 as a catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). These included carbon nanostructures (CNS) prepared by high energy ball milling of graphite and transition metal catalysts, followed by heat treatment. Among the key factors discussed were the graphitic content, high surface area, microporous structure, good electrical conductivity and the ability of the material to attach functional groups. Some graphic results supporting the usage of CNS as catalyst support for PEMFCs were presented. Upon chemical oxidation, surface functional groups such as carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl were populated on the surface of CNS. Nanosized platinum particles with particle size distribution between 3 nm and 5 nm were reduced on the functionalized sites of CNS in a colloidal medium. The paper also presented cyclic voltammograms, XPS, HRTEM and PSD results. 3 refs.

  17. Investigation of altenative carbon materials for fuel-cell catalyst support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mikkel Juul

    samples. Generally, the measurements using this method suffered from poor electrode homogeneity due to the problem of dispersing the CNT and CNF material on the electrode disc. For the carbon samples the peroxide percentage was 25–75 % at 0.066 V vs. the dynamic hydrogen electrode (DHE), but no ORR......In order to ensure high utilization of the catalyst material in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) it is usually fixed in the form of nanoparticles on a supporting material. The catalyst is platinum or a platinum alloy, and the commonly used support is carbon black (CB). Although...... structured carbon forms such as graphitized CBs, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and carbon nanofibres (CNFs). This thesis concerns the investigation of an array of different materials which may prospec-tively replace the conventional materials used in the catalyst. The study comprised 13 carbon samples which...

  18. Palladium-alloy catalysts as ethanol tolerant cathodes for direct alcohol fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie; Varela, F.J.R. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Coahuila (Mexico). Unidad Saltillo

    2008-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that electroactive palladium (Pd) and Pd-alloy catalysts prepared using a sputtering technique possess a similar degree of activity as platinum (Pt) electrodes. This study demonstrated that Pd and Pd-alloys show a high degree of tolerance to ethanol during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) processes. The onset potential of the ORR process in the presence of 0.5M of ethanol decreased by only 33 mV and 18 mV on Pd and Pd-cobalt (Co) catalysts. Linear sweep voltammetry experiments showed that no peak current density caused by the electro-oxidation of ethanol was observed in the Pd-based catalysts. The selective behaviour of the Pd and Pd-Co catalysts was attributed to a slow rate of adsorption of the ethanol as well as the presence of reaction intermediates on the catalytic surface. Results suggested that the Pd and Pd-Co catalysts are suitable candidates for direct alcohol fuel cell applications. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Simple solution-processed CuO{sub X} as anode buffer layer for efficient organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Wenfei [CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Materials, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Institute of Hybrid Materials, The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Yang, Chunpeng [CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Materials, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Bao, Xichang, E-mail: baoxc@qibebt.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Materials, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Sun, Liang; Wang, Ning [CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Materials, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Tang, Jianguo [Institute of Hybrid Materials, The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Chen, Weichao [CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Materials, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Yang, Renqiang, E-mail: yangrq@qibebt.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Materials, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Simple solution-processed CuO{sub X} hole transport layer for efficient organic solar cell. • Good photovoltaic performances as hole transport layer in OSCs with P3HT and PBDTTT-C as donor materials. • The device with CuO{sub X} as hole transport layer shows great improved stability compared with that of device with PEDOT:PSS as hole transport layer. - Abstract: A simple, solution-processed ultrathin CuO{sub X} anode buffer layer was fabricated for high performance organic solar cells (OSCs). XPS measurement demonstrated that the CuO{sub X} was the composite of CuO and Cu{sub 2}O. The CuO{sub X} modified ITO glass exhibit a better surface contact with the active layer. The photovoltaic performance of the devices with CuO{sub X} layer was optimized by varying the thickness of CuO{sub X} films through changing solution concentration. With P3HT:PC{sub 61}BM as the active layer, we demonstrated an enhanced PCE of 4.14% with CuO{sub X} anode buffer layer, compared with that of PEDOT:PSS layer. The CuO{sub X} layer also exhibits efficient photovoltaic performance in devices with PBDTTT-C:PC{sub 71}BM as the active layer. The long-term stability of CuO{sub X} device is better than that of PEDOT:PSS device. The results indicate that the easy solution-processed CuO{sub X} film can act as an efficient anode buffer layer for high-efficiency OSCs.

  20. Design and optimization of a combined fuel reforming and solid oxide fuel cell system with anode off-gas recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Seok; Chung, J.N.; Chen, Yen-Cho

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this work, an analytical, parametric study is performed to evaluate the feasibility and performance of a combined fuel reforming and SOFC system. → Specifically the effects of adding the anode off-gas recycling and recirculation components and the CO 2 absorbent unit are investigated. → The AOG recycle ratio increases with increasing S/C ratio and the addition of AOG recycle eliminates the need for external water consumption. → The key finding is that for the SOFC operating at 900 deg. C with the steam to carbon ratio at 5 and no AOG recirculation, the system efficiency peaks. - Abstract: An energy conversion and management concept for a combined system of a solid oxide fuel cell coupled with a fuel reforming device is developed and analyzed by a thermodynamic and electrochemical model. The model is verified by an experiment and then used to evaluate the overall system performance and to further suggest an optimal design strategy. The unique feature of the system is the inclusion of the anode off-gas recycle that eliminates the need of external water consumption for practical applications. The system performance is evaluated as a function of the steam to carbon ratio, fuel cell temperature, anode off gas recycle ratio and CO 2 adsorption percentage. For most of the operating conditions investigated, the system efficiency starts at around 70% and then monotonically decreases to the average of 50% at the peak power density before dropping down to zero at the limiting current density point. From an engineering application point of view, the proposed combined fuel reforming and SOFC system with a range of efficiency between 50% and 70% is considered very attractive. It is suggested that the optimal system is the one where the SOFC operates around 900 deg. C with S/C ratio higher than 3, maximum CO 2 capture, and minimum AOG recirculation.

  1. Influence of humidification on deterioration of gas diffusivity in catalyst layer on polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramitsu, Y.; Sato, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Hori, M. [Fuel Cell Research Center, Daido University, 10-3 Takiharu-cho, Minami-ku, Nagoya 457-8530 (Japan); Hosomi, H.; Aoki, Y.; Harada, T.; Sakiyama, Y.; Nakagawa, Y. [Toray Research Center Inc., 3-3-7 Sonoyama, Otsu, Shiga 520-8567 (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    The effect of water on polymer electrolyte fuel cell degradation was examined with humidity as a parameter. Polymer electrolyte fuel cells were subjected to long-term operation of 10 000 h to examine the relation between decline in cell voltage and degradation of the catalyst layers or gas diffusion layers. The diffusion overpotential increased during long-term operation at relatively high humidification of 81% RH, but only in the catalyst layer and not in the gas diffusion layer. At low humidification of 52% RH, the increase in diffusion overpotential was small, indicating that the increase was more likely to occur under high humidification. Post-analysis of the catalyst layer revealed that the membrane electrode assembly had increased diffusion overpotential during operation under high humidification, as a result of the sharp decline in porosity. The increase of diffusion overpotential in the catalyst layer was also investigated by the observation of the degradation due to the oxidation of the Pt-carbon supports. However, it was found that the oxidation of carbon support which had increased diffusion overpotential was small. (author)

  2. A Review on Anodic Aluminum Oxide Methods for Fabrication of Nanostructures for Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jaroslaw; Cielecki, Pawel Piotr

    2018-01-01

    , low fabrication cost and easy control over its nano-scale morphology, make AAO patterning methods an intriguing candidate for nanopatterning. Hence, in this work, we present a review on the fabrication techniques and on nanostructures from Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO) for OSC applications....... The versatility of such patterning technique is shown by pointing out the possibility of using an AAO template for the fabrication of nanowires by wetting, nanodots by evaporation, nanostructures by imprinting resists, organic layers and much more....

  3. Spherical carbon capsules with hollow macroporous core and mesoporous shell structures as a highly efficient catalyst support in the direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Geun Seok; Yoon, Suk Bon; Kim, Jung Ho; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2004-12-07

    Carbon capsules with hollow core and mesoporous shell (HCMS) structures were used as a support material for Pt(50)-Ru(50) catalyst, and the catalytic performance of the HCMS supported catalyst in the direct methanol fuel cell was described; the HCMS carbon supported catalysts exhibited much higher specific activity for methanol oxidation than the commonly used E-TEK catalyst by about 80%, proving that the HCMS carbon capsules are an excellent support for electrode catalysts in DMFC.

  4. Pulse electrodeposition to prepare core-shell structured AuPt@Pd/C catalyst for formic acid fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xueyi; Luo, Fan; Song, Huiyu; Liao, Shijun; Li, Hualing

    2014-01-01

    A novel core-shell structured AuPt@Pd/C catalyst for the electrooxidation of formic acid is synthesized by a pulse electrodeposition process, and the AuPt core nanoparticles are obtained by a NaBH4 reduction method. The catalyst is characterized with X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The core-shell structure of the catalyst is revealed by the increase in particle size resulting from a Pd layer covering the AuPt core, and by a negative shift in the CO stripping peaks. The addition of a small amount of Pt improves the dispersion of Au and results in smaller core particles. The catalyst's activity is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry in formic acid solution. The catalyst shows excellent activity towards the anodic oxidation of formic acid, the mass activity reaches 4.4 A mg-1Pd and 0.83 A mg-1metal, which are 8.5 and 1.6 times that of commercial Pd/C. This enhanced electrocatalytic activity could be ascribed to the good dispersion of Au core particles resulting from the addition of Pt, as well as to the interaction between the Pd shell layer and the Au and Pt in the core nanoparticles.

  5. Use of phyllosilicates in electrochemical devices: possible use of sepiolite as a support of catalysts in direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC); Utilizacao de filosilicatos em dispositivos eletroquimicos: possivel uso da sepiolita como suporte de catalisadores em celulas a combustivel com uso direto de etanol (DAFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra-Silva, J.; Silva, A.C.; Mello-Castanho, S.R.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cerpa, A. [Universidad Europea de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    Direct alcohol Fuel cells (DAFC) are interesting to use Brazil for reasons of fuel logistics and availability. The catalysts used in these devices to promote the oxidation of alcohol at the anode need to be fixed on a substrate which must provide high specific surface area, porosity, chemical and thermal resistance, this target can be achieved with the characteristics sepiolite. This paper proposes sepiolite as catalyst support for DAFC. Sepiolite is a phyllosilicate with double layered tetrahedral silicon cells and fibrillar structure. Catalysts (Pt / Sb / Sn) were prepared by cation substitution method and tested by cyclic voltammetry. Techniques as XRD and FT-IR were also used for characterizing materials. Was obtained up to 35 mA / g (Pt) peak current (redox ethanol) indicating the possibility of sepiolite technology development to use un proposed purpose. (author)

  6. Development of large aperture projection scatterometry for catalyst loading evaluation in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Michael T.; Barnes, Bryan M.; Sohn, Martin; Stanfield, Eric; Silver, Richard M.

    2017-10-01

    Widespread commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells remains curbed by various manufacturing and infrastructure challenges. One such technical barrier identified by the U. S. Department of Energy is the need for high-speed, in-line process control of platinum-based catalyst layers in the membrane electrode assembly of the fuel cell. Using multiple reflectivity-based optical methods, such as optical scatterometry and large aperture projection scatterometry, we demonstrate in-line-capable catalyst loading measurements of carbon-supported Pt nanoparticle and Pt-alloy nanostructured thin film catalyst coated membranes. Large aperture projection scatterometry is a new high-throughput approach developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology specifically for fuel cell manufacturing metrology. Angle- and wavelength-resolved measurements of these fuel cell soft goods validate the ability of reflectivity-based measurements to produce industrially relevant sensitivities to changes in Pt and Pt-alloy loading. The successful application of these optical methods to fuel cell manufacturing metrology directly addresses the shortage of high-throughput process control approaches needed to facilitate performance improvements and manufacturing cost-reductions required to make fuel cells commercially viable.

  7. Modelling of CH4 multiple-reforming within the Ni-YSZ anode of a solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dang Long; Tran, Quang Tuyen; Sakamoto, Mio; Sasaki, Kazunari; Shiratori, Yusuke

    2017-08-01

    A new approach for the modelling of the simultaneous dry and steam reforming of CH4 (methane multiple-reforming (MMR)) within the Ni-YSZ anode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is introduced in this paper. MMR is modelled by using artificial neural network (ANN) and fuzzy inference system (FIS) that can express the gas composition and temperature dependences of the consumption or the production rate of gaseous species involved in MMR. The necessary parameters for this approach are determined from the measured reforming kinetics for an anode-supported cell (ASC) fuelled by a CH4-CO2-H2O-N2 mixture. The developed MMR model is incorporated into a 3D-CFD planar ASC model to calculate the SOFC performance, and the calculated results match well with experimental values for the feed of simulated biogas (CH4/CO2 = 1) and H2. The established SOFC model considering MMR is a powerful tool to simulate the performance of internal reforming SOFC.

  8. Synthesis And Electrochemical Characteristics Of Mechanically Alloyed Anode Materials SnS2 For Li/SnS2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong J.H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing demand for efficient and economic energy storage, tin disulfide (SnS2, as one of the most attractive anode candidates for the next generation high-energy rechargeable Li-ion battery, have been paid more and more attention because of its high theoretical energy density and cost effectiveness. In this study, a new, simple and effective process, mechanical alloying (MA, has been developed for preparing fine anode material tin disulfides, in which ammonium chloride (AC, referred to as process control agents (PCAs, were used to prevent excessive cold-welding and accelerate the synthesis rates to some extent. Meanwhile, in order to decrease the mean size of SnS2 powder particles and improve the contact areas between the active materials, wet milling process was also conducted with normal hexane (NH as a solvent PCA. The prepared powders were both characterized by X-ray diffraction, Field emission-scanning electron microscopeand particle size analyzer. Finally, electrochemical measurements for Li/SnS2 cells were takenat room temperature, using a two-electrode cell assembled in an argon-filled glove box and the electrolyte of 1M LiPF6 in a mixture of ethylene carbonate(EC/dimethylcarbonate (DMC/ethylene methyl carbonate (EMC (volume ratio of 1:1:1.

  9. Layered oxygen-deficient double perovskite as an efficient and stable anode for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengodan, Sivaprakash; Choi, Sihyuk; Jun, Areum; Shin, Tae Ho; Ju, Young-Wan; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Jeeyoung; Irvine, John T S; Kim, Guntae

    2015-02-01

    Different layered perovskite-related oxides are known to exhibit important electronic, magnetic and electrochemical properties. Owing to their excellent mixed-ionic and electronic conductivity and fast oxygen kinetics, cation layered double perovskite oxides such as PrBaCo2O5 in particular have exhibited excellent properties as solid oxide fuel cell oxygen electrodes. Here, we show for the first time that related layered materials can be used as high-performance fuel electrodes. Good redox stability with tolerance to coking and sulphur contamination from hydrocarbon fuels is demonstrated for the layered perovskite anode PrBaMn2O5+δ (PBMO). The PBMO anode is fabricated by in situ annealing of Pr0.5Ba0.5MnO3-δ in fuel conditions and actual fuel cell operation is demonstrated. At 800 °C, layered PBMO shows high electrical conductivity of 8.16 S cm(-1) in 5% H2 and demonstrates peak power densities of 1.7 and 1.3 W cm(-2) at 850 °C using humidified hydrogen and propane fuels, respectively.

  10. Fe3C-based oxygen reduction catalysts: synthesis, hollow spherical structures and applications in fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed study of a novel Fe3C-based spherical catalyst with respect to synthetic parameters, nanostructure formation, ORR active sites and fuel cell demonstration. The catalyst is synthesized by high temperature autoclave pyrolysis using decomposing precursors. Below 500 °C, melamine...

  11. Sodium borohydride hydrogen generator using Co–P/Ni foam catalysts for 200 W proton exchange membrane fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Taek Hyun; Gang, Byeong Gyu; Kim, Hyuntak; Kwon, Sejin

    2015-01-01

    The response characteristics of electroless-deposited Co–P/Ni foam catalysts for sodium borohydride hydrolysis were investigated. The effect of nickel foam geometry on the properties of the catalysts was evaluated. As the PPI (pores per inch) of the nickel foam increased, the hydrogen generation rate per gram of the deposited catalyst increased due to an increase in surface area. The response characteristics of various catalysts were compared under real operating conditions. When a thin nickel foam with high PPI was used, the response characteristics of the catalyst improved due to an increase in the amount of the deposited catalyst and surface area. Finally, a 200 W PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) system using electroless-deposited Co–P/Ni foam (110 PPI) catalyst was investigated. The response time to reach a hydrogen generation rate sufficient for a 200 W PEMFC was 71 s, and the energy density of a 200 W fuel cell system for producing 600 Wh was 252.1 Wh/kg. A fuel cell system using Co–P/Ni foam catalysts can be widely used as a power source for mobile applications due to fast response characteristics and high energy density. - Highlights: • Response characteristics of Co–P/Ni foam catalysts are investigated. • Catalytic activity is improved with increase in PPI (pores per inch) of Ni foam. • Co–P/Ni foam (110 PPI) catalyst has improved response characteristics. • The energy density of a 200 W PEMFC system for producing 600 Wh is 252.1 Wh/kg. • Co–P/Ni foam (110 PPI) catalyst is suitable for fuel cell system.

  12. Optimization of the Pd-Fe-Mo Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeayeon; Jang, Jeongseok; Lee, Jin Goo; Jeon, Ok Sung; Kim, Hyeong Su; Hwang, Ho Jung; Shul, Yong Gun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pd-Mo-Fe catalysts show high catalytic activity and stability for oxygen-reduction reactions in acid media. • The optimum compositions were 7.5:1.5:1.0 for Pd-Fe-Mo, and the optimum temperatures were 500 °C. • The Pd-Fe-Mo catalysts were successfully applied to the PEMFC cathode, showing ∼500 mA cm −1 at 0.6 V. • The lattice constant was strongly related to the activity and stability of the catalysts for oxygen-reduction reactions. - Abstract: Highly active and durable non-platinum catalysts for oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) have been developed for energy conversion devices such as proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In this study, Pd-Fe-Mo catalyst is reported as a non-platinum catalyst for ORR. The atomic ratio and annealing temperatures are controlled on the catalysts to understand interplay between their physical and chemical properties and electrochemical activities. The Pd-Fe-Mo catalyst optimized with 7.5:1.5:1.0 of the atomic ratio and 500 °C of the annealing temperature shows 32.18 mA mg −1 PGM (PGM: platinum group metal) of the kinetic current density at 0.9 V for ORR, which is comparable to that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. The current density is degraded to 6.20 mA mg −1 PGM after 3000 cycling of cyclic voltammetry, but it is greatly enhanced value compared to other non-platinum catalysts. In actual application to PEMFCs, the 20% Pd-Fe-Mo catalyst supported on carbons exhibits a high performance of 506 mA cm −2 at 0.6 V. The results suggest that the Pd-Fe-Mo catalyst can be a good candidate for non-platinum ORR catalysts.

  13. In-situ study of the gas-phase composition and temperature of an intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell anode surface fed by reformate natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoni, F.; Silva Mosqueda, D. M.; Pumiglia, D.; Viceconti, E.; Conti, B.; Boigues Muñoz, C.; Bosio, B.; Ulgiati, S.; McPhail, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    An innovative experimental setup is used for in-depth and in-operando characterization of solid oxide fuel cell anodic processes. This work focuses on the heterogeneous reactions taking place on a 121 cm2 anode-supported cell (ASC) running with a H2, CH4, CO2, CO and steam gas mixture as a fuel, using an operating temperature of 923 K. The results have been obtained by analyzing the gas composition and temperature profiles along the anode surface in different conditions: open circuit voltage (OCV) and under two different current densities, 165 mA cm-2 and 330 mA cm-2, corresponding to 27% and 54% of fuel utilization, respectively. The gas composition and temperature analysis results are consistent, allowing to monitor the evolution of the principal chemical and electrochemical reactions along the anode surface. A possible competition between CO2 and H2O in methane internal reforming is shown under OCV condition and low current density values, leading to two different types of methane reforming: Steam Reforming and Dry Reforming. Under a current load of 40 A, the dominance of exothermic reactions leads to a more marked increase of temperature in the portion of the cell close to the inlet revealing that current density is not uniform along the anode surface.

  14. Effect of redox treatments on Ce0.50Zr0.50O2 based solid oxide fuel cell anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaro, Marta; Pappacena, Alfonsina; Abate, Chiara; Ferluga, Matteo; Llorca, Jordi; Trovarelli, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    This work investigates the activity of copper modified Ce0.50Zr0.50O2 (Cu-CZ) based anodes prepared through subsequent impregnation steps into a porous YSZ matrix. The ceria-zirconia oxide was reduced at increasing temperatures and the effect of structural changes on anode performance investigated at 973 K under humidified H2. Performance of all cells increased after one redox cycle due to a decrease of both the anode polarization and the ohmic resistance of the cell. The redox behaviour of Cu-CZ anode was investigated in a symmetrical cell configuration and it was observed that subsequent redox cycles lead to an activation and stabilization of the electrodes. SEM and EIS characterizations showed that this is mainly attributable to a rearrangement of the morphology and microstructure of the CZ oxide at the electrode/electrolyte interface and to an improvement of copper distribution into the porous electrode matrix. It is inferred that the interplay of copper and CZ favours the promotion of anode activity by increasing the number of active sites; moreover it stabilizes the redox behaviour of the electrode. An optimization of electrical and structural properties of Cu-CZ composites was also discussed.

  15. Effects of microstructure and composition of anode Pt based electrocatalysts on performance of direct alcohol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, L.; Li, H.; Yan, S.; Sun, G. [Dalian Inst. of Chemical Physics, Dalian (China). Direct Alcohol Fuel Cell Lab; Xin, Q. [Dalian Inst. of Chemical Physics, Dalian (China). Direct Alcohol Fuel Cell Lab; Dalian Inst. of Chemical Physics, Dalian (China). State Key Laboratory of Catalysis

    2008-07-01

    This paper reported on a study in which platinum (Pt)-based electrocatalysts were synthesized and characterized by XRD, TEM and EDS. The focus of the study was on the relationship between the microstructure and components of PtRu and PtSn catalysts and the performance of direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs). All of the Pt-based electrocatalysts were prepared by a modified polyol method. XRD patterns of the 2 catalysts showed that both catalysts have an fcc pattern of Pt. This was also confirmed by the shift of diffraction peaks of Pt in both catalysts. Electrochemical measurements were carried out using an EG and G model 273A potentiostat/galvanostat and a three-electrode test cell at room temperature. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were fabricated with a pair of stainless steel plates with parallel flow-fields. The MEAs were activated by 1 M methanol/ethanol at 75 degrees C for 3 hours before all the data were collected. The study showed that PtRu is active to methanol electrooxidation while PtSn is active to ethanol electrooxidation. Based on the above experimental analysis, it was determined that the dilatation of Pt lattice parameter is favourable for ethanol adsorption, while the suitable contract of Pt lattice parameter is favorable for methanol electrooxidation. Since Pt is more electronegative than Sn, the partial electrons of Sn atom could be transferred to Pt atom leading to filling of Pt d band. Although Ru is as electronegative as Pt, the electric effect of Pt and Ru may not be as pronounced. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Characteristics of Sr0.92Y0.08Ti1-yNiyO3-δ anode and Ni-infiltrated Sr0.92Y0.08TiO3-δ anode using CH4 fuel in solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Soonil; Yun, Jeong Woo

    2018-01-01

    Strontium titanium oxide co-doped with yttrium and nickel (SrxY1-xTiyNi1-yO3-δ; hereafter, SYTN), was investigated as an alternative anode material for solid oxide fuel cells. To improve the ionic conductivity of the Sr0.92Y0.08TiO3-δ (SYT) anode, Ni2+ was substituted into the B-site (initially occupied by Ti4+), thereby forming oxygen vacancies. To analyze the effects of Ni-doping in the SYT anode, the electrochemical properties of the SYTN anode were compared with those of the Ni-infiltrated SYT(Ni@SYT) using H2 and CH4 as fuels. The electrochemical reactions at the SYTN anode in the presence of both H2 and CH4 were limited by relatively slow reactions, such as non-charged processes including oxygen surface exchange and solid surface diffusion. The high electrical conductivity and excellent catalytic activity of the Ni nanoparticles in the Ni@SYT anode led to improved cell performance. CH4 decomposition at the Ni@SYT anode occurred via thermal pyrolysis of CH4 rather than by steam methane reforming, resulting in carbon deposition. In comparison, the poor inherent catalytic activity for CH4 oxidation exhibited by the SYTN anode minimized carbon deposition on the anode surface.

  17. Metalloporphyrin catalysts for oxygen reduction developed using computer-aided molecular design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryba, G.N.; Hobbs, J.D.; Shelnutt, J.A. [and others

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a new class of metalloporphyrin materials used as catalsyts for use in fuel cell applications. The metalloporphyrins are excellent candidates for use as catalysts at both the anode and cathode. The catalysts reduce oxygen in 1 M potassium hydroxide, as well as in 2 M sulfuric acid. Covalent attachment to carbon supports is being investigated. The computer-aided molecular design is an iterative process, in which experimental results feed back into the design of future catalysts.

  18. Novel synthesis of highly durable and active Pt catalyst encapsulated in nitrogen containing carbon for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunjoon; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Insoo; Lim, Taeho; Kwon, Oh Joong

    2017-09-01

    Novel synthesis of a Pt catalyst encapsulated in a N-containing carbon layer for use in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell is described in this study. A Pt-aniline complex, formed by mixing Pt precursor and aniline monomer, was used as the source of Pt, C, and N. Heat treatment of the Pt-aniline complex with carbon black yielded 5 nm Pt nanoparticles encapsulated by a N-containing carbon layer originating from aniline carbonization. The synthesized Pt catalyst exhibited higher mass specific activity to oxygen reduction reaction than that shown by conventional Pt/C catalyst because pyridinic N with graphitic carbon in the carbon layer provided active sites for oxygen reduction reaction in addition to those provided by Pt. In single cell testing, initial performance of the synthesized catalyst was limited because the thick catalyst layer increased resistance related to mass transfer. However, it was observed that the carbon layer successfully prevented Pt nanoparticles from growing via agglomeration and Ostwald ripening under fuel cell operation, thereby improving durability. Furthermore, a mass specific performance of the synthesized catalyst higher than that of a conventional Pt/C catalyst was achieved by modifying the synthesized catalyst's layer thickness.

  19. Thermal cycling and electrochemical characteristics of solid oxide fuel cell supported on stainless steel with a new 3-phase composite anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayaghi, Amir Masoud; Kim, Kun Joong; Kim, Sun Jae; Kim, Sunwoong; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2017-06-01

    We report design, fabrication method, and fast thermal-cycling ability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that use stainless steel (STS) as a support, and a new 3-phase anode. La and Ni co-doped SrTiO3 (La0.2Sr0.8Ti0.9Ni0.1O3-d, LSTN), replaces some of the Ni in conventional Ni-yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode; the resultant LSTN-YSZ-Ni 3-phase-composite anode is tested as a new reduction (or decomposition)-resistant anode of STS-supported SOFCs that can be co-fired with STS. A multi-layered cell with YSZ electrolyte (thickness ∼5 μm), composite anode, STS-cermet contact-layer, and STS support is designed, then fabricated by tape casting, lamination, and co-firing at 1250 °C in reducing atmosphere. The maximum power density (MPD) is 325 mW cm-2 at 650 °C; this is one of the highest among STS-supported cells fabricated by co-firing. The cell also shows stable open-circuit voltage and Ohmic resistance during 100 rapid thermal cycles between 170 and 600 °C. STS support minimizes stress and avoids cracking of electrolyte during rapid thermal cycling. The excellent MPD and stability during thermal cycles, and promising characteristics of SOFC as a power source for vehicle or mobile devices that requires rapid thermal cycles, are attributed to the new design of the cell with new anode structure.

  20. Efficient and stable polymer solar cells prepared using plasmonic graphene oxides as anode buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chung-Lei; Chuang, Ming-Kai; Chen, Chyong-Hua; Chu, Chih-Wei; Keshtov, Muchamed L.; Chen, Fang-Chung

    2015-08-01

    Gold nanoparticle-decorated graphene oxides (AuNP-GOs) have been incorporated into inverted organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs) as anode interlayers. The OPVs fabricated with AuNP-GOs exhibited significant improvement in both the short-circuit current and fill factor compared to a reference device fabricated with neat GOs. We attribute the improvement in the efficiency of the device to the plasmonic effects of the AuNP-GO nanocomposites, which induced local enhancement of the electromagnetic field. More importantly, the inverted OPVs also exhibited better reliability after the use of AuNP-GO nanocomposites.

  1. Microbial fuel cells with an integrated spacer and separate anode and cathode modules

    KAUST Repository

    He, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    A new type of scalable MFC was developed based on using alternating graphite fiber brush array anode modules and dual cathode modules in order to simplify construction, operation, and maintenance of the electrodes. The modular MFC design was tested with a single (two-sided) cathode module with a specific surface area of 29 m2 m−3 based on a total liquid volume (1.4 L; 20 m2 m−3 using the total reactor volume of 2 L), and two brush anode modules. Three different types of spacers were used in the cathode module to provide structural stability, and enhance air flow relative to previous cassette (combined anode–cathode) designs: a low-profile wire spacer; a rigid polycarbonate column spacer; and a flexible plastic mesh spacer. The best performance was obtained using the wire spacer that produced a maximum power density of 1100 ± 10 mW m−2 of cathode (32 ± 0.3 W m−3 based on liquid volume) with an acetate-amended wastewater (COD = 1010 ± 30 mg L−1), compared to 1010 ± 10 mW m−2 for the column and 650 ± 20 mW m−2 for the mesh spacers. Anode potentials were unaffected by the different types of spacers. Raw domestic wastewater produced a maximum of 400 ± 8 mW m−2 under fed batch conditions (wire-spacers), which is one of the highest power densities for this fuel. Over time the maximum power was reduced to 300 ± 10 mW m−2 and 275 ± 7 mW m−2 for the two anode compartments, with only slightly less power of 250 ± 20 mW m−2 obtained under continuous flow conditions. In fixed-resistance tests, the average COD removal was 57 ± 5% at a hydraulic retention time of 8 h. These results show that this modular MFC design can both simplify reactor construction and enable relatively high power generation from even relatively dilute wastewater.

  2. A robust NiO-Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9 anode for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Dong

    2015-07-02

    In order to directly use methane without a reforming process, NiO-Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (NiO-SDC) nanocomposite anode are successfully synthesized via a one-pot, surfactant-assisted co-assembly approach for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells. Both NiO with cubic phase and SDC with fluorite phase are obtained at 550 °C. Both NiO nanoparticles and SDC nanoparticles are highly monodispersed in size with nearly spherical shapes. Based on the as-synthesized NiO-SDC, two kinds of single cells with different micro/macro-porous structure are successfully fabricated. As a result, the cell performance was improved by 40%-45% with the new double-pore NiO-SDC anode relative to the cell performance with the conventional NiO-SDC anode due to a wider triple-phase-boundary (TPB) area. In addition, no significant degradation of the cell performance was observed after 60 hours, which means an increasing of long term stability. Therefore, the as-synthesized NiO-SDC nanocomposite is a promising anode for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells.

  3. Facile synthesis of Ni-decorated multi-layers graphene sheets as effective anode for direct urea fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Yousef

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A large amount of urea-containing wastewater is produced as a by-product in the fertilizer industry, requiring costly and complicated treatment strategies. Considering that urea can be exploited as fuel, this wastewater can be treated and simultaneously exploited as a renewable energy source in a direct urea fuel cell. In this study, multi-layers graphene/nickel nanocomposites were prepared by a one-step green method for use as an anode in the direct urea fuel cell. Typically, commercial sugar was mixed with nickel(II acetate tetrahydrate in distilled water and then calcined at 800 °C for 1 h. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS were employed to characterize the final product. The results confirmed the formation of multi-layers graphene sheets decorated by nickel nanoparticles. To investigate the influence of metal nanoparticles content, samples were prepared using different amounts of the metal precursor; nickel acetate content was changed from 0 to 5 wt.%. Investigation of the electrochemical characterizations indicated that the sample prepared using the original solution with 3 wt.% nickel acetate had the best current density, 81.65 mA/cm2 in a 0.33 M urea solution (in 1 M KOH at an applied voltage 0.9 V vs Ag/AgCl. In a passive direct urea fuel cell based on the optimal composition, the observed maximum power density was 4.06 × 10−3 mW/cm2 with an open circuit voltage of 0.197 V at room temperature in an actual electric circuit. Overall, this study introduces a cheap and beneficial methodology to prepare effective anode materials for direct urea fuel cells.

  4. Inert Anode Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1999-07-01

    This ASME report provides a broad assessment of open literature and patents that exist in the area of inert anodes and their related cathode systems and cell designs, technologies that are relevant for the advanced smelting of aluminum. The report also discusses the opportunities, barriers, and issues associated with these technologies from a technical, environmental, and economic viewpoint.

  5. Two 3D structured Co-Ni bimetallic oxides as cathode catalysts for high-performance alkaline direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Shu, Chengyong; Fang, Yuan; Chen, Yuanzhen; Liu, Yongning

    2017-09-01

    Two NiCo2O4 bimetallic oxides were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method. SEM and TEM observations show that these materials have three-dimensional (3D) dandelion-like (DL) and flower-like (FL) morphologies. Their large specific surface areas (90.68 and 19.8 m2·g-1) and porous structures provide many active sites and effective transport pathways for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Electrochemical measurements with a rotating ring-disc electrode (RRDE) indicate that the electron transfer numbers of the NiCo2O4-DL and NiCo2O4-FL catalysts for ORR in an alkaline solution are 3.97 and 3.91, respectively. Fuel cells were assembled with the bimetallic oxides, PtRu/C and a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) as cathode catalysts, anode catalyst and electrolyte film, respectively. For NiCo2O4-DL, the peak power density reaches up to 73.5 mW·cm-2 at 26 °C, which is the highest room-temperature value reported to date. The high catalytic activity of NiCo2O4 is mainly attributed to the presence of many Co3+ cations that directly donate electrons to O2 to reduce it via a more efficient and effective route. Furthermore, the catalytic performance of NiCo2O4-DL is superior to that of NiCo2O4-FL because it has a higher specific surface area and is less crystalline.

  6. Anodic biofilms in microbial fuel cells harbor low numbers of higher-power-producing bacteria than abundant genera

    KAUST Repository

    Kiely, Patrick D.

    2010-07-15

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode communities often reveal just a few genera, but it is not known to what extent less abundant bacteria could be important for improving performance. We examined the microbial community in an MFC fed with formic acid for more than 1 year and determined using 16S rRNA gene cloning and fluorescent in situ hybridization that members of the Paracoccus genus comprised most (~30%) of the anode community. A Paracoccus isolate obtained from this biofilm (Paracoccus denitrificans strain PS-1) produced only 5.6 mW/m 2, whereas the original mixed culture produced up to 10 mW/m 2. Despite the absence of any Shewanella species in the clone library, we isolated a strain of Shewanella putrefaciens (strain PS-2) from the same biofilm capable of producing a higher-power density (17.4 mW/m2) than the mixed culture, although voltage generation was variable. Our results suggest that the numerical abundance of microorganisms in biofilms cannot be assumed a priori to correlate to capacities of these predominant species for high-power production. Detailed screening of bacterial biofilms may therefore be needed to identify important strains capable of high-power generation for specific substrates. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Group IVA Element (Si, Ge, Sn)-Based Alloying/Dealloying Anodes as Negative Electrodes for Full-Cell Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dequan; Liu, Zheng Jiao; Li, Xiuwan; Xie, Wenhe; Wang, Qi; Liu, Qiming; Fu, Yujun; He, Deyan

    2017-12-01

    To satisfy the increasing energy demands of portable electronics, electric vehicles, and miniaturized energy storage devices, improvements to lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are required to provide higher energy/power densities and longer cycle lives. Group IVA element (Si, Ge, Sn)-based alloying/dealloying anodes are promising candidates for use as electrodes in next-generation LIBs owing to their extremely high gravimetric and volumetric capacities, low working voltages, and natural abundances. However, due to the violent volume changes that occur during lithium-ion insertion/extraction and the formation of an unstable solid electrolyte interface, the use of Group IVA element-based anodes in commercial LIBs is still a great challenge. Evaluating the electrochemical performance of an anode in a full-cell configuration is a key step in investigating the possible application of the active material in LIBs. In this regard, the recent progress and important approaches to overcoming and alleviating the drawbacks of Group IVA element-based anode materials are reviewed, such as the severe volume variations during cycling and the relatively brittle electrode/electrolyte interface in full-cell LIBs. Finally, perspectives and future challenges in achieving the practical application of Group IVA element-based anodes in high-energy and high-power-density LIB systems are proposed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Development and manufacturing of tape casted, anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells; Entwicklung und Herstellung von foliengegossenen, anodengestuetzten Festoxidbrennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafbauer, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells offer high potential in transforming the chemical energy of hydrogen or natural gas into electrical energy. Due to the high efficiency of fuel cells, lots of effort has been made in the improvement of net efficiency and in materials development during the last years. Recently, the introduction of high performance, low-cost production technologies become more and more important. At the Institute of Energy Research IEF-1 of Forschungszentrum Julich, standard SOFCs were processed by time and work consuming methods. On the way to market entrance, product costs have to be reduced drastically. The aim of this thesis is the introduction of a high efficient low-cost processing route for the SOFC manufacturing. Therefore, the well-known and well established shaping technology tape casting was used for generating the anode substrates. As the first goal of this approach, two different tape casting slurries were developed in order to get substrates in the thickness range from 300 to 500 {mu}m after sintering. After shaping of the substrates, sinter regimes for the different necessary coatings were adapted to the novel substrate types in order to obtain cells with high performance and strength. Therefore, the different coating technologies like screen printing and vacuum slip casting were used for cell manufacturing. The optimization of the different coating steps during cell manufacturing led to high performance SOFCs with a 10% higher power output compared to the Julich state-of-the-art SOFC. Additional experiments verified the workability of the novel tape cast substrates for the manufacturing of near-net-shape SOFC. Finally, the novel cell types based on tape cast substrates were assembled to stacks with up to ten repeating units. Stack tests showed identical performance and degradation compared to stacks containing state-of-the-art SOFCs. Thus, the complete lifetime circle of a SOFC starting from powder preparation to stack assembly has been

  9. Development of Methanol-Reforming Catalysts for Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Agrell, Johan

    2003-01-01

    Vehicles powered by proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuelcells are approaching commercialisation. Being inherently cleanand efficient sources of power, fuel cells constitute asustainable alternative to internal combustion engines to meetfuture low-emission legislation. The PEM fuel cell may befuelled directly by hydrogen, but other alternatives appearmore attractive at present, due to problems related to theproduction, transportation and handling of hydrogen. Fuelling with an alcohol fuel, such...

  10. Final Report - Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debe, Mark

    2012-09-28

    The principal objectives of the program were development of a durable, low cost, high performance cathode electrode (catalyst and support), that is fully integrated into a fuel cell membrane electrode assembly with gas diffusion media, fabricated by high volume capable processes, and is able to meet or exceed the 2015 DOE targets. Work completed in this contract was an extension of the developments under three preceding cooperative agreements/grants Nos. DE-FC-02-97EE50473, DE-FC-99EE50582 and DE-FC36- 02AL67621 which investigated catalyzed membrane electrode assemblies for PEM fuel cells based on a fundamentally new, nanostructured thin film catalyst and support system, and demonstrated the feasibility for high volume manufacturability.

  11. An Investigation of Palladium Oxygen Reduction Catalysts for the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Álvarez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of Pd and Pt was carried out in DMFC using different methanol concentrations and under different operating conditions. Cell performance was compared at methanol concentrations of 1, 3, 5, and 7 M and at temperatures of 20, 40, and 60°C. Homemade Pd nanoparticles were prepared on Vulcan XC-72R using ethylene glycol as the reducing agent at pH 11. The resulting catalyst, Pd/C, with metal nanoparticles of approximately 6 nm diameter, was tested as a cathode catalyst in DMFC. At methanol concentrations of 5 M and higher, the Pd cathode-based cell performed better than that with Pt at 60°C with air.

  12. Mesoporous nitrogen-rich carbon materials as cathode catalysts in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Yongtae

    2014-12-01

    The high cost of the catalyst material used for the oxygen reduction reaction in microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes is one of the factors limiting practical applications of this technology. Mesoporous nitrogen-rich carbon (MNC), prepared at different temperatures, was examined as an oxygen reduction catalyst, and compared in performance to Pt in MFCs and electrochemical cells. MNC calcined at 800 °C produced a maximum power density of 979 ± 131 mW m-2 in MFCs, which was 37% higher than that produced using MNC calined at 600 °C (715 ± 152 mW m-2), and only 14% lower than that obtained with Pt (1143 ± 54 mW m-2). The extent of COD removal and coulombic efficiencies were the same for all cathode materials. These results show that MNC could be used as an alternative to Pt in MFCs. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling Low-Platinum-Loading Effects in Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Wonseok; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-01-01

    The cathode catalyst layer within a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell is the most complex and critical, yet least understood, layer within the cell. The exact method and equations for modeling this layer are still being revised and will be discussed in this paper, including a 0.8 reaction order, existence of Pt oxides, possible non-isopotential agglomerates, and the impact of a film resistance towards oxygen transport. While the former assumptions are relatively straightforward to understand and implement, the latter film resistance is shown to be critically important in explaining increased mass-transport limitations with low Pt-loading catalyst layers. Model results demonstrate agreement with experimental data that the increased oxygen flux and/or diffusion pathway through the film can substantially decrease performance. Also, some scale-up concepts from the agglomerate scale to the more macroscopic porous-electrode scale are discussed and the resulting optimization scenarios investigated.

  14. Final Report: Cathode Catalysis in Hydrogen/Oxygen Fuel Cells: New Catalysts, Mechanism, and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Kenis, Paul J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Nuzzo, Ralph G. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Rauchfuss, Thomas B. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-01-18

    In this research, we prosecuted a comprehensive plan of research directed at developing new catalysts and new understandings relevant to the operation of low temperature hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells. The focal point of this work was one centered on the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR), the electrochemical process that most fundamentally limits the technological utility of these environmentally benign energy conversion devices. Over the period of grant support, we developed new ORR catalysts, based on Cu dimers and multimers. In this area, we developed substantial new insight into design rules required to establish better ORR materials, inspired by the three-Cu active site in laccase which has the highest ORR onset potential of any material known. We also developed new methods of characterization for the ORR on conventional (metal-based) catalysts. Finally, we developed a new platform to study the rate of proton transfer relevant to proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, of which the ORR is an exemplar. Other aspects of work involved theory and prototype catalyst testing.

  15. Biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for bioelectricity production: A novel approach in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanakumar, Kandasamy, E-mail: saravana732@gmail.com [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai (China); MubarakAli, Davoodbasha [Microbial Genetic Engineering Laboratory, Division of Bioengineering, College of Life Science and Bioengineering, Incheon National University, Songdo 406772, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Microbiology, School of Lifesciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Kathiresan, Kandasamy [Centre of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai 608 502, Tamil Nadu (India); Thajuddin, Nooruddin [Department of Microbiology, School of Lifesciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Alharbi, Naiyf S. [Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Chen, Jie, E-mail: jiechen59@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Trichoderma sp., showed an abilities to synthesis of AgNPs and AuNPs with an excellent stability. • AuNPs significantly enhanced the bioelectricity production by MFC of anaerobic fermentation as catalyst. • Maximum bioelectricity production was optimized and obtained the voltage of 432.80 mA using RSM. - Abstract: The present work aimed to use the biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for bioelectricity production in microbial fuel cell (MFC) approach under anaerobic condition. Silver and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized using Trichoderma sp. Particle size and cystallinity were measured by X-ray diffraction revealed the crystalline structure with average size of 36.17 nm. Electron microscopic studies showed spherical shaped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and cubical shaped AuNPs with size ranges from 50 to 150 nm. The concentration of biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for enhanced bioelectricity generations and estimated by response surface methodology (RSM) and found at the greatest of 342.80 mA under optimized conditions are time interval, temperature, nanoparticles used as 63 h, 28 ± 2.0 °C, 22.54 mg l{sup −1} (AgNPs) and 25.62 mg l{sup −1} (AuNPs) in a batch reactor. AuNPs acted as an excellent catalyst to enhance the bioelectricity production. This novel technique could be used for eco-friendly, economically feasible and facile electricity production.

  16. Preliminary Electrochemical Characterization of Anode Supported Solid Oxide Cell (AS-SOC) Produced in the Institute of Power Engineering Operated in Electrolysis Mode (SOEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupecki, Jakub; Motyliński, Konrad; Skrzypkiewicz, Marek; Wierzbicki, Michał; Naumovich, Yevgeniy

    2017-12-01

    The article discusses the operation of solid oxide electrochemical cells (SOC) developed in the Institute of Power Engineering as prospective key components of power-to-gas systems. The fundamentals of the solid oxide cells operated as fuel cells (SOFC - solid oxide fuel cells) and electrolysers (SOEC - solid oxide fuel cells) are given. The experimental technique used for electrochemical characterization of cells is presented. The results obtained for planar cell with anodic support are given and discussed. Based on the results, the applicability of the cells in power-to-gas systems (P2G) is evaluated.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of PtRu/C catalysts obtained by colloidal and deposition methods for fuel cell applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egberto Gomes Franco

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to compare catalysts produced by the Bönnemann - colloidal method (PtRu (B1 and PtRu (B2, and those produced by the spontaneous deposition method (PtRu (SD. The catalysts produced by both methods had good electrochemical behavior for methanol oxidation for proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications. The structure of the catalyst was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis (EDS was used to determine the semi-quantitative composition of the catalysts, and the electrochemical behavior was determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV. The diffractograms of the binary catalysts revealed platinum and ruthenium as the only crystalline phases, as per ICDD data base. The PtRu (B1 catalyst, treated in a reducing atmosphere, has the same structure as PtRu (B2, treated in an oxidising/reducing atmosphere, except that the crystallite size was around 1.7 nm for PtRu (B1 instead of 9.9 nm for PtRu (B2. The catalysts PtRu (B2 and PtRu (SD showed similar cyclic voltammetric behavior, which was better than that of PtRu (B1. Both methods are suitable for the production of electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. The colloidal method is more expensive than the deposition method, but the former permits the production of ternary and quaternary catalyst systems with enhanced CO tolerance.

  18. A proposed agglomerate model for oxygen reduction in the catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Gao, Yuan; Ostadi, Hossein; Jiang, Kyle; Chen, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a new agglomerate model to describe oxygen reduction reaction. • We showed how to calculate the model parameters from catalyst layer structure. • We verified the agglomerate model. - Abstract: Oxygen diffusion and reduction in the catalyst layer of PEM fuel cell is an important process in fuel cell modelling, but models able to link the reduction rate to catalyst-layer structure are lack; this paper makes such an effort. We first link the average reduction rate over the agglomerate within a catalyst layer to a probability that an oxygen molecule, which is initially on the agglomerate surface, will enter and remain in the agglomerate at any time in the absence of any electrochemical reaction. We then propose a method to directly calculate distribution function of this probability and apply it to two catalyst layers with contrasting structures. A formula is proposed to describe these calculated distribution functions, from which the agglomerate model is derived. The model has two parameters and both can be independently calculated from catalyst layer structures. We verify the model by first showing that it is an improvement and able to reproduce what the spherical model describes, and then testing it against the average oxygen reductions directly calculated from pore-scale simulations of oxygen diffusion and reaction in the two catalyst layers. The proposed model is simple, but significant as it links the average oxygen reduction to catalyst layer structures, and its two parameters can be directly calculated rather than by calibration

  19. Development of Low Temperature Catalysts for an Integrated Ammonia PEM Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    It is proposed that an integrated ammonia-PEM fuel cell could unlock the potential of ammonia to act as a high capacity chemical hydrogen storage vector and enable renewable energy to be delivered eectively to road transport applications. Catalysts are developed for low temperature ammonia decomposition with activity from 450 K (ruthenium and cesium on graphitised carbon nanotubes). Results strongly suggest that the cesium is present on the surface and close proximity to ruthenium nanoparticl...

  20. Fuel Cell Platinum Catalysts Supported on Mediate Surface Area Carbon Black Supports

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaluža, Luděk; Larsen, M.J.; Zdražil, Miroslav; Gulková, Daniela; Odgaard, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2015 (2015), s. 913-918 ISSN 1974-9791. [International Conference on Chemical and Process Engineering - ICheaP12 /12./. Milano, 19.05.2015-22.05.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7HX13003 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 303466 - IMMEDIATE Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : carbon black * platinum catalyst * fuel cell Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering