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Sample records for celiac plexus neurolysis

  1. Ganglion block. Celiac plexus neurolysis; Ganglienblockade. Neurolyse des Plexus coeliacus

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    Kraemer, S.C.; Seifarth, H. [Klinikum Esslingen gGmbH, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Esslingen (Germany); Meier, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Ulm (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Pain originating from the organs of the upper abdomen, especially in patients suffering from inoperable carcinoma of the pancreas or advanced inflammatory conditions, is difficult to treat in a significant number of patients. Computed tomography (CT) guided neurolysis is the most commonly used technique for neurolysis of the celiac plexus. Ethanol is used to destroy the nociceptive fibers passing through the plexus and provides an effective means of diminishing pain arising from the upper abdomen. Using either an anterior or posterior approach, a 22 G Chiba needle is advanced to the antecrural space and neurolysis is achieved by injecting a volume of 20-50 ml of ethanol together with a local anesthetic and contrast medium. In up to 80 % of patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen, CT-guided celiac plexus neurolysis diminishes pain or allows a reduction of analgesic medication; however, in some patients the effect may only be temporary necessitating a second intervention. In inflammatory conditions, celiac neurolysis is often less effective in reducing abdominal pain. The CT-guided procedure for neurolysis of the celiac plexus is safe and effective in diminishing pain especially in patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen. The procedure can be repeated if the effect is only temporary. (orig.) [German] Therapierefraktaere und schwere rezidivierende Schmerzen im Oberbauch stellen insbesondere beim nicht operablen Pankreaskarzinom, aber auch bei fortgeschrittenen entzuendlichen Erkrankungen eine Herausforderung dar. Die CT-gesteuerte Neurolyse/Blockade des Plexus coeliacus schaltet durch eine gezielte Zerstoerung der afferenten und efferenten Nervenfasern mit Alkohol die Schmerzweiterleitung aus. Mittels unterschiedlicher Zugaenge von ventral oder dorsal wird eine 22-G-Chiba-Nadel CT-durchleuchtungsgesteuert nach prae- und/oder paraaortal auf Hoehe des Truncus coeliacus vorgebracht. An der entsprechenden Lokalisation erfolgt die Injektion von 20

  2. Pulmonary embolism following celiac plexus block and neurolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizada, Miles S.; Kelly, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute pain in chronic disease requires the physician to choose from an arsenal of pain management techniques tailored to the individual patient. Celiac plexus block and neurolysis are commonly employed for the management of chronic abdominal pain, especially in debilitating conditions such as cancer or chronic pancreatitis. The procedure is safe, well tolerated, and produces few complications. We present a case of pulmonary embolism following a celiac plexus block and neurolysis procedure. Further study is required to determine if celiac plexus ablation, alone or in combination with other risk factors, may contribute to increased risk for pulmonary embolism in patients seeking treatment for chronic upper abdominal pain conditions. PMID:27365890

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block and neurolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Ichiro; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2017-02-03

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) is widely used for reducing pain originating from upper abdominal organs. It is mainly indicated to treat pancreatic cancer pain, but also to relieve pain as a result of chronic pancreatitis. Real-time guidance and color Doppler imaging by EUS made the procedure easier and safer, resulting in greater pain relief. Currently, two techniques are used for EUS-CPN. The classic approach, known as the central technique, involves injection of a neurolytic agent at the base of the celiac axis. In the bilateral technique, the neurolytic agent is injected on both sides of the celiac axis. In addition, EUS-guided direct celiac ganglia neurolysis (EUS-CGN) was introduced recently. Pain relief is achieved by EUS-CPN in 70-80% of patients with pancreatic cancer and in 50-60% of those with chronic pancreatitis. The bilateral technique may be more efficient than the central technique, although the central technique is easier and possibly safer. Moreover, EUS-CGN may provide greater pain relief than conventional EUS-CPN. Procedure-related complications include transient pain exacerbation, transient hypotension, transient diarrhea, and inebriation. Although most complications are not serious, major adverse events such as retroperitoneal bleeding, abscess, and ischemic complications occasionally occur.

  4. Celiac plexus neurolysis in the management of unresectable pancreatic cancer: When and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Jonathan M; Chen, Yen-I; Sahai, Anand V

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the second most common abdominal cancer in North America with an estimated 20% resectability at diagnosis, and overall 5-year survival of 5%. Pain is common in pancreatic cancer patients with 70%-80% suffering substantial pain. Celiac plexus neurolysis (CPN) is a technique that can potentially improve pain control in pancreatic cancer while preventing further escalation of opioid consumption. CPN is performed by injecting absolute alcohol into the celiac plexus neural network of ganglia. This review sets out to explore the current status of CPN in non-resectable pancreatic cancer. We will examine: (1) the efficacy and safety of percutaneous-CPN and endoscopic ultrasound guided-CPN; (2) specific technique modifications including bilateral (vs central) injections and celiac ganglia neurolysis; and (3) the issue of CPN timing, early at pancreatic cancer diagnosis vs traditional late use as salvage therapy. PMID:24605017

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis using a reverse phase polymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keith; L; Obstein; Fernanda; P; Martins; Gloria; Fernández-Esparrach; Christopher; C; Thompson

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To assess the feasibility of endoscopic ultrasound(EUS)guided celiac plexus neurolysis(CPN) using a poloxamer. METHODS:In this prospective evaluation,six Yorkshire pigs underwent EUS-guided CPN.Three received an injection of 10 mL of 0.25%Lidocaine plus methylene blue(group 1) and three received an injection of 10 mL of 0.25%Lidocaine plus blue colored poloxamer(PS137-25)(group 2) .Necropsy was performed immediately after the animals were sacrificed.The abdominal and pelvic cavities were examined for th...

  6. Endoscopic ultrasonography guided celiac plexus neurolysis and celiac plexus block in the management of pain due to pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Michaels, Anthony J.; Draganov, Peter V

    2007-01-01

    Pain is a common symptom of pancreatic disease and is frequently difficult to manage. Pain relief provided by narcotics is often suboptimal and is associated with significant side effects. An alternative approach to pain management in pancreatic disease is the use of celiac plexus block (CPB) or neurolysis (CPN). Originally performed by anesthesiologists and radiologists via a posterior approach, recent advances in endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) have made this technique an attractive altern...

  7. Endoscopic ultrasonography guided celiac plexus neurolysis and celiac plexus block in the management of pain due to pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anthony J Michaels; Peter V Draganov

    2007-01-01

    Pain is a common symptom of pancreatic disease and is frequently difficult to manage. Pain relief provided by narcotics is often suboptimal and is associated with significant side effects. An alternative approach to pain management in pancreatic disease is the use of celiac plexus block (CPB) or neurolysis (CPN). Originally performed by anesthesiologists and radiologists via a posterior approach, recent advances in endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) have made this technique an attractive alternative. EUS guided celiac plexus block/neurolysis is simple to perform and avoids serious complications such as paraplegia or pneumothorax that are associated with the posterior approach. EUS guided CPN should be considered first line therapy in patients with pain due to pancreatic cancer. It provides superior pain control compared to traditional management with narcotics. A trend for improved survival in pancreatic cancer patients treated with CPN has been reported,but larger studies are needed to confirm this finding.At this time, the use of EUS guided CPB cannot be recommended as routine therapy for pain in chronic pancreatitis since only one-half of the patients experience pain reduction and the beneficial effect tends to be short lived. EUS guided CPB and CPN should be used as part of a multidisciplinary team approach for pain management.

  8. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacological, percutaneous celiac plexus blockade is often inefficient in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Lack of efficiency could be due to incomplete denervation of the plexus; however, a method for measuring the completeness of celiac plexus blockade is not yet available. We...... have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... regarding pain after 1 week. In conclusion, pancreatic hormone concentrations in response to standing are not useful for monitoring celiac plexus block, whereas heart rate, blood pressure and hepato-splanchnic blood flow may yield useful information. From such measurements it was concluded that permanent...

  9. 内镜超声引导下腹腔神经丛阻滞术治疗胰腺癌所致癌性腹痛的临床研究%A prospective study of endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis for pain management in patients with pancreatic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹晓平; 陈素玉; 吕瑛; 张晓琦; 李雯; 徐肇敏

    2011-01-01

    Objective To prospectively assess the efficacy and safety of endoscopic ultrasoundguided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) in the management of pain caused by pancreatic carcinoma.Methods Patients with confirmed un-resectable pancreatic malignancy were treated with EUS-CPN once or twice.The data including age,gender,pain duration,opioid consumption,tumor location,pain scores before and after the procedure,number of treatment,duration of pain relief and survival time were collected.Results A total of 27 cases with cancerous abdominal pain were recruited.The median pain scores were significantly lower after EUS-CPN,and pain relief was obtained in 81.5% (95% CI,66.8% -96.1% ) patients with a median duration of 56.0 days (95% CI,17.1-94.9),whose confidence interval was comparable to that of survival time (97.0 days,95 % CI,82.7-111.3 ).No clinical factors could predict post-procedure duration of pain relief (x2 =6.757,P =0.239).Procedure-related transient diarrhea and fever were noted only in 1 patient.No major complications occurred.Conclusion EUS-guided CPN is safe and effective in alleviating abdominal pain associated with pancreatic cancer,even at the late stage.Moreover,no clinical factor could predict post-procedure degree or duration of pain relief.%目的 前瞻性评价内镜超声引导下腹腔神经丛阻滞术缓解胰腺癌所致癌性腹痛的有效性及安全性.方法 手术无法切除胰腺癌患者接受1至2次内镜超声引导下腹腔神经丛阻滞术,收集分析患者年龄、性别、术前腹痛病程、阿片类药物使用情况、肿瘤部位、治疗前后疼痛评分、治疗次数、术后疼痛缓解时间及生存时间.结果 27例晚期胰腺癌患者纳入研究.术后疼痛评分低于术前,差异有统计学意义,81.5%患者术后疼痛缓解,中位镇痛持续时间56.0 d[95% CI(17.1 ~94.9)],可信区间与中位生存时间97.0 d[95% CI(82.7 ~ 111.3)]重叠.术前腹痛病程、术前疼痛评分、

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided coeliac plexus neurolysis to reduce pain in patients with pancreatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, Andreas Slot; Karstensen, John Gésdal; Cherciu, Irina;

    2014-01-01

    Pain is among the most common symptoms in patients with pancreatic cancer and up to 80% require analgesics, most often as opioids. Unfortunately the analgesic effect is frequently insufficient, and increasing doses are required, resulting in unpleasant side effects. Endoscopic ultrasound......-guided neurolysis is a well established method to alleviate or reduce pain due to pancreatic cancer with a documented effect in 80% of patients. The aim of this review is to draw attention to endoscopic ultrasound-guided neurolysis and to discuss its potential which may not be fully utilized....

  11. Celiac plexus block: an anatomical study and simulation using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Gabriela Augusta Mateus; Lopes, Paulo Tadeu Campos; Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira dos, E-mail: pclopes@ulbra.br [Universidade Luterana do Brasil (Ulbra), Canoas, RS (Brazil); Pozzobon, Adriane [Centro Universitario Univates, Lajeado, RS (Brazil); Duarte, Rodrigo Dias; Cima, Alexandre da Silveira; Massignan, Angela [Fundacao Serdil/Saint Pastous, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: to analyze anatomical variations associated with celiac plexus complex by means of computed tomography simulation, assessing the risk for organ injury as the transcrural technique is utilized. Materials and Methods: one hundred eight transaxial computed tomography images of abdomen were analyzed. The aortic-vertebral, celiac trunk (CeT)-vertebral, CeT-aortic and celiac-aortic-vertebral topographical relationships were recorded. Two needle insertion pathways were drawn on each of the images, at right and left, 9 cm and 4.5 cm away from the midline. Transfixed vital organs and gender-related associations were recorded. Results: aortic-vertebral - 45.37% at left and 54.62% in the middle; CeT-vertebral - T12, 36.11%; T12-L1, 32.4%; L1, 27.77%; T11-T12, 2.77%; CeT-aortic - 53.7% at left and 46.3% in the middle; celiac-aortic-vertebral - L-l, 22.22%; M-m, 23.15%; L-m, 31.48%; M-l, 23.15%. Neither correspondence on the right side nor significant gender-related associations were observed. Conclusion: considering the wide range of abdominal anatomical variations and the characteristics of needle insertion pathways, celiac plexus block should not be standardized. Imaging should be performed prior to the procedure in order to reduce the risks for injuries or for negative outcomes to patients. Gender-related anatomical variations involved in celiac plexus block should be more deeply investigated, since few studies have addressed the subject. (author)

  12. Celiac plexus block: an anatomical study and simulation using computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Augusta Mateus Pereira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze anatomical variations associated with celiac plexus complex by means of computed tomography simulation, assessing the risk for organ injury as the transcrural technique is utilized. Materials and Methods: One hundred eight transaxial computed tomography images of abdomen were analyzed. The aortic-vertebral, celiac trunk (CeT-vertebral, CeT-aortic and celiac-aortic-vertebral topographical relationships were recorded. Two needle insertion pathways were drawn on each of the images, at right and left, 9 cm and 4.5 cm away from the midline. Transfixed vital organs and gender-related associations were recorded. Results: Aortic-vertebral - 45.37% at left and 54.62% in the middle; CeT-vertebral - T12, 36.11%; T12-L1, 32.4%; L1, 27.77%; T11-T12, 2.77%; CeT-aortic - 53.7% at left and 46.3% in the middle; celiac-aortic-vertebral - L-l, 22.22%; M-m, 23.15%; L-m, 31.48%; M-l, 23.15%. Neither correspondence on the right side nor significant gender-related associations were observed. Conclusion: Considering the wide range of abdominal anatomical variations and the characteristics of needle insertion pathways, celiac plexus block should not be standardized. Imaging should be performed prior to the procedure in order to reduce the risks for injuries or for negative outcomes to patients. Gender-related anatomical variations involved in celiac plexus block should be more deeply investigated, since few studies have addressed the subject.

  13. Effects of Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block on Liver Regeneration in Rats with Partial Hepatectomy

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    Jun Li; Hong-Tao Yan; Jian-Xiang Che; Shu-Rong Bai; Qing-Ming Qiu; Ling Ren; Fan Pan; Xiao-Qin Sun; Fu-Zhou Tian; Dong-Xuan Li; Li-Jun Tang

    2013-01-01

    Liver regeneration is the basic physiological process after partial hepatectomy (PH), and is important for the functional rehabilitation of the liver after acute hepatic injury. This study was designed to explore the effects of neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) on liver regeneration after PH. We established a model of PH in rats, assessing hepatic blood flow, liver function, and serum CRP, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 concentrations of the residuary liver after PH. Additionally, histopathologica...

  14. [Synaptoarchitectonics of the ganglia of the celiac plexus in white rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkova, N A; Kakabadze, S A; Tepliakova, N P

    1978-01-01

    In 50 intact white rats at the age of 6, 15, 23 and 30 months synapsoarchitectonics of the celiac plexus nodes was studied by an electron microscopy method. Peculiarities in synapsoarchitectonics are stipulated by pericaryon processes in neurons, some of them have no contacts with the axonal terminals, while others have contacts with the axonal terminals. The former include small (about 0.5 mkm) drop-like and large (up to 1.5 mkm) polymorphous processes within the limits of perisomatic membrane, as well as processes penetrating the neuronal capsule. All of them contain, in different combinations, vesicles, ribosomas, fibrillae, and the largest processes--small cisterns of granular cytoplasmatic network and single mitochondria. The processes of the first group are considered as original stages for the development of the second group processes. The latter are represented by different in size (about 1.0--2.0 mkm) in form (digital, cone-, pin-, goblet-shaped, cylindrical, branching) and in content formations. There is, as a rule, one contact on the processes of an uncomplicated form, while on the branching processes there can be up to three and more contacting axonal terminals. Peculiar features in the composition of the processes taken as a whole (specific forms, absence of dendritic tubes, sometimes numerous contacts with axonal terminals in spite of small size) distinguish them from newly forming dendritic processes and these formations are considered as independent specialized receptor apparatus in the pericaryon of neurons of the celiac plexus.

  15. CT-guided celiac plexus block with absolute alcohol : the anterior approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Mi Suk; Jang, Young Ik; Kim, Jeong Hoi; Ym, Seong Hee; Lee, Jin Hee [Namwon Medical Center, Namwon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National Univ. College of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided celiac plexus block (CPB) using an anterior approach, and to determine the role of CT in this procedure. CPB was attempted in 15 patients(10 men and 5 women;mean age, 62.3 years) with intractable upper abdominal pain due to terminal malignancy of the pancreas, liver, bowel,and kidney. To permit an anterior approach, patients lied supine on the CT scan table during the procedure. One or two 21-guage needles were placed just anterior to the diaphragmatic crus at or between the levels of the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries and 10-40ml of 99.9% alcohol was injected. Pain relief following the procedure was assessed and pain was graded on a visual analogue scale (VAS) from 0 to 10. There were no technical failures and no neurologic or hemorrhagic complications. Abdominal pain during alcohol injection occurred in all patients, and transient hypotension in three. One patient with recurrent cancer of the pancreatic head died of sepsis five days after the procedure;the cause of sepsis was difficult to determine, but there was thought to be a biliary source of infection. Two days after block, 13 of 15 procedures(86.7%) had produced at least partial pain relief;in 12 patients, relief was good. With CT guidance, more directed positioning of the needle is possible, allowing alcohol to be deposited in specific ganglion areas. CT-guided celiac plexus block using an anterior approach was an easy and effective way of reducing intractable upper abdominal pain due to terminal malignancies. CT guidance allowed precise needle placement and a safer procedure.

  16. Steroid-Induced Psychosis after EUS-Guided Celiac Plexus Blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jason J.

    2017-01-01

    A 46-year-old female with no previous personal or family psychiatric history underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided celiac plexus blockade (CPB) to treat pain related to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-associated chronic pancreatitis. She had excellent response to her first three CPBs using bupivacaine and triamcinolone. The patient’s subsequent CPBs were complicated by symptoms of racing thoughts, delusional thinking, and insomnia. She was diagnosed with acute psychosis secondary to triamcinolone. This is the first reported case of steroid-induced psychosis caused by EUS-guided CPB. Optimal treatment for steroid-induced psychiatric symptoms include dose reduction or discontinuation of steroids and administration of lithium, valproic acid, or atypical antipsychotics. PMID:28144616

  17. MR-guided Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Ablation: An Evaluation of Effect and Injection Spread Pattern in Cancer Patients with Celiac Tumor Infiltration

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    Akural, Etem [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Pain Clinic (Finland); Ojala, Risto O. [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Finland); Jaervimaeki, Voitto [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology (Finland); Kariniemi, Juho; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.blanco@oulu.fi [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Finland)

    2013-04-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, the initial accuracy, and the effects of the MR-guided neurolytic celiac plexus ablation as a method to treat cancer-induced chronic abdominal pain. Thirteen celiac plexus ablations were performed for 12 patients. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with optical navigation was used for procedural guidance. As an adjunct to the MR-guided needle positioning, the needle location was confirmed with saline injection and consequent MR imaging (STIR sequence). The spread of the ablative injection material (alcohol-lidocaine mix) was observed by repeating this sequence after the therapeutic injection. Pain scores from seven patients (eight ablations) were used to assess the therapy effect. MR guidance allowed adequate needle positioning and visualization of injection material in all cases. The rest pain scores significantly decreased from 4 (median) at baseline to 1 (median) at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Average and worst pain experienced during the past week were significantly lower at the 2-week time point compared with the baseline (p < 0.05). However, the intervention did not result in reduction of opioid use at 2 weeks.MR guidance is an accurate and safe method for celiac plexus ablation with positive therapeutic effect.

  18. Chronic abdominal pain secondary to mesentericpanniculitis treated successfully with endoscopicultrasonography-guided celiac plexus block: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a chronic illness that ischaracterized by fibrosing inflammation of the mesenteriesthat can lead to intractable abdominal pain. Paincontrol is a crucial component of the management plan.Most patients will improve with oral corticosteroidstreatment, however, some patients will require a trialof other immunosuppressive agents, and a minorityof patients will continue to have refractory disease.Endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus block is usedfrequently to control abdominal pain in patients withpancreatic pathology. To our knowledge there are nocase reports describing its use in mesenteric panniculitispatients with refractory abdominal pain.

  19. Paraplegia after intercostal neurolysis with phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gollapalli L

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lakshman Gollapalli, Rudramanaidu Muppuri Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: In patients with advanced stages of cancer, severe pain is commonly encountered and is very difficult to treat. It affects the quality of life of the patient and the families involved. Pain can be managed using analgesics and adjuvant therapy. However, studies have shown that at least 10%–15% of patients fail to control pain adequately and will experience severe pain. We discuss the case of a 66-year-old female with metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma of the left submandibular gland and developed paraplegia following intercostal neurolysis with phenol. After a successful diagnostic T6 to T12 intercostal nerve block, the patient was scheduled for an intercostal neurolytic block. We injected 2 mL of 10% aqueous phenol at each level on the left from the T6 to T12 ribs. One hour after the procedure, the patient developed bilateral lower extremity weakness with difficulty moving. A physical examination showed the absence of sensation to pinpricks and vibration from T10 to S5 and an absence of anal sphincter tone and sensation. Magnetic resonance images of the thoracic and lumbar spine showed leptomeningeal metastatic disease and myelitis. We postulate that the paraplegia could be from phenol diffusing along either the spinal nerves or the paravertebral venous plexus into the subarachnoid space. This case report points to the risks involved with phenol neurolysis close to the spine, and we propose alternative methods to minimize neurological complications. Keywords: intercostal neurolysis, pain, phenol, paraplegia 

  20. Endoscopic Sciatic Neurolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Joshua S; McConkey, Mark O; Brick, Matthew J

    2015-08-01

    Despite remaining a controversial diagnosis, piriformis syndrome continues to affect patients' quality of life with pain, sitting discomfort, and exercise intolerance. Open sciatic neurolysis has been noted by the senior author to often only bring temporary relief of the symptoms, with the recurrence presumably due to postoperative scar tissue. Minimally invasive techniques used to decompress the nerve have met with mixed results. This article describes a step-by-step surgical technique designed to maximize patient safety, as well as surgeon orientation, and achieve a thorough neurolysis. Preoperative findings suggestive of piriformis syndrome are described and include retro-trochanteric pain, sciatica-like leg pain, and paresthesias, as well as a positive response to computed tomography-guided injection of dilute ropivacaine hydrochloride and 40 mg of triamcinolone. The operation is performed with the patient in the lateral decubitus position through 2 portals 6 to 8 cm apart, allowing for good triangulation. Dissection is undertaken with a combination of radiofrequency and a laparoscopic peanut, with the assistance of a vascular sling to control the sciatic nerve. Encouraging results have been achieved, and with increasing interest in this procedure, a step-by-step technical description with an accompanying video may prove useful for other experienced hip arthroscopists. Pearls and pitfalls are discussed.

  1. Clinical Efficiency Analysis of Visceral Nerve Plexus Neurolysis through Post-curs of Diaphragm Approach in Pancreatic Cancer Pain Management%经膈脚后间隙穿刺损毁内脏神经治疗胰腺癌疼痛的临床疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于雪; 刘妍; 奚奇; 万成福; 董道松; 赵林; 宋涛

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨CT引导下经膈脚后间隙穿刺毁损内脏神经治疗胰腺癌疼痛患者的疗效及安全性。方法收集2013年10月至2014年12月于中国医科大学附属第一医院疼痛科就诊的58例胰腺癌痛患者,按病情基本接近结合患者及家属的意愿原则将患者分为2组,内脏神经毁损组(A组,32例)、非毁损组(B组,26例)。A组行膈脚后间隙(内脏神经)穿刺,注入无水乙醇15 mL;B组应用奥施康定配合吗啡即释片止痛治疗。分别在A组术前(T0)、B组为入组当日,术后1 d(T1)、15 d(T15)、30 d (T30)、60 d(T60)观察2组患者疼痛缓解、阿片类药物用量、生活质量、睡眠质量、不良反应及并发症。结果 A组患者无穿刺失败,术后疼痛视觉模拟评分(VAS)评分较T0明显降低(P<0.01)。2组VAS、生活质量评分(Karnofsky评分)、睡眠质量评分(PSQI评分)在T1、T15、T30、T60均有统计学差异(P<0.05),A组明显优于B组。B组阿片类药物应用量与A组比较明显增多(P<0.01)。A组术后出现不良反应为体位性低血压(6例)、肋间神经痛(2例)、腹泻(2例);B组的不良反应为恶心(20例)、便秘(11例)、头晕(8例)。结论 CT引导下经膈脚后间隙内脏神经毁损治疗胰腺癌疼痛疗效确切,安全性高,并发症少。%Objective To evaluate the clinical effect of computed tomography⁃guided visceral nerve plexus ethanol neurolysis through post⁃curs of diaphragm approach in the treatment of patients with pancreatic cancer pain using,and study the safety and life quality improvement of patients . Methods A total of 58 patients suffered from pancreatic cancer pain,who were treated in the department of pain medicine of the First Hospital of China Medical University from October 2013 to December 2014,were recruited for the study. The patients were divided into two groups according to the

  2. 以家猪作为超声内镜引导下腹腔神经节穿刺术模型的实验研究%Porcine model for endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus paracentesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凯旋; 金震东; 湛先保; 陈洁; 刘岩; 李兆申

    2010-01-01

    目的 通过在健康家养猪进行超声内镜引导下腹腔神经节穿刺操作训练探讨其可行性和应用价值.方法 选择6只健康家养猪用于研究.术前肌内注射盐酸氯胺酮10 mg/kg镇静,动物安静后给予静脉缓慢注射3%戊巴比妥钠0.8 ml/kg.麻醉稳定后进行穿刺操作并植入空粒子,术后行CT增强扫描以辅助判断穿刺是否成功.结果 试验动物均无死亡,除1只家猪穿刺后CT扫描发现粒子在胃腔内,隔日再行穿刺种植粒子成功,其余均一次性穿刺成功.行CT增强扫描发现粒子定位准确,均匀分布于腹主动脉腹腔干起始部的两侧.结论 家猪的解剖结构与人类相似,可作为初学者进行超声内镜引导下腹腔神经丛穿刺术培训的理想动物模型.%Objective To explore the feasibility of establishing porcine model for training of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided celiac plexus paracentesis.Methods A total of 6 healthy pigs were sedated with an intramuscular injection of Ketamin at 10 mg/kg,followed by intravenous injection of 3% pentobarbital at 0.8 ml/kg.EUS was then performed and empty seeds were implanted into celiac plexus.Enhanced CT scan was performed to confirm the location of the implanted seeds.Results No animal died after the procedure.All seeds were accurately distributed on both sides of the celiac trunk except in one pig the seed was found in stomach by CT scan and was re-implanted another day.Conclusion Pigs are similar to human in anatomic structure and they can be excellent models for beginner endoscopy physicians to acquire the skill of EUS guided celiac plexus paracentesis.

  3. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Celiac Plexus Neurolysis in Pancreatic Cancer: A Prospective Pilot Study of Safety Using 10 mL versus 20 mL Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia K. LeBlanc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The dose of alcohol used in EUS-CPN is not standardized. The objective was to compare the safety of 20 mL alcohol versus 10 mL alcohol during EUS-CPN for patients with pancreatic cancer-related pain. Methods. 20 patients were selected to receive 10 mL or 20 mL of alcohol during EUS-CPN. Followup was done at baseline, 24 hours, and weekly. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL was assessed at baseline, week 2, week 4, and every 4 weeks thereafter until pain returned. Results. There were no major complications in both groups. Minor self-limited adverse effects were seen in 6 (30% subjects and included lightheadedness in 1 (5%, transient diarrhea in 2 (10%, and transient nausea and vomiting in 3. Pain relief was similar in both groups: 80% in the 10 mL group and 100% in the 20 mL group (. The mean (± SD duration of pain relief in the 10 mL and 20 mL groups was and weeks, respectively. 30% of patients in each group had complete pain relief. Conclusions. EUS-CPN using 20 mL of alcohol is safe. Similar clinical outcomes were seen in both groups. Further investigations to confirm these findings are warranted.

  4. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Celiac Plexus Neurolysis in Pancreatic Cancer: A Prospective Pilot Study of Safety Using 10 mL versus 20 mL Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Julia K.; Rawl, Susan; Juan, Michelle; Johnson, Cynthia; Kroenke, Kurt; McHenry, Lee; Sherman, Stuart; McGreevy, Kathy; Al-Haddad, Mohammad; DeWitt, John

    2013-01-01

    Background. The dose of alcohol used in EUS-CPN is not standardized. The objective was to compare the safety of 20 mL alcohol versus 10 mL alcohol during EUS-CPN for patients with pancreatic cancer-related pain. Methods. 20 patients were selected to receive 10 mL or 20 mL of alcohol during EUS-CPN. Followup was done at baseline, 24 hours, and weekly. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was assessed at baseline, week 2, week 4, and every 4 weeks thereafter until pain returned. Results. There were no major complications in both groups. Minor self-limited adverse effects were seen in 6 (30%) subjects and included lightheadedness in 1 (5%), transient diarrhea in 2 (10%), and transient nausea and vomiting in 3. Pain relief was similar in both groups: 80% in the 10 mL group and 100% in the 20 mL group (P = 0.21). The mean (± SD) duration of pain relief in the 10 mL and 20 mL groups was 7.9 ± 10.8 and 8.4 ± 9.2 weeks, respectively. 30% of patients in each group had complete pain relief. Conclusions. EUS-CPN using 20 mL of alcohol is safe. Similar clinical outcomes were seen in both groups. Further investigations to confirm these findings are warranted. PMID:23365492

  5. 腹腔神经丛阻滞对肝部分切除术后肝细胞凋亡的影响%Effect of neurolytic celiac plexus block on hepatocellular apoptosis after partial hepatectomy in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李军; 车建翔; 魏晓红; 邱庆明; 林露; 白树荣; 潘璠; 孙小琴

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察腹腔神经丛阻滞( NCPB)对肝部分切除术( PH)大鼠残余肝细胞凋亡的影响。方法60只清洁雄性SD大鼠,构建大鼠70%PH模型,随机分为对照组和NCPB组。 NCPB组在术后12h开始给予双侧0.5%利多卡因经皮NCPB,1次/d,而对照组以0.9%生理盐水替换。分别于术后第1、3、7d测定残肝功能、血流量和凋亡相关蛋白Bcl-2相关X蛋白( BAX )和B细胞淋巴瘤/白血病-2( Bcl-2)的表达。结果 NCPB组大鼠的谷草转氨酶(AST)和谷丙转氨酶(ALT)在PH术后第1、3、7d均不同程度地低于对照组( P<0.01或P<0.05);对照组PH术后肝细胞出现明显的脂肪变性,且较多见小灶性肝细胞坏死和小片状肝细胞坏死,而NCPB组肝组织变性坏死明显减轻;与对照组相比,NCPB组大鼠的肝脏血流量在各个时间点均显著高于对照组(P<0.01); PH术后两组肝组织BAX均逐渐下降,但在相应时间点NCPB组显著低于对照组(P<0.05或P<0.01),而Bcl-2显著升高,但NCPB组却显著高于对照组(P<0.01),在第3d和第7d NCPB组的BAX/Bcl-2比值显著低于对照组( P<0.01)。结论 NCPB减轻大鼠PH术后早期肝功能损害,可能与抑制PH术后早期肝细胞凋亡有关。%Objective To investigate the effects of neurolytic celiac plexus block ( NCPB) on the apoptosis of residual liver cells after partial hepatectomy ( PH) in rats.Methods Sixty clean male SD rats were randomly di-vided into control group and NCPB group after 70%PH.NCPB group received pertaneous neurolytic celiac plexus block with 0.5%lidocaine(one time/day),and control group received the same procedures , but physiological saline was injected instead of 0.5%lidocaine.The residual liver function , liver blood flow and expressions of apoptosis-related protein BAX and Bcl-2 were determined at 1 day,3 days and 7 days after PH.Results The aspartate amin-otransferase(AST) and

  6. Piriformis Syndrome and Endoscopic Sciatic Neurolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Joshua S; Mei-Dan, Omer; Brick, Mathew J

    2016-03-01

    Piriformis syndrome is the compression or the irritation of the sciatic nerve by the adjacent piriformis muscle in the buttock leading to symptoms that include buttock pain, leg pain, and altered neurology in the sciatic nerve distribution. Epidemiological figures of the prevalence are unknown, but are estimated to be about 12.2% to 27%. There is no consensus on the diagnostic criteria. Advancement in magnetic resonance imaging allows us to observe unilateral hyperintensity and bowing of the sciatic nerve. The pathophysiology of the disease includes single blunt trauma, overuse causing piriformis hypertrophy, and long-term microtrauma causing scarring. Treatments include physiotherapy, steroid injections, and surgery. Minimally invasive techniques are emerging with the hope that with less postoperative scar tissue formation, there will be less recurrence of the disease. In this chapter, senior author describes his technique for endoscopic sciatic neurolysis.

  7. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hero Brokalaki

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a small intestine disease caused by the immunological response to gluten, a component of wheat, rye and barley. The worldwide prevalence of celiac disease ranges between 0.2% and 2.2 %. The clinical features of celiac disease includes diarrhea, steatorrhea, flatulence, abdominal pain and weight loss. The asymptomatic type of celiac disease is characterized by soft or normally shaped stool, weakness, lassitude and moderate weight loss. In children, celiac disease usually arises between the first and the third year of age, with diarrhea, flatulence and low weight. The malabsorption in small intestine causes many extaintestinal manifestations, such us anemia, bone abnormalities, hemorrhage and neuropathy. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histological examination of tissue samples taken by duodenum due gastroscopy and by the detection of certain antibodies in blood (anti-GL-IgG, anti-GL-IgA, ΕΜΑ-IgA και anti-tTg-IgA. The only therapeutic approach to celiac disease is a gluten-free diet and, if it is necessary, the administration of iron, folic acid, calcium and vitamins (K, B12. The prognosis of celiac disease is excellent, if there is an early diagnosis and the patient keeps for life a gluten free diet.

  8. 内镜超声引导下腹腔神经丛毁损术缓解胰腺癌所致癌性腹痛的效果%Effect of EUS-guided Celiac Plexus Ablation Relieving Cancerous Pain of Pancreatic Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋武; 何应科; 罗坤; 杨林

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨内镜超声引导下腹腔神经丛毁损术( EUS-CPN)缓解胰腺癌所致癌性腹痛的临床效果。方法选取2013年1月至2014年1月安岳县人民医院收治的100例胰腺癌伴明显癌痛患者为研究对象,按随机数字表法分为对照组和观察组,各50例。对照组患者采用CT-CPN治疗,观察组患者采用EUS-CPN治疗。评价两组患者胰腺癌痛控制的临床效果,记录两组患者手术前后不同时间点的疼痛视觉模拟评分( VAS)及疼痛缓解度,并对围术期间患者的不良反应发生情况进行统计。结果术后1 d、1周、1个月、2个月,两组患者的VAS评分均呈下降趋势( P<0.05),且观察组患者术后各时间点的VAS评分均低于对照组,两组间、时点间、组间·时点间交互作用比较差异有统计学意义( P <0.05)。观察组术后1 d、1周、1个月、2个月的疼痛缓解率分别为54.0%(27/50)、76.0%(38/50)、100.0%(50/50)、100.0%(50/50),均高于对照组[34.0%(17/50)、52.0%(26/50)、68.0%(34/50)、76.0%(38/50)],差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。随访2个月后,观察组患者停用镇痛药物的比例高于对照组[72.0%(36/50)比24.0(12/50)],而总并发症发生率低于对照组[18.0%(9/50)比38.0%(19/50)],差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论 EUS-CPN对晚期胰腺癌所致癌性腹痛的疗效确切,可显著缓解癌痛,提高患者的生活质量,虽然术后易出现血压下降、腹泻等并发症,但经积极处理后均可很快恢复,可作为缓解胰腺癌痛较为安全、有效的方法。%Objective To investigate effect of the endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis ( EUS-CPN) for clinical remission of the pancreatic cancerous abdominal pain.Methods Total of 100 cases of pancreatic cancer with significant pain in Anyue People′s Hospital

  9. Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digestive problems called inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or lactose intolerance . And in some cases, a kid won't ... for Kids With Celiac Disease Inflammatory Bowel Disease Lactose Intolerance Are Your Bowels Moving? Indigestion Nut and Peanut ...

  10. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  11. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Celiac Disease Many kids have sensitivities to certain foods, ... protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, consuming ...

  12. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins...... osteoporosis, iron and vitamin deficiencies, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma....

  13. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy is characterized by intestinal mucosal damage and malabsorption from dietary intake of wheat, rye or barley. Symptoms may appear with introduction of cereal in the first 3 years of life. A second peak in symptoms occurs in adults during the third or forth decade and even as late as eight decade of life. The prevalence of this disease is approximately 1 in 250 adults. The disease is more prevalent in Ireland as high as 1 in 120 adults. The disorder occurs in Arab, Hispanics, Israeli Jews, Iranian and European but is rare in Chinese and African American. To have celiac disease the patient should have the celiac disease genetic markers as HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8. Patient with celiac disease may have 95 per cent for DQ 2 and the rest is by DQ 8. Someone may have the genetic marker and never develops the disease. In general 50 percent with markers may develop celiac disease. To develop the disease the gene needs to become activated. This may happen with a viral or bacterial infection, a surgery, delivery, accident, or psychological stress. After activation of gene cause the tight junction to opens with the release of Zonulin This results in passage of gluten through the tight junction and formation of multiple antibodies and autoimmune disease. This also allows entrance of other proteins and development of multiple food allergies. As a result is shortening, flattening of intestinal villi resulting in food, vitamins and minerals malabsorption.

  14. Sympathetic radiofrequency neurolysis for unilateral lumbar hyperhidrosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşik, Züleyha Soytürk; Orbey, Başak Ceyda; Aşik, Ibrahim

    2008-07-01

    Patients with hyperhidrosis suffer from physical, social and mental discomfort which often cannot be treated sufficiently using conservative measures. A new percutaneous approach to sympathectomy using radiofrequency denervation has seemed to offer longer duration of action and less incidence of post sympathetic neuralgia. This article reports the authors' experience with sympathetic RF neurolysis in a 35 year old male with right unilateral lumbar hyperhidrosis. Under scopy guided localization of the lumbar spine sympathetic blockade with local anesthetics to L2-5 vertebral levels were performed as a diagnostic block. Lesion effectiveness is monitored by bilateral feet skin temperature measurement. Clinical effects produced by the first sympathetic ganglion block were sustained for 1 week and then RF neurolysis of lumbar sympathetic ganglion was performed to the same levels for a longer effect. The procedure was accomplished within 30 minutes and the patient was discharged within 2 hours after the procedure. Hyperhidrosis was relieved after the procedure and there were no postsympathectomy neuralgia and sexual dysfunction. The patient obtained improvement of lumbar hyperhidrosis at his first month of follow- up and was satisfied with the outcome. In conclusion, RF neurolysis of lumbar sympathetic ganglions is a safe and effective palliative procedure with minimal invasiveness for relieving excessive sweat secretion in patients with localized hyperhidrosis.

  15. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina;

    2015-01-01

    the small intestinal mucosa and absorption. Adherence to a GFD usually requires dietary advice from a clinical dietician. The monitoring of antibody levels and malabsorption markers is crucial during follow-up and allows for early treatment of disease complications. Important complications include......This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins...

  16. Celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Isabel

    2008-08-01

    Celiac disease is an immunologically mediated enteropathy of the small intestine, characterized by lifelong intolerance to the gliadin and related prolamines from wheat and other cereals, that occurs in genetically predisposed individuals. Symptoms result from structural damage to the mucosa of the small intestine, which may cause malabsorption with positive autoantibodies in the sera. Normal mucosal architecture is restored after the use of a gluten-free diet and the normalization of the autoantibodies. Villous atrophy and high levels of autoantibodies reappear when gluten is reintroduced into the diet (gluten challenge).

  17. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%, widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.

  18. Obturator neurolysis using 65% alcohol for adductor muscle spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Ghai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is motor alteration characterized by muscle hypertonia and hyperreflexia. It is an important complication of spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy, and multiple sclerosis. If uncorrected, fibrosis and eventually bony deformity lock the joint into a fixed contracture. Chemical neurolysis using various agents is one of the therapeutic possibilities to alleviate spasticity. We are, hereby, reporting 3 patients in whom 65% alcohol was used as neurolytic agent for the treatment of hip adductor spasticity, and the effect lasted for a variable period.

  19. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina;

    2015-01-01

    , which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers......This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins...... the small intestinal mucosa and absorption. Adherence to a GFD usually requires dietary advice from a clinical dietician. The monitoring of antibody levels and malabsorption markers is crucial during follow-up and allows for early treatment of disease complications. Important complications include...

  20. Celiac Disease Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Celiac Disease Antibody Tests Share this page: Was this ... else I should know? How is it used? Celiac disease antibody tests are primarily used to help ...

  1. Celiac disease - sprue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gluten intolerance; Gluten-sensitive enteropathy; Gluten-free diet celiac disease ... The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown. The lining of the intestines have small areas called villi which project outward into the opening of ...

  2. Celiac disease - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002443.htm Celiac disease - nutritional considerations To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Celiac disease is an immune disorder passed down through families. ...

  3. Celiac Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2015 ... Contents What are some of the symptoms of celiac disease? Some people with celiac disease may not ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions celiac disease celiac disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Celiac disease is a condition in which the immune ...

  5. Celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luis Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder,induced by the intake of gluten proteins present in wheat, barley and rye. Contrary to common belief,this disorder is a protean systemic disease, rather than merely a pure digestive alteration. CD is closely associated with genes that code HLA-Ⅱ antigens, mainly of DQ2 and DQ8 classes. Previously, it was considered to be a rare childhood disorder, but is actually considered a frequent condition, present at any age, which may have multiple complications. Tissue transglutaminase-2(tTG), appears to be an important component of this disease, both, in its pathogenesis and diagnosis. Active CD is characterized by intestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms, villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, and strongly positive tTG auto-antibodies. The duodenal biopsy is considered to be the "gold standard" for diagnosis, but its practice has significant limitations in its interpretation, especially in adults. Occasionally, it results in a false-negative because of patchy mucosal changes and the presence of mucosal villous atrophy is often more severe in the proximal jejunum, usually not reached by endoscopic biopsies. CD is associated with increased rates of several diseases, such as iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, dermatitis herpetiformis,several neurologic and endocrine diseases, persistent chronic hypertransami-nasemia of unknown origin,various types of cancer and other autoimmune disorders.Treatment of CD dictates a strict, life-long gluten-free diet, which results in remission for most individuals,although its effect on some associated extraintestinal manifestations remains to be established.

  6. Celiac Artery Compression Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Muqeetadnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac artery compression syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain and weight loss. It is the result of external compression of celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament. We present a case of celiac artery compression syndrome in a 57-year-old male with severe postprandial abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. The patient eventually responded well to surgical division of the median arcuate ligament by laparoscopy.

  7. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) National Rehabilitation Information ... is a network of nerves that conducts signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to ...

  8. Traumatic plexus lesion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, R.T.M. van; Cohen, S.P.; Kleef, M. van; Mekhail, N.; Huygen, F.

    2011-01-01

    Pain, motor, and sensory deficits characterize patients with a traumatic lesion of the brachial plexus. Frequently, more severe injuries co-exist that require immediate surgical attention. Early rehabilitation and physical therapy are the cornerstones of treatment. Pharmacological management can be

  9. Celiac disease: clinical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Emel’yanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented clinical cases of patients with a diagnosis of gluten enteropathy in treatment in the department of gastroenterology Regional Clinical Hospital. The case is of interest to doctors of different specialties for the differential diagnosis of anemia and malabsorption syndrome, demonstrate both the classic version, and atypical forms of the disease course. Diagnosis of celiac disease is based on three key positions: clinical findings, histology and serological markers. The clinical picture of celiac disease is characterized by pronounced polymorphism, by going beyond the a gastroenterological pathology. For screening of gluten sensitive celiac typically used an antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Morphological research of the mucous membrane of the small intestine is the determining criterion in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The use of specific gluten-free diet leads to the positive dynamics of the disease and improve the quality of life of patients.

  10. Celiac Support Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... America and support CSA. Click here to start shopping! Celiac SUPPORT ASSOCIATION ® GLUTEN-FREE RESOURCE DIRECTORY These ... visit www.schwans.com and register for an online account. Orders must be placed online to be ...

  11. Study Links Celiac Disease, Anorexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164453.html Study Links Celiac Disease, Anorexia Chances of being diagnosed with eating ... April 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Young women with celiac disease may face a heightened risk of being ...

  12. Celiac disease - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojković Gradimir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Celiac disease (nontropical sprue, gluten-sensitive enteropathy, chronic intestinal malabsorption disorder is caused by gluten intolerance. This hereditary disorder is caused by sensitivity to gliadin. Because the body's own immune system causes the damage, celiac disease is considered to be an autoimmune disorder. However, it is also classified as a disease of malabsorption because nutrients are not absorbed. When people with celiac disease eat foods containing gluten, their immune system responds by damaging the small intestine. Specifically, tiny finger-like protrusions, called villi, on the lining of the small intestine are lost. The diagnosis is suspected on the basis of symptoms and signs, enhanced by laboratory and x-ray studies, and confirmed by biopsy revealing flat mucosa and subsequent clinical and histologic improvement on a gluten-free diet. Gluten must be excluded from diet. Supplementary vitamins, minerals and hematinics may be given depending on deficiency. Case report This is a case report of a 23-year old female patient with a mineralization defect (osteomalacia and secondary osteoporosis caused by long-time unrecognized celiac disease. The patient had many symptoms: short stature, steatorrhea, anemia, weight loss and chronic bone pain. Laboratory and x-ray studies and jejunal biopsy revealed a chronic intestinal malabsorption disorder caused by gluten intolerance. Gluten-free diet and supplementary vitamins, minerals and hematinics were included with apparent clinical remission. Discussion and Conclusion Some people with celiac disease may not have symptoms. The undamaged part of their small intestine is able to absorb enough nutrients to prevent symptoms. However, people without symptoms are still at risk for complications of celiac disease. Biopsy of the small intestine is the best way to diagnose celiac disease. Decreased bone density (osteoporosis and osteomalacia is a serious problem for celiacs. If calcium

  13. SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Mega Puspadisari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial cervical plexus block is one of the regional anesthesia in  neck were limited to thesuperficial fascia. Anesthesia is used to relieve pain caused either during or after the surgery iscompleted. This technique can be done by landmark or with ultrasound guiding. The midpointof posterior border of the Sternocleidomastoid was identified and the prosedure done on thatplace or on the level of cartilage cricoid.

  14. 腹腔神经丛毁损阻滞癌痛患者血浆胃动素及β-内啡肽的变化%Changes in Plasma Motilin and β-endorphin in Cancer Patients Treated with Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚鹏; 丁远远; 姜长林; 马佳明; 孟凌新

    2011-01-01

    目的:观察腹腔神经丛毁损性治疗前后镇痛效果、患者生存质量及血浆胃动素、β-内啡肽的变化.方法:选取2009年2月至2010年9月间中国医科大学附属盛京医院收治的62例顽固性上腹部癌性疼痛患者,其中男37例,女25例,平均年龄57.6岁.应用多种强阿片类镇痛药效果不佳或不良反应严重,疼痛评分大于5,生存质量低下,无严重凝血功能障碍,无腹腔内感染、脓毒血症及肠梗阻.在CT引导下行腹腔神经丛毁损性阻滞治疗.观察镇痛疗效、生存质量、不良反应及并发症,在治疗前及治疗后第1、3、7天检测血浆胃动素及β-内啡肽水平.结果:治疗后患者疼痛明显缓解,疼痛评分降低,治疗前11点数字疼痛评分(NRS)为7.6±1.2,治疗后第7天为1.1±0.3,疼痛缓解50%(中度)以上的患者占96.8%.治疗后不良反应轻微,均在3天内缓解,无严重并发症发生,生存质量评分在治疗后明显改善,QOL各指标评分均明显降低.血浆胃动素水平在治疗后1天开始明显升高,治疗后3天达高峰,治疗后7天略有回落,但仍明显高于治疗前水平;β-EP水平在治疗后1天未见明显变化,但在治疗后3天明显升高,治疗后7天高达(336.9±29.4)pg/mL.结论:腹腔神经丛毁损阻滞治疗可以明显缓解上腹部癌痛,提高胃动素及β-内啡肽水平,改善胃肠动力,提高患者的生存质量,疗效确切,安全易行.%Objective: To evaluate the effects of neurolytic celiac plexus block ( NCPB ) on pain relief, quality of life, and blood concentration of motilin and β-endorphin before and after treatment in patients with upper abdominal visceral cancer pain.Methods: Sixty-two patients with intractable upper abdominal visceral cancer pain were enrolled in the study ( 37 males and 25 females ).All cases, including those with pain managed by opioids and those who rejected opioid usage because of severe adverse effects, still suffered persistent moderate

  15. The effect of neurolytic celiac plexus block on liver inflammatory reaction after partial hepatectomy in rats%腹腔神经丛阻滞对大鼠肝部分切除术后残肝炎症反应的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹洪; 李军; 崔建峰; 闫洪涛; 陈涛; 石力; 汤礼军

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) on the inflammatory reaction of the remaining liver tissue and liver function after partial hepatectomy (PH) in rats.Methods Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats of SPF were constructed as a PH model with deligation and ablation operated on their left and middle lobes,respectively.Then,they were randomly divided into two groups:NCPB group and control group.Twelve hours after the surgery,0.5% lidocaine was given in the NCPB group once a day,while 0.9% saline was given in the control group.Determination of liver function,generation of the remaining liver,and deposition of IL-β,TNF-α of the pathological section was respectively made on Day 1,3 and 7 after the surgery.Results On Day 1,3 and 7 after surgery,both the aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and the alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in NCPB group were,to different degrees,lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05).Strikingly,total bilirubin in NCPB group was lower than that in control group (P < 0.01) on Day 7,while the level of semm albumin was higher than that in control group (P < 0.01).There was no statistically significant difference on the generation of the remaining livers between NCPB and control groups.On Day 3 and 7,the deposition of IL-β,TNF-α in the pathological sections of NCPB group were lower than those in control group.Conclusion NCPB can not only effectively reduce the damage of liver function caused by PH surgery,but also improve the inflammatory reaction of the residual liver.%目的 观察腹腔神经丛阻滞(NCPB)对大鼠肝部分切除术(PH)后残存肝组织炎症反应及肝功能的影响.方法 30只SPF级雄性SD大鼠分别用肝左叶、中叶根部结扎切除构建经典大鼠PH模型.动物随机平均分为NCPB组和对照组.前者在术后12 h开始给予双侧0.5%利多卡因经皮NCPB,对照组则以0.9%生理盐水替换,1次/d.术后第1、3、7天行NCPB后30 min取材,

  16. Celiac ganglia block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Akhan, Okan [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: oakhan@hacettepe.edu.tr

    2005-09-01

    Pain occurs frequently in patients with advanced cancers. Tumors originating from upper abdominal viscera such as pancreas, stomach, duodenum, proximal small bowel, liver and biliary tract and from compressing enlarged lymph nodes can cause severe abdominal pain, which do not respond satisfactorily to medical treatment or radiotherapy. Percutaneous celiac ganglia block (CGB) can be performed with high success and low complication rates under imaging guidance to obtain pain relief in patients with upper abdominal malignancies. A significant relationship between pain relief and degree of tumoral celiac ganglia invasion according to CT features was described in the literature. Performing the procedure in the early grades of celiac ganglia invasion on CT can increase the effectiveness of the CGB, which is contrary to World Health Organization criteria stating that CGB must be performed in patients with advanced stage cancer. CGB may also be effectively performed in patients with chronic pancreatitis for pain palliation.

  17. Management of Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of early neurosurgical treatment of 58 infants with various types of brachial plexus birth injury have been compared with non-surgical intervention in 91 patients followed by a multidisciplinary team at the Brachial Plexus Program, Miami Children’s Hospital, FL.

  18. A Surprising Culprit Behind Celiac Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_164503.html A Surprising Culprit Behind Celiac Disease? Study suggests harmless viruses may set stage ... typically harmless type of virus might sometimes trigger celiac disease, a new study suggests. Celiac disease is ...

  19. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This page is best accessed via your desktop. Celiac Disease Program Home > Centers + Services > Programs and Services > ... Nutrition Bone Health Program Growth and Nutrition Program Celiac Disease Program | Videos Contact the Celiac Disease Program ...

  20. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This page is best accessed via your desktop. Celiac Disease Program Home > Centers + Services > Programs and Services > ... Nutrition Bone Health Program Growth and Nutrition Program Celiac Disease Program | Videos Contact the Celiac Disease Program ...

  1. Brachial artery perforator-based propeller flap coverage for prevention of readhesion after ulnar nerve neurolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Hirotake; Motomiya, Makoto; Sakurai, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Dai; Funakoshi, Tadanao; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2015-02-01

    It is difficult for most plastic and orthopaedic surgeons to treat nerve dysfunction related to neural adhesion because the pathophysiology and suitable treatment have not been clarified. In the current report, we describe our experience of surgical treatment for adhesive ulnar neuropathy. A 58-year-old male complained of pain radiating to the ulnar nerve-innervated area during elbow and wrist motion caused by adhesive ulnar neuropathy after complex open trauma of the elbow joint. The patient obtained a good clinical outcome by surgical neurolysis of the ulnar nerve combined with a brachial artery perforator-based propeller flap to cover the soft tissue defect after resection of the scar tissue and to prevent readhesion of the ulnar nerve. This flap may be a useful option for ulnar nerve coverage after neurolysis without microvascular anastomosis in specific cases.

  2. Genetics of celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricano-Ponce, Isis; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier

    2015-01-01

    New insights into the underlying molecular pathophysiology of celiac disease (CeD) over the last few years have been guided by major advances in the fields of genetics and genomics. The development and use of the Immunochip genotyping platform paved the way for the discovery of 39 non-HLA loci assoc

  3. Interfascicular neurolysis in chronic ulnar nerve lesions at the elbow: an electrophysiological study.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Interfascicular neurolysis of the ulnar nerve at the elbow was performed in nine consecutive patients with moderate to severe ulnar palsy. Sensory and motor conduction velocities were determined before and up to six times after the operation, and a follow-up period of three years or more in all but two patients. None of the patients recovered after the operation, and all developed severe and sometimes persistent paraesthesiae. Electrophysiologically there was no evidence of improvement immedi...

  4. Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Series Urinary Tract Imaging Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals) Serologic tests for celiac disease provide an effective first step in identifying ...

  5. Malignancy in adult celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2009-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested that the incidence of some neoplastic disorders, particularly malignantlymphoma and small intestinal adenocarcinoma, are increased in celiac disease. Earlier studies from the United Kingdom have also suggested a link between celiac disease and esophageal carcinoma, although this has not been confirmed in North America. The risk of other gastrointestinal cancers seems to be limited. Gastric cancer does not appear to be detected more frequently, although direct endoscopic visualization of the upper gastrointestinal tract is now very common in patients with celiac disease. Colon cancer also appears to be limited in celiac disease, even in patients first diagnosed with celiac disease late in life. This has led to the hypothesis that untreated celiac disease may be protective, possibly owing to impaired absorption of fat or fat-soluble agents, including hydrocarbons and putative co-carcinogens implicated in the pathogenesis of colon cancer, which may be poorly absorbed and rapidly excreted.

  6. CT-guided percutaneous neurolysis methods. State of the art and first results; CT-gesteuerte Neurolysen. Stand der Technik und aktuelle Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, B. [Abt. Radiodiagnostik, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Richter, G.M. [Abt. Radiodiagnostik, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Roeren, T. [Abt. Radiodiagnostik, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Kauffmann, G.W. [Abt. Radiodiagnostik, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    We used 21G or 22G fine needles. All CT-guided percutaneous neurolysis methods require a proper blood coagulation. Most common CT scanners are suitable for neurolysis if there is enough room for maintaining sterile conditions. All neurolysis methods involve sterile puncture of the ganglia under local anesthesia, a test block with anesthetic and contrast agent to assess the clinical effect and the definitive block with a mixture of 96% ethanol and local anesthetic. This allows us to correct the position of the needle if we see improper distribution of the test block or unwanted side effects. Though inflammatory complications of the peritoneum due to puncture are rarely seen, we prefer the dorsal approach whenever possible. Results: Seven of 20 legs showed at least transient clinical improvement after CT-guided lumbar sympathectomies; 13 legs had to be amputated. Results of the methods in the literature differ. For lumbar sympathectomy, improved perfusion is reported in 39-89%, depending on the pre-selection of the patient group. Discussion: It was recently proved that sympathectomy not only improves perfusion of the skin but also of the muscle. The hypothesis of a steal effect after sympathectomy towards skin perfusion was disproved. Modern aggressive surgical and interventional treatment often leaves patients to sympathectomy whose reservers of collateralization are nearly exhausted. We presume this is the reason for the different results we found in our patient group. For thoracic sympathectomy the clinical treatment depends very much on the indications. Whereas palmar hyperhidrosis offers nearly 100% success, only 60-70% of patients with disturbance of perfusion have benefited. Results in celiac ganglia block also differ. Patients with carcinoma of the pancreas and other organs of the upper abdomen benefit in 80-100% of all cases, patients with chronic pancreatitis in 60-80%. (orig./VHE) [Deutsch] Thorakale und lumbale Sympathikolyse sowie die Zoeliakusblockade

  7. Celiac disease: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkowski, Timothy D; Viera, Anthony J

    2014-01-15

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. It is triggered by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Gluten is a storage protein in wheat, rye, and barley, which are staples in many American diets. Celiac disease is characterized by chronic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa, which leads to atrophy of the small intestinal villi and subsequent malabsorption. The condition may develop at any age. Intestinal manifestations include diarrhea and weight loss. Common extraintestinal manifestations include iron deficiency anemia, decreased bone mineral density, and neuropathy. Most cases of celiac disease are diagnosed in persons with extraintestinal manifestations. The presence of dermatitis herpetiformis is pathognomonic for celiac disease. Diagnosis is supported by a positive tissue transglutaminase serologic test but, in general, should be confirmed by a small bowel biopsy showing the characteristic histology associated with celiac disease. The presence of human leukocyte antigen alleles DQ2, DQ8, or both is essential for the development of celiac disease, and can be a useful genetic test in select instances. Treatment of celiac disease is a gluten-free diet. Dietary education should focus on identifying hidden sources of gluten, planning balanced meals, reading labels, food shopping, dining out, and dining during travel. About 5% of patients with celiac disease are refractory to a gluten-free diet. These patients should be referred to a gastroenterologist for reconsideration of the diagnosis or for aggressive treatment of refractory celiac disease, which may involve corticosteroids and immunomodulators.

  8. Hepatic manifestations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hugh James FreemanDepartment of Medicine (Gastroenterology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaAbstract: Different hepatic and biliary tract disorders may occur with celiac disease. Some have been hypothesized to share genetic or immunopathogenetic factors, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune hepatitis. Other hepatic changes in celiac disease may occur with malnutrition resulting from impaired nutrient absorption, including hepatic steatosis. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T-cell lymphoma.Keywords: celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, fatty liver, gluten-free diet

  9. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmanová, Iva; Sánchez, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity has recently been recognized by the scientific community as a part of gluten-related disorders, and is defined as a condition with gastrointestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms triggered by gluten ingestion in the absence of celiac disease and wheat allergy. Currently, there is no specific serological marker and non-celiac gluten sensitivity remains a diagnosis of exclusion: testing for celiac disease and wheat allergy must be negative, symptoms must improve with a gluten-free diet, and diagnosis must be confirmed by the gluten challenge. In this article, we discuss current knowledge of pathophysiology, clinical and epidemilogical spectrum, diagnosis, and treatment of NCGS.

  10. MRI of the brachial plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, H.W. van [Dept. of Radiology, St. Antonius Ziekenhuis, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2001-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of first choice for evaluating the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. This review discusses the used imaging techniques, the normal anatomy, and a variety of pathologies that can involve the brachial plexus. The pathology includes primary and secondary tumors (the most frequent secondary tumors being superior sulcus tumor and metastatic breast carcinoma), radiation plexopathy, trauma, thoracic outlet syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). (orig.)

  11. Non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husby, Steffen; Murray, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) has been introduced recently as a potentially common disease on the basis of studies of patients with claimed reactivity to gluten but without the characteristics of celiac disease (CD). CD is characterized by antibody reactivity toward the autoantigen...

  12. CT-guided plexus and splanchnic nerve neurolytic block. Experience in 150 cases and techniques optimization; Il blocco neurolitico del plesso celiaco e dei nervi splancnici con tomografia computerizzata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, V.; Frigerio, A.; Menna, S.; Di Virgilio, M.R. [Ospedale San Giovanni, Turin (Italy). Serv. di Radiologia; Debernardi, F.; Musso, L. [Ospedale San Giovanni, Turin (Italy). Serv. di Anestesia, Rianimazione e Terapia Antalgica

    1999-09-01

    The paper reports the personal experience in computerized tomography guided celiac plexus and splanchnic nerve neurolytic block blocks. [Italian] Scopo del lavoro e' illustrare l'esperienza personale nell'uso della tomografia computerizzata nel trattamento del dolore da neoplasie addominali superiori, rivoluzionando le tecniche di esecuzione, aumentandone la precisione e riducendone notevolmente il rischio di complicanze.

  13. Axillary artery injury combined with delayed brachial plexus palsy due to compressive hematoma in a young patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajima Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Axillary artery injury in the shoulder region following blunt trauma without association with either shoulder dislocation or fracture of the humeral neck has been previously reported. Axillary artery injury might also be accompanied with brachial plexus injury. However, delayed onset of brachial plexus palsy caused by a compressive hematoma associated with axillary injury after blunt trauma in the shoulder region has been rarely reported. In previous reports, this condition only occurred in old patients with sclerotic vessels. We present a case of a young patient who suffered axillary artery injury associated with brachial plexus palsy that occurred tardily due to compressive hematoma after blunt trauma in the shoulder region without association of either shoulder dislocation or humeral neck fracture. Case presentation A 16-year-old male injured his right shoulder in a motorbike accident. On initial physical evaluation, the pulses on the radial and ulnar arteries in the affected arm were palpable. Paralysis developed later from 2 days after the injury. Functions in the right arm became significantly impaired. Angiography showed complete occlusion of the axillary artery. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass measuring 4 × 5 cm that was suspected to be a hematoma compressing the brachial plexus in a space between the subscapular muscle and the pectoralis minor muscle. Surgery was performed on the third day after injury. In intraoperative observations, the axillary artery was occluded with thrombus along 5 cm; a subscapular artery was ruptured; the brachial plexus was compressed by the hematoma. After evacuation of the hematoma, neurolysis of the brachial plexus, and revascularization of the axillary artery, the patient had an excellent functional recovery of the affected upper limb, postoperatively. Conclusion Surgeons should be aware that axillary artery injuries may even occur in young people after severe blunt

  14. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, P; Jenssen, C; Hocke, M;

    2015-01-01

    The fifth section of the Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS) of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) assesses the evidence for all the categories of endoscopic ultrasound-guided treatment reported to date. Celiac plexus neurolysis and bl...

  15. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Conditions What Is Celiac Disease? Search Symptoms and Systems Symptoms Diagnosis Diagnosis Of Celiac Disease - Sensitivity/Specific ... Now What Is Celiac Disease? Search Symptoms and Systems Symptoms Diagnosis Diagnosis Of Celiac Disease - Sensitivity/Specific ...

  16. What is Celiac Disease? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease? Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of Contents ... people choose the right foods. How common is celiac disease? Celiac disease affects people in all parts ...

  17. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RD Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist. A 2010 Peer Review Resesarch Grant from the Celiac Support Association made ... Celiac Disease International Symposium Celiac Disease 2013 Peer Review Research Application History of Gluten Induced Diseases Celiac ...

  18. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H R

    2015-10-05

    Celiac disease is a multisystem immune based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The prevalence of celiac disease has risen in recent decades and is currently about 1% in most Western populations. The reason for this rise is unknown, although environmental factors related to the hygiene hypothesis are suspected. The pathophysiology of celiac disease involves both the innate and adaptive immune response to dietary gluten. Clinical features are diverse and include gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic bone disease, infertility, and many other manifestations. Although a gluten-free diet is effective in most patients, this diet can be burdensome and can limit quality of life; consequently, non-dietary therapies are at various stages of development. This review also covers non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The pathophysiology of this clinical phenotype is poorly understood, but it is a cause of increasing interest in gluten-free diets in the general population.

  19. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  20. Refractory Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Khatami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Refractory celiac disease (RCD is when malabsorption symptoms and villous atrophy persist despite strict adherence to a gluten free diet (GFD for more than 12 months and other causes of villous atrophy have been ruled out.  RCD is considered a rare disease and almost exclusively occurs in adults. Persistent diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss are the most common symptoms in RCD. Also, anemia, fatigue, malaise, thromboembolic events and coexisting autoimmune disorders are frequent. Diagnosis of RCD is based on other causes of unresponsiveness to the GFD, particularly collagenous sprue, ulcerative jejunitis, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Many disorders such as autoimmune enteropathy, tropical sprue, common variable immunodeficiency, and intolerance to non-gluten dietary proteins may have similar histological findings but not necessarily identical with CD and therefore should be excluded. Repeat intestinal biopsy may help to differentiate causes of non-responsive CD associated with ongoing villous atrophy (e.g., gluten contamination, small-bowel bacterial overgrowth, RCD. There are 2 subtypes of RCD according to absence (type I or presence (type II of an abnormal intraepithelial lymphocyte population. RCD type 1 usually becomes better with a combination of aggressive nutritional support, adherence to GFD, and pharmacologic therapies such as prednisone, budesonide and azathioprine. For RCD type 2, more aggressive therapeutic approach is needed since clinical response to therapies is less certain and may evolve into aggressive enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma and the prognosis is poor.   Key words: Celiac Disease, Refractory.  

  1. Ultrasound-guided alcohol neurolysis and radiofrequency ablation of painful stump neuroma: effective treatments for post-amputation pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Xu, Yongming; Zhou, Jin; Pu, Shaofeng; Lv, Yingying; Chen, Yueping; Du, Dongping

    2017-01-01

    Background Post-amputation pain (PAP) is highly prevalent after limb amputation, and stump neuromas play a key role in the generation of the pain. Presently, PAP refractory to medical management is frequently treated with minimally invasive procedures guided by ultrasound, such as alcohol neurolysis and radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Objective To record the immediate and long-term efficacy of alcohol neurolysis and RFA. We first used alcohol neurolysis and then, when necessary, we performed RFA on PAP patients. Study design Prospective case series. Setting Pain management center. Methods Thirteen subjects were treated with ultrasound-guided procedures. Results All patients were treated with neurolysis using alcohol solutions guided by ultrasound. Seven (54%) of 13 subjects achieved pain relief after 1–3 alcohol injection treatments. The remaining 6 subjects obtained pain relief after receiving 2 administrations of ultrasound-guided RFA. After a 6-month follow-up evaluation period, pain quantities were also assessed. Both stump pain (including intermittent sharp pain and continuous burning pain) and phantom pain were relieved. The frequency of intermittent sharp pain was decreased, and no complications were noted during the observation. Conclusion The use of ultrasound guidance for alcohol injection and RFA of painful stump neuromas is a simple, radiation-free, safe, and effective procedure that provides sustained pain relief in PAP patients. In this case series, RFA was found to be an effective alternative to alcohol injection. PMID:28223839

  2. Atypical presentations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasa Adriana Luminita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated the association of celiac disease in 81 children with autoimmune disease and genetic syndromes over a two years periods (January 2014 to July 2016 in Pediatric Clinic in Constanta. Because the extraintestinal symptoms are an atypical presentation of celiac disease we determined in these children the presence of celiac disease antibodies: Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgA and IgA total serum level as a screening method followeds in selective cases by Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgG, anti-endomysial antibodies, deamidated gliadin antibodies IgA and IgG and intestinal biopsia. In our study 8 patients had been diagnosed with celiac disease with extraintestinal symptoms, of which 4 with type 1 diabetes, 1 patient with ataxia, 2 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and 1 patient with Down syndrome that associate also autoimmune thyroiditis, alopecia areata, enamel hypoplasia.

  3. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diagnosis If antibody tests and symptoms suggest celiac disease, the physician needs to establish the diagnosis by obtaining tiny pieces of tissue from the upper small intestine to check for damage ...

  4. Celiac Disease Facts and Figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person who has celiac disease consumes gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley, the individual’s immune system responds by attacking the small intestine and inhibiting the absorption of important nutrients into the body. Undiagnosed and ...

  5. Recent advances in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman; Angeli Chopra; Michael Tom Clandinin; Alan BR Thomson

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease now affects about one person in a hundred in Europe and North America. In this review, we consider a number of important and exciting recent developments, such as clinical associations, HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 predispositions, the concept of potential celiac disease, the use of new imaging/endoscopy techniques, and the development of refractory disease. This review will be of use to all internists, pediatricians and gastroenterologists.

  6. Endocrine manifestations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Philip

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease can have extra gastrointestinal tract (GIT presentations, most of which are endocrine. The aim of this study was to present patients diagnosed to have celiac disease from an endocrine department and to study the prevalence of endocrinopathies in celiac disease. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 patients from the endocrinology department (LLRM Medical College, Meerut between January 2011 and July 2012 and who were diagnosed to have celiac disease were included in the study. Results: Short stature was the commonest presentation (25%, other presentations included short stature and delayed puberty (20%, delayed puberty (11%, screening for celiac disease in type-1 DM patients (17%, rickets (6%, anemia not responding to oral therapy (6%, type-1 DM with recurrent hypoglycaemia (6%, and osteomalacia (3%. The endocrine manifestations include (after complete evaluation short stature (58%, delayed puberty (31%, elevated alkaline phospahatase (67%, low calcium (22%, X-rays suggestive of osteomalacia or rickets (8%, capopedal spasm (6%, and night blindness (6%. Anti-TPO antibody positivity was found in 53%, hypothyroidism in 28%, subclinical hypothyroidism in 17%, and type-1 DM in 25% of the patients. A total of 14% patients had no GI symptoms. Conclusion: Celiac disease is an endocrine disrupter as well as the great masquerader having varied presentations including short stature, delayed puberty, and rickets. Some patients who have celiac disease may not have any GI symptoms, making the diagnosis all the more difficult. Also, there is significant incidence of celiac disease with hypothyroidism and type-1 DM, making screening for it important in these diseases.

  7. Gut Microbiota and Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Giovanni; Di Biase, Anna Rita; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Ravaioli, Federico; Scaioli, Eleonora; Colecchia, Antonio; Festi, Davide

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence regarding celiac disease has increasingly shown the role of innate immunity in triggering the immune response by stimulating the adaptive immune response and by mucosal damage. The interaction between the gut microbiota and the mucosal wall is mediated by the same receptors which can activate innate immunity. Thus, changes in gut microbiota may lead to activation of this inflammatory pathway. This paper is a review of the current knowledge regarding the relationship between celiac disease and gut microbiota. In fact, patients with celiac disease have a reduction in beneficial species and an increase in those potentially pathogenic as compared to healthy subjects. This dysbiosis is reduced, but might still remain, after a gluten-free diet. Thus, gut microbiota could play a significant role in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, as described by studies which link dysbiosis with the inflammatory milieu in celiac patients. The use of probiotics seems to reduce the inflammatory response and restore a normal proportion of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. Additional evidence is needed in order to better understand the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, and the clinical impact and therapeutic use of probiotics in this setting.

  8. Diagnostic challenges in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Haghighat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   1-The most important challenge in diagnosis of celiac disease is not- performing the diagnostic tests in suspected persons. Because of multi-organ damage and multiple manifestations of disease, diagnosis of celiac disease may be delayed. It seems general physicians should be awared about uncommon presentations of disease and indications of celiac tests 2-The second most important challenge is in patients with suspected disease but negative serologic tests. In these cases evaluating of HLA can be useful. 3- The third challenge is in cases with positive serologic tests but negative histopathological findings. There may be false positive serologic response or consumption of gluten before testing. We recommend introduction of gluten for at least 3 mo and re- endoscopy and if diagnosis is equivocal HLA-typing  for DQ8 and  DQ2 should be done. 4-The forth challenge is about performing endoscopy. Based on guideline from ESPGHAN if there are typical clinical manifestations of celiac disease, Anti-TTG more than ten times UPN , positive Anti-EMA and HLA DQ2, performing endoscopy may not be necessary, but many physicians don’t agree with this idea. 5-In people who are genetically predisposed to celiac disease antibody levels may be fluctuating thus endoscopy with biopsy should be done in these patients. 6-In children lower than 2years, Anti- TTG and Anti –EMA have low sensitivity. we recommend Anti-TTG and Anti-DGP in these patients. 7-Resolution of symptoms after gluten free diet is not necessarily a feature of celiac disease. This condition may be seen in patients with IBS or non-celiac gluten sensitivity.  

  9. Diagnostic Challenges in Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Haghighat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available 1. The most important challenge in diagnosis of celiac disease is not-performing the diagnostic tests in suspected persons. Because of multi-organ damage and multiple manifestations of disease, diagnosis of celiac disease may be delayed. It seems general physicians should be aware about uncommon presentations of disease and indications of celiac tests. 2. The second most important challenge is in patients with suspected disease but negative serologic tests. In these cases evaluating of HLA can be useful. 3. The third challenge is in cases with positive serologic tests but negative histopathological findings. There may be false positive serologic response or consumption of gluten before testing. We recommend introduction of gluten for at least 3 mo and re- endoscopy and if diagnosis is equivocal HLA-typing for DQ8 and DQ2 should be done. 4. The forth challenge is about performing endoscopy. Based on guideline from ESPGHAN if there are typical clinical manifestations of celiac disease, Anti-TTG more than ten times UPN, positive Anti-EMA and HLA DQ2, performing endoscopy may not be necessary, but many physicians don’t agree with this idea. 5. In people who are genetically predisposed to celiac disease antibody levels may be fluctuating thus endoscopy with biopsy should be done in these patients. 6. In children lower than 2years, Anti- TTG and Anti –EMA have low sensitivity. we recommend Anti-TTG and Anti-DGP in these patients. 7. Resolution of symptoms after gluten free diet is not necessarily a feature of celiac disease. This condition may be seen in patients with IBS or non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

  10. Celiac disease : how complicated can it get?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjon, Jennifer May-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common inflammatory disorder of the small intestine which is triggered by ingested gluten proteins. Previous studies identified crucial steps in the development of celiac disease and based on this knowledge, we propose a threshold model for the development of celiac disease

  11. Celiac disease in first degree relatives of celiac children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Oliveira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT - The first degree relatives of celiac patients represent a high risk group for the development of this disorder, so their screening may be crucial in the prevention of long-term complications. OBJECTIVE - In order to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in a group of first degree relatives of children with proven gluten intolerance, we conducted a prospective study that consisted in the screening of celiac disease, using a capillary immunoassay rapid test that allows a qualitative detection of IgA antibody to human recombinant tissue transglutaminase (IgA-TTG. METHODS - When the screening test was positive subjects were advised to proceed with further investigation. The screening test was performed in 268 first degree relatives (143 mothers, 89 fathers, 36 siblings corresponding to 163 children with celiac disease. RESULTS - Screening test was positive in 12 relatives (4.5%, of which 1 refused to continue the investigation. In the remaining 11 relatives celiac disease was diagnosed in 7 cases (2.6%, 5 mothers, 2 fathers who had a median age of 39 years (27-56 years, mild gastrointestinal symptoms, high titre of IgA-TTG and histology abnormalities confirming the diagnosis. All these patients are currently on a gluten-free diet. CONCLUSION - The prevalence of celiac disease among first degree relatives (2.6% was 5 times higher than that in the general population. Although the recommendations for screening asymptomatic high risk groups, such as first degree relatives, are not unanimous the early diagnosis is crucial in preventing complications, including nutritional deficiency and cancer.

  12. Functional reconstruction following brachial plexus root avulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guixin Sun; Cunyi Fan; Yudong Gu

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To sum up the treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion and the progress in functional reconstruction and rehabilitation following brachial plexus root avulsion.DATA SOURCES: A search of Medline was performed to select functional reconstruction and rehabilitation following brachial plexus injury-related English articles published between January 1990 and July 2006, with key words of "brachial plexus injury, reconstruction and rehabilitation". Meanwhile, a computer-based search of CBM was carried out to select the similar Chinese articles published between January 1998 and July 2006,with key words of "brachial plexus injury, reconstruction and rehabilitation".STUDY SELECTION: The materials were checked primarily, and the literatures of functional reconstruction and rehabilitation of brachial plexus injury were selected and the full texts were retrieved.Inclusive criteria: ① Functional reconstruction following brachial plexus injury. ② Rehabilitation method of brachial plexus injury. Exclusive criteria: Reviews, repetitive study, and Meta analytical papers.DATA EXTRACTION: Forty-six literatures about functional reconstruction following brachial plexus injury were collected, and 36 of them met the inclusive criteria.DATA SYNTHESIS: Brachial plexus injury causes the complete or incomplete palsy of muscle of upper extremity. The treatment of brachial plexus is to displace not very important nerves to the distal end of very important nerve, called nerve transfer, which is an important method to treat brachial plexus injury.Postoperative rehabilitations consist of sensory training and motor functional training. It is very important to keep the initiativeness of exercise. Besides recovering peripheral nerve continuity by operation, combined treatment and accelerating neural regeneration, active motors of cerebral cortex is also the important factor to reconstruct peripheral nerve function.CONCLUSION: Consciously and actively strengthening functional

  13. Neurological disorders and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Giovanni; Bordo, Bianca M; Schalling, Renzo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; Di Bella, Camillo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) determines neurologic manifestations in 10% of all CD patients. We describe the most common clinical manifestations as cerebellar ataxia, gluten encephalopathy, multiple sclerosis, peripheral neuropathies, sensorineural hearing loss, epilepsy, headache, depression, cognitive deficiencies and other less described clinical conditions. Our aim is to perform, as more as possible, a review about the most recent update on the topics in international literature. It is important to consider clinical neurological manifestations in celiac patients and to research these conditions also in the follow-up because they may start also one year after the start of gluten free diet (GFD) as peripheral neuropathy. The association with autism is analysed and possible new association with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) are considered.

  14. Pericardial effusion in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Ashrafi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affected 1% of all population in United State. Classic manifestations of disease consist of early childhood diarrhea, malabsorption, steatorrhea and growth retardation but disease can affects adult at any age. In adult anemia is a more frequent finding. This patient was a 40-year-old lady with progressive fatigue and lower extremities pitting edema. Iron deficiency anemia and celiac disease were diagnosed on the basis of low serum ferritin, elevated serum level of IgA endomysial and tissue transglutaminase anti-bodies and histologic findings in small bowel biopsies. Pericardial effusion in her evaluation was detected incidentally. Asymptomatic pericardial effusion in this patient was only detectable with imaging. After starting of gluten free diet and iron supplement fatigue, peripheral edema and pericardial effusion on echocardiography decreased. It should be noted that asymptomatic pericardial effusion may be seen in adults with celiac disease.

  15. Spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Cimilli Ozturk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyspepsia with mild, stabbing epigastric discomfort without history of trauma is a very common symptom that emergency physicians see in their daily practice. Vascular emergencies, mostly the aortic dissection and aneurysm, are always described in the differential diagnosis with persistent symptoms. Isolated celiac artery dissection occurring spontaneously is a very rare diagnosis. The involvement of branch vessels is generally observed and patients show various clinical signs and symptoms according to the involved branch vessel. Here we are presenting a case with spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection, without any branch vessel involvement or visceral damage, detected by computed tomography scans taken on admission.

  16. Capsule endoscopy in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy is an attractive and patient- friendly tool that provides high quality images of the small bowel. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is the primary and most evaluated indication to capsule endoscopy; however, indications are expanding and a small number of preliminary reports have been presented concerning the role of video capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The purpose of this review is to update the current knowledge and to hypothesize on future perspectives of the use of video capsule endoscopy in patients with celiac disease.

  17. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos Real People Living with Celiac Disease - new Have you or someone you know been recently diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity? Do you need more information straight from a ...

  18. Celiac Disease Changes Everything | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Celiac Disease Changes Everything Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table ... your thoughts when you were told you had celiac disease? I was actually thrilled when I was ...

  19. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Symptoms Diagnosis Diagnosis Of Celiac Disease - Sensitivity/Specific Treatment CSA Medications Position Olmesartan Frequently Asked Questions Gluten- ... Sensitivity and Definitions Dermatitis Herpetiformis Defined Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Celiac Disease Research Celiac DDW 2015 Development of ...

  20. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Login No Account? Register Now! Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos Real People Living with Celiac ... know been recently diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity? Do you need more information straight from ...

  1. MR imaging of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posniak, H V; Olson, M C; Dudiak, C M; Wisniewski, R; O'Malley, C

    1993-08-01

    The brachial plexus is difficult to evaluate with conventional radiologic techniques, including CT. However, it is well shown by MR imaging, which has direct multiplanar imaging capability and superior soft-tissue resolution [1-4]. We present our technique for evaluating the brachial plexus, discuss the anatomy, and illustrate normal and abnormal findings.

  2. Cubital compressive neuropathy in the elbow: in situ neurolysis versus anterior transposition – comparative study,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Sousa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To compare the results from two of the most commonly used surgical techniques: in situ decompression and subcutaneous transposition. The processes of patients treated surgically in a public university hospital between January 2004 and December 2011 were reviewed. Cases of proximal compression of the nerve, angular deformity of the elbow and systemic diseases associated with non-compressive neuropathy were excluded.Methods:Ninety-seven cases were included (96 patients. According to the modified McGowan score, 14.4% of the patients presented grade Ia, 27.8% grade II, 26.8% grade IIb and 30.9% grade III. In situ neurolysis of the cubital was performed in 64 cases and subcutaneous anterior transposition in 33.Results:According to the modified Wilson and Knout score, the results were excellent in 49.5%, good in 18.6%, only satisfactory in 17.5% and poor in 14.4%. In comparing the two techniques, we observed similar numbers of excellent and good results. Grades IIb and III were associated with more results that were less satisfactory or poor, independent of the surgical technique.Conclusion:Both techniques were shown to be efficient and safe for treating cubital tunnel syndrome.

  3. Dysbiosis a risk factor for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girbovan, Anamaria; Sur, Genel; Samasca, Gabriel; Lupan, Iulia

    2017-04-01

    Celiac disease remains one of the most challenging pathologies of the small intestine. It involves multiple pathogenic pathways and there are no disease-changing pharmacological agents available against it yet. The term microbiota refers to the community of microorganisms that inhabit a particular region of the body. Normal gut microbiota has a vital role in maintaining the intestinal homeostasis and promoting health. Celiac disease is associated with microbiota alteration, especially with an increase in the number of Gram-negative bacteria and a decrease in the number of Gram-positive bacteria. There is a strong relationship between intestinal dysbiosis and celiac disease, and recent studies are aimed at determining whether the celiac disease is a risk factor for dysbiosis or dysbiosis is for celiac disease. Therefore, the aim of this review was to assess the latest findings regarding the gut microbiota and its impact on the celiac disease, including therapeutic aspects.

  4. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic disorders in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2006-01-01

    A variety of hepatic and biliary tract disorders may complicate the clinical course of celiac disease. Some of these have been hypothesized to share common genetic factors or have a common immunopathogenesis, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune forms of hepatitis or cholangitis. Other hepatic changes in celiac disease may be associated with malnutrition resulting from impaired nutrient absorption,including hepatic steatosis. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, suchas hepatic T-cell lymphoma. Finally, pancreatic exocrine function may be impaired in celiac disease and represent a cause of treatment failure.

  5. Diagnosis and Updates in Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannahan, Sarah; Leffler, Daniel A

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder induced by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. It can result in intraintestinal and extraintestinal manifestations of disease including diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, osteoporosis, or lymphoma. Diagnosis of celiac disease is made through initial serologic testing and then confirmed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsies. Generally celiac disease is a benign disorder with a good prognosis in those who adhere to a gluten-free diet. However, in refractory disease, complications may develop that warrant additional testing with more advanced radiologic and endoscopic methods. This article reviews the current strategy to diagnose celiac disease and the newer modalities to assess for associated complications.

  6. Celiac disease, rare symptoms, autoimmune patology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Volta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 42-years-old woman with constipation, anemia and recurrent itch. After several investigations, celiac disease was diagnosed and a treatment with a gluten-free diet was applied with beneficial effects. Recognizing celiac disease can be difficult because some of its symptoms are similar to those of other diseases. In fact, sometimes it is confused with irritable bowel syndrome or iron-deficiency anemia or intestinal infections: as a result, celiac disease is commonly underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. This case report is described to address the physician to a correct diagnosis of celiac disease.

  7. [Celiac disease and "gluten sensitivity"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronconi, G M; Parma, B; Barera, G

    2010-01-01

    It is known that celiac disease is characterized by a huge variety of clinical forms ranging from classical ones to silent forms, potential ones and to an increased number of cases of gluten-sensitivity. The latter is an abnormal non-allergic sensibility to gluten. Clinical manifestations can be very different without a severe intestinal damage (Marsh/Oberhuber 0-I) and this condition seems to benefit from a gluten free diet. Cases of gluten-sensitivity appear very interesting in the search of histological markers with elevated specificity, which are able to identify slight and early gluten dependent enteropathy, especially in at risk patients for celiac disease even before classical autoantibodies appear: for instance, this is the case of intraepithelial lymphocytes T-cell receptor gamma delta and mucosal deposits of class IgA anti transglutaminase antibodies. Other studies are investigating transglutaminase isoenzimes (different from tissue one), that can be identified in patients with gluten dependent symptoms without classical autoantibodies. Forms of gluten allergy have a different pathogenesis from celiac disease and are represented by "backer's asthma" or by classical allergy to wheat proteins. Clinical manifestations can vary from anaphylactic reactions to dermatological, respiratory and intestinal symptoms. Also in these cases the therapeutic approach is based on gluten free diet.

  8. Coexistence of Celiac Disease and Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simila, Seppo; Kokkonen, Jourma

    1990-01-01

    Three Finnish patients with Down syndrome and celiac disease are described. The incidence of celiac disease among patients with Down syndrome was calculated to be 20 times greater than in children without Down syndrome, indicating that it should be kept in mind when patients suffer from recurrent diarrhea and/or delayed puberty. (Author/JDD)

  9. Neurinomas of the brachial plexus: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, A; Gallinaro, L S; Bertagni, A; Montesano, G; Prece, V; Illuminati, G

    1999-01-01

    Neurinomas, also referred to as neurilemmomas and schwannomas, are rare benign tumours of the peripheral nerves, a low proportion of which arise from the brachial plexus. Authors report a case of an ancient schwannoma arising from the brachial plexus. The tumour, usually asymptomatic, may cause sensory radicular symptoms, or rarely motor deficits in the involved arm. Enucleation of the tumour from the nerve without damage to any of the fascicles is the correct treatment.

  10. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a permanent challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Otto Heise

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP has an incidence of 1.5 cases per 1000 live births and it has not declined despite recent advances in obstetrics. Most patients will recover spontaneously, but some will remain severely handicapped. Rehabilitation is important in most cases and brachial plexus surgery can improve the functional outcome of selected patients. This review highlights the current management of infants with NBPP, including conservative and operative approaches.

  11. Symptoms and biomarkers associated with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kårhus, Line L; Thuesen, Betina H; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify possible early predictors (symptoms and biomarkers) of celiac disease, compare symptoms before and after screening, and evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of serologic screening for celiac disease in an adult Danish population. METHODS: This cross-sectional population......-based study was based on the 5-year follow-up of the Health2006 cohort, where 2297 individuals were screened for celiac disease; 56 were antibody positive and thus invited to clinical evaluation. Eight were diagnosed with biopsy-verified celiac disease. A follow-up questionnaire was sent to antibody......-positive individuals 19 months after the clinical evaluation to obtain information on their symptoms and their experience with participation in the screening. RESULTS: Before screening, participants subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease did not differ from the rest of the population with respect to symptoms...

  12. Birth outcomes of women with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Bente; Fonager, Kirsten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine birthweight, low birthweight (celiac disease in relation to their first hospitalization for the disease. METHODS: This was a historical cohort study based on The Danish Medical Birth Registry...... data of celiac women discharged from Danish hospitals from 1977-1992. The study included 211 newborns to 127 mothers with celiac disease, and 1260 control deliveries. RESULTS: Before celiac women were first hospitalized the mean birthweight of their newborns was 238 g (95% confidence interval [95% CI......] = 150, 325 g) lower than that of the control women, after adjustment for potential confounders. After the first hospitalization the mean birthweight for newborns of diseased women was higher than that of controls, by 67 g (95% CI = -88, 223 g) after adjustment for potential confounders. Before celiac...

  13. Hepatobiliary Disorders in Celiac Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal K. Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication reviews recent literature and summarizes hepatobiliary abnormalities that may complicate the clinical course of celiac disease. A wide spectrum of hepatobiliary diseases has been described, including asymptomatic elevations of liver enzyme levels, nonspecific hepatitis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease. Moreover, in the majority of patients, liver enzyme levels will normalize on a gluten-free diet. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T-cell lymphoma. Because many celiac patients do not have overt gastrointestinal symptoms, a high index of suspicion is required. Simple methods of detecting celiac disease such as serum antibody tests help in the early identification of the disease, thus preventing serious complications of the disorder. The IgG DGP antibody test and IgA tTG antibody test used in combination are an excellent screening test for suspected cases of celiac disease.

  14. Quality of life and its domains in leprosy patients after neurolysis: a study using WHOQOL-BREF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Felipe J J; Cunha, Antonio José Ledo A; Gosling, Artur Padão; Fontana, Ana Paula; Gomes, Maria Katia

    2013-06-01

    Surgical nerve decompression in leprosy is indicated to prevent or treat nerve damage, and to improve sensory motor function and quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to describe QoL of leprosy patients after surgical nerve decompression. Participants who underwent neurolysis in the last 5 years were recruited. The assessment consisted of collecting demographic and clinical information, QoL and its domain scores. Descriptive statistical analysis of demographic and clinical data was presented. Included 33 patients (43 +/- 11.0 years) who had neurolysis with a total of 61 nerves operated. The results of WHOQOL-bref showed that overall QoL mean was 11.2 (+/- 3.63) and domains scored as follow: physical (11.0 +/- 3.56), environment (11.47 +/- 2.11), psychological (13.29 +/- 2.79) and social relations (15.03 +/- 3.66). Measures of QoL should become part of the standard battery of tools used to assess health and well-being and it may contribute to identifying patients' needs in rehabilitation.

  15. Cutaneous manifestations in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L Abenavoli; G Addolorato; I Proietti; L Leggio; A Ferrulli; L Vonghia; R Capizzi; M Rotoli; PL Amerio; G Gasbarrini

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune gluten-dependent enteropathy characterized by atrophy of intestinal villi that improves after gluten-free diet (GFD). CD is often associated with extra-intestinal manifestations;among them, several skin diseases are described in CD patients. The present review reports all CD-associated skin manifestations described in the literature and tries to analyze the possible mechanisms involved in this association. The opportunity to evaluate the possible presence of CD in patients affected by skin disorders is discussed.

  16. Exo-celiac liver in Glyptosternum maculatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A unique structure in the fish of Glyptosternum maculatum (Regan) (Siluriformes: Sisoridae) is reported. It was identified as a part of the liver named "exo-celiac liver". This new organ is located between skin and muscle and connected with the celiac liver by a funiform tissue, "joint belt". It has similar histological features and isozyme electrophoretogramic bands of lactate dehydrogenase, esterase, malate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase as in the celiac liver. This unique organ has biological research value and could serve as an important tool for studying organogenesis and evolution.

  17. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) outcome with conservative management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eng, GD; Binder, H; Getson, P; ODonnell, R

    1996-01-01

    Resurgence of neurosurgical intervention oi obstetrical brachial plexus palsy prompted our review of 186 patients evaluated between 1981 and 1993, correlating clinical examination, electrodiagnosis, and functional outcome with conservative management. Eighty-eight percent had upper brachial plexus p

  18. Systematic evaluation of brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, S

    1993-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries offer a unique challenge to the athletic trainer because of their relatively high frequency rate in contact sports and because of the complexity of the neuroanatomy in the cervical area. During a game, athletic trainers must make a fast, accurate decision regarding a player's return to competition. It is imperative that the athletic trainer be able to quickly differentiate between minor injuries and more serious injuries warranting removal from the game and/or physician referral. A systematic approach to the evaluation of a brachial plexus injury is essential to ensure proper treatment. This paper will present a structured approach to an on-the-field assessment of brachial plexus injuries.

  19. Auxo-Endocrinological Approach to Celiac Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Bozzola

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a permanent genetically determined intolerance to gluten that generally presents with gastrointestinal symptoms in young children and extraintestinal manifestations (endocrinological, dermatological, neurological, etc. later. Furthermore, many studies demonstrate the close association between celiac and endocrine diseases, including growth and pubertal disorders, type I diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroid diseases, probably due to the presence of a common genetic predisposition. Follow-up for celiac children after the start of gluten-free diet is mandatory to avoid complications such as growth hormone deficiency. The present review deals with the problem of the diagnosis of endocrine-associated diseases in celiac children and gives suggestions for correct management and follow-up of these patients.

  20. Lymphadenopathy in celiac disease: computed tomographic observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B.; Bayless, T.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-06-01

    Lymphadenopathy in patients with celiac disease is generally viewed with alarm due to the association between celiac disease and intestinal lymphoma. Four patients with celiac disease are described in whom significant mesenteric and paraaortic adenopathy was demonstrated by computed tomogrophy (CT). The subsequent clinical course of these patients revealed no evidence of lymphoma. In two patients with longstanding celiac disease and recent relapse, exploratory laparotomy revealed reactive hyperplasia in the enlarged glands; in one patient this was associated with intestinal ulceration, and in the other no underlying pathology was found. Follow-up CT scans in both these patients demonstrated regression of the findings with clinical improvement. In the other two patients, CT was performed as part of the initial evaluation.

  1. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... of Emergency Medicine Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Department of Neurology Department of Surgery More Programs & ... Related Clinical Services Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bone Health Program Growth and Nutrition Program Celiac ...

  2. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-08-21

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet.

  3. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  4. Long-term efficacy and safety of internal neurolysis for trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Andrew L; Ozpinar, Alp; Lee, Albert; Raslan, Ahmed M; McCartney, Shirley; Burchiel, Kim J

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) occurs and recurs in the absence of neurovascular compression (NVC). While microvascular decompression (MVD) is the most effective treatment for TN, it is not possible when NVC is not present. Therefore, the authors sought to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and durability of internal neurolysis (IN), or "nerve combing," as a treatment for TN without NVC. METHODS This was a retrospective review of all cases of Type 1 TN involving all patients 18 years of age or older who underwent evaluation (and surgery when appropriate) at Oregon Health & Science University between July 2006 and February 2013. Chart reviews and telephone interviews were conducted to assess patient outcomes. Pain intensity was evaluated with the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) Pain Intensity scale, and the Brief Pain Inventory-Facial (BPI-Facial) was used to assess general and face-specific activity. Pain-free survival and durability of successful pain relief (BNI pain scores of 1 or 2) were statistically evaluated with Kaplan-Meier analysis. Prognostic factors were identified and analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS A total of 177 patients with Type 1 TN were identified. A subgroup of 27 was found to have no NVC on high-resolution MRI/MR angiography or at surgery. These patients were significantly younger than patients with classic Type 1 TN. Long-term follow-up was available for 26 of 27 patients, and 23 responded to the telephone survey. The median follow-up duration was 43.4 months. Immediate postoperative results were comparable to MVD, with 85% of patients pain free and 96% of patients with successful pain relief. At 1 year and 5 years, the rate of pain-free survival was 58% and 47%, respectively. Successful pain relief at those intervals was maintained in 77% and 72% of patients. Almost all patients experienced some degree of numbness or hypesthesia (96%), but in patients with successful pain relief, this numbness did not

  5. New aspects in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI Torres; MA López Casado; A Ríos

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder characterized by an immune response to ingested gluten and has a strong HLA association with HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules, but human HLA-DQ risk factors do not explain the entire genetic susceptibility to gluten intolerance. CD is caused by the lack of immune tolerance (oral tolerance) to wheat gluten. In this sense,the expression of soluble HLA-G in CD is of special interest because the molecule plays an important role in the induction of immune tolerance. The enhanced expression of soluble HLA-G found in CD may be part of a mechanism to restore the gluten intolerance. In this editorial, we review recent progress in understanding CD in relation to its prevalence, diagnosis and possible mechanisms of pathogenesis.

  6. Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease FOR ... 263-9000 Bethesda, Maryland (January 21, 2014) – Adding quinoa to the gluten-free diet of patients with ...

  7. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available Account Login No Account? Register Now! Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos Real People Living with Celiac Disease - new Have you or someone you know been recently diagnosed ...

  8. MR imaging of the brachial plexus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, Hendrik Wouter van

    2001-01-01

    In this retrospective study we describe the MR imaging findings in 230 consecutive patients with suspected pathology in or near the brachial plexus. These patients were studied from 1991 through to 1996. Chapter 2 describes the anatomy and the MR imaging techniques. As the anatomy of the brachial pl

  9. Risk factors in familial forms of celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease has been reported in up to 2% of some European populations. A similar risk has been identified in the America and Australia where immigration of Eu-ropeans has occurred. Moreover, an increasing number of celiac disease patients are being identified in many Asian countries, including China and India. Finally, celiac disease has also been detected in Asian immigrants and their descendants to other countries, such as Canada. Within these so-called "general" celiac populations, however, there are...

  10. Changing Spectrum of Celiac Disease in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Kishor Prasad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Celiac disease is an important cause of chronic diarrhea, failure to thrive, and anemia in children. Mode of presentation of celiac disease has changed in last few years. Study was conducted to determine the mode of clinical presentation of a large group of patients with celiac disease and whether there has been a change in the presentation with the time. Methods:A prospective study was conducted on 134 children diagnosed to be having celiac disease in the Pediatric Gastroenterology, PGIMER, Chandigarh, from July 1st 2006 to December 31st 2007. Their detailed clinical profile was recorded on a pretested proforma and all patients underwent hemogram, liver function tests, IgA Anti tTG, and upper GI endoscopy. Findings:Major symptoms at presentation were diarrhea (54.5%, failure to thrive (52.2%, abdominal distension (41%, anemia (40%, pain abdomen (19.4%, vomiting (15.7% and constipation (2.2% of cases. 60.4% of patients had short stature. Anemia was microcytic hypochromic in 79.1% of patients, and dimorphic in 20.9%. Serum transaminases were raised in 38.8 % of cases. The mean serum anti tTG level was 164.24U/ml (Range 0-749 U/ml and levels correlated with the severity of small intestinal damage on biopsy. 15 patients were negative for the serology but 8 out of them had IgA deficiency and all had histopathology suggestive of celiac disease. Conclusion:Classical presentation of celiac disease is less commonly encountered these days probably related to the more widespread use of serologic testing and early recognition of atypical manifestations of celiac disease.

  11. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos Real People Living with Celiac Disease - new Have you or someone you know been recently diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity? Do you need more information straight from a ...

  12. High frequency of celiac disease in Down syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, EK; Mearin, ML; Bouquet, J; vonBlomberg, ME; Stapel, SO; vanElburg, RM; deGraaf, EAB

    1996-01-01

    We screened 115 children with Down syndrome for celiac disease, using antigliadin, antiendomysium, and antireticulin serum antibodies and an intestinal permeability test, Celiac disease was diagnosed in eight children, giving a frequency of 7.0%. We recommend screening for celiac disease in all pers

  13. What Is Celiac Disease? How Do I Live with It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaska, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue, is a hereditary, autoimmune disease that causes a sensitivity to gluten, which is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. The key symptoms of celiac disease are diarrhea, constipation, gas, bloating, backaches, stomachaches, nausea, anemia, fatigue, osteoporosis, stunted growth in children, and weight…

  14. Celiac Disease Presenting as Profound Diarrhea and Weight Loss - A Celiac Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bul, Vadim; Sleesman, Brett; Boulay, Brian

    2016-08-05

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease is a hypersensitivity enteropathy that can have various presentations in adults. Rarely, patients can present with severe lab abnormalities, dehydration and weight loss caused by celiac disease - a celiac crisis. CASE REPORT A 46-year-old male with a past medical history significant for diabetes mellitus, type 2 (DM2) and recently treated Bell's Palsy presented to the emergency room complaining of weakness, diarrhea and lightheadedness. On presentation, the patient had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 60 mm Hg and a lactic acidosis with pH of 7.28. Infectious etiologies of diarrhea were ruled out. The patient had an EGD which showed erythema of the duodenal bulb. Serum anti-gliadin and anti-TTG IgA were both elevated suggesting Celiac disease. Biopsies showed histopathology consistent with celiac disease. The patient's diarrhea resolved after initiation of a gluten free diet. He gained 25 kilograms after discharge and did not require further hospitalizations for diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS Celiac crisis is a very rare presentation of celiac disease in adults but nonetheless should be considered in patients with marked metabolic derangements in the setting of osmotic diarrhea. Treatment consists of a gluten free diet and may require management with steroids and total parenteral nutrition (TPN).

  15. Diagnosis of gluten related disorders: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Villalta, Danilo; Norsa, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Francesca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-06-21

    Cereal crops and cereal consumption have had a vital role in Mankind's history. In the recent years gluten ingestion has been linked with a range of clinical disorders. Gluten-related disorders have gradually emerged as an epidemiologically relevant phenomenon with an estimated global prevalence around 5%. Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity represent different gluten-related disorders. Similar clinical manifestations can be observed in these disorders, yet there are peculiar pathogenetic pathways involved in their development. Celiac disease and wheat allergy have been extensively studied, while non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a relatively novel clinical entity, believed to be closely related to other gastrointestinal functional syndromes. The diagnosis of celiac disease and wheat allergy is based on a combination of findings from the patient's clinical history and specific tests, including serology and duodenal biopsies in case of celiac disease, or laboratory and functional assays for wheat allergy. On the other hand, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still mainly a diagnosis of exclusion, in the absence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria. A multimodal pragmatic approach combining findings from the clinical history, symptoms, serological and histological tests is required in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. A thorough knowledge of the differences and overlap in clinical presentation among gluten-related disorders, and between them and other gastrointestinal disorders, will help clinicians in the process of differential diagnosis.

  16. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  17. Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease may initially present as a neurological disorder. Alternatively, celiac disease may be complicated by neurological changes. With impaired nutrient absorption, different deficiency syndromes may occur and these may be manifested clinically with neurological changes. However, in patients with deficiency syndromes, extensive involvement of the small intestine with celiac disease is often evident. There are a number of reports of celiac disease associated with neuropathy, ataxia, dementia and seizure disorder. In these reports, there is no clear relationship with nutrient deficiency and a precise mechanism for the neurological changes has not been defined. A small number of patients have been reported to have responded to vitamin E administration, but most do not. In some, gluten antibodies have also been described, especially in those with ataxia, but a consistent response to a gluten-free diet has not been defined. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with unexplained neurological disorders, including ataxia and dementia. Further studies are needed, however, to determine if a gluten-free diet will lead to improvement in the associated neurological disorder.

  18. Role of oats in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comino, Isabel; Moreno, María de Lourdes; Sousa, Carolina

    2015-11-07

    A gluten-free diet is currently the only effective means of treating individuals with celiac disease. Such a diet enables celiac patients to control their symptoms and avoid various complications associated with this condition. However, while the quality of gluten-free foods has significantly improved during recent decades, maintenance of a gluten-free diet does not necessarily ensure adequate nutritional intake. Because oats are an important source of proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and fibre, their inclusion in a gluten-free diet might improve the nutritional status of a celiac patient. Although oats are included in the list of gluten-free ingredients specified in European regulations, their safety when consumed by celiac patients remains debatable. Some studies claim that pure oats are safe for most celiac people, and contamination with other cereal sources is the main problem facing people with this disease. However, it is necessary to consider that oats include many varieties, containing various amino acid sequences and showing different immunoreactivities associated with toxic prolamins. As a result, several studies have shown that the immunogenicity of oats varies depending on the cultivar consumed. Thus, it is essential to thoroughly study the variety of oats used in a food ingredient before including it in a gluten-free diet.

  19. Prevalence of celiac disease in siblings of Iranian patients with celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Chomeili

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Celiac disease, one of the best-known autoimmune human leukocyte antigen-dependent disorders, has a relatively increased prevalence in first-degree relatives. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in siblings of patients with confirmed celiac disease. METHODS: Siblings of confirmed celiac disease patients in our center were identified and enrolled in this study. Their serum immunoglobulin A and tissue transglutaminase antibody-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (anti-tissue transglutaminase, immunoglobulin A, and immunoglobulin G were measured and multiple endoscopic duodenal biopsy specimens were obtained with parental consensus. Celiac disease was confirmed by observation of characteristic histological changes. RESULTS: A total of 49 children (male, 29; female, 20; age, 2-16 years with confirmed celiac disease in a pediatric gastroenterology ward were studied from 1999 to 2006. We found 30 siblings (female, 16 all shared in both parents. The only measurement available was for immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase antibody. A duodenal biopsy was performed in all 30 siblings. Clinical findings such as abdominal pain, fatigue, growth retardation and diarrhea were found in 53.3% of the completely studied siblings, and positive serology without histological changes was identified in four cases. Both serology and biopsy (confirmed new cases were positive in 2 of the 30 siblings. CONCLUSION: High prevalence of celiac disease among siblings of patients with confirmed celiac disease necessitates serologic screening (and confirmatory biopsy if indicated in families having celiac disease. It is advantageous to diagnose the disease as soon as possible because early diagnosis and diet intervention may prevent serious complications such as growth retardation, short stature, chronic diarrhea, and malignancy.

  20. CT-guided stellate ganglion blockade vs. radiofrequency neurolysis in the management of refractory type I complex regional pain syndrome of the upper limb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastler, Adrian [University Hospital CHU Gabriel Montpied, Radiology Department, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Franche Comte University, I4S Laboratory-EA 4268-IFR 133, Besancon (France); CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Hopital Gabriel Montpied, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Aubry, Sebastien; Kastler, Bruno [University Hospital CHU Jean Minjoz, Radiology and Interventional Pain Unit, Besancon (France); Franche Comte University, I4S Laboratory-EA 4268-IFR 133, Besancon (France); Sailley, Nicolas; Michalakis, Demosthene [University Hospital CHU Jean Minjoz, Radiology and Interventional Pain Unit, Besancon (France); Siliman, Gaye [University Hospital CHU St Jacques, Clinical Investigation Center, Besancon (France); Gory, Guillaume [Franche Comte University, I4S Laboratory-EA 4268-IFR 133, Besancon (France); Lajoie, Jean-Louis [University Hospital CHU Jean Minjoz, Pain evaluation and Management Unit, Besancon (France)

    2013-05-15

    To describe and evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency neurolysis (RFN) vs. local blockade of the stellate ganglion in the management of chronic refractory type I complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) of the upper limb. Sixty-seven patients were included in this retrospective study between 2000 and 2011. All suffered from chronic upper limb type I CRPS refractory to conventional pain therapies. Thirty-three patients underwent stellate ganglion blockade and 34 benefited from radiofrequency neurolysis of the stellate ganglion. CT guidance was used in both groups. The procedure was considered effective when pain relief was {>=}50 %, lasting for at least 2 years. Thirty-nine women (58.2 %) and 28 men (41.8 %) with a mean age of 49.5 years were included in the study. Univariate analysis performed on the blockade and RFN groups showed a significantly (P < 0.0001) higher success rate in the RFN group (67.6 %, 23/34) compared with the blockade group (21.2 %, 7/33) with an odds ratio of 7.76. CT-guided radiofrequency neurolysis of the stellate ganglion is a safe and successful treatment of chronic refractory type I CRPS of the upper limb. It appears to be more effective than stellate ganglion blockade. (orig.)

  1. Quantitative image analysis of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    We outline the use of quantitative techniques that are currently used for analysis of celiac disease. Image processing techniques can be useful to statistically analyze the pixular data of endoscopic images that is acquired with standard or videocapsule endoscopy. It is shown how current techniques have evolved to become more useful for gastroenterologists who seek to understand celiac disease and to screen for it in suspected patients. New directions for focus in the development of methodology for diagnosis and treatment of this disease are suggested. It is evident that there are yet broad areas where there is potential to expand the use of quantitative techniques for improved analysis in suspected or known celiac disease patients. PMID:25759524

  2. Adult celiac disease in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    There is an increased awareness that celiac disease may occur in the elderly although presentations with either diarrhea, weight loss or both may be less common causing delays in diagnosis for prolonged periods.Higher detection rates also seem evident owing to active case screening, largely through serodiagnostic measures. In some elderly patients who are genetically predisposed, it has been hypothesized that celiac disease might be precipitated late in life by an antigen,possibly from an infectious agent. As a result, peptide mimicry or other poorly-defined mechanisms may precipitate an autoimmune gluten-dependent clinical state. Although diarrhea and weight loss occur, only isolated iron deficiency anemia may be present at the time of initial diagnosis. In addition, the risk of other autoimmune disorders, particularly autoimmune thyroiditis, and bone disease, are increased. Osteopenia may also be associated with an increased risk of fractures. Finally, elderly celiacs have an increased risk of malignant intestinal disease, especially lymphoma.

  3. Quantitative image analysis of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2015-03-07

    We outline the use of quantitative techniques that are currently used for analysis of celiac disease. Image processing techniques can be useful to statistically analyze the pixular data of endoscopic images that is acquired with standard or videocapsule endoscopy. It is shown how current techniques have evolved to become more useful for gastroenterologists who seek to understand celiac disease and to screen for it in suspected patients. New directions for focus in the development of methodology for diagnosis and treatment of this disease are suggested. It is evident that there are yet broad areas where there is potential to expand the use of quantitative techniques for improved analysis in suspected or known celiac disease patients.

  4. Bone Mineralization in Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Larussa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates a well-established relationship between low bone mineral density (BMD and celiac disease (CD, but data on the pathogenesis of bone derangement in this setting are still inconclusive. In patients with symptomatic CD, low BMD appears to be directly related to the intestinal malabsorption. Adherence to a strict gluten-free diet (GFD will reverse the histological changes in the intestine and also the biochemical evidence of calcium malabsorption, resulting in rapid increase of BMD. Nevertheless, GFD improves BMD but does not normalize it in all patients, even after the recovery of intestinal mucosa. Other mechanisms of bone injury than calcium and vitamin D malabsorption are thought to be involved, such as proinflammatory cytokines, parathyroid function abnormalities, and misbalanced bone remodeling factors, most of all represented by the receptor activator of nuclear factor B/receptor activator of nuclear factor B-ligand/osteoprotegerin system. By means of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, it is now rapid and easy to obtain semiquantitative values of BMD. However, the question is still open about who and when submit to DXA evaluation in CD, in order to estimate risk of fractures. Furthermore, additional information on the role of nutritional supplements and alternative therapies is needed.

  5. Celiac Disease in Women with Hip Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBoff, Meryl S.; Cobb, Haley; Gao, Lisa Y.; Hawkes, William; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Kolatkar, Nikheel S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Objective Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, however, the risk of fractures in celiac disease patients is unclear. We compared the prevalence of celiac disease between a group of women with hip fractures and a group of women undergoing elective joint replacement surgery and the association between celiac disease and vitamin D levels. Methods Two hundred eight community dwelling and postmenopausal women were recruited from Boston, MA (n=81) and Baltimore, MD (n=127). We measured tissue transglutaminase IgA by ELISA to diagnose celiac disease and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels by radioimmunoassay in both women with hip fractures (n=157) and the control group (n=51), all of whom were from Boston. Subjects were excluded if they took any medications or had medical conditions that might affect bone. Results Median serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower (p< 0.0001) in the hip fracture cohorts compared to the elective joint replacement cohort (14.1 ng/ml vs. 21.3 ng/ml, respectively). There were no differences in the percentage of subjects with a positive tissue transglutaminase in the women with hip fractures versus the control group (1.91% vs. 1.61%, respectively). Conclusion Vitamin D levels are markedly reduced in women with hip fractures, however hip fracture patients did not show a higher percentage of positive tissue transglutaminase levels compared with controls. These data suggest that routine testing for celiac disease among hip fracture patients may not prove useful, although larger prospective studies among hip fracture subjects are needed. PMID:23732553

  6. Notch receptors in human choroid plexus tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beschorner, R; Waidelich, J; Trautmann, K; Psaras, T; Schittenhelm, J

    2013-08-01

    Notch signaling plays a role in development and formation of the normal choroid plexus (nCP), and in formation of various tumors in humans. Activation of Notch3 has been reported to promote tumor growth in invasive gliomas and to initiate formation of choroid plexus tumors (CPT) in mice. We investigated the expression of all currently known Notch receptors (Notch 1-4) in 55 samples of nCP and 88 CPT, including 61 choroid plexus papillomas (CPP), 22 atypical CPP and 5 choroid plexus carcinomas by immunohistochemistry. Notch expression was semiquantitatively evaluated separately for membranous/cytoplasmic and for nuclear staining. In addition, we examined Her2 expression (EGFR2, Her2/neu, ErbB2, CD340) because of its functional link to Notch signaling. All samples were negative for Notch3. Membranous/cytoplasmic expression of Notch1 (pnCP compared to CPT. Nuclear expression of Notch1, -2 and -4 was significantly higher in CPT compared to nCP (pnCP to a predominant nuclear expression in CPT. Her2 was weakly expressed in 42/84 CPT but only in 2/53 nCP (p=0.0001) and positively correlated with nuclear expression of Notch1, -2 and 4 in CPT. In summary, a shift between membranous/cytoplasmic (non-canonical signaling pathway) and nuclear expression (canonical signaling pathway) of Notch1, -2 and -4 and upregulation of Her2 indicate neoplastic transformation in human CP and may reveal new therapeutic approaches.

  7. Axillary brachial plexus blockade in moyamoya disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saban Yalcin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is characterized by steno-occlusive changes of the intracranial internal carotid arteries. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are strictly impaired. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management is to preserve the stability between oxygen supply and demand in the brain. Peripheral nerve blockade allows excellent neurological status monitoring and maintains haemodynamic stability which is very important in this patient group. Herein, we present an axillary brachial plexus blockade in a moyamoya patient operated for radius fracture.

  8. MRI of the brachial plexus: A pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, Hendrik W. van [Department of Radiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Koekoekslaan 1, 3435 CM Nieuwegein (Netherlands)], E-mail: h.es@antoniusziekenhuis.nl; Bollen, Thomas L.; Heesewijk, Hans P.M. van [Department of Radiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Koekoekslaan 1, 3435 CM Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brachial plexus is the imaging modality of first choice for depicting anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. The anatomy of the roots, trunks, divisions and cords is very well depicted due to the inherent contrast differences between the nerves and the surrounding fat. In this pictorial review the technique and the anatomy will be discussed. The following pathology will be addressed: neurogenic tumors of the brachial plexus and sympathetic chain, superior sulcus tumors, other tumors in the vicinity of the brachial plexus, the differentiation between radiation and metastatic plexopathy, trauma, neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome and immune-mediated neuropathies.

  9. Screening for celiac disease in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwitz, Anna; Skaaby, Tea; Kårhus, Line Lund

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) as recorded in the Danish National Patient Registry is ∼50/100,000 persons. This is much lower than the reported prevalence of CD in other Nordic countries and underdiagnosis is suspected. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of CD in a population...

  10. Celiac Disease Presenting with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Sarbay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immunological disorder. Clinical manifestations occur as a result of intestinal mucosa damage and malabsorption. CD is also associated with extraintestinal manifestations and autoimmune disorders. The coexistence of CD and autoimmune diseases has been described before. In this article, a patient with CD presenting with thrombocytopenia is discussed.

  11. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... 617-355-6058 Visit the Celiac Support Group Facebook page CSG Facebook Page Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and ... Use Public Policy © 2005-2017 All Rights Reserved Facebook Twitter YouTube LinkedIn Google+ Instagram Boston Children's Hospital ...

  12. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development.

  13. Vertical infraclavicular brachial plexus block in children: a preliminary study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose Maria, B. de; Tielens, L.K.P.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brachial plexus blockade is a well-established technique in upper limb surgery. Among the infraclavicular approaches, the vertical infraclavicular brachial plexus (VIP) block is easy to perform and has a large spectrum of nerve blockade. The aim of this preliminary study was to determine

  14. Osteoarticular manifestations of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Stéphanie; Lioté, Frédéric

    2016-11-04

    Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune enteropathy based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The global prevalence of 1% to 2% represents only the tip of the iceberg. The diagnosis is confirmed by positive specific antibody, anti-transglutaminase or anti-endomysium, specific lesions of the small intestine and a response to strict gluten-free diet. The diagnosis is difficult and often delayed because the clinical variability is very large, ranging from digestive clinical presentation "classic" to "atypical" symptoms, often extra-intestinal, that are sometimes attributed to a concomitant disease or a complication. Among them, there are frequent musculoskeletal manifestations such as osteoporosis and osteomalacia. In the absence of risk factor, osteoporosis, in a premenopausal women or in a man less than 55 years, more is if it is severe and refractory to medications, need to rheumatologists on the track of celiac disease in the absence of digestive symptoms. Osteomalacia is related to secondary hypovitaminosis D malabsorption. Supplementation by calcifediol, water-soluble vitamin D, may be indicated. Celiac disease is associated with an autoimmune disease in almost 1/3 of the cases. Knowing these potential associations allows earlier diagnosis in patients whose only manifestation, a concomitant disease. Anemia, chronic fatigue or unexplained polyarthralgia are symptoms associated with celiac disease to look for specific antibodies. The aim of early diagnosis is to prevent the emergence of other systemic disorders and avoid complications such as bone fractures and cancer, especially intestinal lymphoma. Non-celiac gluten intolerance is a new entity defined by symptomatology similar to that of celiac disease induced by the ingestion of gluten and disappearing after crowding-out, among patients without specific antibodies and without intestinal lesion of celiac disease. This entity is a cause, at

  15. Neoplastic Disorders in 100 Patients with Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUGH J Freeman

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports have suggested that the incidence of some neoplastic disorders, particularly malignant lymphoma, is increased in patients with celiac disease. In this study, the type and number of neoplastic disorders detected in 100 consecutive celiac disease patients were explored. Sixty-five patients were initially diagnosed with celiac disease before, and 35 after, age 60 years. Ten elderly celiac patients had lymphoma or small intestinal adenocarcinoma. Although the overall incidence of malignant lymphoma was 8%, similar to that in other centres, the incidence in elderly celiac patients was 23% in this study. Celiac disease was detected before or after the diagnosis of lymphoma or small intestinal adenocarcinoma. In some patients, epithelial lymphocytosis was evident in the gastric, colonic or biliary tract epithelium. In addition, other immune-mediated disorders, dermatitis herpetiformis and autoimmune thyroiditis, were common. Finally, other malignant disorders of the esophagus, stomach and colon were not detected.

  16. Telocytes in meninges and choroid plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, B O; Gherghiceanu, M; Kostin, S; Ceafalan, L; Popescu, L M

    2012-05-16

    Telocytes (TCs) are a recently identified type of interstitial cells present in a wide variety of organs in humans and mammals (www.telocytes.com). They are characterized by a small cell body, but extremely long cell processes - telopodes (Tp), and a specific phenotype. TCs establish close contacts with blood capillaries, nerve fibers and stem cells. We report here identification of TCs by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence in rat meninges and choroid plexus/subventricular zone, in the vicinity of putative stem cells. The presence of TCs in brain areas involved in adult neurogenesis might indicate that they have a role in modulation of neural stem cell fate.

  17. Hepatobiliary Tract and Pancreatic Disorders in Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of hepatobiliary tract and pancreatic disorders have been documented in patients with celiac disease. Some disorders have shared immunological or genetic factors, including chronic hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and sclerosing cholangitis. Other hepatic or pancreatic pathological changes in celiac disease have been documented with severe malnutrition and malabsorption, including hepatic steatosis and pancreatic insufficiency, sometimes with pancreatic calcification. Finally, celiac disease may be associated with other very rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T cell lymphoma.

  18. Neurologic and Psychiatric Manifestations of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Jessica R.; Eaton, William W; Cascella, Nicola G.; Fasano, Alessio; Kelly, Deanna L.

    2012-01-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disease dependent on gluten (a protein present in wheat, rye or barley) that occurs in about 1% of the population and is generally characterized by gastrointestinal complaints. More recently the understanding and knowledge of gluten sensitivity (GS), has emerged as an illness distinct from celiac disease with an estimated prevalence 6 times that of CD. Gluten sensitive people do not have villous atrophy or antibodies that are present in celiac disease...

  19. Serological Testing in Screening for Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Rachel Gillett

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Assays for celiac-related antibodies are becoming widely available, and the present review aims to clarify the use of these investigations in the diagnosis of, management of and screening for adult celiac disease. The sensitivities and specificities of various antibody tests are discussed, along with their clinical use as an adjunct to small bowel biopsy, and as a first-line investigation for patients with atypical symptoms of celiac disease or patients at high risk of developing sprue.

  20. Anesthesia experience along with familial Mediterranean fever and celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sargın

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available (Anesthetic management in patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac Disease Familial Mediterranean Fever is an autosomal recessive transmitted disease which often seen at Mediterranean origin society and it goes by deterioration at inflammation control. Celiac disease is a proximal small intestine disease which develops gluten intolerance by autoimmune mechanism in sensitive people. Association of Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac disease is a rare situation. In this article we present our anesthesia experience on a bilateral septic arthritis case who also have Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac disease association.

  1. Chronic urticaria and celiac disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroni, Diego G; Paiola, Giulia; Tenero, Laura; Fornaro, Martina; Bodini, Alessandro; Pollini, Federica; Piacentini, Giorgio L

    2010-01-01

    We describe a case of a 9-year-old girl who presented chronic urticaria associated with celiac disease. The prevalence of the manifestation of chronic urticaria in celiac disease is unknown but increase in atopic immunologic disorders has been reported in the setting of gluten enteropathy. Relationship between the clinical manifestations is not clear. The present case of subclinical celiac disease diagnosis in an otherwise asymptomatic child with chronic urticaria further reinforces the evidence that differential for celiac disease warrants to be always considered in children with refractory urticaria.

  2. Preventing complications in celiac disease: our experience with managing adult celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, C J; Wierdsma, N J; Berkenpas, M; Jacobs, M A J M; Bouma, G

    2015-06-01

    Celiac disease is, as we know it, rather than being a rare and incurable disease until the 1950's, both quite common in screening studies and readily treatable. Three conditions are triggered by gluten consumption: celiac disease, the skin rash dermatitis herpetiformis and gluten ataxia. We describe our follow up for out clinic management, as evidence based data about such an approach are lacking in current literature. No food, beverages or medications containing any amount of gluten can be taken. Compliance is often difficult especially when patients are asymptomatic. We control a cohort, in daily practice, of over 700 adult patients. The majority of patients manage the diet without any problems. We describe our follow up in general, for serology, laboratory and histology. Forty percent of our newly diagnosed celiac patients do have a BMI over 25 kg/m(2). An appropriate attitude for this problem is lacking. The problem of slowly weaning off Dapsone over 5-10 years in DH is recognized. The bone density is checked in all newly diagnosed celiac patients. We control, if necessary, by telephone and lab controls done in local cities and see our patients only every two years face-to-face for follow up. The main question is if the adherence to a GFD, quality of life and prevention of complications is improved by visiting a dedicated celiac clinic. We hope to standardize this attitude on evidence data in the years to come.

  3. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    2016-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  4. Celiac disease and gluten-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Steve

    2005-09-01

    Celiac disease develops from an autoimmune response to specific dietary grains that contain gluten. Diagnosis can be made based on the classical presentation of diarrhea, fatty stools, and abdominal bloating and cramping, as well as the presence of specific serum antibodies. In addition, gluten ingestion has increasingly been found to be associated with other conditions not usually correlated with gluten intolerance. The subsequent diversity of the clinical presentation in these cases can complicate decision-making and delay treatment initiation in conditions such as ataxia, headaches, arthritis, neuropathy, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and others. This review explores the etiology and pathology of celiac disease, presents support for the relationship between gluten and other diseases, and provides effective screening and treatment protocols.

  5. Vitiligo and autoantibodies of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabihollah Shahmoradi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: There may be a relationship between celiac disease and vitiligo. This may indicate a common basic autoimmune mechanism that is an explanation for few case reports that gluten free diets were effective in the treatment of vitiligo patients. Both T test and exact fisher test showed no effect of age, sex and job on seropositivity of these patients (P = 0.56 and P = 0.74, respectively

  6. Vitiligo and autoantibodies of celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zabihollah Shahmoradi; Jamshid Najafian; Farahnaz Fatemi Naeini; Farinaz Fahimipour

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vitiligo is an acquired, idiopathic disorder characterized by circumscribed depigmented macules and patches. The exact etiology and pathogenesis of vitiligo is not clear. Many theories have been presented regarding this subject among them aautoimmune theory is the most important one. The association of vitiligo with other autoimmune disorders has been reported, but the relationship between vitiligo and celiac disease is controversial. The aim of this study was to study the frequen...

  7. Massive hemothorax: A rare complication after supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shiv Kumar; Katyal, Surabhi; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    Plexus block is the preferred anesthesia plan for upper limb surgeries. Among the known complications, hematoma formation following the vascular trauma is often occur but this complication is frequently underreported. We present a case where a massive hemothorax developed post operatively in a patient who underwent resection of giant cell tumor of the right hand radius bone followed by arthroplasty under brachial plexus block using supraclavicular approach. This case report attempts to highlight the essence of remaining vigilant postoperatively for first initial days after brachial plexus block, especially after failed or multiple attempts. Ultrasound guided technique in combination with nerve stimulator has proven to be more reliable and safer than traditional techniques.

  8. Latest In vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoven, Samantha; Murray, Joseph A.; Marietta, Eric V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease is a gluten free diet, and there is an increased desire for alternative therapies. In vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease have been generated in order to better understand the pathogenesis of celiac disease, and this review will discuss these models as well as the testing of alternative therapies using these models. Areas Covered The research discussed describes the different in vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease that currently exist and how they have contributed to our understanding of how gluten can stimulate both innate and adaptive immune responses in celiac patients. We also provide a summary on the alternative therapies that have been tested with these models and discuss whether subsequent clinical trials were done based on these tests done with these models of celiac disease. Expert Opinion Only a few of the alternative therapies that have been tested with animal models have gone on to clinical trials; however, those that did go on to clinical trial have provided promising results from a safety standpoint. Further trials are required to determine if some of these therapies may serve as an effective adjunct to a gluten free diet to alleviate the adverse affects associated with accidental gluten exposure. A “magic-bullet” approach may not be the answer to celiac disease, but possibly a future cocktail of these different therapeutics may allow celiac patients to consume an unrestricted diet. PMID:23293929

  9. Intraepithelial lymphocytes in refractory celiac disease : lost in transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Frederike

    2014-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease type II (RCDII) is a severe complication of coeliac disease. Whereas celiac disease can successfully be treated by the strict avoidance of gluten, refractory celiac patients show no remission despite a gluten-free diet. The pathology of RCDII is only partially understood,

  10. Celiac Disease--What Parents and Caregivers Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disorder characterized by a heightened sensitivity to gluten, the protein in wheat, barley and rye. The disease is more common than most people think, affecting approximately 3 million in the United States, about 1 in 100. One of the most notable things about celiac disease is that up to 97 percent of…

  11. Advances in celiac disease and gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewinski, Mary M

    2008-04-01

    Celiac disease is becoming an increasingly recognized autoimmune enteropathy caused by a permanent intolerance to gluten. Once thought to be a rare disease of childhood characterized by diarrhea, celiac disease is actually a multisystemic disorder that occurs as a result of an immune response to ingested gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Screening studies have revealed that celiac disease is most common in asymptomatic adults in the United States. Although considerable scientific progress has been made in understanding celiac disease and in preventing or curing its manifestations, a strict gluten-free diet is the only treatment for celiac disease to date. Early diagnosis and treatment, together with regular follow-up visits with a dietitian, are necessary to ensure nutritional adequacy and to prevent malnutrition while adhering to the gluten-free diet for life. The purpose of this review is to provide clinicians with current updated information about celiac disease, its diverse clinical presentation and increased prevalence, the complex pathophysiology and strong genetic predisposition to celiac disease, and its diagnosis. This review focuses in detail on the gluten-free diet and the importance of intense expert dietary counseling for all patients with celiac disease. Recent advances in the gluten-free diet include food allergen labeling as well as the US Food and Drug Administration's proposed definition of the food-labeling term gluten-free. The gluten-free diet is complex and patients need comprehensive nutrition education from a skilled dietitian.

  12. Exome sequencing in a family segregating for celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szperl, A M; Ricaño-Ponce, I; Li, J K; Deelen, P; Kanterakis, A; Plagnol, V; van Dijk, Freerk; Westra, H J; Trynka, G; Mulder, C. J.; Swertz, M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Zheng, H C H

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is a multifactorial disorder caused by an unknown number of genetic factors interacting with an environmental factor. Hence, most patients are singletons and large families segregating with celiac disease are rare. We report on a three-generation family with six patients in which the

  13. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diagnosis Of Celiac Disease - Sensitivity/Specific Treatment CSA Medications Position Olmesartan Frequently Asked Questions Gluten-Free Gluten ... Diagnosis Of Celiac Disease - Sensitivity/Specific Treatment CSA Medications Position Olmesartan Frequently Asked Questions Gluten-Free Gluten ...

  14. Symptomatic third ventricular choroid plexus cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, A.H. (Children' s Hospital, Sydney (Australia). Dept. of Radiology); Villanueva, A.C. (Jose Reyes Memorial Medical Center, Manila (Philippines))

    1992-10-01

    We describe the imaging findings in 3 children with choroid plexus cysts (CPC) at the foramen of Monro. All CPC measured less than 2 cm and produced symptoms of raised intracranial pressure when located at the foramen of Monro where there was obstruction to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. Two of our patients had relief of symptoms after resection of the cyst. One patient with inoperable cardiac defects died and had no surgery performed. Cranial sonography and CT-ventriculography are the modalities of choice in evaluating ventriculomegaly when the diagnosis of occult obstructive CPC is entertained in children. Cranial sonography is indicated in infants with an open fontanelle and CT-ventriculography is reserved for older children with hydrocephalus which is not responding to shunting. (orig./GDG).

  15. Celiac artery stenosis/occlusion treated by interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Osamu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-1-1, Honjo Kumamoto 860-8505 (Japan)], E-mail: osamu-3643ik@do9.enjoy.ne.jp; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-1-1, Honjo Kumamoto 860-8505 (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Severe stenosis/occlusion of the proximal celiac trunk due to median arcuate ligament compression (MALC), arteriosclerosis, pancreatitis, tumor invasion, and celiac axis agenesis has been reported. However, clinically significant ischemic bowel disease attributable to celiac axis stenosis/occlusion appears to be rare because the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) provides for rich collateral circulation. In patients with celiac axis stenosis/occlusion, the most important and frequently encountered collateral vessels from the SMA are the pancreaticoduodenal arcades. Patients with celiac artery stenosis/occlusion are treated by interventional radiology (IR) via dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade. In patients with dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade on SMA angiograms, IR through this artery may be successful. Here we provide several tips on surmounting these difficulties in IR including transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma, an implantable port system for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy to treat metastatic liver tumors, coil embolization of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms, and arterial stimulation test with venous sampling for insulinomas.

  16. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isasi, Carlos; Tejerina, Eva; Morán, Luz M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune systemic disease having among its clinical manifestations frequent symptoms common to rheumatologic diseases such as musculoskeletal pain, asthenia, and cognitive fatigue. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like Sjögren disease. It is a well-characterized disease with specific diagnostic tests. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is an emerging entity with symptoms similar to celiac disease, but without specific diagnostic tests. The concept of non-celiac gluten sensitivity and its diagnostic problems are reviewed, and the hypothesis of its association with fibromyalgia, spondyloarthritis, and autoimmune conditions is proposed. Clinical observations supporting the hypothesis are described, highlighting the benefit of treating non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

  17. Celiac Injury Due to Arcuate Ligament: An Endovascular Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zini, Chiara, E-mail: zini.chiara@gmail.com; Corona, Mario, E-mail: mario.corona@uniroma.it; Boatta, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.boatta@yahoo.it; Wlderk, Andrea, E-mail: a.wlderk@virgilio.it; Salvatori, Filippo Maria, E-mail: filippomaria.salvatori@uniroma1.it; Fanelli, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.fanelli@uniroma1.it [' Sapienza,' -University of Rome, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit, Radiology, Oncology and Pathology Department (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Celiac trunk injures are rare events, with high mortality rates and difficult management. Endovascular treatment may be considered to avoid bleeding. We report a case of severe bleeding in a 37-year-old man resulting from celiac trunk stretching after a motorcycle crash. Because direct celiac trunk catheterization was not possible, a retrograde catheterization of the common hepatic artery was performed via the superior mesenteric artery. Two vascular plugs (type IV) were released, and the exclusion of the celiac trunk origin was completed with the deployment of an aortic cuff. The patient's clinical condition immediately improved, and after 6 months' follow-up, imaging confirmed the complete exclusion of the celiac trunk.

  18. 2013 Update on Celiac Disease and Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Astegiano

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder, characterized by small intestinal inflammation and villous atrophy after the ingestion of gluten by genetically susceptible individuals. Several extraintestinal manifestations have been associated to celiac disease. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a primary disorder of the esophagus characterized by upper gastrointestinal symptoms, absence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field in biopsy specimens. Both celiac disease and eosinophilic esophagitis are caused by aberrant, but distinct, immune responses to ingested antigens and can be responsive to restricted food intake. The aim of this review is to assess whether there is an association between these two pathologies. In the majority of the studies examined, including the studies in pediatric population, the prevalence of eosinophilic esophagitis in subjects with celiac disease was about 10-times that of the general population. We suggest searching for eosinophilic esophagitis in all children undergoing endoscopy for suspicious celiac disease.

  19. Review and practice guidelines for celiac disease in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadhem, Omar N; Azeez, Ghassan; Smalligan, Roger D; Urban, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is defined as a state of heightened immunologic responsiveness to ingested gluten (from wheat, barley, or rye) in genetically susceptible individuals. Ingestion of the offending proteins leads to inflammation and intestinal mucosal damage, which may result in a spectrum of gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional abnormalities, and systemic complications ranging from anemia and osteoporosis to secondary autoimmunity and malignancy. The genetic influence in the pathogenesis of celiac disease is indicated by its familial occurrence. Celiac disease does not develop unless a person has alleles that encode for human leukocyte antigen DQ2 or DQ8 proteins. The clinical picture of celiac disease has changed considerably during the past 30 years. Diarrhea, which was the presenting symptom in > 90% of celiac disease patients before 1981, is now the chief complaint in celiac disease presentations, including anemia and bone disease, is revealed by the widespread availability of serologic testing. An association between celiac disease and autoimmune disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, and Sjögren's syndrome, has been well documented. The tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin antibody and the endomysial immunoglobulin antibody are the most sensitive and specific serologic tests, respectively, for identifying individuals who need to undergo an intestinal biopsy. If the suspicion of celiac disease is high, intestinal biopsy should be pursued even if serologic tests are negative. The gold standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease is a small bowel biopsy showing villous atrophy. The treatment for celiac disease is lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). Despite the proven benefits of the GFD, it can be exceedingly difficult to completely avoid gluten-containing foods, and adherence to a GFD is estimated to be only 45% to 80%.

  20. [Celiac disease: an unique autoinmune model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo Sáez, Luis Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease is a unique autoimmune disorder, because the environmental precipitant factor is known. It is gluten, the major storage protein of wheat and similar grains. Originally was considered a rare malabsorption syndrome of childhood, but nowadays is recognized a common condition, that affects to 1% of the general population, all over the world', involves to all different races, may be diagnosed at any age, and affects to many organ systems. Therapy for the disease is a gluten-free-diet that must be strict and long-term. This diet cause a total recovery clinical and analytical, with excellent quality of life of patients.

  1. New strategies for diagnosis and management of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Dyanne P; Gill, James M; Dave, Bhavin; DiPrinzio, Marie J; Quisel, Anna; Foy, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Celiac disease is a gastrointestinal disorder characterized by inflammation, leading to injury to the mucosal lining of the small intestine. The inflammation occurs when gliadin, a protein found in such gluten-containing foods as wheat, rye, and barley, is ingested by genetically susceptible individuals. The mucosal damage and subsequent malabsorption of nutrients leads to various complications. Researchers estimate that more than 2 million people in the United States have celiac disease-a prevalence that is greater than was previously believed. Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed annually with celiac disease. Until recently, diagnosis has been complicated by the fact that the indicators of celiac disease are nonspecific. However, because of the development of new, easy-to-administer serology tests, diagnosis has become much less complicated. After conducting a review of the literature, the authors recommend a serologic testing sequence for diagnosis of celiac disease and urge that adults and children with an assortment of symptoms be tested for this disease. Common signs and symptoms of celiac disease include anemia, arthralgia, fatigue, infertility, neuropathy, and weight loss, in addition to such gastrointestinal symptomatology as abdominal pain, anorexia, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea. The only treatment for patients with celiac disease remains a gluten-free diet.

  2. Adult celiac disease with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh J Freeman; Helen R Gillett; Peter M Gillett; Joel Oger

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with some autoimmune disorders. A 40-year-old competitive strongman with celiac disease responded to a glutenfree diet, but developed profound and generalized motor weakness with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis, a disorder reported to occur in about 1 in 5000. This possible relationship between myasthenia gravis and celiac disease was further explored in serological studies. Frozen stored serum samples from 23 acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis patients with no intestinal symptoms were used to screen for celiac disease. Both endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were examined. One of 23 (or, about 4.3%) was positive for both IgA-endomysial and IgA tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Endoscopic studies subsequently showed duodenal mucosal scalloping and biopsies confirmed the histopathological changes of celiac disease. Celiac disease and myasthenia gravis may occur together more often than is currently appreciated. The presence of motor weakness in celiac disease may be a clue to occult myasthenia gravis, even in the absence of intestinal symptoms.

  3. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  4. Celiac disease presenting as severe osteopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Christopher J; Cardile, Anthony P; Dickert, Judith

    2011-11-01

    The authors describe a unique presentation of celiac disease as multiple non-traumatic fractures in a young male without gastrointestinal complaints. A 29-year-old man presented with back pain and was found to have a non-traumatic compression fracture of the lumbar and thoracic spine on plain X-ray. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) confirmed osteoporosis at the L3/L4 vertebral bodies. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium, and vitamin D levels were normal. He had no gastrointestinal complaints, but serologic studies were positive to include an elevated gliadin IgA Ab, gliadin IgG Ab, and an elevated tissue transglutaminase IgA Ab. He was treated with a gluten-free diet, calcium, and vitamin D supplementation as well as teriparatide. Follow up bone density showed improvement and has no further fractures to date. Primary care physicians, gastroenterologists, and endocrinologists must have a high index of clinical suspicion for celiac disease in any patient who presents with low bone density regardless of the serum 25-OH vitamin D levels or presence of gastrointestinal complaints.

  5. Operative outcome of partial plantar fasciectomy and neurolysis to the nerve of the abductor digiti minimi muscle for recalcitrant plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conflitti, Joseph M; Tarquinio, Thom A

    2004-07-01

    A retrospective review was conducted of 23 patients (26 feet) to assess operative outcome of partial plantar fasciectomy and neurolysis to the nerve of the abductor digiti minimi muscle for recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Nonsurgical treatment was implemented in all patients with no relief of symptoms (average 20.8 months) prior to surgery. Using a visual analog pain scale (0-10), the average preoperative pain was 9.2 (range, 8-10). Prior to surgery, 65.2% of patients had severe limitations of activity, and 34.8% of patients had moderate limitations of activity. An average 25.3-month follow-up (range, 8-51) was performed by telephone interview. Average postoperative pain decreased to 1.7 using the same visual analog scale. Thirteen patients (57%) had no functional limitations postoperatively and nine patients (39%) had minimal functional limitations postoperatively. One patient (4%) had moderate functional limitations postoperatively. Twenty patients (87%) were completely satisfied with the surgery, two patients (9%) were satisfied with reservations, and one patient (4%) was unsatisfied with the surgery. The average period before return to work or daily activities was 1.5 months. Two patients had minor complications of partial wound dehiscence that healed uneventfully and mild dorsal midfoot pain which required temporary use of a boot walker. While the majority of patients with plantar fasciitis can be managed with nonoperative treatment, those patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciitis can be effectively treated with partial plantar fasciectomy and neurolysis to the nerve of the abductor digiti minimi muscle.

  6. Ultrasound localization of the sacral plexus using a parasacral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Alon Y; Joshi, Rama; Uskova, Anna; Chelly, Jacques E

    2009-06-01

    In this report, we describe the feasibility of locating the sacral plexus nerve using a parasacral approach and an ultrasound-guided technique. The parasacral region using a curved probe (2-5 MHz) was scanned in 17 patients in search of the medial border of the ischial bone and the lateral border of the sacrum, which represent the limit of the greater sciatic foramen. In addition, attempts were made to identify the piriformis muscles and the gluteal arteries. The sacral plexus was identified at the level of the sciatic foramen as a round hyperechoic structure. The gluteal arteries were identified in 10 of 17 patients, but we failed to positively identify the piriformis muscle in any patient. To confirm localization of the sacral plexus, an insulated needle attached to a nerve stimulator was advanced and, in each case, a sacral plexus motor response was elicited (plantar flexion-12, dorsal flexion-1, hamstring muscle stimulation-3, gastrocnemius muscle stimulation-1-not recorded) at a current between 0.2 and 0.5 mA. No complications were observed. This report confirms the feasibility of using ultrasound to locate the sacral plexus using a parasacral approach.

  7. Diagnostik proximaler Läsionen des Plexus brachialis: Eine Übersicht

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus D

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Die funktionelle Anatomie des Plexus brachialis wird beschrieben. Daraus leiten sich klinische und neurophysiologische Untersuchungen bei Schäden des Plexus sowie einzelner Armnerven ab. Auf die distalen Nervenläsionen wird nicht eingegangen.

  8. The Development of Hemochromatosis after Treatment for Celiac Sprue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mang Ma

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac sprue is a chronic disease characterized by maldigestion and malabsorption. Whereas many diseases have been reported in association with celiac sprue, hemochromatosis has not. A 62-year-old man with celiac sprue and a history of iron deficiency and osteopenic bone disease who developed hemochromatosis is reported. Liver biopsy showed portal tract fibrosis, early nodule formation and increased hepatic iron storage. The patient developed hemochromatosis with hepatic injury two years after his transferrin saturation became elevated and 10 years after he had been placed on gluten-free diet. Lifelong iron accumulation was prevented by chronic malabsorption of iron but hemochromatosis became manifest when his celiac sprue was treated.

  9. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... put out a series of videos to help families. They have a helpful video for Celiacs going ... A Local Chapter Find a Resource Unit My Family Health History CSA Programs CSA Annual Contests Essay ...

  10. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diseases Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Videos Food Nutrition and Recipes Too Get Involved 2015 Gluten-Free ... Bay Baking Meisters Gluten-Free Mixtures One Source Nutrition Pro Bites Starfish World Wise Grains World Wise ...

  11. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staff Nurse Parent Principal School Counselor Staff Memo Students Teacher Cel Kids Recipes Cel Kids for Parents Camps Cel Kids Fun & Games Federal Register Report Food Problems Copyright © 2016 Celiac Support Association, Inc. All rights ...

  12. What People with Celiac Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People With Celiac Disease Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available in: PDF (98 KB) Related Resources ... Management Strategies Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  13. A unique case of isolated, spontaneous, symptomatic celiac trunk dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Ferguson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of isolated spontaneous celiac trunk dissections have been appearing in the literature more recently with the increased availability of high-resolution computerized tomography angiograms. We report a unique case of this entity. A 48-year-old woman presented with acute abdominal pain that radiated to the back and worsened with breathing. This was diagnosed as a celiac trunk dissection by computerized tomography angiogram. She was treated conservatively with antihypertensive medications, anticoagulants, and opioid medication for pain control.

  14. Acute celiac trunk thrombosis revealed by biliary peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerraya, H; Sbaï, A; Khalfallah, M; Dziri, C

    2015-11-01

    Acute thrombosis of the celiac trunk is a very uncommon condition, which is a life-threatening emergency. The clinical presentation is highly variable depending on the extent of the ischemic territory. We report a case of biliary peritonitis related to an acute thrombosis of the celiac trunk. This case highlights the role of abdominal computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute upper abdominal pain.

  15. Non responsive celiac disease due to coexisting hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadia, Lalit; Shivpuri, Deepak

    2012-04-01

    Celiac disease is associated with several genetic disorders, but its association with hereditary fructose intolerance is rare. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare autosomal recessive disease of fructose metabolism presenting as vomiting after intake of fructose. An association between these two distinct genetic gastrointestinal disorders is important as treatment failure of celiac disease calls for careful evaluation for hereditary fructose intolerance. We report a patient with an association of these two disorders.

  16. Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adults with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Passananti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact social activities and emotional state. Aim was to investigate the prevalence of altered eating behaviour in celiac patients. Methods. Celiac patients and controls completed a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2, Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, and Symptom Check List (SCL-90. Results. One hundred celiac adults and 100 controls were not statistically different for gender, age, and physical activity. STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, Somatization, Interpersonal, Sensitivity, and Anxiety scores of the SLC-90 were higher in CD patients than controls. EDI-2 was different in pulse thinness, social insecurity, perfectionism, inadequacy, ascetisms, and interpersonal diffidence between CD and HC women, whilst only in interceptive awareness between CD and HC men. A higher EAT-26 score was associated with the CD group dependently with gastrointestinal symptoms. The EAT26 demonstrated association between indices of diet-related disorders in both CD and the feminine gender after controlling for anxiety and depression. Conclusion. CD itself and not gastrointestinal related symptoms or psychological factors may contribute pathological eating behavior in celiac adults. Eating disorders appear to be more frequent in young celiac women than in CD men and in HC.

  17. Celiac Disease in Oman: A Tertiary Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfiq Taki Al-Lawati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the frequency of encounter of celiac disease in Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman.Methods: Retrospective study of records of all adult and pediatric patients in Royal Hospital from the period of 1/4/2006 to 31/3/2012. Data regarding symptoms, anthropometry of the patients, haemoglobuin levels, liver and thyroid functions were retrieved. Diagnosis of celiac disease was established based on combination of serological detection of anti tissues transglutaminase (tTG or anti endomysial antibodies (EMA with duodenal biopsy.Results: Only 9 children were identified in the hospital during the period of study. Two children were identified by screening protocol for Insulin Dependent Diabetes Melitus (IDDM and one child from short stature workup. Six children presented with abdominal pain and diarrhea. Four children were severely wasted and stunted. No adult patients were identified with celiac disease. Anaemia was noted in 3 children and none had deranged thyroid functions.Conclusion: Celiac disease is infrequently encountered in Royal Hospital and might be under diagnosed. The low rate of celiac disease in children with IDDM might indicate a different genetic composition. Awareness about celiac disease and family screening should be implemented in Oman.

  18. Small bowel ultrasound in patients with celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartusek, D. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: dbartusek@fnbrno.cz; Valek, V. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: v.valek@fnbrno.cz; Husty, J. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: jhusty@fnbrno.cz; Uteseny, J. [Department of Pediatric Internal Medicine, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: juteseny@fnbrno.cz

    2007-08-15

    Objective: Celiac disease (CD) is a common, lifelong disease with small bowel malabsorption based on genetically conditioned gluten intolerance. The clinical manifestation could be very heterogeneous. The proof of celiac disease is now based mainly on clinical and laboratory (antibodies and enterobiopsy) signs, which are in some cases problematic and inconvenient. Materials and methods: In our study we have examined 250 patients with suspection or with proven celiac disease and we evaluated specific ultrasound small bowel changes in this group. In the next step, we chose 59 patients with laboratory proved celiac disease and we statistically compared ultrasound, other laboratory and clinical findings in different forms and stages of the disease. Results: Specific small bowel pathologies in patients with celiac disease (like changes of intestinal villi in different parts of small bowel, abnormal peristalsis and mesenterial lymphadenopathy) can be well visualized by ultrasound and in combination with clinical and laboratory signs ultrasound examination could have an important role in screening, determination of diagnosis and monitoring of patients with different forms of celiac disease.

  19. Are gastric hyperplastic polyps an additional manifestation in celiac disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Maria Pina; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Rocchi, Chiara; Loria, Maria Francesca; Soro, Sara; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Gastric polyps are frequently reported in patients undergoing upper endoscopic procedures. In this retrospective study, the association between hyperplastic polyps and celiac disease in Northern Sardinia was estimated. Age, gender, body mass index, and medications taken in the 2 preceding months, including proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), H2 receptor blockers (anti-H2), Helicobacter pylori status, endoscopic findings, and histology from charts of patients undergoing esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy were reviewed. Polyps were classified as hyperplastic, fundic gland, inflammatory, and adenomatous. 3.7% (423/11379) patients had celiac disease. Prevalence of gastric polyps was 4.2% (3.8% among celiac vs 4.2% nonceliac patients). Inflammatory polyp was the most common histotype (55.8% and 56.2%) followed by fundic gland polyps (31.4% and 43.7%), hyperplastic (8.7% and 0%), and adenomas, in celiac and nonceliac patients, respectively. Fundic gland polyps were more common in PPI users (odds ratio: 4.06) than in nonusers (2.65, P = 0.001) among celiac and nonceliac patients. Age older than 50, female gender, esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy year, and PPI use were associated with the presence of polyps, whereas active H pylori infection was not. Gastric polyps were common in Sardinian patients undergoing esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy. However, the previously reported association between hyperplastic polyps and celiac disease was not confirmed in our study. PMID:28151870

  20. Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adults with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passananti, V.; Siniscalchi, M.; Zingone, F.; Bucci, C.; Tortora, R.; Iovino, P.; Ciacci, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact social activities and emotional state. Aim was to investigate the prevalence of altered eating behaviour in celiac patients. Methods. Celiac patients and controls completed a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2), and Symptom Check List (SCL-90). Results. One hundred celiac adults and 100 controls were not statistically different for gender, age, and physical activity. STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, Somatization, Interpersonal, Sensitivity, and Anxiety scores of the SLC-90 were higher in CD patients than controls. EDI-2 was different in pulse thinness, social insecurity, perfectionism, inadequacy, ascetisms, and interpersonal diffidence between CD and HC women, whilst only in interceptive awareness between CD and HC men. A higher EAT-26 score was associated with the CD group dependently with gastrointestinal symptoms. The EAT26 demonstrated association between indices of diet-related disorders in both CD and the feminine gender after controlling for anxiety and depression. Conclusion. CD itself and not gastrointestinal related symptoms or psychological factors may contribute pathological eating behavior in celiac adults. Eating disorders appear to be more frequent in young celiac women than in CD men and in HC. PMID:24369457

  1. Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shenyu Zhang; Hailiang Tang; Junming Zhou; Yudong Gu

    2014-01-01

    Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown. In this study, rat models of an avulsion injury to the left brachial plexus root (associated with upper-limb chronic neuropathic pain) were given electroacu-puncture stimulation at bilateralQuchi(LI11),Hegu(LI04),Zusanli(ST36) andYanglingquan (GB34). After electroacupuncture therapy, chronic neuropathic pain in the rats’ upper limbs was signiifcantly attenuated. Immunolfuorescence staining showed that the expression of β-endorphins in the arcuate nucleus was signiifcantly increased after therapy. Thus, experimental ifndings indi-cate that electroacupuncture can attenuate neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury through upregulatingβ-endorphin expression.

  2. Choroid plexus failure in the Kearns-Sayre syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spector Reynold

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Kearns-Sayre syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder (generally due to mitochondrial DNA deletions that causes ophthalmoplegia, retinopathy, ataxia and brain abnormalities such as leukoencephalopathy. In this syndrome, the choroid plexus epithelial cells, unlike brain cells, are greatly enlarged and granular, consistent with their inability to adequately transport folate from blood into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, and homovanillic acid (a dopamine metabolite from CSF into blood. This inability to transport folates from blood into CSF (and brain adequately, causes cerebral folate deficiency that can be partially reversed by very high doses of reduced folates. The Kearns-Sayre syndrome is a disease that interferes with key choroid plexus functions and is a cause of generalized choroid plexus failure.

  3. The sub-peritoneal arterial plexus of Sir William Turner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marious; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Ghabili, Kamyar; Agutter, Paul S

    2010-08-20

    Sir William Turner (1832-1916) was Professor of Anatomy at the University of Edinburgh. His classic paper of 1863 on the anastomoses between the parietal and visceral branches of the abdominal aorta, later known as the sub-peritoneal arterial plexus of Turner, has mostly been forgotten. Located in the retroperitoneum and surrounding the kidneys and other adjacent structures, this plexus is an important route of collateral circulation. In the current paper, we discuss the sub-peritoneal arterial plexus as described by Turner in 1863 and review the literature concerning its potential clinical significance in the kidney, emphasizing its probable role in the metastatic spread of various tumors of abdominal organs and in the continuing viability of the kidney after renal artery occlusion. A biographical sketch of Sir William Turner is also presented.

  4. Prevalence of celiac disease in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Vázquez Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD is a common systemic disease related to a permanent intolerance to gluten and is often associated with different autoimmune and neurological diseases. Its mean prevalence in the general population is 1-2% worldwide. Our aim was to study the prevalence of celiac disease in a prospective series of Multiple Sclerosis (MS patients and their first-degree relatives. Methods We analyzed the prevalence of serological, histological and genetic CD markers in a series of 72 MS patients and in their 126 first-degree relatives, compared to 123 healthy controls. Results Tissue IgA-anti-transglutaminase-2 antibodies were positive in 7 MS patients (10%, compared to 3 healthy controls (2.4% (p We detected mild or moderate villous atrophy (Marsh III type in duodenal biopsies, in 8 MS patients (11.1%. We also found a high proportion of CD among first-degree relatives: 23/126 (32%. Several associated diseases were detected, mainly dermatitis 41 (57% and iron deficiency anemia in 28 (39% MS patients. We also found in them, an increased frequency of circulating auto-antibodies such as anti-TPO in 19 (26%, ANA in 11 (15% and AMA in 2 (3%. Conclusions We have found an increased prevalence of CD in 8 of the 72 MS patients (11.1% and also in their first-degree relatives (23/126 [32%]. Therefore, increased efforts aimed at the early detection and dietary treatment of CD, among antibody-positive MS patients, are advisable.

  5. Current and emerging therapy for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharia, Govind K

    2014-01-01

    At present, strict and lifelong gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50 mg/day) can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten-free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of adherence to GFD by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase 2, immune-modulation, and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoids, budesonides) and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appear very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten-free diet.

  6. Current and emerging therapy for celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind K Makharia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAt present, strict and lifelong gluten free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50mg/day can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of compliance by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase-2, immune-modulation and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoides, budesonides and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appears very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten free diet.

  7. Traumatic injuries of brachial plexus: present methods of surgical treatment Part II. Treatment policy for brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Novikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The task of this paper is to familiarize practicing neurologists, neurosurgeons, traumatologists, and orthopedists with the current principles of diagnosis and treatment of different brachial plexus (BP injuries. Part I describes the anatomy of BP in detail, considers the main mechanisms of its injuries, and gives their current classification (Nervno-Myshechnye Bolezni (Neuromuscular Diseases 2012;4:19–27.Part II presents the author's approach to treatment of brachial plexus injuries according to the type of lesion and period of denervation: nonoperative methods; rehabilitation; preoperative management; indications for surgical treatment. The tactics and techniques of primary brachial plexus reconstructions are discussed in detail.

  8. TEVAR and covering the celiac artery. Is it safe or not?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    in these patients. If the distal sealing zone above the celiac axis is too short, several endovascular alternatives are possible; hybrid procedures with TEVAR and open by-pass to the celiac artery, custom made stent-grafts with scallop or fenestration for the celiac artery, or intentional coverage of the celiac...... artery. In the latter case, adequate collateral supply to the upper gastrointestinal tract is crucial. Collateral arteries joining the celiac and the superior mesenteric arteries are well characterized in patients with chronic celiac stenosis or occlusion. Are these collateral pathways sufficient also...... for sudden iatrogenic closure of the celiac artery? By performing a preoperative angiography of the superior mesenteric artery with temporary balloon occlusion of the celiac artery, collateral capacity between the two vessels can be tested in advance. Exact positioning of the distal end of a large thoracic...

  9. Frequency of Celiac Disease In Children With Chronic Functional Constipation in Shiraz-Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Ehsaei, Zahra; Honar, Naser; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease is an autoimmune mediated small intestine inflammation which occurs due to hypersensitivity reaction to gluten and related proteins in diet in genetically predisposed individuals. Prevalence of celiac among the population is about 0.5 – 1 % in most countries. Frequency of celiac disease in children is the subject of a few research. In this study, we aim to determine the frequency of celiac disease in patients presenting with functional constipation. METHODS This cros...

  10. Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of Contents ... far, so good," says Tibbie Klose of her celiac disease. It's been nine years since she was ...

  11. A major non-HLA locus in celiac disease maps to chromosome 19.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, van MJ; Meijer, JW; Sandkuijl, L.A.; Bardoel, A.F.; Mulder, C.J.J.; Pearson, PL; Houwen, RH; Wijmenga, C.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The pathogenesis of celiac disease is still unknown despite its well-known association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and DQ8. It is clear that non-HLA genes contribute to celiac disease development as well, but none of the previous genome-wide screens in celiac disease

  12. Celiac disease presenting as the Paterson-Brown Kelly (Plummer-Vinson) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, W; McConnell, B

    1999-02-01

    We describe two patients with Paterson-Brown Kelly (Plummer-Vinson) syndrome whose iron deficiency anemia was due to celiac disease. They presented with dysphagia 13 and 9 yr, respectively, before celiac disease was diagnosed. Neither had gastrointestinal symptoms suggestive of malabsorption. Celiac disease is a recognized cause of chronic iron deficiency and should be considered as an etiological factor for sideropenic dysphagia.

  13. The Macroanatomy of the Sacral Plexus and Its Nerves in Eurasian Eagle Owls (Bubo bubo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Y; Demiraslan, Y; Aslan, K; Coban, A

    2016-10-01

    This study was carried out to reveal the formation of the sacral plexus in the Eurasian Eagle Owls (Bubo bubo) and the nerves originating from this plexus. Five EEOs, three of them were male and two were female, were provided from Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center of Kafkas University and used as materials. Following the euthanizing of the animals, abdominal cavity was opened. The nerves of plexus sacrales were dissected and photographed. It was detected that the sacral plexus was formed by the ventral ramus of five synsacral nerves. Moreover, it was determined that the roots of the sacral plexus formed three trunks: the truncus cranialis, the truncus medius and the truncus caudalis in fossa renalis. The availability of the n. ischiofemoralis and the availability of n. parafibularis were detected in the EEOs. Five branches were specified as having segregated from the sacral plexus: the n. cutaneus femoralis caudalis, the mutual root of n. fibularis with n. tibialis (n. ischiadicus), the rami musculares, the n. coxalis caudalis and the ramus muscularis. It was observed that the sacral plexus was linked to the lumbar plexus by the n. furcalis, to the pudendus plexus via the n. bigeminus. Consequently, the anatomic structure of the EEO's sacral plexus, the participating synsacral nerves to plexus and the innervation areas of these nerves were revealed.

  14. Brachial plexus neuropathy - A long-term outcome study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, JHB; Groothoff, JW; Nicolai, JP; Rietman, JS

    2000-01-01

    This retrospective study assessed the long-term outcome of brachial plexus neuropathy in 16 patients. The mean follow up was 8 years. Nine patients complained of persistent pain and muscle weakness, four had continuing problems with various activities of daily living and 11 had trouble with some hou

  15. Occult radiological effects of lipomatosis of the lumbosacral plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahan, Mark A. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Howe, B.M.; Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Spinner, Robert J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurosurgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Lipomatosis of nerve (LN) is a condition of massive peripheral nerve enlargement frequently associated with hypertrophy within the distribution of the nerve, and most commonly affecting the distal limbs. We sought to understand if LN of the lumbosacral plexus would be associated with the trophic effects of LN on surrounding tissue within the pelvis, which may be clinically occult, but present on MRI. Fifty-one cases of LN, confirmed by pathology or pathognomonic appearance on MRI, were reviewed. Patients with LN of the sciatic nerve were investigated for radiological signs suggestive of overgrowth. Five patients had involvement of the sciatic nerve, 4 of whom had MR imaging of the pelvis. Three patients had LN involving the lumbosacral plexus, and one patient had isolated involvement of the sciatic nerve. All patients with involvement of the lumbosacral plexus demonstrated previously unrecognized evidence of nerve territory overgrowth in the pelvis, including: LN, profound adipose proliferation, muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, and bone hypertrophy and ankylosis. The patient with LN involving the intrapelvic sciatic nerve, but not the lumbosacral plexus did not demonstrate any radiological evidence of pelvic overgrowth. LN is broader in anatomical reach than previously understood. Proximal plexal innervation may be involved, with a consequent effect on axial skeleton and intrapelvic structures. (orig.)

  16. Influx mechanisms in the embryonic and adult rat choroid plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptome of embryonic and adult rat lateral ventricular choroid plexus, using a combination of RNA-Sequencing and microarray data, was analyzed by functional groups of influx transporters, particularly solute carrier (SLC) transporters. RNA-Seq was performed at embryonic day (E) 15 and a...

  17. Sarcoidosis, Celiac Disease and Deep Venous Thrombosis: a Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Çelik

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology and it may rarely be associated with a second disorder. Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy characterized with malabsorption caused by gluten intolerance, and several reports indicate an association between celiac disease and sarcoidosis. In addition, although celiac disease is associated with several extraintestinal pathologies, venous thrombosis has been rarely reported. Herein we present a rare case report of a patient with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis, celiac disease and deep venous thrombosis because of the rare association of these disorders. The patient was admitted with abdominal pain, weight loss, chronic diarrhea and a 5-day history of swelling in her right leg. A diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis was achieved by doppler ultrasonographic examination. The diagnosis of celiac disease was made by biopsy of duodenal mucosa and supported with elevated serum level of anti-gliadin IgA and IgG, and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was achieved by transbronchial needle aspiration from the subcarinal lymph node during flexible bronchoscopy.

  18. Frequency of Celiac Disease in Patients with Hypothyroidism

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    Mojtaba Mehrdad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Celiac disease (CD is closely associated with other autoimmune endocrine disorders, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease. The aim of this study was to find the frequency of celiac disease in patients with hypothyroidism in Guilan province, north of Iran. Methods. A total of 454 consecutive patients with hypothyroidism underwent celiac serological tests antiGliadin antibodies (AGA, antitissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA-tTG and antiendomysial antibodies (EMA-IgA. Small intestinal biopsy was performed when any of celiac serological tests was positive. Results. Eleven (2.4% patients were positive for celiac serology, and two patients with documented villous atrophy were diagnosed with classic CD (0.4%; 95%. Two patients with classic CD had Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT (0.6%; 95%. Six (54.5% of 11 were suffering from overt hypothyroidism and 45.5% from subclinical hypothyroidism. Six (54.5% had HT, and 45.5% had nonautoimmune hypothyroidism. Conclusions. In this study, prevalence of CD was lower than other studies. Most of the patients with CD were suffering from HT, but there was no significant statistical relation between CD and HT.

  19. PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL SCREENING IN CHILDREN WITH CELIAC DISEASE

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    Şedat IŞIKAY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The involvement of the peripheral nervous system in children with celiac disease is particularly rare. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the need for neurophysiological testing in celiac disease patients without neurological symptoms in order to detect early subclinical neuropathy and its possible correlations with clinical and demographic characteristics. Methods Two hundred and twenty consecutive children with celiac disease were screened for neurological symptoms and signs, and those without symptoms or signs were included. Also, patients with comorbidities associated with peripheral neuropathy or a history of neurological disease were excluded. The remaining 167 asymptomatic patients as well as 100 control cases were tested electro-physiologically for peripheral nervous system diseases. Motor nerve conduction studies, including F-waves, were performed for the median, ulnar, peroneal, and tibial nerves, and sensory nerve conduction studies were performed for the median, ulnar, and sural nerves with H reflex of the soleus muscle unilaterally. All studies were carried out using surface recording electrodes. Normative values established in our laboratory were used. Results Evidence for subclinical neuropathy was not determined with electrophysiological studies in any of the participants. Conclusion In this highly selective celiac disease group without any signs, symptoms as well as the predisposing factors for polyneuropathy, we did not determine any cases with neuropathy. With these results we can conclude that in asymptomatic cases with celiac disease electrophysiological studies are not necessary. However, larger studies with the electrophysiological studies performed at different stages of disease at follow-ups are warranted.

  20. Description of the celiac artery in domestic pigeons (Columba livia

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    Cibele Geeverghese

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to define the origin and distribution of the celiac artery and its collateral branches in 15 fowls from the Columba livia species, which were obtained from the Zoonosis Control Center of Brasilia, Brazil. In order to mark the arterial system of the specimens, the left brachiocephalic trunk was canullated and a colored water-latex solution was injected there. Afterwards, fowls were fixed in a 10% v/v formaldehyde solution and dissected with appropriate equipment, presenting the results described in this paper. The celiac artery originated from the ventral face of the descendent aorta. The first collateral branch arose from the celiac artery itself, forming the esophageal artery. Then, the celiac artery has bifurcated into two branches, named left and right branches of the celiac artery. The left branch emitted the proventricular ventral artery, followed by the splenic arteries, proventricular dorsal artery, and the left hepatic artery. The left branch has bifurcated into two branches, known as ventral and left gastric arteries. The right branch emitted the right hepatic artery, followed by the ileal artery and the right gastric artery. Finally, the right branch turned into the pancreaticoduodenal artery. Our findings showed a great similarity with the avian lineages of the Gallus gallus species, except for the lack of ileocecal artery, cystic branches, and dorsal gastric artery.

  1. Chronic Urticaria: A Cutaneous Manifestation of Celiac Disease

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    Jessica Haussmann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is an immune-mediated disease of the small bowel that results in malabsorption. It classically presents with gastrointestinal symptoms including chronic diarrhea, weight loss, abdominal bloating and anorexia. It is becoming more frequently identified in asymptomatic patients with a diagnosis of deficiencies related to malabsorption of iron, folic acid, vitamin B12 and vitamin D. It is increasingly identified as a cause for early or refractory osteoporosis. Occasionally, celiac disease presents with cutaneous manifestations alone. Dermatitis herpetiformis is a well-recognized cutaneous manifestation of celiac disease. Other cutaneous manifestations include alopecia, angular stomatitis and aphthous ulcerations. Described here is a case of a 24-year-old woman who presented with intermittent urticaria and gastrointestinal complaints. She was found to have celiac disease on small-bowel biopsy. Both her gastrointestinal symptoms and urticaria resolved when she was put on a gluten-free diet, suggesting that her urticaria was a cutaneous manifestation of celiac disease.

  2. Association of celiac disease with multiple sclerosis

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    Abolfazli.R

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS and the gluten intolerance disease, celiac disease, (CD are immune-mediated diseases. Better testing for antibodies associated with CD, including anti-gliadin antibody [AGA], as well as anti-endomysial and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies, has improved the diagnosis of CD. Certain neurologic conditions have a reported association with CD. Previous researchers have investigated the role of a gluten-free diet in the treatment of MS and found no benefits. Here, we investigate the possible immunological association of CD with MS.Methods: Using ELISA, we estimated serum IgG and IgA anti-gliadin and IgA anti-endomysial antibodies in 34 MS patients, who were new or previous cases without immunosuppressant treatment for at least the last six months. The mean age was 29.6 years (range 15-46 years, with 30 patients relapsing-remitting, and four secondary-progressive MS. Thirty-four random anonymous blood donors were used as serologic controls (mean age 31.4 years, range 19-50 years. The individuals in both groups with elevated AGA (IgG or IgA or anti-endomysial antibody (IgA underwent duodenal biopsy.Results: In the MS group, high levels of IgG AGA were found in 5.9% of the subjects, and 5.9% had elevated IgA AGA. In the controls, elevated IgG AGA was detected in 5.9% of the subjects and IgA AGA in 2.9% (p=0.051 and 0.48, respectively. For IgG and IgA AGA levels, no significant differences were found between the patient and control groups. IgA anti-endomysial antibodies were not found in either group. Upon biopsy, the specific pathological features of celiac were absent.Conclusion: The same number of MS patients and controls had high levels of AGA, with normal levels of IgA anti-endomysial antibodies, which is more specific for CD, while the GI biopsies from both groups were not specific for CD. Therefore, AGA levels in any neurologic case should be interpreted with caution. The present study showed no

  3. Burning Tongue as Initial Presentation of Celiac Disease in an Elderly Woman: A Case Report.

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    Sherman, Andrea; Zamulko, Alla

    2016-06-01

    There are few reports in the literature where celiac disease presents with tongue manifestations, although atypical presentations of celiac disease are not uncommon. This case report highlights an atypical presentation of celiac disease in an elderly female. Our patient presented to clinic with complaints of a burning tongue for the past two years as well as occasional loose stools and fatigue. Work-up revealed iron deficiency anemia, zinc deficiency and an abnormal celiac panel. Complete symptom improvement was noted by 10 weeks into the initiation of a gluten free diet. Celiac disease can present at any age and should be considered as a differential in findings of malabsorption and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  4. Immunogenetic Pathogenesis of Celiac Disease and Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Escudero-Hernández, Celia; Peña, Amado Salvador; Bernardo, David

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is the most common oral intolerance in Western countries. It results from an immune response towards gluten proteins from certain cereals in genetically predisposed individuals (HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8). Its pathogenesis involves the adaptive (HLA molecules, transglutaminase 2, dendritic cells, and CD4(+) T-cells) and the innate immunity with an IL-15-mediated response elicited in the intraepithelial compartment. At present, the only treatment is a permanent strict gluten-free diet (GFD). Multidisciplinary studies have provided a deeper insight of the genetic and immunological factors and their interaction with the microbiota in the pathogenesis of the disease. Similarly, a better understanding of the composition of the toxic gluten peptides has improved the ways to detect them in food and drinks and how to monitor GFD compliance via non-invasive approaches. This review, therefore, addresses the major findings obtained in the last few years including the re-discovery of non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

  5. Celiac disease and obstetric complications: a systematic review and metaanalysis.

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    Saccone, Gabriele; Berghella, Vincenzo; Sarno, Laura; Maruotti, Giuseppe M; Cetin, Irene; Greco, Luigi; Khashan, Ali S; McCarthy, Fergus; Martinelli, Domenico; Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Pasquale

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this metaanalysis was to evaluate the risk of the development of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease. We searched electronic databases from their inception until February 2015. We included all cohort studies that reported the incidence of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease compared with women without celiac disease (ie, control group). Studies without a control group and case-control studies were excluded. The primary outcome was defined a priori and was the incidence of a composite of obstetric complications that included intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, low birthweight, preeclampsia and preterm birth. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, stillbirth, preeclampsia, small for gestational age, and low birthweight. The review was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015017263) before data extraction. All authors were contacted to obtain the original databases and perform individual participant data metaanalysis. Primary and secondary outcomes were assessed in the aggregate data analysis and in the individual participant data metaanalysis. We included 10 cohort studies (4,844,555 women) in this metaanalysis. Four authors provided the entire databases for the individual participant data analysis. Because none of the included studies stratified data for the primary outcome (ie, composite outcome), the assessment of this outcome for the aggregate analysis was not feasible. Aggregate data analysis showed that, compared with women in the control group, women with celiac disease (both treated and untreated) had a significantly higher risk of the development of preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.66), intrauterine growth restriction (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-4.67), stillbirth (odds ratio, 4.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-21.75), low birthweight (odds ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1

  6. Mass spectrometry analysis of gliadins in celiac disease.

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    Ferranti, Pasquale; Mamone, Gianfranco; Picariello, Gianluca; Addeo, Francesco

    2007-12-01

    In recent years, scientific research on wheat gluten proteins has followed three main directions aimed at (1) finding relationships between individual genetic alleles coding for gliadins, high or low molecular weight glutenin subunits, and the viscoelastic dough properties of flour-derived products such as pasta and bread; (2) identifying prolamins and derived peptides involved in celiac disease, a pathological condition in which the small intestine of genetically predisposed individuals is reversibly damaged; and (3) developing and validating sensitive and specific methods for detecting trace amounts of gluten proteins in gluten-free foods for celiac disease patients. In this review, the main aspects of current and perspective applications of mass spectrometry and proteomic technologies to the structural characterization of gliadins are presented, with focus on issues related to detection, identification, and quantification of intact gliadins, as well as gliadin-derived peptides relevant to the biochemical, immunological, and toxicological aspects of celiac disease.

  7. Occult Celiac Disease Associated with Lymphocytic Sclerosing Cholangitis

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    Hugh J Freeman

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old male with dermatitis herpetiformis and a previously treated lymphoma involving an inguinal lymph node developed abnormal liver chemistry tests. Because of intermittent diarrhea, additional studies revealed lymphocytic colitis and occult celiac disease that responded to a gluten-free diet. A liver biopsy done to explore persistently abnormal liver chemistry tests showed a portal tract-centred inflammatory process characterized by biliary ductal proliferation, epithelial lymphocytosis and concentric lamellar fibrosis. Quantitation of immunoglobulins was normal and antimitochondrial antibodies were negative. Retrograde cholangiograms showed radiological features typical of primary sclerosing cholangius. The epithelial lymphocycosis reported in gastric, small and large intestinal mucosa of some patients with celiac disease may also be present in the biliary ductal columnar epithelium. This report provides additional evidence that celiac disease may be a far more extensive pathological process.

  8. Celiac Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Study

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    Giuseppe Mazzarella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD is mandatory for celiac disease (CD but has poor compliance, justifying novel strategies. We found that wheat flour transamidation inhibited IFN-γ secretion by intestinal T cells from CD patients. Herein, the primary endpoint was to evaluate the ability of transamidated gluten to maintain GFD CD patients in clinical remission. Secondary endpoints were efficacy in prevention of the inflammatory response and safety at the kidney level, where reaction products are metabolized. In a randomized single blinded, controlled 90-day trial, 47 GFD CD patients received 3.7 g/day of gluten from nontransamidated (12 or transamidated (35 flour. On day 15, 75% and 37% of patients in the control and experimental groups, respectively, showed clinical relapse (=0.04 whereas intestinal permeability was mainly altered in the control group (50% versus 20%, =0.06. On day 90, 0 controls and 14 patients in the experimental group completed the challenge with no variation of antitransglutaminase IgA (=0.63, Marsh-Oberhuber grading (=0.08, or intestinal IFN-γ mRNA (>0.05. Creatinine clearance did not vary after 90 days of treatment (=0.46. In conclusion, transamidated gluten reduced the number of clinical relapses in challenged patients with no changes of baseline values for serological/mucosal CD markers and an unaltered kidney function.

  9. Atypical Celiac Disease: From Recognizing to Managing

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    B. Admou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic clinical presentation of celiac disease (CD becomes increasingly common in physician’s daily practice, which requires an awareness of its many clinical faces with atypical, silent, and latent forms. Besides the common genetic background (HLA DQ2/DQ8 of the disease, other non-HLA genes are now notably reported with a probable association to atypical forms. The availability of high-sensitive and specific serologic tests such as antitissue transglutuminase, antiendomysium, and more recent antideamidated, gliadin peptide antibodies permits to efficiently uncover a large portion of the submerged CD iceberg, including individuals having conditions associated with a high risk of developing CD (type 1 diabetes, autoimmune diseases, Down syndrome, family history of CD, etc., biologic abnormalities (iron deficiency anemia, abnormal transaminase levels, etc., and extraintestinal symptoms (short stature, neuropsychiatric disorders, alopecia, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent aphtous stomatitis, etc.. Despite the therapeutic alternatives currently in developing, the strict adherence to a GFD remains the only effective and safe therapy for CD.

  10. [Irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease and gluten].

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    Mearin, Fermín; Montoro, Miguel

    2014-08-04

    For many years irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and celiac disease (CD) have been considered 2 completely separate entities, with CD being clearly related to a permanent gluten intolerance and IBS having no relation with gluten ingestion. However IBS and CD symptoms may be indistinguishable, especially when diarrhea, bloating or abdominal pain predominate. In the last decade several studies have shown that the separation between CD and IBS is not so clear. Thus, some patients who have been diagnosed of IBS suffer in fact from CD. In addition, it seems that there is a group of patients who, without having CD, suffer gluten intolerance that cause them digestive symptoms similar to those of IBS. Gluten sensitivity is defined as the spectrum of morphological, immunological and functional abnormalities that respond to a gluten-free diet. This concept includes histological, immunological and clinical manifestations in the absence of evident morphological abnormalities. Therefore, it is mandatory to establish in a scientific way in which patients a gluten-free diet will be beneficial as well as when this is not justified.

  11. Occult celiac disease prevents penetrance of hemochromatosis

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    Andreas Geier; Siegfried Matern; Carsten Gartung; Igor Theurl; Guenter Weiss; Frank Lammert; Christoph G. Dietrich; Ralf Weiskirchen; Heinz Zoller; Benita Hermanns

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To report a patient with C282Y homozygocity, depleted body iron and intestinal atrophy caused by celiac disease (CD) who experienced resolution of the enteropathy with subsequent normalization of iron metabolism upon glutenfree diet.METHODS: To obtain information on the tissue distribution and quantitative expression of proteins involved in duodenal iron trafficking, we determined the expression of divalent-metal transporter 1 (DMT1), ferroportin 1 (FP1) and transferrin receptor (TfR1) by means of immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR in duodenal biopsies of this patient.RESULTS: Whereas in hereditary hemochromatosis patients without CD, DMT1 expression was up-regulated leading to excessive uptake of iron, we identified a significant reduction in protein and mRNA expression of DMT1 as acompensatory mechanism in this patient with HH and CD.CONCLUSION: Occult CD may compensate tot increased DMT1 expression in a specific subset of individuals withhomozygous C282Y mutations in the hemochromatosis(HFE) gene, thus contributing to the low penetrance of HH.

  12. Celiac disease: is it really possible to overcome duodenal biopsy?

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    Grande, Elisabetta; Ferranti, Silvia; Gaggiano, Carla; Di Virgilio, Nicola; Vascotto, Marina

    2016-05-06

    We report the case of a two-year-five-month-old child who underwent screening for celiac disease due to strong familiarity. During the first observation body weight and height were at 25th and 50th centile for gender and age. Physical examination did not reveal any sign of disease. Blood tests showed increased transaminases levels and antibodies research showed: tTG IgA: 100 UI/ml, tTG IgG: 36,6 UI/ml, EMA IgA: positive. HLA study revealed homozygous allelic combination DRB1*07;DQA102:01; DQB1* 02:02 with presence of a double copy of beta chain in the composition of the  DQ2 heterodymer. Biopsy with histological examination did find neither mucosal alteration  nor lymphocytic infiltrates (Marsh 0). During follow up with free diet the patient remained asymptomatic and all antibody titers decreased up to normalization. According to ESPGHAN guidelines the finding of hypertransaminasemia as sign of celiac hepatic inflammation, a more than 10-fold increase of tTG IgA and a high-risk HLA would permit diagnosis of celiac disease but histological examination done due to mismatch between paucity of clinical sings and a "multiple risk combination" excluded it, allowing diagnosis of potential celiac disease.  We believe that this case is interesting because of its being in contrast with current literature data that suggest a linear relationship between antibodies levels and histological damage with tTG IgA at the upper reference range in case of potential celiac disease. According to guidelines we could have avoided intestinal biopsy but we would have considered as celiac a patient who is maybe just potentially affected.

  13. A Comparison of Hand Pain and Hand Function after Z-plasty Reconstruction of the Transverse Carpal Ligament with Traditional Median Neurolysis in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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    Majid Sajjadi Saravi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common focal mono-neuropathy. A study was designed to compare the effects of traditional open carpal tunnel release with median neurolysis and Z-plasty reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament on post-operative hand pain and hand function in patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.   Methods: Fifty-two patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome entered the study. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups to undergo simple transverse carpal ligament release or division of the ligament with Z-lengthening reconstruction. Forty-five patients completed the study. Two patients of the simple open surgery group and 5 patients of the Z-plasty reconstruction group did not complete the follow up course. After the procedure, the patients were followed to assess post-operative pain and hand function during a 12-week period.   Results: The scores of hand pain on the first day after surgery were not statistically different between the two groups (P=0.213. But the score of hand pain was significantly lower in the Z-plasty reconstruction group at week 1, week 3, and week 6 after surgery (P

  14. Celiac disease in South-West of Iran

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    Rahim Masjedizadeh; Eskandar Hajiani; Jalal Hashemi; Ali Akbar Shayesteh; Karim Moula; Tahereh Rajabi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Celiac disease is characterized by life-long gluten intolerance. Clinical features of patients with celiac disease are variable. Studies about the prevalence of celiac disease in our country are scarce and there is no study on the prevalence of celiac disease in southern Iran. In the current study, clinical, laboratory and histological features of 52 patients with celiac disease were evaluated.METHODS: In a cross sectional study we retrospectively studied the characteristics of 52 celiac patients at Ahwaz JundiShapour University Hospitals (AJSUH)from November 1, 1999 to 1st Sep 2004. Intestinal biopsy and serum antigliadin and anti-endomysium antibodies were used for the diagnosis of patients.Mucosal lesions were classified according to the criteria of Marsh. Antigliadin antibodies were measured with a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Anti-endomysium antibodies were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence with the use of a section of monkey esophagus. Routine hematological and biochemical analyses and measurement of immunoglobulin levels were undertaken.RESULTS: Male: female ratio was 1.08. The mean ± SD patient age was 21 ± 4.5 years (range 10-70 years) and the most common symptoms were diarrhea and weight loss (78.8%) followed by fatigue (73.1%), pallor (65.4%),anorexia (40.4%), abdominal distention (32.7%), and failure to thrive (23.1%). Diarrhea and weight loss and fatigue were the most common findings. Iron deficiency anemia was found in 63.2% of patients and this became normal after adoption of a gluten-free diet in all patients.Immunoglobulin A, IgG antigliadin antibodies and IgA anti-endomysium antibodies were found in 33 and 48cases, 78.8% and 85.4% of patients, respectively. Biopsy of the small intestine revealed that 90.4% of patients had typical lesions according to the Marsh classification.CONCLUSION: Although classical presentation was seen in most of the patients, atypical clinical manifestations of celiac disease should be kept in

  15. Erythrocytic transglutaminase inhibition hemolysis at presentation of celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petar; Ivanovski; Dimitrije; Nikoli; Nikola; Dimitrijevi; Ivan; Ivanovski; Vojislav; Perii

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune condition.Previously it was considered to be a rare childhood disorder,but is actually considered a relatively common condition,present at any age,which may have multiple complications and manifestations.Hematological disorders of the disease are not uncommon.Among these disorders,the most frequently reported are anemias as a result of iron deficiency,often associated with folate and/or B12 deficiency.Anemias caused by hemolysis are very rarely reported in celiac p...

  16. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine changes in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Although there is a great deal of information on celiac disease and associated involvement of other nonintestinal sites, data on concomitant changes in the structure and function of the pancreas is limited. The present review critically examines pancreatic endocrine changes that have been well documented in the literature, including insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Pancreatic exocrine alterations may also occur, and if severe, marked malnutrition with pancreatic failure and ductal calcification have been observed. Finally, other pancreatic disorders have been recorded with celiac disease.

  17. Gluten ataxia is better classified as non-celiac gluten sensitivity than as celiac disease: a comparative clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Luis; Hernández-Lahoz, Carlos; Lauret, Eugenia; Rodriguez-Peláez, Maria; Soucek, Miroslav; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Kruzliak, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gluten ataxia (GA) has customarily been considered to be the main neurological manifestation of celiac disease (CD). In recent years, the condition of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) has been defined, which includes some patients who are not considered "true celiacs." We performed a comparative clinicopathological study of these three entities. We studied 31 GA, 48 CD and 37 NCGS patients, prospectively in the same center for a period of 7 years. The protocol study included two serological determinations for gluten sensitivity [anti-gliadin IgA and IgG (AGA) and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA (TG) antibodies], HLA-DQ2 typing, and duodenal histological assessment. Demographics and investigative findings were compared. Females were 55 % in GA, 75 % in CD (p gluten sensitivity-related characteristics measured were different to CD patients, but very close to NCGS. We conclude that GA patients are better classified within the NCGS group, than within CD.

  18. Diffuse choroid plexus hyperplasia: an under-diagnosed cause of hydrocephalus in children?

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    Aziz, Azian Abd.; Coleman, Lee [Royal Children' s Hospital Melbourne, Department of Medical Imaging, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Morokoff, Andrew; Maixner, Wirginia [Royal Children' s Hospital Melbourne, Department of Neurosurgery, Parkville (Australia)

    2005-08-01

    Hydrocephalus is a common neurological disorder in children and the result of a variety of causes. However, with the advancement of imaging modalities, particularly MRI, previously reported rarer causes of hydrocephalus in children are now being more readily appreciated. We report an 11-year-old boy with diffuse villous hyperplasia of the choroid plexus. He had a ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunt in-situ and a prior diagnosis from infancy of congenital aqueduct stenosis as the cause of his hydrocephalus. His current presentation was with further shunt dysfunction. CT and MRI demonstrated enlarged choroid plexuses but did not confirm aqueduct stenosis. CSF overproduction was demonstrated from the externalized ventricular drain. The enlarged choroid plexuses were surgically resected and histology confirmed choroid plexus hyperplasia. Identification of choroid plexus hyperplasia is important since the neurosurgical management of hydrocephalus is not VP shunt insertion, but resection of the hyperplastic choroid plexus. (orig.)

  19. Altered choroid plexus gene expression in major depressive disorder

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    Cortney Ann Turner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Given the emergent interest in biomarkers for mood disorders, we assessed gene expression in the choroid plexus, the region that produces cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD. Genes that are expressed in the choroid plexus (CP can be secreted into the CSF and may be potential biomarker candidates. Given that we have previously shown that fibroblast growth factor family members are differentially expressed in post-mortem brain of subjects with MDD and the CP is a known source of growth factors in the brain, we posed the question whether growth factor dysregulation would be found in the CP of subjects with MDD. We performed laser capture microscopy of the choroid plexus at the level of the hippocampus in subjects with MDD and psychiatrically normal controls. We then extracted, amplified, labeled and hybridized the cRNA to Illumina BeadChips to assess gene expression. In controls, the most highly abundant known transcript was transthyretin. Moreover, half of the 14 most highly expressed transcripts in controls encode ribosomal proteins. Using BeadStudio software, we identified 169 transcripts differentially expressed (p< 0.05 between control and MDD samples. Using pathway analysis we noted that the top network altered in subjects with MDD included multiple members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ pathway. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR confirmed downregulation of several transcripts that interact with the extracellular matrix in subjects with MDD. These results suggest that there may be an altered cytoskeleton in the choroid plexus in MDD subjects that may lead to a disrupted blood-CSF-brain barrier.

  20. Ultrasonographic evaluation of brachial plexus tumors in five dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Scott; Long, Craig; Knipe, Marguerite; Hornof, Bill

    2005-01-01

    Five dogs with unilateral thoracic limb lameness, neurologic deficits, muscle atrophy, and pain, or a combination of these signs, were examined using ultrasonograghy. Large, hypoechoic tubular masses that displaced vessels and destroyed the normal architecture were found in each dog. The affected axilla of each patient was then imaged with computed tomography or magnetic resonance to fully assess the extent of the masses. We describe the use of ultrasound in screening patients for brachial plexus tumors.

  1. Sacral plexus injury after radiotherapy for carcinoma of cervix

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    Stryker, J.A.; Sommerville, K.; Perez, R.; Velkley, D.E. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Hershey (USA))

    1990-10-01

    A 42-year-old woman developed lower extremity weakness and sensory loss 1 year after external and intracavitary radiotherapy for Stage IB carcinoma of cervix. She has been followed for 5 years posttreatment, and the neurologic abnormalities have persisted, but no evidence of recurrent carcinoma has been found. We believe this to be a rare case of sacral plexus radiculopathy developing as a late complication after radiotherapy. Suggestions are made for improving the radiotherapy technique to prevent this complication in future cases.

  2. Development and Notch signaling requirements of the zebrafish choroid plexus.

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    Brent R Bill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The choroid plexus (CP is an epithelial and vascular structure in the ventricular system of the brain that is a critical part of the blood-brain barrier. The CP has two primary functions, 1 to produce and regulate components of the cerebral spinal fluid, and 2 to inhibit entry into the brain of exogenous substances. Despite its importance in neurobiology, little is known about how this structure forms. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that the transposon-mediated enhancer trap zebrafish line Et(Mn16 expresses green fluorescent protein within a population of cells that migrate toward the midline and coalesce to form the definitive CP. We further demonstrate the development of the integral vascular network of the definitive CP. Utilizing pharmacologic pan-notch inhibition and specific morpholino-mediated knockdown, we demonstrate a requirement for Notch signaling in choroid plexus development. We identify three Notch signaling pathway members as mediating this effect, notch1b, deltaA, and deltaD. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This work is the first to identify the zebrafish choroid plexus and to characterize its epithelial and vasculature integration. This study, in the context of other comparative anatomical studies, strongly indicates a conserved mechanism for development of the CP. Finally, we characterize a requirement for Notch signaling in the developing CP. This establishes the zebrafish CP as an important new system for the determination of key signaling pathways in the formation of this essential component of the vertebrate brain.

  3. Inflammatory Neuropathy of the Lumbosacral Plexus following Periacetabular Osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijn Ghijselings

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. During periacetabular osteotomy (PAO, the sciatic, femoral, and obturator nerves are at risk. Most frequently nerve lesions can be attributed to a mechanical cause; however, in the absence of a clear mechanical cause surgeons are faced with a diagnostic problem and in many cases no diagnosis will be established. We report a case of inflammatory neuropathy of the lumbosacral plexus following a PAO. Case Presentation. A 31-year-old female developed weakness of ankle and knee flexion and extension 6 months after a PAO. Electrophysiological studies revealed damage to the obturator, femoral, and sciatic nerve consistent with an inflammatory lumbosacral plexopathy. MRI of the lumbosacral plexus was normal. The patient was treated with multimodal pain therapy and prolonged physiotherapy; nevertheless, symptoms worsened over time. At 2-year follow-up, there were no signs of recovery. Discussion. Inflammatory neuropathy of the lumbosacral plexus is a potential cause of pain and weakness after ipsilateral orthopaedic procedures. It should be distinguished from more frequently encountered mechanical causes of postsurgical neuropathy based on clinical suspicion, electrophysiological studies, MRI, and nerve biopsy. It is important that the orthopaedic community is aware of this complication since there is some evidence that early recognition and initiation of immunosuppressive therapy can lead to improved clinical outcome.

  4. Prejunctional Muscarinic Receptors in the Deep Muscular Plexus of Canine Ileum: Comparison with Smooth Muscle Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    myenteric and submucosal plexuses. activity with axonal varicosities of deep muscular plexus was that is, the negative control of neurotransmitter...from synaptosomes of the myenteric plextis. .J. Neuriochem. 38: MAN. TF. WV.: Interaction of agonists aInd selective antagonists with gastric 501-508...population associated with the deep muscular plexus synaptosomal fraction was linked to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity , as demonstrated by a

  5. Celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naiyana Gujral; Hugh J Freeman; Alan BR Thomson

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases,resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and nonHLA genes].The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world.However,the population with diabetes,autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD,at least in part,because of shared HLA typing.Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium,and interact directly with the immune system,via both bans-and para-cellular routes.From a diagnostic perspective,symptoms may be viewed as either "typical" or "atypical'; In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD,should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis.Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or antiendomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy.Currently,the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD.A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide,prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption,blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue,restore immune tolerance towards gluten,modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin,and restoration of intestinal architecture.

  6. Celiac Disease and Autoimmune-Associated Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Lauret

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is frequently accompanied by a variety of extradigestive manifestations, thus making it a systemic disease rather than a disease limited to the gastrointestinal tract. This is primarily explained by the fact that CD belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases. The only one with a known etiology is related to a permanent intolerance to gluten. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved in the last decades, due to a greater interest in the diagnosis of atypical and asymptomatic patients, which are more frequent in adults. The known presence of several associated diseases provides guidance in the search of oligosymptomatic cases as well as studies performed in relatives of patients with CD. The causes for the onset and manifestation of associated diseases are diverse; some share a similar genetic base, like type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D; others share pathogenic mechanisms, and yet, others are of unknown nature. General practitioners and other specialists must remember that CD may debut with extraintestinal manifestations, and associated illnesses may appear both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the evolution of the disease. The implementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD improves the overall clinical course and influences the evolution of the associated diseases. In some cases, such as iron deficiency anemia, the GFD contributes to its disappearance. In other disorders, like T1D, this allows a better control of the disease. In several other complications and/or associated diseases, an adequate adherence to a GFD may slow down their evolution, especially if implemented during an early stage.

  7. Celiac Node Failure Patterns After Definitive Chemoradiation for Esophageal Cancer in the Modern Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); UC Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Xiao Lianchun [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yuki [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crane, Christopher; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Bhutani, Manoop S.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The celiac lymph node axis acts as a gateway for metastatic systemic spread. The need for prophylactic celiac nodal coverage in chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is controversial. Given the improved ability to evaluate lymph node status before treatment via positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasound, we hypothesized that prophylactic celiac node irradiation may not be needed for patients with localized esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the radiation treatment volumes for 131 patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Patients with celiac lymph node involvement at baseline were excluded. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy. The location of all celiac node failures was compared with the radiation treatment plan to determine whether the failures occurred within or outside the radiation treatment field. Results: At a median follow-up time of 52.6 months (95% CI 46.1-56.7 months), 6 of 60 patients (10%) without celiac node coverage had celiac nodal failure; in 5 of these patients, the failures represented the first site of recurrence. Of the 71 patients who had celiac coverage, only 5 patients (7%) had celiac region relapse. In multivariate analyses, having a pretreatment-to-post-treatment change in standardized uptake value on PET >52% (odds ratio [OR] 0.198, p = 0.0327) and having failure in the clinical target volume (OR 10.72, p = 0.001) were associated with risk of celiac region relapse. Of those without celiac coverage, the 6 patients that later developed celiac failure had a worse median overall survival time compared with the other 54 patients who did not fail (median overall survival time: 16.5 months vs. 31.5 months, p = 0.041). Acute and late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Although celiac lymph node failures occur in approximately 1 of 10 patients, the lack of effective salvage treatments and subsequent low morbidity may justify prophylactic treatment

  8. Evaluation of an education day for families of children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Emily S; Ulster, Alissa A

    2011-09-01

    Children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy may have chronic physical impairment in their affected upper extremity. Affected children and their families may benefit from psychosocial interventions including therapeutic relationships with health professionals, meeting other families living with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, support groups, and social work. One method of addressing psychosocial needs is through a support and education day. The purpose of this quality improvement project is to evaluate parental perceptions of a support and education day called the "Brachial Plexus Family Day." Families of children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy who attended the Brachial Plexus Family Day completed a questionnaire to evaluate the different programs offered during the day. The families also ranked the importance of different psychosocial supports offered in the clinic. Sixty-three out of 69 families completed the questionnaire. Each program of the Brachial Plexus Family Day was rated as good or excellent by the respondents. Ninety-seven percent of respondents rated meeting other families and children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy as helpful supports. Attending a Brachial Plexus Family day event (86%), followed by connecting with a doctor (60%), and physical or occupational therapist (59%) were the highest ranked supports reported by the families. The parents and caregivers that attended the Brachial Plexus Family Day rated the program highly. This group also valued the opportunity to connect with other families and children affected with the same condition.

  9. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  10. Novel Axillary Approach for Brachial Plexus in Robotic Surgery: A Cadaveric Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihangir Tetik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus surgery using the da Vinci surgical robot is a new procedure. Although the supraclavicular approach is a well known described and used procedure for robotic surgery, axillary approach was unknown for brachial plexus surgery. A cadaveric study was planned to evaluate the robotic axillary approach for brachial plexus surgery. Our results showed that robotic surgery is a very useful method and should be used routinely for brachial plexus surgery and particularly for thoracic outlet syndrome. However, we emphasize that new instruments should be designed and further studies are needed to evaluate in vivo results.

  11. Multiple immune disorders in unrecognized celiac disease: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgio La Villa; Peietro Pantaleo; Roberto Tarquini; Lino Cirami; Federico Perfetto; Francesco Mancuso; Giacomo Laffi

    2003-01-01

    We reported a female patient with unrecognized celiac disease and multiple extra intestinal manifestations, mainly related to a deranged immune function, including macroamilasemia, macrolipasemia, IgA nephropathy,thyroiditis, and anti-b2-glicoprotein-1 antibodies, that disappeared or improved after the implementation of a gluten-free diet.

  12. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2013 Peer Review Research Application Diagnosis Of Celiac Disease - Sensitivity/Specific CSA Medications Position Olmesartan Olmesartan Cafeteria Poster Cafeteria Staff Nurse Parent Principal School Counselor Staff Memo Students Teacher Cereal, Grain and Flour Cereal, Grain and Flour ...

  13. Gluten: a two-edged sword. Immunopathogenesis of celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de F.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Wijmenga, C.

    2005-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small intestinal disorder caused by adaptive and innate immune responses triggered by the gluten proteins present in wheat. In the intestine, gluten is partially degraded and modified, which results in gluten peptides that bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 and tr

  14. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Gluten Free Diet The Boston Children's Hospital put out a series of videos to help families. They have a helpful video for Celiacs going off to college for the first time. The DVD below provides tips to help students navigate college dining services and maintain a gluten-free diet while ...

  15. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, Patrick C. A.; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Curtotti, Alessandra; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Heap, Graham A. R.; Adany, Roza; Aromaa, Arpo; Bardella, Maria Teresa; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Bockett, Nicholas A.; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Dema, Barbara; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Fernandez-Arquero, Miguel; Fiatal, Szilvia; Grandone, Elvira; Green, Peter M.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Gwilliam, Rhian; Houwen, Roderick H. J.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Kaukinen, Katri; Kelleher, Dermot; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma; Kurppa, Kalle; MacMathuna, Padraic; Maki, Markku; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; McCann, Owen T.; Mearin, M. Luisa; Mein, Charles A.; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Mistry, Vanisha; Mora, Barbara; Morley, Katherine I.; Mulder, Chris J.; Murray, Joseph A.; Nunez, Concepcion; Oosterom, Elvira; Ophoff, Roel A.; Polanco, Isabel; Peltonen, Leena; Platteel, Mathieu; Rybak, Anna; Salomaa, Veikko; Schweizer, Joachim J.; Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tack, Greetje J.; Turner, Graham; Veldink, Jan H.; Verbeek, Wieke H. M.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Wolters, Victorien M.; Urcelay, Elena; Cukrowska, Bozena; Greco, Luigi; Neuhausen, Susan L.; McManus, Ross; Barisani, Donatella; Deloukas, Panos; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Saavalainen, Paivi; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We performed a second-generation genome-wide association study of 4,533 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 10,750 control subjects. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with P(GWAS) <10(-4) and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions re

  16. Neurologic and psychiatric manifestations of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jessica R; Eaton, William W; Cascella, Nicola G; Fasano, Alessio; Kelly, Deanna L

    2012-03-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disease dependent on gluten (a protein present in wheat, rye or barley) that occurs in about 1% of the population and is generally characterized by gastrointestinal complaints. More recently the understanding and knowledge of gluten sensitivity (GS), has emerged as an illness distinct from celiac disease with an estimated prevalence 6 times that of CD. Gluten sensitive people do not have villous atrophy or antibodies that are present in celiac disease, but rather they can test positive for antibodies to gliadin. Both CD and GS may present with a variety of neurologic and psychiatric co-morbidities, however, extraintestinal symptoms may be the prime presentation in those with GS. However, gluten sensitivity remains undertreated and underrecognized as a contributing factor to psychiatric and neurologic manifestations. This review focuses on neurologic and psychiatric manifestations implicated with gluten sensitivity, reviews the emergence of gluten sensitivity distinct from celiac disease, and summarizes the potential mechanisms related to this immune reaction.

  17. Celiac disease is overrepresented in patients with constipation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelleboer, Rolf A. A.; Janssen, Rob L. H.; Deckers-Kocken, Judith M.; Wouters, Edward; Nissen, Annemieke C.; Bolz, Werner E. A.; Ten, Walther E. Tjon A.; van der Feen, Cathelijne; Oosterhuis, Koen J.; Rovekamp, Mechelien H.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; Houwen, Roderick H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: It is suggested that patients with constipation should be screened for celiac disease. Similarly, it is recommended to investigate these patients for hypothyroidism and hypercalcemia. However, no evidence for these recommendations is available so far. We therefore set out to determine the

  18. Positive predictive value of serological diagnostic measures in celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftedal, Peter; Nielsen, Christian; Madsen, Jonas Trolle

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) antibodies, immunoglobulin A (IgA) anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG), IgA endomysium antibody (EMA), IgA and IgG anti-gliadin antibodies (IgA and IgG AGA) are first-line diagnostic tools used in selecting patients for duodenal biopsy. The goal of this study was to evaluate...

  19. Celiac disease : from basic insight to therapy development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stępniak, Dariusz Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to gluten, proteins found in wheat and related cereals. In this study two major questions were addressed: i) which specific properties of gluten contribute to its disease-inducing characteristics ii) how can gluten

  20. Duodenal microbiota composition and mucosal homeostasis in pediatric celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, J.C.; Kalliomäki, M.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Palva, A.; Lähteenoja, H.; Vos, de W.M.; Salojärvi, J.; Satokari, R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine which is triggered by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed (HLA-DQ2/DQ8 positive) individuals. Only a fraction of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 positive individuals develop CD indicating that other factors have a role in the disorde

  1. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Induced Diseases Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Videos Food Nutrition and Recipes Too Get Involved 2015 Gluten-Free Expos Membership Participate in Clinical Trials Cel Kids Cel Kids Doctor Visit Gluten-Free Exchange Student Cel Kids Getting Along At School Cafeteria Poster ...

  2. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Bountiful Pantry DNI Group, LLC Earth Cafe Living Foods Grandpa's Kitchen Lazy 8 Specialty Foods Once Again Nut Butter Sauce Goddess CSA Leadership ... Induced Diseases Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Videos Food Nutrition and Recipes Too Get Involved 2015 Gluten- ...

  3. Small intestinal biopsies in celiac disease: duodenal or jejunal?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, JW; Wahab, PJ; Mulder, C.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For diagnosis and follow-up of celiac disease, pediatric societies advise that intestinal mucosal specimens should be obtained using suction capsule from the jejunum. This procedure is strenuous for patients, time-consuming, expensive and requires radiographic guidance. Mucosal biopsies

  4. Duodenal versus jejunal biopsies in suspected celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, WJ; van Baarlen, J; Kleibeuker, JH; Kolkman, JJ

    2004-01-01

    Background and Study Aims: In the past, small-bowel biopsies for diagnosis of celiac disease were taken from the jejunum with a suction capsule, but nowadays most physicians take endoscopic biopsies from the distal duodenum. To validate that practice we compared the diagnostic yield of endoscopic du

  5. Protein-protein interaction network of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Peyvandi, Hassan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Safaei, Akram; Rostami, Kamran; Vafaee, Reza; Heidari, Mohammadhossein; Hosseini, Mostafa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Celiac Disease. Background: Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease with susceptibility of individuals to gluten of wheat, rye and barley. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and involved pathway may lead to the development of drug target discovery. The protein interaction network is one of the supportive fields to discover the pathogenesis biomarkers for celiac disease. Material and methods: In the present study, we collected the articles that focused on the proteomic data in celiac disease. According to the gene expression investigations of these articles, 31 candidate proteins were selected for this study. The networks of related differentially expressed protein were explored using Cytoscape 3.3 and the PPI analysis methods such as MCODE and ClueGO. Results: According to the network analysis Ubiquitin C, Heat shock protein 90kDa alpha (cytosolic and Grp94); class A, B and 1 member, Heat shock 70kDa protein, and protein 5 (glucose-regulated protein, 78kDa), T-complex, Chaperon in containing TCP1; subunit 7 (beta) and subunit 4 (delta) and subunit 2 (beta), have been introduced as hub-bottlnecks proteins. HSP90AA1, MKKS, EZR, HSPA14, APOB and CAD have been determined as seed proteins. Conclusion: Chaperons have a bold presentation in curtail area in network therefore these key proteins beside the other hub-bottlneck proteins may be a suitable candidates biomarker panel for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment processes in celiac disease. PMID:27895852

  6. [Celiac disease--the chameleon among the food intolerances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhle, Alexander; Wolters, Maike; Hahn, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder resulting from gluten intolerance and is based on a genetically predisposition. Symptoms occur upon exposure to prolamin from wheat, rye, barley and related grain. The pathogenesis of celiac disease has not yet been sufficiently elucidated but is being considered as an autoimmune process. At its core are the deamidation of prolamin fragments, the building of specific antibodies and the activation of cytotoxic T-cells. The immunological inflammatory process is accompanied by structural damages of the enterocytes (villous atrophy, colonization and crypt hyperplasia). The symptoms and their extent depend on the type of the celiac disease; classic and non-classic forms are being distinguished (atypical, oligosymptomatic, latent and silent celiac disease). Characteristics of the classic presentation are malabsorption syndrome and intestinal symptoms such as mushy diarrhea and abdominal distension. The diagnosis of celiac disease is based on four pillars: Anamnesis and clinical presentation, serological evidence of coeliac specific antibodies (IgA-t-TG; IgA-EmA), small intestine biopsy and improvement of symptoms after institution of a gluten-free diet. The basis of the therapy is a lifelong gluten-free diet, i. e. wheat, rye, barley, spelt, green-core, faro-wheat, kamuth and conventional oats as well as food items obtained therefrom. Small amounts of up to 50 mg gluten per day are usually tolerated by most patients; amounts of > or = 100 mg/day lead mostly to symptoms. Gluten-free foods contain < or = 20 ppm or 20 mg/kg (Sign: symbol of the 'crossed ear' or label 'gluten-free'). At the beginning of the therapy the fat and lactose intake may need to be reduced; also the supplementation of single micronutrients (fat-soluble vitamins, folic acid, B12, iron, and calcium) may be required. Alternative therapies are being developed but have not yet been clinically tested.

  7. Meta-analysis on anxiety and depression in adult celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, D F; Gerdes, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We used meta-analysis to test hypotheses concerning whether adult celiac disease is reliably linked with anxiety and/or depression. METHOD: We examined published reports on anxiety and depression in adult celiac disease. RESULTS: Eighteen studies on depression and eleven studies...... on anxiety in adult celiac disease met selection criteria. They show that depression is reliably more common and/or more severe in adults with celiac disease than in healthy adults (overall meta-analysis effect size: 0.97). The fail-safe margin of unpublished reports that would be required to negate...... the finding exceeds 8000. Adults with celiac disease do not, however, differ reliably in terms of depression from adults with other physical illnesses, nor do they differ reliably from healthy adults or adults with other physical illnesses in terms of anxiety. CONCLUSION: Depression is common in adult celiac...

  8. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce differential effects in fibroblasts from celiac disease patients and from healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolella, Gaetana; Lepretti, Marilena; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Nanayakkara, Merlin; Di Zenzo, Marina; Sblattero, Daniele; Auricchio, Salvatore; Esposito, Carla; Caputo, Ivana

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 transglutaminase (TG2) has an important pathogenic role in celiac disease (CD), an inflammatory intestinal disease that is caused by the ingestion of gluten-containing cereals. Indeed, TG2 deamidates specific gliadin peptides, thus enhancing their immunogenicity. Moreover, the transamidating activity seems to provoke an autoimmune response, where TG2 is the main autoantigen. Many studies have highlighted a possible pathogenetic role of anti-TG2 antibodies, because they modulate TG2 enzymatic activity and they can interact with cell-surface TG2, triggering a wide range of intracellular responses. Autoantibodies also alter the uptake of the alpha-gliadin peptide 31-43 (p31-43), responsible of the innate immune response in CD, thus partially protecting cells from p31-43 damaging effects in an intestinal cell line. Here, we investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies protect cells from p31-43-induced damage in a CD model consisting of primary dermal fibroblasts. We found that the antibodies specifically reduced the uptake of p31-43 by fibroblasts derived from healthy subjects but not in those derived from CD patients. Analyses of TG2 expression and enzymatic activity did not reveal any significant difference between fibroblasts from healthy and celiac subjects, suggesting that other features related to TG2 may be responsible of such different behaviors, e.g., trafficking or subcellular distribution. Our findings are in line with the concept that a "celiac cellular phenotype" exists and that TG2 may contribute to this phenotype. Moreover, they suggest that the autoimmune response to TG2, which alone may damage the celiac mucosa, also fails in its protective role in celiac cells.

  9. Interstitial cells of Cajal and Auerbach's plexus. A scanning electron microscopical study of guinea-pig small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Harry; Thuneberg, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy......Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy...

  10. An adult case of celiac sprue triggered after an ileal resection for perforated Meckel's diverticulum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Firdevs Topal; Sabiye Akbulut; Ismail Cagatay Topcu; Yasemin Dolek; Ozlem Yonem

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease can be triggered by upper abdominal surgery,such as vagotomy,oesophagectomy,pancreaticoduodenectomy,and gastrojejunal anastomosis.Here we report a case of a 24 year-old woman who developed celiac disease after an ileal resection for perforated Meckel's diverticula.This is the first reported celiac case that has been triggered,not by upper abdominal surgery,but after ileal resection for Meckel's diverticula.

  11. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Omani Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Siham Al-Sinani; Sharef Waadallah Sharef; Saif Al-Yaarubi; Ibrahim Al-Zakwani; Khalid Al-Naamani; Aisha Al-Hajri; Said Al-Hasani

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Published studies on the prevalence of celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus from the Arab World are scant. We aim to report the prevalence of celiac disease in Omani children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.Methods: Children with type 1 diabetes mellitus were prospectively screened for celiac disease, at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman over a period of one year (June 2011 - May 2012). Serum anti tissue transglutaminase IgA, endomysial IgA antibodies and total Ig...

  12. HELICOBACTER PYLORI PREVALENCE IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: results from a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan LASA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Some previously published studies have suggested an inverse relationship between celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori, raising the possibility of the protective role Helicobacter pylori could have against celiac disease development. Nevertheless, this association is inconclusive. Objectives To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in celiac subjects. Methods Between January 2013 and June 2014, patients over 18 years old undergoing upper endoscopy who required both gastric and duodenal biopsies were included for analysis. Enrolled subjects were divided in two groups: those with a diagnosis of celiac disease and those without a celiac disease diagnosis. Helicobacter pylori infection prevalence was compared between groups. Among celiac patients, endoscopic markers of villous atrophy as well as histological damage severity were compared between those with and without Helicobacter pylori infection. Results Overall, 312 patients were enrolled. Seventy two of them had a diagnosis of celiac disease. Helicobacter pylori infection prevalence among celiac disease patients was 12.5%, compared to 30% in non-celiac patients [OR=0.33 (0.15-0.71]. There was not a significant difference in terms of the severity of villous atrophy in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection compared to those without it. There was a slight increase in the prevalence of endoscopic markers in those Helicobacter pylori-negative celiac subjects. Conclusion Helicobacter pylori infection seems to be less frequent in celiac patients; among those celiac subjects with concomitant Helicobacter pylori infection, histological damage degree and presence of endoscopic markers suggesting villous atrophy seem to be similar to those without Helicobacter pylori infection.

  13. Brachial plexus variations in its formation and main branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Paula Sassoli Fazan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The brachial plexus has a complex anatomical structure since its origin in the neck throughout its course in the axillary region. It also has close relationship to important anatomic structures what makes it an easy target of a sort of variations and provides its clinical and surgical importance. The aims of the present study were to describe the brachial plexus anatomical variations in origin and respective branches, and to correlate these variations with sex, color of the subjects and side of the body. METHODS: Twenty-seven adult cadavers separated into sex and color had their brachial plexuses evaluated on the right and left sides. RESULTS: Our results are extensive and describe a large number of variations, including some that have not been reported in the literature. Our results showed that the phrenic nerve had a complete origin from the plexus in 20% of the cases. In this way, a lesion of the brachial plexus roots could result in diaphragm palsy. It is not usual that the long thoracic nerve pierces the scalenus medius muscle but it occurred in 63% of our cases. Another observation was that the posterior cord was formed by the posterior divisions of the superior and middle trunks in 9%. In these cases, the axillary and the radial nerves may not receive fibers from C7 and C8, as usually described. CONCLUSION: Finally, the plexuses studied did not show that sex, color or side of the body had much if any influence upon the presence of variations.OBJETIVOS: O plexo braquial apresenta uma estrutura anatômica complexa, desde sua origem, no pescoço, até sua ramificação terminal, na região axilar. Ele também apresenta relações importantes com outras estruturas anatômicas locais, o que o torna vulnerável ao aparecimento de uma série de variações anatômicas, marcando sua importância clínica e cirúrgica. Os objetivos desse estudo foram de descrever as variações anatômicas do plexo braquial, desde sua origem até seus

  14. Neurological Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Celiac Disease: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Nikpour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity may initially present asone or more neurological signs and/or symptoms. On the other hand, it may be associated with or complicated by neurological manifestations. Neurological presentations are rare in children but as many as 36% of adult patients present with neurological changes. With severe malnutrition after progression of celiac disease, different vitamin deficiencies may develop. Such problems can in turn overlap with previous neurological abnormalities including ataxia,epilepsy, neuropathy, dementia, and cognitive disorders. Inthis study, we aimed to review the neurological aspects of celiac disease. Early diagnosis and treatment could prevent related disability in patients with celiac disease.

  15. Glue embolization of a ruptured celiac trunk pseudoaneurysm via the gastroduodenal artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoder, M.; Cejna, M.; Hittmaier, K.; Lammer, J. [Department of Radiology, Division of Angiography and Interventional Radiology, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Laengle, F. [Department of Surgery, Division of General Surgery, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2000-08-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter embolization of splanchnic artery aneurysms is a minimally invasive and alternative therapy to conventional surgical intervention. Due to a high-grade stenosis at the origin of the celiac trunk, a retrograde approach to the celiac trunk pseudoaneurysm via the gastroduodenal artery was necessary. To prevent undesirable embolization into the peripheral left gastric artery initial occlusion of the central portion of the left gastric artery was performed with microcoils using a Tracker catheter. Complete occlusion of the celiac trunk itself and the short adjacent segments of the celiac artery was achieved by using a mixture of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate and ethiodized oil as the embolizing agent. (orig.)

  16. Firing of an Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator: An Unusual Presentation of Celiac Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jeffry; Liu, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Celiac crisis, an atypical presentation of celiac disease, is characterized by acute diarrhea and severe metabolic derangements. This diagnosis is often missed in the differential of acute diarrheal illness. Our patient is a 69-year-old man who presented with ICD firing and was found to have profound metabolic derangements. Further evaluation revealed undiagnosed celiac disease and his symptoms resolved with a gluten-free diet. Celiac crisis should be considered in all patients presenting with acute diarrhea, metabolic acidosis, and severe electrolyte abnormalities as management can be life-saving. PMID:27761475

  17. Choroid plexus papillomas: advances in molecular biology and understanding of tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaee, Michael; Oh, Michael C; Bloch, Orin; Sun, Matthew Z; Kaur, Gurvinder; Auguste, Kurtis I; Tihan, Tarik; Parsa, Andrew T

    2013-03-01

    Choroid plexus papillomas are rare, benign tumors originating from the choroid plexus. Although generally found within the ventricular system, they can arise ectopically in the brain parenchyma or disseminate throughout the neuraxis. We sought to review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular biology and oncogenic pathways associated with this disease. A comprehensive PubMed literature review was conducted to identify manuscripts discussing the clinical, molecular, and genetic features of choroid plexus papillomas. Articles concerning diagnosis, treatment, and long-term patient outcomes were also reviewed. The introduction of atypical choroid plexus papilloma as a distinct entity has increased the need for accurate histopathologic diagnosis. Advances in immunohistochemical staining have improved our ability to differentiate choroid plexus papillomas from other intracranial tumors or metastatic lesions using combinations of key markers and mitotic indices. Recent findings have implicated Notch3 signaling, the transcription factor TWIST1, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand pathway in choroid plexus papilloma tumorigenesis. A combination of commonly occurring chromosomal duplications and deletions has also been identified. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although chemotherapy and radiotherapy may be considered for recurrent or metastatic lesions. While generally considered benign, these tumors possess a complex biology that sheds insight into other choroid plexus tumors, particularly malignant choroid plexus carcinomas. Improving our understanding of the molecular biology, genetics, and oncogenic pathways associated with this tumor will allow for the development of targeted therapies and improved outcomes for patients with this disease.

  18. Correlation Between Ultrasound Imaging, Cross-Sectional Anatomy, and Histology of the Brachial Plexus A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, Geert J.; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Joergen; Scheffer, Gert J.; Chan, Vincent W.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanato

  19. Structure of the brachial plexus root and adjacent regions displayed by ultrasound imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengyi Li; Xun Xia; Xiaoming Rong; Yamei Tang; Dachuan Xu

    2012-01-01

    Brachial plexuses of 110 healthy volunteers were examined using high resolution color Doppler ultrasound. Ultrasonic characteristics and anatomic variation in the intervertebral foramen, interscalene, supraclavicular and infraclavicular, as well as the axillary brachial plexus were investigated. Results confirmed that the normal brachial plexus on cross section exhibited round or elliptic hypoechoic texture. Longitudinal section imaging showed many parallel linear hypo-moderate echoes, with hypo-echo. The transverse processes of the seventh cervical vertebra, the scalene space, the subclavian artery and the deep cervical artery are important markers in an examination. The display rates for the interscalene, and supraclavicular and axillary brachial plexuses were 100% each, while that for the infraclavicular brachial plexus was 97%. The region where the normal brachial plexus root traversed the intervertebral foramen exhibited a regular hypo-echo. The display rate for the C5-7 nerve roots was 100%, while those for C8 and T1 were 83% and 68%, respectively. A total of 20 of the 110 subjects underwent cervical CT scan. High-frequency ultrasound can clearly display the outline of the transverse processes of the vertebrae, which were consistent with CT results. These results indicate that high-frequency ultrasound provides a new method for observing the morphology of the brachial plexus. The C7 vertebra is a marker for identifying the position of brachial plexus nerve roots.

  20. 3 T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: Structural and microstructural evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouhi, Ammar, E-mail: Ammar.Mallouhi@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Marik, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Marik@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela, E-mail: Daniela.Prayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz, E-mail: Franz.Kainberger@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bodner, Gerd, E-mail: Gerd.Bodner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kasprian, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Kasprian@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-09-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus.

  1. Vibration sensation as an indicator of surgical anesthesia following brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Jindal

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Vibration sense serves as a reliable indicator for the onset of surgical anesthesia following brachial plexus block. Vibration sense testing with 128 Hz Rydel–Seiffer tuning fork along with motor power assessment should be used as an objective tool to assess the onset of surgical anesthesia following brachial plexus block.

  2. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, Geert J; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Jörgen; Scheffer, Gert J; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanatomy is provided.

  3. Crohn's disease: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in colonic myenteric plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri J; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The role of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), remains unclear. Ultrastructural alterations in ICC in the colonic myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) have been reported previously in UC, but descriptions of ICC...... were dilated and appeared to be empty. Lipid droplets and lipofuscin-bodies were prominent in glial cells and neurons. ICC-MP were scanty but, as in controls, had caveolae, prominent intermediate filaments, cytoplasmic dense bodies, and membrane-associated dense bands with a patchy basal lamina. ICC...

  4. Obesity in children with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Avreeta K; Mills, Janith; Bauer, Andrea S; Ezaki, Marybeth

    2015-11-01

    Fetal macrosomia is associated with a 14-fold increased risk of brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), and is a predictor of childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationships between BPBP, fetal macrosomia, and childhood obesity. We retrospectively reviewed 214 children with BPBP. The average age was 8 years and 53% had a Narakas 1 grade BPBP. Overall, 49% of children were normal weight, 22% overweight, and 29% obese. Of the children with a history of fetal macrosomia, 41% were obese; a statistically significant difference. Overall quality of life scores, however, were not correlated with obesity.

  5. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Zi-hai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP. All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical

  6. Evaluation of the Endomysial Antibody for Celiac Disease: Operating Properties and Associated Cost Implications in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Atkinson

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the operating properties of endomysial antibodies (EMAs in the diagnosis of celiac disease and to examine, using a cost minimization model, different strategies used in the diagnosis of celiac disease.

  7. Nerve transfer helps repair brachial plexus injury by increasing cerebral cortical plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guixin Sun; Zuopei Wu; Xinhong Wang; Xiaoxiao Tan; Yudong Gu

    2014-01-01

    In the treatment of brachial plexus injury, nerves that are functionally less important are trans-ferred onto the distal ends of damaged crucial nerves to help recover neuromuscular function in the target region. For example, intercostal nerves are transferred onto axillary nerves, and accessory nerves are transferred onto suprascapular nerves, the phrenic nerve is transferred onto the musculocutaneous nerves, and the contralateral C7 nerve is transferred onto the median or radial nerves. Nerve transfer has become a major method for reconstructing the brachial plexus after avulsion injury. Many experiments have shown that nerve transfers for treatment of brachi-al plexus injury can help reconstruct cerebral cortical function and increase cortical plasticity. In this review article, we summarize the recent progress in the use of diverse nerve transfer methods for the repair of brachial plexus injury, and we discuss the impact of nerve transfer on cerebral cortical plasticity after brachial plexus injury.

  8. Clinical research of comprehensive rehabilitation in treating brachial plexus injury patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jun-ming; GU Yu-dong; XU Xiao-jun; ZHANG Shen-yu; ZHAO Xin

    2012-01-01

    Background Brachial plexus injury is one of the difficult medical problems in the world.The aim of this study was to observe the clinical therapeutic effect of comprehensive rehabilitation in treating dysfunction after brachial plexus injury.Methods Forty-three cases of dysfunction after brachial plexus injury were divided into two groups randomly.The treatment group,which totaled 21 patients (including 14 cases of total brachial plexus injury and seven cases of branch brachial plexus injury),was treated with comprehensive rehabilitation including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation,mid-frequency electrotherapy,Tuina therapy,and occupational therapy.The control group,which totaled 22patients (including 16 cases of total brachial plexus injury and six cases of branch brachial plexus injury),was treated with home-based electrical nerve stimulation and occupational therapy.Each course was of 30 days duration and the patients received four courses totally.After four courses,the rehabilitation effect was evaluated according to the brachial plexus function evaluation standard and electromyogram (EMG) assessment.Results In the treatment group,there was significant difference in the scores of brachial plexus function pre- and post-treatment (P <0.01 ) in both "total" and "branch" injury.The scores of two "total injury" groups had statistical differences (P <0.01),while the scores of two "branch injury" groups had statistical differences (P<0.05) after four courses.EMG suggested that the.appearance of regeneration potentials of the recipient nerves in the treatment group was earlier than the control group and had significant differences (P <0.05).Conclusion Comprehensive rehabilitation was more effective in treating dysfunction after brachial plexus injury thannonintegrated rehabilitation.

  9. Long-term Fracture Risk in Patients with Celiac Disease: A Population-Based Study in Olmsted County, Minnesota

    OpenAIRE

    Jafri, Mohammed R.; Nordstrom, Charles W.; Murray, Joseph A; Van Dyke, Carol T.; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Melton, Lee J.

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, but there are conflicting data regarding fracture risk. We determined the fracture incidence relative to matched controls in a population-based cohort with celiac disease before and after diagnosis. Olmsted County residents with celiac disease (n = 83) diagnosed between 1950 and 2002 were compared with 166 gender and age matched controls. Fracture histories were ascertained from each subject’s medical records. Celiac disease is linked ...

  10. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain; Celiac Truncus Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfu Birkan

    2016-01-01

    In this case we presented a patient who were admitted to surgery department with complaints of abdominal pain and nausea. There were no pathological findings on physical examination, direct abdominal x-ray, chest radiograph and biochemical parameters. At proximal of the celiac trunk, it was shown approximately 3x2 cm in size fusiform aneurysmal dilatation on the patient%u2019s abdominal ultrasonography and turbulence, arterial flow on the patient%u2019s abdominal doppler ultrasonography subsequently. In abdominal computed tomography we detected dense calcifications, dilatation and hypodensities that may belong to a thrombus in the lumen superior mesenteric vein (SMV. At the same time, approximately 3.5 cm segment of trunk celiak we observed aneurysm dilatation which reaching 2 cm at the widest point. Celiac trunk aneurysm is a rare cause of abdominal pain and often noticed after the complicated, thus it must always be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis.

  11. Association between celiac disease and primary lactase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, M S; Luciano, R; Ferretti, F; Muraca, M; Panetta, F; Bracci, F; Ottino, S; Diamanti, A

    2012-12-01

    Primary lactase deficiency (PLD) is a common inherited condition caused by a reduced activity of lactase. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms C/T(-13910) and G/A(-22018) upstream of the lactase gene are associated with lactase nonpersistence. In celiac disease (CD) patients, lactose intolerance could be due to secondary lactase deficiency and to PLD. The aim of this study were to evaluate the association of PLD and CD using genetic test, and to define the prevalence of PLD in celiac subjects compared with a control population. A total of 188 controls and 92 biopsy-proven CD patients were included in the study. More than 70% of all subjects were found homozygous for the polymorphisms. Differences in the prevalence of PLD were not found between CD patients and controls.In conclusions, the hereditary lactase deficiency is frequent in Italian CD children as in control population.

  12. A Case of Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Batur-Caglayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system (CNS. Since a correlation between gluten intake and incidence of MS had been reported, the relationship of antigliadin antibodies and MS was debated. Case Report. We report the case of a 45-year-old female MS patient who is under interferon treatment. After seven years of monitoring, during her routine gastroenterological assessment, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. Conclusion. Beside the neurological manifestations that have been demonstrated in about 10% of celiac disease (CD patients, white-matter abnormalities in brain MRI are uncommon and controversial. But in the literature, MS seems to be associated with CD as in our patient. We suggest that MS patients with gastroenterological complaints should undergo an assessment for CD.

  13. Organ culture system as a means to detect celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picarelli, Antonio; Libanori, Valerio; De Nitto, Daniela; Saponara, Annarita; Di Tola, Marco; Donato, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies can be produced in vitro by the intestinal mucosa of celiac disease (CD) patients in clinical remission, when the culture is performed in the presence of gliadin peptides. Our aim was to use this organ culture system as a means to detect the pathognomonic antibodies of celiac disease (CD) in the culture supernatants. Organ culture was performed in the presence of three different activators to evaluate which one induced the strongest antibody response in intestinal mucosa from patients in clinical remission of CD. Our data confirm the high efficiency of synthetic peptide 31-43 as a specific immunological activator in CD and demonstrate its capability to stimulate production/secretion of CD-specific antibodies. We envision that this organ culture system may prove to be useful as a new technique for CD diagnosis.

  14. Celiac disease: Alternatives to a gluten free diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabiana; Zingone; Pietro; Capone; Carolina; Ciacci

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine caused by the ingestion of gluten or related rye and barley proteins. At present, the only available treatment is a strict gluten-exclusion diet. However, recent understanding of the molecular basis for this disorder has improved and enabled the identif ication of targets for new therapies. This article aims to critically summarize these recent studies.

  15. Demographics, clinical features and treatment of pediatric celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tapsas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by ingestion of gluten-containing food in genetically predisposed subjects. The enteropathy is presented with a wide variety of clinical manifestations, which can occur even outside the gastrointestinal tract. In the majority of cases, the diagnosis of CD is based on a small intestinal biopsy showing mucosal alterations, i.e. intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy. The treatm...

  16. Influence of intestinal microbiota in celiac disease pathogenesis and risk

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVARES SEVILLA, MARTA

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic enteropathy triggered by cereal gluten proteins in genetically predisposed individuals. The etiology is strongly associated with the genes of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) encoding the DQ2/DQ8 molecules. Most CD patients carry this genotype but this is also present in the 40% of the general population and only a small percentage develops the disease. Thus, the HLA-DQ genotype is necessary but not solely responsible for the disease development. Gluten ...

  17. Celiac Disease in an Adoptive Child with Recurrent Giardia Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tchidjou, Hyppolite K.; De Matteis, Arianna; Di Iorio, Laura; Finocchi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an inflammatory disease of the small intestine. A complete management and differential diagnosis of such disease includes food intolerances, intestinal infections, and irritable bowel syndrome. We describe an 8-years-old adoptive girl from Congo with negative medical history. Patient followed for recurrent abdominal pain and diarrhea associated to Giardia infection, unresponsive to antiparasitic therapy. Persistence of symptoms despite antiparasitic therapy, prompted us...

  18. Principles of Proper Nutrition in Children with Celiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    H Khajavikia; N Taleschian-Tabrizi

    2014-01-01

      Introduction: Celiac disease (CD) is a hereditary disorder of the immune system which damages the mucosa of the small intestine caused by gluten consumption(even very small amounts). Villous atrophy, leads to malabsorption, which is due to decreased absorption levels. The first bowel symptoms are seen during the first 2 years of life. Currently, the only treatment is to compliance with a gluten-free diet lifelong. The purpose of this study was to introduce the principles of proper nutrition...

  19. Parallels between pathogens and gluten peptides in celiac sprue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Bethune

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens are exogenous agents capable of causing disease in susceptible organisms. In celiac sprue, a disease triggered by partially hydrolyzed gluten peptides in the small intestine, the offending immunotoxins cannot replicate, but otherwise have many hallmarks of classical pathogens. First, dietary gluten and its peptide metabolites are ubiquitous components of the modern diet, yet only a small, genetically susceptible fraction of the human population contracts celiac sprue. Second, immunotoxic gluten peptides have certain unusual structural features that allow them to survive the harsh proteolytic conditions of the gastrointestinal tract and thereby interact extensively with the mucosal lining of the small intestine. Third, they invade across epithelial barriers intact to access the underlying gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Fourth, they possess recognition sequences for selective modification by an endogenous enzyme, transglutaminase 2, allowing for in situ activation to a more immunotoxic form via host subversion. Fifth, they precipitate a T cell-mediated immune reaction comprising both innate and adaptive responses that causes chronic inflammation of the small intestine. Sixth, complete elimination of immunotoxic gluten peptides from the celiac diet results in remission, whereas reintroduction of gluten in the diet causes relapse. Therefore, in analogy with antibiotics, orally administered proteases that reduce the host's exposure to the immunotoxin by accelerating gluten peptide destruction have considerable therapeutic potential. Last but not least, notwithstanding the power of in vitro methods to reconstitute the essence of the immune response to gluten in a celiac patient, animal models for the disease, while elusive, are likely to yield fundamentally new systems-level insights.

  20. Rapid, automated mosaicking of the human corneal subbasal nerve plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishnav, Yash J; Rucker, Stuart A; Saharia, Keshav; McNamara, Nancy A

    2017-03-04

    Corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) is an in vivo technique used to study corneal nerve morphology. The largest proportion of nerves innervating the cornea lie within the subbasal nerve plexus, where their morphology is altered by refractive surgery, diabetes and dry eye. The main limitations to clinical use of CCM as a diagnostic tool are the small field of view of CCM images and the lengthy time needed to quantify nerves in collected images. Here, we present a novel, rapid, fully automated technique to mosaic individual CCM images into wide-field maps of corneal nerves. We implemented an OpenCV image stitcher that accounts for corneal deformation and uses feature detection to stitch CCM images into a montage. The method takes 3-5 min to process and stitch 40-100 frames on an Amazon EC2 Micro instance. The speed, automation and ease of use conferred by this technique is the first step toward point of care evaluation of wide-field subbasal plexus (SBP) maps in a clinical setting.

  1. USE OF DEXMEDETOMIDINE ALONG WITH BUPIVACAINE FOR BRACHIAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Gandhi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Supraclavicular brachial plexus block provides safe, effective, low cost anaesthesia with good postoperative analgesia. This study was conducted to compare the postoperative analgesic efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine for brachial plexus blockade along with bupivacaine. Methodology: This prospective double blind study was conducted on 70 patients of age 18 to 60 years posted for various upper limb surgeries and randomly allocated into two equal groups of 35 each. Control group-C received injection bupivacaine (0.25% 38 milliliter plus 2 milliliter normal saline, dexmedetomidine group-D received injection bupivacaine (0.25% 38 milliliter plus dexmedetomidine 30 microgram (2 milliliter. Assessment of motor and sensory blockade, pulse, systolic blood pressure, respiration and side effects were noted every 5 minutes for first 30 minute and every 10 minute till end of surgery. Duration of analgesia and incidence of various complications following the procedure were observed. Results: It was observed that in control group onset of motor and sensory blockade was faster. Where as, dexmedetomidine group have better hemodynamic stability and greater postoperative analgesia. Only two cases of bradycardia and two cases of hypotension were noticed in dexmedetomidine group-D. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(1.000: 67-69

  2. Our experience on brachial plexus blockade in upper extremity surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Uslukaya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Peripheral nerve blocks are usually used either alone or along with general anesthesia for postoperative analgesia. We also aimed to present the results and experiences.Materials and methods: This retrospective study was conducted to scan the files of patients who underwent orthopedic upper extremity surgery with peripheral nerve block between September 2009 and October 2010. After ethics committee approval was obtained, 114 patients who were ASA physical status I-III, aged 18-70, performed upper extremity surgery in the Orthopedics and Traumatology Clinic were included to study. Patients’ demographic data, clinical diagnoses, premedication status, peripheral block type, local anesthetic dose, stimuplex needle types, hemodynamic parameters at the during surgery, the first postoperative analgesic requirements, complications and patient satisfaction were recorded.Results: Demographic data were similar to each other. Brachial plexus block was commonly performed for the forearm surgery. Infraclavicular block was performed the most frequently to patients. As the classical methods in the supine position were preferred in 98.2% of patients, Stimuplex A needle (B. Braun, Melsungen AG, Germany have been used for blockage in 80.7% of patients. Also, in 54.4% of patients, 30 ml of local anesthetic solution composed of bupivacaine + prilocaine was used for blockade. Blocks applied to patients had provided adequate anesthesia.Conclusion: Since the brachial plexus blockade guided peripheral nerve stimulator for upper extremity surgery provide adequate depth of anesthesia and analgesia, it may be a good alternative to general anesthesia because of unwanted side effects

  3. Bovine milk intolerance in celiac disease is related to IgA reactivity to alpha- and beta-caseins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; de la Barca, Ana María Calderón

    2009-06-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease triggered mainly by ingestion of wheat gluten proteins. However, some other dietary proteins, such as those of cow's milk, induce celiac disease-like symptoms in some patients with celiac disease. Different approaches have been done to detect the component responsible for this problem, including the possibility of gluten peptides present in cow's milk.

  4. The Spectrum of Differences between Childhood and Adulthood Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachele Ciccocioppo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An old saying states that ‘’children are not little adults” and this certainly holds true for celiac disease, as there are many peculiar aspects regarding its epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical presentations, associated diseases, and response to treatment in pediatric compared to adult populations, to such an extent that it merits a description of its own. In fact, contrary to the past when it was thought that celiac disease was a disorder predominantly affecting childhood and characterized by a malabsorption syndrome, nowadays it is well recognized that it affects also adult and elderly people with an impressive variability of clinical presentation. In general, the clinical guidelines for diagnosis recommend starting with specific serologic testing in all suspected subjects, including those suffering from extraintestinal related conditions, and performing upper endoscopy with appropriate biopsy sampling of duodenal mucosa in case of positivity. The latter may be omitted in young patients showing high titers of anti-transglutaminase antibodies. The subsequent management of a celiac patient differs substantially depending on the age at diagnosis and should be based on the important consideration that this is a lifelong condition.

  5. The broad spectrum of celiac disease and gluten sensitive enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOCAN, OANA; DUMITRAŞCU, DAN L.

    2016-01-01

    The celiac disease is an immune chronic condition with genetic transmission, caused by the intolerance to gluten. Gluten is a protein from cereals containing the following soluble proteins: gliadine, which is the most toxic, and the prolamins. The average prevalence is about 1% in USA and Europe, but high in Africa: 5.6% in West Sahara. In the pathogenesis several factors are involved: gluten as external trigger, genetic predisposition (HLA, MYO9B), viral infections, abnormal immune reaction to gluten. Severity is correlated with the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes, cryptic hyperplasia and villous atrophy, as well as with the length of intestinal involvement. The severity is assessed according to the Marsh–Oberhuber staging. Diagnostic criteria are: positive serological tests, intestinal biopsy, the reversal after gluten free diet (GFD). Beside refractory forms, new conditions have been described, like the non celiac gluten intolerance. In a time when more and more people adhere to GFD for nonscientific reasons, practitioners should be updated with the progress in celiac disease knowledge. PMID:27547052

  6. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: Time for sifting the grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-07-21

    In the last few years, a new nomenclature has been proposed for the disease induced by the ingestion of gluten, a protein present in wheat, rice, barley and oats. Besides celiac disease and wheat allergy, the most studied forms of gluten-related disorders characterized by an evident immune mechanism (autoimmune in celiac disease and IgE-mediated in wheat allergy), a new entity has been included, apparently not driven by an aberrant immune response: the non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). NCGS is characterized by a heterogeneous clinical picture with intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms arising after gluten ingestion and rapidly improving after its withdrawal from the diet. The pathogenesis of NCGS is largely unknown, but a mixture of factors such as the stimulation of the innate immune system, the direct cytotoxic effects of gluten, and probably the synergy with other wheat molecules, are clues for the complicated puzzle. In addition, the diagnostic procedures still remain problematic due to the absence of efficient diagnostic markers; thus, diagnosis is based upon the symptomatic response to a gluten-free diet and the recurrence of symptoms after gluten reintroduction with the possibility of an important involvement of a placebo effect. The temporary withdrawal of gluten seems a reasonable therapy, but the timing of gluten reintroduction and the correct patient management approach are have not yet been determined.

  7. The broad spectrum of celiac disease and gluten sensitive enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocan, Oana; Dumitraşcu, Dan L

    2016-01-01

    The celiac disease is an immune chronic condition with genetic transmission, caused by the intolerance to gluten. Gluten is a protein from cereals containing the following soluble proteins: gliadine, which is the most toxic, and the prolamins. The average prevalence is about 1% in USA and Europe, but high in Africa: 5.6% in West Sahara. In the pathogenesis several factors are involved: gluten as external trigger, genetic predisposition (HLA, MYO9B), viral infections, abnormal immune reaction to gluten. Severity is correlated with the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes, cryptic hyperplasia and villous atrophy, as well as with the length of intestinal involvement. The severity is assessed according to the Marsh-Oberhuber staging. Diagnostic criteria are: positive serological tests, intestinal biopsy, the reversal after gluten free diet (GFD). Beside refractory forms, new conditions have been described, like the non celiac gluten intolerance. In a time when more and more people adhere to GFD for nonscientific reasons, practitioners should be updated with the progress in celiac disease knowledge.

  8. Epidemiology of celiac disease in iran: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami Nejad, M; Rostami, K; Emami, Mh; Zali, Mr; Malekzadeh, R

    2011-03-01

    Celiac disease (CD) was traditionally believed to be a chronic enteropathy, almost exclusively affecting people of European origin. Celiac disease is the permanent intolerance to dietary gluten, the major protein component of wheat. The availability of new, simple, very sensitive and specific serological tests has shown that CD is as common in Middle Eastern countries as in Europe, Australia and New Zealand where the major dietary staple is wheat. A high prevalence of CD has been found in Iran, in both the general population and the at-risk groups, i.e. patients with type 1 diabetes or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In developing countries, serological testing in at risk groups is necessary for early identification of celiac patients. Clinical studies show that presentation with non-specific symptoms or a lack of symptoms is as common in the Middle East as in Europe. Wheat is a major component of the Iranian diet and exposure to wheat proteins induces some degree of immune tolerance, leading to milder symptoms that may be mistaken with other GI disorders. The implementation of gluten free diet (GFD) is a major challenge for both patients and clinicians in Iran, especially since commercial gluten-free products are not available in this area.

  9. Redo thoracic endovascular aortic repair due to endoleak with celiac artery snorkeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planer, David; Bliagos, Dimitrios; Gray, William A

    2011-10-01

    Reintervention due to endoleak of aortic endograft repair is often challenging. Herein, we report endovascular endoleak repair in a patient with previous thoracic and abdominal endovascular grafts with extensive coverage of the aorta. The present technique included snorkeling of the celiac trunk to preserve antegrade flow in the celiac artery and to maintain future options for reintervention.

  10. Aneurysms of Peripancreatic Arterial Arcades Coexisting with Celiac Trunk Stenosis or Occlusion: Single Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniak, Robert; Grabowska-Derlatka, Laretta; Nawrot, Ireneusz; Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Rowiński, Olgierd

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. True aneurysms of peripancreatic arterial arcades (PAAAs) are rare. Most of them coexist with celiac axis stenosis/occlusion due to median arcuate ligament (MAL) compression or atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cause of celiac axis lesion and characterize the anatomy of the aneurysms. These findings may have important management implications. Material and Methods. A retrospective analysis of 15 patients with true PAAAs was performed. The diagnosis was established by contrast-enhanced CT, using a 64-MDCT scanner. We evaluated the most probable cause of celiac axis lesion. Aneurysms were characterized by their number, location, size, and morphology. Location of the aneurysms was classified either as pancreaticoduodenal arteries (PDA) or as dorsal pancreatic arteries (DPA) as they may represent different collateral pathways between superior mesenteric artery and celiac trunk. Results. A total of 32 true PAAAs were identified. Celiac trunk was occluded in 12 patients and critically narrowed in 3 patients. Celiac axis lesion was categorized as secondary to MAL compression in 14 cases and due to atherosclerosis in 1 case. The most common location of the aneurysms was inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries. Only in 1 case aneurysms involved both PDA and DPA. Conclusions. Coexistence of PAAAs with celiac axis compression as well as involvement of either PDAs or DPAs has important therapeutic implications. The uninvolved collateral pathway may be sufficient to preserve effective circulation in celiac trunk branches in case of resection or embolization of the aneurysms. However, further studies are crucial to confirm our findings.

  11. The surface-associated proteins of wheat starch granules: suitability of wheat starch for celiac patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat starch is used to make baked products for celiac patients in several European countries, but is avoided in the US because of uncertainty about the amounts of associated grain storage (gluten) proteins. People with celiac disease (CD) must avoid wheat, rye and barley proteins and products that...

  12. Importance of diastolic velocities in the detection of celiac and mesenteric artery disease by duplex ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Just, S; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease.......To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease....

  13. Positive Celiac Disease Serology and Reduced Bone Mineral Density in Adult Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R Duerksen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low bone density and osteoporosis have been demonstrated in celiac disease populations in Europe, South America and the United States. Serological testing with tissue transglutaminase (TTG and immunoglobulin A endomysial (EMA antibodies is highly specific for celiac disease, while antigliadin antibody (AGA testing is less specific.

  14. Autoimmune Disease in First-Degree Relatives and Spouses of Individuals With Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emilsson, Louise; Wijmenga, Cisca; Murray, Joseph A.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: First-degree relatives of individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk for this disorder, but little is known about their risk for other autoimmune diseases. We assessed the risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease in first-degree relatives and spouses of people with celiac d

  15. Asymptomatic Celiac Disease in Children with Trisomy 21 at 26 Months of Age or Less

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J. Roizen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of asymptomatic celiac disease identified in children with Down syndrome after being screened at around twenty-four months of age.  These cases raise the question as to what age is screening for celiac disease indicated in a child with Down syndrome and no symptoms.

  16. Celiac lesion T cells recognize epitopes that cluster in regions of gliadins rich in proline residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentz-Hansen, Helene; McAdam, Stephen N; Molberg, Øyvind

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Celiac disease is a gluten-induced enteropathy that shows a strong association with HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8. Gluten-specific T cells, invariably restricted by DQ2 or DQ8, can be isolated from celiac lesions. Such gut-derived T cells have a preference for recognition of gluten that has...

  17. Brachial and lumbar plexuses in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: MRI assessment including apparent diffusion coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Yuko; Sato, Noriko; Yamashita, Fumio; Kida, Jiro; Takahashi, Tomoyuki [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Radiology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Tomoko [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Neurology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Sasaki, Masayuki; Komaki, Hirofumi [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Child Neurology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Saitama Medial University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Iruma-gun, Saitama (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Our purpose was to clarify the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the brachial and lumbar plexuses in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) using various kinds of sequences, including diffusion-weighted images (DWI). We evaluated the MR imaging findings for lumbar and/or brachial nerve plexuses in 13 CIDP patients and 11 normal volunteers. The nerve swelling was evaluated in comparison with normal controls by coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), and signal abnormalities were evaluated by coronal STIR, T1-weighted images, and DWIs. The degrees of contrast enhancement and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the plexus were also assessed. In the patient group, diffuse enlargement and abnormally high signals were detected in 16 out of 24 plexuses (66.7%) on STIR, a slightly high signal was detected in 12 of 24 plexuses (50%) on T1-weighted images, and a high-intensity signal was detected in 10 of 18 plexuses (55.6%) on DWIs with high ADC values. Contrast enhancement of the plexuses was revealed in 6 of 19 plexuses (31.6%) and was mild in all cases. There were statistically significant differences between the ADC values of patients with either swelling or abnormal signals and those of both normal volunteers and patients without neither swelling nor abnormal signals. There were no relationships between MR imaging and any clinical findings. STIR is sufficient to assist clinicians in diagnosing CIDP. T1-weighted images and DWIs seemed useful for speculating about the pathological changes in swollen plexuses in CIDP patients. (orig.)

  18. Squamous cell carcinoma of hypopharynx in a patient with history of celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Akhavan; A Seifadini

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is a gluten-related malabsorption in small intestine occurring in genetically susceptible patients. In this disease the risk of many malignancies is increased the most important of which being non-Hodgkin lymphoma of small intestine. Other malignancies include adenocarcinoma of small intestine and squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus and melanoma. As to our knowledge so far only one case of celiac disease associated with hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma has been reported. In this article we presented a patient suffering from celiac disease with squamous cell carcinoma of hypopharynx. She underwent chemotherapy and radiation therapy, unfortunately however she died because of progress of disease. So, in patients with celiac disease we should pay attention to various malignancies and when cases of cancers are accompanied by malabsorption we must think of celiac disease involvement.

  19. Is Celiac Disease an Etiological Factor in Children with Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Taner; Balcı, Oya; Özçay, Figen; Bayraktar, Nilufer; Alehan, Füsun

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with nonsyndromic intellectual disability, we investigated serum levels of tissue transglutaminase antibody and total IgA from 232 children with nonsyndromic intellectual disability and in a healthy control group of 239 children. Study participants who were positive for tissue transglutaminase antibody underwent a duodenal biopsy. A total of 3 patients in the nonsyndromic intellectual disability group (5.45%) and 1 in the control group (0.41%) had positive serum tissue transglutaminase antibody (P > .05). Duodenal biopsy confirmed celiac disease in only 1 patient who had nonsyndromic intellectual disability. In this present study, children with nonsyndromic intellectual disability did not exhibit a higher celiac disease prevalence rate compared with healthy controls. Therefore, we suggest that screening test for celiac disease should not be necessary as a part of the management of mild and moderate nonsyndromic intellectual disability. However, cases of severe nonsyndromic intellectual disability could be examined for celiac disease.

  20. Choroid plexus tumors: An institutional series of 25 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Girish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Choroid plexus tumors (CPT are rare neoplasms that pose considerable treatment challenges. This study reviews a single institute′s experience with 25 patients of CPT and attempts to contribute to the general body of knowledge on CPT. Materials and Methods : A retrospective analysis of the case records of 25 patients operated for CPT since January 1998 and having a minimum of 1 year follow-up. Results : The study group included 12 (48% cases of choroid plexus papilloma (CPP, 09 (36% cases of choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC and 4 cases of atypical CPP. The mean age at presentation was 18.6 years (range, 6 months to 54 years; SD, 18.7 and a male preponderance was noted (17:8. Raised intracranial pressure was the commonest presenting symptom (72%. The tumors were distributed as follows: lateral ventricle (16; 64%, fourth ventricle (5; 20%, fourth ventricle with cerebellopontine angle extension (3; 12%, and third ventricle (1; 4%. A complete surgical excision was achieved in 11 cases of CPP and 8 cases of CPC. Operative complications include pneumocephalus (40%, focal deficits (36%, subdural effusion (32%, and persistent hydrocephalus requiring shunt (24%. All patients with CPP had a good outcome at the end of a mean follow-up of 5.4 years, whereas the median survival for patients with CPCs who underwent a subtotal resection with adjuvant therapy was 36 months. Conclusion : CPTs include a spectra ranging from CPP to CPC. Radiologic and histologic characterization of these tumors is difficult and newer immunohistochemical and genetic studies should be done to differentiate them from each other. Total excision offers a good prognosis and should be attempted for all forms of CPTs. CPPs carry a good prognosis, and adjuvant therapy is not indicated even after partial excision. CPCs and atypical CPCs carry a poor prognosis, and adjuvant therapy improves survival marginally after total excision. Spinal drop metastases are common for CPC and

  1. Intestinal T-cell responses in celiac disease - impact of celiac disease associated bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Sjöberg

    Full Text Available A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD, an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequently seen in patients with CD during the "Swedish CD epidemic" and bacterial candidates could later be isolated from patients born during the epidemic suggesting long-lasting changes in the gut microbiota. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A plays a role in both inflammation and anti-bacterial responses. In active CD IL-17A was produced by both CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 and CD4(+ T cells (Th17, with intraepithelial Tc17 cells being the dominant producers. Gluten peptides as well as CD associated bacteria induced IL-17A responses in ex vivo challenged biopsies from patients with inactive CD. The IL-17A response was suppressed in patients born during the epidemic when a mixture of CD associated bacteria was added to gluten, while the reverse was the case in patients born after the epidemic. Under these conditions Th17 cells were the dominant producers. Thus Tc17 and Th17 responses to gluten and bacteria seem to pave the way for the chronic disease with interferon-γ-production by intraepithelial Tc1 cells and lamina propria Th1 cells. The CD associated bacteria and the dysbiosis they might cause in the resident microbiota may be a risk factor for CD either by directly influencing the immune responses in the mucosa or by enhancing inflammatory responses to gluten.

  2. Intestinal T-cell responses in celiac disease - impact of celiac disease associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Veronika; Sandström, Olof; Hedberg, Maria; Hammarström, Sten; Hernell, Olle; Hammarström, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD), an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequently seen in patients with CD during the "Swedish CD epidemic" and bacterial candidates could later be isolated from patients born during the epidemic suggesting long-lasting changes in the gut microbiota. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) plays a role in both inflammation and anti-bacterial responses. In active CD IL-17A was produced by both CD8(+) T cells (Tc17) and CD4(+) T cells (Th17), with intraepithelial Tc17 cells being the dominant producers. Gluten peptides as well as CD associated bacteria induced IL-17A responses in ex vivo challenged biopsies from patients with inactive CD. The IL-17A response was suppressed in patients born during the epidemic when a mixture of CD associated bacteria was added to gluten, while the reverse was the case in patients born after the epidemic. Under these conditions Th17 cells were the dominant producers. Thus Tc17 and Th17 responses to gluten and bacteria seem to pave the way for the chronic disease with interferon-γ-production by intraepithelial Tc1 cells and lamina propria Th1 cells. The CD associated bacteria and the dysbiosis they might cause in the resident microbiota may be a risk factor for CD either by directly influencing the immune responses in the mucosa or by enhancing inflammatory responses to gluten.

  3. Validation of celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register using duodenal biopsies, celiac disease-specific antibodies, and human leukocyte-antigen genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Stine Dydensborg; Stordal, Ketil; Hansen, Tine Plato

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. To validate the diagnoses, we used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank) and information on celiac disease......-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes obtained from patient medical records. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included all the children who were born from 1995 to 2012 and who were registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. We reviewed all the pathology reports...... on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank and the information in the medical records on celiac disease-specific antibodies (ie, anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG) and HLA genotypes. RESULTS: We identified 2,247 children who were...

  4. Choroid plexus papilloma originating in the sella turcica--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameshima, Tetsuro; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Sugimura, Toshihide; Izumi, Naoto; Seki, Toshitaka; Maeda, Takahiro; Tsuboi, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Masaaki; Kimura, Teruo; Nabeshima, Kazuki

    2010-01-01

    A 51-year-old female presented with a rare case of choroid plexus papilloma originating in the sella turcica manifesting as headaches that was not readily distinguishable preoperatively from pituitary adenoma. Head magnetic resonance imaging revealed a tumor extending from the sella turcica to the suprasellar cistern. The tumor was removed via an endonasal transsphenoidal approach. Histological examination indicated a papillary structure covered with a layer of columnar epithelial cells that resembled normal choroid plexus. These findings, together with immunohistochemistry, led to a diagnosis of choroid plexus papilloma.

  5. Transcultural adaptation and validation of the Celiac Disease Quality of Life (CD-QOL survey, a specific questionnaire to measure quality of life in patients with celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Casellas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: celiac disease is a chronic condition that requires continued treatment, with the resultant impact on health-related quality of life (HRQOL of people who suffer it. Most studies in this field have used generic questionnaires to measure HRQOL in celiac patients. It was therefore decided to conduct a study to translate into Spanish and validate a specific questionnaire for celiac disease, the Celiac Disease Quality Of Life Survey (CD-QOL. Objectives: to translate and validate in Spanish the specific celiac disease questionnaire CD-QOL. Methods: a multicenter, prospective, observational study was designed consisting of two phases: In the first phase, the questionnaire was translated and adapted into Spanish using the translation/back translation procedure and an understandability study. In the second phase, internal consistency of the translated questionnaire was analyzed. For this, results of the CD-QOL were compared to those of EuroQol and the Daily Fatigue Impact Scale (D-FIS. Understandability of the translated and adapted questionnaire was tested in six patients, and the validation study was done in 298 celiac patients (201 treated with a gluten-free diet and 97 at diagnosis. Results: in both celiac groups, Cronbach's alpha coefficient was high (0.90, feasibility was excellent (99.2 % of patients completed all questions, and there were no ceiling and floor effects. Spearman correlation to EuroQol and D-FIS was statistically significant (p < 0.05. CD-QOL score was different depending on whether state of health was good, fair, or poor based on the EuroQol score. Conclusion: the Spanish version of the CD-QOL is a valid tool for measuring HRQOL in celiac patients.

  6. Lack of evidence of the effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants (under the age of two years) diagnosed with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Gelding, Bronwyn

    2006-12-01

    Background  Obstetric brachial plexus palsy, which occurs in 1-3 per 1000 live births, results from traction and/or compression of the brachial plexus in utero, during descent through the birth canal or during delivery. This results in a spectrum of injuries that range in extent of damage and severity and can lead to a lifelong impairment and functional difficulties associated with the use of the affected upper limb. Most infants diagnosed with obstetric brachial plexus palsy receive treatment, such as surgery to the brachial plexus, physiotherapy or occupational therapy, within the first months of life. However, there is controversy regarding the most effective form of management. This review follows on from our previous systematic review which investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management in infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. This systematic review focuses on the effects of primary surgery. Objectives  The objective of this review was to systematically assess and collate all available evidence on effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Search strategy  A systematic literature search was performed using 13 databases: TRIP, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Proquest 5000, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Expanded Academic ASAP, Meditext, Science Direct, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, the Australian Digital Thesis program. Those studies that were reported in English and published between July 1992 to June 2004 were included in this review. Selection criteria  Quantitative studies that investigated the effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were eligible for inclusion into this review. This excluded studies where infants were solely managed conservatively or with pharmacological agents, or underwent surgery for the management of

  7. Misdiagnosis of Brachial Plexus Schwannoma as Cervical Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Khajepour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are relatively rare but benign nerve sheath tumors deriving from Schwann cells with low tendency of transformation to malignancy. Extracranial shwannomas usually present insidiously and thus are often diagnosed incorrectly or after lengthy delays. We present the case of a 51 years old female patient with chronic cervical pain radiating in left upper limb who was treated as cervical radiculopathy for 5 years. By aggrevation of pain and paresthesia, imaging and electrodiagnostic study revealed schwannoma of brachial plexus. In case of radiating pain and paresthesia in upper limb (such as this case symptoms can be misleading for cervical radiculopathy but careful examination especialy in persistence of symptoms with negative imaging results for radiculopathies are important and electrodiagnostic study can be helpful.

  8. Brachial plexus injury: the London experience with supraclavicular traction lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Rolfe

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author details the experiences of his hospital and other London hospitals in treating brachial plexus injury. As noted, important advances have been made in methods of diagnosis and repair. Myelography was replaced by CT scan and later by MRI. Among the topics the author explores are diagnosis (including pain, the presence or absence of the Tinel sign, and the irradiation of pins and needles) and the principles of repair. The author emphasizes that it is imperative that ruptured nerves be repaired as soon as possible, with the closed traction lesion coming, in urgency, close behind reattachment of the amputated hand or repair of a great artery and a trunk nerve in the combined lesion. Finally, the article concludes that the surgeon must be actively engaged in the whole process of rehabilitation and treatment of pain. This is part of a Point-Counterpoint discussion with Dr. David G. Kline's presentation of "A Personal Experience."

  9. [Continuous lumbar plexus block sets in France. Our experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascurain, P; Breining, T; Labbani, L; Le Gourrier, L; Lupescu, R; Gaertner, E

    2003-12-01

    The undeniable postoperative analgesia brought by the lumbar plexus block among patients scheduled for major surgery of the hip or knee justifies, the setting of a catheter to allow a continues analgesia more durable. Having drawn aside the difficulties of the daily practice (in allusion to the number of blocks carried out per day) and anatomical variations, the failure of the perineural catheter setting is in direct relationship with the material used by the anaesthesiologists for neurostimulation. The presentation of a case report describes a failure of catheter introduction due to the canula in deep continuous blocks, and the advantages and disadvantages of the various sets of neurostimulation. The authors conclude that the sets with the "catheter through the needle" are to be recommended, particularly the stimulating Tuohy needle.

  10. Technical note: the humeral canal approach to the brachial plexus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Frizelle, H P

    2012-02-03

    Many variations to the axillary approach to the brachial plexus have been described. However, the success rate varies depending on the approach used and on the definition of success. Recent work describes a new approach to regional anaesthesia of the upper limb at the humeral\\/brachial canal using selective stimulation of the major nerves. This report outlines initial experience with this block, describing the technique and results in 50 patients undergoing hand and forearm surgery. All patients were assessed for completeness of motor and sensory block. The overall success rate was 90 percent. Motor block was present in 80 percent of patients. Completion of the block was necessary in 5 patients. Two patients required general anaesthesia. The preponderance of ulnar deficiencies agrees with previously published data on this technique. No complications were described. Initial experience confirms the high success rate described using the Dupre technique. This technically straightforward approach with minimal complications can be recommended for regional anaesthesia of the upper limb.

  11. Clinical benefit of a gluten-free diet in type 1 diabetic children with screening-detected celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte; Brock-Jacobsen, Bendt; Lund, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to 1) determine the prevalence of celiac disease in Danish children with type 1 diabetes and 2) estimate the clinical effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) in patients with diabetes and celiac disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In a region comprising 24......% of the Danish population, all patients celiac disease was suspected in patients with endomysium and tissue transglutaminase antibodies in serum and confirmed by intestinal biopsy. Patients with celiac...... disease were followed for 2 years while consuming a GFD. RESULTS: In 28 of 33 patients with celiac antibodies, an intestinal biopsy showed villous atrophy. In 5 patients, celiac disease had been diagnosed previously, giving an overall prevalence of 12.3% (95% CI 8.6-16.9). Patients with celiac disease had...

  12. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and children, and all specialists treating upper extremity injuries. Participants The evidence interpretation and recommendation consensus team (Canadian OBPI Working Group) was composed of clinicians representing each of Canada's 10 multidisciplinary centres. Outcome measures An electronic modified Delphi approach was used for consensus, with agreement criteria defined a priori. Quality indicators for referral to a multidisciplinary centre were established by consensus. An original meta-analysis of primary nerve repair and review of Canadian epidemiology and burden were previously completed. Results 7 recommendations address clinical gaps and guide identification, referral, treatment and outcome assessment: (1) physically examine for OBPI in newborns with arm asymmetry or risk factors; (2) refer newborns with OBPI to a multidisciplinary centre by 1 month; (3) provide pregnancy/birth history and physical examination findings at birth; (4) multidisciplinary centres should include a therapist and peripheral nerve surgeon experienced with OBPI; (5) physical therapy should be advised by a multidisciplinary team; (6) microsurgical nerve repair is indicated in root avulsion and other OBPI meeting centre operative criteria; (7) the common data set includes the Narakas classification, limb length, Active Movement Scale (AMS) and Brachial Plexus Outcome Measure (BPOM) 2 years after birth/surgery. Conclusions The process established a new network of opinion leaders and researchers for further

  13. Radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Mondrup, K.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology R)

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and latency period of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients by a neurological follow-up examination at least 60 months (range 67-130 months) after the primary treatment. All patients were treated primarily with simple mastectomy, axillary nodal sampling and radiotherapy (RT). Postoperatively, pre- and postmenopausal patients were randomly allocated chemotherapy for antiestrogen treatment. All patients were recurrence-free at time of examination. Clinically, 35% (25-47%) of the patients had RBP; 19% (11-29%) had definite RBP, i.e. were physically disabled, and 16% (9-26%) had probable RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-35%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%) of cases assessment of a definite level was not possible. RBP was more common after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (42%) than after radiotherapy alone (26%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The incidence of definite RBP was significantly higher in the younger age group (p = 0.02). This could be due to more extensive axillary surgery but also to the fact that chemotherapy was given to most premenopausal patients. In most patients with RBP the symptoms began during or immediately after radiotherapy, and were thus without significant latency. Chemotherapy might enhance the radiation-induced effect on nerve tissue, thus diminishing the latency period. Lymphedema was present in 22% (14-32%), especially in the older patients, and not associated with the development of RBP. In conclusion, the damaging effect of RT on peripheral nerve tissue was documented. Since no successful treatment is available, restricted use of RT to the brachial plexus is warranted, especially when administered concomitantly with cytotoxic therapy. (orig.).

  14. On the morphology of the brachial plexus of the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, M; Sakai, T

    1997-04-01

    Four forelimbs of 3 platypuses and 3 forelimbs of 2 echidnas were examined to study the precise form of the brachial plexus and to clarify the structural characteristics of the brachial plexus in phylogeny. The spinal components contributing to the plexus (C4-T2) and the formation patterns of the 3 trunks of the plexus were the same as those generally observed in mammals. In the cranial half of the brachial plexus from C4, 5 and 6 in monotremes, division into the ventral bundle (lateral cord) and dorsal bundle (axillary nerve) is clear, as in other mammals. However, for monotremes, in the caudal half of the plexus from C7 and T1 (+T2) and the nerves arising from the caudal plexus there is no definite division into the ventral and dorsal bundles, which distribute to the flexor and extensor parts of the forelimbs, respectively. The lower trunk of the monotreme brachial plexus forms a cord which contains both ventral and dorsal components. This characteristic diverges from the generally accepted idea that the tetrapod limb plexus is divided clearly into 2 layers: a dorsal layer for extensors and a ventral layer for flexors of the limb. Considering the incomplete dorsoventral division of forelimb nerves in some reptiles and urodeles, the caudal half of the monotreme brachial plexus has characteristics in common with those of lower tetrapods.

  15. Reliability of 3D upper limb motion analysis in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Judy; Malone, Ailish; Kiernan, Damien; Meldrum, Dara

    2017-03-01

    Kinematics, measured by 3D upper limb motion analysis (3D-ULMA), can potentially increase understanding of movement patterns by quantifying individual joint contributions. Reliability in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) has not been established.

  16. MRI of the brachial plexus and its region: anatomy and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouter van Es, H. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Witkamp, T.D. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Feldberg, M.A.M. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1995-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brachial plexus and its region has become the imaging modality of choice, due to its multiplanar capabilities and inherent contrast differences between the brachial plexus, related vessels, and surrounding fat. A total of 41 patients with clinically suspected brachial plexus pathology or tumors in its region were studied. A normal anatomy was found in 12 patients. Pathologic entities included: traumatic nerve-root avulsion (n = 2), hematoma (n = 1), postoperative changes after scalenotomy (n = 2), primary tumor of the brachial plexus (n = 2), primary (n = 8) and metastatic (n = 1) tumors in the superior sulcus, primary (n = 5) and metastatic (n = 4) tumors in the axillary, supra- or infraclavicular region, and changes after nodal dissection and radiation therapy for breast carcinoma (n = 5; 1 patient also had had a prior scalenotomy). There was a positive correlation with surgery in 11 patients, and a negative correlation in 1 patient. (orig.)

  17. Neurolymphomatosis of Brachial Plexus in Patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jun Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurolymphomatosis (NL is a rare clinical disease where neoplastic cells invade the cranial nerves and peripheral nerve roots, plexus, or other nerves in patients with hematologic malignancy. Most NL cases are caused by B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. Diagnosis can be made by imaging with positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We experienced two cases of NL involving the brachial plexus in patients with NHL. One patient, who had NHL with central nervous system (CNS involvement, experienced complete remission after 8 cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy but relapsed into NL of the brachial plexus 5 months later. The other patient, who suffered from primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, had been undergoing chemoradiotherapy but progressed to NL of the brachial plexus.

  18. Neuroanatomy of the brachial plexus: normal and variant anatomy of its formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth O; Vekris, Marios; Demesticha, Theano; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2010-03-01

    The brachial plexus is the complex network of nerves, extending from the neck to the axilla, which supplies motor, sensory, and sympathetic fibers to the upper extremity. Typically, it is formed by the union of the ventral primary rami of the spinal nerves, C5-C8 & T1, the so-called "roots" of the brachial plexus. By examining the neural architecture of the brachial plexus, the most constant arrangement of nerve fibers can be delineated, and the most predominate variations in the neural architecture defined. A thorough understanding of the neuroanatomy of the brachial plexus, with an appreciation of the possible anatomic variations that may occur is necessary for effective clinical practice.

  19. Neonatal brachial plexus injury: comparison of incidence and antecedents between 2 decades.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer M

    2011-04-01

    We sought to compare the incidence and antecedents of neonatal brachial plexus injury (BPI) in 2 different 5-year epochs a decade apart following the introduction of specific staff training in the management of shoulder dystocia.

  20. Restoration and protection of brachial plexus injur y:hot topics in the last decade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaizhi Zhang; Zheng Lv; Jun Liu; He Zhu; Rui Li

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is frequently induced by injuries, accidents or birth trauma. Upper limb function may be partially or totally lost after injury, or left permanently disabled. With the de-velopment of various medical technologies, different types of interventions are used, but their effectiveness is wide ranging. Many repair methods have phasic characteristics, i.e., repairs are done in different phases. This study explored research progress and hot topic methods for pro-tection after brachial plexus injury, by analyzing 1,797 articles concerning the repair of brachial plexus injuries, published between 2004 and 2013 and indexed by the Science Citation Index database. Results revealed that there are many methods used to repair brachial plexus injury, and their effects are varied. Intervention methods include nerve transfer surgery, electrical stimula-tion, cell transplantation, neurotrophic factor therapy and drug treatment. Therapeutic methods in this ifeld change according to the hot topic of research.

  1. Interleukin-10 haplotypes in Celiac Disease in the Spanish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Arquero Miguel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD is a chronic disorder characterized by a pathological inflammatory response after exposure to gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The HLA complex accounts for less than half of the genetic component of the disease, and additional genes must be implicated. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is an important regulator of mucosal immunity, and several reports have described alterations of IL-10 levels in celiac patients. The IL-10 gene is located on chromosome 1, and its promoter carries several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and microsatellites which have been associated to production levels. Our aim was to study the role of those polymorphisms in susceptibility to CD in our population. Methods A case-control and a familial study were performed. Positions -1082, -819 and -592 of the IL-10 promoter were typed by TaqMan and allele specific PCR. IL10R and IL10G microsatellites were amplified with labelled primers, and they were subsequently run on an automatic sequencer. In this study 446 patients and 573 controls were included, all of them white Spaniards. Extended haplotypes encompassing microsatellites and SNPs were obtained in families and estimated in controls by the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. Results No significant associations after Bonferroni correction were observed in the SNPs or any of the microsatellites. Stratification by HLA-DQ2 (DQA1*0501-DQB1*02 status did not alter the results. When extended haplotypes were analyzed, no differences were apparent either. Conclusion The IL-10 polymorphisms studied are not associated with celiac disease. Our data suggest that the IL-10 alteration seen in patients may be more consequence than cause of the disease.

  2. The Frequency Distribution of Celiac Autoantibodies in Alopecia Areata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Panjehpour, Tayebeh; Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Matin, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is a noncicatricial (nonscarring) alopecia. The association between AA and celiac disease (CD) is debatable. Several studies declare the relationship between AA and CD as measurement of celiac autoantibodies (anti-gliadin IgA and anti-gliadin IgG), but a few studies consider anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency distribution of celiac autoantibodies (all of them) in patients with AA compared with controls. Methods: This study is a case–control study. Thirty-five patients entered in each group. Anti-gliadin IgA, anti-gliadin IgG, and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA were tested in all patients. Samples were examined in ELISA method with binding site's kits, and the result was reported as positive/negative. Finally, the frequency distribution of autoantibodies was examined. Results: The age average did not show a significant difference between two groups (P = 0.62). In addition, there was no significant difference between the two groups based on gender (P = 0.15). The prevalence of antibody in case and control groups was 2.85% and 0%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.31). Conclusions: There may be a relationship between CD and AA, but the absence of statistical association between AA and CD does not mean that there is no relationship between gluten and AA in certain patients. Thus, we have shown here that the biological tests to search for CD do not bring information and proof enough, and it is why we recommend another approach to disclose gluten intolerance in AA patients. PMID:27833723

  3. Osteoporosis in celiac disease and in endocrine and reproductive disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Velia Stazi; Antonello Trecca; Biagino Trinti

    2008-01-01

    As the increase in lifespan brings to light diseases that were previously not clinically detectable, osteoporosis has become an issue of worldwide significance. The disease is marked by a loss of bone mass; the bones become less dense, fragile and more prone to fracturing. Because it is regulated by endocrine and environmental factors, osteoporosis presents a multifactorial etiopathogenesis, with the genetic component accounting for 70% of an individual variation in bone mass density (BMD), the principal determinant, with age, of fracture risk. Pathological conditions such as celiac disease (CD) exacerbate the process of bone loss, so that the occurrence of osteoporosis in celiac subjects is of particular note: indeed, the screening of osteoporosis patients for this disease is advisable, since it may be the only sign of undiagnosed CD. An increase in interleukin IL-1β, of the IL-1 system, in the relatives of celiac patients confirms the genetic predisposition to osteoporosis and its presence is evidence of an association between the two conditions. The direct effect on the bones of CD is secondary to poor absorption of calcium and vitamin D. In women osteoporosis is indirectly associated with early menopause and amenorrhea, and it may follow prolonged breast-feeding and frequent pregnancies, while in men it is associated with hypogonadism and GH deficit. These endocrine and non-endocrine factors exert their effects on bones by modulating the RANK/RANK-L/OPG system. An appropriate lifestyle from adolescence onwards, together with early diagnosis of and treatment for CD and primary and secondary endocrine pathologies are important for the prevention of damage to the bones.

  4. Nicotinic receptor mediates nitric oxide synthase expression in the rat gastric myenteric plexus.

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism that regulates the synthesis of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), a key enzyme responsible for NO production in the myenteric plexus, remains unknown. We investigated the roles of the vagal nerve and nicotinic synapses in the mediation of NOS synthesis in the gastric myenteric plexus in rats. Truncal vagotomy and administration of hexamethonium significantly reduced nonadrenergic, noncholinergic relaxation, the catalytic activity of NOS, the number of NOS-immunoreactive cells, and th...

  5. Potentialities Of Tendomyoplasty In Rehabilitation Of Patients With Rough Injuries Of Brachial Plexus Trunks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A.Korshunova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To improve functional results after surgical treatment of consequences of brachial plexus trunks rough injuries rehabilitation results of 111 patients with consequences of brachial plexus trunks rough injuries were studied. Thanks to the adequate tendomyoplasty rehabilitation of shoulder abduction, forearm flexion and of hand grasping is obtained in 85% of patients. The suggested method of treatment may be recommended for wide usage in practical health care

  6. Brachial plexus palsy due to subclavian artery pseudo aneurysm from internal jugular cannulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modi Manisha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal jugular vein is the preferred route for central venous cannulation because of easy accessibility and high success rate. Arterial puncture is the most common complication, the reported incidence being 9.3%. However, brachial plexus palsy following arterial puncture is a rare complication of this procedure. We report a case of brachial plexus palsy due to compression by right subclavian pseudoaneurysm as a result of internal jugular vein cannulation in chronic renal failure patient.

  7. Is hyperhomocysteinemia relevant in patients with celiac disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Casella; Gabrio Bassotti; Vincenzo Villanacci; Camillo Di Bella; Fabio Pagni; Gian Luigi Corti; Giuseppe Sabatino; Mara Piatti; Vittorio Baldini

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether this might be related to the presence of hyperhomocysteinemia. METHODS: From January 1998 to December 2008, we evaluated the presence of hyperhomocysteinemia in a series of 165 adult celiac disease (CD) patients (138 females and 27 males, mean age 43 years). RESULTS: Hyperhomocysteinemia was evident in 32 patients (19.3%), although most of them had moderate levels (mean value 25 mcg/ml; range 15-30). Only one patient had a history of myocardial infarction (heterozygosis for N5-N10-metil tetrahydrofolate reductase mutation). CONCLUSION: The systematic assessment of hyperhomocysteinemia seems, at present, unjustified in CD patients.

  8. Stroke and dilated cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murat; Dogan; Erdal; Peker; Eren; Cagan; Sinan; Akbayram; Mehmet; Acikgoz; Huseyin; Caksen; Abdurrahman; Uner; Yasar; Cesur

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease(CD) is manifested by a variety of clinical signs and symptoms that may begin either in childhood or adult life.Neurological symptoms without signs of malabsorption have been observed for a long time in CD.In this report,an 8-year-old girl with CD presented with rarely seen dilated cardiomyopathy and stroke.The girl was admitted with left side weakness.Her medical history indicated abdominal distention,chronic diarrhea,failure to thrive,and geophagia.On physical examination,short stature,pale ...

  9. Burden of celiac disease in the Mediterranean area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luigi Greco; Zrinjka Mi(s)ak; Eleftheria Roma; Raanan Shamir; Selma Terzic; Laura Timpone; Abdelhak Abkari; Mona Abu-Zekry; Thomas Attard; Faouzi Bouguerrà; Paskal Cullufi; Aydan Kansu; Dusanka Micetic-Turk

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the burden of undiagnosed celiac disease (CD) in the Mediterranean area in terms of morbidity, mortality and health cost. METHODS: For statistics regarding the population of each country in the Mediterranean area, we accessed authoritative international sources (World Bank, World Health Organization and United Nations). The prevalence of CD was obtained for most countries from published reports. An overall prevalence rate of 1% cases/total population was finally estimated to represent the frequency of the disease in the area, since none of the available confidence intervals of the reported rates significantly excluded this rate. The distribution of symptoms and complications was obtained from reliable reports in the same cohort. A standardized mortality rate of 1.8 was obtained from recent reports. Crude health cost was estimated for the years between symptoms and diagnosis for adults and children, and was standardized for purchasing power parity to account for the different economic profiles amongst Mediterranean countries.RESULTS: In the next 10 years, the Mediterranean area will have about half a billion inhabitants, of which 120 million will be children. The projected number of CD diagnoses in 2020 is 5 million cases (1 million celiac children), with a relative increase of 11% compared to 2010. Based on the 2010 rate, there will be about 550 000 symptomatic adults and about 240 000 sick children: 85% of the symptomatic patients will suffer from gastrointestinal complaints, 40% are likely to have anemia, 30% will likely have osteopenia, 20% of children will have short stature, and 10% will have abnormal liver enzymes. The estimated standardized medical costs for symptomatic celiac patients during the delay between symptom onset and diagnosis (mean 6 years for adults, 2 years for children) will be about €4 billion (€387 million for children) over the next 10 years. A delay in diagnosis is expected to increase mortal ity: about 600 000 celiac

  10. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseeha, Marcelle G.; Attia, Maximos N.; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  11. Celiac-Associated Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Study of 16 Patients with Overt Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports have suggested that autoimmune thyroid disorders (including Hashimoto’s or lymphocytic thyroiditis may occur in patients with celiac disease. In this study, the prevalence of thyroid disease was explored in a series of 96 consecutive patients seen with biopsy-defined adult celiac disease (average age 47.3 years. Sixteen celiac patients (average age 58.1 years were detected with hypothyroidism, including four treated with radio-iodine ablation or thyroidectomy for Grave’s disease. In addition to celiac disease, almost half had dermatitis herpetiformis, a small intestinal neoplasm (particularly lymphoma or both. Diagnosis of thyroid disease preceded diagnosis of celiac disease in 13 patients or was made concurrently in two patients. In only one patient was thyroid disease detected after celiac disease was diagnosed. This indicates that thyroid diseases occur more commonly in celiac disease than is currently appreciated, possibly due to shared embryological origins or common immunopathological features, and may be the presenting clinical manifestation in adults especially if there is coexistent dermatitis herpetiformis. Careful monitoring of this subgroup may be warranted because of the frequency of neoplastic intestinal diseases, particularly lymphoma.

  12. The role of infectious mediators and gut microbiome in the pathogenesis of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami Nejad, Mohammad; Ishaq, Sauid; Al Dulaimi, David; Zali, Mohammad Reza; Rostami, Kamran

    2015-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune disorder that is associated with gluten sensitivity in people who are genetically predisposed. In celiac disease, food containing gluten mounts inflammatory response that results in villous atrophy in small bowel and increased permeability. This disorder is not only related to complications in the small bowel, but also has association with manifestations outside the GI tract. Small bowel mucosal immunity, exposed to infectious agents, is affected by CD; therefore, it is likely that patients with untreated celiac disease are more susceptible to infectious diseases. It is possible that sensitivity to gluten increases in patients infected with infectious diseases, and consequently infection may trigger CD in susceptible individuals. It is likely that, due to reduced immunity following the loss of intestinal villi, viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections develop faster in celiac disease patients and systemic complication occur more frequently. In addition, increased permeability, changing the microbiota following the chronic inflammation of the small intestine and abnormal immunological reactions are associated with celiac disease. PubMed, Medline, Google scholar, SID, and Magiran were searched for full text articles published between 1999 and 2014 in Persian and English. The associated keywords were used, and papers, which described particularly the impact of infectious agents on celiac disease, were selected. In this review, we have focused on the role of infectious agents and gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of celiac disease.

  13. EFFICACY OF DEXAMETHASONE AS AN ADJUVANT TO BUPIVACAINE IN SUPRACLAVICULAR BRACHIAL PLEXUS BLOCK

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    Rakesh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: Brachial plexus nerve blocks have analgesic and opioid sparing benefits for upper extremity surgery. Single - injection techniques are limited by duration of local anaesthetic agents, however Continuous block techniques can be used for prolonged anaesthesia and analgesia but it presents management challenges. The study was designed to compare the effects of dexamethasone administered as an adjunct to bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block on the onset , duration and postoperative analgesia following upper limb surgeries. METHODS AND MATERIAL: A prospective, double - blind study was undertaken in patients scheduled for upper limb surgeries under supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups, Group B and BD . Group B received 30 ml of 0.375% bupivacaine with 2 ml normal saline while Group BD received 30 ml of 0.375% bupivacain with 2ml(8mg dexamethasone for supraclavicular brachial plexus block. The groups were compared regarding quality of sensory and motor blockade, duration of post operative analgesia and intra and postoperative complications. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in duration of motor and sensory block and analgesia in Group BD as compared to Group B patients ( P < 0.0001. No significant side effects were noted. CONCLUSIONS: The addition of 8 mg of dexamethasone to bupivac a ine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block prolongs the duration of motor and sensory block and extends the analgesia period. KEYWORDS: A naesthesia adjuvants; D examethasone; B rachial plexus block .

  14. Unusual case of extradural choroid plexus papilloma of the sacral canal. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtkaya-Yapicier, Ozlem; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Van Peteghem, Karl Peter; Sawicki, John E

    2002-07-01

    An unusual case of a sacral, extradural choroid plexus papilloma involving the S1-3 level is described. This 50-year-old woman presented with a 4-month history of pain involving her right buttock, perineum, and leg. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine revealed a well-defined, mildly enhancing sacral canal mass at the S1-3 level; its appearance was consistent with that of a benign tumor. Intraoperatively, the lesion was found to be extradural in location and was entwined among nerve roots in the sacral canal. Microscopic examination of the gross totally resected tumor revealed typical features of a choroid plexus papilloma. Despite performing a thorough neuroimaging workup (craniospinal contrast-enhanced MR imaging) for an intracranial or spinal primary mass, none was found. The choroid plexus appeared entirely normal; however, both a cavum septum pellucidum and a cavum vergae were noted. Extraneural choroid plexus papilloma, specifically intrasacral, extradural choroid plexus papilloma has not been previously reported. The present example is thought to have arisen either from ectopic choroid plexus tissue or perhaps by metaplasia from ependymal rests.

  15. A DTC niche plexus surrounds the germline stem cell pool in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Dana T; Knobel, Karla; Affeldt, Katharyn; Crittenden, Sarah L; Kimble, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The mesenchymal distal tip cell (DTC) provides the niche for Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells (GSCs). The DTC has a complex cellular architecture: its cell body caps the distal gonadal end and contacts germ cells extensively, but it also includes multiple cellular processes that extend along the germline tube and intercalate between germ cells. Here we use the lag-2 DTC promoter to drive expression of myristoylated GFP, which highlights DTC membranes and permits a more detailed view of DTC architecture. We find that short processes intercalating between germ cells contact more germ cells than seen previously. We define this region of extensive niche contact with germ cells as the DTC plexus. The extent of the DTC plexus corresponds well with the previously determined extent of the GSC pool. Moreover, expression of a differentiation marker increases as germ cells move out of the plexus. Maintenance of this DTC plexus depends on the presence of undifferentiated germ cells, suggesting that germ cell state can influence niche architecture. The roles of this DTC architecture remain an open question. One idea is that the DTC plexus delivers Notch signaling to the cluster of germ cells comprising the GSC pool; another idea is that the plexus anchors GSCs at the distal end.

  16. Associations of prenatally detected choroid plexus cysts with biochemical risk for congenital disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielius Serapinas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: C horoid plexus cysts are one of the foetus ultrasonography findings that raise parents’ concerns about their child’s health. Usually cysts are found in an estimated 1% all performed ultrasonographies. Aim of the research: To evaluate the risk of Down syndrome, Edward’s syndrome and neural tube defect when choroid plexus cysts are found. Material and methods : The risks of Down syndrome, Edward’s syndrome and neural tube defect were calculated by using second-trimester biomarkers (a-fetoprotein, human choriongonadotropin, unconjugated estriol for patients with choroid plexus cysts. A control group was selected randomly with calculated risks and without any abnormal ultrasonography findings. These risks were compared between the two groups. Results: Twelve pregnancies with diagnosed choroid plexus cysts were included in this study during the year 2012. Choroid plexus cyst findings during this case/control study have shown that only one case from the test group had progressed to more serious foetal aberrations (Edward’s syndrome; nonetheless, this progression did not influence statistically significant changes in the test and control groups. No statistically significant changes between the risks of disorders according the PRISCA method were observed in the appearance of Down syndrome or neural tube defect.  Conclusions : There is no data that choroid plexus cysts increase the risk of Down syndrome, Edward’s syndrome and neural tube defect.

  17. Choroid plexus of the fourth ventricle: Review and anatomic study highlighting anatomical variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Aggarwal, Anjali; Gupta, Tulika; Loukas, Marios; Sahni, Daisy; Ansari, Shaheryar F; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2016-04-01

    Relatively few studies have been performed that analyze the morphology of the choroid plexus of the fourth ventricle. Due to the importance of this tissue as a landmark on imaging and during surgical intervention of the fourth ventricle, the authors performed a cadaveric study to better characterize this important structure. The choroid plexus of the fourth ventricle of 60 formalin fixed adult human brains was examined and measured. The horizontal distance from the midline to the lateral most point of the protruding tip of the horizontal limbs was measured. In the majority of the 60 brain specimens, right and left horizontal limbs of the choroid plexus were seen extending from the midline and protruding out of their respective lateral apertures of the fourth ventricle and into the subarachnoid space. However, on 3.3% of sides, there was absence of an extension into the foramen of Luschka and in one specimen, this lack of extension into the foramen of Luschka was bilateral. On two sides, there was discontinuity between the midline choroid plexus and the tuft of choroid just outside the foramen of Luschka. For specimens in which the choroid plexus did protrude through the foramen of Luschka (96.7%), these tufts were located anterior to the flocculus and inferolateral to the facial/vestibulocochlear nerve complex and posterosuperior to the glossopharyngeal/vagal/accessory complex. A thorough understanding of the normal and variant anatomy of the fourth ventricular choroid plexus is necessary for those who operate in, or interpret imaging of, this region.

  18. Improvement of mount preparations in showing myenteric nerve plexus from intestines of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红; 张远强; 孙岚; 王春杨; 尹岭

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The whole mount preparations of digestive tract is an effective experimental way to study the appearance and distribution of nerve plexus in digestive tract. Although myentric nerve plexus preparations technique was reported very early. But we have done experiment over and over during our research work in order to improve this traditional method and to meet the needs of our research work, we made some progresses in regular mount preparations after many experiments, which helped offer better situation in observing myentric nerve plexus. Methods: Five healthy male adult Kunming mice (20-30 g in weight) were used in this study. After intraperitoneal injection of muscle relaxant, with dislocation of cervical vertebra method, the abdominal cavity was exposed through abdominal median incision. After several steps of mount preparations the mucous layer and longitudinal muscle layer mount preparations with myentric nerve plexus were stripped under anatomical microscope. Immunohistochemical staining was also used in our study. Results: The mount preparation samples with myentric nerve plexus from intestines of mice showed positive SP immunoreaction. The positive cells were dark brown. Many of the cytons appeared circular and oval, while some appeared triangular or irregular. Conclusion: Our improved method is really a good method to show enteric nerve plexus. The method has many advantages and is particularly applied to small animals such as Kunming mice and BALB/c mice, weighing from 20 g to 30 g.

  19. OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus of mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, R; Richards, J G; Campfield, L A; Tartaglia, L A; Guisez, Y; van der Heyden, J; Travernier, J; Plaetinck, G; Burn, P

    1996-05-28

    Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor.

  20. Celiac disease markers in patients with liver diseases: A single center large scale screening study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pavel Drastich; Eva Honsová; Alena Lodererová; Marcela Jare(s)ová; Aneta Pekáriková; Iva Hoffmanová; Ludmila Tu(c)ková

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To study the coincidence of celiac disease,we tested its serological markers in patients with various liver diseases.METHODS:Large-scale screening of serum antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG),and deamidated gliadin using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and serum antibodies against endomysium using immunohistochemistry,in patients with various liver diseases (n =962) and patients who underwent liver transplantation (OLTx,n =523) was performed.The expression of tTG in liver tissue samples of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and from various liver diseases using immunohistochemistry was carried out.The final diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed by histological analysis of small-intestinal biopsy.RESULTS:We found that 29 of 962 patients (3%) with liver diseases and 5 of 523 patients (0.8%) who underwent OLTx were seropositive for IgA and IgG anti-tTG antibodies.However,celiac disease was biopsy-diagnosed in 16 patients:4 with autoimmune hepatitis type Ⅰ,3 with Wilson's disease,3 with celiac hepatitis,2 with primary sclerosing cholangitis,1with primary biliary cirrhosis,1 with Budd-Chiari syndrome,1 with toxic hepatitis,and 1 with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.Unexpectedly,the highest prevalence of celiac disease was found in patients with Wilson's disease (9.7%),with which it is only rarely associated.On the other hand,no OLTx patients were diagnosed with celiac disease in our study.A pilot study of the expression of tTG in liver tissue using immunohistochemistry documented the overexpression of this molecule in endothelial cells and periportal hepatocytes of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and toxic hepatitis,primary sclerosing cholangitis or autoimmune hepatitis type Ⅰ.CONCLUSION:We suggest that screening for celiac disease may be beneficial not only in patients with associated liver diseases,but also in patients with Wilson's disease.

  1. The molecular basis for oat intolerance in patients with celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Arentz-Hansen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is a small intestinal inflammatory disorder characterized by malabsorption, nutrient deficiency, and a range of clinical manifestations. It is caused by an inappropriate immune response to dietary gluten and is treated with a gluten-free diet. Recent feeding studies have indicated oats to be safe for celiac disease patients, and oats are now often included in the celiac disease diet. This study aimed to investigate whether oat intolerance exists in celiac disease and to characterize the cells and processes underlying this intolerance. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We selected for study nine adults with celiac disease who had a history of oats exposure. Four of the patients had clinical symptoms on an oats-containing diet, and three of these four patients had intestinal inflammation typical of celiac disease at the time of oats exposure. We established oats-avenin-specific and -reactive intestinal T-cell lines from these three patients, as well as from two other patients who appeared to tolerate oats. The avenin-reactive T-cell lines recognized avenin peptides in the context of HLA-DQ2. These peptides have sequences rich in proline and glutamine residues closely resembling wheat gluten epitopes. Deamidation (glutamine-->glutamic acid conversion by tissue transglutaminase was involved in the avenin epitope formation. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that some celiac disease patients have avenin-reactive mucosal T-cells that can cause mucosal inflammation. Oat intolerance may be a reason for villous atrophy and inflammation in patients with celiac disease who are eating oats but otherwise are adhering to a strict gluten-free diet. Clinical follow-up of celiac disease patients eating oats is advisable.

  2. Genetic variants associated with celiac disease and the risk for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Henning; Willenborg, Christina; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Ferrario, Paola G; König, Inke R; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schunkert, Heribert

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Genetic-epidemiological analyses identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with celiac disease. If there is a causal relation between celiac disease and CAD, one might expect that risk alleles primarily associated with celiac disease also increase the risk of CAD. In this study we identified from literature 41 SNPs that have been previously described to be genome-wide associated with celiac disease (p DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) dataset, a meta-analysis comprising genome-wide SNP association data from 22,233 CAD cases and 64,762 controls. 24 out of 41 (58.5 %) risk alleles for celiac disease displayed a positive association with CAD (CAD-OR range 1.001-1.081). The remaining risk alleles for celiac disease (n = 16) revealed CAD-ORs of ≤1.0 (range 0.951-1.0). The proportion of CAD associated alleles was greater but did not differ significantly from the proportion of 50 % expected by chance (p = 0.069). One SNP (rs653178 at the SH2B3/ATXN2 locus) displayed study-wise statistically significant association with CAD with directionality consistent effects on celiac disease and CAD. However, the effect of this locus is most likely driven by pleiotropic effects on multiple other diseases. In conclusion, this genetically based approach provided no convincing evidence that SNPs associated with celiac disease contribute to the risk of CAD. Hence, common non-genetic factors may play a more important role explaining the coincidence of these two complex disease conditions.

  3. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Omani Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross Sectional Study

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    Siham Al-Sinani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Published studies on the prevalence of celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus from the Arab World are scant. We aim to report the prevalence of celiac disease in Omani children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.Methods: Children with type 1 diabetes mellitus were prospectively screened for celiac disease, at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman over a period of one year (June 2011 - May 2012. Serum anti tissue transglutaminase IgA, endomysial IgA antibodies and total IgA were measured for screening of celiac disease. Children with positive anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or endomysial IgA antibodies underwent endoscopy.Results: A total of 103 children with type 1 diabetes mellitus were initially included. Ten patients were lost to follow up. Ninety-three patients aged 2-17 years underwent screening for celiac disease. Sixteen patients had positive anti-tissue transglutaminase (17%. Fourteen patients underwent endoscopy with duodenal biopsies, while two were lost to follow-up. Five patients with positive anti-tissue transglutaminase had intestinal biopsy proven celiac disease. The prevalence of celiac disease is 5.5% in our cohort of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.Conclusions: The prevalence of celiac disease in Omani children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus is similar to the World’s reported prevalence, but is less than that reported for Middle Eastern Arab children. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study on the prevalence of celiac disease in Omani children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  4. A morphometric study of the celiac trunk and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venieratos, Dionysios; Panagouli, Eleni; Lolis, Evangelos; Tsaraklis, Athanasios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2013-09-01

    The anatomy of the celiac trunk and its branches was examined in 77 adult human cadavers of Caucasian (Hellenic) origin. The celiac trunk followed the normal pattern, namely trifurcation to the common hepatic, splenic, and left gastric arteries, in 90.9% of the dissections (70/77). Two different types of trifurcation were observed: (a) a true tripod when the celiac trunk ended in a complete trifurcation (74.0%, 57/77) and (b) a false tripod when the three arteries did not have a common origin (16.9%, 13/77). Such a clear predominance of the true tripod is not reported elsewhere. Anatomic variations were found in 9.1% (7/77). Bifurcation of the celiac trunk into splenic and left gastric artery (splenogastric trunk) was observed in one specimen (1.3%), whereas the common hepatic artery emerged directly from the aorta. Absence of the celiac trunk was also found in two individuals (2.6%). The celiac trunk presented additional branches (lumbar and inferior phrenic arteries) in 5.2% (4/77). The median level of origin of the celiac trunk was at the upper third of L1 (22.7% to 17/75). The total length of the celiac trunk ranged from 1.1 to 5.0 cm, whereas the mean length was 2.8 cm (standard deviation = 0.80 cm, standard error of mean = 0.09 cm) irrespective of the existence of variations. The mean length of the celiac arteries which formed a false tripod was found to be larger than those of the arteries which formed a true tripod but only a weak statistically significant difference was established (P = 0.073).

  5. Celiac disease biodetection using lossy-mode resonances generated in tapered single-mode optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, A. B.; Corres, J. M.; Del Villar, I.; Matias, I. R.; Arregui, F. J.

    2014-05-01

    This work presents the development and test of an anti-gliadin antibodies biosensor based on lossy mode resonances (LMRs) to detect celiac disease. Several polyelectrolites were used to perform layer-by-layer assembly processes in order to generate the LMR and to fabricate a gliadin-embedded thin-film. The LMR shifted 20 nm when immersed in a 5 ppm anti-gliadin antibodies-PBS solution, what makes this bioprobe suitable for detecting celiac disease. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that LMRs are used to detect celiac disease and these results suppose promising prospects on the use of such phenomena as biological detectors.

  6. Is the Prevalence of Celiac Disease Higher than the General Population in Inflammatory Bowel Diseaese?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandaghi, Elahe; Hojatnia, Mona; Vahedi, Homayoon; Shahbaz-Khani, Bijan; Kolahdoozan, Shadi; Ansari, Reza

    2015-04-01

    BACKGROUND In some studies inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and celiac disease were considered to be associated and some belive that this association may influence the prognosis of IBD. However, there is a cosiderable controversy regarding this association. Therefore ,we aimed to assess the association of these two common digestive diseases and evaluate the complications of this association. METHODS In this comparative study, 200 patients with ulceritive colitis (UC) and 206 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) were evaluated for celiac disease using relevant diagnostic tests and pathologic studies. Total IgA, IgA tissue transgulaminase antibody and specific IgA anti endomysial antibody were asseyed. In cases of IgA deficiency, total IgG and IgG tissue TG and IgG anti endomyseal Ab were measured. Patients with increased specific IgA and IgG antibodies for celiac disease, underwent endoscopy and 4 standard samples were obtained. Our results were compared with the results of the prevalence study of celiac disease in the general population. Data were analyzed using analytic and descriptive statistics at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS Among the studied patients, 1 patient with UC had elevated IgA anti tTG antibody and IgA anti-endomysial antibody who underwent endoscopy and celiac was confirmed on pathology. Hence, of the 200 patientswith UC, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed in 1 patient (1:200) with no significant difference with the prevalence of celiac disease in the general population (1:166). However, none of our patients with Crohn's disease had celiac disease (0:206). CONCLUSION We found no significant difference in the prevalence of celiac disease between patients with UC and the general population. Since most of our participants had a mild level of Crohn's activation, none of those with Crohn's disease had celiac disease. Complications of IBD including sclerosing cholangitis, may be more common in patients with concurrent celiac disease

  7. Role of еlectromyography in assessing prognosis for children with obstetric brachial plexus injury in practice of a specialized center

    OpenAIRE

    M. L. Novikov; D. S. Druzhinin; V. A. Bulanova; T. E. Torno

    2014-01-01

    The aim of current publication – to present our own experience in use of electromyographic examination in prognosis for children with obstetric brachial plexus injury to practical neurologists and neurophysiologists. Review of literature shows that common approaches to electrotrophysiological diagnosis of obstetric brachial plexus injury do not exist. The aim of this study– to evaluate retrospectively electrophysiological and sonographic parameters of obstetric brachial plexus injury in child...

  8. The role of ultrasonography in patients with celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirella Fraquelli; Valentina Sciola; Chiara Villa; Dario Conte

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present review was to summarize the current evidence on the role of ultrasonography (US) and doppler-US in the diagnosis of celiac disease.Several ultrasonographic signs have been reported in the association with celiac disease in studies using realtime US. Firstly, case control studies identified some of these US signs and then in a prospective series some of these parameters, due to their high specificity, have been shown to be of value in confirming CD diagnosis,whereas others, due to their high sensitivity, have been demonstrated to be useful in excluding the presence of the disease.The pattern of splanchnic circulation in CD have extensively been investigated by several studies all of which reported similar results and identified a hyperdynamic mesenteric circulation that reverts to normal values after successful a gluten-free regimen.The last part of this review will deal with the possible role of US in identyfing the most severe and common intestinal complication of CD, i.e. the enteropathyassociated T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  9. Celiac disease and microscopic colitis: A report of 4 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zsolt Barta; Eva Zold; Arpad Nagy; Margit Zeher; Istvan Csipo

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine that occurs in genetically predisposed people at all ages. However, it can be associated also to other immunopathological disorders, and may be associated with abnormal histology in segments of the gut other than the small bowel including colonic inflammation. While guidelines for endoscopic investigation of the jejunum are well defined, no indication is defined for colonic investigation. We describe four cases of concurrent CD and microscopic colitis (MC) diagnosed at our department over a 10-year period and analyzed the main features and outcomes of CD in this setting. The symptoms of these patients were improved initially by a gluten-free diet before the onset of MC symptoms. Two of the patients were siblings and had an atypical form of CD. The other two patients with CD and MC also presented with fibrosing alveolitis and were anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody positive. The co-existence of immune-mediated small bowel and colonic inflammatory and pulmonary diseases are not well-known, and no systematic approach has been used to identify the lifelong patterns of these immune-based diseases. Patients can develop, or present with CD at any stage in life, which can co-exist with other gastrointestinal diseases of (auto-) immune origin. In addition, the familial co-existence and prevalence of MC in patients with a prior diagnosis of CD are unclear. Clinicians managing celiac disease should be aware of these associations and understand when to consider colon investigation.

  10. Enzymatic Strategies to Detoxify Gluten: Implications for Celiac Disease

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    Ivana Caputo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a permanent intolerance to the gliadin fraction of wheat gluten and to similar barley and rye proteins that occurs in genetically susceptible subjects. After ingestion, degraded gluten proteins reach the small intestine and trigger an inappropriate T cell-mediated immune response, which can result in intestinal mucosal inflammation and extraintestinal manifestations. To date, no pharmacological treatment is available to gluten-intolerant patients, and a strict, life-long gluten-free diet is the only safe and efficient treatment available. Inevitably, this may produce considerable psychological, emotional, and economic stress. Therefore, the scientific community is very interested in establishing alternative or adjunctive treatments. Attractive and novel forms of therapy include strategies to eliminate detrimental gluten peptides from the celiac diet so that the immunogenic effect of the gluten epitopes can be neutralized, as well as strategies to block the gluten-induced inflammatory response. In the present paper, we review recent developments in the use of enzymes as additives or as processing aids in the food biotechnology industry to detoxify gluten.

  11. Celiac Disease, Inflammation and Oxidative Damage: A Nutrigenetic Approach

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    Letizia Saturni

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD, a common heritable chronic inflammatory condition of the small intestine caused by permanent intolerance to gluten/gliadin (prolamin, is characterized by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Developments in proteomics have provided an important contribution to the understanding of the biochemical and immunological aspects of the disease and the mechanisms involved in toxicity of prolamins. It has been demonstrated that some gliadin peptides resistant to complete proteolytic digestion may directly affect intestinal cell structure and functions by modulating gene expression and oxidative stress. In recent years, the creation of the two research fields Nutrigenomics and Nutrigenetics, has enabled the elucidation of some interactions between diet, nutrients and genes. Various dietary components including long chain ω-3 fatty acids, plant flavonoids, and carotenoids have been demonstrated to modulate oxidative stress, gene expression and production of inflammatory mediators. Therefore their adoption could preserve intestinal barrier integrity, play a protective role against toxicity of gliadin peptides and have a role in nutritional therapy of celiac disease.

  12. World epidemiology of non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasagar, Brintha; Cox, Jessica; Herion, John T; Ivanoff, Erin

    2017-03-01

    While the term "gluten" has become commonplace, the disorders associated with gluten still remain poorly understood. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), the most recently recognized of the gluten-related disorders, is arguably the most unknown. While celiac disease and wheat allergy have diagnostic algorithm, NCGS remains a diagnosis of exclusion. With no evidence-based objective diagnostic criteria or serological tests, it is difficult to diagnose and even more difficult to study epidemiologically. Studies often use varied definitions of NCGS and are difficult to compare or validate. Further complicating diagnosis, NCGS has variable and wide-ranging symptoms which overlap with a number of other diseases and changes to diet are inherently difficult to study. In fact, some have argued that NCGS does not exist as a distinct entity or that it may not be caused by the gluten portion of foods. In this review, we outline the current knowledge, hypotheses, and debates surrounding the epidemiology of NCGS in the context of the spectrum of gluten-related disorders.

  13. Posttranslational modification of gluten shapes TCR usage in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Ráki, Melinda; Gunnarsen, Kristin S; Løset, Geir-Åge; Lundin, Knut E A; Sandlie, Inger; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2011-09-15

    Posttranslational modification of Ag is implicated in several autoimmune diseases. In celiac disease, a cereal gluten-induced enteropathy with several autoimmune features, T cell recognition of the gluten Ag is heavily dependent on the posttranslational conversion of Gln to Glu residues. Evidence suggests that the enhanced recognition of deamidated gluten peptides results from improved peptide binding to the MHC and TCR interaction with the peptide-MHC complex. In this study, we report that there is a biased usage of TCR Vβ6.7 chain among TCRs reactive to the immunodominant DQ2-α-II gliadin epitope. We isolated Vβ6.7 and DQ2-αII tetramer-positive CD4(+) T cells from peripheral blood of gluten-challenged celiac patients and sequenced the TCRs of a large number of single T cells. TCR sequence analysis revealed in vivo clonal expansion, convergent recombination, semipublic response, and the notable conservation of a non-germline-encoded Arg residue in the CDR3β loop. Functional testing of a prototype DQ2-α-II-reactive TCR by analysis of TCR transfectants and soluble single-chain TCRs indicate that the deamidated residue in the DQ2-α-II peptide poses constraints on the TCR structure in which the conserved Arg residue is a critical element. The findings have implications for understanding T cell responses to posttranslationally modified Ags.

  14. Prevalence and clinical picture of celiac disease in Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamico, Margherita; Pasquino, Anna M; Mariani, Paolo; Danesi, Helene M; Culasso, Franco; Mazzanti, Laura; Petri, Antonella; Bona, Giovanni

    2002-12-01

    A multicenter study of Turner syndrome (TS) patients was carried out to estimate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) and to detect clinical characteristics and laboratory data of affected patients. Three hundred eighty-nine girls with TS were screened by IgA antigliadin antibodies and/or antiendomysial antibodies. Intestinal biopsy was offered to positive cases. CD was diagnosed in 25 patients. In celiac subjects, anemia, anorexia, and delayed growth (with respect to Italian TS curves) were frequently present; whereas distended abdomen, chronic diarrhea, constipation, and vomiting occurred more rarely. In addition, low serum iron levels, hemoglobinemia, and high values of aminotransferases were observed. Ten patients showed classic CD, 8 showed atypical symptoms, and 7 showed a silent CD. In 11 symptomatic patients, the diagnosis of CD was made at the onset of symptoms, whereas 7 of them showed a median delay of 79 months in diagnosis. Other autoimmune disorders were observed in 40% of the patients. Our study confirms the high prevalence (6.4%) of CD in a large series of TS patients. Moreover, the subclinical picture in 60% of the cases, the diagnostic delay, and the incidence of other autoimmune disorders suggest that routine screening of CD in TS is indicated.

  15. Refractory celiac disease and sprue-like intestinal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease is a gluten-dependent small intestinal mucosal disorder that causes rnalabsorption,often with diarrhea and weight loss.Diagnosis is based on detection of tupical biopsy changes in the proximal small bowel,followed by evidence for an unequivocal response to a gluten-free diet.Refractoriness in celiac disease may be due to poor diet compliance,sometimes intentional,or consumption of ubiquitious sources of gluten.Alternatively,the original diagnosis may not be correct(eg.,duodenal Crohn's disease),or a second cause for symptoms may be present (eg.,collagenous colitis,functional bowel disorder).In some with recurrent symptoms,a complication may be present (eg.,collagenous sprue,small bowel carcinoma,lymphoma).In some,a response to a gluten-free diet can not be unequivocally defined,and more precise historical terms have been used including "sprue-like intestinal disease" or "unclassified sprue".Although a "wastebasket diagnosis",these likely represent a heterogeneous group,and some,but not all,may develop lymphorna.Precise definition will be critical in the future as an array of new treatments,induding biological agents,may emerge.

  16. [Frequent causes of diarrhea: celiac disease and lactose intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowiak, Carsten; Ludwig, Diether

    2008-06-15

    Celiac disease and lactose intolerance are both relatively frequent diseases with symptoms occurring after ingestion of certain food components. In celiac disease wheat gluten and related proteins of other cereals induce an inflammatory disease of the small intestine in predisposed individuals, leading to gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms. Moreover, there is an association with many other diseases and besides classic symptoms (diarrhea, weight loss, malabsorption) atypical courses with less or lacking gastrointestinal symptoms exist. The prevalence is about 1 : 100 (Europe, USA) and higher than supposed earlier. Diagnostic criteria include serologic tests (tissue transglutaminase antibody, endomysial antibody) and characteristic small bowel histology (lymphocytic infiltration, villous atrophy). Therapy is a strict and lifelong gluten-free diet. Rarely, refractory disease or lack of compliance are associated with increased risk of malignancy and worse prognosis. Lactose intolerance is attributed to low intestinal lactase levels, due to reduced genetic expression or mucosal injury and consequent intolerance to dairy products. The frequency is varying in different ethnic groups, occurring in 10-15% of Northern European people. Intensity of clinical symptoms (diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloating) depends on the amount of ingested lactose and individual activity of intestinal lactase. The capacity of lactose malabsorption can be measured using the noninvasive lactose breath hydrogen test. The treatment is based on a reduced dietary lactose intake or in case of secondary form treatment of the underlying disease.

  17. [Electrical nerve stimulation for plexus and nerve blocks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, J; Klotz, E; Bogusch, G; Volk, T

    2007-11-01

    Despite the increasing use of ultrasound, electrical nerve stimulation is commonly used as the standard for both plexus and peripheral nerve blocks. Several recent randomized trials have contributed to a better understanding of physiological and clinical correlations. Traditionally used currents and impulse widths are better defined in relation to the distance between needle tip and nerves. Commercially available devices enable transcutaneous nerve stimulation and provide new opportunities for the detection of puncture sites and for training. The electrically ideal position of the needle usually is defined by motor responses which can not be interpreted without profound anatomical knowledge. For instance, interscalene blocks can be successful even after motor responses of deltoid or pectoral muscles. Infraclavicular blocks should be aimed at stimulation of the posterior fascicle (extension). In contrast to multiple single nerve blocks, axillary single-shot blocks more commonly result in incomplete anaesthesia. Blockade of the femoral nerve can be performed without any nerve stimulation if the fascia iliaca block is used. Independently of the various approaches to the sciatic nerve, inversion and plantar flexion are the best options for single-shot blocks. Further clinical trials are needed to define the advantages of stimulating catheters in continuous nerve blocks.

  18. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide provokes acetylcholine release from the myenteric plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusunoki, M.; Tsai, L.H.; Taniyama, K.; Tanaka, C.

    1986-07-01

    Effects of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) on the release of acetylcholine (ACh) from longitudinal muscle strips with myenteric plexus (LM) preparations were examined in the guinea pig small intestine. VIP (10 to 10 W M) induced a concentration-dependent contraction of LM preparation. The VIP-induced contractions seem to be related to three components, the scopolamine-sensitive, the scopolamine-insensitive, the tetrodotoxin-sensitive, and the tetrodotoxin-insensitive contractions. VIP (10 to 10 W M) induced a concentration-dependent increase in the release of (TH)ACh from LM preparations preloaded with (TH)choline. The VIP-evoked (TH)ACh release was inhibited by removal of CaS from the perfusion medium and by treatment with tetrodotoxin but not by scopolamine and hexamethonium. The spontaneous and VIP-evoked (TH)ACh release was not affected by phentolamine, propranolol, methysergide, diphenhydramine, cimetidine, bicuculline, or (D-ProS, D-Trp/sup 7,9/)substance P. The result demonstrates that VIP induces contractions of longitudinal smooth muscle directly and indirectly by the stimulation of both cholinergic neurons and noncholinergic excitatory neurons.

  19. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohyama Sho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enlarged by the tumor, which was approximately 40 cm in length, and showed no response to electric stimulation. We resected a part of the musculocutaneous nerve for biopsy and performed latissimus dorsi muscle transposition in order to repair elbow flexion. Morphologically, the tumor consisted of typical Antoni A areas, and immunohistochemistry revealed a Schwann cell origin of the tumor cells moreover, there was no sign of axon differentiation in the tumor. Therefore, the final diagnosis of plexiform Schwannoma was confirmed.

  20. Fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae Sepsis in a Patient With Celiac Disease-Associated Hyposplenism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouseph, Madhu M.; Simons, Malorie; Treaba, Diana O.; Yakirevich, Evgeny; Green, Peter H.; Bhagat, Govind; Moss, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with poorly controlled celiac disease (CD) and fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis, describe the morphologic findings, and stress the need for monitoring splenic function and pneumococcal vaccination in these patients. PMID:27761478

  1. Traumatic Neuroma around the Celiac Trunk after Gastrectomy Mimicking a Nodal Metastasis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Ryu, Seung Wan; Kang, Yu Na [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    Traumatic neuroma is a well-known disorder that occurs after trauma or surgery involving the peripheral nerve and develops from a nonneoplastic proliferation of the proximal end of a severed, partially transected, or injured nerve. However, in the abdomen, traumatic neuromas have been sporadically reported to occur in the bile duct. We present here a case of traumatic neuroma around the celiac trunk after gastrectomy that mimicks a nodal metastasis. In conclusion, the imaging finding of traumatic neuroma around the celiac trunk was a homogeneous hypovascular mass without narrowing or irregularity of encased arteries and without increased uptake on PET-CT. Although from a clinical standpoint, establishing an accurate preoperative diagnosis is difficult to perform, the presence of a traumatic neuroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of a mass around the celiac trunk in a patient that has undergone celiac nodal dissection.

  2. CELIAC DISEASE AS A CAUSE OF RECURRENT ANEMIA: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an immune mediated enteropathy with sensitivity to gluten. It is a disease with heterogenous presentation. We report a case of a 12 year old who presented with episodes of recurrent anemia. The patient had no gastro intestinal symptoms. Celiac disease should be considered in any child with iron resistant anemia even if no gastrointestinal symptoms are present. Celiac Disease is an immune mediated enteropathy with permanent sensitivity to gluten in genetically susceptible individuals.1 The clinical manifestation of the disease can be quite varied. The various clinical symptoms described with celiac disease include failure to thrive, diarrhea, vomiting, short stature, delayed puberty, iron deficiency anemia not responding to hematinics etc.1 In some patients anemia might be the sole presentation.2

  3. Neurological manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of celiac disease: A comprehensive review

    OpenAIRE

    Shahriar Nikpour

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity may initially present as one or more neurological signs and/or symptoms. On the other hand, it may be associated with or complicated by neurological manifestations. Neurological presentations are rare in children but as many as 36% of adult patients present with neurological changes. With severe malnutrition after progression of celiac disease, different vitamin deficiencies may develop. Such problems can in turn overlap with previous neurological abnormal...

  4. An Unusual Case of Stent Migration After Celiac Trunk Endovascular Revascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negri, Silvia; Ferraro, Stefania; Piffaretti, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.piffaretti@uninsubria.it; Rivolta, Nicola; Bossi, Matteo [University of Insubria School of Medicine, Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Circolo University Hospital (Italy); Carrafiello, Gianpaolo [University of Insubria School of Medicine, Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Circolo University Hospital (Italy); Castelli, Patrizio [University of Insubria School of Medicine, Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Circolo University Hospital (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    A 61-year-old woman underwent celiac trunk stenting to treat abdominal angina. Three months later, she was readmitted for recurrent symptoms. Computed tomography control revealed the migration of the stent into the splenic artery. No sign of vessel injury or end-organ ischemia was detected. Repeat stenting of the celiac trunk was performed; the postoperative course was uneventful. 12 months later, the patient was asymptomatic with the second stent in its correct position, and she was asymptomatic for mesenteric ischemia.

  5. Frequency of Celiac Disease In Children With Chronic Functional Constipation in Shiraz-Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Ehsaei, Zahra; Honar, Naser; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2015-07-01

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease is an autoimmune mediated small intestine inflammation which occurs due to hypersensitivity reaction to gluten and related proteins in diet in genetically predisposed individuals. Prevalence of celiac among the population is about 0.5 - 1 % in most countries. Frequency of celiac disease in children is the subject of a few research. In this study, we aim to determine the frequency of celiac disease in patients presenting with functional constipation. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted on children referring to Imam Reza Clinic, affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences during one year starting from 2011, March 20. One hundred and one children 2-18 years of age with constipation for more than 2 months according to ROME III criteria. The entire participants underwent serologic studies of Total IgA and IgA TTG. Serum IgG TTG was measured in cases with reported values of Total IgA below the lowest normal limits. Moreover, endoscopic biopsy of the small intestine was also performed for patients with positive serology. RESULTS Of all the 101 studied participants, only four individuals (3.96 %) had positive test results for IgA TTG ( potential celiac disease). one of these patients refused to do endoscopy and endoscopic small intestine biopsy was performed for 3 patients. Two of them had normal pathology and one of them(0.99 %) was confirmed for celiac disease. CONCLUSION The frequency of celiac disease in children with chronic constipation is slightly higher than general population but without significant difference( 0.99% VS 0.6% ; p=0.64). So the screening serologic test for celiac disease is not recommended in children with chronic constipation.

  6. Age-related differences in celiac disease: Specific characteristics of adult presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santiago; Vivas; Luis; Vaquero; Laura; Rodríguez-Martín; Alberto; Caminero

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease may appear both in early childhood andin elderly subjects. Current knowledge of the disease has revealed some differences associated to the age of presentation. Furthermore, monitoring and prognosis of celiac subjects can vary depending on the pediatric or adult stage. The main objective of this review is to provide guidance for the adult diagnostic and follow-up processes, which must be tailored specifically for adults and be different from pediatric patients.

  7. Enteroclysis in adult celiac disease: diagnostic value of specific radiographic features

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    Lomoschitz, F.; Schima, W.; Schober, E.; Turetschek, K. [Department of Radiology and Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Radiologic Research, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kaider, A. [Department of Medical Computer Sciences, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Vogelsang, H. [Department of Internal Medicine IV, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various radiographic findings at enteroclysis in adult patients with untreated celiac disease. Twenty-seven adult patients underwent enteroclysis because of unspecific intestinal symptoms before definitive biopsy proof of celiac disease. Enteroclysis of 123 subjects with similar clinical presentation, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, occult intestinal bleeding, and weight loss, who had a definitive diagnosis other than celiac disease, served as controls. The radiographic features previously described in the literature as indicative of adult celiac disease (i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds, increase of ileal folds, small bowel dilatation, flocculation) were evaluated in blinded fashion in all studies and the subjective likelihood of diagnosis of celiac disease was assessed. Assessing every finding separately, each feature proved to have a high specificity (78-100%) but low sensitivity (19-59%) for celiac disease. Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern was the single best feature (specificity 100%, 95% CI 97-100%; sensitivity 59%, 95% CI 40-78%); however, combination of criteria enables establishment of the diagnosis of celiac disease quite accurately (specificity 100%, 95% CI 98-100%; sensitivity 78%, 95% CI 58-91%). Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern as a single finding as well as combination at least three of the following features, i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds (''colonization''), increase of ileal folds (''jejunization''), dilatation, and flocculation, make enteroclysis an accurate tool for diagnosis of celiac disease in adult patients with suspected intestinal disease. (orig.)

  8. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup(®), is the most important causal factor in this epidemic. Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria. Characteristics of celiac disease point to impairment in many cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, activating vitamin D3, catabolizing vitamin A, and maintaining bile acid production and sulfate supplies to the gut. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate's strong ability to chelate these elements. Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate's known depletion of these amino acids. Celiac disease patients have an increased risk to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure. Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate. Glyphosate residues in wheat and other crops are likely increasing recently due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to the harvest. We argue that the practice of "ripening" sugar cane with glyphosate may explain the recent

  9. Increased Mercury Levels in Patients with Celiac Disease following a Gluten-Free Regimen

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    Luca Elli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Although mercury is involved in several immunological diseases, nothing is known about its implication in celiac disease. Our aim was to evaluate blood and urinary levels of mercury in celiac patients. Methods. We prospectively enrolled 30 celiac patients (20 treated with normal duodenal mucosa and 10 untreated with duodenal atrophy and 20 healthy controls from the same geographic area. Blood and urinary mercury concentrations were measured by means of flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Enrolled patients underwent dental chart for amalgam fillings and completed a food-frequency questionnaire to evaluate diet and fish intake. Results. Mercury blood/urinary levels were 2.4±2.3/1.0±1.4, 10.2±6.7/2.2±3.0 and 3.7±2.7/1.3±1.2 in untreated CD, treated CD, and healthy controls, respectively. Resulting mercury levels were significantly higher in celiac patients following a gluten-free diet. No differences were found regarding fish intake and number of amalgam fillings. No demographic or clinical data were significantly associated with mercury levels in biologic samples. Conclusion. Data demonstrate a fourfold increase of mercury blood levels in celiac patients following a gluten-free diet. Further studies are needed to clarify its role in celiac mechanism.

  10. Gluten Introduction, Breastfeeding, and Celiac Disease: Back to the Drawing Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Murray, Joseph A; Verdú, Elena F; Crowe, Sheila E; Dennis, Melinda; Fasano, Alessio; Green, Peter H R; Guandalini, Stefano; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-01-01

    This commentary by the leadership of the North American Society for the Study of Celiac Disease (NASSCD) concerns recent research findings regarding infant feeding practices. Celiac disease has increased markedly in recent decades, and seroprevalence studies indicate that this is a true rise, rather than one due to increased awareness and testing. Prior studies have suggested that infant feeding practices and timing of initial gluten exposure are central to the development of celiac disease. Two recent multicenter randomized trials tested strategies of early or delayed gluten introduction in infants, and neither strategy appeared to influence celiac disease risk. These studies also found that breastfeeding did not protect against the development of celiac disease. While disappointing, these results should spur the study of wider environmental risk factors beyond infant feeding, such as intrauterine and perinatal exposures as well as environmental influences later in life, including drug exposure, microbial infections, and the microbiome. Given that celiac disease can develop at any age, it is imperative to study these proposed triggers so as to elucidate the loss of tolerance to gluten and to develop future intervention strategies.

  11. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Oats: A Canadian Position Based on a Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vieille, Sébastien; Pulido, Olga M; Abbott, Michael; Koerner, Terence B; Godefroy, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the latest scientific data related to the safety of uncontaminated oats (<20 ppm of gluten) in the diet of individuals with celiac disease (CD). It updates the previous Health Canada position posted on the Health Canada website in 2007 and a related paper published in 2009. It considers a number of recent studies published between January 2008 and January 2015. While recognizing that a few people with celiac disease seem to be clinically intolerant to oats, this review concludes that oats uncontaminated by gluten-containing cereals (wheat, rye, and barley) can be safely ingested by most patients with celiac disease and that there is no conclusive evidence that the consumption of uncontaminated or specially produced oats containing no greater than 20 ppm gluten by patients with celiac disease should be limited to a specific daily amount. However, individuals with CD should observe a stabilization phase before introducing uncontaminated oats to the gluten-free diet (GFD). Oats uncontaminated with gluten should only be introduced after all symptoms of celiac disease have resolved and the individual has been on a GFD for a minimum of 6 months. Long-term regular medical follow-up of these patients is recommended but this is no different recommendation to celiac individuals on a GFD without oats.

  12. Altered expression of type-1 and type-2 cannabinoid receptors in celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Battista

    Full Text Available Anandamide (AEA is the prominent member of the endocannabinoid family and its biological action is mediated through the binding to both type-1 (CB1 and type-2 (CB2 cannabinoid receptors (CBR. The presence of AEA and CBR in the gastrointestinal tract highlighted their pathophysiological role in several gut diseases, including celiac disease. Here, we aimed to investigate the expression of CBR at transcriptional and translational levels in the duodenal mucosa of untreated celiac patients, celiac patients on a gluten-free diet for at least 12 months and control subjects. Also biopsies from treated celiac patients cultured ex vivo with peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin were investigated. Our data show higher levels of both CB1 and CB2 receptors during active disease and normal CBR levels in treated celiac patients. In conclusion, we demonstrate an up-regulation of CB1 and CB2 mRNA and protein expression, that points to the therapeutic potential of targeting CBR in patients with celiac disease.

  13. Possible association between celiac disease and bacterial transglutaminase in food processing: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Aaron; Matthias, Torsten

    2015-08-01

    The incidence of celiac disease is increasing worldwide, and human tissue transglutaminase has long been considered the autoantigen of celiac disease. Concomitantly, the food industry has introduced ingredients such as microbial transglutaminase, which acts as a food glue, thereby revolutionizing food qualities. Several observations have led to the hypothesis that microbial transglutaminase is a new environmental enhancer of celiac disease. First, microbial transglutaminase deamidates/transamidates glutens such as the endogenous human tissue transglutaminase. It is capable of crosslinking proteins and other macromolecules, thereby changing their antigenicity and resulting in an increased antigenic load presented to the immune system. Second, it increases the stability of protein against proteinases, thus diminishing foreign protein elimination. Infections and the crosslinked nutritional constituent gluten and microbial transglutaminase increase the permeability of the intestine, where microbial transglutaminases are necessary for bacterial survival. The resulting intestinal leakage allows more immunogenic foreign molecules to induce celiac disease. The increased use of microbial transglutaminase in food processing may promote celiac pathogenesis ex vivo, where deamidation/transamidation starts, possibly explaining the surge in incidence of celiac disease. If future research substantiates this hypothesis, the findings will affect food product labeling, food additive policies of the food industry, and consumer health education.

  14. Diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, L.S. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Yaylali, Ilker [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ruiz, Jennifer; Altman, Nolan R. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Grossman, John A.I. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); New York University, Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Detailed evaluation of a brachial plexus birth injury is important for treatment planning. To determine the diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury. Included in the study were 31 children with perinatal brachial plexus injury who underwent surgical intervention. All patients had cervical and brachial plexus MRI. The standard of reference was the combination of intraoperative (1) surgical evaluation and (2) electrophysiological studies (motor evoked potentials, MEP, and somatosensory evoked potentials, SSEP), and (3) the evaluation of histopathological neuronal loss. MRI findings of cord lesion, pseudomeningocele, and post-traumatic neuroma were correlated with the standard of reference. Diagnostic performance characteristics including sensitivity and specificity were determined. From June 2001 to March 2004, 31 children (mean age 7.3 months, standard deviation 1.6 months, range 4.8-12.1 months; 19 male, 12 female) with a brachial plexus birth injury who underwent surgical intervention were enrolled. Sensitivity and specificity of an MRI finding of post-traumatic neuroma were 97% (30/31) and 100% (31/31), respectively, using the contralateral normal brachial plexus as the control. However, MRI could not determine the exact anatomic area (i.e. trunk or division) of the post-traumatic brachial plexus neuroma injury. Sensitivity and specificity for an MRI finding of pseudomeningocele in determining exiting nerve injury were 50% and 100%, respectively, using MEP, and 44% and 80%, respectively, using SSEP as the standard of reference. MRI in infants could not image well the exiting nerve roots to determine consistently the presence or absence of definite avulsion. In children younger than 18 months with brachial plexus injury, the MRI finding of pseudomeningocele has a low sensitivity and a high specificity for nerve root avulsion. MRI and MR myelography cannot image well the exiting nerve roots to determine

  15. ARRHYTHMIA INDUCED BY NICOTINE ACTIVATING CARDIAC INTRINSIC NEURONS IN CANINE ATRIAL AND VENTRICULAR GANGLIAL PLEXUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁秉祥; 刘书勤; 李萍; 李新华

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the arrhythmia induced by stimulation of nicotine-sensitive neurons in cardiac ganglial plexuses. Methods When nicotine (100μg) was injected into canine right atrial ganglial plexus (RAGP) and ganglial plexus between aorta and pulmonary artery (A-PGP) in 33 anesthetized open-chest dog, electrocardiogram, atrial force and ventricular intramyocardial pressures (IMP) were recorded. The responses were also recorded following administration of atropine or propranolol and after heart acute decentralization. Results Ventricular arrhythmia (VA) was induced by injections of nicotine into A-PGP, but not by injections of nicotine into RAGP in 13 dogs. Atrioventricilar (A-V) block was induced by nicotine activating RAGP in 10 dogs, but not by nicotine activating A-PGP. Propranolol could reduce the frequency of VA elicited by stimulating A-PGP, atropine could reduce the frequency of A-V block elicited by stimulating RAGP. After acute decentralization, VA was still induced by activation of A-PGP in 9 dogs, but A-V block elicited by stimulating RAGP was decreased. Conclusion VA is induced by stimulating N receptor in cardiac nicotine-sensitive efferent sympathetic neurons of ventricular ganglial plexus (A-PGP), and then modifying β receptor of ventricles. A-V block is elicited by stimulating N receptor in atrial ganglial plexus (RAGP), then modifying M receptor of A-V node not only via efferent parasympathetic neurons, but also via afferent pathway.

  16. Standard versus a novel technique for restoring neurological function following brachial plexus injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Damien Kuffler

    2011-01-01

    The brachial plexus, a complex network of peripheral nerves, involves the motor, sensory, and sympathetic nerve supply to the upper extremity, and is formed by the union of the ventral primary rami of the spinal nerves. Brachial plexus trauma, damage to the complex of nerves, has a high incidence from delivery throughout life, leading to loss of all innervation of the arm and hand, their paralysis, and frequently results in excruciating neuropathic pain. The most frequent brachial plexus repair techniques use autologous sensory nerve grafts to bridge the nerve gaps. However, these do not induce reliable neurological recovery or reduce neuropathic pain, thus permanent neurological loss and neuropathic pain frequently occur. The present study evaluated the current best brachial plexus repair techniques and another involving a collagen tube filled with autologous platelet-rich fibrin that clinically induces extensive neurological recovery and a reduction/elimination of neuropathic pain, which are not possible by sural nerve grafts, even across long nerve gaps that are repaired years post trauma, and in older patients. This novel technique is proposed for use in restoring brachial plexus neurological function and in reducing/eliminating neuropathic pain.

  17. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  18. Origin of celiac disease: How old are predisposing haplotypes?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Gasbarrini; Olga Rickards; Cristina Martínez-Labarga; Elsa Pacciani; Filiberto Chilleri; Lucrezia Laterza; Giuseppe Marangi; Franco Scaldaferri; Antonio Gasbarrini

    2012-01-01

    We recently presented the case of a first century AD young woman,found in the archaeological site of Cosa,showing clinical signs of malnutrition,such as short height,osteoporosis,dental enamel hypoplasia and cribra orbitalia,indirect sign of anemia,all strongly suggestive for celiac disease (CD).However,whether these findings were actually associated to CD was not shown based on genetic parameters.To investigate her human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ⅱ polymorphism,we extracted DNA from a bone sample and a tooth and genotyped HLA using three HLA-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms for DQ8,DQ2.2 and DQ2.5,specifically associated to CD.She displayed HLA DQ 2.5,the haplotype associated to the highest risk of CD.This is the first report showing the presence of a HLA haplotype compatible for CD in archaeological specimens.

  19. Effector and suppressor T cells in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Giuseppe

    2015-06-28

    Celiac disease (CD) is a T-cell mediated immune disease in which gliadin-derived peptides activate lamina propria effector CD4+ T cells. This activation leads to the release of cytokines, compatible with a Th1-like pattern, which play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of CD, controlling many aspects of the inflammatory immune response. Recent studies have shown that a novel subset of effector T cells, characterized by expression of high levels of IL-17A, termed Th17 cells, plays a pathogenic role in CD. While these effector T cell subsets produce proinflammatory cytokines, which cause substantial tissue injury in vivo in CD, recent studies have suggested the existence of additional CD4(+) T cell subsets with suppressor functions. These subsets include type 1 regulatory T cells and CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells, expressing the master transcription factor Foxp3, which have important implications for disease progression.

  20. Regression of conjunctival tumor during dietary treatment of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncer Samuray

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old girl presented with a hemorrhagic conjunctival lesion in the right eye. The medical history revealed premature cessation of breast feeding, intolerance to the ingestion of baby foods, anorexia, and abdominal distention. Prior to her referral, endoscopic small intestinal biopsy had been carried out under general anesthesia with a possible diagnosis of Celiac Disease (CD. Her parents did not want their child to undergo general anesthesia for the second time for the excisional biopsy. We decided to follow the patient until all systemic investigations were concluded. In evaluation, the case was diagnosed with CD and the conjunctival tumor showed complete regression during gluten-free dietary treatment. The clinical fleshy appearance of the lesion with spider-like vascular extensions and subconjunctival hemorrhagic spots, possible association with an acquired immune system dysfunction due to CD, and spontaneous regression by a gluten-free diet led us to make a presumed diagnosis of conjunctival Kaposi sarcoma.

  1. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caraceni, M.P.; Molteni, N.; Bardella, M.T.; Ortolani, S.; Nogara, A.; Bianchi, P.A.

    1988-03-01

    Bone mineral density (/sup 125/I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups.

  2. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmune disorders in children: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti, Antonella; Capriati, Teresa; Bizzarri, Carla; Panetta, Fabio; Ferretti, Francesca; Ancinelli, Monica; Romano, Francesca; Locatelli, Mattia

    2013-12-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a life-long inflammatory condition of the gut that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. Several autoimmune diseases (AI) are associated with CD. To date, no conclusive evidence is available that proves if the relationship between CD and AI is mediated by gluten exposure, or if CD and AI could co-occur due to other causes, in particular the loss of the intestinal barrier function and the common genetic background. Furthermore, it is not clear yet if CD needs a regular screening program for AI. This review will cover the key studies on both the pathogenetic and clinical evidence explaining this association. We will review the reports including patients aged endocrine AI.

  3. Celiac disease treatment: gluten-free diet and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki, Markku

    2014-07-01

    The basis for celiac disease (CD) treatment is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. On the diet, the small intestinal mucosal injury heals and gluten-induced symptoms and signs disappear. The mucosal healing is a prerequisite for sustaining health and is also obtained with a diet containing oats and trace amounts of gluten, industrially purified wheat starch-based gluten-free products. The small intestinal mucosa does not heal in noncompliant people, nor when a patient is inadvertently ingesting gluten. Development of adjunctive or alternative therapies is on its way. There are several novel treatment pipelines within academy and industry. Examples are the ideas of using glutenases as a drug to degrade the ingested gluten, polymers to bind and sequester the gluten to the feces, and also vaccine development for an immunotherapy to induce tolerance towards gluten. Clinical drug trials are to be foreseen in CD, soon also in children.

  4. [Celiac sprue: A pictorial revision of main imaging findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constanza Damm, Araneda; Matías Molina, Villagra; Giancarlo Schiappacasse, Faúndez; Claudio Cortés, Arriagada

    2014-01-01

    Celiac sprue (CS) is an autoinmune desease caused by gliadin intake. The exposure to this protein produces damage of the intestinal mucosae, primarily of the duodenum and yeyunum, causing different symptoms and diverse imaging findings. The objective of this review is to show a pictorial essay of the main findings of CS and its complications in barited fluroscopy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance. We show different images of patients with certified diagnosis of CS. In summary, these imaging modalities are useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with CS, as well as for the detection of complications. We believe that they are useful complementary exams that aid to the existing diagnosis criteria.

  5. Ages of celiac disease: from changing environment to improved diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasini, Alberto; Not, Tarcisio; Ventura, Alessandro

    2011-08-28

    From the time of Gee's landmark writings, the recent history of celiac disease (CD) can be divided into many ages, each driven by a diagnostic advance and a deeper knowledge of disease pathogenesis. At the same time, these advances were paralleled by the identification of new clinical patterns associated with CD and by a continuous redefinition of the prevalence of the disease in population. In the beginning, CD was considered a chronic indigestion, even if the causative food was not known; later, the disease was proven to depend on an intolerance to wheat gliadin, leading to typical mucosal changes in the gut and to a malabsorption syndrome. This knowledge led to curing the disease with a gluten-free diet. After the identification of antibodies to gluten (AGA) in the serum of patients and the identification of gluten-specific lymphocytes in the mucosa, CD was described as an immune disorder, resembling a chronic "gluten infection". The use of serological testing for AGA allowed identification of the higher prevalence of this disorder, revealing atypical patterns of presentation. More recently, the characterization of autoantibodies to endomysium and to transglutaminase shifted the attention to a complex autoimmune pathogenesis and to the increased risk of developing autoimmune disorders in untreated CD. New diagnostic assays, based on molecular technologies, will introduce new changes, with the promise of better defining the spectrum of gluten reactivity and the real burden of gluten related-disorders in the population. Herein, we describe the different periods of CD experience, and further developments for the next celiac age will be proposed.

  6. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac DM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Migliarese Isaac,1 Jessica Wu,2 Diana R Mager,3,4 Justine M Turner1 1Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta; 2Alberta Health Services–Child Health Nutrition Services, Stollery Children’s Hospital; 3Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutritional Science; 4Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD. Keywords: celiac disease

  7. Why Oats Are Safe and Healthy for Celiac Disease Patients

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    Luud J. W. J. Gilissen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The water-insoluble storage proteins of cereals (prolamins are called “gluten” in wheat, barley, and rye, and “avenins” in oat. Gluten can provoke celiac disease (CD in genetically susceptible individuals (those with human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 serotypes. Avenins are present at a lower concentration (10%–15% of total protein content in oat as compared to gluten in wheat (80%–85%. The avenins in the genus Avena (cultivated oat as well as various wild species of which gene bank accessions were analyzed are free of the known CD immunogenic epitopes from wheat, barley, and rye. T cells that recognize avenin-specific epitopes have been found very rarely in CD patients. CD patients that consume oats daily do not show significantly increased levels of intraepithelial lymphocyte (EIL cells. The safety and the positive health effects of the long-term inclusion of oats in the gluten-free diet have been confirmed in long-term studies. Since 2009 (EC 41/2009 and 2013 (FDA oat products may be sold as gluten-free in several countries provided a gluten contamination level below 20 ppm. Introduction of oats in the gluten-free diet of celiac patients is advised after the recovery of the intestine. Health effects of oat consumption are reflected in European Food Safety Authority (EFSA- and Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved health claims. Oats can form a healthy, nutritious, fiber-rich, and safe complement to the gluten-free diet.

  8. Ages of celiac disease: From changing environment to improved diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto Tommasini; Tarcisio Not; Alessandro Ventura

    2011-01-01

    From the time of Gee's landmark writings, the recent history of celiac disease (CD) can be divided into manyages, each driven by a diagnostic advance and a deeperknowledge of disease pathogenesis. At the same time,these advances were paralleled by the identification of new clinical patterns associated with CD and by a continuous redefinition of the prevalence of the diseasein population. In the beginning, CD was considered a chronic indigestion, even if the causative food was notknown; later, the disease was proven to depend on anintolerance to wheat gliadin, leading to typical mucosalchanges in the gut and to a malabsorption syndrome. This knowledge led to curing the disease with a gluten-free diet. After the identification of antibodies to gluten(AGA) in the serum of patients and the identification of gluten-specific lymphocytes in the mucosa, CD was described as an immune disorder, resembling a chronic "gluten infection". The use of serological testing for AGA allowed identification of the higher prevalence of this disorder, revealing atypical patterns of presenta-tion. More recently, the characterization of autoantibod-ies to endomysium and to transglutaminase shifted the attention to a complex autoimmune pathogenesis and to the increased risk of developing autoimmune disor-ders in untreated CD. New diagnostic assays, based on molecular technologies, will introduce new changes, with the promise of better defining the spectrum of gluten reactivity and the real burden of gluten related-disorders in the population. Herein, we describe the different periods of CD experience, and further devel-opments for the next celiac age will be proposed.

  9. Principles of Proper Nutrition in Children with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Khajavikia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Celiac disease (CD is a hereditary disorder of the immune system which damages the mucosa of the small intestine caused by gluten consumption(even very small amounts. Villous atrophy, leads to malabsorption, which is due to decreased absorption levels. The first bowel symptoms are seen during the first 2 years of life. Currently, the only treatment is to compliance with a gluten-free diet lifelong. The purpose of this study was to introduce the principles of proper nutrition in children with CD to prevent complications of malabsorption.   Results: The patients do not tolerate the proteins of cereals in bread such as wheat, barley, black barley and rye. Substituting wheat flour with rice flour, corn and potatoes and using olive oil, sunflower, corn oil and peanut oil for cooking is recommended. Until the disappearance of symptoms, consumption of milk, fat and high-fiber foods should be avoided. Deficiency of folic acid, iron, vitamin B12 and calcium are common. If necessary, iron, folic acid and multivitamin can be used. These children need proper energy according to their personal needs and should have a diet high in protein. Consumption of potatoes, corn, vegetables, fruits, meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy and nuts (non- roasted in any form is allowed. Identifying foods which contain gluten (prepared sauces, sausages, salami, herbal supplements, all canned meat products, crushed barbecue, prepared soups, espresso and coffee , white vinegar, curd, dried milk, pasta, pastries prepared by wheat flour, compote and food supplements is recommended.   Conclusions: The identification of substances containing gluten by parents and children, and removal of harmful substances from the diet causes the intestines to quickly begin to rebuild itself. Keywords: Nutrition, Child, Celiac, Diet.

  10. Overview of biomarkers for diagnosis and monitoring of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca, Ignazio

    2015-01-01

    Among the adverse reactions caused by wheat, celiac disease (CD) is the longest studied and best-known pathology. The more recently defined non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) presents with symptoms which are often indistinguishable from CD. Diagnosis of CD is based on serologic, molecular, and bioptic testing. The IgA anti-transglutaminase (tTG) test is considered highly important, as it shows high sensitivity and specificity and its levels correlate to the degree of intestinal damage. Small bowel biopsy can be avoided in symptomatic patients with IgA anti-tTG levels above 10× the manufacturer's cut-off. Recently, tests of anti-deamidated peptides of gliadin (DGP) have replaced classic anti-native gliadin (AGA) tests. DGP assays have a considerably higher diagnostic accuracy than AGA assays, especially in the IgG class, and can replace anti-tTG tests in patients with selective IgA deficiency. The combination of IgG anti-DGP plus IgA anti-tTG assays show greater sensitivity than a single test, with very high specificity. EMA tests have great diagnostic accuracy but are not recommended by all the latest guidelines because they are observer dependent. Biopsy must still be considered the gold standard for CD diagnosis. HLA-DQ genotyping can be used to screen asymptomatic children and in cases of histology/serology disagreement. About half of NCGS patients are DQ2 positive and have IgG AGA. To diagnose NCGS, first CD and wheat allergy must be excluded; then the wheat dependence of symptoms must be verified by a gluten-free diet and subsequent gluten challenge.

  11. Homeostatic capabilities of the choroid plexus epithelium in Alzheimer's disease

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    Duncan John

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As the secretory source of vitamins, peptides and hormones for neurons, the choroid plexus (CP epithelium critically provides substances for brain homeostasis. This distributive process of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF volume transmission reaches many cellular targets in the CNS. In ageing and ageing-related dementias, the CP-CSF system is less able to regulate brain interstitial fluid. CP primarily generates CSF bulk flow, and so its malfunctioning exacerbates Alzheimers disease (AD. Considerable attention has been devoted to the blood-brain barrier in AD, but more insight is needed on regulatory systems at the human blood-CSF barrier in order to improve epithelial function in severe disease. Using autopsied CP specimens from AD patients, we immunocytochemically examined expression of heat shock proteins (HSP90 and GRP94, fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFr and a fluid-regulatory protein (NaK2Cl cotransporter isoform 1 or NKCC1. CP upregulated HSP90, FGFr and NKCC1, even in end-stage AD. These CP adjustments involve growth factors and neuropeptides that help to buffer perturbations in CNS water balance and metabolism. They shed light on CP-CSF system responses to ventriculomegaly and the altered intracranial pressure that occurs in AD and normal pressure hydrocephalus. The ability of injured CP to express key regulatory proteins even at Braak stage V/VI, points to plasticity and function that may be boosted by drug treatment to expedite CSF dynamics. The enhanced expression of human CP 'homeostatic proteins' in AD dementia is discussed in relation to brain deficits and pharmacology.

  12. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesch, Francisca Eugster

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

  13. [Pain caused by brachial plexus injury during coronary revascularization. Report of 3 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, M A; Marí, C; Miranda, A F; Burón, J A; Fernández, F E; Suárez, R

    1992-01-01

    We report three cases of injury of the brachial plexus after coronary revascularization surgery. During the postoperative phase all patients presented plexopathy involving the left C8 and D1 roots. The symptoms were pain, paresthesia, and motor deficits. The proposed mechanisms for injury of the brachial plexus during cardiac surgery are: hyperabduction of the arm, direct traumatism produced by the needle during catheterization of the internal jugular vein, and traction and compression associated with sternal retraction. In the three patients we ruled out alterations during cannulation of the internal jugular vein and malposition of the arms. We think that in our cases the fundamental mechanism was an excessive and assymetrical opening of sternal and Favoloro's separators that were used in all cases during dissection of the left internal mammary artery. We conclude that injury of the brachial plexus can be minimized by reducing the opening of both separators and by placing Favaloro's separator in a lower position.

  14. Aging. Aging-induced type I interferon response at the choroid plexus negatively affects brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; David, Eyal; Castellano, Joseph M; Miller, Omer; Kertser, Alexander; Berkutzki, Tamara; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Bezalel, Dana; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Amit, Ido; Schwartz, Michal

    2014-10-03

    Aging-associated cognitive decline is affected by factors produced inside and outside the brain. By using multiorgan genome-wide analysis of aged mice, we found that the choroid plexus, an interface between the brain and the circulation, shows a type I interferon (IFN-I)-dependent gene expression profile that was also found in aged human brains. In aged mice, this response was induced by brain-derived signals, present in the cerebrospinal fluid. Blocking IFN-I signaling within the aged brain partially restored cognitive function and hippocampal neurogenesis and reestablished IFN-II-dependent choroid plexus activity, which is lost in aging. Our data identify a chronic aging-induced IFN-I signature, often associated with antiviral response, at the brain's choroid plexus and demonstrate its negative influence on brain function, thereby suggesting a target for ameliorating cognitive decline in aging.

  15. Brachial plexus palsy following a training run with a heavy backpack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Robert; Sheena, Y; Simpson, C; Power, D

    2014-12-01

    A 23-year-old male British soldier developed a progressive sensory loss and weakness in his right arm during a 12 km training run with a load of approximately 70 kg. There was no recovery of his symptoms within 3 months and both MRI and USS did not demonstrate a site of compression within the brachial plexus. An infraclavicular brachial plexus exploration was performed 11 months after injury that indicated an ischaemic neuropathy with post-injury fibrosis. Injuries of the brachial plexus secondary to carrying a heavy backpack during prolonged periods of exercise are rare, particularly in the infraclavicular region. Cases such as this highlight that training regimens within the military population should be appraised due to the risk of similar injuries occurring.

  16. Computed tomography of the sacral plexus and sciatic nerve in the greater sciatic foramen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzieri, C.F.; Hilal, S.K.

    1984-07-01

    The sacral plexus forms the sciatic nerve, which leaves the pelvis through the greater sciatic foramen. The anatomic boundaries of the greater sciatic foramen and the relation of the sacral plexus and sciatic nerve to the structures within are identified and described on axial computed tomography (CT). The piriform muscle, which passes through the center of the greater sciatic foramen, is a recognizable landmark that is extremely helpful in locating the sacral plexus and sciatic nerve on CT. The pelvic CT images of 25 patients studied for unrelated reasons and two patients studied for complaints related to the greater sciatic foramen were reviewed. CT was very useful in demonstrating the anatomy of this region and for the investigation of sciatic pain due to lesions outside the neural canal.

  17. Diffusion tensor MRI and fiber tractography of the sacral plexus in children with spina bifida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakma, Wieke; Dik, Pieter; ten Haken, Bennie

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is still largely unknown how neural tube defects in spina bifida affect the nerves at the level of the sacral plexus. Visualizing the sacral plexus in 3 dimensions could improve our anatomical understanding of neurological problems in patients with spina bifida. We investigated...... anatomical and microstructural properties of the sacral plexus of patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients 8 to 16 years old with spina bifida underwent diffusion tensor imaging on a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system...... compared to 10 healthy controls. RESULTS: Nerves of patients with spina bifida showed asymmetry and disorganization to a large extent compared to those of healthy controls. Especially at the myelomeningocele level it was difficult to find a connection with the cauda equina. Mean, axial and radial...

  18. Brachial plexus surgery: the role of the surgical technique for improvement of the functional outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Pretto Flores

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study aims to demonstrate the techniques employed in surgery of the brachial plexus that are associated to evidence-based improvement of the functional outcome of these patients. METHOD: A retrospective study of one hundred cases of traumatic brachial plexus injuries. Comparison between the postoperative outcomes associated to some different surgical techniques was demonstrated. RESULTS: The technique of proximal nerve roots grafting was associated to good results in about 70% of the cases. Significantly better outcomes were associated to the Oberlin's procedure and the Sansak's procedure, while the improvement of outcomes associated to phrenic to musculocutaneous nerve and the accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer did not reach statistical significance. Reinnervation of the hand was observed in less than 30% of the cases. CONCLUSION: Brachial plexus surgery renders satisfactory results for reinnervation of the proximal musculature of the upper limb, however the same good outcomes are not usually associated to the reinnervation of the hand.

  19. Neuroendoscopic assessment of choroid plexus coagulation to release ventricular catheter: note on the seldinger technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikuni, Koshiro; Freitas, Luiz R M; Oliveira, Matheus F; Leme, Ricardo J A

    2013-01-01

    Shunting is fundamental in neurosurgical practice and a large number of patients experience shunt dysfunction throughout life. The Seldinger technique seems to be a valuable tool in the management of dysfunctions and consists of coagulating the choroid plexus before shunt removal. We report the unique case of a neuroendoscopic view of choroid plexus coagulation by the Seldinger technique in a 7-year-old child with shunt dysfunction submitted to endoscopic third ventriculostomy and previous shunt removal. We reinforce the security and efficacy of the Seldinger technique with a direct neuroendoscopic view of the coagulation process.

  20. Brachial plexus injury in two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, L; Richards, M; Saunders, G

    1993-01-01

    Two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), found near Deltaville, Virginia (USA), were evaluated because of inability to use a wing. Results of needle electromyographic studies of the affected wing muscles in both hawks were compatible with denervation. On euthanasia, one hawk had extensive axon and myelin loss with multifocal perivascular lymphocytic inflammation of its brachial plexus and radial nerve. Demyelination and axon loss in the dorsal white matter of the spinal cord on the affected side also were found at the origin of the brachial plexus. The other hawk's wing had not returned to functional status > 2 yr after injury.

  1. Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy in the Context of Early Physical Rehabilitation

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    Vivian Lucía Yanes Sierra

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cuban health system currently promotes prenatal testing and monitoring of pregnancy; nevertheless obstetric brachial plexus palsy remains an unfortunate consequence of a difficult delivery and is one of the most common birth trauma. Traditionally, its treatment has been conservative, based on multidisciplinary monitoring and consultations with various specialists to deal with the consequences. After conducting an extensive literature review, we discussed in this paper the etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology, types of injuries, prognosis and outcome, consequences, assessment tools, existing treatments and series of exercises for obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

  2. LOWER BIFIDOBACTERIA COUNTS IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE ON A GLUTEN-FREE DIET

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    Lisléia GOLFETTO

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context The ingestion of gluten is responsible for the symptoms of Celiac disease, but other environmental factors can also influence. Strains of the Bifidobacterium genus have been shown to afford protection against the inflammatory response and mucosal damage caused by gliadin peptides in vitro. Objectives This study was designed to compare the concentration of fecal bifidobacteria and pH of patients with celiac disease on gluten-free diet and control subjects in order to identify if the imbalance on fecal microbiota still remain during the treatment of celiac disease and identify the necessity of dietary supplementation with pre- or probiotics. Methods It was analyzed the feces of 42 healthy subjects and 14 celiac patients. The bifidobacteria count in feces was done in selective medium BIM-25. Microscopic analysis of the colonies was performed by Gram stain. The identification of the genus Bifidobacterium was performed by determination of fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase. Fecal pH was measured using a pH meter. Results The concentration of bifidobacteria per gram of feces was significantly higher in healthy subjects (controls (1.5 ± 0.63 x108 CFU/g when compared to celiac patients (2.5 ± 1.5 x107 CFU/g. The fecal pH was not different between celiac patients (7.19 ± 0.521 and controls (7.18 ± 0.522. Conclusions These results suggest that with lower levels of bifidobacteria, celiac patients have an imbalance in the intestinal microbiota, regardless of pH, even while on a gluten-free diet. This fact could favor the pathological process of the disorder.

  3. THE PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE AMONG PATIENTS WITH FAMILIAL MEDITERRANEAN FEVER

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    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Familial Mediterranean Fever and celiac disease are both related to auto-inflammation and/or auto-immunity and they share some common clinical features such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating and flatulence. Objectives We aimed to determine the association of these two diseases, if present. Methods Totally 112 patients diagnosed with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 cases as healthy control were included in the study. All participants were examined for the evidence of celiac disease, with serum tissue transglutaminase IgA levels (tTG IgA. Results Totally 144 cases, 112 with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 healthy control cases were included in the study. tTG IgA positivity was determined in three cases with Familial Mediterranean Fever and in one case in control group. In that aspect there was no significant difference regarding the tTG IgA positivity between groups (P=0.81. Duodenum biopsy was performed to the tTG IgA positive cases and revealed Marsh Type 3b in two Familial Mediterranean Fever cases and Marsh Type 3c in the other one while the biopsy results were of the only tTG IgA positive case in control group was Marsh Type 3b. In HLA evaluation of the celiac cases; HLA DQ2 was present in two celiac cases of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group and in the only celiac case of the control group while HLA DQ8 was present in one celiac case of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group. Conclusions We did not determine an association of Familial Mediterranean Fever with celiac disease. Larger studies with subgroup analysis are warranted to determine the relationship of these two diseases.

  4. Celiac Anti-Type 2 Transglutaminase Antibodies Induce Phosphoproteome Modification in Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marabotti, Anna; Lepretti, Marilena; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Vitale, Monica; Zambrano, Nicola; Sblattero, Daniele; Esposito, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2) activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. Methods and Principal Findings We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins), three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. Conclusions Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here identified in this study

  5. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce phosphoproteome modification in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Paolella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2 activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins, three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here

  6. Dough quality of bread wheat lacking ¿-gliadins with celiac disease epitopes and addition of celiac-safe avenins to improve dough quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeck, van den H.C.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Meer, van der I.M.; Hamer, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is a T-cell mediated immune response in the small intestine of genetically susceptible individuals caused by ingested gluten proteins from wheat, rye, and barley. In the allohexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), gluten proteins are encoded by multigene loci present on the homoeol

  7. Presence of celiac disease epitopes in modern and old hexaploid wheat varieties: wheat breeding may have contributed to increased prevalence of celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeck, van den H.C.; Jong, de H.C.; Salentijn, E.M.J.; Dekking, L.; Bosch, H.J.; Hamer, R.J.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Meer, van der I.M.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Gluten proteins from wheat can induce celiac disease (CD) in genetically susceptible individuals. Specific gluten peptides can be presented by antigen presenting cells to gluten-sensitive T-cell lymphocytes leading to CD. During the last decades, a significant increase has been observed in the preva

  8. Rhabdoid choroid plexus carcinoma: a rare histological type Carcinoma de plexus coroides de tipo rabdoide: un tipo histológico raro

    OpenAIRE

    Martha Lilia Tena-Suck; Juan Luis Gómez-Amador; Alma Ortiz-Plata; C. Salina-Lara; Daniel Rembao-Bojórquez; Rosalba Vega-Orozco

    2007-01-01

    Primary central nervous system atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors mostly occur during early childhood and are almost invariably fatal. These tumors show similar histological and radiological features to primitive neuroectodermal tumor, meduloblastoma and choroid plexus carcinoma, but present different biological behaviors. We present the case of an 18 year-old man who presented headache, vomiting and ataxia. CT-scan and MRI revealed a posterior fossa tumor. A gross total resection was performe...

  9. Choroid plexus carcinomas in children: MRI features and patient outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Steven P. [University of Rochester School of Medicine, Strong Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rochester, NY (United States); University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Radiology, 601 Elmwood Avenue, P.O. Box 648, Rochester, NY (United States); Khademian, Zarir P.; Zimmerman, Robert A. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chuang, Sylvester H. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Radiology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pollack, Ian F. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Korones, David N. [University of Rochester School of Medicine, Strong Memorial Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Choroid plexus carcinomas (CPC) are rare malignant intracranial neoplasms usually occurring in young children. The objectives of this study were to characterize the preoperative MRI features of CPC, determine the frequency of disseminated disease in the CNS at diagnosis, and assess patient outcomes. The preoperative cranial MR images of 11 patients with CPC were retrospectively reviewed for lesion location, lesion size, un-enhanced and enhanced MRI signal characteristics, and presence of disseminated intracranial tumor. Postoperative cranial and spinal MRI images were reviewed for residual, recurrent, and/or disseminated tumor. The study group included six male and five female patients ranging in age from 5 months to 5.3 years (median=1.8 years). CPC were located in the lateral (n=8), fourth (n=1), and third (n=1) ventricles, and foramen of Luschka (n=1). Mean tumor size was 5.2cm x 4.9cm x 5.0 cm. On short-TR images, CPC had heterogeneous, predominantly intermediate signal with foci of high signal in 45% of lesions from areas of hemorrhage. On long-TR/long-TE images, solid portions of CPC typically had heterogeneous, intermediate-to-slightly-high signal. Small zones of low signal on long-TR/long-TE images were seen in 55% of the lesions secondary to areas of hemorrhage and/or calcifications. Tubular flow voids representing blood vessels were seen in 55% of the lesions. Zones of high signal comparable to CSF were seen in 64% of CPC secondary to cystic/necrotic zones. All CPC showed prominent contrast enhancement. Irregular enhancing margins suggesting subependymal invasion were seen in 73% of the lesions. Findings consistent with edema in the brain adjacent to the enhancing lesions were seen in 73% of CPC. CPC caused hydrocephalus in 82% of patients at diagnosis. Two patients died from hemorrhagic complications from surgical biopsies. Disseminated tumor in the leptomeninges was present in 45% of patients at diagnosis and was associated with a poor prognosis. The 1

  10. Gluten-Free Diet Does Not Appear to Induce Endoscopic Remission of Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children with Coexistent Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease and eosinophilic esophagitis are usually considered to be separate gastrointestinal diseases; however, it appears that they may coexist more often than would be expected. It is unknown whether eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with celiac disease responds to a gluten-free diet.

  11. From genome-wide association studies to disease mechanisms : celiac disease as a model for autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Wijmenga, Cisca; Withoff, Sebo

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by a chronic inflammatory reaction in the intestine and is triggered by gluten, a constituent derived from grains which is present in the common daily diet in the Western world. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms behind celiac disease etiology are still not f

  12. Screening detected celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus : Effect on the clinical course - (A case control study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rami, B; Sumnik, Z; Schober, E; Waldhor, T; Battelino, T; Bratanic, N; Kurti, K; Lebl, J; Limbert, C; Madacsy, L; Odink, RJH; Paskova, M; Soltesz, G

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate clinical and metabolic characteristics of diabetic children with screening detected celiac disease in a multicenter case-control study. Methods: Cases: 98 diabetic patients were diagnosed as having silent celiac disease by screening with endomysial antibodies and subsequent

  13. Focus on Inclusive Education: The Educational and Social Challenges of Children with Celiac Disease: What Educators Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chick, Kay A.

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disease in which gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and contaminated oats, attacks the lining of the small intestine. Children with this disease must eliminate gluten from their diet. This article provides educators with essential information on celiac disease and the federal laws that protect the…

  14. Screening detected celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Effect on the clinical course - (A case control study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rami, B.; Sumnik, Z.; Schober, E.; Waldhor, T.; Battelino, T.; Bratanic, N.; Kurti, K.; Lebl, J.; Limbert, C.; Madacsy, L.; Odink, R.J.H.; Paskova, M.; Soltesz, G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate clinical and metabolic characteristics of diabetic children with screening detected celiac disease in a multicenter case-control study. Methods: Cases: 98 diabetic patients were diagnosed as having silent celiac disease by screening with endomysial antibodies and subsequent

  15. Surgical fasciectomy of the trapezius muscle combined with neurolysis of the Spinal accessory nerve; results and long-term follow-up in 30 consecutive cases of refractory chronic whiplash syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Michael

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic problems from whiplash trauma generally include headache, pain and neck stiffness that may prove refractory to conservative treatment modalities. As has previously been reported, such afflicted patients may experience significant temporary relief with injections of local anesthetic to painful trigger points in muscles of the shoulder and neck, or lasting symptomatic improvement through surgical excision of myofascial trigger points. In a subset of patients who present with chronic whiplash syndrome, the clinical findings suggest an affliction of the spinal accessory nerve (CN XI, SAN by entrapment under the fascia of the trapezius muscle. The present study was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of SAN neurolysis in chronic whiplash syndrome. Methods A standardized questionnaire and a linear visual-analogue scale graded 0-10 was used to assess disability related to five symptoms (pain, headache, insomnia, weakness, and stiffness before, and one year after surgery in a series of thirty consecutive patients. Results The preoperative duration of symptoms ranged from seven months to 13 years. The following changes in disability scores were documented one year after surgery: Overall pain decreased from 9.5 +/- 0.9 to 3.2 +/- 2.6 (p Conclusions Entrapment of the spinal accessory nerve and/or chronic compartment syndrome of the trapezius muscle may cause chronic debilitating pain after whiplash trauma, without radiological or electrodiagnostic evidence of injury. In such cases, surgical treatment may provide lasting relief.

  16. Prevalence and clinical features of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ventura

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder with an average prevalence of 1% in Europe and the United States. Because of strong European ancestry in southern Brazil, this study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of celiac disease among autoimmune thyroiditis patients.DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study in a public university hospital.METHODS: This cross-sectional prevalence study included autoimmune thyroiditis patients who were tested for anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies between August 2010 and July 2011.RESULTS: Fifty-three patients with autoimmune thyroiditis were included; 92.5% were women, with mean age of 49.0 ± 13.5 years. Five patients (9.3% were serologically positive for celiac disease: three of them (5.6% were reactive for anti-endomysial antibodies and two (3.7% for anti-transglutaminase. None of them exhibited anemia and one presented diarrhea. Endoscopy was performed on two patients: one with normal histology and the other with lymphocytic infiltrate and villous atrophy.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of celiac disease among patients with autoimmune thyroid disease was 9.3%; one patient complained of diarrhea and none presented anemia. Among at-risk populations, like autoimmune thyroiditis patients, the presence of diarrhea or anemia should not be used as a criterion for indicating celiac disease investigation. This must be done for all autoimmune thyroiditis patients because of its high prevalence.

  17. Enteroscopy and radiology for the management of celiac disease complications: Time for a pragmatic roadmap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchi, Federica; Locatelli, Martina; Tomba, Carolina; Conte, Dario; Ferretti, Francesca; Elli, Luca

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease is the most common autoimmune enteropathy in Western countries, and is usually associated with a good response to the gluten free diet and an excellent prognosis. However, a minority of patients develop complications of the disease, such as refractory celiac disease, ulcerative jejunoileitis and neoplastic complications such as adenocarcinoma of the small bowel and enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma. Neoplastic complications described in association with celiac disease have a high mortality rate, due to their aggressive behavior and to the usual advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. In recent years, the detection of small bowel lesions has dramatically improved thank to the availability of highly performing radiologic and endoscopic techniques. The diagnostic delay of malignant complications in patients with celiac disease may be improved by establishing a pragmatic flowchart for the identification and follow up of "at risk" patients. We performed a comprehensive review of the articles published on this issue in order to promote a roadmap to be applied when facing with celiac patients with suspected small bowel complications.

  18. Beyond moulage sign and TTG levels: the role of cross-sectional imaging in celiac sprue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheedy, Shannon P; Barlow, John M; Fletcher, Joel G; Smyrk, Thomas C; Scholz, Francis J; Codipilly, Don C; Al Bawardy, Badr F; Fidler, Jeff L

    2017-02-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes inflammation and destruction in the small intestine of genetically susceptible individuals following ingestion of gluten. Awareness of the disease has increased; however, it remains a challenge to diagnose. This review summarizes the intestinal and extraintestinal cross-sectional imaging findings of celiac disease. Small intestine fold abnormalities are the most specific imaging findings for celiac disease, whereas most other imaging findings reflect a more generalized pattern seen with malabsorptive processes. Familiarity with the imaging pattern may allow the radiologist to suggest the diagnosis in patients with atypical presentations in whom it is not clinically suspected. Earlier detection allows earlier treatment initiation and may prevent significant morbidity and mortality that can occur with delayed diagnosis. Refractory celiac disease carries the greatest risk of mortality due to associated complications, including cavitating mesenteric lymph node syndrome, ulcerative jejunoileitis, enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma, and adenocarcinoma, all of which are described and illustrated. Radiologic and endoscopic investigations are complimentary modalities in the setting of complicated celiac disease.

  19. Partially responsive celiac disease resulting from small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and lactose intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Asha

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease is a common cause of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption syndrome all over the world. Though it was considered uncommon in India in past, it is being described frequently recently. Some patients with celiac disease do not improve despite gluten free diet (GFD. A study described 15 cases of celiac disease unresponsive to GFD in whom small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO or lactose intolerance was the cause for unresponsiveness. Case presentation During a three-year period, 12 adult patients with celiac disease were seen in the Luminal Gastroenterology Clinic in a tertiary referral center in northern India. Two of these 12 patients (16.6%, who did not fully respond to GFD initially, are presented here. Unresponsiveness resulted from SIBO in one and lactose intolerance in the other. The former patient responded to antibiotics and the latter to lactose withdrawal in addition to standard GFD. Conclusion In patients with celiac disease partially responsive or unresponsive to GFD, SIBO and lactose intolerance should be suspected; appropriate investigations and treatment for these may result in complete recovery.

  20. [Intolerance of gluten--a new disease or undiagnosed celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel'nikova, E A

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease is about 1% in the population and is growing due to the wide use of immunological methods of diagnosis. In recent years, in-depth research of the celiac disease has led not only to an increase in the number of patients with celiac disease, but also to the emergence of a broad spectrum of diseases associated with the ingestion of gluten. In this regard, a new pathology, known as "gluten intolerance or gluten sensitivity", attracted special attention of researchers. Studies in recent years have established that patients with this pathology may have both gastrointestinal symptoms and extraintestinal manifestations. Examinations of such patients usually do not find histological changes of the mucous membrane of the small intestine and autoimmune antibodies (to tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and endomysial (EMA)); however an increased level of gliadin antibodies (AGA) is often observed. Allergy to gluten is also absent. A gluten-free diet for such patients, like in case of the celiac disease, leads to the disappearance of clinical symptoms. Exact criteria for the diagnosis of this nosology have not been identified so far, but most researchers believe that prevalence of "gluten intolerance" is much higher than that of celiac disease.

  1. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: Another condition that responds to gluten].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Elizabeth; Araya, Magdalena

    2015-05-01

    Remission of gastrointestinal and general symptoms after gluten withdrawal has been described in some non-celiac individuals for nearly 30 years. Only recently, efforts have been made to define this entity, now referred to as "non-celiac gluten sensitivity". It includes patients that clinically respond to gluten free diet without exhibiting allergic or autoimmune features to explain such response. Wheat allergy, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and symptoms induced by high FODMAPs (Fermentable, Oligo-, Di-, Mono-saccharides And Polyols) consumption are the main differential diagnoses. The relationship with neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism has not been demonstrated, but currently it gives ground to great hope in families with affected children. Epidemiology of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is not clear. It is described as more common among women and less common in children. Genetic and immune factors, changes in intestinal microbiota and non-gluten components present in wheat grains are main factors postulated in the pathogenesis of this condition. To date, there are no specific biomarkers for non-celiac gluten sensitivity and diagnosis is reached by excluding other causes of disease. A trial with gluten-free diet and subsequent gluten challenge is the methodology most frequently used to confirm diagnosis.

  2. Association of LPP and TAGAP Polymorphisms with Celiac Disease Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Qi; Zhang, Na; Zhou, Zi-Xing; Huang, Chui-Can; Zeng, Cheng-Li; Xiao, Di; Guo, Cong-Cong; Han, Ya-Jing; Ye, Xiao-Hong; Ye, Xing-Guang; Ou, Mei-Ling; Zhang, Bao-Huan; Liu, Yang; Zeng, Eddy Y.; Yang, Guang; Jing, Chun-Xia

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lipoma preferred partner (LPP) and T-cell activation Rho GTPase activating protein (TAGAP) polymorphisms might influence the susceptibility to celiac disease. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis by identifying relevant studies to estimate the risks of these polymorphisms on celiac disease. Methods: The PubMed, Web of Science and Embase databases were searched (up to October 2016) for LPP rs1464510 and TAGAP rs1738074 polymorphisms. Results: This meta-analysis included the same 7 studies for LPP rs1464510 and TAGAP rs1738074. The minor risk A allele at both rs1464510 and rs1738074 carried risks (odds ratios) of 1.26 (95% CI: 1.22–1.30) and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.14–1.21), respectively, which contributed to increased risks in all celiac disease patients by 10.72% and 6.59%, respectively. The estimated lambdas were 0.512 and 0.496, respectively, suggesting that a co-dominant model would be suitable for both gene effects. Conclusions: This meta-analysis provides robust estimates that polymorphisms in LPP and TAGAP genes are potential risk factors for celiac disease in European and American. Prospective studies and more genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed to confirm these findings, and some corresponding molecular biology experiments should be carried out to clarify the pathogenic mechanisms of celiac disease. PMID:28208589

  3. [IgA-class antigliadin antibodies in the screening and follow-up of celiac disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadatou, B; Ferretti, F; Colistro, F; Castellucci, G; Lucidi, V; Ricci, S; Cerminara, R; Bella, S; Colombo, A M; Gambarara, M

    1992-01-01

    IgA antigliadin antibodies (IgA-AGA) have been determined with an enzyme immunoassay in 2.141 pediatric patients. High levels of IgA were found in 98% of 53 celiac patients (1st biopsy), in 81% of 16 celiac patients after gluten challenge, while high levels of these antibodies were not found in 200 patients on gluten-free diet. Moreover high levels of IgA-AGA were found in 29% of 48 patients with normal jejunal biopsy and in 4% of 1.824 patients with gastrointestinal problems other than celiac disease. Our results confirm the data report in literature about the sensibility and the specificity of the IgA-AGA dosage as a screening test for celiac disease, but the possibility of false pathological and false normal values confirms the intestinal biopsy, as the main procedure for the diagnosis of celiac disease.

  4. Celiac disease in children: is it a problem in Kuwait?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Qabandi W

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wafa'a Al-Qabandi,1 Eman Buhamrah,2 Dalia Al-Abdulrazzaq,1 Khaled Hamadi,2 Fawaz Al Refaee3 1Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kuwait; 2Department of Pediatrics, Al Amiri Hospital, Kuwait; 3Department of Pediatrics, Al Adan Hospital, Kuwait  All authors contributed equally to the study Background: Celiac disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory disease of the small intestine triggered by gluten ingestion. The objective of this study is to describe our experience with CD children in Kuwait. Methods: The records of children with CD seen in the pediatric gastroenterology unit between February 1998 and December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were referred because of symptoms or positive CD antibody screening of a high-risk group (type 1 diabetes and Down syndrome. Results: Forty-seven patients were diagnosed: 53% were symptomatic and 47% were identified by screening. The median age at diagnosis was 66 (range 7–189 months. All cases were biopsy-proven except one. The symptomatic patients were significantly younger than those identified following screening (P<0.004. In the whole group, 66% were females and 77% were Kuwaitis; 9% had a positive family history of CD. The estimated cumulative incidence was 6.9/105. The median duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 8.5 (range 2–54 months. Failure to thrive was the most common presenting complaint (72% followed by diarrhea (64% and abdominal distension (56%. Atypical manifestations were seen in 60% of patients. Underweight and short stature were confirmed in 19% and 17% of patients, respectively. Overweight and obesity were detected in 14% and 6%, respectively. CD serology was based on a combination of antiendomysial and antigliadin antibodies. The median follow up was 24 (range 12–144 months. All patients were commenced on a gluten free diet, but good compliance was only achieved in 78%. Conclusion: The low frequency of childhood CD in Kuwait could

  5. Membrane-bound proteases of the gerbil subfornical organ and choroid plexus: an enzyme histochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitro, A; De Bault, L E

    1994-03-01

    Using enzyme-histochemical methods, the membrane-bound peptidases, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GTP), microsomal alanyl aminopeptidase (mAAP), glutamyl aminopeptidase (EAP), and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV), were studied in microvessels of the gerbil subfornical organ (SFO), choroid plexus adjacent to the SFO, and the ependyma of brain ventricle walls in the vicinity of the SFO. Vessels and microvessels of gerbil SFO and choroid plexus were positive for gamma-GTP, mAAP, and EAP, but negative for DPP IV. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) microvessels in the surrounding brain tissue also showed positive reactions for gamma-GTP, mAAP, and EAP but a negative reaction for DPP IV. Both epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and ependymal cells of the ventricle walls were negative for all four studied enzymes. It is suggested that blood-borne peptide hormones which can be substrates for these membrane-bound proteases can be modulated by gamma-GTP, mAAP, and EAP, but not by DPP IV, when they come in contact with the plasma membrane of the endothelial cells of the vessels in gerbil SFO, choroid plexus, and surrounding brain tissue.

  6. Distal infrared thermography and skin temperature after ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Semera; Bjerregaard, Lars S; Lundstrøm, Lars H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increases in skin temperature may be used as an early predictor of the success of interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB), but we lack detailed information on the thermographic response. OBJECTIVE: To investigate and characterise the thermographic response after IBPBs. DESIGN: Prosp...

  7. Medical Rehabilitation and Occupational Therapy in Patients with Lesion of Plexus Brachialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacheva D.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Causes for plexus brachialis damage are versatile, and in some cases remain unknown, but mostly result from degenerative and inflammatory processes. Treatment of brachial plexus dysfunction is often conservative and is subject to a team of specialists - neurologists, traumatologists, rehabilitation physicians, kinesitherapists and occupational therapists. The objective of the research is to report the recovery of patients with lesion of plexus brachialis after a complex physiotherapy and rehabilitation treatment program that includes electrostimulation, remedial massage, kinesitherapy, electrotherapy and occupational therapy. A total of 159 patients, treated at the Clinic of Physical Therapy, University Hospital of Pleven, were included in the study. Improvement of measured indexes: pain assessment, centimetry, assessment of upper limb muscle weakness, dynamometry and functional test of activities of daily living, was registered in all patients under observation. In order to achieve good results in the rehabilitation of patients with injured plexus brachialis, timely diagnosis, good medication therapy and early start of complex physiotherapy and rehabilitation are of crucial importance, so that performance of daily living activities improves. The good results come slowly and with difficulties, but the quality of life of patients and the quality of labor performed by them, improves significantly.

  8. Reduced functional connectivity within the primary motor cortex of patients with brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraiman, D.; Miranda, M.F.; Erthal, F.; Buur, P.F.; Elschot, M.; Souza, L.; Rombouts, S.A.; Schimmelpenninck, C.A.; Norris, D.G.; Malessy, M.J.; Galves, A.; Vargas, C.D.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at the effects of traumatic brachial plexus lesion with root avulsions (BPA) upon the organization of the primary motor cortex (M1). Nine right-handed patients with a right BPA in whom an intercostal to musculocutaneous (ICN-MC) nerve transfer was performed had post-operative resting

  9. Valproic acid protects neurons and promotes neuronal regeneration after brachial plexus avulsion****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Li; Dianxiu Wu; Rui Li; Xiaojuan Zhu; Shusen Cui

    2013-01-01

    Valproic acid has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects and promote neurite outgrowth in several peripheral nerve injury models. However, whether valproic acid can exert its beneficial effect on neurons after brachial plexus avulsion injury is currently unknown. In this study, brachial plexus root avulsion models, established in Wistar rats, were administered daily with valproic acid dis-solved in drinking water (300 mg/kg) or normal water. On days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 28 after avulsion injury, tissues of the C 5-T 1 spinal cord segments of the avulsion injured side were harvested to in-vestigate the expression of Bcl-2, c-Jun and growth associated protein 43 by real-time PCR and western blot assay. Results showed that valproic acid significantly increased the expression of Bcl-2 and growth associated protein 43, and reduced the c-Jun expression after brachial plexus avulsion. Our findings indicate that valproic acid can protect neurons in the spinal cord and enhance neuronal regeneration fol owing brachial plexus root avulsion.

  10. Nicotinic receptor mediates nitric oxide synthase expression in the rat gastric myenteric plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Takahashi, T; Taniuchi, M; Hsu, C X; Owyang, C

    1998-04-01

    The mechanism that regulates the synthesis of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), a key enzyme responsible for NO production in the myenteric plexus, remains unknown. We investigated the roles of the vagal nerve and nicotinic synapses in the mediation of NOS synthesis in the gastric myenteric plexus in rats. Truncal vagotomy and administration of hexamethonium significantly reduced nonadrenergic, noncholinergic relaxation, the catalytic activity of NOS, the number of NOS-immunoreactive cells, and the density of NOS-immunoreactive bands and NOS mRNA bands obtained from gastric tissue. These results suggest that NOS expression in the gastric myenteric plexus is controlled by the vagal nerve and nicotinic synapses. We also investigated if stimulation of the nicotinic receptor increases neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression in cultured gastric myenteric ganglia. Incubation of cultured gastric myenteric ganglia with the nicotinic receptor agonist, 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperizinium (DMPP, 10(-10)-10(-7) M), for 24 h significantly increased the number of nNOS-immunoreactive cells and the density of immunoreactive nNOS bands and nNOS mRNA bands. nNOS mRNA expression stimulated by DMPP was antagonized by a protein kinase C antagonist, a phospholipase C inhibitor, and an intracellular Ca2+ chelator. We concluded that activation of the nicotinic receptor stimulates a Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C pathway, which in turn, upregulates nNOS mRNA expression and nNOS synthesis in the gastric myenteric plexus.

  11. Origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of the gray brocket deer Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla: Cervidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Gonçalves Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus is a set of nerves originated in the cervicothoracic medular region which innervates the thoracic limb and its surroundings. Its study in different species is important not only as a source of morphological knowledge, but also because it facilitates the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders resulting from various pathologies. This study aimed to describe the origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of Mazama gouazoubira. Three specimens were used, belonging to the scientific collection of the Laboratory for Teaching and Research on Wild Animals of Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU; they were fixed in 3.7% formaldehyde and dissected. In M. gouazoubira, the brachial plexus resulted from connections between the branches of the three last cervical spinal nerves, C6, C7, C8, and the first thoracic one, T1, and it had as derivations the nerves suprascapular, cranial and caudal subscapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, median, ulnar, radial, pectoral, thoracodorsal, long thoracic and lateral thoracic. The muscles innervated by the brachial plexus nerves were the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres major, teres minor, deltoid, cleidobrachial, coracobrachialis, biceps brachialis, brachial, triceps brachialis, anconeus, flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, lateral ulnar, extensor carpi obliquus, extensor digitorum, superficial pectoral, deep pectoral, ventral serratus, and external oblique abdominal.

  12. Anatomical characteristics of the brachial plexus of the maned sloth (Bradypus torquatus Illiger, 1811

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    Gessica Ariane de Melo Cruz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Eight male and female maned sloth (Bradypus torquatus cadavers, previously fixed in formalin, were used to identify the origin of the brachial plexus, nerves and innervation territory in order to determine an anatomical pattern for this species. The plexus of B. torquatus was derived from the C7 to C10 and T1 to T2 spinal nerves, but the participation of T2 was variable. The spinal nerves gave origin to the cranial and caudal trunks, which joined to form a common trunk, from which two fascicles were formed. All the nerves from the brachial plexus were originated from these two fascicles, except the thoracic, long pectoral and suprascapular nerves, which arose before the formation of the common trunk. The organization of the brachial plexus into trunks and fascicles, and subsequent origin of peripheral nerves, demonstrates that most of the spinal nerves contribute to the composition of the peripheral nerves and the possibility that lesions or traumatic injuries would damage most of the thoracic member.

  13. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini V Bhat Pai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk.

  14. Does the Addition of Tramadol and Ketamine to Ropivacaine Prolong the Axillary Brachial Plexus Block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Can Senel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. A prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial to assess the effect of tramadol and ketamine, 50 mg, added to ropivacaine in brachial plexus anesthesia. Methods. Thirty-six ASA physical statuses I and II patients, between 18 and 60 years of age, scheduled for forearm and hand surgery under axillary brachial plexus block, were allocated to 3 groups. Group R received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL, group RT received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL with 50 mg tramadol, and group RK received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL with 50 mg ketamine for axillary brachial plexus block. The onset times and the duration of sensory and motor blocks, duration of analgesia, hemodynamic parameters, and adverse events (nausea, vomiting, and feeling uncomfortable were recorded. Results. The onset time of sensorial block was the fastest in ropivacaine + tramadol group. Duration of sensorial and motor block was the shortest in the ropivacaine + tramadol group. Duration of analgesia was significantly longer in ropivacaine + tramadol group. Conclusion. We conclude that when added to brachial plexus analgesia at a dose of 50 mg, tramadol extends the onset and duration time of the block and improves the quality of postoperative analgesia without any side effects.

  15. A clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, S F

    2012-05-01

    Competency in anesthesia traditionally has been determined subjectively in practice. Optimal training in procedural skills requires valid and reliable forms of assessment. The objective was to examine a procedure-specific clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block for inter-rater reliability and construct validity in a clinical setting.

  16. Neurovascular plexus theory for "escape pain phenomenon" in lower third molar surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gururaj Arakeri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain during extraction of impacted mandibular third molars which can occur despite adequate local anesthesia is termed as "escape pain phenomenon". Recently, it was described during elevation of a mesioangular impacted mandibular third molar and also while curetting an extracted third molar socket. This phenomenon has been overlooked, as it was previously considered secondary to pressure effect on the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle (IANB. However, it is unlikely that the pain impulses originate from direct pressure on the IANB, as the nerve is blocked more proximally at its entry into the mandible. The authors speculated that the occasional presence of a neurovascular plexus (NVP independent of the IANB causes the escape of a pain impulse upon stimulation by root pressure or instrumentation. To validate the presence of such a plexus, a meticulous literature search and review were performed. The search revealed evidence of the occasional presence of a NVP consisting of auriculotemporal and/or retromolar neural filaments. The plexus may be present around the inferior alveolar artery or embedded within the IANB, and does not innervate the tooth. This plexus likely propagates pain impulses only upon stimulation by compression or instrumentation in the apical area of the tooth socket. This theory explains the absence of pain during tooth sectioning and bone guttering in the presence of a complete inferior alveolar nerve block.

  17. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Rohini V Bhat; Hegde, Harihar V; Santhosh, McB; Roopa, S; Deshpande, Shrinivas S; Rao, P Raghavendra

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis) and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk.

  18. 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging in children with brachial plexus birth injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shinong Pan; Qiyong Guo; Lijie Tian; Wei Liao; Feng Tian; Jian Mao; Fei Wang; Rongjie Bai; Qi Li; Zhian Chen

    2011-01-01

    Brachial plexus birth injuries in children are usually diagnosed using 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging, while the application of high-field magnetic resonance imaging is rarely reported. Therefore, a retrospective comparison of 18 cases of children with brachial plexus injury was performed to investigate the characteristics of 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative observations. Magnetic resonance examinations in 18 cases of children showed that pseudo-meningocele sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positivity rates were 83.3%, 79.6%, 81.1%, and 40.0%, respectively. As for the neuroma and fibrous scar encapsulation, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positivity rates were 92.9%, 50.0%, 83.3%, and 77.8%, respectively. These results confirm that 3.0-T high-field magnetic resonance imaging can clearly reveal abnormal changes in brachial plexus injury, in which pseudo-meningocele, fibrous scar encapsulation, and neuroma are the characteristic changes of obstetric brachial plexus preganglionic and postganglionic nerve injury.

  19. A Case of Scapulothoracic Dissociation with Brachial Plexus Injury: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

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    Lee, G.K.; Suh, K.J.; Choi, J.A.; Oh, O.Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-11-15

    Scapulothoracic dissociation is defined as violent lateral or rotational displacement of the shoulder girdle from its thoracic attachments with severe neurovascular injury. We describe the radiographic and associated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of a case of scapulothoracic dissociation with brachial plexus injury in a 17-year-old man, and include a review of the relevant literature.

  20. Distribution of nitric oxide synthase in stomach myenteric plexus of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Peng; Jin-Bin Feng; Hong Yon; Yun Zhao; Shi-Liang Wang

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the distribution of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in rat stomach myenteric plexus. METHODS: The distribution of NOS in gastric wall was studied in quantity and location by the NADPH-diaphorase (NDP) histochemical staining method and whole mount preparation technique. RESULTS: NOS was distributed in whole stomach wall, most of them were located in myenteric plexus, and distributed in submucosal plexus. The shape of NOS positive neurons was basically similar, most of them being round and oval in shape. But their density, size and staining intensity varied greatly in the different parts of stomach. The density was 62 -± 38 cells/mm2(antrum), 43 ± 32 cells/mm2(body), and 32 ± 28 cells/mm2 (fundus), respectively. The size and staining intensity of NOS positive neurons in the fundus were basically the same, the neurons being large and dark stained, while they were obviously different in antrum. In the body of the stomach, the NOS positive neurons were in an intermediate state from fundus to antrum. There were some beadlike structures which were strung together by NOS positive varicosities in nerve fibers, some were closely adherent to the outer walls of blood vessels. CONCLUSION: Nitric oxide might he involved in the modulation of motility, secretion and blood ciroulation of the stomach, and the significant difference of NOS positive neurons in different parts of stomach myenteric plexus may be related to the physiologic function of stomach.

  1. Brachial plexus injury after transfer of free latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周友清; 陈亮; 胡韶楠; 顾玉东

    2002-01-01

    @@ Free latissimus dorsi muscle transfer is widely used for functional reconstruction of flexion of elbow and fingers after brachial plexus injury at later stage, as well as for soft tissue coverage because of its large size and long and reliable pedicle with adequate vessel diameter.

  2. Variation in brachial plexus formation, branching pattern and relation with major vessels

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    G. Anwer Khan

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: The present study carried out on adult human cadavers revealed some rare variations in the formation, branching pattern and relations of the brachial plexus. These variations are of clinical significance for the surgeons, radiologists and the anesthesiologists. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1591-1594

  3. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

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    Hua Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C 6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10 6 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C 6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  4. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve:evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Jin; Qi Yang; Feng Ji; Ya-jie Zhang; Yan Zhao; Min Luo

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as em-bryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C6root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 106 cells/mL, 3μL/injection, 25 injections) immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also signiifcantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effec-tively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  5. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF FENTANYL AND DEXMEDETOMIDINE IN SUPRACLAVICULAR BRACHIAL PLEXUS BLOCK ACHIEVED WITH ROPIVACAINE

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    Soma C.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Supraclavicular block of brachial plexus provides complete and reliable anaesthesia for upper limb surgeries. Ropivacaine, is an affective local anaesthetic in for brachial plexus anaesthesia. It is a potent blocker of Aδ and C fibres, rendering good sensory effect but le ss motor blockade. We evaluated the anaesthetic quality and length of analgesia with the addition of either fentanyl or dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine for Supraclavicular brachial plexus block. METHODS: In a prospective clinical trial, 90 patients were ran domly allocated to either receive 30 ml ropivacaine 0.5% (Group R, 30 ml ropivacaine 0.5% with fentanyl 50 mcg (Group RF or 30 ml ropivacaine 0.5% with dexmedetomedine 50 mcg (Group RD in Supraclavicular brachial plexus. The characteristics for anaesthe sia and analgesia were assessed for the three groups. OBSERVATIONS: Demographic profile was comparable in the groups. The onset of analgesia and time to complete analgesia was enhanced in Group RD and Group RF compared to Group R. Prolongation of sensory b lockade and motor blockade with extended duration of postoperative analgesia was observed in Group RD and Group RF compared to Group R. There were minimum haemodynamic disturbances and side - effects in any group except f or Grade 3 sedation score which was f requently noted in patients receiving dexmedetomidine as adjunct. RESULTS: Compared to the use of ropivacaine 0.5%, 30 ml alone for supraclavicular brachial plexus block, the addition of 50 mcg fentanyl or 50 mcg dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine enhanced onset of block and also increased duration of surgical anaesthesia with prolongation of post - operative analgesia. Furthermore blockade characteristics improved better with addition of dexmedetomodine than fentanyl without increasing incidence of unwanted s ide - effects.

  6. Influx mechanisms in the embryonic and adult rat choroid plexus: a transcriptome study

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    Norman Ruthven Saunders

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptome of embryonic and adult rat lateral ventricular choroid plexus, using a combination of RNA-Sequencing and microarray data, was analysed by functional groups of influx transporters, particularly solute carrier (SLC transporters. RNA-Seq was performed at embryonic day (E 15 and adult with additional data obtained at intermediate ages from microarray analysis. The largest represented functional group in the embryo was amino acid transporters (twelve with expression levels 2-98 times greater than in the adult. In contrast, in the adult only six amino acid transporters were up-regulated compared to the embryo and at more modest enrichment levels (<5-fold enrichment above E15. In E15 plexus five glucose transporters, in particular Glut-1, and only one monocarboxylate transporter were enriched compared to the adult, whereas only two glucose transporters but six monocarboxylate transporters in the adult plexus were expressed at higher levels than in embryos. These results are compared with earlier published physiological studies of amino acid and monocarboxylate transport in developing rodents. This comparison shows correlation of high expression of some transporters in the developing brain with higher amino acid transport activity reported previously. Data for divalent metal transporters are also considered. Immunohistochemistry of several transporters (e.g. Slc16a10, a thyroid hormone transporter gene products was carried out to confirm translational activity and to define cellular distribution of the proteins. Overall the results show that there is substantial expression of numerous influx transporters in the embryonic choroid plexus, many at higher levels than in the adult. This, together with immunohistochemical evidence and data from published physiological transport studies suggests that the choroid plexus in embryonic brain plays a major role in supplying the developing brain with essential nutrients.

  7. An epidemiological study of traumatic brachial plexus injury patients treated at an Indian centre

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    Darshan Kumar A Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidemiological studies on traumatic brachial plexus injuries are few and these studies help us to improve the treatment, rehabilitation of these patients and to allocate the resources required in their management. Epidemiological factors can vary in different countries. We wanted to know the situation in an Indian centre. Materials and Methods: Data regarding age, sex, affected side, mode of injury, distribution of paralysis, associated injuries, pain at the time of presentation and the index procedure they underwent were collected from 304 patients. Additional data like the vehicle associated during the accident, speed of the vehicle during the accident, employment status and integration into the family were collected in 144 patients out of the 304 patients. Results: Road traffic accidents accounted for 94% of patients and of the road traffic accidents 90% involved two wheelers. Brachial plexus injury formed a part of multitrauma in 54% of this study group and 46% had isolated brachial plexus injury. Associated injuries like fractures, vascular injuries and head injuries are much less probably due to the lower velocity of the vehicles compared to the western world. The average time interval from the date of injury to exploration of the brachial plexus was 127 days and 124 (40.78% patients presented to us within this duration. Fifty-seven per cent had joined back to work by an average of 8.6 months. It took an average of 6.8 months for the global brachial plexus-injured patients to write in their non-dominant hand.

  8. [Coexistence of Celiac Disease and autoimmune hepatitis case study and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Martín; Nolte, Cecilia; Luna, Eduardo; Scavino, Yolanda

    2006-01-01

    The case of a patient who was initially diagnosed with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, with subsequent documentation of Celiac Disease histologically and serologically is reported. The patient presented elevation of the aminotransferases, upon detection of the Celiac Disease which was initially attributed to the underlying disease. However, despite the complete resolution of her articular symptoms with a gluten-free diet, the liver chemistry abnormalities persisted. This led to consider an autoimmune hepatitis as the cause which was documented with a liver biopsy three months after the diagnosis of the celiac disease and under a strict gluten-free diet. Treatment with prednisone and azathioprine was initiated with complete normalization of aminotransferase levels. We present the sequence of events with the results and a review of the literature.

  9. Is gluten a cause of gastrointestinal symptoms in people without celiac disease?

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    Biesiekierski, Jessica R; Muir, Jane G; Gibson, Peter R

    2013-12-01

    The avoidance of wheat- and gluten-containing products is a worldwide phenomenon. While celiac disease is a well-established entity, the evidence base for gluten as a trigger of symptoms in patients without celiac disease (so-called 'non-celiac gluten sensitivity' or NCGS) is limited. The problems lie in the complexity of wheat and the ability of its carbohydrate as well as protein components to trigger gastrointestinal symptoms, the potentially false assumption that response to a gluten-free diet equates to an effect of gluten withdrawal, and diagnostic criteria for coeliac disease. Recent randomized controlled re-challenge trials have suggested that gluten may worsen gastrointestinal symptoms, but failed to confirm patients with self-perceived NCGS have specific gluten sensitivity. Furthermore, mechanisms by which gluten triggers symptoms have yet to be identified. This review discusses the most recent scientific evidence and our current understanding of NCGS.

  10. Symptomatic Secondary Selective IgM Immunodeficiency in Adult Man with Undiagnosed Celiac Disease

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    Eli Magen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective IgM immunodeficiency (SIgMID is a heterogeneous disorder with no known genetic background and may occur as a primary or a secondary condition. Celiac disease has been reported in association with several humeral immunodeficiencies, including isolated severe selective IgA deficiency, panhypogammaglobulinemia, and isolated combined IgA and IgM deficiency. There are only few reported cases of pediatric and adult patients with SIgMID and celiac disease. In this paper, we describe an adult patient with a symptomatic secondary SIgMID associated with undiagnosed celiac disease, with a resolution of clinical symptoms of immunodeficiency and serum IgM normalization following a gluten-free diet.

  11. Reversible Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Celiac Disease: Is it A Coincidental Finding?

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    Kenan Çelik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac Disease (CD is an autoimmune disease of the small intestine characterized by the immune response against ingested gluten. This response causes characteristic damage to the villi, which in turn results in malabsorption. Clinical signs and symptoms of CD may start early in childhood or in adulthood. Some people are completely asymptomatic. The term celiac crisis is used for patients with acute-onset severe abdominal pain which is potentially fatal. Although various extraintestinal signs and symptoms have been defined in CD, there are contradictory reports regarding hearing loss. We hereby report a patient with celiac disease who was investigated for malabsorption and was diagnosed with mild to medium temporary sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL. (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2013;51:190-2

  12. Refractory Celiac Disease Type II: A Case Report that Demonstrates the Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges

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    Alexandra Fernandes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Refractory celiac disease is an uncommon but serious complication of celiac disease. We describe a case of a severe refractory celiac disease type II, complicated with ulcerative jejunoileitis, in a 68 years old female, unresponsive to consecutive treatments with budesonide, prednisolone, cladribine and autologous stem cell transplantation. The patient maintained severe malnutrition, advanced osteoporosis, anaemia, vitamin deficiencies and hydro-electrolytic imbalances, necessitating consecutive hospitalizations for total parenteral nutrition. The patient also developed life-threatening complications, namely respiratory and urinary septic shock and also episodes of haemorrhagic shock secondary to ulcerative jejunoileitis. The progression to enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma was never demonstrated, but the patient died 7 years after the diagnosis due to a septic shock secondary to a nosocomial pneumonia and osteomyelitis related to a spontaneous hip fracture. This case highlights the difficulties in the diagnostic process, therapeutic management and surveillance of this rare condition associated with very poor prognosis.

  13. Lumbar Plexus and Sciatic Nerve Blocks for Fixation of Proximal Femoral Fractures in patients with Multiple Co-Morbidities

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    T.V.S Gopal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesia management for proximal femoral fractures of high risk patients with debilitating systemic co-morbidities is a challenging task. It is generally done under the effect of regional anaesthesia or general anaesthesia (GA, with systemic analgesics for alleviation of pain after surgery. A combination of lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve blocks can provide anaesthesia and analgesia to the entire lower extremity including the hip. Analgesic potency of lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve blocks is similar to epidural analgesia for hip surgery without the undesirable side effects. We describe here two cases of proximal femoral fractures which were done under combined lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block.

  14. Choroid plexus tumors: review of three cases. Carcinoma de plexos coroideos: revision a proposito de 3 casos

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    Zuazo Ojeda, A.; Ereo Ealo, M.J.; Mateos Goi, B.; Larrea Rementeria, F.; Pastor Cordoba, A.

    1994-01-01

    Choroid plexus tumors are rare, constituting approximately 0.5-0.6% of all intracranial neoplasms. Choroid plexus carcinomas are even more infrequent. We report three cases of choroid plexus carcinoma, the first signs of which were increased of head size or neurological disorders. The ultrasound (US) study demonstrated the existence of an highly echogenic intraventricular mass. One of the cases was studied by MR: on T1-weighted images the tumor was isointense to gray matter, and of intermediate signal intensity with T2-weighting. CT findings include intense homogeneous enhancement of the solid portions. (Author)

  15. Cytotoxicity of polyaniline nanomaterial on rat celiac macrophages in vitro.

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    Yu-Sang Li

    Full Text Available Polyaniline nanomaterial (nPANI is getting popular in many industrial fields due to its conductivity and stability. The fate and effect of nPANI in the environment is of paramount importance towards its technological applications. In this work, the cytotoxicity of nPANI, which was prepared by rapid surface polymerization, was studied on rat celiac macrophages. Cell viability of macrophages treated with various concentrations of nPANI and different periods ranging from 24 to 72 hours was tested by a MTT assay. Damages of nPANI to structures of macrophages were evaluated according to the exposure level of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and change of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP. We observed no significant effects of nPANI on the survival, ROS level and MMP loss of macrophages at concentrations up to 1 µg/ml. However, higher dose of nPANI (10 µg/ml or above induced cell death, changes of ROS level and MMP. In addition, an increase in the expression level of caspase-3 protein and its activated form was detected in a Western blot assay under the high dose exposure of nPANI. All together, our experimental results suggest that the hazardous potential of nPANI on macrophages is time- and dose-dependent and high dose of nPANI can induce cell apoptosis through caspase-3 mediated pathway.

  16. Th17-Related Genes and Celiac Disease Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Luz María; García-Magariños, Manuel; Dema, Bárbara; Espino, Laura; Maluenda, Carlos; Polanco, Isabel; Figueredo, M. Ángeles; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Núñez, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Th17 cells are known to be involved in several autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In celiac disease (CD), recent studies suggest an implication of those cells in disease pathogenesis. We aimed at studying the role of genes relevant for the Th17 immune response in CD susceptibility. A total of 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), mainly selected to cover most of the variability present in 16 Th17-related genes (IL23R, RORC, IL6R, IL17A, IL17F, CCR6, IL6, JAK2, TNFSF15, IL23A, IL22, STAT3, TBX21, SOCS3, IL12RB1 and IL17RA), were genotyped in 735 CD patients and 549 ethnically matched healthy controls. Case-control comparisons for each SNP and for the haplotypes resulting from the SNPs studied in each gene were performed using chi-square tests. Gene-gene interactions were also evaluated following different methodological approaches. No significant results emerged after performing the appropriate statistical corrections. Our results seem to discard a relevant role of Th17 cells on CD risk. PMID:22359581

  17. Th17-related genes and celiac disease susceptibility.

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    Luz María Medrano

    Full Text Available Th17 cells are known to be involved in several autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In celiac disease (CD, recent studies suggest an implication of those cells in disease pathogenesis. We aimed at studying the role of genes relevant for the Th17 immune response in CD susceptibility. A total of 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, mainly selected to cover most of the variability present in 16 Th17-related genes (IL23R, RORC, IL6R, IL17A, IL17F, CCR6, IL6, JAK2, TNFSF15, IL23A, IL22, STAT3, TBX21, SOCS3, IL12RB1 and IL17RA, were genotyped in 735 CD patients and 549 ethnically matched healthy controls. Case-control comparisons for each SNP and for the haplotypes resulting from the SNPs studied in each gene were performed using chi-square tests. Gene-gene interactions were also evaluated following different methodological approaches. No significant results emerged after performing the appropriate statistical corrections. Our results seem to discard a relevant role of Th17 cells on CD risk.

  18. Transverse Myelitis as Manifestation of Celiac Disease in a Toddler.

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    Krom, Hilde; Sprangers, Fleur; van den Berg, René; Benninga, Marc Alexander; Kindermann, Angelika

    2017-03-01

    We present a 17-month-old girl with rapidly progressive unwillingness to sit, stand, play, and walk. Furthermore, she lacked appetite, vomited, lost weight, and had an iron deficiency. Physical examination revealed a cachectic, irritable girl with a distended abdomen, dystrophic legs with paraparesis, disturbed sensibility, and areflexia. An MRI scan revealed abnormal high signal intensity on T2-weighted images in the cord on the thoracic level, without cerebral abnormalities, indicating transverse myelitis (TM). Laboratory investigations revealed elevated immunoglobulin A antibodies against gliadin (1980.0 kU/L; normal, 0-10.1 kU/L) and tissue transglutaminase (110.0 kU/L; normal, 0-10.1 kU/L). Gastroscopy revealed villous atrophy in the duodenal biopsies and lymphocytic gastritis according to Marsh IIIb, compatible with celiac disease (CD). After the start of a gluten free diet and methylprednisolone, she recovered completely. To our knowledge, this is the first pediatric case of TM as manifestation of CD. We suggest that all children with TM or other neurologic manifestations of unknown origin should be screened for CD.

  19. Celiac disease manifested by polyneuropathy and swollen ankles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zlatko Djuric; Borislav Kamenov; Vuka Katic

    2007-01-01

    A 27-year-old male started to have his ankles swollen during his military service. He was examined at a military hospital where electromyoneurography showed the signs of distal sensory-motor polyneuropathy with axon demyelinization and weak myopathic changes,whereas histopathological examination of gastrocnemius muscle biopsy revealed some mild and nonspecific myopathy. Besides, he was found to have subcutaneous ankle tissue edemas and hypertransaminasemia. Due to these reasons, he was dismissed from the military service and examined at another hospital where bone osteodensitometry revealed low bone mineral density of the spine. However, his medical problems were not resolved and after the second discharge from hospital he was desperately seeing doctors from time to time. Finally, at our institution he was shown to have celiac disease (CD) by positive serology (antitissue transglutaminase and antiendomysial antibodies) and small bowel mucosal histopathological examination,which showed total small bowel villous atrophy. Three months after the initiation of gluten-free diet, his ankle edema disappeared, electromyoneurographic signs of polyneuropathy improved and liver aminotransferases normalized. Good knowledge of CD extraintestinal signs and serologic screening are essential for early CD recognition and therapy.

  20. Non-dietary forms of treatment for adult celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2013-01-01

    At present,treatment for celiac disease includes a strict gluten-free diet.Compliance,however,is difficult and gluten-free food products are costly,and,sometimes very inconvenient.A number of potential alternative measures have been proposed to either replace or supplement gluten-free diet therapy.In the past,non-dietary forms of treatment were used(e.g.,corticosteroids) by some clinicians,often to supplement a gluten-free diet in patients that appeared to be poorly responsive to a gluten-free diet.Some of new and novel non-dietary measures have already advanced to a clinical trial phase.There are still some difficulties even if initial studies suggest a particularly exciting and novel form of non-dietary treatment.In particular,precise monitoring of the response to these agents will become critical.Symptom or laboratory improvement may be important,but it will be critical to ensure that ongoing inflammatory change and mucosal injury are not present.Therapeutic trials will be made more difficult because there is already an effective treatment regimen.

  1. Is enteroscopy necessary for diagnosis of celiac disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taylan Kav; Bulent Sivri

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the small intestine as a result of reaction to wheat protein,gluten.Exclusion of dietary gluten is the mainstay of the treatment that necessitates a precise diagnosis of the disease.Serological screening may aid in identifying patients with suspected CD,which should be confirmed by intestinal biopsy.It has been shown that duodenal biopsies are good for detection of the disease in most patients.However,there is a group of patients with positive serology and inconclusive pathology.As a result of the widespread use of serology,many patients with equivocal findings grow quickly.Unfortunately current endoscopic methods can only diagnose villous atrophy,which can be present in the later grades of disease (i.e.,Marsh Ⅲ).To diagnose CD correctly,going deeper in the intestine may be necessary.Enteroscopy can reveal changes in CD in the intestinal mucosa in 10%-17% of cases that have negative histology at initial workup.Invasiveness of the method limits its use.Capsule endoscopy may be a good substitute for enteroscopy.However,both techniques should be reserved for patients with suspected diagnosis of complications.This paper reviews the current literature in terms of the value of enteroscopy for diagnosis of CD.

  2. Celiac disease: A missed cause of metabolic bone disease

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    Ashu Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Celiac disease (CD is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease. The symptoms of CD are varied and atypical, with many patients having no gastrointestinal symptoms. Metabolic bone disease (MBD is a less recognized manifestation of CD associated with spectrum of musculoskeletal signs and symptoms, viz. bone pains, proximal muscle weakness, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fracture. We here report five patients who presented with severe MBD as the only manifestation of CD. Materials and Methods: Records of 825 patients of CD diagnosed during 2002-2010 were retrospectively analyzed for clinical features, risk factors, signs, biochemical, and radiological parameters. Results: We were able to identify five patients (0.6% of CD who had monosymptomatic presentation with musculoskeletal symptoms and signs in the form of bone pains, proximal myopathy, and fragility fractures without any gastrointestinal manifestation. All the five patients had severe MBD in the form of osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fragility fractures. Four of the five patients had additional risk factors such as antiepileptic drugs, chronic alcohol consumption, malnutrition, and associated vitamin D deficiency which might have contributed to the severity of MBD. Conclusion: Severe metabolic disease as the only presentation of CD is rare. Patients show significant improvement in clinical, biochemical, and radiological parameters with gluten-free diet, calcium, and vitamin D supplementation. CD should be looked for routinely in patients presenting with unexplained MBD.

  3. Is adult celiac disease really uncommon in Chinese?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-ling JIANG; Bing-ling ZHANG; You-shi LIU

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a type of intestinal malabsorption syndrome, in which the patients are intolerant to the gliadin in dietary gluten, resulting in chronic diarrhea and secondary malnutrition. The disease is common in Europe and the United States, but only sporadic reports are found in East Asia including China. Is CD really rare in China? We examined 62 patients by capsule endoscopy for chronic diarrhea from June 2003 to March 2008. Four patients with chronic diarrhea and weight loss were diag-nosed to have CD. Under the capsule endoscopy, we observed that the villi of the proximal small bowel became short, and that the mucous membrane became atrophied in these four patients. Duodenal biopsies were performed during gastroscopy and the pathological changes of mucosa were confirmed to be Marsh 3 stage of CD. A gluten free diet significantly improved the condi-tions of the four patients. We suspect that in China, especially in the northern area where wheat is the main food, CD might not be uncommon, and its under-diagnosis could be caused by its clinical manifestations that could be easily covered by the symptoms from other clinical situations, particularly when it came to subclinical patients without obvious symptom or to patients with ex-traintestinal symptoms as the initial manifestations.

  4. The opioid effects of gluten exorphins: asymptomatic celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruimboom, Leo; de Punder, Karin

    2015-11-24

    Gluten-containing cereals are a main food staple present in the daily human diet, including wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten intake is associated with the development of celiac disease (CD) and related disorders such as diabetes mellitus type I, depression, and schizophrenia. However, until now, there is no consent about the possible deleterious effects of gluten intake because of often failing symptoms even in persons with proven CD. Asymptomatic CD (ACD) is present in the majority of affected patients and is characterized by the absence of classical gluten-intolerance signs, such as diarrhea, bloating, and abdominal pain. Nevertheless, these individuals very often develop diseases that can be related with gluten intake. Gluten can be degraded into several morphine-like substances, named gluten exorphins. These compounds have proven opioid effects and could mask the deleterious effects of gluten protein on gastrointestinal lining and function. Here we describe a putative mechanism, explaining how gluten could "mask" its own toxicity by exorphins that are produced through gluten protein digestion.

  5. Evaluation of Cladribine treatment in refractory celiac disease type Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Greetje J Tack; Wieke HM Verbeek; Abdul Al-Toma; Dirk J Kuik; Marco WJ Schreurs; Otto Visser; Chris JJ Mulder

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate cladribine [2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA)] therapy in refractory celiac disease (RCD) Ⅱ. METHODS: An open-label cohort-study of RCD Ⅱ patients treated with 2-CdA was performed between 2000 and 2010. Survival rate, enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) occurrence, clinical course, and histological and immunological response rates were evaluated. RESULTS: Overall, 32 patients were included with a median follow-up of 31 mo. Eighteen patients responded well to 2-CdA. Patients responsive to 2-CdA had a statistically significant increased survival compared to those who were unresponsive. The overall 3- and 5-year survival was 83% in the responder and 63% and 22% in the non-responder group, respectively. The overall 2-year clinical, histological and immunological response rates were 81%, 47% and 41%, respectively. Progression into EATL was reported in 16%, all of these patients died. CONCLUSION: Treatment of RCD Ⅱ with 2-CdA holds promise, showing excellent clinical and histological response rates, and probably less frequent transition into EATL.

  6. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Daniela Migliarese; Wu, Jessica; Mager, Diana R; Turner, Justine M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD) is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician) in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD.

  7. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D.; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L.; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C.; Verdu, Elena F.; Bai, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  8. Defective expression of scavenger receptors in celiac disease mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Cupi

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a gluten sensitive enteropathy characterized by a marked infiltration of the mucosa with immune cells, over-production of inflammatory cytokines and epithelial cell damage. The factors/mechanisms that sustain and amplify the ongoing mucosal inflammation in CD are not however fully understood. Here, we have examined whether in CD there is a defective clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, a phenomenon that helps promote tolerogenic signals thus liming pathogenic responses. Accumulation of apoptotic cells and bodies was more pronounced in the epithelial and lamina propria compartments of active CD patients as compared to inactive CD patients and normal controls. Expression of scavenger receptors, which are involved in the clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, namely thrombospondin (TSP-1, CD36 and CD61, was significantly reduced in active CD as compared to inactive CD and normal mucosal samples. Consistently, lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC of active CD patients had diminished ability to phagocyte apoptotic cells. Interleukin (IL-15, IL-21 and interferon-γ, cytokines over-produced in active CD, inhibited the expression of TSP-1, CD36, and CD61 in normal intestinal LPMC. These results indicate that CD-related inflammation is marked by diminished clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, thus suggesting a role for such a defect in the ongoing mucosal inflammation in this disorder.

  9. Defective expression of scavenger receptors in celiac disease mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupi, Maria Laura; Sarra, Massimiliano; De Nitto, Daniela; Franzè, Eleonora; Marafini, Irene; Monteleone, Ivan; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Paoluzi, Omero Alessandro; Di Fusco, Davide; Gentileschi, Paolo; Ortenzi, Angela; Colantoni, Alfredo; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a gluten sensitive enteropathy characterized by a marked infiltration of the mucosa with immune cells, over-production of inflammatory cytokines and epithelial cell damage. The factors/mechanisms that sustain and amplify the ongoing mucosal inflammation in CD are not however fully understood. Here, we have examined whether in CD there is a defective clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, a phenomenon that helps promote tolerogenic signals thus liming pathogenic responses. Accumulation of apoptotic cells and bodies was more pronounced in the epithelial and lamina propria compartments of active CD patients as compared to inactive CD patients and normal controls. Expression of scavenger receptors, which are involved in the clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, namely thrombospondin (TSP)-1, CD36 and CD61, was significantly reduced in active CD as compared to inactive CD and normal mucosal samples. Consistently, lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) of active CD patients had diminished ability to phagocyte apoptotic cells. Interleukin (IL)-15, IL-21 and interferon-γ, cytokines over-produced in active CD, inhibited the expression of TSP-1, CD36, and CD61 in normal intestinal LPMC. These results indicate that CD-related inflammation is marked by diminished clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, thus suggesting a role for such a defect in the ongoing mucosal inflammation in this disorder.

  10. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: an emerging syndrome with many unsettled issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Volta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still an undefined syndrome with several unsettled issues despite the increasing awareness of its existence. Gluten is likely responsible for the clinical picture in a subset of patients, whereas in other cases it concurs to this syndrome together with fermentable mono-oligo-disaccharides and polyols and wheat proteins (e.g., amylase trypsin inhibitors. Innate immunity plays a pivotal role in the development of this syndrome, which is characterized by gut inflammation without villous atrophy and likely changes of intestinal barrier function. Data on its epidemiology are still undefined and largely variable. In the USA its prevalence varies from 0.6% to 6% in primary or tertiary care, respectively. Clinically, patients complain of gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms triggered by the ingestion of gluten without evidence of celiac disease and wheat allergy. Intestinal symptoms resemble those of irritable bowel syndrome, whereas neurological signs are quite common among extra-intestinal manifestations. So far, there are no biomarkers for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, but about half of patients shows anti-gliadin antibodies of immunoglobulin G class. Although not specific for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, the detection of such antibodies can support the diagnosis in patients with gluten-related symptoms. In the absence of diagnostic biomarkers a double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge is currently the best way for confirming non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Studies aimed at clarifying the pathophysiological, clinical and laboratory features of non-celiac gluten sensitivity will help a better management of patients with this novel and intriguing clinical entity.

  11. Effect of B vitamin supplementation on plasma homocysteine levels in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammed Hadithi; Chris JJ Mulder; Frank Stam; Joshan Azizi; J Bart A Crusius; Amado Salvador Pe(n)a; Coen DA Stehouwer; Yvo M Smulders

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of vitamin supplements on homocysteine levels in patients with celiac disease. METHODS: Vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, and fasting plasma homocysteine levels were measured in 51 consecutive adults with celiac disease [median (range) age 56 (18-63) years; 40% men, 26 (51%) had villous atrophy, and 25 (49%) used B-vitamin supplements] and 50 healthy control individuals matched for age and sex. Finally, the C677T polymorphism of 5,10-methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) was evaluated in 46 patients with celiac disease and all control individuals. RESULTS: Patients with celiac disease and using vitamin supplements had higher serum vitamin B6 ( P = 0.003), folate ( P < 0.001), and vitamin B12 ( P = 0.012) levels than patients who did not or healthy controls ( P = 0.035, P < 0.001, P = 0.007, for vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin B12, respectively). Lower plasma homocysteine levels were found in patients using vitamin supplements than in patients who did not ( P = 0.001) or healthy controls ( P = 0.003). However, vitamin B6 and folate, not vitamin B12, were significantly and independently associated with homocysteine levels. Twenty-four (48%) of 50 controls and 23 (50%) of 46 patients with celiac disease carried the MTHFR thermolabile variant T-allele ( P = 0.89). CONCLUSION: Homocysteine levels are dependent on Marsh classification and the regular use of B-vitamin supplements is effective in reduction of homocysteine levels in patients with celiac disease and should be considered in disease management.

  12. [The surgical treatment of an aneurysm of the celiac trunk and hepatic artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Camarero, S J; Menéndez, A I; Rodero, J I; Alvarez, J L; Cermeño, B; Viana, M M

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of splenic aneurysms with double location, at the celiac trunks and at the common hepatic artery, in the same patient that was treated by a surgical procedure. We also review literature about the hepatic aneurysms at the celiac trunks, with special attention on the aspects of etiology, natural evolutions and different surgical procedures available. It is remarkable on this kind of pathology that special attention should be paid in order to avoid the simple ligature-exclusion of the aneurysm, it involves realizing an endoaneurysmorrhaphy followed by an aorto-hepatic by-pass.

  13. Endovascular stent graft for treatment of complicated spontaneous dissection of celiac artery: Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ung Rae; Lee, Young Hwan [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwan [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    We report 2 cases of complicated spontaneous dissection of the celiac artery, which were successfully treated by a stent graft. The first patient was a 47-year-old man who presented with acute abdominal pain. CT scan showed ruptured saccular aneurysm with surrounding retroperitoneal hematoma. The second patient was a 57-year-old man with progressive dissecting aneurysm. Endovascular stent graft was placed in the celiac trunk to control bleeding, and to prevent rupture in each patient. Follow-up CT scans showed complete obliteration of a dissecting aneurysm.

  14. Epitope-dependent functional effects of celiac disease autoantibodies on transglutaminase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hnida, Kathrin; Stamnaes, Jorunn; du Pré, M Fleur

    2016-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a Ca(2+)-dependent cross-linking enzyme involved in the pathogenesis of CD. We have previously characterized a panel of anti-TG2 mAbs generated from gut plasma cells of celiac patients and identified four epitopes (epitopes 1-4) located in the N-terminal part of TG2...... of epitope 1-targeting B cells to keep TG2 active and protected from oxidation might explain why generation of epitope 1-targeting plasma cells seems to be favored in celiac patients....

  15. Anxiety and depression in adult patients with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Winfried; Huser; Karl-Heinz; Janke; Bodo; Klump; Michael; Gregor; Andreas; Hinz

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To compare anxiety and depression levels in adult patients with celiac disease (CD) on a gluten-free diet (GFD) with controls.METHODS: The levels of anxiety, depression and of a probable anxiety or depressive disorder were assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in 441 adult patients with CD recruited by the German Celiac Society, in 235 age-and sex-matched patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in remission or with slight disease activity, and in 441 adult persons of a representa...

  16. Celiac disease in Middle Eastern and North African countries:A new burden?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kassem; Barada; Abbas; Bitar; Mohamad; Abdul-Razak; Mokadem; Jana; Ghazi; Hashash; Peter; Green

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease(CD) is now recognized as a common disorder among Middle Eastern(ME) and North African(NA) populations.The aim of this review is to assess the available data regarding CD in the ME and NA and to compare this information with that of Western countries.A literature review was performed using the electronic databases PubMed and Medline(1950-2008) as search engines,and "celiac disease" was used as a Mesh term.The search was limited to ME and NA countries.The prevalence of CD in ME and NA countries...

  17. Isolated Celiac and Splenic Artery Dissection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An isolated dissection of the celiac artery is an extremely rare condition that requires a high level of suspicion to evoke the diagnosis. Once established, the natural course is unpredictable in view of the discrepancies in its management requiring a case-by-case analysis. In this paper, we report an unusual case of spontaneous abdominal pain that was diagnosed with celiac and splenic artery rupture secondary to physical stress. This paper underlines the necessity to maintain a high level of suspicion for arterial dissections and we also review the management plan in such cases.

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound-fine needle injection for oncological therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeremy; Kaplan; Amaara; Khalid; Natalie; Cosgrove; Ayesha; Soomro; Syed; Mohsin; Mazhar; Ali; A; Siddiqui

    2015-01-01

    The minimal invasiveness and precision of endoscopicultrasound(EUS) has lead to both its widespread use as a diagnostic and staging modality for gastrointestinal and pancreaticobiliary malignancies, and to its expand-ing role as a therapeutic modality. EUS-guided celiac plexus neurolysis is now a well-accepted modality for palliation of pain in patients with pancreatic cancer. EUS-guided ablation, brachytherapy, fiducial marker placement, and antitumor agent injection have been described as methods of performing minimally invasive oncological therapy. EUS-fine needle injection may be performed as adjunctive, alternative, or palliative treatment. This review summarizes the studies to date that have described these methods. A literature search using the Pub Med/MEDLINE databases was performed. While most published studies to date are limited with disappointing outcomes, the concept of a role of EUS in oncological therapy seems promising.

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of pancreatic masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinga, Mariana; Gheorghe, Cristian; Dumitrescu, Marius; Gheorghe, Liana; Nicolaie, Tudor

    2004-03-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) represents a highly sensitive method for the detection of pancreatic masses. When available, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) is the best technique for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer due to its ability to obtain tissue for diagnosis. The standardized indications for pancreatic EUS-FNA comprise the definite diagnosis of malignancy and histopathological confirmation of adenocarcinoma before surgical resection, chemo/radiotherapy, or celiac plexus neurolysis. The technique of performing EUS-FNA is described in detail, from the vizualization of the target lesion and adequate placement of the transducer to allow optimal needle access, to needle penetration and sampling of the targeted lesion. We report a series of 9 patients who underwent EUS-FNA and shortly review the indications, technique, results and impact of EUS-FNA on the management of these patients.

  20. Celiac Disease Genomic, Environmental, Microbiome, and Metabolomic (CDGEMM) Study Design: Approach to the Future of Personalized Prevention of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Maureen M; Camhi, Stephanie; Huedo-Medina, Tania B; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-11-11

    In the past it was believed that genetic predisposition and exposure to gluten were necessary and sufficient to develop celiac disease (CD). Recent studies however suggest that loss of gluten tolerance can occur at any time in life as a consequence of other environmental stimuli. Many environmental factors known to influence the composition of the intestinal microbiota are also suggested to play a role in the development of CD. These include birthing delivery mode, infant feeding, and antibiotic use. To date no large-scale longitudinal studies have defined if and how gut microbiota composition and metabolomic profiles may influence the loss of gluten tolerance and subsequent onset of CD in genetically-susceptible individuals. Here we describe a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal study of infants at risk for CD which will employ a blend of basic and applied studies to yield fundamental insights into the role of the gut microbiome as an additional factor that may play a key role in early steps involved in the onset of autoimmune disease.