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Sample records for celiac artery

  1. Celiac artery compression syndrome.

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    Kokotsakis, J N; Lambidis, C D; Lioulias, A G; Skouteli, E T; Bastounis, E A; Livesay, J J

    2000-04-01

    Celiac artery compression syndrome occurs when the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm causes extrinsic compression of the celiac trunk. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with a three-month history of postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and some emesis, without weight loss. There was a bruit in the upper mid-epigastrium and the lateral aortic arteriography revealed a significant stenosis of the celiac artery. At operation, the celiac axis was found to be severely compressed anteriorly by fibers forming the inferior margin of the arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. The ligament was cut and a vein by-pass from the supraceliac aorta to the distal celiac artery was performed. The patient remains well and free of symptoms two and a half years since operation.In this report we discuss the indications and the therapeutic options of this syndrome as well as a review of the literature is being given.

  2. Giant true celiac artery aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aljabri, Badr

    2009-01-01

    Celiac artery aneurysms are rare and usually asymptomatic. The management of these aneurysms is challenging, especially when they are large and involve the confluence of the trifurcation. We present here a case of a large celiac artery aneurysm involving its branches in a young woman. Preoperative investigations, intraoperative findings, and the operative procedure are also presented and discussed. (author

  3. Spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection

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    Tuba Cimilli Ozturk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyspepsia with mild, stabbing epigastric discomfort without history of trauma is a very common symptom that emergency physicians see in their daily practice. Vascular emergencies, mostly the aortic dissection and aneurysm, are always described in the differential diagnosis with persistent symptoms. Isolated celiac artery dissection occurring spontaneously is a very rare diagnosis. The involvement of branch vessels is generally observed and patients show various clinical signs and symptoms according to the involved branch vessel. Here we are presenting a case with spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection, without any branch vessel involvement or visceral damage, detected by computed tomography scans taken on admission.

  4. Celiac artery thrombosis and superior mesenteric artery stenosis

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    Mohit Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute thrombosis of the celiac artery trunk or elsewhere in mesenteric blood supply is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain. Celiac artery thrombosis carries high mortality and morbidity rates if the diagnosis and treatment are delayed. It is frequently associated with other cardiovascular events. The most common etiology is atherosclerosis. The main goal of the treatment is to revascularize and start the diminished or stopped mesenteric blood flow and to avoid end-organ ischemia. Thrombolysis with urokinase followed by anticoagulation with heparin in an emergency situation can save the life of the patient before surgical intervention.

  5. Celiac artery stenosis/occlusion treated by interventional radiology

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    Ikeda, Osamu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-1-1, Honjo Kumamoto 860-8505 (Japan)], E-mail: osamu-3643ik@do9.enjoy.ne.jp; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-1-1, Honjo Kumamoto 860-8505 (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Severe stenosis/occlusion of the proximal celiac trunk due to median arcuate ligament compression (MALC), arteriosclerosis, pancreatitis, tumor invasion, and celiac axis agenesis has been reported. However, clinically significant ischemic bowel disease attributable to celiac axis stenosis/occlusion appears to be rare because the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) provides for rich collateral circulation. In patients with celiac axis stenosis/occlusion, the most important and frequently encountered collateral vessels from the SMA are the pancreaticoduodenal arcades. Patients with celiac artery stenosis/occlusion are treated by interventional radiology (IR) via dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade. In patients with dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade on SMA angiograms, IR through this artery may be successful. Here we provide several tips on surmounting these difficulties in IR including transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma, an implantable port system for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy to treat metastatic liver tumors, coil embolization of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms, and arterial stimulation test with venous sampling for insulinomas.

  6. Description of the celiac artery in domestic pigeons (Columba livia

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    Cibele Geeverghese

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to define the origin and distribution of the celiac artery and its collateral branches in 15 fowls from the Columba livia species, which were obtained from the Zoonosis Control Center of Brasilia, Brazil. In order to mark the arterial system of the specimens, the left brachiocephalic trunk was canullated and a colored water-latex solution was injected there. Afterwards, fowls were fixed in a 10% v/v formaldehyde solution and dissected with appropriate equipment, presenting the results described in this paper. The celiac artery originated from the ventral face of the descendent aorta. The first collateral branch arose from the celiac artery itself, forming the esophageal artery. Then, the celiac artery has bifurcated into two branches, named left and right branches of the celiac artery. The left branch emitted the proventricular ventral artery, followed by the splenic arteries, proventricular dorsal artery, and the left hepatic artery. The left branch has bifurcated into two branches, known as ventral and left gastric arteries. The right branch emitted the right hepatic artery, followed by the ileal artery and the right gastric artery. Finally, the right branch turned into the pancreaticoduodenal artery. Our findings showed a great similarity with the avian lineages of the Gallus gallus species, except for the lack of ileocecal artery, cystic branches, and dorsal gastric artery.

  7. Celiac artery compression syndrome with bilateral Bochdalek hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kara, K.; Verim, S.; Bozkurt, Y.; Tasar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Celiac artery compression syndrome or median arcuate ligament syndrome is rare and controversial condition. The definition of the syndrome relies on a combination of both clinical and radiographic features. It typically occurs in young patients, who may present with epigastric pain and weight loss. Bochdalek hernia is the most common congenital diaphragmatic hernia in adults. Bilaterality of this pathology is rare. There are not many reports about the associated pathologies to Bochdalek hernia. Objectives and tasks: We aimed to demonstrate the computed tomography (CT) angiography findings of celiac artery compression syndrome with Bochdalek hernia that has detected incidentally. Materials and methods: A CT angiography was performed to 32-year-old patient having postphelebitic syndrome for the possible diagnosis as pulmonary embolus. Results: At the imaging pulmonary arteries and the branches were normal. Celiac artery compression syndrome with Bochdalek Hernia was detected incidentally. A %75 stenosis at the origin of celiac artery and post stenotic dilatation after the stenosis was seen due to the compression. A poster medial defect at the diaphragm was seen as an additional finding for the cause of Bochdalek hernia. Conclusion: Many incidental finding can be detected at vascular and non vascular area in the routine CT angiography imaging. The pathologies like celiac artery compression syndrome and congenital diaphragm pathologies can be detected easily at CT angiography method

  8. Possible cause underlying gastric necrosis and perforation: Celiac artery thrombosis

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    Ahmet Peker

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we are sharing a case of a 76-year-old woman with known hypertension, atrial fibrillation,diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, who is presenting with stomach necrosis and perforation possibly due to celiac artery thrombosis after newly developed abdominal pain and bloody vomiting. In our case, emergency surgery was planned and the patient refused the operation and was lost at 48 hours of clinical follow-up. We aimed to discuss the etiology of celiac artery thrombosis, briefly. We believe that necrosis and perforation of the stomach due to celiac artery thrombosis deserves to be shared because it is a rare and difficult case to manage.

  9. Celiac Artery Stenting to Facilitate Hepatic Yttrium-90 Radioembolization Therapy

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    Murthy R. Chamarthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioembolization offers a novel way to treat the nonresectable, liver predominant hepatic malignancies with better tumor response and overall progression-free survival rates. Transarterial catheter-based radioembolization procedure involves the hepatic arterial administration of glass- or resin-based beta emitting Yttirum-90 microspheres. Safe delivery of the tumoricidal radiation dose requires careful angiogram planning and coil embolization to quantify lung shunting and prevent systemic toxicity, respectively. Diagnostic pretreatment angiogram also serves to identify the hepatic arterial variant anatomy and other coexisting pathologies that might require a different or alternative approach. We describe a complex case of celiac artery stenosis with tortuous pancreaticoduodenal arterial arcade precluding access to the right hepatic artery for performing radioembolization. Celiac artery stenting of the stenosis was performed to facilitate subsequent safe and successful Yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization.

  10. Celiac artery trunk thrombosis presenting as acute liver failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbarian, M.A.; Kahrom, M.; Kahrom, H.

    2011-01-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is a life-threatening vascular emergency that requires early diagnosis and intervention to adequately restore mesenteric blood flow and to prevent bowel necrosis and patient death. While, almost always superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are involved, we report a 57-year-old male with an unusual celiac artery trunk thrombosis leading to gastero-duodenal and hepato-splenic infarction, and presenting an acute liver failure. (author)

  11. Importance of diastolic velocities in the detection of celiac and mesenteric artery disease by duplex ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Just, S; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease.......To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease....

  12. Surgical repair of a celiac artery aneurysm using a sutureless proximal anastomosis device.

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    Uchida, Tetsuro; Hamasaki, Azumi; Kuroda, Yoshinori; Yamashita, Atsushi; Hayashi, Jun; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2017-12-01

    Some celiac artery aneurysms are not suitable for endovascular therapy. We describe the case of a 63-year-old man with a celiac trunk aneurysm extending to the hepatosplenic bifurcation. The aneurysm was resected and oversewn at the origin from the abdominal aorta. A saphenous vein bypass from the supraceliac aorta to the celiac artery bifurcation was performed using a sutureless anastomotic device (PAS-Port system; Cardica, Redwood City, Calif) to create the proximal anastomosis, eliminating the need for aortic clamping. This system is thought to make direct proximal aortic anastomosis safe and easy in patients requiring surgical reconstruction of celiac artery aneurysms.

  13. Surgical repair of a celiac artery aneurysm using a sutureless proximal anastomosis device

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    Tetsuro Uchida, MD, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Some celiac artery aneurysms are not suitable for endovascular therapy. We describe the case of a 63-year-old man with a celiac trunk aneurysm extending to the hepatosplenic bifurcation. The aneurysm was resected and oversewn at the origin from the abdominal aorta. A saphenous vein bypass from the supraceliac aorta to the celiac artery bifurcation was performed using a sutureless anastomotic device (PAS-Port system; Cardica, Redwood City, Calif to create the proximal anastomosis, eliminating the need for aortic clamping. This system is thought to make direct proximal aortic anastomosis safe and easy in patients requiring surgical reconstruction of celiac artery aneurysms.

  14. TEVAR and covering the celiac artery. Is it safe or not?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Morten; Lönn, Lars Birger; Schroeder, Torben Veith

    2010-01-01

    artery. In the latter case, adequate collateral supply to the upper gastrointestinal tract is crucial. Collateral arteries joining the celiac and the superior mesenteric arteries are well characterized in patients with chronic celiac stenosis or occlusion. Are these collateral pathways sufficient also...... for sudden iatrogenic closure of the celiac artery? By performing a preoperative angiography of the superior mesenteric artery with temporary balloon occlusion of the celiac artery, collateral capacity between the two vessels can be tested in advance. Exact positioning of the distal end of a large thoracic...... together, in the large majority of patients, it appears that intentional celiac coverage can be done safely provided that sufficient collateral function have been demonstrated in advance....

  15. Surgical repair of a celiac artery aneurysm using a sutureless proximal anastomosis device

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    Tetsuro Uchida, MD, PhD; Azumi Hamasaki, MD, PhD; Yoshinori Kuroda, MD; Atsushi Yamashita, MD; Jun Hayashi, MD; Mitsuaki Sadahiro, MD, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Some celiac artery aneurysms are not suitable for endovascular therapy. We describe the case of a 63-year-old man with a celiac trunk aneurysm extending to the hepatosplenic bifurcation. The aneurysm was resected and oversewn at the origin from the abdominal aorta. A saphenous vein bypass from the supraceliac aorta to the celiac artery bifurcation was performed using a sutureless anastomotic device (PAS-Port system; Cardica, Redwood City, Calif) to create the proximal anastomosis, eliminating...

  16. Treatment of celiac artery stenosis with interventional techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Maoqiang; Wang Zhijun; Liu Fengyong; Wang Zhongpu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To present two cases of celiac artery (CA) stenosis treated successfully by interventional technique. Methods: Two patients characterised by chronic upper abdominal pain after eating, associated with weight loss and an epigastric bruit were treated with interventional procedure. The diagnosis was suggested by color Doppler imaging of the celiac axis and confirmed by aortography. One patient possessed the classic triad of median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS). Arteriosclerosis was found to be responsible for the CA stenosis in another one. The interventional technique consisted of conventional PTA and stent placement in the CA. Results: Abdominal arteriograms in both patients showed severe stenosis (>90%) of CA. The stenotic segments were dilated and stented during the same session. One patient with balloon expandable Palmaz stent placed in the proximal celiac artery, another with 2 wallstents deployed in the CA trunk. The post procedural arteriograms showed good dilation of the lesions with immediate improvement of CA blood flow. Follow-up Doppler ultrasound scans showed normal flow patterns in the CA. Three months after the procedures, their upper gastrointestinal symptoms had resolved and regained body weights. They remained well and free of symptoms, at 16 months and 26 months follow-up, respectively, after the procedure. Conclusions: CA stenosis can successfully be treated with angioplasty and stenting. (authors)

  17. Self-limiting Spontaneous Isolated Celiac Artery Dissection: A Case Report

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    A.D. Morzycki

    Full Text Available : Introduction: Isolated dissection of the celiac artery is rare, with less then 100 cases reported to date. Although some patients present with epigastric pain and tenderness, many cases are asymptomatic and found incidentally on CT. The appropriate management of isolated celiac artery dissections is unclear. This report illustrates an observational approach to a symptomatic case of isolated celiac artery dissection. Report: A 55-year-old Caucassian male presented to the emergency department with epigastric pain. His Initial CT revealed possible celiac artery dissection with associated intramural hematoma. Due to continued pain, a subsequent CTA was ordered. This scan showed progression of the intramural hematoma to near occlusion of the hepatic artery. Despite this, there were no signs of ischemic hepatitis as indicated by normal levels of liver transaminases. There was also no evidence to suggest propagation of the dissection or pseudo-aneurysm formation. We therefore choose a conservative and observational approach to this isolated celiac artery dissection. His dissection was managed with ASA and metoprolol, and he was discharged after 1 week of observation. 3 week follow-up CTA showed spontaneous resolution of the intramural hematoma and improved patency of the hepatic artery. There was no change at 3 months follow-up. Conclusion: This case highlights that an observational approach to cases of isolated celiac artery dissection may be indicated if there is no evident end organ disease or malperfusion. Keywords: Celiac artery, Dissection, Management

  18. Laparoscopic treatment of celiac artery compression syndrome: case series and review of current treatment modalities.

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    Vaziri, Khashayar; Hungness, Eric S; Pearson, Erik G; Soper, Nathaniel J

    2009-02-01

    Compression of the celiac artery by the diaphragmatic crura, the median arcuate ligament, or the fibrous periaortic ganglionic tissue results in a rare constellation of symptoms known as celiac artery compression syndrome (CACS). First described in 1963 by Harjola in a patient with symptoms of mesenteric ischemia, it remains an elusive diagnosis. Patients commonly present with a wide variety of symptoms resulting in multiple diagnostic tests. A firm diagnosis is difficult to establish, and treatment is equally challenging. These challenges are illustrated by the following case series, and evidence supporting current treatment modalities is reviewed. We describe a laparoscopic approach to decompression of the celiac artery facilitated by intraoperative ultrasound.

  19. TEVAR and covering the celiac artery. Is it safe or not?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Morten; Lönn, Lars Birger; Schroeder, Torben Veith

    2010-01-01

    stent-graft can be challenging and require special considerations and techniques. Most case series in the literature support the efficacy and the safety of intentional celiac covering. However, there are also reports of ischemic foregut complications that could be associated to the procedure. Taken...... artery. In the latter case, adequate collateral supply to the upper gastrointestinal tract is crucial. Collateral arteries joining the celiac and the superior mesenteric arteries are well characterized in patients with chronic celiac stenosis or occlusion. Are these collateral pathways sufficient also...

  20. Transcatheter embolization of celiac artery pseudoaneurysm following pancreatico-duodenectomy for pancreatic cancer. A case report

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    Mori, K.; Yoshioka, H.; Kuramochi, M.; Saida, Y.; Itai, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Tsukuba Univ. Hospital (Japan); Murata, S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden); Michishita, N. [Dept. of Radiology, Tsuchiura Kyodo Hospital (Japan); Oda, T. [Dept. of Surgery, Tsukuba Univ. Hospital (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    A case of transcatheter embolization of a celiac artery pseudoaneurysm in a 70-year-old man is reported. The pseudoaneurysm was considered to be the result of pancreatic anastomotic leakage and an intra-abdominal abscess following pancreaticoduodenectomy with irradiation of 66 Gy for pancreatic carcinoma. To avoid recanalization of the pseudoaneurysm due to retrograde blood flow, first all branches of the celiac artery were embolized with metallic coils, and then the celiac trunk was also occluded. Hepatic arterial flow was preserved by the right hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery. After the procedure, the patient had no noticeable complications associated with the embolization nor any recurrence of the pancreatic cancer, and he achieved a 2-year survival. (orig.)

  1. Transcatheter embolization of celiac artery pseudoaneurysm following pancreatico-duodenectomy for pancreatic cancer. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, K.; Yoshioka, H.; Kuramochi, M.; Saida, Y.; Itai, Y.; Murata, S.; Michishita, N.; Oda, T.

    1998-01-01

    A case of transcatheter embolization of a celiac artery pseudoaneurysm in a 70-year-old man is reported. The pseudoaneurysm was considered to be the result of pancreatic anastomotic leakage and an intra-abdominal abscess following pancreaticoduodenectomy with irradiation of 66 Gy for pancreatic carcinoma. To avoid recanalization of the pseudoaneurysm due to retrograde blood flow, first all branches of the celiac artery were embolized with metallic coils, and then the celiac trunk was also occluded. Hepatic arterial flow was preserved by the right hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery. After the procedure, the patient had no noticeable complications associated with the embolization nor any recurrence of the pancreatic cancer, and he achieved a 2-year survival. (orig.)

  2. A Case of Spontaneous Isolated Celiac Artery Dissection with Pseudoaneurysm Formation.

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    Kim, John; Moree, Lamar H; Muehlberger, Michael J

    2017-08-27

    Spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection is a rare disease and patients without evidence of significant complications often resolve with medical therapy alone; however, the extension of the dissection can lead to more serious complications including aneurysmal dilatation, complete occlusion, and rupture of a visceral artery. In these patients, optimal management has not yet been clearly defined and treatment primarily depends on clinical presentation and lesions identified on imaging studies. This case report demonstrates the conservative management of spontaneous celiac artery dissection. A 49-year-old male presented to our emergency department with acute and persistent abdominal pain. A contrast-enhanced computed tomogram (CT) of abdomen showed a pseudoaneurysm involving the ostium of the celiac artery with focal dissection, with no evidence of thrombosis or infarction to the visceral organs. Ultrasound studies demonstrated a prominent but patent celiac artery with adequate distal perfusion. Therefore, conservative medical management with antiplatelet therapy was initiated in our patient. Follow-up repeat ultrasound three weeks following discharge showed no evidence of dissection flap, stenosis, thrombosis or increase in the size of the aneurysm. This case report demonstrates that conservative medical management with antiplatelet therapy can be sufficient in treating spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection with pseudoaneurysm formation. We suggest endovascular or surgical intervention should be reserved for patients who present with hemodynamic instability, or other serious complications, such as aneurysm rupture or visceral infarction.

  3. Genetic variants associated with celiac disease and the risk for coronary artery disease.

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    Jansen, Henning; Willenborg, Christina; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Ferrario, Paola G; König, Inke R; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schunkert, Heribert

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Genetic-epidemiological analyses identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with celiac disease. If there is a causal relation between celiac disease and CAD, one might expect that risk alleles primarily associated with celiac disease also increase the risk of CAD. In this study we identified from literature 41 SNPs that have been previously described to be genome-wide associated with celiac disease (p DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) dataset, a meta-analysis comprising genome-wide SNP association data from 22,233 CAD cases and 64,762 controls. 24 out of 41 (58.5 %) risk alleles for celiac disease displayed a positive association with CAD (CAD-OR range 1.001-1.081). The remaining risk alleles for celiac disease (n = 16) revealed CAD-ORs of ≤1.0 (range 0.951-1.0). The proportion of CAD associated alleles was greater but did not differ significantly from the proportion of 50 % expected by chance (p = 0.069). One SNP (rs653178 at the SH2B3/ATXN2 locus) displayed study-wise statistically significant association with CAD with directionality consistent effects on celiac disease and CAD. However, the effect of this locus is most likely driven by pleiotropic effects on multiple other diseases. In conclusion, this genetically based approach provided no convincing evidence that SNPs associated with celiac disease contribute to the risk of CAD. Hence, common non-genetic factors may play a more important role explaining the coincidence of these two complex disease conditions.

  4. Computed tomography angiography study of variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic artery in 100 patients.

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    Brasil, Ivelise Regina Canito; de Araujo, Igor Farias; Lima, Adriana Augusta Lopes de Araujo; Melo, Ernesto Lima Araujo; Esmeraldo, Ronaldo de Matos

    2018-01-01

    To describe the main anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and the hepatic artery at their origins. This was a prospective analysis of 100 consecutive computed tomography angiography studies of the abdomen performed during a one-year period. The findings were stratified according to classification systems devised by Sureka et al. and Michels. The celiac trunk was "normal" (i.e., the hepatogastrosplenic trunk and superior mesenteric artery originating separately from the abdominal aorta) in 43 patients. In our sample, we identified four types of variations of the celiac trunk. Regarding the hepatic artery, a normal anatomical pattern (i.e., the proper hepatic artery being a continuation of the common hepatic artery and bifurcating into the right and left hepatic arteries) was seen in 82 patients. We observed six types of variations of the hepatic artery. We found rates of variations of the hepatic artery that are different from those reported in the literature. Our findings underscore the need for proper knowledge and awareness of these anatomical variations, which can facilitate their recognition and inform decisions regarding the planning of surgical procedures, in order to avoid iatrogenic intraoperative injuries, which could lead to complications.

  5. Percutaneous Retrograde Recanalization of the Celiac Artery by Way of the Superior Mesenteric Artery for Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia

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    Joseph, George, E-mail: joseph59@gmail.com; Chacko, Sujith Thomas [Christian Medical College, Department of Cardiology (India)

    2013-02-15

    A 52-year-old man presented with recurrent postprandial abdominal pain, sitophobia, and progressive weight loss. Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) due to subtotal occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and flush occlusion of the celiac artery (CA) was diagnosed. Retrograde recanalization of the CA by way of a collateral channel from the SMA was performed using contemporary recanalization equipment. The CA and SMA were then stented, resulting in sustained resolution of CMI-related symptoms.

  6. Endovascular stent graft for treatment of complicated spontaneous dissection of celiac artery: Report of two cases

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    Kang, Ung Rae; Lee, Young Hwan [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwan [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    We report 2 cases of complicated spontaneous dissection of the celiac artery, which were successfully treated by a stent graft. The first patient was a 47-year-old man who presented with acute abdominal pain. CT scan showed ruptured saccular aneurysm with surrounding retroperitoneal hematoma. The second patient was a 57-year-old man with progressive dissecting aneurysm. Endovascular stent graft was placed in the celiac trunk to control bleeding, and to prevent rupture in each patient. Follow-up CT scans showed complete obliteration of a dissecting aneurysm.

  7. Spontaneous dissection of the celiac artery in the young: a case report and systematic review of the literature.

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    Tana, Marco; Tana, Claudio; Schiavone, Cosima; Verdiani, Valerio; Palermo, Carlo; Alessandri, Massimo; Giamberardino, Maria Adele; Montagnani, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    The spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection (siCAD) represents a challenging cause of abdominal pain and complete information regarding incidence, etiology and risk factors in the young is still lacking. In this study, we report a case of siCAD occurred in a young woman and we systematically searched for information on siCADs in literature databases. PubMed/Embase and Cochrane were searched for, using the following terms: Isolated celiac trunk dissection, isolated celiac artery dissection, celiac artery dissection, celiac trunk dissection, spontaneous isolated visceral artery dissection, spontaneous isolated dissection of visceral arteries, isolated celiac artery dissection in the young, isolated celiac trunk dissection in the young. Patients were included if they were younger than 50 years, if they had a spontaneous etiology and a selective involvement of the celiac artery (with or without involvement of its branches). 180 studies were found, and 18 remained after screening. Twenty-one patients (male = 19, female = 2) with siCADs were included. Mean age was 44.71 ± 3.61 years. Hypertension was the most prevalent comorbidity. All patients presented with abdominal pain, more often located in the epigastrium (n = 11). Almost all patients underwent CT to confirm the diagnosis. A conservative treatment was adopted in 13 patients while an invasive approach was adopted in 8 patients (endovascular approach in 7). siCADs represent a rare but important cause of vascular dissection in the young. Uncomplicated cases can be safely treated with conservative strategies. The surgical or endovascular repair is indicated when dissections complicate or symptoms persist despite an adequate conservative treatment.

  8. Celiac Artery Compression Syndrome: An Experience in a Single Institution in Taiwan

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    Jen-Wei Chou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac artery compression syndrome (CACS or median arcuate ligament (MAL syndrome is a rare vascular disease. The clinical manifestations of CACS include the triad of postprandial pain, vomiting, and weight loss. The pathogenesis of CACS is the external compression of celiac artery by the MAL or celiac ganglion. Moreover, some authors also reported the compression with different etiologies, such as neoplasms of pancreatic head, adjacent duodenal carcinoma, vascular aneurysms, aortic dissection, or sarcoidosis. In the literature, most cases of CACS were reported from Western countries. In contrast, this disease was seldom reported in Oriental countries or regions, including Taiwan. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS is also a rare disease characterized by compression of the third portion of the duodenum by the SMA. The clinical features of SMAS are postprandial pain, vomiting, and weight loss. To date, there are no guidelines to ensure the proper treatment of patients with CACS because of its low incidence. Thus, tailored therapy for patients with CACS remains a challenge as well as the prediction of clinical response and prognosis. The aim of our present study was to investigate the clinical features, the association with SMAS, treatments, and outcomes of patients with CACS in a single institution in Taiwan.

  9. Variations in the origin of inferior phrenic arteries and their relationship to celiac axis variations on CT angiography

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    Aslaner, Ramazan; Pekcevik, Yeliz; Sahin, Hilal [Dept. of Radiology, Tepecik Training and Research Hospital, Izmir (Turkmenistan); Toka, Onur [Dept. of Statistics, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2017-04-15

    Knowing the origin of the inferior phrenic artery (IPA) is important prior to surgical interventions and interventional radiological procedures related to IPA. We aimed to identify variations in the origin of IPA and to investigate the relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variations using computed tomography angiography (CTA). The CTA images of 1000 patients (737 male and 263 female, the mean age 60, range 18–94 years) were reviewed in an analysis of IPA and celiac axis variations. The origin of IPA was divided into two groups, those originating as a common trunk and those originating independently without a truncus. The relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variation was analyzed using Pearson's chi-square test. Both IPAs originated from a common trunk in 295 (29.5%) patients. From which the majority of the common trunk originated from the aorta. Contrastingly, the inferior phrenic arteries originated from different origins in 705 (70.5%) patients. The majority of the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) and the left inferior phrenic artery (LIPA) originated independently from the celiac axis. Variation in the celiac axis were detected in 110 (11%) patients. The origin of IPA was found to be significantly different in the presence of celiac axis variation. The majority of IPA originated from the aorta in patients with a common IPA trunk, while the majority of RIPA and LIPA originating from the celiac axis in patients without a common IPA trunk. Thus, the origin of IPA may widely differ in the presence of celiac axis variation.

  10. Variations in the origin of inferior phrenic arteries and their relationship to celiac axis variations on CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslaner, Ramazan; Pekcevik, Yeliz; Sahin, Hilal; Toka, Onur

    2017-01-01

    Knowing the origin of the inferior phrenic artery (IPA) is important prior to surgical interventions and interventional radiological procedures related to IPA. We aimed to identify variations in the origin of IPA and to investigate the relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variations using computed tomography angiography (CTA). The CTA images of 1000 patients (737 male and 263 female, the mean age 60, range 18–94 years) were reviewed in an analysis of IPA and celiac axis variations. The origin of IPA was divided into two groups, those originating as a common trunk and those originating independently without a truncus. The relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variation was analyzed using Pearson's chi-square test. Both IPAs originated from a common trunk in 295 (29.5%) patients. From which the majority of the common trunk originated from the aorta. Contrastingly, the inferior phrenic arteries originated from different origins in 705 (70.5%) patients. The majority of the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) and the left inferior phrenic artery (LIPA) originated independently from the celiac axis. Variation in the celiac axis were detected in 110 (11%) patients. The origin of IPA was found to be significantly different in the presence of celiac axis variation. The majority of IPA originated from the aorta in patients with a common IPA trunk, while the majority of RIPA and LIPA originating from the celiac axis in patients without a common IPA trunk. Thus, the origin of IPA may widely differ in the presence of celiac axis variation

  11. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: normal anatomy and main variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo-Neto, Severino Aires; Mello-Junior, Carlos Fernando de; Franca, Henrique Almeida; Duarte, Claudia Martina Araujo; Borges, Rafael Farias; Magalhaes, Ana Guardiana Ximenes de, E-mail: severinoaires@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    Although digital angiography remains as the gold standard for imaging the celiac arterial trunk and hepatic arteries, multidetector computed tomography in association with digital images processing by software resources represents a useful tool particularly attractive for its non invasiveness. Knowledge of normal anatomy as well as of its variations is helpful in images interpretation and to address surgical planning on a case-by-case basis. The present essay illustrates several types of anatomical variations of celiac trunk, hepatic artery and its main branches, by means of digitally reconstructed computed tomography images, correlating their prevalence in the population with surgical implications. (author)

  12. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of an Aneurysm of the Pancreatico-duodenal Artery with Occluded Celiac Trunk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, C.H.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Tato, F.; Reiser, M.; Rieger, J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a case of a wide-necked aneurysm of the pancreatico-duodenal artery with occlusion of the celiac trunk in an asymptomatic patient. The aneurysm was considered to be at high risk of rupture. Successful embolization after interdisciplinary consultation was followed with color-coded duplex ultrasound (CCDS) demonstrating significant flow reduction. Three weeks later CCDS and angiography demonstrated exclusion of the aneurysm and a patent arterial supply of the liver and spleen fed by superior mesenteric artery (SMA) collaterals. The patient has done well so far, without major adverse clinical events or evidence for tissue necrosis of the liver, pancreas or spleen. Discussion of the case and review of the literature indicate that transcatheter embolization is the therapy of choice even in complicated cases

  13. Multidetector-row computed tomography for evaluating the branching angle of the celiac artery: a descriptive study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokue, Hiroyuki; Tokue, Azusa; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2012-01-01

    We performed this study in order to investigate the shape of the origin of the celiac artery in maximum intensity projection (MIP) using routine 64 multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) data in order to plan for the implantation of an intra-arterial hepatic port system. A total of 1,104 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were assessed with MDCT. In the definition of the branching angle, the anterior side of the abdominal aorta was considered the baseline, and the cranial and caudal sides were designated as 0 and 180 degrees, respectively. The angles between 0 and 90 degrees and between 90 and 180 degrees from the cranial side were considered upward and downward, respectively, and the branching angle of the celiac artery was classified every 30 degrees. The subclavian arterial route was used for the implantation of an intra-arterial hepatic port system in patients with branching angles of 150 degrees or more (sharp downward). The median branching angle was (median ± standard deviation) 135 ± 23 (range, 51–174) degrees. The branching was upward in 77 patients (7%) and downward in 1,027 patients (93%). The branching was downward with an angle of 120 to150 degrees in most patients (n = 613). The branching was sharply downward with an angle of 150 degrees or more in 177 patients (16%). A total of 10 patients were referred for interventional placement of an intra-arterial hepatic port system. The subclavian arterial route was used for implantation of an intra-arterial hepatic port system in 2 patients with sharp downward branching. The branching angle of the celiac artery can be easily determined by the preparation of MIP images from routine MDCT data. MIP may provide useful information for the selection of the catheter insertion route in order to avoid a sharp branching angle of the celiac artery

  14. Multidetector-row computed tomography for evaluating the branching angle of the celiac artery: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokue Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed this study in order to investigate the shape of the origin of the celiac artery in maximum intensity projection (MIP using routine 64 multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT data in order to plan for the implantation of an intra-arterial hepatic port system. Methods A total of 1,104 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were assessed with MDCT. In the definition of the branching angle, the anterior side of the abdominal aorta was considered the baseline, and the cranial and caudal sides were designated as 0 and 180 degrees, respectively. The angles between 0 and 90 degrees and between 90 and 180 degrees from the cranial side were considered upward and downward, respectively, and the branching angle of the celiac artery was classified every 30 degrees. The subclavian arterial route was used for the implantation of an intra-arterial hepatic port system in patients with branching angles of 150 degrees or more (sharp downward. Results The median branching angle was (median ± standard deviation 135 ± 23 (range, 51–174 degrees. The branching was upward in 77 patients (7% and downward in 1,027 patients (93%. The branching was downward with an angle of 120 to150 degrees in most patients (n = 613. The branching was sharply downward with an angle of 150 degrees or more in 177 patients (16%. A total of 10 patients were referred for interventional placement of an intra-arterial hepatic port system. The subclavian arterial route was used for implantation of an intra-arterial hepatic port system in 2 patients with sharp downward branching. Conclusions The branching angle of the celiac artery can be easily determined by the preparation of MIP images from routine MDCT data. MIP may provide useful information for the selection of the catheter insertion route in order to avoid a sharp branching angle of the celiac artery.

  15. Anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: an analysis using multidetector computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; Franca, Henrique Almeida; Mello Junior, Carlos Fernando de; Silva Neto, Eulampio Jose; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; Duarte, Claudia Martina Araujo; Cavalcanti Neto, Bartolomeu Fragoso; Farias, Rebeca Danielly da Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the prevalence of anatomical variations of celiac arterial trunk (CAT) branches and hepatic arterial system (HAS), as well as the CAT diameter, length and distance to the superior mesenteric artery. Materials And Methods: Retrospective, cross-sectional and predominantly descriptive study based on the analysis of multidetector computed tomography images of 60 patients. Results: The celiac trunk anatomy was normal in 90% of cases. Hepatosplenic trunk was found in 8.3% of patients, and hepatogastric trunk in 1.7%. Variation of the HAS was observed in 21.7% of cases, including anomalous location of the right hepatic artery in 8.3% of cases, and of the left hepatic artery, in 5%. Also, cases of joint relocation of right and left hepatic arteries, and trifurcation of the proper hepatic artery were observed, respectively, in 3 (5%) and 2 (3.3%) patients. Mean length and caliber of the CAT were 2.3 cm and 0.8 cm, respectively. Mean distance between CAT and superior mesenteric artery was 1.2 cm (standard deviation = 4.08). A significant correlation was observed between CAT diameter and length, and CAT diameter and distance to superior mesenteric artery. Conclusion: The pattern of CAT variations and diameter corroborate the majority of the literature data. However, this does not happen in relation to the HAS. (author)

  16. Anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: an analysis using multidetector computed tomography angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino Aires Araujo Neto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To analyze the prevalence of anatomical variations of celiac arterial trunk (CAT branches and hepatic arterial system (HAS, as well as the CAT diameter, length and distance to the superior mesenteric artery. Materials and Methods: Retrospective, cross-sectional and predominantly descriptive study based on the analysis of multidetector computed tomography images of 60 patients. Results: The celiac trunk anatomy was normal in 90% of cases. Hepatosplenic trunk was found in 8.3% of patients, and hepatogastric trunk in 1.7%. Variation of the HAS was observed in 21.7% of cases, including anomalous location of the right hepatic artery in 8.3% of cases, and of the left hepatic artery, in 5%. Also, cases of joint relocation of right and left hepatic arteries, and trifurcation of the proper hepatic artery were observed, respectively, in 3 (5% and 2 (3.3% patients. Mean length and caliber of the CAT were 2.3 cm and 0.8 cm, respectively. Mean distance between CAT and superior mesenteric artery was 1.2 cm (standard deviation = 4.08. A significant correlation was observed between CAT diameter and length, and CAT diameter and distance to superior mesenteric artery. Conclusion: The pattern of CAT variations and diameter corroborate the majority of the literature data. However, this does not happen in relation to the HAS.

  17. Anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: an analysis using multidetector computed tomography angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; Franca, Henrique Almeida; Mello Junior, Carlos Fernando de; Silva Neto, Eulampio Jose; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; Duarte, Claudia Martina Araujo; Cavalcanti Neto, Bartolomeu Fragoso; Farias, Rebeca Danielly da Fonseca, E-mail: severinoaires@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Objective: To analyze the prevalence of anatomical variations of celiac arterial trunk (CAT) branches and hepatic arterial system (HAS), as well as the CAT diameter, length and distance to the superior mesenteric artery. Materials And Methods: Retrospective, cross-sectional and predominantly descriptive study based on the analysis of multidetector computed tomography images of 60 patients. Results: The celiac trunk anatomy was normal in 90% of cases. Hepatosplenic trunk was found in 8.3% of patients, and hepatogastric trunk in 1.7%. Variation of the HAS was observed in 21.7% of cases, including anomalous location of the right hepatic artery in 8.3% of cases, and of the left hepatic artery, in 5%. Also, cases of joint relocation of right and left hepatic arteries, and trifurcation of the proper hepatic artery were observed, respectively, in 3 (5%) and 2 (3.3%) patients. Mean length and caliber of the CAT were 2.3 cm and 0.8 cm, respectively. Mean distance between CAT and superior mesenteric artery was 1.2 cm (standard deviation = 4.08). A significant correlation was observed between CAT diameter and length, and CAT diameter and distance to superior mesenteric artery. Conclusion: The pattern of CAT variations and diameter corroborate the majority of the literature data. However, this does not happen in relation to the HAS. (author)

  18. Inferior Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysms Associated with Occlusive Lesions of the Celiac Axis: Diagnosis, Treatment Options, Outcomes, and Review of the Literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flood, Karen, E-mail: karenrogers@doctors.org.uk; Nicholson, Anthony A. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To describe the presentation, treatment, and outcomes for 14 patients with aneurysms of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries associated with occlusive lesions of the celiac axis, and to review the literature for similar cases. Methods, Over a period of 12 years, 14 patients (10 women and 4 men) ranging in age from 26 to 50 (mean 46) years were demonstrated to have aneurysms of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery origin associated with stenosis or occlusion of the celiac axis. All patients were treated by a combination of surgery and interventional radiology. Results. Outcome data collected between 3 months and 4 years (mean 2 years) demonstrated that all aneurysms remained excluded, and all 14 patients were well. The 49 case reports in the literature confirm the findings of this cohort. Conclusion. In inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm resulting from celiac occlusive disease, endovascular treatment is best achieved by stenting the celiac axis and/or embolizing the aneurysm when necessary.

  19. Intestinal brucellosis associated with celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery stenosis and with ileum mucosa and submucosa thickening: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miaoqian; Zhu, Qingli; Yang, Qian; Li, Wenbo; Wang, Xinning; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Baotong; Li, Zhenghong; Yang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is a multisystem infection found worldwide that has a broad range of characteristics, which range from acute fever and hepatomegaly to chronic infections that most commonly affect the central nervous system, cardiovascular system, or skeletal system. Gastrointestinal and splanchnic artery involvements in brucellosis are relatively uncommon. We report a case of brucellosis in an adolescent presenting as intermittent abdominal pain, diarrhea, and fever, with intestinal tract involvement. And stenosis of the celiac artery and the superior mesenteric artery was found after exposed to risk factors of Brucella infection. Splanchnic vessels stenosis and an endothelial lesion may exacerbate the prevalent symptom of abdominal pain, as a form of colic pain, occurring after eating. The patient was diagnosed as brucellosis. The narrowing of the SMA and CA was suspected to be vasculitis secondary to the brucellosis. The patient was treated with minocycline and rifampicin for 12 weeks totally. The gastrointestinal manifestations of brucellosis recovered rapidly under intensive treatment. However, follow-up imaging revealed that the superior mesenteric artery and celiac artery stenosis was unimproved. In brucellosis, gastrointestinal manifestations may be the only observable features of the disease. Splanchnic arterial stenosis is a rare complication of brucellosis. Sonography and computed tomography may be useful for both diagnosis and follow-up.

  20. Perioperative Hemodynamic Monitoring of Common Hepatic Artery for Endovascular Embolization of a Pancreaticoduodenal Arcade Aneurysm with Celiac Stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Eisuke, E-mail: eisuke.shibata1130@gmail.com; Takao, Hidemasa; Amemiya, Shiori; Ohtomo, Kuni [The University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    This report describes perioperative hemodynamic monitoring of the common hepatic artery (CHA) during endovascular treatment of a pancreaticoduodenal arcade aneurysm, in a patient with celiac artery stenosis caused by the median arcuate ligament. Pressure monitoring was performed as a safety measure against critical complications such as liver ischemia. As the aneurysm was located in the anterior pancreaticoduodenal artery (APDA) and the posterior pancreaticoduodenal artery (PPDA) was small in caliber, the patient was considered to be at a high risk of liver ischemia. No significant change in pressure was observed in the CHA on balloon occlusion test in the APDA. Immediately after embolization, the PPDA enlarged and the pressure in the CHA was well maintained. Pressure monitoring appears to improve patient safety during endovascular treatment of visceral aneurysms.

  1. Arterial anomalies of the celiac trunk and median arcuate ligament compression in dogs and cats assessed by computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pommellet, Hélène M; Scansen, Brian A; Mathys, Dimitria A; Mollenkopf, Dixie F; Reeves, Lauren; Skinas, Melissa L; Patel, Mira

    2018-02-01

    To identify abnormalities of the celiac artery (CA) and major branches in dogs and cats by computed tomography angiography (CTA). Multi-institutional retrospective case series. Two hundred fifty-four dogs and 13 cats. Abdominal CTA images from 2009 to 2017 were reviewed. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between CA abnormalities and sex, age, size of dog, concurrent venous anomaly, or presence of gastrointestinal signs. Abnormalities in the CA were observed in 32 animals (11.9%) including 9 with abnormal branching (3.4%) and 23 with CA compression (8.6%). A celiacomesenteric trunk was observed in 8 (2.9%; 6 dogs, 2 cats). The splenic artery originated from the cranial mesenteric artery in 1 dog; the hepatic arterial branches originated from the left gastric artery in another. Four out of 32 animals (12.5%) with an arterial anomaly had another vascular abnormality. Large breed dogs were more likely to have an arterial anomaly (OR 4.3, 95% CI: 1.18-15.5, P = .02) and 12 times more likely to have CA compression (OR 12.0, 95% CI: 1.4-97.7, P = .02) compared to small breed dogs. Dogs with CA compression were more likely to present for gastrointestinal signs (OR 3.6, 95% CI: 1.2-10.3, P = .01). Anomalies of the celiac trunk are apparent on CTA and may impact surgical or image-guided intervention. Compression at the origin of the CA was apparent on imaging, similar to the median arcuate ligament syndrome in people, although the significance of this finding in dogs is unknown. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  2. Penetrating Atherosclerotic Ulcer of the Abdominal Aorta Involving the Celiac Trunk Origin and Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion: Endovascular Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G.; Petrocelli, Francesco; Seitun, Sara; Robaldo, Alessandro; Mazzei, Raffaele

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of endovascular treatment in a 64-year-old woman affected by a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU) of the abdominal aorta with a 26-mm pseudoaneurysm involving the celiac trunk (CT) origin and with superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion in the first 30 mm. The patient underwent stenting to treat the SMA occlusion and subsequent deployment of a custom-designed fenestrated endovascular stent-graft to treat the PAU involving the CT origin. Follow-up at 6 months after device placement demonstrated no complications, and there was complete thrombosis of the PAU and patency of the two branch vessels.

  3. Celiac Artery Stenting in the Treatment of Intestinal Ischemia Due to the Sacrifice of the Dominant Inferior Mesenteric Artery During Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zijie; Pan, Tianyue; Lian, Weishuai; Guo, Daqiao; Dong, Zhihui; Fu, Weiguo

    2016-08-01

    A 42-year-old man had intestinal ischemia 7 weeks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair due to sacrifice of the inferior mesenteric artery, which had compensated for the intestinal blood supply because of the total occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and severe stenosis of the celiac artery (CA). He was diagnosed in the active phase of Takayasu arteritis, and an emergency endovascular treatment was performed. After the SMA failed to be recanalized, a stent was successfully placed into the CA; this choice was made based on the preexisting collaterals between them. The symptoms were relieved shortly after the operation. The Kirk arcade, the Barkow arcade, and the enlarged pancreaticoduodenal arcade were visualized on the follow-up computed tomography angiography. Based on this case, a short review of celiomesenteric and intermesenteric collateral circulations is presented. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. A study on variation types in celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery using 3D volume rendering of MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Keun; Jang, Seong Joo [Dept. of Radiological physics Graduate School of Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Young Ill [Dept. of Radiological Technology of Kwangyang Health College, Kwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the variation which based on Celiac axis and SMA using by CT volume rendering images. 613 patients underwent abdominal CTA, there were 552 patients (99.05%, TypeⅠ, Ⅱ ) with normal anatomical form and 61 (9.95%, Type Ⅲ-Ⅻ) with variation. TypeⅠ was 339(55.31%), Type Ⅱ was 213 (34.74%), Type Ⅲ was 18 (2.93%), Type Ⅳ was 12 patients (1.95%), Type Ⅴ was 11 patient (1.79%), Type Ⅵ was 9 patients (1.46%), Type Ⅶ was 6 patients (0.97%), Type Ⅷ was 1 patient (0.16%), Type Ⅸ was 1 patient (0.16%), Type Ⅹ was 1 patient (0.16%), Type Ⅺ was 1 patient (0.16%), and Type Ⅻ was 1 patient (0.16%) into totally new types of variation. In conclusion, we could found 9 new types of variation by classifying based on celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery. These results were considered to be an important opportunity for a new vessel map.

  5. Utility of Amplatzer Vascular Plug with Preoperative Common Hepatic Artery Embolization for Distal Pancreatectomy with En Bloc Celiac Axis Resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toguchi, Masafumi, E-mail: e024163@yahoo.co.jp; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Numoto, Isao; Hidaka, Syojiro; Yamakawa, Miho [Kindai University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Asato, Nobuyuki [Kindai University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Nara Hospital (Japan); Im, SungWoon; Yagyu, Yukinobu; Matsuki, Mitsuru [Kindai University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Takeyama, Yoshifumi [Kindai University, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Murakami, Takamichi [Kindai University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the feasibility and safety of the Amplatzer vascular plug (AVP) for preoperative common hepatic embolization (CHA) before distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac axis resection (DP-CAR) to redistribute blood flow to the stomach and liver via the superior mesenteric artery (SMA).Materials and MethodsFour patients (3 males, 1 female; median age 69 years) with locally advanced pancreatic body cancer underwent preoperative CHA embolization with AVP. After embolization, SMA arteriography was performed to confirm the alteration of blood flow from the SMA to the proper hepatic artery.ResultsIn three of four patients, technical successes were achieved with sufficient margin from the origin of gastroduodenal artery. In one patient, the margin was less than 5 mm, although surgery was successfully performed without any problem. Eventually, all patients underwent the DP-CAR without arterial reconstruction or liver ischemia.ConclusionsAVP application is feasible and safe as an embolic procedure for preoperative CHA embolization of DP-CAR.

  6. Utility of Amplatzer Vascular Plug with Preoperative Common Hepatic Artery Embolization for Distal Pancreatectomy with En Bloc Celiac Axis Resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toguchi, Masafumi; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Numoto, Isao; Hidaka, Syojiro; Yamakawa, Miho; Asato, Nobuyuki; Im, SungWoon; Yagyu, Yukinobu; Matsuki, Mitsuru; Takeyama, Yoshifumi; Murakami, Takamichi

    2017-01-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the feasibility and safety of the Amplatzer vascular plug (AVP) for preoperative common hepatic embolization (CHA) before distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac axis resection (DP-CAR) to redistribute blood flow to the stomach and liver via the superior mesenteric artery (SMA).Materials and MethodsFour patients (3 males, 1 female; median age 69 years) with locally advanced pancreatic body cancer underwent preoperative CHA embolization with AVP. After embolization, SMA arteriography was performed to confirm the alteration of blood flow from the SMA to the proper hepatic artery.ResultsIn three of four patients, technical successes were achieved with sufficient margin from the origin of gastroduodenal artery. In one patient, the margin was less than 5 mm, although surgery was successfully performed without any problem. Eventually, all patients underwent the DP-CAR without arterial reconstruction or liver ischemia.ConclusionsAVP application is feasible and safe as an embolic procedure for preoperative CHA embolization of DP-CAR.

  7. A major pain in the … Back and epigastrium: an unusual case of spontaneous celiac artery dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumkum Sarkar Patel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old woman with mitral valve prolapse, chronic low back pain, and a 30-pack year smoking history presented for a second admission of poorly controlled mid-back pain 10 days after her first admission. She had concomitant epigastric pain, sharp/burning in quality, radiating to the right side and to the mid-back, not associated with food nor improving with pain medications. She denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, dark stools, or blood per rectum. Our purpose was to determine the cause of the patient's epigastric pain. Physical examination revealed epigastric and mid-back tenderness on palpation. Labs were normal except for a hemoglobin drop from 14 to 12.1 g/dL over 2 days. Abdominal ultrasound and subsequent esophagogastroduodenoscopy were normal. Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomographic (CT scan revealed the development of a spontaneous celiac artery dissection as the cause of the epigastric pain. The patient was observed without stenting and subsequent CT angiography 4 days later did not reveal worsening of the dissection. She was discharged on aspirin and clopidogrel with outpatient follow-up. Thus far, less than 100 cases of isolated spontaneous celiac artery dissections have been reported. The advent of CT scans and magnetic resonance imaging has increasingly enabled its detection. Risk factors may include hypertension, arteriosclerosis, smoking, and cystic medial necrosis. There is a 5:1 male to female ratio with an average presenting age of 55. Management of dissections may include surgical repair, endovascular stenting, and selective embolization. Limited dissections can be managed conservatively with anti-platelet and/or anticoagulation agents and strict blood pressure control, as done in our patient.

  8. Obstructive jaundice caused by pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms associated with celiac axis stenosis: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tiansheng; Wan, Zhili; Chen, Hongwei; Mao, Xixian; Yi, Yayang; Li, Dewei

    2015-07-01

    Pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm (PDA) is quite rare, which accounts for only approximate 2% of all visceral aneurysms. Besides, PDA is usually related to celiac axis stenosis (CAS) and prone to rupture. Advanced imaging examination can facilitate the disclosure of such peripancreatic masses, but most of them were seldom diagnosed until they rupture because of the nonspecific symptoms. Secondary to PDA, obstructive jaundice is however an extremely rare manifestation. A case of an 84-year-old man is reported here, who suffered from severe jaundice caused by a ruptured PDA associated with CAS. In addition, this review collects and organizes PDAs with jaundice by applying a MEDLINE search and discusses the pathogenesis and therapeutic options of these aneurysms leading to external compression over the bile duct. Consequently, the formation of PDA with obstructive jaundice is based on the specific anatomy of pancreaticoduodenal arcades. When there is a retroperitoneal mass around the head of the pancreas associated with unexpected jaundice, PDA should be considered, for which early aggressive therapy is required. The case report and literature review suggest that PDA associated with obstructive jaundice may be treated successfully by single transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) without auxiliary biliary drainage, whether it ruptures or not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute effect of oral sensation of sweetness on celiac artery blood flow and gastric myoelectrical activity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Kohei; Kashima, Hideaki; Yokota, Akiko; Miura, Kohei; Yamaoka Endo, Masako; Hirano, Harutoyo; Tsuji, Toshio; Fukuba, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about the effect of sweet taste stimulus on gastrointestinal motility and splanchnic blood flow. We examined whether gastric myoelectrical activity and/or celiac artery blood flow (CABF), which perfuses the stomach, are increased following an oral sensation of sweetness. After overnight fasting, 11 subjects rested for 5min and sipped, but not swallowed, one of four solutions for 1min. The fluid was then spat out, and subjects remained at rest for a further 10min. Fluids were approximately 15ml of three glucose solutions (4, 16, or 48%) or distilled water. Subjects completed trials with all four solutions in a randomized order. During each trial, gastric myoelectrical activity and CABF were continuously measured using electrogastrography and pulsed Doppler ultrasonography, respectively. None of the four solutions affected gastric myoelectrical activity. CABF was significantly increased after oral stimuli by all three glucose solutions, but not by water. There were no significant differences in the increments in CABF among the three glucose solutions. These results suggest that a sweet taste stimulus above a certain level of intensity acutely increases CABF during cephalic phase, without augmentation of gastric myoelectrical activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Celiac Trunk and Its Anatomical Variations: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinal-Garcia, David F; Nuno-Guzman, Carlos M; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Maria E; Ibarra-Hurtado, Tomas R

    2018-04-01

    The celiac artery, celiac axis or celiac trunk is the first major abdominal branch of the aorta. Anatomic variations and accessory vessels have been reported with variable percentages. The purpose of this study was to report the pattern of the celiac trunk and its anatomic variations in a sample of Mexican population. Celiac trunk dissection was performed in 140 fresh cadavers. Cadavers of Mexican subjects aged 18 years and older were included. Cadavers with previous upper abdominal surgery, abdominal trauma, disease process that distorted the arterial anatomy or signs of putrefaction were excluded. Celiac trunk variations and external diameter, accessory vessels, and vertebral level of origin were described. Celiac trunk patterns were reported according to the Panagouli classification. This study was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of our Hospital. The celiac trunk derived in a common hepatic artery, a left gastric artery and a splenic artery (type I) in 43.6% of dissections. A true tripod was found in 7.1% and a false tripod in 36.4%. Celiac trunk bifurcation (type II) was found in 7.1%. Additional branches (type III) were observed in 47.9%. One or both phrenic arteries originated from the celiac trunk in 41.4% of dissections. Celiac trunk tetrafurcation was observed in 12.9%, pentafurcation in 12.9%, hexafurcation in 1.4%, and heptafurcation in 0.7%. The mean diameter of the celiac trunk ranged from 6 to 12 mm, with a mean diameter of 7.2 mm (SD = 1.39 mm). No significant difference was found between the diameters of the different types of celiac trunk (P > 0.05). The celiac trunk originated between the 12th thoracic and first lumbar vertebral bodies in 90% of dissections. Trifurcation of the celiac trunk was lower than previously reported. A high proportion of cases with additional vessels were found.

  11. Differential Diagnosis of the pancreatic disease : significance of perivascular changes at celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ryang; Kim, Ki Whang; Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Dong Guk; Lee, Sung Il; Ahn, Chang Soo; Oh, Sei Jung [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Kim, Young Hwan [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to classify perivascular change in the celiac trunk and SMA occurring in pancreatic disease and to evaluate its significance in differential diagnosis. In 73 patients with pancreatic disease (42, acute pancreatitis; 14, chronic pancreatitis; 17, pancreatic cancer) abdominal CT findings were retrospectively reviewed. We defined infiltration as linear or irregular density and thickening as presence of a soft tissue mantle surrounding the vessel, and statistically evaluated the usefulness of these factors for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. Thickening of the celiac trunk and SMA is a valuable finding in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic inflammatory disease and pancreatic cancer. When applied to the differential diagnosis of pancreatic disease, perivascular change should be classified as either infiltration or thickening. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  12. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  13. Anatomical variations in the origins of the celiac axis and the superior mesenteric artery: MDCT angiographic findings and their probable embryological mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi; Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lu; Li, Ran; Chen, Jin-hua; Gong, Shui-gen [Institute of Surgery Research, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Chongqing (China)

    2014-08-15

    To identify the spectrum and prevalence of anatomical variations in the origin of the celiac axis (CA), the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and their major branches by using multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography. A retrospective evaluation was carried out on 1,500 abdominal MDCT angiography images. The aortic origins of the CA, the SMA and their major branch patterns were investigated. Normal aortic origins of CA and SMA were noted in 1,347 (89.8 %) patients. Seven types of CA and SMA origin variants were identified in 153 (10.2 %) patients. The three most common variations were hepatomesenteric trunk (67 patients, 4.47 %), celiomesenteric trunk (CMT) (51 patients, 3.4 %) and splenomesenteric trunk (18 patients, 1.2 %). An evaluation of CMT was classified as long (34 patients, 66.7 %) or short (17 patients, 33.3 %) subtypes, compared with the length of the common trunk. Further CMT classification was based on the origin of the left gastric artery: subtype I, 26 patients (53.1 %); subtype II, 5 patients (10.2 %); subtype III, 15 patients (30.6 %); subtype IV, 3 patients (6.1 %). Dislocation interruption, incomplete interruption and persistence of the longitudinal anastomosis could be the embryological mechanisms of the variant origins of the CA, the SMA and their major branches. (orig.)

  14. Anatomical variations in the origins of the celiac axis and the superior mesenteric artery: MDCT angiographic findings and their probable embryological mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yi; Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lu; Li, Ran; Chen, Jin-hua; Gong, Shui-gen

    2014-01-01

    To identify the spectrum and prevalence of anatomical variations in the origin of the celiac axis (CA), the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and their major branches by using multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography. A retrospective evaluation was carried out on 1,500 abdominal MDCT angiography images. The aortic origins of the CA, the SMA and their major branch patterns were investigated. Normal aortic origins of CA and SMA were noted in 1,347 (89.8 %) patients. Seven types of CA and SMA origin variants were identified in 153 (10.2 %) patients. The three most common variations were hepatomesenteric trunk (67 patients, 4.47 %), celiomesenteric trunk (CMT) (51 patients, 3.4 %) and splenomesenteric trunk (18 patients, 1.2 %). An evaluation of CMT was classified as long (34 patients, 66.7 %) or short (17 patients, 33.3 %) subtypes, compared with the length of the common trunk. Further CMT classification was based on the origin of the left gastric artery: subtype I, 26 patients (53.1 %); subtype II, 5 patients (10.2 %); subtype III, 15 patients (30.6 %); subtype IV, 3 patients (6.1 %). Dislocation interruption, incomplete interruption and persistence of the longitudinal anastomosis could be the embryological mechanisms of the variant origins of the CA, the SMA and their major branches. (orig.)

  15. Celiac sprue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Andrés; Kelly, Ciarán P

    2002-10-01

    Celiac sprue, celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is a malabsorption disorder of the small intestine that occurs after ingestion of wheat gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. This disease is characterized by intestinal malabsorption associated with villous atrophy of the small intestinal mucosa, clinical and histological improvement after adherence to strict gluten free diet, and relapse when gluten is reintroduced. Celiac sprue has a high prevalence in Western Europe and North America where it is estimated to affect 1:120 to 1:300 individuals. The pathogenesis of celiac sprue is related to inappropriate intestinal T-cell activation in HLA-DQ2 positive individuals triggered by antigenic peptides from wheat gluten or prolamins from barley and rye. Although previously thought to be mainly a disease of childhood onset, the diagnosis is increasingly being made in adults. There are a wide variety of presentations, which range from asymptomatic forms to severe diarrhea, weight loss and nutritional deficiencies. Extraintestinal manifestations including anemia, osteopenia or neurological disorders and associated conditions such as diabetes or hypothyroidism are commonly present. The availability of highly sensitive and specific serologic markers has dramatically facilitated the diagnosis of celiac sprue. However, the demonstration of characteristic histological abnormalities in a biopsy specimen of the small intestine remains the mainstay of diagnosis. Treatment consists of life-long avoidance of dietary gluten to control symptoms and to prevent both immediate and long-term complications.

  16. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, ... physician. Established by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic ...

  17. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins...

  18. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy is characterized by intestinal mucosal damage and malabsorption from dietary intake of wheat, rye or barley. Symptoms may appear with introduction of cereal in the first 3 years of life. A second peak in symptoms occurs in adults during the third or forth decade and even as late as eight decade of life. The prevalence of this disease is approximately 1 in 250 adults. The disease is more prevalent in Ireland as high as 1 in 120 adults. The disorder occurs in Arab, Hispanics, Israeli Jews, Iranian and European but is rare in Chinese and African American. To have celiac disease the patient should have the celiac disease genetic markers as HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8. Patient with celiac disease may have 95 per cent for DQ 2 and the rest is by DQ 8. Someone may have the genetic marker and never develops the disease. In general 50 percent with markers may develop celiac disease. To develop the disease the gene needs to become activated. This may happen with a viral or bacterial infection, a surgery, delivery, accident, or psychological stress. After activation of gene cause the tight junction to opens with the release of Zonulin This results in passage of gluten through the tight junction and formation of multiple antibodies and autoimmune disease. This also allows entrance of other proteins and development of multiple food allergies. As a result is shortening, flattening of intestinal villi resulting in food, vitamins and minerals malabsorption.

  19. Natural course and outcomes of spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection according to morphological findings on computed tomography angiography: STROBE compliant article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bohyun; Lee, Byung Soo; Kwak, Hyun Kyu; Kang, Hyuncheol; Ahn, Jung Hwan

    2018-02-01

    We aimed to identify natural course and optimal management of spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection (SICAD) according to morphologic classification determined on computed tomography angiography (CTA), and to investigate the association between symptoms and morphological classification of SICAD.This retrospective observational study included 21 consecutive patients with SICAD from January 2012 to April 2017. Demographic data, clinical features, treatment modalities, follow-up results, and CTA findings including morphologic classification, dissection length, and relative diameter of the true lumen (TLRD) were reviewed. Changes in follow-up CTA were recorded and compared to prior studies to reveal natural course of the disease.The serial changes of SICAD on follow-up CTA according to morphologic classifications were as follows; type I (5/5, no interval change), type IIa (1/1, no interval change), type IIb (1/1, partial remodeling), type IIIa (1/4, complete remodeling; 1/4, partial remodeling; 1/4, no interval change; 1/4, deterioration), type IIIb (4/6, no interval change; 2/6, partial remodeling), and type IV (2/2, no interval change). Thirteen (61.9%) symptomatic and 8 (38.1%) asymptomatic patients were all treated with conservative management with or without antiplatelet and/or anticoagulation therapies. Symptomatic group (SG) more commonly had type IIb, IIIa, IIIb, and IV than asymptomatic group (AG) (SG; 11 patients, AG; 1 patient, P = .002). TLRD in AG was larger than that in SG (SG: 40.5 ± 24.1%, AG: 61.7 ± 7.0%, P = .045).SICAD might be treated by conservative management in stable patients irrespective of the morphologic classification except for with type IV (dissecting aneurysm) and extension of celiac branch who may need an early intervention. Types IIb, IIIa, IIIb, and IV are TLRD are associated with patients' symptoms. Further studies on extended natural course of SICAD with a larger number of subjects are needed to draw a strong

  20. Celiac artery in New Zealand rabbit: anatomical study of its origin and arrangement for experimental research and surgical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Abidu-Figueiredo,Marcelo; Xavier-Silva,Bárbara; Cardinot,Themis M.; Babinski,Márcio A.; Chagas,Maurício A.

    2008-01-01

    Rabbits have been used as an experimental model in many diseases and for the study of toxicology, pharmacology and surgery in many universities. However, some aspects of their macro anatomy need a more detailed description, especially the abdominal and pelvic arterial vascular system, which has a huge variability in distribution and trajectory. Thirty cadaveric adult New Zealand rabbits, 13 male and 17 female, with an average weight and rostrum-sacral length of 2.5 kg and 40cm, respectively, ...

  1. Emergency Pancreatoduodenectomy with Preservation of Gastroduodenal Artery for Massive Gastrointestinal Bleeding due to Duodenal Metastasis by Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Patient with Celiac Artery Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos Neofytou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma is rare, and even rarer is a massive gastrointestinal bleeding from such tumours. Coeliac occlusive disease, although rarely symptomatic, can lead to ischaemic changes with anastomotic dehiscence and leaks when a patient undergoes pancreatoduodenectomy. A 41-year-old man with known metastasis to the adrenal glands and the second part of the duodenum close to the ampulla of Vater from clear cell renal cell carcinoma was admitted to our department due to massive gastrointestinal bleeding from the duodenal metastasis. Endoscopic control of the bleed was not possible, while the bleeding vessel embolization was able to control the haemorrhage only temporarily. An angiography during the embolization demonstrated the presence of stenosis of the coeliac artery and also hypertrophic inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries supplying the proper hepatic artery via the gastroduodenal artery (GDA. The patient underwent emergency pancreatoduodenectomy with preservation of the gastroduodenal artery. The patient had an uneventful recovery and did not experience further bleeding. Also the blood flow to the liver was compromised as shown by the normal liver function tests (LFTs postoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a preservation of the GDA during an emergency pancreatoduodenectomy.

  2. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%, widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.

  3. Celiac Injury Due to Arcuate Ligament: An Endovascular Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zini, Chiara, E-mail: zini.chiara@gmail.com; Corona, Mario, E-mail: mario.corona@uniroma.it; Boatta, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.boatta@yahoo.it; Wlderk, Andrea, E-mail: a.wlderk@virgilio.it; Salvatori, Filippo Maria, E-mail: filippomaria.salvatori@uniroma1.it; Fanelli, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.fanelli@uniroma1.it [' Sapienza,' -University of Rome, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit, Radiology, Oncology and Pathology Department (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Celiac trunk injures are rare events, with high mortality rates and difficult management. Endovascular treatment may be considered to avoid bleeding. We report a case of severe bleeding in a 37-year-old man resulting from celiac trunk stretching after a motorcycle crash. Because direct celiac trunk catheterization was not possible, a retrograde catheterization of the common hepatic artery was performed via the superior mesenteric artery. Two vascular plugs (type IV) were released, and the exclusion of the celiac trunk origin was completed with the deployment of an aortic cuff. The patient's clinical condition immediately improved, and after 6 months' follow-up, imaging confirmed the complete exclusion of the celiac trunk.

  4. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins......, which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers...... the small intestinal mucosa and absorption. Adherence to a GFD usually requires dietary advice from a clinical dietician. The monitoring of antibody levels and malabsorption markers is crucial during follow-up and allows for early treatment of disease complications. Important complications include...

  5. [Celiac trunk resection in patients with pancreatic cancer and severe pain syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patyutko, Yu I; Abgaryan, M G; Kudashkin, N E; Kotelnikov, A G

    2016-01-01

    To show the advisability, satisfactory tolerance and good analgesic effect of surgery for pancreatic ductal carcinoma with celiac trunk invasion. Distal subtotal pancreatectomy with resection of celiac trunk and common hepatic artery was made in 21 patients. Early postoperative complications after distal subtotal pancreatectomy with celiac trunk resection occurred in 10 (47.6%) patients. There was no postoperative mortality. Resection edges including retroperitoneal space and pancreas did not contain tumor cells according to histological examination. Complete analgesic effect was obtained in 100% of patients after distal subtotal pancreatectomy with celiac trunk resection and neurodissection. 1- and 2-year survival was 59.1% and 21.5% respectively in patients with locally advanced pancreatic ductal carcinoma who underwent distal subtotal pancreatectomy with celiac trunk resection, median - 13 months, maximum lifetime - 57 months. Distal subtotal pancreatectomy with resection of celiac trunk and common hepatic artery is safe, provides significant analgesic effect, increases resectability and expands the indications for pancreatectomy.

  6. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Request A Second Opinion Visit the Celiac Support Group Facebook page Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1- ... Request A Second Opinion Visit the Celiac Support Group Facebook page Navigation Celiac Disease Program Meet Our ...

  7. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cookbooks Gluten Free Recipes Videos Experiencing Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping ... health professionals. I. Introduction : Experiencing Celiac Disease II. What is Celiac Disease? : Diagnosis and treatment III. Diet ...

  8. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This page is best accessed via your desktop. Celiac Disease Program Home > Centers + Services > Programs and Services > Celiac ... Nutrition Bone Health Program Growth and Nutrition Program Celiac Disease Program | Videos Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1- ...

  9. Trichotillomania in Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Ayad Al Lihabi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Trichotillomania is an underreported and underdiagnosed condition associated with significant impairments in social and functional relationships. The connection between celiac disease and trichotillomania is not yet established clearly. Only a few cases of trichotillomania have been reported to date. Here, we report the case of a 22-year-old Saudi female, who presented with celiac disease and trichotillomania to the psychiatry clinic. This is the first report of its kind in Saudi Arabia. By reporting this case, I highlight the importance of psychiatric and comprehensive approaches in patients with celiac disease.

  10. Celiac disease: clinical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Emel’yanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented clinical cases of patients with a diagnosis of gluten enteropathy in treatment in the department of gastroenterology Regional Clinical Hospital. The case is of interest to doctors of different specialties for the differential diagnosis of anemia and malabsorption syndrome, demonstrate both the classic version, and atypical forms of the disease course. Diagnosis of celiac disease is based on three key positions: clinical findings, histology and serological markers. The clinical picture of celiac disease is characterized by pronounced polymorphism, by going beyond the a gastroenterological pathology. For screening of gluten sensitive celiac typically used an antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Morphological research of the mucous membrane of the small intestine is the determining criterion in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The use of specific gluten-free diet leads to the positive dynamics of the disease and improve the quality of life of patients.

  11. Celiac disease - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluten-free diet; Gluten sensitive enteropathy - diet; Celiac sprue - diet ... To follow a gluten-free diet means, you need to avoid all foods, drinks, and medicines made with gluten. This means not eating anything made ...

  12. Celiac disease - sprue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprue; Nontropical sprue; Gluten intolerance; Gluten-sensitive enteropathy; Gluten-free diet celiac disease ... intestines will heal if you follow a lifelong gluten-free diet . Do not eat foods, drink beverages, or take ...

  13. Trichotillomania in Celiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Abeer Ayad Al Lihabi

    2016-01-01

    Trichotillomania is an underreported and underdiagnosed condition associated with significant impairments in social and functional relationships. The connection between celiac disease and trichotillomania is not yet established clearly. Only a few cases of trichotillomania have been reported to date. Here, we report the case of a 22-year-old Saudi female, who presented with celiac disease and trichotillomania to the psychiatry clinic. This is the first report of its kind in Saudi Arabia. By r...

  14. Celiac Disease Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is one of the most prevalent autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders but as the case of Ms. J illustrates, diagnosis is often delayed or missed. Based on serology studies, the prevalence of celiac disease in many populations is estimated to be approximately 1% and has been increasing steadily over the last 50 years. Evaluation for celiac disease is generally straightforward, and uses commonly available serologic tests, however the signs and symptoms of celiac disease are nonspecific and highly heterogeneous making diagnosis difficult. While celiac disease is often considered a mild disorder treatable with simple dietary changes, in reality celiac disease imparts considerable risks including reduced bone mineral density, impaired quality of life, and increased overall mortality. In addition, the gluten free diet is highly burdensome and can profoundly affect patients and their families. For these reasons, care of individuals with celiac disease requires prompt diagnosis and ongoing multidisciplinary management. PMID:21990301

  15. Celiac ganglia block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Akhan, Okan [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: oakhan@hacettepe.edu.tr

    2005-09-01

    Pain occurs frequently in patients with advanced cancers. Tumors originating from upper abdominal viscera such as pancreas, stomach, duodenum, proximal small bowel, liver and biliary tract and from compressing enlarged lymph nodes can cause severe abdominal pain, which do not respond satisfactorily to medical treatment or radiotherapy. Percutaneous celiac ganglia block (CGB) can be performed with high success and low complication rates under imaging guidance to obtain pain relief in patients with upper abdominal malignancies. A significant relationship between pain relief and degree of tumoral celiac ganglia invasion according to CT features was described in the literature. Performing the procedure in the early grades of celiac ganglia invasion on CT can increase the effectiveness of the CGB, which is contrary to World Health Organization criteria stating that CGB must be performed in patients with advanced stage cancer. CGB may also be effectively performed in patients with chronic pancreatitis for pain palliation.

  16. Celiac ganglia block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinci, Devrim; Akhan, Okan

    2005-01-01

    Pain occurs frequently in patients with advanced cancers. Tumors originating from upper abdominal viscera such as pancreas, stomach, duodenum, proximal small bowel, liver and biliary tract and from compressing enlarged lymph nodes can cause severe abdominal pain, which do not respond satisfactorily to medical treatment or radiotherapy. Percutaneous celiac ganglia block (CGB) can be performed with high success and low complication rates under imaging guidance to obtain pain relief in patients with upper abdominal malignancies. A significant relationship between pain relief and degree of tumoral celiac ganglia invasion according to CT features was described in the literature. Performing the procedure in the early grades of celiac ganglia invasion on CT can increase the effectiveness of the CGB, which is contrary to World Health Organization criteria stating that CGB must be performed in patients with advanced stage cancer. CGB may also be effectively performed in patients with chronic pancreatitis for pain palliation

  17. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Meet our Team Conditions and Treatments Celiac Support Group Patient Resources + Videos – Experiencing Celiac Disease What is ... 1-617-355-6058 Visit the Celiac Support Group Facebook page CSG Facebook Page Boston Children's Hospital ...

  18. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Donate Donate Pay Your Bill MyChildren's Patient Portal Celiac Disease Program Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1- ... Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach ...

  19. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Videos – Experiencing Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking + School Eating Out ... What is Celiac Disease? : Diagnosis and treatment III. Diet Information : How to start and maintain a gluten- ...

  20. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This page is best accessed via your desktop. Celiac Disease Program Home > Centers + Services > Programs and Services > ... Nutrition Bone Health Program Growth and Nutrition Program Celiac Disease Program | Videos Contact the Celiac Disease Program ...

  1. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos Experiencing Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking ... What is Celiac Disease? : Diagnosis and treatment III. Diet Information : How to start and maintain a gluten- ...

  2. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Program Growth and Nutrition Program Celiac Disease Program | Videos Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1-617-355- ... live happy and productive lives. Each of our video segments provides practical information about celiac disease from ...

  3. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Donate Pay Your Bill MyChildren's Patient Portal Celiac Disease Program Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1-617- ... Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach you ...

  4. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos Experiencing Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At ... Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and your family about a ...

  5. Symptoms of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cholangitis etc.) • Weight loss • Pale, foul-smelling stool • Iron-deficiency anemia that does not respond to iron therapy • Fatigue • ... common sign of celiac disease in adults is iron deficiency anemia that does not respond to iron therapy. Who ...

  6. Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Series Urinary Tract Imaging Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals) Serologic tests for celiac disease provide an effective first step in identifying ...

  7. An Unusual Case of Stent Migration After Celiac Trunk Endovascular Revascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negri, Silvia; Ferraro, Stefania; Piffaretti, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.piffaretti@uninsubria.it; Rivolta, Nicola; Bossi, Matteo [University of Insubria School of Medicine, Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Circolo University Hospital (Italy); Carrafiello, Gianpaolo [University of Insubria School of Medicine, Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Circolo University Hospital (Italy); Castelli, Patrizio [University of Insubria School of Medicine, Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Circolo University Hospital (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    A 61-year-old woman underwent celiac trunk stenting to treat abdominal angina. Three months later, she was readmitted for recurrent symptoms. Computed tomography control revealed the migration of the stent into the splenic artery. No sign of vessel injury or end-organ ischemia was detected. Repeat stenting of the celiac trunk was performed; the postoperative course was uneventful. 12 months later, the patient was asymptomatic with the second stent in its correct position, and she was asymptomatic for mesenteric ischemia.

  8. Hepatic manifestations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hugh James FreemanDepartment of Medicine (Gastroenterology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaAbstract: Different hepatic and biliary tract disorders may occur with celiac disease. Some have been hypothesized to share genetic or immunopathogenetic factors, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune hepatitis. Other hepatic changes in celiac disease may occur with malnutrition resulting from impaired nutrient absorption, including hepatic steatosis. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T-cell lymphoma.Keywords: celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, fatty liver, gluten-free diet

  9. Celiac artery in New Zealand rabbit: anatomical study of its origin and arrangement for experimental research and surgical practice Artéria celíaca em coelhos Nova Zelândia: estudo anatômico de sua origem e arranjo para a pesquisa experimental e a prática cirúrgica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Abidu-Figueiredo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Rabbits have been used as an experimental model in many diseases and for the study of toxicology, pharmacology and surgery in many universities. However, some aspects of their macro anatomy need a more detailed description, especially the abdominal and pelvic arterial vascular system, which has a huge variability in distribution and trajectory. Thirty cadaveric adult New Zealand rabbits, 13 male and 17 female, with an average weight and rostrum-sacral length of 2.5 kg and 40cm, respectively, were used. The thoracic aorta was cannulated and the vascular system was filled with stained latex S-65. The celiac artery and its proximal branches were dissected and lengthened in order to evidence origin and proximal ramifications. The celiac artery emerged between the 12th and 13th thoracic vertebra in 11 (36.7% rabbits; at the level of the 13th thoracic vertebra in 6 (20% rabbits; between the 13th thoracic vertebra and the 1st lumbar vertebra in 12 (40% rabbits; and at the level of the 1st lumbar vertebra in only one (3.3% rabbit. The mean length of the celiac artery was 0.5cm. The celiac artery first branch was the lienal artery, the second branch was the left gastric artery and the hepatic artery arose from the left gastric artery in all the dissected rabbits. No relation was observed between the celiac artery length and the rostrum-sacral length in rabbits. The number of left gastric and lienal artery branches and the distribution of celiac artery origin are not gender dependent.Os coelhos têm sido usados como modelo experimental em diferentes patologias e para estudos de toxicologia, farmacologia e cirurgia em várias universidades. Entretanto apesar de sua grande utilização, muitos aspectos de sua macroanatomia, em especial os que se referem ao sistema vascular arterial que irrigam as viscerais abdomino-pélvicas ainda carecem de uma descrição mais detalhada, pois os vasos arteriais apresentam grande variabilidade na sua distribuição e

  10. Potential Celiac Patients : A Model of Celiac Disease Pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tosco, Antonella; Izzo, Valentina; Tucci, Francesca; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Renata; Romanos, Jihane; Trynka, Gosia; Auricchio, Salvatore; Jabri, Bana; Greco, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim: Potential celiacs have the 'celiactype' HLA, positive anti-transglutaminase antibodies but no damage at small intestinal mucosa. Only a minority of them develops mucosal lesion. More than 40 genes were associated to Celiac Disease (CD) but we still do not know how those pathways

  11. Celiac disease : towards new therapeutic modalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitea, Doina Cristina

    2011-01-01

    What is known about celiac disease? Celiac disease is one of the most common food intolerances, approximately 1% of the population being a celiac disease patient. It is now known that celiac disease is precipitated by ingestion of gluten, the major storage proteins in wheat, and similar proteins in

  12. Non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husby, Steffen; Murray, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) has been introduced recently as a potentially common disease on the basis of studies of patients with claimed reactivity to gluten but without the characteristics of celiac disease (CD). CD is characterized by antibody reactivity toward the autoantigen...

  13. Prevalência da estenose aterosclerótica do tronco celíaco e da artéria mesentérica superior na arteriopatia oclusiva dos membros inferiores Prevalence of atherosclerotic stenosis of celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery in occlusive arteriopathy of lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenes Pereira Reis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Contexto: A eventual relação entre a aterosclerose das artérias dos membros inferiores com a aterosclerose das artérias intestinais foi pouco estudada. Objetivo: Avaliar pela ecografia vascular (Doppler presença de lesões com estenose 70% na artéria mesentérica superior e/ou tronco celíaco em doentes com arteriopatia obstrutiva crônica dos membros inferiores. Método: Foram estudados dois grupos, cada um com 60 doentes (40 homens e 20 mulheres. O grupo-caso foi composto por doentes com arteriopatia obstrutiva crônica dos membros inferiores, claudicação intermitente limitante ou dor de repouso e/ou lesões tróficas de extremidade, sem queixas gastrintestinais. O grupo-controle foi constituído por enfermos sem doença arterial obstrutiva dos membros inferiores e sem queixas gastrintestinais. Consideraram-se fatores de risco presença de diabetes melito, hipertensão arterial, obesidade, angina/infarto, tabagismo e dislipidemia. Todos os doentes foram submetidos a ecografia vascular do tronco celíaco e da artéria mesentérica superior. Os doentes do grupo-caso foram separados pela presença de claudicação intermitente limitante (N = 12 ou lesão trófica e/ou dor de repouso (N = 48. Resultados: Houve associação significante entre idade (p = 0,04 e cardiopatia isquêmica (p = 0,04 com aterosclerose da artéria mesentérica superior. Os fatores de risco não mostraram associação significante com presença de estenose do tronco celíaco. Observou-se associação significante entre arteriopatia dos membros inferiores e lesão estenótica da artéria mesentérica superior (p = 0,006 e do tronco celíaco (p Background: The occasional relationship between arterial atherosclerosis of lower limbs and atherosclerosis of intestinal arteries has not been fully studied yet. Objective: To assess the presence of lesions with ≥ 70% stenosis in the superior mesenteric artery and/or in the celiac trunk in patients with chronic obstructive

  14. What is Celiac Disease? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease? Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of Contents ... people choose the right foods. How common is celiac disease? Celiac disease affects people in all parts ...

  15. Traumatic Neuroma around the Celiac Trunk after Gastrectomy Mimicking a Nodal Metastasis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Ryu, Seung Wan; Kang, Yu Na [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    Traumatic neuroma is a well-known disorder that occurs after trauma or surgery involving the peripheral nerve and develops from a nonneoplastic proliferation of the proximal end of a severed, partially transected, or injured nerve. However, in the abdomen, traumatic neuromas have been sporadically reported to occur in the bile duct. We present here a case of traumatic neuroma around the celiac trunk after gastrectomy that mimicks a nodal metastasis. In conclusion, the imaging finding of traumatic neuroma around the celiac trunk was a homogeneous hypovascular mass without narrowing or irregularity of encased arteries and without increased uptake on PET-CT. Although from a clinical standpoint, establishing an accurate preoperative diagnosis is difficult to perform, the presence of a traumatic neuroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of a mass around the celiac trunk in a patient that has undergone celiac nodal dissection.

  16. Celiac disease and its histopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pudasaini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is gluten induced enteropathy and is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine characterized by malabsorption. It is a common immune mediated disorder which is triggered by consumption of wheat (gluten. It occurs in genetically predisposed individuals (carriers of HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes. It is characterized by inflammation of the small-intestinal mucosa and myriad gastrointestinal and systemic manifestations. A duodenal biopsy with positive serology is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Celiac disease. As there are changing presentation for Celiac disease, communication of pathologist and gastroenterologists is essential for appropriate interpretation of duodenal biopsy.

  17. Nutritional deficiencies in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Susan H; Kelly, Darlene G; Murray, Joseph A

    2007-03-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by small bowel enteropathy, precipitated in genetically susceptible individuals by the ingestion of "gluten," which is a term used to encompass the storage proteins of wheat, rye, and barley. Although the intestine heals with removal of gluten from the diet, the intolerance is permanent and the damage recurs if gluten is reintroduced. This damage causes a wide variety of consequence including maldigestion and malabsorption, resulting in the characteristic, although not universal, features of malnutrition. This article examines recent advances in the understanding of the spectrum of celiac disease, illustrates the impact of celiac disease on nutrition, and describes approaches to the management of the disease.

  18. Extraintestinal manifestations of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Lincoln; Green, Peter H

    2006-10-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that occurs in genetically predisposed individuals as the result of an immune response to gluten. It is present in approximately 1% of the population. Diarrhea has become a less common mode of presentation (dermatitis herpetiforme, and neurologic disorders, mainly peripheral neuropathy and ataxia. Arthritis is commonly found in patients with celiac disease when systematically sought. Overall, autoimmune diseases occur more frequently (three to ten times more) in those with celiac disease than in the general population. A gluten-free diet is the standard of treatment, although its effect on some of the extraintestinal manifestations remains to be determined.

  19. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a multisystem immune based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The prevalence of celiac disease has risen in recent decades and is currently about 1% in most Western populations. The reason for this rise is unknown, although environmental factors related to the hygiene hypothesis are suspected. The pathophysiology of celiac disease involves both the innate and adaptive immune response to dietary gluten. Clinical features are diverse and include gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic bone disease, infertility, and many other manifestations. Although a gluten-free diet is effective in most patients, this diet can be burdensome and can limit quality of life; consequently, non-dietary therapies are at various stages of development. This review also covers non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The pathophysiology of this clinical phenotype is poorly understood, but it is a cause of increasing interest in gluten-free diets in the general population. PMID:26438584

  20. Refractory Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Khatami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Refractory celiac disease (RCD is when malabsorption symptoms and villous atrophy persist despite strict adherence to a gluten free diet (GFD for more than 12 months and other causes of villous atrophy have been ruled out.  RCD is considered a rare disease and almost exclusively occurs in adults. Persistent diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss are the most common symptoms in RCD. Also, anemia, fatigue, malaise, thromboembolic events and coexisting autoimmune disorders are frequent. Diagnosis of RCD is based on other causes of unresponsiveness to the GFD, particularly collagenous sprue, ulcerative jejunitis, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Many disorders such as autoimmune enteropathy, tropical sprue, common variable immunodeficiency, and intolerance to non-gluten dietary proteins may have similar histological findings but not necessarily identical with CD and therefore should be excluded. Repeat intestinal biopsy may help to differentiate causes of non-responsive CD associated with ongoing villous atrophy (e.g., gluten contamination, small-bowel bacterial overgrowth, RCD. There are 2 subtypes of RCD according to absence (type I or presence (type II of an abnormal intraepithelial lymphocyte population. RCD type 1 usually becomes better with a combination of aggressive nutritional support, adherence to GFD, and pharmacologic therapies such as prednisone, budesonide and azathioprine. For RCD type 2, more aggressive therapeutic approach is needed since clinical response to therapies is less certain and may evolve into aggressive enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma and the prognosis is poor.   Key words: Celiac Disease, Refractory.  

  1. Atypical presentations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasa Adriana Luminita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated the association of celiac disease in 81 children with autoimmune disease and genetic syndromes over a two years periods (January 2014 to July 2016 in Pediatric Clinic in Constanta. Because the extraintestinal symptoms are an atypical presentation of celiac disease we determined in these children the presence of celiac disease antibodies: Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgA and IgA total serum level as a screening method followeds in selective cases by Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgG, anti-endomysial antibodies, deamidated gliadin antibodies IgA and IgG and intestinal biopsia. In our study 8 patients had been diagnosed with celiac disease with extraintestinal symptoms, of which 4 with type 1 diabetes, 1 patient with ataxia, 2 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and 1 patient with Down syndrome that associate also autoimmune thyroiditis, alopecia areata, enamel hypoplasia.

  2. Non-Celiac Wheat Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Green, MD Celiac Genetic Testing with Annette K. Taylor, MS, PhD Introduction to Drug Development with Daniel ... July 2016, a team of researchers at Columbia University Medical Center, published a study confirming that wheat ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... own tissues and organs. Without a strict, lifelong gluten-free diet, inflammation resulting from immune system overactivity may cause ... cases, celiac disease does not improve with a gluten-free diet and progresses to a condition called refractory sprue. ...

  4. Celiac Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease and the intestinal disease respond to a gluten-free diet and recur if gluten is added back into ... intestinal condition, people with DH must maintain a gluten-free diet. Screening Screening for celiac disease means testing for ...

  5. Isolated celiac trunk aneurysm dissection: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban-Zubero, Eduardo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous and isolated celiac artery dissection is a rare clinical disease. It is the fourth cause of abdominal aneurysms behind those that occur in the splenic, hepatic, and superior mesenteric arteries. It is important to suspect the diagnosis of this entity whose clinical symptoms are unspecific. We report the case of a 60 year-old male treated in our hospital because of this illness, and present a review of this pathology, specially focused on the diagnosis and the different treatments available.

  6. Celiac Disease Presenting as Profound Diarrhea and Weight Loss ? A Celiac Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Bul, Vadim; Sleesman, Brett; Boulay, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: Celiac crisis Symptoms: Abdominal pain ? chronic diarrhea ? lightheadedness ? weakness ? weight loss Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: ? Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Celiac disease is a hypersensitivity enteropathy that can have various presentations in adults. Rarely, patients can present with severe lab abnormalities, dehydration and weight loss caused by celiac disease ? a celiac crisis. Case Report: A 46-...

  7. Global epidemiology of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Bykova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the data on the prevalence of celiac disease in various world regions. The numbers of patients with celiac disease continues to rise every year. According to some authors, this is to be related not only to improvement in diagnosis, but to other extrinsic factors, as well, that require additional studies. In the 1980s the prevalence of this disease was 1.05%, and by the beginning of 2000s, it amounted to 1.99%. In particular, from 1993 to 2002 in Britain its incidence increased from 6 to 13.3 per 100,000. Both raised awareness of doctors and conduction of epidemiological studies play a decisive role in the improvement of the diagnosis of celiac disease. The information cumulated up to now makes it possible to conclude that the highest diagnostic rates of celiac disease can be found in the risk groups. They include 1st and 2nd degree relatives of patients with celiac disease, patients with autoimmune disorders (type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroiditis; those with clinical signs of an intestinal disorder, such as chronic diarrhea, as well as patients with anemia, osteoporosis and high transaminase levels of unknown origin. According to the Finnish epidemiological study, the prevalence of celiac disease, depending on the risk group, may vary from 6.6 to 16.3%. The guidelines by the American College of Gastroenterology, British Society of Gastroenterology, North-American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, and the Russian Consensus on Diagnosis and Treatment of Celiac Disease in Adults and Children all recommend thorough examination of patients from the risk groups. Active diagnosis of celiac disease (screening has been recognized as one of the approaches to primary prevention to autoimmune disorders and cancer.

  8. Gut Microbiota and Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Giovanni; Di Biase, Anna Rita; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Ravaioli, Federico; Scaioli, Eleonora; Colecchia, Antonio; Festi, Davide

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence regarding celiac disease has increasingly shown the role of innate immunity in triggering the immune response by stimulating the adaptive immune response and by mucosal damage. The interaction between the gut microbiota and the mucosal wall is mediated by the same receptors which can activate innate immunity. Thus, changes in gut microbiota may lead to activation of this inflammatory pathway. This paper is a review of the current knowledge regarding the relationship between celiac disease and gut microbiota. In fact, patients with celiac disease have a reduction in beneficial species and an increase in those potentially pathogenic as compared to healthy subjects. This dysbiosis is reduced, but might still remain, after a gluten-free diet. Thus, gut microbiota could play a significant role in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, as described by studies which link dysbiosis with the inflammatory milieu in celiac patients. The use of probiotics seems to reduce the inflammatory response and restore a normal proportion of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. Additional evidence is needed in order to better understand the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of celiac disease, and the clinical impact and therapeutic use of probiotics in this setting.

  9. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Program (OWL) Simulator Program More Pediatric Hand Transplant Program Boston Children's has launched the world's 1st program ... is best accessed via your desktop. Celiac Disease Program Home > Centers + Services > Programs and Services > Celiac Disease ...

  10. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease ... Support Group : Resources and support for families. XII. Kids Speak : What kids with celiac disease have to ...

  11. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | ... Group : Resources and support for families. XII. Kids Speak : What kids with celiac disease have to say ...

  12. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Harvard Medical School Promotion Criteria Annual Career Conference Work Life Resources More Education and Training CME and ... Support Group Patient Resources + Videos – Experiencing Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping ...

  13. RENAL INVOLVEMENT IN CHILDREN WITH CELIAC DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Trifonova; N. V. Rusakova

    2012-01-01

    The literature review deals with renal involvement in children with celiac disease. The article contains common conceptions on possible variants of renal disorders and mechanisms of development of dysmetabolic and IgA-nephropathy in children with celiac disease.

  14. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Laboratories More Innovation Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) Technology and Innovation Development Office (TIDO) Areas of Focus ... Experiencing Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking + School Eating Out Away ...

  15. Celiac disease : how complicated can it get?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjon, Jennifer May-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common inflammatory disorder of the small intestine which is triggered by ingested gluten proteins. Previous studies identified crucial steps in the development of celiac disease and based on this knowledge, we propose a threshold model for the development of celiac disease

  16. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Donate Donate Pay Your Bill MyChildren's Patient Portal Celiac Disease Program Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1-617- ... Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach you ...

  17. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Location Overview Meet our Team Conditions and Treatments Celiac Support Group Patient Resources + Videos – Experiencing Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking + School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak ...

  18. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatology and Nutrition Bone Health Program Growth and Nutrition Program Celiac Disease Program | Videos Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1-617-355-6058 Visit the Celiac Support Group Facebook page CSG Facebook Page Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and your family about a ...

  19. Atypical Celiac Disease Resistant to Thyroxine Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Oguzhan Aksu

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease, an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in susceptible individuals upon ingestion of gluten containing diet, is closely associated with other autoimmune endocrine disorders, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease. Celiac disease and hypothyroidism ( especially due to Hashimoto disease) cooccurence is frequently mentioned in the literature. The relationship between celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease was first described three decades ago. Patients usually have...

  20. Diagnostic challenges in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Haghighat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   1-The most important challenge in diagnosis of celiac disease is not- performing the diagnostic tests in suspected persons. Because of multi-organ damage and multiple manifestations of disease, diagnosis of celiac disease may be delayed. It seems general physicians should be awared about uncommon presentations of disease and indications of celiac tests 2-The second most important challenge is in patients with suspected disease but negative serologic tests. In these cases evaluating of HLA can be useful. 3- The third challenge is in cases with positive serologic tests but negative histopathological findings. There may be false positive serologic response or consumption of gluten before testing. We recommend introduction of gluten for at least 3 mo and re- endoscopy and if diagnosis is equivocal HLA-typing  for DQ8 and  DQ2 should be done. 4-The forth challenge is about performing endoscopy. Based on guideline from ESPGHAN if there are typical clinical manifestations of celiac disease, Anti-TTG more than ten times UPN , positive Anti-EMA and HLA DQ2, performing endoscopy may not be necessary, but many physicians don’t agree with this idea. 5-In people who are genetically predisposed to celiac disease antibody levels may be fluctuating thus endoscopy with biopsy should be done in these patients. 6-In children lower than 2years, Anti- TTG and Anti –EMA have low sensitivity. we recommend Anti-TTG and Anti-DGP in these patients. 7-Resolution of symptoms after gluten free diet is not necessarily a feature of celiac disease. This condition may be seen in patients with IBS or non-celiac gluten sensitivity.  

  1. Extended Distal Pancreatectomy with En Bloc Resection of the Celiac Axis for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick H. Alizai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to a lack of early symptoms, pancreatic cancers of the body and tail are discovered mostly at advanced stages. These locally advanced cancers often involve the celiac axis or the common hepatic artery and are therefore declared unresectable. The extended distal pancreatectomy with en bloc resection of the celiac artery may offer a chance of complete resection. We present the case of a 48-year-old female with pancreatic body cancer invading the celiac axis. The patient underwent laparoscopy to exclude hepatic and peritoneal metastasis. Subsequently, a selective embolization of the common hepatic artery was performed to enlarge arterial flow to the hepatobiliary system and the stomach via the pancreatoduodenal arcades from the superior mesenteric artery. Fifteen days after embolization, the extended distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and en bloc resection of the celiac axis was carried out. The postoperative course was uneventful, and complete tumor resection was achieved. This case report and a review of the literature show the feasibility and safety of the extended distal pancreatectomy with en bloc resection of the celiac axis. A preoperative embolization of the celiac axis may avoid ischemia-related complications of the stomach or the liver.

  2. Interest in medical therapy for celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Christina A.; Simpson, Suzanne; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Lewis, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A gluten-free diet is the treatment for celiac disease, but pharmaceutical agents are being developed. The level of interest amongst patients in using a medication to treat celiac disease is unknown. This study examined the level of interest amongst patients in medication to treat celiac disease. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to celiac disease patients and data were collected on demographics, presentation, and interest in medication. Three validated celiac disease-specific instruments were incorporated: Celiac Disease Associated Quality of Life, the Celiac Symptom Index, and the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test. Results: Responses were received from 365 individuals with biopsy-proven celiac disease. Respondents were 78% (n = 276) female, 48% (n = 170) over 50 years of age, and experienced a classical (diarrhea predominant) presentation in 44% (n = 154). Of the 339 individuals answering the question regarding use of a medication to treat celiac disease, 66% were interested. Interest was greatest in older individuals (71% >50 years of age versus 60% celiac disease are interested in using a medication. Interest was highest among men, older individuals, frequent restaurant customers, individuals dissatisfied with their weight or concerned with the cost of a gluten-free diet, and those with a worse quality of life. PMID:24003336

  3. Borrelia infection and risk of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaedini, Armin; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Wormser, Gary P; Green, Peter H; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-09-15

    Environmental factors, including infectious agents, are speculated to play a role in the rising prevalence and the geographic distribution of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder. In the USA and Sweden where the regional variation in the frequency of celiac disease has been studied, a similarity with the geographic distribution of Lyme disease, an emerging multisystemic infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes, has been found, thus raising the possibility of a link. We aimed to determine if infection with Borrelia contributes to an increased risk of celiac disease. Biopsy reports from all of Sweden's pathology departments were used to identify 15,769 individuals with celiac disease. Through linkage to the nationwide Patient Register, we compared the rate of earlier occurrence of Lyme disease in the patients with celiac disease to that in 78,331 matched controls. To further assess the temporal relationship between Borrelia infection and celiac disease, we also examined the risk of subsequent Lyme disease in patients with a diagnosis of celiac disease. Twenty-five individuals (0.16%) with celiac disease had a prior diagnosis of Lyme disease, whereas 79 (0.5%) had a subsequent diagnosis of Lyme disease. A modest association between Lyme disease and celiac disease was seen both before (odds ratio, 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-2.47) and after the diagnosis of celiac disease (hazard ratio, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.40-2.35), with the risk of disease being highest in the first year of follow-up. Only a minor fraction of the celiac disease patient population had a prior diagnosis of Lyme disease. The similar association between Lyme disease and celiac disease both before and after the diagnosis of celiac disease is strongly suggestive of surveillance bias as a likely contributor. Taken together, the data indicate that Borrelia infection is not a substantive risk factor in the development of celiac disease.

  4. Cardiovascular involvement in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Lewis, Suzanne K; Biviano, Angelo B; Iyer, Vivek; Garan, Hasan; Green, Peter H

    2017-08-26

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune response to ingestion of gluten protein, which is found in wheat, rye, and barley grains, and results in both small intestinal manifestations, including villous atrophy, as well as systemic manifestations. The main treatment for the disease is a gluten-free diet (GFD), which typically results in the restoration of the small intestinal villi, and restoration of other affected organ systems, to their normal functioning. In an increasing number of recently published studies, there has been great interest in the occurrence of alterations in the cardiovascular system in untreated CD. Herein, published studies in which CD and cardiovascular terms appear in the title of the study were reviewed. The publications were categorized into one of several types: (1) articles (including cohort and case-control studies); (2) reviews and meta-analyses; (3) case studies (one to three patient reports); (4) letters; (5) editorials; and (6) abstracts (used when no full-length work had been published). The studies were subdivided as either heart or vascular studies, and were further characterized by the particular condition that was evident in conjunction with CD. Publication information was determined using the Google Scholar search tool. For each publication, its type and year of publication were tabulated. Salient information from each article was then compiled. It was determined that there has been a sharp increase in the number of CD - cardiovascular studies since 2000. Most of the publications are either of the type "article" or "case study". The largest number of documents published concerned CD in conjunction with cardiomyopathy (33 studies), and there have also been substantial numbers of studies published on CD and thrombosis (27), cardiovascular risk (17), atherosclerosis (13), stroke (12), arterial function (11), and ischemic heart disease (11). Based on the published research, it can be concluded that many types of cardiovascular issues

  5. Celiac Disease Changes Everything | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Celiac Disease Changes Everything Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table ... your thoughts when you were told you had celiac disease? I was actually thrilled when I was ...

  6. What People with Celiac Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment for celiac disease is to follow a gluten-free diet. What Is Osteoporosis? The Link Between Celiac Disease ... with celiac disease who have successfully adopted a gluten-free diet also need to follow the same basic strategies ...

  7. [Celiac sprue (review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fric, P

    2003-06-01

    Celiac sprue may be defined as a model autoimmune disease with known trigger (gluten), a tight genetic linkage (with HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8) and a specific humoral autoimmune response (autoantibodies to tissue transglutaminase, tTG). Gliadin peptides are repeatedly presented to HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 positive cells and induce an immune response in small-intestinal mucosa. tTG is a specific endomysial autoantigen released during cellular stress and by deamidation of gliadin peptides as well as by binding with them facilitates their interaction with HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 cells. CS is the consequence of an inappropriate by T-cells mediated immune reaction to gluten. The diagnosis is based on criteria of the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition revised in 1990. The availability of sensitive and specific detection methods of serum antibodies to endomysium (AEA) and tTG (AtTGA) was followed by recognition of a broad spectrum of both the clinical presentation and histologic changes of intestinal mucosa in CS. The majority of patients have atypical clinical symptoms. The present prevalence of CS amounts to approximately 1:250. The following forms of CS are distinguished: classic (typical), latent, potential, subclinical, and silent. CS is frequently associated with other diseases and many of them are also of autoimmune origin. Serologic testing is indicated in subjects with atypical symptoms and autoimmune diseases. In cases with distinct suspicion biopsy should be always performed irrespective of the serologic tests. In refractory sprue the cryptic form of enteritis associated T-cell lymphoma should be excluded. Gluten-free diet is the cornerstone of CS therapy. The Alimentary Codex in individual countries admits different amounts of residual gluten in gluten-free products. In future years new basic knowledge as well as practical diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations may be expected.

  8. Neurologic Complications of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with celiac disease (CD [n=l 11] and controls (n=211 were questioned regarding neurologic disorders, their charts were reviewed, and they received neurologic evaluations, including brain imaging or EEG if indicated, in a study of neurologic complications of CD at Carmel Medical Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

  9. Celiac disease and associated diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Zakharova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the current definition proposed by the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN in 2012, celiac disease is regarded as an immune-mediated systemic disease caused by gluten and respective prola-mins in genetically predisposed people. Detailed studies of the pathogenesis of gluten enteropathy provided the basis for investigating the possible causes of the common concurrence of celiac disease with a number of autoimmune and endocrine diseases. The possible reasons for the association are considered to be common genetic markers in the patients, a cross reaction of the autoantibodies formed in celiac disease and activated T lymphocytes with the body's intrinsic antigens, as well as the systemic action of proinflam-matory cytokines. Although many issues of pathophysiology remain a matter of debate, the fact that patients suffering from a number of diseases form a group at risk for celiac disease and require a careful follow-up and examination for timely diagnosis and use of gluten-free diet is currently beyond question.

  10. Celiac Disease and Thyroid Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolism to significantly increase. This is called hyperthyroidism. Hashimoto’s disease and Grave’s Disease are two common causes ... the dietitian? Celiac Disease and Thyroid Conditions | continued Hashimoto’s Disease (Also called Chronic Lymphocytic Thyroiditis) •Your body’s ...

  11. Dysbiosis a risk factor for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girbovan, Anamaria; Sur, Genel; Samasca, Gabriel; Lupan, Iulia

    2017-04-01

    Celiac disease remains one of the most challenging pathologies of the small intestine. It involves multiple pathogenic pathways and there are no disease-changing pharmacological agents available against it yet. The term microbiota refers to the community of microorganisms that inhabit a particular region of the body. Normal gut microbiota has a vital role in maintaining the intestinal homeostasis and promoting health. Celiac disease is associated with microbiota alteration, especially with an increase in the number of Gram-negative bacteria and a decrease in the number of Gram-positive bacteria. There is a strong relationship between intestinal dysbiosis and celiac disease, and recent studies are aimed at determining whether the celiac disease is a risk factor for dysbiosis or dysbiosis is for celiac disease. Therefore, the aim of this review was to assess the latest findings regarding the gut microbiota and its impact on the celiac disease, including therapeutic aspects.

  12. Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, K; Yayla, Ç; Yüksel, M; Açar, B; Ünal, S; Ertem, A G; Kaplan, M; Akpinar, M Y; Kiliç, Z M Y; Kayaçetin, E

    2017-11-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the small intestine. It has been known that dilated cardiomyopathy and ischemic coronary artery disease have become more frequent in patients with celiac disease. The aim of the study was to assess Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with celiac disease. This study was conducted at a single center in collaboration with gastroenterology and cardiology clinics. Between January 2014 and June 2015, a total of 76 consecutive patients were enrolled (38 patients with celiac disease and 38 control subjects). Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratio were measured from the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Tp-e interval (64.2±11.0 vs. 44.5±6.0; pceliac disease than control subjects. There was a significant positive correlation between Tp-e/QTc ratio and disease duration in patients with celiac disease (r=0.480, p=0.003) and also there was a significant positive correlation between Tp-e/QTc ratio and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r=0.434, pceliac disease. Whether these changes increase the risk of ventricular arrhythmia deserve further studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  13. Celiac disease, rare symptoms, autoimmune patology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Volta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 42-years-old woman with constipation, anemia and recurrent itch. After several investigations, celiac disease was diagnosed and a treatment with a gluten-free diet was applied with beneficial effects. Recognizing celiac disease can be difficult because some of its symptoms are similar to those of other diseases. In fact, sometimes it is confused with irritable bowel syndrome or iron-deficiency anemia or intestinal infections: as a result, celiac disease is commonly underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. This case report is described to address the physician to a correct diagnosis of celiac disease.

  14. Endocrine manifestations in celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune small intestinal mucosal disorder that often presents with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss. Often, one or more associated endocrine disorders may be associated with CD. For this review, methods involved an extensive review of published English-language materials. In children and adolescents, prospective studies have demonstrated a significant relationship to insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, whereas in adults, autoimmune forms of thyroid diseas...

  15. Pseudoaneurysm of the celiac trunk following acute pancreatitis. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brnic, Z.; Hebrang, A.; Novacic, K.; Popic, J.; Janus, D.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Visceral artery aneurysms (VAA) are well-known complication of pancreatitis. Splenic artery is the most common localisation, but other peripancreatic vessels may also be affected. Although VAA may develop palpable epigastric mass, bleeding and pain, they are often fully asymptomatic, being incidentally picked up on abdominal US, CT or angiography for other reasons. Case report. The authors report a case of a 38-year-old male with pseudoaneurysm of celiac trunk following an acute pancreatitis. The complex cystic-solid epigastric mass was initially detected by grey-scale US, and its vascular nature was suspected on colour-Doppler US scan. Precise localisation was determined by angiography. Conclusions. Colour-Doppler US is a reliable diagnostic method for detection of VAA, but hardly identifies the vessel of origin in many patients. Angiography is fundamental for the final diagnosis, followed by immobilisation in selected cases. Celiac axis always has to be kept in mind as a rare possible localisation of VAA. (author)

  16. Diagnostic challenges in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Karol; Mulak, Agata; Jasińska, Maria; Paradowski, Leszek

    2017-07-01

    Diagnosis of celiac disease in adults is currently based on serologic tests in combination with histopathological assessment of small intestinal biopsy specimens. High titers of celiac-specific antibodies in immunocompetent patients with villous atrophy in a good quality biopsy sample allow us to state a confident diagnosis. The relief of symptoms and histological improvement after embarking on a gluten free diet further support the initial diagnosis. However, in some cases, these conditions are not fulfilled, which requires a critical evaluation of laboratory and histopathology results and a consideration of other potential causes for the observed pathologies. To avoid diagnostic uncertainty, both biopsy and laboratory testing should be performed on a diet containing gluten. Immune deficiency, cross reaction of antibodies and possibilities of seronegative or latent celiac disease should be considered while evaluating serology results. Uneven distribution and variable intensity of histopathological changes in the small intestine along with multiple disorders presenting a similar specimen image may lead to invalid biopsy results. Additional laboratory testing and careful examination of a patient's history may deliver important data for a differential diagnosis and a more specific biopsy evaluation. Persistence or recurrence of symptoms, despite the ongoing treatment, requires a revision of the initial diagnosis, an evaluation of the gluten free diet and a search for concurrent disorders or complications.

  17. Clinical and Histologic Mimickers of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Amrit K; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2017-08-17

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small bowel, classically associated with diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption. The diagnosis of celiac disease is made when there are compatible clinical features, supportive serologic markers, representative histology from the small bowel, and response to a gluten-free diet. Histologic findings associated with celiac disease include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hyperplasia, villous atrophy, and a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate in the lamina propria. It is important to recognize and diagnose celiac disease, as strict adherence to a gluten-free diet can lead to resolution of clinical and histologic manifestations of the disease. However, many other entities can present with clinical and/or histologic features of celiac disease. In this review article, we highlight key clinical and histologic mimickers of celiac disease. The evaluation of a patient with serologically negative enteropathy necessitates a carefully elicited history and detailed review by a pathologist. Medications can mimic celiac disease and should be considered in all patients with a serologically negative enteropathy. Many mimickers of celiac disease have clues to the underlying diagnosis, and many have a targeted therapy. It is necessary to provide patients with a correct diagnosis rather than subject them to a lifetime of an unnecessary gluten-free diet.

  18. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and your family about a healthful celiac lifestyle. Education is key in making parents feel more at ...

  19. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Living Injuries and Safety More Boston Children's Hospital #1 Ranked Children’s Hospital by U.S. News & World Report ... Disease Program | Videos Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1-617-355-6058 Visit the Celiac Support Group ...

  20. Coexistence of Celiac Disease and Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simila, Seppo; Kokkonen, Jourma

    1990-01-01

    Three Finnish patients with Down syndrome and celiac disease are described. The incidence of celiac disease among patients with Down syndrome was calculated to be 20 times greater than in children without Down syndrome, indicating that it should be kept in mind when patients suffer from recurrent diarrhea and/or delayed puberty. (Author/JDD)

  1. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provides practical information about celiac disease from real-life families, as well as health professionals. I. Introduction : Experiencing ... cope. XI. Support Group : Resources and support for families. XII. Kids Speak : What kids with celiac disease have to say about life with the condition. ... “ Boston Children’s is so much ...

  2. RENAL INVOLVEMENT IN CHILDREN WITH CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Trifonova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review deals with renal involvement in children with celiac disease. The article contains common conceptions on possible variants of renal disorders and mechanisms of development of dysmetabolic and IgA-nephropathy in children with celiac disease.

  3. Optimizing the diagnosis of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Michelle Shui Yee; Sanders, David S

    2017-05-01

    The diagnostic approach in celiac disease is continuously evolving as our understanding of its pathophysiology improves. This review aims to provide a summary of contemporary work that supports optimization of the diagnosis of this common yet underdiagnosed condition. The recently updated National Institute of Clinical Excellence and European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines and the contentious biopsy-free diagnostic approach will be discussed. We will review the evidence advocating optimal biopsy techniques such as single bite biopsy and controversial bulb biopsy sampling to increase diagnostic yield. Recent data providing phenotypical characterization and clinical outcomes of celiac subtypes such as potential celiac disease, seronegative celiac disease and ultrashort celiac disease will be covered. We will present emerging evidence on novel case finding strategies with point of care tests. Promising novel markers for celiac disease such as serum intestinal fatty acid binding protein and in-vitro gluten challenge will be included. Recent work has demonstrated the clinical significance of the celiac disease subtypes, emphasizing the importance of careful diagnosis and recognition. There is a move toward a less invasive and perhaps more cost-effective diagnostic approach in celiac disease, but duodenal biopsy remains the gold standard at present for all adults and the majority of pediatric patients.

  4. Birth outcomes of women with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Bente; Fonager, Kirsten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine birthweight, low birthweight (celiac disease in relation to their first hospitalization for the disease. METHODS: This was a historical cohort study based on The Danish Medical Birth Registry...... data of celiac women discharged from Danish hospitals from 1977-1992. The study included 211 newborns to 127 mothers with celiac disease, and 1260 control deliveries. RESULTS: Before celiac women were first hospitalized the mean birthweight of their newborns was 238 g (95% confidence interval [95% CI......] = 150, 325 g) lower than that of the control women, after adjustment for potential confounders. After the first hospitalization the mean birthweight for newborns of diseased women was higher than that of controls, by 67 g (95% CI = -88, 223 g) after adjustment for potential confounders. Before celiac...

  5. Symptoms and biomarkers associated with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kårhus, Line L; Thuesen, Betina H; Rumessen, Juri J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify possible early predictors (symptoms and biomarkers) of celiac disease, compare symptoms before and after screening, and evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of serologic screening for celiac disease in an adult Danish population. METHODS: This cross-sectional population......-based study was based on the 5-year follow-up of the Health2006 cohort, where 2297 individuals were screened for celiac disease; 56 were antibody positive and thus invited to clinical evaluation. Eight were diagnosed with biopsy-verified celiac disease. A follow-up questionnaire was sent to antibody......-positive individuals 19 months after the clinical evaluation to obtain information on their symptoms and their experience with participation in the screening. RESULTS: Before screening, participants subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease did not differ from the rest of the population with respect to symptoms...

  6. Hepatobiliary Disorders in Celiac Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal K. Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication reviews recent literature and summarizes hepatobiliary abnormalities that may complicate the clinical course of celiac disease. A wide spectrum of hepatobiliary diseases has been described, including asymptomatic elevations of liver enzyme levels, nonspecific hepatitis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease. Moreover, in the majority of patients, liver enzyme levels will normalize on a gluten-free diet. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T-cell lymphoma. Because many celiac patients do not have overt gastrointestinal symptoms, a high index of suspicion is required. Simple methods of detecting celiac disease such as serum antibody tests help in the early identification of the disease, thus preventing serious complications of the disorder. The IgG DGP antibody test and IgA tTG antibody test used in combination are an excellent screening test for suspected cases of celiac disease.

  7. Atypical Celiac Disease Resistant to Thyroxine Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguzhan Aksu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease, an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in susceptible individuals upon ingestion of gluten containing diet, is closely associated with other autoimmune endocrine disorders, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease. Celiac disease and hypothyroidism ( especially due to Hashimoto disease cooccurence is frequently mentioned in the literature. The relationship between celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease was first described three decades ago. Patients usually have the classical presentation of diarrhoea and steatorrhoea but hypothyroidism with weight loss and increased dose requirement of L Thyroxine are two well recognised presentations of celiac disease in hypothyroidism. It is known that these cases are resistant to thyroxine replacement. Herein we presented a 35 year old female patient with atypical celiac disease and needed an extremely high dose of thyroxine such as 1600 mcg/day for treatment.

  8. Celiac Disease and Other Causes of Duodenitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Daniel R; Owen, David A

    2018-01-01

    - Patients who receive an upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination frequently have biopsies taken from the duodenum. Accurate interpretation of duodenal biopsies is essential for patient care. Celiac disease is a common clinical concern, but pathologists need to be aware of other conditions of the duodenum that mimic celiac disease. - To review the normal histologic features of duodenal mucosa and describe the clinical and histologic findings in celiac disease and its mimics, listing the differentiating features of biopsies with villous atrophy and epithelial lymphocytosis. - The study comprises a literature review of pertinent publications as of November 30, 2016. - Celiac disease is a common cause of abnormal duodenal histology. However, many of the histologic features found in the duodenal biopsy of patients with celiac disease are also present in other conditions that affect the small bowel. Diagnostic precision may be enhanced by obtaining a careful patient history and by ancillary laboratory testing, particularly for the presence of antitissue transglutaminase antibodies.

  9. The pattern of the arterial supply of the pancreas in anthropoid apes, catarrhine monkeys and platyrrhine monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawuti, Alimujiang; Miyaki, Takayoshi; Saito, Toshiyuki; Itoh, Masahiro

    2009-11-01

    To get the full understanding of the arterial distribution to the pancreas, the analysis of the distribution of the variety of monkey species would be helpful. In this study, we studied the layout of the pancreatic artery in anthropoids (1 gorilla, 3 chimpanzees and 2 white-handed gibbons), in catarrhine monkeys (1 hamadryas baboon, 2 anubid baboons, 10 savannah monkeys) and in platyrrhine monkeys (6 squirrel monkeys). The pancreas of the monkeys was supplied by the arteries originating from the celiac trunk and/or superior mesenteric artery. There were three patterns in the arterial distribution; (1) the celiac artery supplied the major area of the pancreas. (2) the superior mesenteric artery supplied the major area of the pancreas. (3) the celiac artery supplied the whole pancreas. The pattern of the arterial distribution to the monkey pancreas had a wide variety. The result would be helpful for the elucidation of the development of the vascular distribution in the pancreas.

  10. Cardiomyopathy Associated with Celiac Disease in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Boskovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is predominantly a disease of the small intestine characterized by chronic malabsorption in genetically susceptible individuals who ingest grains containing gluten, such as wheat, barley, and rye. Although previously believed to be uncommon, celiac disease may be present in up to 1% of the adult and children population. Celiac disease is associated frequently with iron-deficiency anemia, dermatitis herpetiformis, selective IgA deficiency, thyroid disorders, diabetes mellitus, and various connective tissue disorders but is rarely associated with cardiomyopathy.

  11. Oral manifestations of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Luca; Carroccio, Antonio; Compilato, Domenico; Panzarella, Vera; Serpico, Rosario; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2008-03-01

    Contrary to early beliefs, celiac disease (CD) is relatively common; however, it still remains underdiagnosed since most cases are atypical, with few or no gastrointestinal symptoms and predominance of extraintestinal manifestations. As a consequence, the diagnosis of the disorder often requires a multidisciplinary approach. Also some oral ailments have been described in celiac patients. In this study, we review the papers that have reported oral manifestations in subjects with CD. A comprehensive literature search was conducted in Medline and Embase databases using appropriate key words. Additional papers were selected by cross-referencing from the retrieved articles. Dental enamel defects are the oral lesions most closely related to CD. There are conflicting data on the association between CD and recurrent aphthous stomatitis. A correlation of CD with atrophic glossitis has been reported, although robust evidence in support of it is lacking. Patients with CD have caries indexes seemingly lower than healthy individuals, but they may experience delay in tooth eruption. Occurrence of other oral mucosal lesions in CD subjects is likely occasional. Patients with systematic dental enamel defects should be screened for CD even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms. CD screening tests for patients with oral aphthae or idiopathic atrophic glossitis should be selectively considered during a medical evaluation that focuses on all aspects of the patient's status.

  12. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos ...

  13. Celiac disease: From pathophysiology to treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzanese, Ilaria; Qehajaj, Dorina; Patrinicola, Federica; Aralica, Merica; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Stifter, Sanja; Elli, Luca; Grizzi, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as “celiac sprue”, is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine, produced by the ingestion of dietary gluten products in susceptible people. It is a multifactorial disease, including genetic and environmental factors. Environmental trigger is represented by gluten while the genetic predisposition has been identified in the major histocompatibility complex region. Celiac disease is not a rare disorder like previously thought, with a global prevalence around 1%. The reason of its under-recognition is mainly referable to the fact that about half of affected people do not have the classic gastrointestinal symptoms, but they present nonspecific manifestations of nutritional deficiency or have no symptoms at all. Here we review the most recent data concerning epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, available diagnostic tests and therapeutic management of celiac disease. PMID:28573065

  14. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids ... to cook and bake gluten-free foods. VII. School : How to prepare your child with celiac disease ...

  15. Lymphadenopathy in celiac disease: computed tomographic observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B.; Bayless, T.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-06-01

    Lymphadenopathy in patients with celiac disease is generally viewed with alarm due to the association between celiac disease and intestinal lymphoma. Four patients with celiac disease are described in whom significant mesenteric and paraaortic adenopathy was demonstrated by computed tomogrophy (CT). The subsequent clinical course of these patients revealed no evidence of lymphoma. In two patients with longstanding celiac disease and recent relapse, exploratory laparotomy revealed reactive hyperplasia in the enlarged glands; in one patient this was associated with intestinal ulceration, and in the other no underlying pathology was found. Follow-up CT scans in both these patients demonstrated regression of the findings with clinical improvement. In the other two patients, CT was performed as part of the initial evaluation.

  16. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Visit The Hospital Experience Customer Service Your Healthcare Team The Center for Families Visitors More Going Home ... a Doctor Find a Location Overview Meet our Team Conditions and Treatments Celiac Support Group Patient Resources + ...

  17. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... and Events Calendar Residency Fellowships Observerships Graduate and post doctoral programs Global Health Program Telehealth More MyPatients ... 617-355-6058 Visit the Celiac Support Group Facebook page CSG Facebook Page Boston Children's Hospital will ...

  18. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... of Emergency Medicine Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Department of Neurology Department of Surgery More Programs & ... Related Clinical Services Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bone Health Program Growth and Nutrition Program Celiac ...

  19. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Criteria Annual Career Conference Work Life Resources More Education and Training CME and Events Calendar Residency Fellowships ... and your family about a healthful celiac lifestyle. Education is key in making parents feel more at ...

  20. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Home > Centers + Services > Programs and Services > Celiac Disease Program Overview > Videos Request an Appointment Second Opinion Find a Doctor Find a Location Overview Meet our Team Conditions ...

  1. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact ...

  2. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... of Neurology Department of Surgery More Programs & Services Congenital Heart Valve Program Epilepsy Program Hydrocephalus Program Optimal Weight for Life Program (OWL) Simulator Program More Pediatric Hand Transplant ... Program Home > Centers + Services > Programs and Services > Celiac ...

  3. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Laboratories More Innovation Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) Technology and Innovation Development Office (TIDO) Areas of Focus ... and your family about a healthful celiac lifestyle. Education is key in making parents feel more at ...

  4. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... segments provides practical information about celiac disease from real-life families, as well as ... How to shop for gluten-free food. VI. Cooking : How to cook and bake gluten- ...

  5. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away ... to keep your kitchen organized and safe. V. Shopping : How to shop for gluten-free food. VI. ...

  6. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Careers Donate Donate Patient Resources Patient Story Two life-threatening conditions. One remarkable wish. Read more Second ... provides practical information about celiac disease from real-life families, as well as health professionals. I. Introduction : ...

  7. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... families. XII. Kids Speak : What kids with celiac disease have to say about life ... not have achieved without the patients and families who inspire us to do our very best for ...

  8. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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  9. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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  10. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From ... How to shop for gluten-free food. VI. Cooking : How to cook and bake gluten-free foods. ...

  11. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research ... your child with celiac disease for school. VIII. Eating Out : How to order and eat out at restaurants. ...

  12. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research ... your child with celiac disease for school. VIII. Eating Out : How to order and eat out at restaurants. ...

  13. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Harvard Medical School Promotion Criteria Annual Career Conference Work Life Resources More Education and Training CME and ... free foods. VII. School : How to prepare your child with celiac disease for school. VIII. Eating Out : ...

  14. Auxo-Endocrinological Approach to Celiac Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Bozzola

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a permanent genetically determined intolerance to gluten that generally presents with gastrointestinal symptoms in young children and extraintestinal manifestations (endocrinological, dermatological, neurological, etc. later. Furthermore, many studies demonstrate the close association between celiac and endocrine diseases, including growth and pubertal disorders, type I diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroid diseases, probably due to the presence of a common genetic predisposition. Follow-up for celiac children after the start of gluten-free diet is mandatory to avoid complications such as growth hormone deficiency. The present review deals with the problem of the diagnosis of endocrine-associated diseases in celiac children and gives suggestions for correct management and follow-up of these patients.

  15. Celiac Disease in The Netherlands: Demographic Data of Members of the Dutch Celiac Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gils, Tom; Rootsaert, Bianca; Bouma, Gerd; Mulder, Chris J J

    2016-12-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease induced by the intake of gluten with a female to male ratio of 2-4:1. Female predominance has not been recognized in serological mass screening studies. Limited data are available on gender and age distribution in the daily clinical practice of celiac disease. The aim of this study is to describe differences in gender and age at the time of celiac disease diagnosis in the Netherlands. Data was obtained from a prospectively maintained database of members of the Dutch Celiac Society in whom celiac disease was diagnosed between 1980 and August 2015. retrospective database study; Setting: database of members of the Dutch Celiac Society; Participants: out of the total number of 26,986 current and ex-members, the data of 7,886 members could be used for analysis. Age at celiac disease diagnosis ranged between 0 and 88 years; the minority (36%) were diagnosed in childhood. In children, the majority (52%) were diagnosed before the age of 4 years. Median age did not differ in children when compared for gender (3 years). In adults, median age differed between males (52 years, IQR 41-61) and females (44 years, IQR 32-56), pceliac disease patients are diagnosed during adulthood, with males diagnosed at an older age. Only one-third of the patients were diagnosed at childhood. Celiac disease is less frequently diagnosed in young adult males.

  16. Going Gluten-Free: Life with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have celiac disease, you must follow a strict gluten-free diet. This can include more than you would expect. ... transfer from your hands to your mouth. A gluten-free diet is the only treatment for celiac disease that ...

  17. Therapeutic approaches for celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plugis, Nicholas M.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common, lifelong autoimmune disorder for which dietary control is the only accepted form of therapy. A strict gluten-free diet is burdensome to patients and can be limited in efficacy, indicating there is an unmet need for novel therapeutic approaches to supplement or supplant dietary therapy. Many molecular events required for disease pathogenesis have been recently characterized and inspire most current and emerging drug-discovery efforts. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) confirm the importance of human leukocyte antigen genes in our pathogenic model and identify a number of new risk loci in this complex disease. Here, we review the status of both emerging and potential therapeutic strategies in the context of disease pathophysiology. We conclude with a discussion of how genes identified during GWAS and follow-up studies that enhance susceptibility may offer insight into developing novel therapies. PMID:26060114

  18. High frequency of celiac disease in Down syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, EK; Mearin, ML; Bouquet, J; vonBlomberg, ME; Stapel, SO; vanElburg, RM; deGraaf, EAB

    We screened 115 children with Down syndrome for celiac disease, using antigliadin, antiendomysium, and antireticulin serum antibodies and an intestinal permeability test, Celiac disease was diagnosed in eight children, giving a frequency of 7.0%. We recommend screening for celiac disease in all

  19. High frequency of celiac disease in Down syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, E. K.; Mearin, M. L.; Bouquet, J.; von Blomberg, B. M.; Stapel, S. O.; van Elburg, R. M.; de Graaf, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    We screened 115 children with Down syndrome for celiac disease, using antigliadin, antiendomysium, and antireticulin serum antibodies and an intestinal permeability test, Celiac disease was diagnosed in eight children, giving a frequency of 7.0%. We recommend screening for celiac disease in all

  20. Diagnosis of gluten related disorders: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Villalta, Danilo; Norsa, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Francesca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Cereal crops and cereal consumption have had a vital role in Mankind’s history. In the recent years gluten ingestion has been linked with a range of clinical disorders. Gluten-related disorders have gradually emerged as an epidemiologically relevant phenomenon with an estimated global prevalence around 5%. Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity represent different gluten-related disorders. Similar clinical manifestations can be observed in these disorders, yet there are peculiar pathogenetic pathways involved in their development. Celiac disease and wheat allergy have been extensively studied, while non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a relatively novel clinical entity, believed to be closely related to other gastrointestinal functional syndromes. The diagnosis of celiac disease and wheat allergy is based on a combination of findings from the patient’s clinical history and specific tests, including serology and duodenal biopsies in case of celiac disease, or laboratory and functional assays for wheat allergy. On the other hand, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still mainly a diagnosis of exclusion, in the absence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria. A multimodal pragmatic approach combining findings from the clinical history, symptoms, serological and histological tests is required in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. A thorough knowledge of the differences and overlap in clinical presentation among gluten-related disorders, and between them and other gastrointestinal disorders, will help clinicians in the process of differential diagnosis. PMID:26109797

  1. Diagnosis of gluten related disorders: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Villalta, Danilo; Norsa, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Francesca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-06-21

    Cereal crops and cereal consumption have had a vital role in Mankind's history. In the recent years gluten ingestion has been linked with a range of clinical disorders. Gluten-related disorders have gradually emerged as an epidemiologically relevant phenomenon with an estimated global prevalence around 5%. Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity represent different gluten-related disorders. Similar clinical manifestations can be observed in these disorders, yet there are peculiar pathogenetic pathways involved in their development. Celiac disease and wheat allergy have been extensively studied, while non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a relatively novel clinical entity, believed to be closely related to other gastrointestinal functional syndromes. The diagnosis of celiac disease and wheat allergy is based on a combination of findings from the patient's clinical history and specific tests, including serology and duodenal biopsies in case of celiac disease, or laboratory and functional assays for wheat allergy. On the other hand, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still mainly a diagnosis of exclusion, in the absence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria. A multimodal pragmatic approach combining findings from the clinical history, symptoms, serological and histological tests is required in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. A thorough knowledge of the differences and overlap in clinical presentation among gluten-related disorders, and between them and other gastrointestinal disorders, will help clinicians in the process of differential diagnosis.

  2. Celiac Disease Presenting as Profound Diarrhea and Weight Loss - A Celiac Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bul, Vadim; Sleesman, Brett; Boulay, Brian

    2016-08-05

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease is a hypersensitivity enteropathy that can have various presentations in adults. Rarely, patients can present with severe lab abnormalities, dehydration and weight loss caused by celiac disease - a celiac crisis. CASE REPORT A 46-year-old male with a past medical history significant for diabetes mellitus, type 2 (DM2) and recently treated Bell's Palsy presented to the emergency room complaining of weakness, diarrhea and lightheadedness. On presentation, the patient had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 60 mm Hg and a lactic acidosis with pH of 7.28. Infectious etiologies of diarrhea were ruled out. The patient had an EGD which showed erythema of the duodenal bulb. Serum anti-gliadin and anti-TTG IgA were both elevated suggesting Celiac disease. Biopsies showed histopathology consistent with celiac disease. The patient's diarrhea resolved after initiation of a gluten free diet. He gained 25 kilograms after discharge and did not require further hospitalizations for diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS Celiac crisis is a very rare presentation of celiac disease in adults but nonetheless should be considered in patients with marked metabolic derangements in the setting of osmotic diarrhea. Treatment consists of a gluten free diet and may require management with steroids and total parenteral nutrition (TPN).

  3. Prevalence of celiac disease in siblings of Iranian patients with celiac disease

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    Bashir Chomeili

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Celiac disease, one of the best-known autoimmune human leukocyte antigen-dependent disorders, has a relatively increased prevalence in first-degree relatives. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in siblings of patients with confirmed celiac disease. METHODS: Siblings of confirmed celiac disease patients in our center were identified and enrolled in this study. Their serum immunoglobulin A and tissue transglutaminase antibody-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (anti-tissue transglutaminase, immunoglobulin A, and immunoglobulin G were measured and multiple endoscopic duodenal biopsy specimens were obtained with parental consensus. Celiac disease was confirmed by observation of characteristic histological changes. RESULTS: A total of 49 children (male, 29; female, 20; age, 2-16 years with confirmed celiac disease in a pediatric gastroenterology ward were studied from 1999 to 2006. We found 30 siblings (female, 16 all shared in both parents. The only measurement available was for immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase antibody. A duodenal biopsy was performed in all 30 siblings. Clinical findings such as abdominal pain, fatigue, growth retardation and diarrhea were found in 53.3% of the completely studied siblings, and positive serology without histological changes was identified in four cases. Both serology and biopsy (confirmed new cases were positive in 2 of the 30 siblings. CONCLUSION: High prevalence of celiac disease among siblings of patients with confirmed celiac disease necessitates serologic screening (and confirmatory biopsy if indicated in families having celiac disease. It is advantageous to diagnose the disease as soon as possible because early diagnosis and diet intervention may prevent serious complications such as growth retardation, short stature, chronic diarrhea, and malignancy.

  4. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

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    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  5. Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease

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    Hugh J Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease may initially present as a neurological disorder. Alternatively, celiac disease may be complicated by neurological changes. With impaired nutrient absorption, different deficiency syndromes may occur and these may be manifested clinically with neurological changes. However, in patients with deficiency syndromes, extensive involvement of the small intestine with celiac disease is often evident. There are a number of reports of celiac disease associated with neuropathy, ataxia, dementia and seizure disorder. In these reports, there is no clear relationship with nutrient deficiency and a precise mechanism for the neurological changes has not been defined. A small number of patients have been reported to have responded to vitamin E administration, but most do not. In some, gluten antibodies have also been described, especially in those with ataxia, but a consistent response to a gluten-free diet has not been defined. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with unexplained neurological disorders, including ataxia and dementia. Further studies are needed, however, to determine if a gluten-free diet will lead to improvement in the associated neurological disorder.

  6. Selected luminal mucosal complications of adult celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Hugh J FreemanDepartment of Medicine (Gastroenterology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Celiac disease is a gluten-dependent intestinal disorder that appears to be associated with several clinical conditions. Some involve the luminal mucosa of the stomach and intestinal tract and may, occasionally, complicate the course of celiac disease. Collagenous colitis has been associated with celiac disease and may lead to chronic diarrhea. Conversely, some of these clinical disorders that involve the luminal mucosa of the stomach and intestine may represent the initial clinical presentation of celiac disease. These disorders should be considered in patients with celiac disease who develop recurrent or refractory symptoms despite adherence to a strict gluten-free diet. Detection of collagenous disorders that affect the luminal mucosa of the stomach or intestinal tract may result in recognition of underlying celiac disease.Keywords: celiac disease, collagenous gastritis, collagenous sprue, collagenous colitis, gluten-free diet

  7. Elderly Onset Celiac Disease: A Narrative Review

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    Maria Cappello

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Celiac sprue is a chronic disease, which usually occurs in children and young adults. However, it can develop in any age group, and the prevalence is increasing even in the elderly population. The atypical patterns of clinical presentation in this age group sometimes can cause a delay in diagnosis. Given the lower sensitivity and specificity of serological tests in the aged population, clinical suspect often arises in the presence of complications (autoimmune disorders, fractures, and finally, malignancy and must be supported by endoscopic and imaging tools. In this review, we highlight the incidence and prevalence of celiac disease in the elderly, the patterns of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and the most frequent complications, with the aim of increasing awareness and reducing the diagnostic delay of celiac disease even in the elderly population.

  8. Endocrine manifestations in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2016-10-14

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune small intestinal mucosal disorder that often presents with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss. Often, one or more associated endocrine disorders may be associated with CD. For this review, methods involved an extensive review of published English-language materials. In children and adolescents, prospective studies have demonstrated a significant relationship to insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, whereas in adults, autoimmune forms of thyroid disease, particularly hypothyroidism, may commonly co-exist. In some with CD, multiple glandular endocrinopathies may also occur and complicate the initial presentation of the intestinal disease. In others presenting with an apparent isolated endocrine disorder, serological screening for underlying subclinical CD may prove to be positive, particularly if type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid or other autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as Addison's disease are first detected. A number of reports have also recorded hypoparathyroidism or hypopituitarism or ovarian failure in CD and these may be improved with a strict gluten-free diet.

  9. Isolated spontaneous dissection of the celiac trunk in a patient with bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Rauf Zeina

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abdel-Rauf Zeina1, Alicia Nachtigal1, Anton Troitsa2, Gil Admon2, Nina Avshovich31Department of Radiology, 2Department of Surgery A, 3Department of Internal Medicine C, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Hadera, Israel. Hillel Yaffe Medical Center is affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, IsraelAbstract: Isolated spontaneous dissection of celiac trunk is a rare entity. The spontaneous dissection of the visceral artery occurs without aortic dissection. The most consistent presenting symptom is acute onset abdominal pain. Complications consist of ischemia, aneurysm formation, and rupture. We report an exceptional case of an isolated spontaneous dissection of the celiac trunk which occurred in a 49 year old male with a previously undiagnosed bicuspid aortic valve (BAV. We also describe the classical appearance in different imaging modalities with a particular emphasis on multidetector computed tomography, and discuss the clinical manifestation and its relationship to BAV.Keywords: celiac trunk dissection, isolated spontaneous dissection, CT angiography, bicuspid aortic valve, MRA

  10. New Insights in Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Branski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune disorder occurring in genetically susceptible subjects. The incidence of CD is around 1%, and it is much more common in first-degree relatives of CD patients, 10%–18%. However, the pattern of the genetic inheritance is still obscure. Environmental factors are undoubtedly affecting the disease’s clinical presentation, time at presentation, and may have an effect on the characteristics of the disease. The clinical presentation of CD has shifted during the previous decades from the classical presentation in which the toddler suffers from diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, failure to thrive, abdominal distension, etc., to the child with a monosymptomatic presentation, such as anemia, as well as an enlarged list of extra-intestinal disorders. The diagnosis of CD is being established by symptoms consistent with CD and positive serology. The ultimate diagnosis should be made upon histological evaluation of the small bowel mucosa. The treatment of CD is a lifelong, strict gluten-free diet (GFD. Compliance with a GFD is quite difficult. Therefore, new strategies for prevention and treatment modalities other than GFD are greatly needed. Recently several promising therapeutic modalities have been developed; these include resuming traditional baking techniques. Another methodology is using probiotic-driven prolylendopeptidase. Another pathway to tackle the therapeutic option in CD is by down-regulation of the activity of zonulin—the active pump enabling gluten to enter the enterocytes. We are facing an era where other modalities beyond a GFD might allow CD patients to be able to tolerate occasionally a small amount of gluten in their diet.

  11. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Schuppan, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small-intestinal inflammatory disease that is triggered by the ingestion of the storage proteins (gluten) of wheat, barley and rye. Endocrine autoimmunity is prevalent in patients with CD and their relatives. The genes that predispose to endocrine autoimmune diseases, e.g. type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and Addison's disease, i.e. DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8, are also the major genetic determinants of CD, which is the best understood HLA-linked disease. Thus, up to 30% of first-degree relatives both of patients with CD and/or endocrine autoimmunity are affected by the other disease. In CD, certain gluten proteins bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 in the small-intestinal mucosa, to activate gluten-specific T cells which are instrumental in the destruction of the resorptive villi. Here, the autoantigen tissue transglutaminase increases the T cell response by generating deamidated gluten peptides that bind more strongly to DQ2 or DQ8. Classical symptoms such as diarrhea and consequences of malabsorption like anemia and osteoporosis are often absent in patients with (screening-detected) CD, but this absence does not significantly affect these patients' incidence of endocrine autoimmunity. Moreover, once autoimmunity is established, a gluten-free diet is not able to induce remission. However, ongoing studies attempt to address how far a gluten-free diet may prevent or retard the development of CD and endocrine autoimmunity in children at risk. The close relationship between CD and endocrine autoimmunity warrants a broader immune genetic and endocrine screening of CD patients and their relatives. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Celiac Disease: Diagnostic Standards and Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaswala, Dharmesh H.; Veeraraghavan, Gopal; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) affects at least 1% of the population and evidence suggests that prevalence is increasing. The diagnosis of CD depends on providers being alert to both typical and atypical presentations and those situations in which patients are at high risk for the disease. Because of variable presentation, physicians need to have a low threshold for celiac testing. Robust knowledge of the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease has served as a catalyst for the development of novel diagnostic tools. Highly sensitive and specific serological assays including Endomysial Antibody (EMA), tissue transglutaminase (tTG), and Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) have greatly simplified testing for CD and serve as the foundation for celiac diagnosis. In addition, genetic testing for HLA DQ2 and DQ8 has become more widely available and there has been refinement of the gluten challenge for use in diagnostic algorithms. While diagnosis is usually straightforward, in special conditions including IgA deficiency, very young children, discrepant histology and serology, and adoption of a gluten free diet prior to testing, CD can be difficult to diagnose. In this review, we provide an overview of the history and current state of celiac disease diagnosis and provide guidance for evaluation of CD in difficult diagnostic circumstances. PMID:28943611

  13. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us ... your child with celiac disease for school. VIII. Eating Out : How to order and eat ... X. Emotional Adjustments: How to adjust & cope. XI. Support Group : ...

  14. Celiac Disease Presenting with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Sarbay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immunological disorder. Clinical manifestations occur as a result of intestinal mucosa damage and malabsorption. CD is also associated with extraintestinal manifestations and autoimmune disorders. The coexistence of CD and autoimmune diseases has been described before. In this article, a patient with CD presenting with thrombocytopenia is discussed.

  15. Influenza and risk of later celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kårhus, Line Lund; Gunnes, Nina; Størdal, Ketil

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Influenza has been linked to autoimmune conditions, but its relationship to subsequent celiac disease (CD) is unknown. Our primary aim was to determine the risk of CD after influenza. A secondary analysis examined the risk of CD following pandemic influenza vaccination. METHODS...

  16. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... School : How to prepare your child with celiac disease for school. VIII. Eating Out : How to order and eat out at restaurants. IX. Away From Home : How to plan for activities and travel. X. Emotional ... have to say about life with the condition. ...

  17. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Go to Clinician Resources Make a referral How to refer a patient How to transfer or transport a patient Accepted health ... Celiac Disease? : Diagnosis and treatment III. Diet Information : How to start and maintain a gluten-free diet. ...

  18. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... School : How to prepare your child with celiac disease for school. VIII. Eating Out : How to order and eat out at restaurants. IX. Away From Home : How to plan for activities and travel. X. Emotional Adjustments: How to adjust & cope. XI. Support Group : Resources and support for ... “ ...

  19. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... 617-355-6058 Visit the Celiac Support Group Facebook page CSG Facebook Page Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and ... Conduct & Compliance Manual © 2005-2018 All Rights Reserved Facebook Twitter YouTube LinkedIn Google+ Instagram Boston Children's Hospital ...

  20. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... patient’s care. Learn more Centers & Services Boston Children's Hospital #1 Ranked Children's Hospital by U. S. News & World Report Centers Brain Center ... Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and your family about a ...

  1. Eating, Diet, and Nutrition for Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a new approach to eating. Is a gluten-free diet safe if I don't have celiac disease? ... she will put you on a gluten-free diet. Gluten-free food labeling requirements The U.S. Food and Drug ...

  2. Magnetic resonance enterography in pediatric celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Gonca; Doganay, Selim; Sevinc, Eylem; Deniz, Kemal; Chavhan, Govind; Gorkem, Sureyya B; Karacabey, Neslihan; Dogan, Mehmet S; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Aslan, Duran

    To assess if magnetic resonance enterography is capable of showing evidence/extent of disease in pediatric patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease by comparing with a control group, and to correlate the magnetic resonance enterography findings with anti-endomysial antibody level, which is an indicator of gluten-free dietary compliance. Thirty-one pediatric patients (mean age 11.7±3.1 years) with biopsy-proven celiac disease and 40 pediatric patients as a control group were recruited in the study. The magnetic resonance enterography images of both patients with celiac disease and those of the control group were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists in a blinded manner for the mucosal pattern, presence of wall thickening, luminal distention of the small bowel, and extra-intestinal findings. Patient charts were reviewed to note clinical features and laboratory findings. The histopathologic review of the duodenal biopsies was re-conducted. The mean duration of the disease was 5.6±1.8 years (range: 3-7.2 years). In 24 (77%) of the patients, anti-endomysial antibody levels were elevated (mean 119.2±66.6RU/mL). Magnetic resonance enterography revealed normal fold pattern in all the patients. Ten (32%) patients had enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes. Although a majority of the patients had elevated anti-endomysial antibody levels indicating poor dietary compliance, magnetic resonance enterography did not show any mucosal abnormality associated with the inability of magnetic resonance enterography to detect mild/early changes of celiac disease in children. Therefore, it may not be useful for the follow-up of pediatric celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Leonardo da Vinci meets celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, Chiara; Ventura, Giovanna; Di Leo, Grazia; Orzes, Nicoletta; Ronfani, Luca; Not, Tarcisio; Ventura, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    Leonardo da Vinci's face symmetry derives from 3 equal craniofacial segments: trichion-nasion (tn), which represents the superior third of the face, nasion-subnasal (ns) that is the medium third of the face, and subnasal-gnathion (sg) that is the length of the lower third of the face. It has been reported that adult subjects with celiac disease (CD) can be identified on the basis of a greater extension of the forehead in comparison to the medium third of the face, with a high tn/ns ratio. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between facial asymmetry and CD in childhood and adulthood. We studied 126 biopsy-proven patients with CD (76 children and 50 adults) and 102 healthy controls (43 children and 59 adults). Their faces were photographed; the pictures were edited using a software program to calculate the facial segments. The tn length was significantly different between adult celiac and adult controls (7.43 ± 1.46 cm vs 6.38 ± 1.73 cm, P = 0.001). The cutoff of 6.5 cm tn, derived from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, identified 43 of 50 patients (sensitivity 86%), but 34 of 59 controls were positive (specificity 54.2%). The positive predictive value was 56%; however, the tn/ns ratio was not significantly different between celiacs and controls. Neither the tn length nor the tn/ns ratio in celiacs correlated to the time of gluten exposure. Adults, but not children, with celiac disease show a forehead extension significantly greater than controls, but this test's specificity appears too low to be used in the screening of CD.

  4. Osteoarticular manifestations of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Stéphanie; Lioté, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune enteropathy based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The global prevalence of 1% to 2% represents only the tip of the iceberg. The diagnosis is confirmed by positive specific antibody, anti-transglutaminase or anti-endomysium, specific lesions of the small intestine and a response to strict gluten-free diet. The diagnosis is difficult and often delayed because the clinical variability is very large, ranging from digestive clinical presentation "classic" to "atypical" symptoms, often extra-intestinal, that are sometimes attributed to a concomitant disease or a complication. Among them, there are frequent musculoskeletal manifestations such as osteoporosis and osteomalacia. In the absence of risk factor, osteoporosis, in a premenopausal women or in a man less than 55 years, more is if it is severe and refractory to medications, need to rheumatologists on the track of celiac disease in the absence of digestive symptoms. Osteomalacia is related to secondary hypovitaminosis D malabsorption. Supplementation by calcifediol, water-soluble vitamin D, may be indicated. Celiac disease is associated with an autoimmune disease in almost 1/3 of the cases. Knowing these potential associations allows earlier diagnosis in patients whose only manifestation, a concomitant disease. Anemia, chronic fatigue or unexplained polyarthralgia are symptoms associated with celiac disease to look for specific antibodies. The aim of early diagnosis is to prevent the emergence of other systemic disorders and avoid complications such as bone fractures and cancer, especially intestinal lymphoma. Non-celiac gluten intolerance is a new entity defined by symptomatology similar to that of celiac disease induced by the ingestion of gluten and disappearing after crowding-out, among patients without specific antibodies and without intestinal lesion of celiac disease. This entity is a cause, at

  5. Acute retroperitoneal bleeding due to inferior mesenteric artery aneurysm: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrón JA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral artery aneurysms (VAA, although uncommon, are increasingly being detected. We describe a case of spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage from a ruptured IMA aneurysm associated with stenosis of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA and celiac trunk, successfully treated with surgery. Methods A 65-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and hypovolemic shock. Abdominal CT scan showed an aneurysm of the inferior mesenteric artery with retroperitoneal hematoma. In addition, an obstructive disease of the superior mesenteric artery and celiac axis was observed. Results Upon emergency laparotomy a ruptured inferior mesenteric artery aneurysm was detected. The aneurysm was excised and the artery reconstructed by end-to-end anastomosis. Conclusions This report discusses the etiology, presentation, diagnosis and case management of inferior mesenteric artery aneurysms.

  6. Serological Testing in Screening for Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Rachel Gillett

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Assays for celiac-related antibodies are becoming widely available, and the present review aims to clarify the use of these investigations in the diagnosis of, management of and screening for adult celiac disease. The sensitivities and specificities of various antibody tests are discussed, along with their clinical use as an adjunct to small bowel biopsy, and as a first-line investigation for patients with atypical symptoms of celiac disease or patients at high risk of developing sprue.

  7. Case Report: Anatomic variation of celiac and testicular arteries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomy Journal of Africa. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 3 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Celiac disease presenting as rickets in Saudi children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiri, Asaad; Saeed, Anjum; AlSarkhy, Ahmed; El Mouzan, Mohammed Issa; El Matary, Wael

    2013-01-01

    Rickets is commonly seen as a sign of malabsorption like celiac disease if it is not treated appropriately with vitamin D and calcium supplements. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency of diagnosis of celiac disease among children with unexplained rickets in Saudi children at a tertiary hospital setting. Retrospective review of records of patients referred over 10 years to a pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology unit. The study included all patients referred for evaluation of unexplained rickets and osteomalacia and screened for celiac disease. The diagnosis of rickets was made on the basis of history, physical examination, biochemical and radiological investigations. The diagnosis of celiac disease was made based on the ESPGHAN (European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) criteria. Twenty-six children with a mean (SD) age of 9.5 (4.6) years (5 males, range 1-15 years) were referred for evaluation of unexplained rickets and were screened for celiac disease. The diagnosis of celiac disease based on small bowel biopsy findings was confirmed in 10 (38.4%) patients with rickets. Serological markers for celiac disease including antiendomyseal antibodies and antitissue transglutaminase antibodies were positive in all ten children. Rickets is not an uncommon presentation of celiac disease in Saudi children and pediatricians should consider celiac disease as an underlying cause for rickets.

  9. Celiac axis stenosis: incidence and etiologies in asymptomatic individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Min; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyun Beom; Shin, Sang June; Park, Jae Hyung

    2000-01-01

    To determine the incidence and etiologies of celiac axis stenosis in asymptomatic individuals. This prospective study involved 400 consecutive patients (male: 319, female: 81) referred to us for celiac arteriography between April and July 1999. When celiac axis branches were opacified by collateral circulation during superior mesenteric arteriography, the presence of celiac axis stenosis was suspected; lateral projection celiac arteriography was performed and the pressure gradient was measured. The indicators used to determine whether or not celiac axis stenosis was significant were luminal narrowing of more than 50% and a resultant pressure gradient of at least 10 mmHg. Its etiology was determined on the basis of angiographic appearances and CT findings. Twenty-nine patients (7.3%) had celiac axis stenosis. The etiology of the condition was extrinsic compression due to the median arcuate ligament in 16 patients (55%) and atherosclerosis in three (10%), while in ten (35%) it was not determined. The incidence of celiac axis stenosis did not vary significantly according to sex, age and the presence of calcified aortic plaque representing atherosclerosis. The incidence of hemodynamically significant celiac axis stenosis in this asymptomatic Korean population was 7.3% and the most important etiology was extrinsic compression by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. Atherosclerosis was only a minor cause of the condition

  10. Psychotropic medication use among patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberberg, Haley M; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H R; Lebwohl, Benjamin

    2018-03-27

    Celiac disease is a multi-system disorder with manifestations that may result in psychiatric disorders. We assessed the prevalence of medication use to treat psychiatric disorders in celiac disease patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy over 9-years at a celiac disease referral center. We compared the prevalence of psychotropic medication use among celiac disease patients (n = 1293) to a control group (n = 1401) with abdominal pain or reflux. Among all patients the mean age was 48.4 years, most were female (69.5%), and 22.7% used any psychotropic medication. There was no difference between overall psychotropic medication use among celiac disease patients and controls (23.9% vs 21.8%, OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.96-1.39, p = 0.12). However, those with celiac disease were more likely to use antidepressants on univariate (16.4% vs 13.4%, p = 0.03) and multivariate analysis (OR 1.28; 95% CI 1.03-1.59; p = 0.03). Use of psychotropic medications was not associated with disease duration or mode of presentation of celiac disease. Celiac disease patients use psychotropic medications at similar rates as those with other gastrointestinal diseases, though subgroup analysis suggests they may use more antidepressants. Future studies should investigate whether celiac disease is associated with mood disorders that are not treated with medications.

  11. Celiac Trunk Embolization, as a Means of Elongating Short Distal Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Necks, Prior to Endovascular Aortic Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belenky, Alexander; Haddad, Menashe; Idov, Igor; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Bachar, Gil N.; Atar, Eli

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in elongating short distal necks of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAAs) by coil embolization of the celiac trunk prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). During 6 years seven patients (five men and two women; mean age, 74) who had DTAAs with short distal necks unsuitable for conventional EVAR, and well patent superior and inferior mesenteric arteries based on CT, were treated in one session with EVAR after the celiac trunk was coil embolized to elongate the neck. All patients were followed by CT every 3 months in the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Technical success was achieved in all patients, and no early or late ischemic complications were noted. No procedural complications occurred and good aneurysm sealing was obtained in all patients. Three endoleaks were identified after 3 months (one patient) and 6 months (two patients); all were treated successfully with insertion of an additional stent-graft. In patients with DTAAs who are candidates for EVAR but have short aneurysm distal necks, celiac trunk embolization-only if the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are patent-is a good and safe way to elongate the neck and enable EVAR.

  12. Prevalence of mucocutaneous findings in Celiac disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Yayla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy which develops as a result of exposure to gluten in food products in individuals with a genetic predisposition. Gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal clinical findings can be seen in these patients. An increased frequence of autoimmune diseases has been reported in patients with celiac disease. Some dermatological diseases, such as dermatitis herpetiformis, vitiligo, psoriasis, alopecia areata and recurrent aphthous stomatitis have been reported to be more common among patients with celiac disease. However, there are no controlled studies on this subject. The aim of this study was to identify the mucocutaneous symptoms seen in celiac patients and to compare these findings with a control group. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine celiac patients and 54 age-and sex-matched healthy volunteers were included in the study. In the patient group, celiac disease history, height and weight parameters, the medications of the patients, compliance to a gluten-free diet, concomitant skin disorders and additional illnesses were questioned; height and weight parameters, diagnosed illnesses, and medications were questioned in the control group. Dermatological analyses were performed in all participants. Results: Mucocutaneous findings were found to be present in 38 patients (77.6% in the celiac patient group and in 31 (57.4% individuals in the control group. The presence of mucocutaneous findings in celiac patients was significantly more common than in the control group. While immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases were detected in 8 celiac patients (16.3%, none of the individuals in the control group had immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases and a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups. Conclusion: In celiac patients, the frequency of immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases and all mucocutaneous diseases were found to be increased. Therefore, we suggest

  13. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  14. Celiac disease and gluten-free diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mikulajová

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an autoimmunity inflammatory disorder of the small intestine caused by the ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The prevalence of the disorder is around 1 % of the Western population and is still increasing. The symptoms of celiac disease include chronic abdominal pain, diarrhoea, and growth retardation in children, and chronic fatigue and headache, bowel complaints, reduced fertility, dermatitis herpetiformis, osteoporosis, nerve and brain disorders, increasing risk of intestinal cancer. The clinical diagnosis of the disease is based on the serological tests and bowel biopsy. The treatment is a long-life gluten-free diet. It is necessary exclude from the diet wheat, rye, barley and probably oats and buckwheat and their products. The novel approaches for celiac disease are focused on the genetic manipulation of nontoxic gluten proteins, enzyme therapy, immune modulation, and induction of oral tolerance to gluten.doi:10.5219/276 Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE

  15. Exome sequencing in a family segregating for celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szperl, A M; Ricaño-Ponce, I; Li, J K; Deelen, P; Kanterakis, A; Plagnol, V; van Dijk, Freerk; Westra, H J; Trynka, G; Mulder, C. J.; Swertz, M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Zheng, H C H

    Celiac disease is a multifactorial disorder caused by an unknown number of genetic factors interacting with an environmental factor. Hence, most patients are singletons and large families segregating with celiac disease are rare. We report on a three-generation family with six patients in which the

  16. Intraepithelial lymphocytes in refractory celiac disease : lost in transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Frederike

    2014-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease type II (RCDII) is a severe complication of coeliac disease. Whereas celiac disease can successfully be treated by the strict avoidance of gluten, refractory celiac patients show no remission despite a gluten-free diet. The pathology of RCDII is only partially understood,

  17. Advances in celiac disease and gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewinski, Mary M

    2008-04-01

    Celiac disease is becoming an increasingly recognized autoimmune enteropathy caused by a permanent intolerance to gluten. Once thought to be a rare disease of childhood characterized by diarrhea, celiac disease is actually a multisystemic disorder that occurs as a result of an immune response to ingested gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Screening studies have revealed that celiac disease is most common in asymptomatic adults in the United States. Although considerable scientific progress has been made in understanding celiac disease and in preventing or curing its manifestations, a strict gluten-free diet is the only treatment for celiac disease to date. Early diagnosis and treatment, together with regular follow-up visits with a dietitian, are necessary to ensure nutritional adequacy and to prevent malnutrition while adhering to the gluten-free diet for life. The purpose of this review is to provide clinicians with current updated information about celiac disease, its diverse clinical presentation and increased prevalence, the complex pathophysiology and strong genetic predisposition to celiac disease, and its diagnosis. This review focuses in detail on the gluten-free diet and the importance of intense expert dietary counseling for all patients with celiac disease. Recent advances in the gluten-free diet include food allergen labeling as well as the US Food and Drug Administration's proposed definition of the food-labeling term gluten-free. The gluten-free diet is complex and patients need comprehensive nutrition education from a skilled dietitian.

  18. Characterization of intestinal microbiota in celiac children | Lahcene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of intestinal microbiota in celiac children. F Lahcene, A Tir Touil Meddah, K Bouziane-Nedjadi, B Meddah, A Leke. Abstract. Celiac disease (CD) is enteropathy autoimmune induced by the ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed subjects. The ingestion of gluten is responsible for the symptoms of CD, ...

  19. Celiac Disease--What Parents and Caregivers Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disorder characterized by a heightened sensitivity to gluten, the protein in wheat, barley and rye. The disease is more common than most people think, affecting approximately 3 million in the United States, about 1 in 100. One of the most notable things about celiac disease is that up to 97 percent of…

  20. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isasi, Carlos; Tejerina, Eva; Morán, Luz M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune systemic disease having among its clinical manifestations frequent symptoms common to rheumatologic diseases such as musculoskeletal pain, asthenia, and cognitive fatigue. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like Sjögren disease. It is a well-characterized disease with specific diagnostic tests. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is an emerging entity with symptoms similar to celiac disease, but without specific diagnostic tests. The concept of non-celiac gluten sensitivity and its diagnostic problems are reviewed, and the hypothesis of its association with fibromyalgia, spondyloarthritis, and autoimmune conditions is proposed. Clinical observations supporting the hypothesis are described, highlighting the benefit of treating non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  1. Celiac disease and anorexia nervosa: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie L. Deschner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between anorexia nervosa and celiac disease remains an area of ongoing research. Identification of celiac disease in patients with restricted nutritional intake can be challenging since abdominal complaints are a common comorbidity associated with eating disorders and since diagnosis of celiac disease requires a duodenal biopsy while on a gluten containing diet. In this report, we present a 12-year-old female who developed anorexia nervosa and was thereafter diagnosed with celiac disease. The latter diagnosis occurred after a 2-year period of persistent abdominal complaints and duodenal biopsies on three separate occasions. Our case highlights the diagnostic challenge, which may include initially missing the diagnosis, associated with celiac disease in patients who are restricting their nutritional intake, and also the importance of re-testing in patients where gastrointestinal complaints are persistent for extended time periods after refeeding.

  2. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacological, percutaneous celiac plexus blockade is often inefficient in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Lack of efficiency could be due to incomplete denervation of the plexus; however, a method for measuring the completeness of celiac plexus blockade is not yet available. We...... have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... regarding pain after 1 week. In conclusion, pancreatic hormone concentrations in response to standing are not useful for monitoring celiac plexus block, whereas heart rate, blood pressure and hepato-splanchnic blood flow may yield useful information. From such measurements it was concluded that permanent...

  3. Treatment of splenic artery aneurysm with double overlapping bare stents: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Jin, Gong Yong [School of Medicine, Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-09-01

    The traditional treatment of splenic artery aneurysm (SAA) is generally surgery and/or transcatheter arterial embolization, but recently, the treatment of SAA using a stent graft has been reported. However, the acute angle of the celiac axis, as well as the tortuous path of the splenic artery makes the use of stent graft difficult for treatment of aneurysma. We report here a case of SAA treated with the technique of double overlapping metallic stents.

  4. Celiac Disease and Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Maureen M; Sapone, Anna; Catassi, Carlo; Fasano, Alessio

    2017-08-15

    The prevalence of gluten-related disorders is rising, and increasing numbers of individuals are empirically trying a gluten-free diet for a variety of signs and symptoms. This review aims to present current evidence regarding screening, diagnosis, and treatment for celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity. Celiac disease is a gluten-induced immune-mediated enteropathy characterized by a specific genetic genotype (HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 genes) and autoantibodies (antitissue transglutaminase and antiendomysial). Although the inflammatory process specifically targets the intestinal mucosa, patients may present with gastrointestinal signs or symptoms, extraintestinal signs or symptoms, or both, suggesting that celiac disease is a systemic disease. Nonceliac gluten sensitivity is diagnosed in individuals who do not have celiac disease or wheat allergy but who have intestinal symptoms, extraintestinal symptoms, or both, related to ingestion of gluten-containing grains, with symptomatic improvement on their withdrawal. The clinical variability and the lack of validated biomarkers for nonceliac gluten sensitivity make establishing the prevalence, reaching a diagnosis, and further study of this condition difficult. Nevertheless, it is possible to differentiate specific gluten-related disorders from other conditions, based on currently available investigations and algorithms. Clinicians cannot distinguish between celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity by symptoms, as they are similar in both. Therefore, screening for celiac disease must occur before a gluten-free diet is implemented, since once a patient initiates a gluten-free diet, testing for celiac disease is no longer accurate. Celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity are common. Although both conditions are treated with a gluten-free diet, distinguishing between celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity is important for long-term therapy. Patients with celiac disease should be followed up

  5. Right Gastroepiploic Artery as an Alternative for Arterial Reconstruction in Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Steinbrück

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. An adequate blood flow is directly related to graft survival in living donor liver transplantation. However, in some cases, unfavorable conditions prevent the use of the hepatic artery for arterial reconstruction. Herein, we report a case in which the recipient right gastroepiploic artery was used as an option for arterial reconstruction in adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation. Case Report. A 62-year-old woman, with cirrhosis due to hepatitis B associated with hepatocellular carcinoma, was submitted to living donor liver transplantation. During surgery, thrombosis of the hepatic artery with intimal dissection until the celiac trunk was observed, which precluded its use in arterial reconstruction. We decided to use the right gastroepiploic artery for arterial revascularization of the liver graft. Despite the discrepancy in size between donor hepatic artery and recipient right gastroepiploic artery, anastomosis was performed successfully. Conclusions. The use of the right gastroepiploic artery as an alternative for arterial revascularization of the liver graft in living donor liver transplantation should always be considered when the hepatic artery of the recipient cannot be used. For performing this type of procedure, familiarity with microsurgical techniques by the surgical team is necessary.

  6. The microbiota as a component of the celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta Nylund

    2016-04-01

    This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of the contribution of microbiota to the pathogenesis and/or onset of celiac disease. In addition, a brief overview of the possible role of the microbiota components on the NCGS is presented.

  7. Celiac disease and intestinal metaplasia of the esophagus (Barrett's esophagus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maieron, Roberto; Elli, Luca; Marino, Marco; Floriani, Irene; Minerva, Francesco; Avellini, Claudio; Falconieri, Giovanni; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Zilli, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies on celiac patients demonstrated that exposure to gliadin alters the motility of the upper gastrointestinal tract, leading to increased acid reflux. No literature is available regarding the possible presence of specialized intestinal metaplasia of the esophagus as a consequence of chronic reflux in adult celiac patients. Our purpose was to evaluate endoscopically and histologically the esophagi of a group of untreated celiac patients. We studied 60 celiac patients, 13 men and 47 women (mean age, 40 +/- 14 [SD] years; range, 18-80 years), at their first endoscopy (following a normal diet). The distal esophagus was evaluated and multiple biopsies were taken. Hematoxylin-eosin and alcian blue stainings were performed. A group of nonceliac, age- and sex-matched patients was used as a control. We found intestinal metaplasia in the distal esophagus of 16 of 60 (26.6%) celiacs (mean age, 45 +/- 13 years; range, 27-75 years), in comparison with a control-group prevalence of 10.9% (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.4-11.2%). Among the celiac group with metaplasia, only one patient had reflux-like symptoms. None had esophagitis. In conclusion, we observed an increased prevalence of esophageal metaplasia in patients with celiac disease. This finding could be the result of motor abnormalities leading to chronic acid reflux, combined with a mucosa which is sensitive to gliadin.

  8. Celiac crisis presenting with status epilepticus and encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijaz, Nadia M; Bracken, Julia M; Chandratre, Sonal R

    2014-12-01

    Celiac crisis is a life-threatening presentation of celiac disease which is described in the context of classic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of diarrhea, leading to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Neurologic manifestations are atypical symptoms of celiac crisis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no published report on seizure or encephalopathy as the presenting manifestation of celiac crisis. We describe a 2-year-old boy presenting with acute status epilepticus and lethargy. Prior to presentation, he had mild abdominal distention and intermittent diarrhea. Laboratory analysis revealed hyponatremia, anemia, hypocalcemia, transaminitis, and hyperglycemia. Electroencephalography revealed severe diffuse encephalopathy, and complete infectious work-up was negative. Initial brain magnetic resonance imaging was normal; however, repeat imaging showed osmotic demyelination syndrome. Given the history of GI symptoms and hyperglycemia, celiac serology was obtained revealing elevated tissue transglutaminase, and a diagnosis was confirmed by Marsh 3c lesions in the duodenum. He significantly improved with steroid therapy in addition to adequate nutrition, fluids, and initiation of a gluten-free diet. We report herein on the first case of celiac crisis presenting with status epilepticus and encephalopathy in the absence of profound GI symptoms. Our case suggests that celiac crisis should be considered in the differential of seizures and encephalopathy in children.

  9. HLA genotyping in pediatric celiac disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanković, Biljana; Radlović, Nedeljko; Leković, Zoran; Ristić, Dragana; Radlović, Vladimir; Nikčević, Gordana; Kotur, Nikola; Vučićević, Ksenija; Kostić, Tatjana; Pavlović, Sonja; Zukić, Branka

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease in the small intestine triggered by gluten uptake that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. HLA-DQ2 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 alleles is found in 90-95% of CD patients. All of the remaining patients carry HLA-DQ8 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*03 and DQB1*03:02 alleles. Specific HLA-DQ genotypes define different risk for CD incidence. Presence of susceptible HLA-DQ genotypes does not predict certain disease development, but their absence makes CD very unlikely, close to 100%. Here we presented for the first time the distribution of HLA-DQ genotypes in the group of pediatric celiac patients from the University Children’s Hospital, Belgrade, Serbia and estimated risk for CD development that these genotypes confer. Seventy three celiac disease patients and 62 healthy individuals underwent genotyping for DQA1, DQB1 alleles and DRB1 allele. 94.5% of patients carried alleles that encode DQ2 protein variant and 2.7% carried alleles that encode DQ8 protein variant. Two patients carried single DQB1*02 allele. No patients were negative for all the alleles predisposing to CD. The highest HLA-DQ genotype risk for CD development was found in group of patients homozygous for DQ2.5 haplotype, followed by the group of heterozygous carriers of DQ2.5 haplotype in combination with DQB1*02 allele within the other haplotype. The lowest risk was observed in carriers of a single copy of DQB1*02 or DQA1*05 allele or other non-predisposing alleles. HLA genotyping, more informative than serological testing commonly used, proved to be a useful diagnostic tool for excluding CD development. PMID:25172978

  10. HLA genotyping in pediatric celiac disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Stanković

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory disease in the small intestine triggered by gluten uptake that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. HLA-DQ2 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 alleles is found in 90-95% of CD patients. All of the remaining patients carry HLA-DQ8 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*03 and DQB1*03:02 alleles. Specific HLA-DQ genotypes define different risk for CD incidence. Presence of susceptible HLA-DQ genotypes does not predict certain disease development, but their absence makes CD very unlikely, close to 100%. Here we presented for the first time the distribution of HLA-DQ genotypes in the group of pediatric celiac patients from the University Children’s Hospital, Belgrade, Serbia and estimated risk for CD development that these genotypes confer. Seventy three celiac disease patients and 62 healthy individuals underwent genotyping for DQA1, DQB alleles and DRB1 allele. 94.5% of patients carried alleles that encode DQ2 protein variant and 2.7% carried alleles that encode DQ8 protein variant. Two patients carried single DQB1*02 allele. No patients were negative for all the alleles predisposing to CD. The highest HLA-DQ genotype risk for CD development was found in group of patients homozygous for DQ2.5 haplotype, followed by the group of heterozygous carriers of DQ2.5 haplotype in combination with DQB1*02 allele within the other haplotype. The lowest risk was observed in carriers of a single copy of DQB1*02 or DQA1*05 allele or other non-predisposing alleles. HLA genotyping, more informative than serological testing commonly used, proved to be a useful diagnostic tool for excluding CD development.

  11. Screening for celiac disease in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwitz, Anna; Skaaby, Tea; Karhus, Line Lund

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) as recorded in the Danish National Patient Registry is ∼50/100,000 persons. This is much lower than the reported prevalence of CD in other Nordic countries and underdiagnosis is suspected. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of CD in a population....... In this general adult population, the prevalence of CD as estimated by screening and clinical evaluation was 10 times higher than the registry-based prevalence of CD. Of 11 participants diagnosed with CD in our screening study, 10 were unaware of the diagnosis prior to the study. Thus, our study suggests that CD...

  12. Elevated serum antiphospholipid antibodies in adults with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Outi; Pitkänen, Katariina; Lindfors, Katri; Huhtala, Heini; Niemelä, Onni; Collin, Pekka; Kurppa, Kalle; Kaukinen, Katri

    2017-12-02

    An increased incidence of thrombosis is suggested in celiac disease. We explored serum levels of antiphospholipid antibodies in untreated and treated adult celiac disease patients. A cohort of 179 biopsy-proven celiac disease patients (89 untreated, 90 on long-term gluten-free diet) and 91 non-celiac controls underwent clinical examination, assessment of celiac serology and enzyme immunoassay testing for anticardiolipin IgG and IgM, prothrombin IgG, and phosphatidylserine-prothrombin IgG and IgM. The level of antiphospholipid antibodies was higher in celiac disease patients compared with controls: anticardiolipin IgG 4.9 (0.7-33.8) vs 2.2 (0.4-9.6) U/ml, antiprothrombin IgG 2.9 (0.3-87.8) vs 2.1 (0.5-187.0) U/ml, antiphosphatidylserine-prothrombin IgG 6.9 (0.0-54.1) vs 2.3 (0.5-15.1) U/ml; p celiac disease at presentation (gastrointestinal symptoms, malabsorption or anemia, and extraintestinal symptoms or screen-detected disease) had no effect on the level of serum antiphospholipid antibodies. The serum level of antiphospholipid antibodies is increased in adults with celiac disease. The higher level of antibodies in treated patients suggests that the increase is not gluten-dependent. The prothrombotic role of antiphospholipid antibodies in celiac disease warrants further studies. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  14. Review and practice guidelines for celiac disease in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadhem, Omar N; Azeez, Ghassan; Smalligan, Roger D; Urban, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is defined as a state of heightened immunologic responsiveness to ingested gluten (from wheat, barley, or rye) in genetically susceptible individuals. Ingestion of the offending proteins leads to inflammation and intestinal mucosal damage, which may result in a spectrum of gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional abnormalities, and systemic complications ranging from anemia and osteoporosis to secondary autoimmunity and malignancy. The genetic influence in the pathogenesis of celiac disease is indicated by its familial occurrence. Celiac disease does not develop unless a person has alleles that encode for human leukocyte antigen DQ2 or DQ8 proteins. The clinical picture of celiac disease has changed considerably during the past 30 years. Diarrhea, which was the presenting symptom in > 90% of celiac disease patients before 1981, is now the chief complaint in disease presentations, including anemia and bone disease, is revealed by the widespread availability of serologic testing. An association between celiac disease and autoimmune disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, and Sjögren's syndrome, has been well documented. The tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin antibody and the endomysial immunoglobulin antibody are the most sensitive and specific serologic tests, respectively, for identifying individuals who need to undergo an intestinal biopsy. If the suspicion of celiac disease is high, intestinal biopsy should be pursued even if serologic tests are negative. The gold standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease is a small bowel biopsy showing villous atrophy. The treatment for celiac disease is lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). Despite the proven benefits of the GFD, it can be exceedingly difficult to completely avoid gluten-containing foods, and adherence to a GFD is estimated to be only 45% to 80%.

  15. Some Immunological Parameters in Women With Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abbas Hasan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is one of an autoimmune diseasein the world and  genetically linked . This disease may be cause many problems for pregnant women and their children . Tthere are many markers specific for celiac disease like anti-tissue transglutaminase and anti-gliadin antibodies which associated with development of celiac disease.In this study, we wished to determine whether there are relationship between  celiac disease and fertility , effect on newborn and to identify the possible implications of these factors to disease course.Thirty female patients with a celiac disease  with ages ranged between (15- 46 years were taken from (Al-Hussein Medical  City/Kerbala.Control group consisted of 20 healthy people who were free from signs and symptoms of celiac disease who matched in age and gender with patients, and had no history for any celiac disease  problem. TTG  IgA & IgG ,AGA EASIA Kit, Generic assay and  was studied using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. T-test and ANOVA and Pearson correlation used to analyze results by using SPSS version 24. P-value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant.TTG and AGA levels were increased significantly (p< 0.05 in patients compared with the control group .TTG and AGA levels were increased significantly (p< 0.05 in patients compared with  the control group. Also, there were  significant abnormality and complication when compared with control groups. So there was significant correlation between celiac disease and infertility and there is some effect on baby of women with celiac disease

  16. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II β-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this β-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP β-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP β-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP α-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DPα-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP α- and β-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion

  17. CT-guided celiac plexus block with absolute alcohol : the anterior approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Mi Suk; Jang, Young Ik; Kim, Jeong Hoi; Ym, Seong Hee; Lee, Jin Hee; Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided celiac plexus block (CPB) using an anterior approach, and to determine the role of CT in this procedure. CPB was attempted in 15 patients(10 men and 5 women;mean age, 62.3 years) with intractable upper abdominal pain due to terminal malignancy of the pancreas, liver, bowel,and kidney. To permit an anterior approach, patients lied supine on the CT scan table during the procedure. One or two 21-guage needles were placed just anterior to the diaphragmatic crus at or between the levels of the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries and 10-40ml of 99.9% alcohol was injected. Pain relief following the procedure was assessed and pain was graded on a visual analogue scale (VAS) from 0 to 10. There were no technical failures and no neurologic or hemorrhagic complications. Abdominal pain during alcohol injection occurred in all patients, and transient hypotension in three. One patient with recurrent cancer of the pancreatic head died of sepsis five days after the procedure;the cause of sepsis was difficult to determine, but there was thought to be a biliary source of infection. Two days after block, 13 of 15 procedures(86.7%) had produced at least partial pain relief;in 12 patients, relief was good. With CT guidance, more directed positioning of the needle is possible, allowing alcohol to be deposited in specific ganglion areas. CT-guided celiac plexus block using an anterior approach was an easy and effective way of reducing intractable upper abdominal pain due to terminal malignancies. CT guidance allowed precise needle placement and a safer procedure

  18. Enfermedad celiaca asociada a síndrome antifosfolípido Celiac disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome

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    O. Jorge

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la enfermedad celiaca puede asociarse a patologías de etiología inmunológica. Presentamos su asociación con síndrome antifosfolípido. Caso 1: mujer, 26 años, diagnosticada de enfermedad celiaca. Seis meses después queda embarazada, presentando muerte fetal. Al año siguiente nuevo embarazo. Anticuerpos anticardiolipina IgG: 20 GPL U/ml (valor normal Introduction: celiac disease may be associated with pathologies of immune etiology. We present its association with antiphospholipid syndrome. Case 1: a 26-year-old female was diagnosed with celiac disease. Six months later she became pregnant, and experienced fetal death. The following year she became pregnant again. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies: 20 GPL U/ml (normal value < 11, and IgM anticardiolipin antibodies: 9 MPL U/ml (n. v. < 10. Hematological tests were otherwise uneventful. Medicated with acetylsalicylic acid she had a normal pregnancy. Case 2: a 48-year-old female diagnosed with celiac disease presented with thrombosis in her left lower limb and renal infarction. Hematological tests showed no prothrombotic alterations (antiphospholipid antibodies were not measured. A year and a half later she had thrombosis in a finger of her hand. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies: 10 GPL (n. v. < 13, and IgM anticardiolipin antibodies: 35 MPL (n. v. < 12. Case 3: a 38-year-old female was diagnosed with celiac disease. Some time later she experienced two spontaneous abortions and a transient ischemic cerebral attack. Nowadays, she is in her sixth month of pregnancy. IgM anticardiolipin antibodies: 75 MPL/ml (n. v. up to 20, and IgG anticardiolipin antibodies within normal values. Hematological tests revealed no other prothrombotic alterations. Discussion: antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, and spontaneous fetal death. Its association with celiac disease has been described in few cases. Celiac disease is associated with spontaneous fetal

  19. Conservative treatment of spontaneous and isolated dissection of mesenteric arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Philippe; Ouaïssi, Mehdi; Cohen, Serge; Piquet, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Isolated and spontaneous dissection of mesenteric arteries is a rare entity; a little more than 50 cases have been reported in medical literature. There is no therapeutic consensus concerning this type of lesion. In this study, we report the results of our treatment based on a conservative approach. This retrospective study concerns eight patients with dissection of the celiac trunk and/or of the upper mesenteric artery (UMA) who were treated between 2002 and 2006. Because these patients were not presenting with acute intestinal ischemia diagnosed by clinical examination or paraclinical tests (medical imaging/biology) or with vital complications, they were treated with an efficient anticoagulation (heparin followed by anti-vitamin K) for 3 to 6 months. Endovascular or surgical treatment was used as the first option in patients with obvious intestinal ischemia or likely to have an arterial rupture, and also when medical treatment had failed. Clinical and radiological follow-up was at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year and then every year. Seven men and one woman (mean age, 48.2; age range, 38-53 years) were treated. Six patients presented with isolated dissection (celiac trunk=4, UMA=2). One patient had a celiac trunk and a UMA dissection and one had a celiac trunk and a UMA dissection along with a dissection of his two renal arteries. On entering the hospital, a patient was operated on for mesenteric ischemia related to a stenosis of the upper mesenteric artery (upper aortomesenteric bypass); a covered stent was implanted in the celiac trunk of another patient presenting with a contained rupture. Both patients were successfully treated. Six patients were medically treated. One of them required an aortohepatic bypass to treat an aneurysmal evolution of the celiac trunk revealed by a computed tomography scan obtained 1 month after the symptoms had begun. In one patient, the dissection remained stable on imaging. Four patients were cured, with a mean 20.1-month

  20. A preliminary discussion of angiographic anatomy and variations of rabbit hepatic vessels and catheterization methods of hepatic artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Diaodong; Yang Renjie; Zhang Hongzhi; Sun Hongliang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the normal angiographic anatomy and variations of rabbit hepatic vessels, and explore the optimal method for hepatic artery catheterization. Methods: 30 rabbits were divided into two groups randomly. Modified surgical method and interventional method were used to catheterize hepatic artery respectively, and followed by angiography to demonstrate the normal anatomy and variations of rabbit celiac artery, hepatic artery and portal vein. Results: The route and distribution of rabbit celiac artery and hepatic artery were very different from human's. The commonly seen variation showed the differences in branching bifurcation of hepatic-gastric artery, with the incidence of 13.3%. The rates of successfully hepatic artery catheterization with surgical and interventional methods were 86.6%(13/15) and 80%(12/15) respectively (P>0.05). The surgical method will not be successful, whenever there's variation. Conclusion: The normal anatomy and variation of rabbit celiac artery and hepatic artery are quite different from human's. Both surgical and interventional catheterizations could be rather successful but possessing advantages and disadvantages of each its own. (authors)

  1. Celiac disease in autoimmune cholestatic liver disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Umberto; Rodrigo, Luis; Granito, Alessandro; Petrolini, Nunzio; Muratori, Paolo; Muratori, Luigi; Linares, Antonio; Veronesi, Lorenza; Fuentes, Dolores; Zauli, Daniela; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2002-10-01

    In this study, serological screening for celiac disease (CD) was performed in patients with autoimmune cholestasis to define the prevalence of such an association and to evaluate the impact of gluten withdrawal on liver disease associated with gluten sensitive enteropathy. Immunoglobulin A endomysial, human and guinea pig tissue transglutaminase antibodies, and immunoglobulin A and G gliadin antibodies were sought in 255 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune cholangitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Immunoglobulin A endomysial and human tissue transglutaminase antibodies were positive in nine patients (seven primary biliary cirrhosis, one autoimmune cholangitis, and one primary sclerosing cholangitis), whose duodenal biopsy results showed villous atrophy consistent with CD. Two of these patients had a malabsorption syndrome, and one had iron-deficiency anemia. Clinical and biochemical signs of cholestasis did not improve after gluten withdrawal in the three patients with severe liver disease. A longer follow-up of the six celiac patients with mild liver damage is needed to clarify whether gluten restriction can contribute to slow down the progression of liver disease. The high prevalence of CD (3.5%) in autoimmune cholestasis suggests that serological screening for CD should be routinely performed in such patients by immunoglobulin A endomysial or human tissue transglutaminase antibodies.

  2. Celiac disease and new diseases related to gluten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Ortega, Ana Isabel; Martínez García, Rosa María; Quiles Blanco, María José; Majid Abu Naji, Jamil Abdel; González Iglesias, María José

    2016-07-12

    Celiac disease is the most common chronic intestinal disease. Nowadays it´s known that this is a multisistemic pathology of immune mechanism, triggered by gluten, which occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. It affects approximately 1% of the world population, which is a very high prevalence, affects all age groups and has symptoms both digestive and extra-digestive. Since it is a disease that requires maintaining a gluten-free diet and medical monitoring for life, it is important to know it and establish its diagnosis properly. Along with celiac disease a number of new diseases related to gluten are diagnosed increasingly, including the non celiac gluten sensitivity or wheat allergy. The suffering of celiac disease, or other related diseases, by conditioning diet changes of the affected individual, it may be associated with nutritional imbalances that need to monitor and try to solve. Therefore patients with this problem need special nutritional advice.

  3. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacological, percutaneous celiac plexus blockade is often inefficient in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Lack of efficiency could be due to incomplete denervation of the plexus; however, a method for measuring the completeness of celiac plexus blockade is not yet available. We...... have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... block in 6 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Blood pressure decreased and heart rate increased after the block (P less than 0.025), whereas no significant change was found in hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance nor in the change of these parameters during transition from the supine to standing...

  4. The Development of Hemochromatosis after Treatment for Celiac Sprue

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    Mang Ma

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac sprue is a chronic disease characterized by maldigestion and malabsorption. Whereas many diseases have been reported in association with celiac sprue, hemochromatosis has not. A 62-year-old man with celiac sprue and a history of iron deficiency and osteopenic bone disease who developed hemochromatosis is reported. Liver biopsy showed portal tract fibrosis, early nodule formation and increased hepatic iron storage. The patient developed hemochromatosis with hepatic injury two years after his transferrin saturation became elevated and 10 years after he had been placed on gluten-free diet. Lifelong iron accumulation was prevented by chronic malabsorption of iron but hemochromatosis became manifest when his celiac sprue was treated.

  5. Sensorineural Hearing Loss and Celiac Disease: A Coincidental Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Volta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease (CD can be associated with a variety of extraintestinal manifestations, including neurological diseases. A new neurological correlation has been found between CD and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL.

  6. [History of gluten and its effects on celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, Alejandra; Araya, Magdalena

    2010-10-01

    The global prevalence of celiac disease is of one person per 250 inhabitants. The disease is induced by gluten, a peptide contained in wheat, rye and barley that during small intestinal digestion generates smaller peptides. Some of these are resistant to hydrolysis and cross through the epithelium into the mucosa, inducing a cascade of immune reactions leading to the appearance of the disease in susceptible individuals. Gluten appeared as a consequence of agricultural practices initiated 10000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of southwest Asia. Celiac disease epidemiology is complicated since consumption of gluten differs depending on the origin of populations. Treatment of celiac disease consists of withdrawing gluten from the diet, a task that becomes difficult in the long term. The concept of gluten-free food has changed along time. This article updates the concept of celiac disease, the history of gluten consumption in the world, the characteristics of a gluten free diet and the difficulties to adhere to it.

  7. Assessing of Celiac Disease and Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ontiveros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The publication of papers on the topic of gluten related disorders has substantially increased over the last few years. This has motivated healthcare professionals to pay attention not only to celiac disease and wheat allergy but also to a condition termed nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS. Until now this condition has been diagnosed clinically on the basis of exclusion criteria and clinical response to gluten withdrawal. In addition, recent research in this field has shown that other food components distinct from gluten are implicated in NCGS cases, thereby changing our general understanding of NCGS diagnosis in either individuals on gluten containing diets or those already following a gluten-free diet with no proper diagnostic work-up of celiac disease. With this in mind, the assessment of NCGS will require extensive knowledge of celiac disease manifestations and the laboratory tests commonly performed during diagnosis of celiac disease.

  8. Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What You Need to Know Media ACG Media Journalists access information on digestive health, including the latest ... tolerated by celiac patients,” said Dr. Zevallos. “Median values for all the patients’ blood tests remained within ...

  9. Eating disorders and celiac disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Basak; Ozbey, Nese; Demir, Kadir; Polat, Aslihan; Yager, Joel

    2006-09-01

    Although chronic physical illness may be associated coincidentally with an eating disorder, some clinicians may overlook the possibility that another medical illness may coexist and contribute concurrently to symptoms such as peculiar eating behaviors, restrictive eating, and/or vomiting accompanied by body dissatisfaction. We present a 31-year-old single woman initially diagnosed with an atypical eating disorder. After a gastroenterology consultation prompted by the atypical characteristics of her eating disturbance, the diagnosis of celiac disease was established. Cause-and-effect relationships between anorexia nervosa and celiac disease are unclear, and celiac disease may lead to confusion in the differential diagnosis of anorexia nervosa. Particularly in atypical cases, and in cases where nausea and bloating are prominent complaints, workup for celiac sprue may reveal the presence of this condition. In such instances, patients may achieve additional relief through the implementation of gluten-free diets. Copyright (c) 2006 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Shear stress alterations in the celiac trunk of patients with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device as shown by in-silico and in-vitro flow analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardulla, Francesco; Pasta, Salvatore; D'Acquisto, Leonardo; Sciacca, Sergio; Agnese, Valentina; Vergara, Christian; Quarteroni, Alfio; Clemenza, Francesco; Bellavia, Diego; Pilato, Michele

    2017-08-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) to treat advanced cardiac heart failure is constantly increasing, although this device leads to high risk for gastrointestinal bleeding. Using in-silico flow analysis, we quantified hemodynamic alterations due to continuous-flow LVAD (HeartWare, Inc., Framingham, MA) in the celiac trunk and major branches of the abdominal aorta, and then explored the relationship between wall shear stress (WSS) and celiac trunk orientation. To assess outflow from the aortic branch, a 3-dimensional-printed patient-specific model of the celiac trunk reconstructed from an LVAD-supported patient was used to estimate echocardiographic outflow velocities under continuous-flow conditions, and then to calibrate computational simulations. Moreover, flow pattern and resulting WSS values were computed for 5 patients with LVAD implantation. Peak WSS values were estimated on the 3 branches of the celiac trunk and the LVAD cannula. The mean WSSs demonstrated that the left gastric artery underwent the highest WSS of 9.08 ± 5.45 Pa, with an average flow velocity of 0.57 ± 0.25 m/s compared with that of other vessel districts. The common hepatic artery had a less critical WSS of 4.58 ± 1.77 Pa. A positive correlation was found between the celiac trunk angulation and the WSS stress just distal to the ostium of the celiac trunk (R = 0.9), which may increase vulnerability of this vessel to bleeding. Although further studies are needed to confirm these findings in a larger patient cohort, computational flow simulations may enhance the information of clinical image data and may have an application in clinical investigations of hemodynamic changes in LVAD-supported patients. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mode of delivery is not associated with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dydensborg Sander, Stine; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Størdal, Ketil; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Murray, Joseph A; Husby, Steffen

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between mode of delivery and the risk of celiac disease in two large population-based birth cohorts with different prevalence of diagnosed celiac disease. This is an observational register-based cohort study using two independent population cohorts. We used data from administrative registers and health administrative registers from Denmark and Norway and linked the data at the individual level. We included all children who were born in Denmark from January 1, 1995 to December 31, 2010 and all children who were born in Norway from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2012. We included 1,051,028 children from Denmark. Cesarean sections were registered for 196,512 children (18.9%). Diagnosed celiac disease was registered for 1,395 children (0.13%). We included 537,457 children from Norway. Cesarean sections were registered for 90,128 children (16.8%). Diagnosed celiac disease was registered for 1,919 children (0.35%). We found no association between the mode of delivery and the risk of diagnosed celiac disease. The adjusted odds ratio for celiac disease for children delivered by any type of cesarean section compared to vaginal delivery was 1.11 (95% CI: 0.96-1.29) in the Danish cohort and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.84-1.09) in the Norwegian cohort. The adjusted odds ratio for celiac disease for children delivered by elective cesarean section compared to vaginal delivery was 1.20 (95% CI: 1.00-1.43) in the Danish cohort and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.79-1.17) in the Norwegian cohort. In this large registry-based study, mode of delivery was not associated with an increased risk of diagnosed celiac disease.

  12. Novel Insights to Celiac Disease: A review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Pourtalebi-Firoozabadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a chronic, systemic and autoimmune disorder of gastrointestinal track that involves approximately 1% of individuals of all ages throughout the world. The collaboration of environmental factor such as gluten proteins and genetic factors, notably HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 trigger the disease. Gluten-free diet is the simply and merely safe and proficient existing treatment. This article summarizes the latest trends in celiac disease.

  13. Dental and Oral Considerations in Pediatric Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Sara; Karlin, Ellen; Meiller, Timothy; Bashirelahi, Nasir

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is the world's most common genetic food intolerance disorder. Children with celiac disease cannot tolerate gluten, a storage protein in wheat, rye, and barley. The first recognizable symptom in children is often an oral manifestation, rather than the typical gastrointestinal symptoms. The purpose of this paper is to review the oral and dental manifestations of CD to help pediatric dentists identify and refer atypically symptomatic patients to their pediatricians.

  14. Do celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity have the same effects on reproductive disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieczyńska, Joanna

    2018-04-01

    The wide spectrum of clinical symptoms of celiac disease (CD) is partly due to the malnourished state caused by the malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients. It has been suggested that fertility problems and obstetric complications may be a consequence of the endocrine disorders caused by selective nutrient deficiencies. The same selective nutrient deficiencies as in CD could be a reason for fertility problems in non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nutrient deficiencies in CD and NCGS on fertility problems. A literature review of fertility problems in men and women and nutrient deficiencies associated with CD and NCGS, was performed up to May 2017. The same selective nutrient deficiencies (folate, iron, vitamin B 12 , and vitamin D) in CD and NCGS could be a reason for fertility problems. CD is postulated to be considered in the preconceptional screening of patients with reproductive disorders, but for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, the effect on fertility is not yet proven. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Celiac Disease in Oman: A Tertiary Centre Experience

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    Tawfiq Taki Al-Lawati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the frequency of encounter of celiac disease in Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman.Methods: Retrospective study of records of all adult and pediatric patients in Royal Hospital from the period of 1/4/2006 to 31/3/2012. Data regarding symptoms, anthropometry of the patients, haemoglobuin levels, liver and thyroid functions were retrieved. Diagnosis of celiac disease was established based on combination of serological detection of anti tissues transglutaminase (tTG or anti endomysial antibodies (EMA with duodenal biopsy.Results: Only 9 children were identified in the hospital during the period of study. Two children were identified by screening protocol for Insulin Dependent Diabetes Melitus (IDDM and one child from short stature workup. Six children presented with abdominal pain and diarrhea. Four children were severely wasted and stunted. No adult patients were identified with celiac disease. Anaemia was noted in 3 children and none had deranged thyroid functions.Conclusion: Celiac disease is infrequently encountered in Royal Hospital and might be under diagnosed. The low rate of celiac disease in children with IDDM might indicate a different genetic composition. Awareness about celiac disease and family screening should be implemented in Oman.

  16. Small bowel ultrasound in patients with celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartusek, D. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: dbartusek@fnbrno.cz; Valek, V. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: v.valek@fnbrno.cz; Husty, J. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: jhusty@fnbrno.cz; Uteseny, J. [Department of Pediatric Internal Medicine, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: juteseny@fnbrno.cz

    2007-08-15

    Objective: Celiac disease (CD) is a common, lifelong disease with small bowel malabsorption based on genetically conditioned gluten intolerance. The clinical manifestation could be very heterogeneous. The proof of celiac disease is now based mainly on clinical and laboratory (antibodies and enterobiopsy) signs, which are in some cases problematic and inconvenient. Materials and methods: In our study we have examined 250 patients with suspection or with proven celiac disease and we evaluated specific ultrasound small bowel changes in this group. In the next step, we chose 59 patients with laboratory proved celiac disease and we statistically compared ultrasound, other laboratory and clinical findings in different forms and stages of the disease. Results: Specific small bowel pathologies in patients with celiac disease (like changes of intestinal villi in different parts of small bowel, abnormal peristalsis and mesenterial lymphadenopathy) can be well visualized by ultrasound and in combination with clinical and laboratory signs ultrasound examination could have an important role in screening, determination of diagnosis and monitoring of patients with different forms of celiac disease.

  17. Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adults with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Passananti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact social activities and emotional state. Aim was to investigate the prevalence of altered eating behaviour in celiac patients. Methods. Celiac patients and controls completed a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2, Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, and Symptom Check List (SCL-90. Results. One hundred celiac adults and 100 controls were not statistically different for gender, age, and physical activity. STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, Somatization, Interpersonal, Sensitivity, and Anxiety scores of the SLC-90 were higher in CD patients than controls. EDI-2 was different in pulse thinness, social insecurity, perfectionism, inadequacy, ascetisms, and interpersonal diffidence between CD and HC women, whilst only in interceptive awareness between CD and HC men. A higher EAT-26 score was associated with the CD group dependently with gastrointestinal symptoms. The EAT26 demonstrated association between indices of diet-related disorders in both CD and the feminine gender after controlling for anxiety and depression. Conclusion. CD itself and not gastrointestinal related symptoms or psychological factors may contribute pathological eating behavior in celiac adults. Eating disorders appear to be more frequent in young celiac women than in CD men and in HC.

  18. Psychological dimensions of celiac disease: toward an integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciacci, Carolina; Iavarone, Alessandro; Siniscalchi, Monica; Romano, Rita; De Rosa, Antonio

    2002-09-01

    Psychic alterations have been reported in celiac disease. Our aim was to evaluate the emotional impact of celiac disease diagnosis in adulthood, the patient/doctor relationship, and the patients' cooperation with disease treatment and diet. The patients were 114 adult celiac patients on a gluten-free diet, there were 25 untreated celiac patients. Self-administered questionnaires aimed to evaluate the patients' level of knowledge of disease, the emotional impact at diagnosis, and feelings during follow-up. Celiac patients showed good knowledge of the disease, directly correlated to their socioeconomic level (P = 0.011). At diagnosis, relief was most intense feeling (Mean +/- SD, 10.82 +/- 7.63), demographics, time latency of diagnosis, and the duration of the disease had no effect on the intensity of all feelings. The scores of the self-rated emotions were entered into a principal component analysis that generated three factors: 1 (fear, anger, anxiety and sadness), 2 (reassurance and resignation), and 3 (relief); patients judged the clinicians presenting the disease "in the right way" (F = 33.279; P anger was the predominant emotion that induced patients to transgress. A positive correlation was observed between feeling different and the sadness, anger, fear (P Anger was inversely correlated with actual compliance to diet (P = 0.0005). In conclusion, in adult patients, adaptive and psychological aspects must be taken into account to understand the celiac patient and for better clinical management.

  19. PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE IN CHILDREN WITH EPILEPSY

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    Camilo VIEIRA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Neurological symptoms have been well-documented in patients with celiac disease, nevertheless, the presumption of a greater prevalence of epilepsy in celiac patients remains controversial. Objectives To determine the frequency of celiac disease in children and adolescents with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy. Methods A cross-sectional study. One hundred pediatric patients with non-symptomatic epilepsy were followed-up at two public pediatric neurology clinics in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Screening for celiac disease was performed by serial measurements of IgA anti-transglutaminase and IgA anti-endomysium antibodies, followed by bowel biopsy in positive cases. HLA DQ02 and DQ08 were investigated in seropositive individuals, assessing the type of seizures, the number of antiepileptic drugs used and the presence gastrointestinal symptoms. Results Three (3.0% patients tested anti-tTG-positive, two with normal duodenal mucosa (Marsh 0 and one with intraepithelial infiltrate (Marsh I. No villous atrophy of the duodenal mucosa (Marsh III celiac disease was found. Two patients tested positive for HLA DQ02; none were DQ08 positive. Conclusion The present study failed to prove the association between celiac disease and epilepsy.

  20. Clinical presentation of adult celiac disease in Western Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qari, Faiza A

    2002-12-01

    To study the clinical presentation of adult celiac disease. A retrospective study of adult patients who were diagnosed with celiac disease based on findings of small intestinal biopsy, response to gluten free diet and exclusion of other causes of malabsorption or vitamin deficiency over a period of 5 years from 1998-2002. The study was carried out at the King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Sixteen patients were diagnosed with celiac disease. Osteomalacia and iron deficiency anemia were common clinical presentations. Diarrhea, malabsorption associated with growth failure was observed in 3 patients with a mean age of 14.5 years. Celiac disease associated with other autoimmune diseases was reported in 6 patients. Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in 3 patients, Hashimoto's hypothyroidism in 2 patients and dermatitis herpetiformis in one patient. No malignancy was observed during the follow-up of our patients. There was a good clinical and biochemical response to gluten free diet in 12 cases. Osteomalacia and iron deficiency anemia were common clinical presentations of celiac disease. Hence, the presence of either one of them in a female patient should raise the possibility of celiac disease.

  1. Small bowel ultrasound in patients with celiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartusek, D.; Valek, V.; Husty, J.; Uteseny, J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Celiac disease (CD) is a common, lifelong disease with small bowel malabsorption based on genetically conditioned gluten intolerance. The clinical manifestation could be very heterogeneous. The proof of celiac disease is now based mainly on clinical and laboratory (antibodies and enterobiopsy) signs, which are in some cases problematic and inconvenient. Materials and methods: In our study we have examined 250 patients with suspection or with proven celiac disease and we evaluated specific ultrasound small bowel changes in this group. In the next step, we chose 59 patients with laboratory proved celiac disease and we statistically compared ultrasound, other laboratory and clinical findings in different forms and stages of the disease. Results: Specific small bowel pathologies in patients with celiac disease (like changes of intestinal villi in different parts of small bowel, abnormal peristalsis and mesenterial lymphadenopathy) can be well visualized by ultrasound and in combination with clinical and laboratory signs ultrasound examination could have an important role in screening, determination of diagnosis and monitoring of patients with different forms of celiac disease

  2. Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Children With Potential Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repo, Marleena; Lindfors, Katri; Mäki, Markku; Huhtala, Heini; Laurila, Kaija; Lähdeaho, Marja-Leena; Saavalainen, Päivi; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle

    2017-01-01

    Active screening for celiac disease frequently detects seropositive children with normal villous morphology (potential celiac disease). It remains unclear whether these subjects should be treated. We here investigated the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in children with potential and mucosal atrophy celiac disease. The prospective study involved 19 children with potential disease, 67 with partial or subtotal villous atrophy (P/SVA), and 16 with total villous atrophy (TVA). Twenty-three healthy children comprised the control group. The groups were compared for various clinical, histological, and laboratory parameters and hepcidin. The prevalence of abnormal parameters was as follows (controls, potential celiac disease, P/SVA, and TVA, respectively): anemia 0%, 15%, 22%, and 63%; low iron 5%, 0%, 14%, and 50%; increased transferrin receptor 1 5%, 16%, 20%, and 47%; low ferritin 0%, 21%, 35%, and 87%; and low transferrin saturation 10%, 11%, 41%, and 71%. One subject had low folate and none had low vitamin B12. The median values for hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and transferrin saturation were significantly lower and transferrin receptor 1 values higher in TVA group compared with other groups. After a median of 7 months on a gluten-free diet hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and albumin in children with P/SVA exceeded the baseline values in the potential celiac disease group. The development of anemia and iron deficiency in celiac disease is a continuum and may already be present in children with normal villous morphology, advocating an early diagnosis and possible dietary treatment of these patients.

  3. A New Technique for Superselective Catheterization of Arteries: Preshaping of a Micro-Guide Wire into a Shepherd's Hook Form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jee Hyun; Chung; Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Lee, Whal; Park, Jae Hyung

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to introduce a new technique for superselective catheterization of arteries with preshaping of a micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook form, and this is useful for superselection of small arteries branching at an acute angle from a large parent artery for the treatment of tumors and hemorrhages. We developed a superselective catheterization technique by using preshaping of a micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook form. We encountered six patients in our practice for whom we failed to catheterize the small tumor-feeding arteries that branched at an acute angle from wide parent arteries during chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma; the parent arteries were the right inferior phrenic artery (n = 4) and the left gastric artery (n = 1) from the celiac axis with celiac stenosis due to compression by the median arcuate ligament and the proper hepatic artery from the gastroduodenal artery (n = 1) in a patient who had celiac axis occlusion with collateral circulation via the pancreaticoduodenal arcade from the superior mesenteric artery. In these consecutive six patients, we tested the usefulness of this new technique with employing preshaping of a micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook form for superselective catheterization of targeted vessels. The target arteries were successfully catheterized and satisfactory transcatheter arterial chemoembolization was performed in all six patients. There were no significant complications such as arterial dissection. We developed a technique that is effective for superselection of vessels with preshaping of micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook hook form, and we successfully applied it during chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma. This technique can be useful for superselection of small arteries that branch from a large parent artery at acute angles for the treatment of tumors and hemorrhages

  4. Celiac disease in siblings with Pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köklü, Seyfettin; Alioğlu, Bülent; Akbal, Erdem; Koçak, Erdem

    2010-04-01

    Pearson syndrome (PS) is a rare mitochondrial disorder characterized by sideroblastic anemia and exocrine pancreas deficiency as a result of mitochondrial DNA deletion or deletion-duplication. A 21-year-old woman and 11-year-old brother who had been diagnosed as PS at the age of 18 and 8, respectively, were admitted to our hospital with the complaints of chronic diarrhea while using exogenous pancreas enzymes. Diarrhea was present in both for a long time and attributed to existing PS. Endoscopic and laboratory examinations revealed celiac disease (CD). After gluten-free diet, their symptoms were resolved. Detailed family investigation revealed that parents and the sister of the siblings were free of both PS and CD. To our knowledge, there has been no previous report of the presence of these 2 disorders, PS and CD, in the same patient. CD should be screened and treated appropriately in cases with PS.

  5. Celiac Disease and Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Runa D; Zawahir, Shamila

    2017-06-01

    Gluten-related disorders include celiac disease (CD), wheat allergy, and nonceliac gluten sensitivity. CD is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by damage to small intestinal mucosa when gluten is ingested in genetically susceptible individuals. Currently, the only available treatment of CD is gluten-free diet. Several potential treatments are being researched. Wheat allergy is a hypersensitivity reaction caused by IgE-mediated and/or non-IgE-mediated immune response, and can involve the gastrointestinal tract, skin, or respiratory tract. Nonceliac gluten sensitivity is one of a variety of immunologic, morphologic, or symptomatic manifestations precipitated by ingestion of gluten in individuals in whom CD and wheat allergy are excluded. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Current and emerging therapy for celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind K Makharia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAt present, strict and lifelong gluten free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50mg/day can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of compliance by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase-2, immune-modulation and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoides, budesonides and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appears very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten free diet.

  7. Current and emerging therapy for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharia, Govind K

    2014-01-01

    At present, strict and lifelong gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50 mg/day) can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten-free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of adherence to GFD by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase 2, immune-modulation, and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoids, budesonides) and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appear very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten-free diet.

  8. Celiac Disease Is Associated with Childhood Psychiatric Disorders: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butwicka, Agnieszka; Lichtenstein, Paul; Frisén, Louise; Almqvist, Catarina; Larsson, Henrik; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-05-01

    To determine the risk of future childhood psychiatric disorders in celiac disease, assess the association between previous psychiatric disorders and celiac disease in children, and investigate the risk of childhood psychiatric disorders in siblings of celiac disease probands. This was a nationwide registry-based matched cohort study in Sweden with 10 903 children (aged celiac disease and 12 710 of their siblings. We assessed the risk of childhood psychiatric disorders (any psychiatric disorder, psychotic disorder, mood disorder, anxiety disorder, eating disorder, psychoactive substance misuse, behavioral disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD], autism spectrum disorder [ASD], and intellectual disability). HRs of future psychiatric disorders in children with celiac disease and their siblings was estimated by Cox regression. The association between previous diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder and current celiac disease was assessed using logistic regression. Compared with the general population, children with celiac disease had a 1.4-fold greater risk of future psychiatric disorders. Childhood celiac disease was identified as a risk factor for mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, behavioral disorders, ADHD, ASD, and intellectual disability. In addition, a previous diagnosis of a mood, eating, or behavioral disorder was more common before the diagnosis of celiac disease. In contrast, siblings of celiac disease probands were at no increased risk of any of the investigated psychiatric disorders. Children with celiac disease are at increased risk for most psychiatric disorders, apparently owing to the biological and/or psychological effects of celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A major non-HLA locus in celiac disease maps to chromosome 19.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, van MJ; Meijer, JW; Sandkuijl, L.A.; Bardoel, A.F.; Mulder, C.J.J.; Pearson, PL; Houwen, RH; Wijmenga, C.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The pathogenesis of celiac disease is still unknown despite its well-known association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and DQ8. It is clear that non-HLA genes contribute to celiac disease development as well, but none of the previous genome-wide screens in celiac disease

  10. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Children with Autoimmune Hepatitis and vice versa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Mehri; Sadjadei, Nooshin; Eftekhari, Kambiz; Khodadad, Ahmad; Motamed, Farzaneh; Fallahi, Gholam-Hossain; Farahmand, Fatemeh

    2014-12-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which the risk of autoimmune liver disease is high. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic and progressive entity and the risk of its being associated with other autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease is high also. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and vice versa. In a cross-sectional study children with autoimmune hepatitis underwent serological screening and endoscopy for celiac disease. In patients with celiac disease, serum aminotransferases were measured and, if abnormal, autoantibodies related to autoimmune hepatitis were checked and needle liver biopsy was performed. Of the 96 patients, 64 had autoimmune hepatitis and 32 celiac disease. Among patients with autoimmune hepatitis only three (4.7%) were compatible with celiac disease. In the group of patients with celiac disease, autoimmune hepatitis was confirmed in four (12.5%) cases. We consider important to state that 3.1% of this group had celiac hepatitis. Autoimmune liver disease is sometimes associated with latent celiac disease. Serological screening for celiac disease should be routinely done in patients with abnormal serum aminotransferases, particularly those with chronic liver disease. On the other hand, celiac disease is often accompanied by other autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune hepatitis.

  11. Increasing the efficacy of a celiac plexus block in patients with severe pancreatic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; Zuurmond, W. W.; de Lange, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical possibilities of placing a catheter near the celiac plexus for performance of a celiac plexus block, and to study the efficacy of repeated neurolytic celiac plexus blocks with alcohol in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer pain resistant

  12. Thermoablation of Liver Metastases: Efficacy of Temporary Celiac Plexus Block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, A.N.; Schaefer, M.; Werk, M.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Cho, C.; Ricke, J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of celiac plexus block during thermoablation of liver metastases. Methods. Fifty-five consecutive patients underwent thermoablation therapy of liver tumors by laser-induced thermotherapy. Twenty-nine patients received a temporary celiac plexus block, 26 patients acted as control group. In both groups fentanyl and midazolam were administered intravenously upon request of the patient. The duration of the intervention, consumption of opiates, and individual pain sensations were documented. Results. No complications resulting from the celiac plexus block were recorded. Celiac plexus block significantly reduced the amount of pain medication used during thermoablation therapy of liver tumors (with block, 2.45 μg fentanyl per kg body weight; without block, 3.58 μg fentanyl per kg body weight, p < 0.05; midazolam consumption was not reduced) in patients with metastases ≤5 mm from the liver capsule. For metastases farther away from the capsule no significant differences in opiate consumption were seen. Celiac plexus block reduced the time for thermoablation significantly (178 min versus 147 min, p < 0.05) no matter how far the metastases were from the liver capsule. Average time needed to set the block was 12 min (range 9-15 min); additional costs for the block were marginal. As expected (as pain medications were given according to individual patients' needs) pain indices did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion. In patients with liver metastases ≤5 mm from the liver capsule, celiac plexus block reduces the amount of opiates necessary, simplifying patient monitoring. In addition celiac plexus block reduces intervention time, with positive effects on overall workflow for all patients

  13. Celiac disease: the situation on the Slovak market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudmila Nagyová

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue, non‐tropical sprue, idiopathic sprue, idiopathic steatorrhoea and gluten‐sensitive enteropathy, is a serious genetic autoimmune disease, which damages the villi of the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. The latest researches show that while in the 1970s the prevalence of celiac disease in the world was 0.03%, in the present years the estimated prevalence is 1%. In average, the prevalence of celiac disease in the Western countries is close to 1:100. The celiac disease occurs more often in the case of women than of men, at a ratio of 2.8:1. The aim of the present paper was to bring few information about the celiac disease, highlight the increasing number of celiacs, as well as to determine the Slovak celiacs opinion about the situation on Slovak market and their consumer behaviour on the market of gluten free products. As research methods, there have been used the methods of survey and structured questionnaire consisting of 22 questions. The total number of respondents was 130 randomly selected celiacs from all over the Slovak republic. For a deeper analysis of the obtained results, there have been set out four assumptions and ten hypotheses, which have been tested with the use of Pearson´s chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-Test and Cramer´s contingency coefficient. The results of the present paper show, that despite the fact that few of our findings are pleasing - almost 52% of our respondents stay that the labelling of gluten free products is sufficient, over 74% of respondents think that they have enough information about the availability of gluten free products and more than 89% of respondents think that the present scope of range of gluten free products is better as before; there are still some shortcomings, which has to be reduced or eliminated - only less than 7% of respondents think that the price of gluten free products is adequate, over 45% of respondents

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Totally Occluded Superior Mesenteric Artery by Retrograde Crossing via the Villemin Arcade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G., E-mail: urossi76@hotmail.com; Seitun, Sara; Bovio, Giulio [IRCCS San Martino University Hospital-IST-National Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (Italy); Fornaro, Rosario [IRCCS San Martino University Hospital-IST-National Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Surgery (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a rare disorder that is commonly caused by progressive atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of one or more mesenteric arteries. Endovascular treatment for symptomatic CMI represents a viable option, especially in high-operative risk patients. We report a case of acute symptomatic CMI with chronic totally occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) associated with significant stenosis of celiac trunk (CT) and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) that underwent endovascular treatment of all the three mesenteric arteries: stenting of CT and IMA stenosis, and recanalization of the SMA occlusion by retrograde crossing via the Villemin arcade.

  15. Endovascular Treatment of Totally Occluded Superior Mesenteric Artery by Retrograde Crossing via the Villemin Arcade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G.; Seitun, Sara; Bovio, Giulio; Fornaro, Rosario

    2013-01-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a rare disorder that is commonly caused by progressive atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of one or more mesenteric arteries. Endovascular treatment for symptomatic CMI represents a viable option, especially in high-operative risk patients. We report a case of acute symptomatic CMI with chronic totally occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) associated with significant stenosis of celiac trunk (CT) and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) that underwent endovascular treatment of all the three mesenteric arteries: stenting of CT and IMA stenosis, and recanalization of the SMA occlusion by retrograde crossing via the Villemin arcade.

  16. Review Article: Celiac Disease, New Approaches to Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashtak, Shahrooz; Murray, Joseph A

    2014-01-01

    STRUCTURED SUMMARY Background Celiac disease is managed by life-long gluten withdrawal from the diet. However strict adherence to a gluten-free diet is difficult and is not always effective. Novel therapeutic approaches are needed to supplement or even replace the dietary treatment. Aims To review recent advances in new therapeutic options for celiac disease. Methods A literature search was performed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, Scopus, DDW.org and ClinicalTrial.gov for English articles and abstracts. The search terms used include but not limited to “Celiac disease”, “new”, “novel”, Advances”, “alternatives” and “Drug therapy”. The cited articles were selected based on the relevancy to the review objective. Results Several new therapeutic approaches for celiac disease are currently under development by targeting its underlying pathogenesis. Alternative therapies range from reproduction of harmless wheat strains to immunomodulatory approaches. Some of these therapies such as enzymatic cleavage of gluten and permeability inhibitors have shown promise in clinical studies. Conclusion Gluten-free diet is still the only practical treatment for patients with celiac disease. Novel strategies provide promise of alternative adjunctive approaches to diet restriction alone for patients with this disorder. PMID:22324389

  17. Association of PTPN22 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms with Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatounian, Majid; Rezaei, Arezou; Sadr, Maryam; Saghazadeh, Amene; Elhamian, Nazanin; Sadeghi, Hengameh; Motevasselian, Fatemeh; Farahmand, Fatemeh; Fallahi, Gholamhossein; Motamed, Farzaneh; Najafi, Mehri; Rezaei, Nima

    2017-06-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic autoimmune disease in which gene-environment interactions cause the immune system to unfavorably react to naturally gluten-containing foods. PTPN22 plays a crucial role in regulating the function of various cells of the immune system, particularly T cells. Polymorphisms of the PTPN22 gene have been associated with many autoimmune diseases. The present genetic association study was conducted to investigate the possible associations between PTPNTT single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and celiac disease in an Iranian population. The study population consisted of 45 patients with celiac disease and 93 healthy controls. The study genotyped five SNPs of the PTPN22 gene: rs12760457, rs1310182, rs1217414, rs33996649, and rs2476601. Control and patient groups did not differ on the genotype distribution of four of five investigated SNPs in the PTPN22 gene, for example, rs12760457, rs2476601, rs1217414, and rs33996649. The only investigated PTPN22 variant, which could be associated with CD, was rs1310182. A significant increase in the carriage of the T allele of rs1310182 in CD patients was observed (OR (95% CI) = 11.42 (5.41, 24.1), p value celiac disease. Our study suggests that the rs1310182 SNP of PTPN22 gene may be a predisposing factor of celiac disease in the Iranian population. Further studies are required to investigate the issue in other racial and ethnic subgroups.

  18. Sarcoidosis, Celiac Disease and Deep Venous Thrombosis: a Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Çelik

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology and it may rarely be associated with a second disorder. Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy characterized with malabsorption caused by gluten intolerance, and several reports indicate an association between celiac disease and sarcoidosis. In addition, although celiac disease is associated with several extraintestinal pathologies, venous thrombosis has been rarely reported. Herein we present a rare case report of a patient with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis, celiac disease and deep venous thrombosis because of the rare association of these disorders. The patient was admitted with abdominal pain, weight loss, chronic diarrhea and a 5-day history of swelling in her right leg. A diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis was achieved by doppler ultrasonographic examination. The diagnosis of celiac disease was made by biopsy of duodenal mucosa and supported with elevated serum level of anti-gliadin IgA and IgG, and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was achieved by transbronchial needle aspiration from the subcarinal lymph node during flexible bronchoscopy.

  19. Chronic Urticaria: A Cutaneous Manifestation of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Haussmann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is an immune-mediated disease of the small bowel that results in malabsorption. It classically presents with gastrointestinal symptoms including chronic diarrhea, weight loss, abdominal bloating and anorexia. It is becoming more frequently identified in asymptomatic patients with a diagnosis of deficiencies related to malabsorption of iron, folic acid, vitamin B12 and vitamin D. It is increasingly identified as a cause for early or refractory osteoporosis. Occasionally, celiac disease presents with cutaneous manifestations alone. Dermatitis herpetiformis is a well-recognized cutaneous manifestation of celiac disease. Other cutaneous manifestations include alopecia, angular stomatitis and aphthous ulcerations. Described here is a case of a 24-year-old woman who presented with intermittent urticaria and gastrointestinal complaints. She was found to have celiac disease on small-bowel biopsy. Both her gastrointestinal symptoms and urticaria resolved when she was put on a gluten-free diet, suggesting that her urticaria was a cutaneous manifestation of celiac disease.

  20. HLA-G and susceptibility to develop celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catamo, Eulalia; Zupin, Luisa; Segat, Ludovica; Celsi, Fulvio; Crovella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen-G has immunomodulatory function and its expression has been associated with several diseases. In our study we analyzed HLA-G polymorphisms in order to evaluate their possible association with susceptibility to celiac disease development. A total of 420 celiac patients and 509 controls were genotyped for HLA-G polymorphisms. We sequenced 800bp upstream the ATG codon (5' upstream regulatory region) and the whole 3' untranslated region of the HLA-G gene, whereas the ΔC deletion at exon 3 was detected by RFLP-PCR. Five polymorphisms (namely -477 C>G, -369 C>A, 14bp del/ins, 3187 A>G, 3196 C>G) and one haplotype (TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG) were significantly more frequent in celiac patients than controls and associated with increased disease susceptibility. The 14bp I/I, 3187 G/G, 3196 G/G genotypes and TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG haplotype, were still significantly associated with increased disease susceptibility (and in addition also the 3003 C/C genotype) when the analysis was restricted to patients and controls presenting the DQ2.5 or DQ8 HLA-DQ celiac disease risk haplotypes. Our findings indicate an association between HLA-G gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to celiac disease development, suggesting that HLA-G molecule is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Celiac disease diagnosed after uncomplicated pregnancy in a patient with history of bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisavljević, Nemanja; Cvetković, Mirjana; Nikolić, Goran; Filipović, Branka; Milinić, Nikola

    2013-01-01

    The association between celiac disease and eating disorders has been very rarely reported. This is the first report on celiac disease associated with bulimia in this part of Europe. An adult female patient with history of bulimia and one uncomplicated pregnancy was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department, due to long lasting dyspeptic symptoms, constipation, major weight loss and fatigue. After positive serological screening, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed with histopathology examination of duodenal biopsy specimen. Complicated interactions between celiac disease and bulimia can make them difficult to diagnose and treat. It is important to consider the presence of celiac disease in patients with bulimia and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  2. Clinical characteristics in children with celiac disease: a single center results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Haldun Emiroglu

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: The age of gluten introduction to the diet is important to the risk of developing celiac disease. Breast-feeding at the time of gluten introduction may reduce the risk of developing celiac disease. Growth retardation and chronic diarrhea are classic findings suggestive of celiac disease. However, it should be remembered that the patients with celiac disease may also be exposed to overweight, obese, constipation, or various other findings. When the gluten-free diet is followed, all symptoms associated with celiac disease are resolved. The treatment of the disease is a lifelong gluten-free diet. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(4.000: 333-339

  3. Presenting Pattern of Pediatric Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Maan; Baker, Robert D; Ly, Erin K; Kozielski, Rafal; Baker, Susan S

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease that can be complicated by impaired nutrition and growth. With the development of sensitive serologic tests, safe endoscopy, and efforts to educate primary care physicians, more children are diagnosed as having CD. The aim of this study is to evaluate the pattern of the presentation of pediatric CD in western New York. Chart review of pediatric patients with CD was undertaken. Patients' demographics, presenting features, disaccharidase assay (DA), celiac serology, and Marsh score were reviewed from patients seen at the Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Center, State University of New York at Buffalo from January 2003 through March 2013. A total of 165 patients with CD were evaluated. Mean age was 10.7 ± 4.3 years, 76 male patients. The presenting features were abdominal pain (n = 87, 52.7%), constipation (n = 65, 38.9%), diarrhea (n = 52, 31.1%), family history of first-degree relative (n = 47, 28.1%), diabetes mellitus type 1 (n = 37, 22.2%), failure to thrive (n = 36, 21.8%), reflux (n = 25, 15.1%), vomiting (n = 24, 14.5%), fatigue (n = 15, 9%), short stature (n = 9, 5.4%), thyroid disease (n = 9, 5.4%), Down syndrome (n = 8, 4.8%). We found no correlation between Marsh score and serum tissue transglutaminase (tTG) immunoglobulin (Ig) A level at diagnosis and no correlation between DA and serum tTG IgA level, presenting feature and tTG IgA level, presenting feature and Marsh score, tTG IgA and DA, or between the age and the presenting feature. Children newly diagnosed as having CD in western New York presented most frequently with abdominal pain and constipation and were older at the time of diagnosis than those described in the classical presentation of CD. We speculate that our patients may have a different long-term natural history and risk factors than originally described for patients with CD.

  4. Celiac disease and obstetric complications: a systematic review and metaanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccone, Gabriele; Berghella, Vincenzo; Sarno, Laura; Maruotti, Giuseppe M; Cetin, Irene; Greco, Luigi; Khashan, Ali S; McCarthy, Fergus; Martinelli, Domenico; Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Pasquale

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this metaanalysis was to evaluate the risk of the development of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease. We searched electronic databases from their inception until February 2015. We included all cohort studies that reported the incidence of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease compared with women without celiac disease (ie, control group). Studies without a control group and case-control studies were excluded. The primary outcome was defined a priori and was the incidence of a composite of obstetric complications that included intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, low birthweight, preeclampsia and preterm birth. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, stillbirth, preeclampsia, small for gestational age, and low birthweight. The review was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015017263) before data extraction. All authors were contacted to obtain the original databases and perform individual participant data metaanalysis. Primary and secondary outcomes were assessed in the aggregate data analysis and in the individual participant data metaanalysis. We included 10 cohort studies (4,844,555 women) in this metaanalysis. Four authors provided the entire databases for the individual participant data analysis. Because none of the included studies stratified data for the primary outcome (ie, composite outcome), the assessment of this outcome for the aggregate analysis was not feasible. Aggregate data analysis showed that, compared with women in the control group, women with celiac disease (both treated and untreated) had a significantly higher risk of the development of preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.66), intrauterine growth restriction (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-4.67), stillbirth (odds ratio, 4.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-21.75), low birthweight (odds ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1

  5. Celiac disease in non-clinical populations of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Mai; Ishimura, Norihisa; Fukuyama, Chika; Izumi, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Nahoko; Araki, Asuka; Oka, Akihiko; Mishiro, Tomoko; Ishihara, Shunji; Maruyama, Riruke; Adachi, Kyoichi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2018-02-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic autoimmune enteropathy caused by gluten ingestion. While its prevalence in Western countries is reported to be as high as 1%, the prevalence has not been evaluated in a large-scale study of a Japanese population. The aim of our study was to clarify the possible presence of celiac disease in a Japanese non-clinical population as well as in patients showing symptoms suggestive of the disease. Serum samples were collected from 2008 non-clinical adults and 47 patients with chronic unexplained abdominal symptoms between April 2014 and June 2016. The anti-tissue transglutaminase (TTG) immunoglobulin A antibody titer was determined as a screening test for celiac disease in all subjects, and individuals with a value of >2 U/mL subsequently underwent testing for the presence of serum endomysial IgA antibody (EMA) as confirmation. Those testing positive for EMA or with a high concentration (>10 U/mL) of TTG were further investigated by histopathological examinations of duodenal mucosal biopsy specimens and HLA typing tests. Of the 2008 non-clinical adults from whom serum samples were collected, 161 tested positive for TTG, and all tested negative for EMA. Four subjects who had a high TTG titer were invited to undergo confirmatory testing, and the histopathological results confirmed the presence of celiac disease in only a single case (0.05%). Of the 47 symptomatic patients, one (2.1%) was found to have a high TTG titer and was diagnosed with celiac disease based on duodenal histopathological findings. The presence of celiac disease in a non-clinical Japanese population was low at 0.05% and was rarely found in patients with unexplained chronic abdominal symptoms.

  6. Celiac disease: is it really possible to overcome duodenal biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Elisabetta; Ferranti, Silvia; Gaggiano, Carla; Di Virgilio, Nicola; Vascotto, Marina

    2016-05-06

    We report the case of a two-year-five-month-old child who underwent screening for celiac disease due to strong familiarity. During the first observation body weight and height were at 25th and 50th centile for gender and age. Physical examination did not reveal any sign of disease. Blood tests showed increased transaminases levels and antibodies research showed: tTG IgA: 100 UI/ml, tTG IgG: 36,6 UI/ml, EMA IgA: positive. HLA study revealed homozygous allelic combination DRB1*07;DQA102:01; DQB1* 02:02 with presence of a double copy of beta chain in the composition of the  DQ2 heterodymer. Biopsy with histological examination did find neither mucosal alteration  nor lymphocytic infiltrates (Marsh 0). During follow up with free diet the patient remained asymptomatic and all antibody titers decreased up to normalization. According to ESPGHAN guidelines the finding of hypertransaminasemia as sign of celiac hepatic inflammation, a more than 10-fold increase of tTG IgA and a high-risk HLA would permit diagnosis of celiac disease but histological examination done due to mismatch between paucity of clinical sings and a "multiple risk combination" excluded it, allowing diagnosis of potential celiac disease.  We believe that this case is interesting because of its being in contrast with current literature data that suggest a linear relationship between antibodies levels and histological damage with tTG IgA at the upper reference range in case of potential celiac disease. According to guidelines we could have avoided intestinal biopsy but we would have considered as celiac a patient who is maybe just potentially affected.

  7. Locally advanced pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma: pancreatectomy with planned arterial resection based on axial arterial encasement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perinel, J; Nappo, G; El Bechwaty, M; Walter, T; Hervieu, V; Valette, P J; Feugier, P; Adham, M

    2016-12-01

    Pancreatectomy with arterial resection for locally advanced pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma (PDA) is associated with high morbidity and is thus considered as a contraindication. The aim of our study was to report our experience of pancreatectomy with planned arterial resection for locally advanced PDA based on specific selection criteria. All patients receiving pancreatectomy for PDA between October 2008 and July 2014 were reviewed. The patients were classified into group 1, pancreatectomy without vascular resection (66 patients); group 2, pancreatectomy with isolated venous resection (31 patients), and group 3, pancreatectomy with arterial resection for locally advanced PDA (14 patients). The primary selection criteria for arterial resection was the possibility of achieving a complete resection based on the extent of axial encasement, the absence of tumor invasion at the origin of celiac trunk (CT) and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and a free distal arterial segment allowing reconstruction. Patient outcomes and survival were analyzed. Six SMA, two CT, four common hepatic artery, and two replaced right hepatic artery resections were undertaken. The preferred arterial reconstruction was splenic artery transposition. Group 3 had a higher preoperative weight loss, a longer operative time, and a higher incidence of intraoperative blood transfusion. Ninety-day mortality occurred in three patients in groups 1 and 2. There were no statistically significant differences in the incidence, grade, and type of complications in the three groups. Postoperative pancreatic fistula and postpancreatectomy hemorrhage were also comparable. In group 3, none had arterial wall invasion and nine patients had recurrence (seven metastatic and two loco-regional). Survival and disease-free survival were comparable between groups. Planned arterial resection for PDA can be performed safely with a good outcome in highly selected patients. Key elements for defining the resectability is based on

  8. Atypical Celiac Disease: From Recognizing to Managing

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    B. Admou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic clinical presentation of celiac disease (CD becomes increasingly common in physician’s daily practice, which requires an awareness of its many clinical faces with atypical, silent, and latent forms. Besides the common genetic background (HLA DQ2/DQ8 of the disease, other non-HLA genes are now notably reported with a probable association to atypical forms. The availability of high-sensitive and specific serologic tests such as antitissue transglutuminase, antiendomysium, and more recent antideamidated, gliadin peptide antibodies permits to efficiently uncover a large portion of the submerged CD iceberg, including individuals having conditions associated with a high risk of developing CD (type 1 diabetes, autoimmune diseases, Down syndrome, family history of CD, etc., biologic abnormalities (iron deficiency anemia, abnormal transaminase levels, etc., and extraintestinal symptoms (short stature, neuropsychiatric disorders, alopecia, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent aphtous stomatitis, etc.. Despite the therapeutic alternatives currently in developing, the strict adherence to a GFD remains the only effective and safe therapy for CD.

  9. HLA Typing and Celiac Disease in Moroccans

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    Daniela Piancatelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and environmental factors are responsible for differences in the prevalence of some diseases across countries. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA allele frequencies in North African populations show some differences in their distribution compared to Europeans, Mediterraneans, and sub-Saharans, and some specific alleles and haplotypes could be clinically relevant. Celiac disease (CD has been fast increasing in prevalence in North Africa; but few immunogenetic data are available for this area, in which a high prevalence of the disease has been described. In this report, we assess and discuss results of HLA class II (HLA-DQA1/DQB1/DRB1 typing in Moroccan patients with CD and compare them with a control population from Morocco—genetically well characterized—and with other North African, Mediterranean, and European populations. The classical HLA-DQ associations were confirmed in Moroccans with CD. The high frequency of DQ2.5 homozygosity (45.2% found in Moroccans with CD was noteworthy as compared with other populations (23%–32%. The genetic risk gradient for CD, identified by previous studies, has been confirmed in Moroccans with some differences, mainly concerning DQ8 genotypes. This study provides the immunogenetic framework of CD in Moroccans and confirms the need to learn more about associations with additional HLA and non-HLA genetic factors.

  10. HLA Typing and Celiac Disease in Moroccans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piancatelli, Daniela; Ben El Barhdadi, Imane; Oumhani, Khadija; Sebastiani, Pierluigi; Colanardi, Alessia; Essaid, Abdellah

    2017-01-06

    Genetic and environmental factors are responsible for differences in the prevalence of some diseases across countries. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies in North African populations show some differences in their distribution compared to Europeans, Mediterraneans, and sub-Saharans, and some specific alleles and haplotypes could be clinically relevant. Celiac disease (CD) has been fast increasing in prevalence in North Africa; but few immunogenetic data are available for this area, in which a high prevalence of the disease has been described. In this report, we assess and discuss results of HLA class II (HLA-DQA1/DQB1/DRB1) typing in Moroccan patients with CD and compare them with a control population from Morocco-genetically well characterized-and with other North African, Mediterranean, and European populations. The classical HLA-DQ associations were confirmed in Moroccans with CD. The high frequency of DQ2.5 homozygosity (45.2%) found in Moroccans with CD was noteworthy as compared with other populations (23%-32%). The genetic risk gradient for CD, identified by previous studies, has been confirmed in Moroccans with some differences, mainly concerning DQ8 genotypes. This study provides the immunogenetic framework of CD in Moroccans and confirms the need to learn more about associations with additional HLA and non-HLA genetic factors.

  11. Celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus

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    Camarca Maria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac Disease (CD occurs in patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D ranging the prevalence of 4.4-11.1% versus 0.5% of the general population. The mechanism of association of these two diseases involves a shared genetic background: HLA genotype DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8 are strongly associated with T1D, DR3-DQ2 with CD. The classical severe presentation of CD rarely occurs in T1D patients, but more often patients have few/mild symptoms of CD or are completely asymptomatic (silent CD. In fact diagnosis of CD is regularly performed by means of the screening in T1D patients. The effects of gluten-free diet (GFD on the growth and T1D metabolic control in CD/T1D patient are controversial. Regarding of the GFD composition, there is a debate on the higher glycaemic index of gluten-free foods respect to gluten-containing foods; furthermore GFD could be poorer of fibers and richer of fat. The adherence to GFD by children with CD-T1D has been reported generally below 50%, lower respect to the 73% of CD patients, a lower compliance being more frequent among asymptomatic patients. The more severe problems of GFD adherence usually occur during adolescence when in GFD non compliant subjects the lowest quality of life is reported. A psychological and educational support should be provided for these patients.

  12. Celiac Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Study

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    Giuseppe Mazzarella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD is mandatory for celiac disease (CD but has poor compliance, justifying novel strategies. We found that wheat flour transamidation inhibited IFN-γ secretion by intestinal T cells from CD patients. Herein, the primary endpoint was to evaluate the ability of transamidated gluten to maintain GFD CD patients in clinical remission. Secondary endpoints were efficacy in prevention of the inflammatory response and safety at the kidney level, where reaction products are metabolized. In a randomized single blinded, controlled 90-day trial, 47 GFD CD patients received 3.7 g/day of gluten from nontransamidated (12 or transamidated (35 flour. On day 15, 75% and 37% of patients in the control and experimental groups, respectively, showed clinical relapse (=0.04 whereas intestinal permeability was mainly altered in the control group (50% versus 20%, =0.06. On day 90, 0 controls and 14 patients in the experimental group completed the challenge with no variation of antitransglutaminase IgA (=0.63, Marsh-Oberhuber grading (=0.08, or intestinal IFN-γ mRNA (>0.05. Creatinine clearance did not vary after 90 days of treatment (=0.46. In conclusion, transamidated gluten reduced the number of clinical relapses in challenged patients with no changes of baseline values for serological/mucosal CD markers and an unaltered kidney function.

  13. Erythema Nodosum in a Child with Celiac Disease

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    Andrew Fretzayas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythema nodosum is an acute, nodular, erythematous eruption usually limited to the extensor aspects of the lower legs. It could be idiopathic or associated with other systemic diseases. We, herein, report a phenotypically healthy, ten-year-old boy who presented with erythema nodosum in whom serological tests of autoimmunity and intestinal histological examination were compatible with celiac disease. The eruption resolved within 2 months following a gluten-free diet. Therefore, the possibility that erythema nodosum represents an extraintestinal manifestation of celiac disease should be kept in mind accordingly in cases where other common causes of this rash are ruled out.

  14. Extension of the celiac intestinal antibody (CIA) pattern through eight antibody assessments in fecal supernatants from patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tola, Marco; Marino, Mariacatia; Casale, Rossella; Di Battista, Valeria; Borghini, Raffaele; Picarelli, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Detection of anti-transglutaminase, anti-endomysium and anti-gliadin antibodies is commonly used to screen celiac disease patients. Besides that in serum, these antibodies are detectable in culture supernatants of oral, duodenal and colonic biopsy samples, saliva, gut lavage fluid samples, and fecal supernatants. Our aim was to extend the intestinal antibody pattern in fecal supernatants from patients with celiac disease. The fecal supernatants obtained from 25 celiac disease patients and 12 healthy volunteers were used to determine IgA and IgG1 anti-endomysium by immunofluorescence analysis, IgA and IgG anti-transglutaminase, IgA and IgG anti-deamidated gliadin peptides, IgA/IgG anti-transglutaminase/deamidated gliadin peptides and IgA anti-actin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IgA anti-endomysium were found in 11 of 25 (44.0%) celiac disease patients and in none of healthy volunteers (p=0.0066). The levels of IgA anti-transglutaminase, IgA anti-deamidated gliadin peptides, IgA/IgG anti-transglutaminase/deamidated gliadin peptides and IgA anti-actin determined in celiac disease patients were significantly higher (p=0.0005, p=0.0018, p=0.0061 and p=0.0477, respectively) than those measured in healthy volunteers. The ROC curve analysis showed a diagnostic significance in IgA anti-transglutaminase (AUC=0.862, pceliac disease. Further studies are needed to better evaluate the role of fecal antibody tests in identifying celiac disease patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. A New Technique for Superselective Catheterization of Arteries: Preshaping of a Micro-Guide Wire into a Shepherd's Hook Form

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    Baek, Jee Hyun; Chung; Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Lee, Whal; Park, Jae Hyung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    We wanted to introduce a new technique for superselective catheterization of arteries with preshaping of a micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook form, and this is useful for superselection of small arteries branching at an acute angle from a large parent artery for the treatment of tumors and hemorrhages. We developed a superselective catheterization technique by using preshaping of a micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook form. We encountered six patients in our practice for whom we failed to catheterize the small tumor-feeding arteries that branched at an acute angle from wide parent arteries during chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma; the parent arteries were the right inferior phrenic artery (n = 4) and the left gastric artery (n = 1) from the celiac axis with celiac stenosis due to compression by the median arcuate ligament and the proper hepatic artery from the gastroduodenal artery (n = 1) in a patient who had celiac axis occlusion with collateral circulation via the pancreaticoduodenal arcade from the superior mesenteric artery. In these consecutive six patients, we tested the usefulness of this new technique with employing preshaping of a micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook form for superselective catheterization of targeted vessels. The target arteries were successfully catheterized and satisfactory transcatheter arterial chemoembolization was performed in all six patients. There were no significant complications such as arterial dissection. We developed a technique that is effective for superselection of vessels with preshaping of micro-guide wire into a shepherd's hook hook form, and we successfully applied it during chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma. This technique can be useful for superselection of small arteries that branch from a large parent artery at acute angles for the treatment of tumors and hemorrhages.

  16. Duplex ultrasonography in the detection of celiac axis stenosis: a validation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Min; Park, Jae Hyung; Choi, Young Ho; Seong, Nak Jong; Yoon, Chang Jin; Chung, Jin Wook [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-11-01

    To assess the predictive value of duplex ultrasonography in the detection of celiac axis (CA) stenosis. In 127 patients designated for coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), lateral aortography for the evaluation of CA stenosis was performed between January and October 2001. Thirty-nine of these patients [M:F=30:9; age, 44-75 (mean, 62) years] underwent CA duplex scanning in the supine position using 2-4 MHz convex probes. CA diameters obtained at lateral aortography were subsequently measured by two radiologists, unaware of the duplex results, and the original duplex velocity values were determined using velocity criteria such as peak systolic velocity (PSV), peak diastolic velocity (PDV) and end diastolic velocity (EDV). CA stenosis was confirmed at lateral aortography in 13 patients (M:F=10:3), in all of whom CA stenosis was greater than 50%. PSV in the CA stenosis group (n=13) was 283{+-}96 cm/sec, PDV was 85{+-}49 cm/sec, and EDV was 55{+-}33 cm/sec, while the corresponding values in the normal CA group were 161{+-}55 cm/sec, 59{+-}21 cm/sec, and 32{+-}9 cm/sec, respectively. PSV was significantly different between the normal and stenosis groups (p<0.01). A threshold of PSV > 250 cm/sec provided high diagnostic accuracy in terms of sensitivity (77%), specificity (85%), positive predictive valve (71%), negative predictive value (88%) and accuracy (82%). EDV > 50 cm/sec provided lower sensitivity (46%), but higher specificity (96%). The most accurate predictive factor for celiac axis (CA) stenosis was increased PSV. Duplex ultrasonography can be used prior to angiographic evaluation as a screening test for patients in whom CA stenosis is suspected.

  17. Hepatic Artery Angiography and Embolization for Hemobilia Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, Tony; Travis, Simon; Ettles, Duncan; Dyet, John; Sedman, Peter; Wedgewood, Kevin; Royston, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The effectiveness of angiography and embolization in diagnosis and treatment were assessed in a cohort of patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: Over a 6-year period 1513 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were carried out in our region. Nine of these patients (0.6%) developed significant upper gastrointestinal bleeding, 5-43 days after surgery. All underwent emergency celiac and selective right hepatic artery angiography. All were treated by coil embolization of the right hepatic artery proximal and distal to the bleeding point. Results: Pseudoaneurysms of the hepatic artery adjacent to cholecystectomy clips were demonstrated in all nine patients at selective right hepatic angiography. In three patients celiac axis angiography alone failed to demonstrate the pseudoaneurysm. Embolization controlled hemorrhage in all patients with no further bleeding and no further intervention. One patient developed a candidal liver abscess in the post-procedure period. All patients are alive and well at follow-up. Conclusion: Selective right hepatic angiography is vital in the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Embolization offers the advantage of minimally invasive treatment in unstable patients, does not disrupt recent biliary reconstruction, allows distal as well as proximal control of the hepatic artery, and is an effective treatment for this potentially life-threatening complication

  18. Celiac disease or positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies in patients undergoing renal biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Rakel; Metso, Martti; Pörsti, Ilkka; Niemelä, Onni; Huhtala, Heini; Mustonen, Jukka; Kaukinen, Katri; Mäkelä, Satu

    2018-01-01

    An association between celiac disease and renal diseases has been suggested, but the results are controversial. To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity among individuals undergoing renal biopsies and to evaluate whether co-existent celiac autoimmunity influences the clinical outcome of the renal disease. The prevalence of celiac autoimmunity (previous diagnosis of celiac disease or positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies) was determined in 827 consecutive patients undergoing kidney biopsies due to clinical indications. Up to 15 years' follow-up data on kidney function and co-morbidities were obtained. Celiac autoimmunity was found in 45 (5.4%) patients. Among the IgA nephropathy patients, 8.2% of had celiac autoimmunity. At the time of kidney biopsy and after a median follow-up of 5 to 6 years, renal function measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was inferior in IgA nephropathy patients with celiac autoimmunity compared to those without it (P=0.048 and P=0.022, respectively). The prevalence of celiac autoimmunity seems to be high in patients undergoing renal biopsies, especially in patients with IgA nephropathy. Such autoimmunity may be associated with worse renal function in IgA nephropathy. Hence the co-existence of celiac disease should be taken into consideration when treating patients with renal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk of Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients With Celiac Disease: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Nobel, Yael R; Green, Peter H R; Blaser, Martin J; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-12-01

    Patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for infections such as tuberculosis, influenza, and pneumococcal pneumonia. However, little is known about the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients with celiac disease. We identified patients with celiac disease based on intestinal biopsies submitted to all pathology departments in Sweden over a 39-year period (from July 1969 through February 2008). We compared risk of CDI (based on stratified Cox proportional hazards models) among patients with celiac disease vs. without celiac disease (controls) matched by age, sex, and calendar period. We identified 28,339 patients with celiac disease and 141,588 controls; neither group had a history of CDI. The incidence of CDI was 56/100,000 person-years among patients with celiac disease and 26/100,000 person-years among controls, yielding an overall hazard ratio (HR) of 2.01 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.64-2.47; Pceliac disease (HR, 5.20; 95% CI, 2.81-9.62; Pceliac disease and controls. In a large population-based cohort study, patients with celiac disease had significantly higher incidence of CDI than controls. This finding is consistent with prior findings of higher rates of other infections in patients with celiac disease, and suggests the possibility of altered gut immunity and/or microbial composition in patients with celiac disease.

  20. Factors associated with number of duodenal samples obtained in suspected celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamban, Leonid; Sorser, Serge; Naydin, Stan; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Shukr, Mousa; Wiemann, Charlotte; Yevsyukov, Daniel; Piper, Michael H; Warren, Bradley; Green, Peter H R

    2017-12-01

     Many people with celiac disease are undiagnosed and there is evidence that insufficient duodenal samples may contribute to underdiagnosis. The aims of this study were to investigate whether more samples leads to a greater likelihood of a diagnosis of celiac disease and to elucidate factors that influence the number of samples collected.  We identified patients from two community hospitals who were undergoing duodenal biopsy for indications (as identified by International Classification of Diseases code) compatible with possible celiac disease. Three cohorts were evaluated: no celiac disease (NCD, normal villi), celiac disease (villous atrophy, Marsh score 3), and possible celiac disease (PCD, Marsh score celiac disease had a median of 4 specimens collected. The percentage of patients diagnosed with celiac disease with one sample was 0.3 % compared with 12.8 % of those with six samples ( P  = 0.001). Patient factors that positively correlated with the number of samples collected were endoscopic features, demographic details, and indication ( P  = 0.001). Endoscopist factors that positively correlated with the number of samples collected were absence of a trainee, pediatric gastroenterologist, and outpatient setting ( P  celiac disease significantly increased with six samples. Multiple factors influenced whether adequate biopsies were taken. Adherence to guidelines may increase the diagnosis rate of celiac disease.

  1. RISK OF INFERTILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: a meta-analysis of observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Sebastian LASA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with several extra-intestinal features, such as reproductive disorders. The relationship between celiac disease and infertility has been previously assessed, with conflicting results. Objectives We seek to determine the relationship between celiac disease and infertility. Methods Data was extracted from case-control or cohort design studies from 1966 to December 2013 using the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Library databases. We analyzed two kinds of trials: those assessing the risk of infertility in subjects with already diagnosed celiac disease, and those evaluating the prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease in subjects with a diagnosis of infertility. Results The search yielded 413 potentially relevant studies for revision, 12 of which were finally included for analysis. A significant association was found between women with a diagnosis of infertility and undiagnosed celiac disease [OR 3.09 (95% CI 1.74-5.49]. When considering those studies assessing the occurrence of infertility in subjects with already-diagnosed celiac disease, no difference was found between celiac disease patients and control subjects [OR 0.99 (0.86-1.13]. Conclusions Undiagnosed celiac disease is a risk factor for infertility. Women seeking medical advice for this particular condition should be screened for celiac disease. Adoption of a gluten-free diet could have a positive impact on fertility in this group of patients.

  2. Celiac disease in a large cohort of children and adolescents with recurrent headache: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenna, Raffaella; Petrarca, Laura; Verdecchia, Paola; Florio, Matteo; Pietropaoli, Nicoletta; Mastrogiorgio, Gerarda; Bavastrelli, Maria; Bonamico, Margherita; Cucchiara, Salvatore

    2016-05-01

    The clinical picture of celiac disease is changing with the emergence of subclinical forms and growing evidence reporting associated neurological disorders. To establish the prevalence of celiac disease in children suffering from recurrent headache. In our retrospective study we collected charts from 1131 children attending our tertiary care Centre for Paediatric Headache over the period 2001-2012. They were screened for celiac disease and positive patients were referred to our Operative Unit for Coeliac disease and confirmed positive children underwent upper endoscopy with multiple duodenal biopsies. Celiac children started a gluten-free diet. 883 children (481 females; median age, 9.8 years, range 3-19) performed celiac disease screening, and among them, 11 children (7 females; median age, 8.2 years, range: 4.8-13.9) were diagnosed with celiac disease. Seven children (5 females, median age, 11.9 years, range: 10.3-13.9) had been diagnosed as celiac prior to the neurological evaluation. The prevalence of celiac disease in our sample is 2.04% vs. 1.2% of the general population (p=0.034). Our study demonstrates, on a large series, that celiac disease prevalence is doubled in patients with chronic headache. Screening for celiac disease could be advised as part of the diagnostic work-up in these paediatric patients, particularly among pharmacological non-responders. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Celiac Node Failure Patterns After Definitive Chemoradiation for Esophageal Cancer in the Modern Era

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    Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); UC Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Xiao Lianchun [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yuki [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crane, Christopher; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Bhutani, Manoop S.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The celiac lymph node axis acts as a gateway for metastatic systemic spread. The need for prophylactic celiac nodal coverage in chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is controversial. Given the improved ability to evaluate lymph node status before treatment via positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasound, we hypothesized that prophylactic celiac node irradiation may not be needed for patients with localized esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the radiation treatment volumes for 131 patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Patients with celiac lymph node involvement at baseline were excluded. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy. The location of all celiac node failures was compared with the radiation treatment plan to determine whether the failures occurred within or outside the radiation treatment field. Results: At a median follow-up time of 52.6 months (95% CI 46.1-56.7 months), 6 of 60 patients (10%) without celiac node coverage had celiac nodal failure; in 5 of these patients, the failures represented the first site of recurrence. Of the 71 patients who had celiac coverage, only 5 patients (7%) had celiac region relapse. In multivariate analyses, having a pretreatment-to-post-treatment change in standardized uptake value on PET >52% (odds ratio [OR] 0.198, p = 0.0327) and having failure in the clinical target volume (OR 10.72, p = 0.001) were associated with risk of celiac region relapse. Of those without celiac coverage, the 6 patients that later developed celiac failure had a worse median overall survival time compared with the other 54 patients who did not fail (median overall survival time: 16.5 months vs. 31.5 months, p = 0.041). Acute and late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Although celiac lymph node failures occur in approximately 1 of 10 patients, the lack of effective salvage treatments and subsequent low morbidity may justify prophylactic treatment

  4. Celiac disease and bone fractures: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Katriina; Pearce, Jo; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease, an autoimmune disease induced by dietary gluten, is associated with metabolic bone disorders, such as low bone mineral density. However, it is unclear whether this translates into an association between celiac disease and such hard clinical outcomes as bone fractures. To systematically review and pool the evidence for the relationship of celiac disease with prevalence and incidence of bone fractures. We systematically searched Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library in January 2014 for studies of celiac disease and bone fractures. Observational studies of any design, in which bone fracture outcomes were compared in individuals with and without celiac disease were included. Two investigators independently extracted results from eligible studies. In the meta-analyses of case-control and cross-sectional studies, bone fractures were almost twice as common in individuals with a clinically diagnosed celiac disease as in those without the disease. In the meta-analyses of prospective studies, celiac disease at baseline was associated with a 30% increase (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14, 1.50) in the risk of any fracture and a 69% increase in the risk of hip fracture (95% CI: 1.10, 2.59). The two studies of unrecognized celiac disease (elevated circulating concentrations of celiac disease-specific autoantibodies but no celiac disease diagnosis) had contradicting findings. Our findings suggest that clinically diagnosed celiac disease and bone fractures co-occur and that celiac disease was associated with an increased risk of hip fractures as well as fractures in general. Further research would be needed to determine whether unrecognized celiac disease is associated with the risk of bone fractures.

  5. Celiac Node Failure Patterns After Definitive Chemoradiation for Esophageal Cancer in the Modern Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini, Arya; Xiao Lianchun; Allen, Pamela K.; Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yuki; Liao, Zhongxing; Hofstetter, Wayne; Crane, Christopher; Komaki, Ritsuko; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Welsh, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The celiac lymph node axis acts as a gateway for metastatic systemic spread. The need for prophylactic celiac nodal coverage in chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is controversial. Given the improved ability to evaluate lymph node status before treatment via positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasound, we hypothesized that prophylactic celiac node irradiation may not be needed for patients with localized esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the radiation treatment volumes for 131 patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Patients with celiac lymph node involvement at baseline were excluded. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy. The location of all celiac node failures was compared with the radiation treatment plan to determine whether the failures occurred within or outside the radiation treatment field. Results: At a median follow-up time of 52.6 months (95% CI 46.1–56.7 months), 6 of 60 patients (10%) without celiac node coverage had celiac nodal failure; in 5 of these patients, the failures represented the first site of recurrence. Of the 71 patients who had celiac coverage, only 5 patients (7%) had celiac region relapse. In multivariate analyses, having a pretreatment-to-post-treatment change in standardized uptake value on PET >52% (odds ratio [OR] 0.198, p = 0.0327) and having failure in the clinical target volume (OR 10.72, p = 0.001) were associated with risk of celiac region relapse. Of those without celiac coverage, the 6 patients that later developed celiac failure had a worse median overall survival time compared with the other 54 patients who did not fail (median overall survival time: 16.5 months vs. 31.5 months, p = 0.041). Acute and late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Although celiac lymph node failures occur in approximately 1 of 10 patients, the lack of effective salvage treatments and subsequent low morbidity may justify prophylactic

  6. Celiac artery in New Zealand rabbit: anatomical study of its origin and arrangement for experimental research and surgical practice Artéria celíaca em coelhos Nova Zelândia: estudo anatômico de sua origem e arranjo para a pesquisa experimental e a prática cirúrgica

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Abidu-Figueiredo; Bárbara Xavier-Silva; Themis M. Cardinot; Márcio A. Babinski; Maurício A. Chagas

    2008-01-01

    Rabbits have been used as an experimental model in many diseases and for the study of toxicology, pharmacology and surgery in many universities. However, some aspects of their macro anatomy need a more detailed description, especially the abdominal and pelvic arterial vascular system, which has a huge variability in distribution and trajectory. Thirty cadaveric adult New Zealand rabbits, 13 male and 17 female, with an average weight and rostrum-sacral length of 2.5 kg and 40cm, respectively, ...

  7. HLA-DQ: Celiac diseasevsinflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosca-Watts, Marta Maia; Minguez, Miguel; Planelles, Dolores; Navarro, Samuel; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Santiago, Jesus; Tosca, Joan; Mora, Francisco

    2018-01-07

    To determine the genetic predisposition to celiac disease (CeD) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients by quantifying the frequency of CeD-related human leucocyte antigen (HLA) (HLA-CeD: HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8) in IBD patients globally, by type of IBD and gender, and by calculating the protective/risk contribution of these haplotypes in the development of the IBD disease. We conducted a prospective study with IBD patients from our Unit. Clinical information was gathered and blood was tested for HLA-CeD. The control group was made up of unrelated Valencian organ donors. 1034 subjects were analyzed: 457 IBD [207 ulcerative coliti (UC) and 250 Crohn's disease (CD)] patients and 577 healthy controls. 39% of the controls and 34% of the patients had HLA-CeD ( P = 0.0852). HLA-DQ2 was less frequent in UC patients ( P = 0.0287), and HLA-DQ8 in CD ( P = 0.0217). In women with UC, the frequency of DQ2.5cis (DQB1*02:01-DQA1*05:01) was reduced ≥ 50% [ P = 0.0344; preventive fraction (PF) = 13%]. PFs (7%-14%) were obtained with all HLA-CeD haplotypes. HLA DQB1*02:02-DQA1*02:01 (HLA-DQ2.2) was more frequent in CD patients with respect to controls ( P = 0.001) and UC patients (etiological fraction = 15%). HLA-CeD is not more frequent in IBD patients, with an even lower frequency of HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 in UC and CD respectively. HLA-DQ2.5 confers protection from the development of UC, especially in women, and HLA-DQ8 does so for the appearance of CD. HLA-DQ2.2 is present in 34% of the CD patients and may constitute a genetic risk factor for CD development.

  8. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  9. The SPINK gene family and celiac disease susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wapenaar, M.C.; Monsuur, A.J.; Poell, J.; Slot, R. van 't; Meijer, J.W.R.; Meijer, G.A.; Mulder, C.J.; Mearin, M.L.; Wijmenga, C.

    2007-01-01

    The gene family of serine protease inhibitors of the Kazal type (SPINK) are functional and positional candidate genes for celiac disease (CD). Our aim was to assess the gut mucosal gene expression and genetic association of SPINK1, -2, -4, and -5 in the Dutch CD population. Gene expression was

  10. A biopsy is not always necessary to diagnose celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubarak, Amani; Wolters, Victorien M.; Gerritsen, Susan A. M.; Gmelig-Meyling, Frits H. J.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Houwen, Roderick H. J.

    2011-01-01

    Small intestinal histology is the criterion standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD). However, results of serological tests such as anti-endomysium antibodies and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTGA) are becoming increasingly reliable. This raises the question of whether a small

  11. The SPINK gene family and celiac disease susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wapenaar, Martin C.; Monsuur, Alienke J.; Poell, Jos; Slot, Ruben Van 't; Meijer, Jos W. R.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Mulder, Chris J.; Mearin, Maria Luisa; Wijmenga, Cisca

    The gene family of serine protease inhibitors of the Kazal type (SPINK) are functional and positional candidate genes for celiac disease (CD). Our aim was to assess the gut mucosal gene expression and genetic association of SPINK1, -2, -4, and -5 in the Dutch CD population. Gene expression was

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block and neurolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Ichiro; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2017-05-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) is widely used for reducing pain originating from upper abdominal organs. It is mainly indicated to treat pancreatic cancer pain, but also to relieve pain as a result of chronic pancreatitis. Real-time guidance and color Doppler imaging by EUS made the procedure easier and safer, resulting in greater pain relief. Currently, two techniques are used for EUS-CPN. The classic approach, known as the central technique, involves injection of a neurolytic agent at the base of the celiac axis. In the bilateral technique, the neurolytic agent is injected on both sides of the celiac axis. In addition, EUS-guided direct celiac ganglia neurolysis (EUS-CGN) was introduced recently. Pain relief is achieved by EUS-CPN in 70-80% of patients with pancreatic cancer and in 50-60% of those with chronic pancreatitis. The bilateral technique may be more efficient than the central technique, although the central technique is easier and possibly safer. Moreover, EUS-CGN may provide greater pain relief than conventional EUS-CPN. Procedure-related complications include transient pain exacerbation, transient hypotension, transient diarrhea, and inebriation. Although most complications are not serious, major adverse events such as retroperitoneal bleeding, abscess, and ischemic complications occasionally occur. © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  13. The effect of celiac diet on microbes in the colon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopečný, Jan; Mrázek, Jakub; Fliegerová, Kateřina

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 46, S1 (2006), S20-S21 ISSN 0926-5287. [5th INRA-RPI GTM Symposium. Gut Microbiology. 21.06.2006-23.06.2006, Aberdeen] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500200572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : celiac diet Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  14. Gluten proteolysis as alternative therapy for celiac patients: A mini ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Celiac disease (CD) results from damage to the small intestinal mucosa due to an inappropriate immune response to a cereal protein (wheat, rye, barley). The only treatment for CD is life-long avoidance of gluten proteins. Gluten-free products are not widely available and usually more expensive. That is why; there is an ...

  15. Gluten: a two-edged sword. Immunopathogenesis of celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de F.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Wijmenga, C.

    2005-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small intestinal disorder caused by adaptive and innate immune responses triggered by the gluten proteins present in wheat. In the intestine, gluten is partially degraded and modified, which results in gluten peptides that bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 and

  16. Management of celiac disease: from evidence to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana M. Attardo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a complex polygenic disorder, which involves genetic factors human leukocyte complex (HLA and non-HLA genes, environmental factors, innate and adoptive immunity, and a robust chronic T-mediated autoimmune component. The main goal of the present monograph is to define a methodological approach for the disease, characterized by frequent late diagnosis, in order for the physician to become aware of the disease management, the diversity of the clinical presentation itself and in different patients. A unique attention is payed to the specific diagnostic tests to define a correct and accurate application of them, and in addition, to disease follow-up and possible complications. Moreover, a dedicated space is assigned to refractory CD, to potential CD and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Legislative aspects of the celiac disease in Italy are addressed, too. The celiac disease guidelines and their evaluation by means of Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II instrument allow us to classify the different recommendations and to apply them according to the stakeholders’ involvement, pertinence, methodological accuracy, clarity and publishing independence. Finally, the most current scientific evidence is taken into account to create a complete updated monograph.

  17. Celiac Disease Genetics : Past, Present and Future Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijmenga, Cisca; Gutierrez Achury, Javier

    In the past few years there has been enormous progress in unraveling the genetic basis of celiac disease (CD). Apart from the well-known association to HLA, there are currently 40 genomic loci associated to CD. Most of these loci show pleiotropic effects across many autoimmune diseases and highlight

  18. Prevalence, incidence, and autoimmune comorbidities of celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grode, Louise; Bech, Bodil H; Jensen, Thomas Møller

    2018-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to describe and identify potential trends with respect to prevalence, incidence, age, sex, and autoimmune comorbidity of celiac disease (CD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A Danish nationwide cohort study of CD using data from The National Patient Register. Patients...

  19. Association between Diabetes Mellitus type 1 and Celiac Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gluten sensitive enteropathy (celiac disease (CD)) has a strong association with diabetes mellitus (type 1DM). Since, 2-3% of CD patients have selective IgA deficiency, the majority of the available tests may fail to show the auto-antibodies (the IgA endomysial antibody (EMA). To prevent such a false negativity, ...

  20. Practice guidelines for endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyse, Jonathan M; Battat, Robert; Sun, Siyu

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of guideline was to provide clear and relevant consensus statements to form a practical guideline for clinicians on the indications, optimal technique, safety and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN). METHODS: Six important clinical...... of inoperable disease. Techniques may still vary based on operator experience. Serious complications exist, but are rare....

  1. Positive predictive value of serological diagnostic measures in celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftedal, Peter; Nielsen, Christian; Madsen, Jonas Trolle

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) antibodies, immunoglobulin A (IgA) anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG), IgA endomysium antibody (EMA), IgA and IgG anti-gliadin antibodies (IgA and IgG AGA) are first-line diagnostic tools used in selecting patients for duodenal biopsy. The goal of this study was to evaluate...

  2. Practice guidelines for endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyse, Jonathan M; Battat, Robert; Sun, Siyu

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of guideline was to provide clear and relevant consensus statements to form a practical guideline for clinicians on the indications, optimal technique, safety and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN). METHODS: Six important clinical...

  3. Duodenal microbiota composition and mucosal homeostasis in pediatric celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, J.C.; Kalliomäki, M.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Palva, A.; Lähteenoja, H.; Vos, de W.M.; Salojärvi, J.; Satokari, R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine which is triggered by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed (HLA-DQ2/DQ8 positive) individuals. Only a fraction of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 positive individuals develop CD indicating that other factors have a role in the

  4. Anemia: monosymptomatic celiac disease. A report of 3 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Depla, A. C.; Bartelsman, J. F.; Mulder, C. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with monosymptomatic celiac disease (CD) can escape diagnosis for a long period. Anemia is a common finding in CD, although anemia as the sole symptom is relatively unknown. We report on three patients who presented with iron deficiency anemia and no other symptom, in whom CD was considered

  5. Small intestinal biopsies in celiac disease: duodenal or jejunal?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, JW; Wahab, PJ; Mulder, C.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For diagnosis and follow-up of celiac disease, pediatric societies advise that intestinal mucosal specimens should be obtained using suction capsule from the jejunum. This procedure is strenuous for patients, time-consuming, expensive and requires radiographic guidance. Mucosal biopsies

  6. Duodenal versus jejunal biopsies in suspected celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, WJ; van Baarlen, J; Kleibeuker, JH; Kolkman, JJ

    2004-01-01

    Background and Study Aims: In the past, small-bowel biopsies for diagnosis of celiac disease were taken from the jejunum with a suction capsule, but nowadays most physicians take endoscopic biopsies from the distal duodenum. To validate that practice we compared the diagnostic yield of endoscopic

  7. Ameliorative Effects of Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block on Stress and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate effects of neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) on stress and inflammation in rats with partial hepatectomy (PH). Methods: A model of PH rat was established, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP); corticosterone (GC); adrenocorticotropin (ACTH); noradrenaline (NA); adrenalin (AD); aspartate ...

  8. The intestinal microflora of childhood patients with indicated celiac disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopečný, Jan; Mrázek, Jakub; Fliegerová, Kateřina; Frühauf, P.; Tučková, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2008), s. 214-216 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * intestinal microflora Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.172, year: 2008

  9. Why Oats Are Safe and Healthy for Celiac Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Meer, van der I.M.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The water-insoluble storage proteins of cereals (prolamins) are called “gluten” in wheat, barley, and rye, and “avenins” in oat. Gluten can provoke celiac disease (CD) in genetically susceptible individuals (those with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 serotypes). Avenins are present at a

  10. Celiac Crisis: A Rare Or Rarely Recognized Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, Nadia; Cheema, Huma Arshad; Suleman, Hassan; Fayyaz, Zafar; Mushtaq, Iqra; Muhammad; Hashmi, Almas

    2016-01-01

    Celiac crisis is a serious life threatening complication of celiac disease characterized by profuse diarrhoea, severe dehydration and metabolic disturbances leading to neuromuscular weakness, cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. It has been described as rare condition and not well documented in the literature. To improve awareness and facilitate diagnosis of this condition, we studied risk factors, pattern of presentation and management plans of celiac crisis. It was a descriptive cross sectional study. Patients presenting in emergency room(ER) with profuse diarrhoea leading to severe dehydration, neuromuscular weakness, and metabolic acidosis and electrolyte abnormalities enrolled in the studies after positive serology and small bowel biopsy suggestive of celiac disease. Total 126 patients out of 350 fulfilled the criteria including 54 (42.8%) male and 71 (56.3%) female. The mean age at presentation was 5.25±1.18 years. Risk factors were poor social status (97.60%), consanguinity (96.77%), early weaning with gluten contained diet (93.54%), and Presenting complaints were loose motion (100%), loss of neck holding (96.77%), dehydration (96.77%), polyuria (95.96%), inability to walk (67.74%), abdominal distension (85.86%). Electrolytes imbalances were hypokalaemia (2.4±0.55), hypocalcaemia (7.29±0.66), hypomagnesaemia (1.89±0.50), hypophosphatemia (2.8±0.68), hypoalbuminemia (3.05±0.48) and metabolic acidosis (96%). One hundred & twenty patients were stabilized with GFD and correction of dehydration, acidosis and electrolyte imbalance. Six patients needed parenteral steroids ant total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Recovery time from crisis was mean 5.4±2.73 days (range 3-20 days). Celiac crisis is a common but under recognized problem in developing countries. Commonest presenting feature is neuromuscular paralysis and biochemical abnormality is hypokalaemia.

  11. Changing patterns of serological testing for celiac disease in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leja, Marcis; Kojalo, Una; Frickauss, Gunars; Bandere, Biruta; Gavars, Didzis; Boka, Viesturs

    2011-06-01

    A number of recent guidelines have discouraged the use of the old anti-gliadin tests for the detection of celiac disease; tissue transglutaminase IgA (tTGA) and anti-endomysial (EMA) tests are recommended instead. Our aim was to evaluate how the current recommendations have been applied in real practice. The secondary aim was to evaluate the positivity rates provided by different test types. We analyzed the number of celiac disease tests [anti-gliadin IgA (AGA), anti-gliadin IgG (AGG), tTGA and EMA] performed by the largest laboratory in Latvia. The analysis was performed on a yearly basis for the period between 2004 and 2009. Additionally, we analyzed the percentage of the positive test results for each of the tests. The number of patients being tested for celiac disease constantly increased, with the average annual growth of 16.1%; this trend was similar both in children and in adults. The majority of patients (62.6%) were tested with anti-gliadin tests only; 27.7% were tested with either tTGA or EMA, while 9.7% were tested by a combination of the above groups. There was a substantial difference in the positivity rates of the different tests from 0.94% for EMA to 21.8% for AGG. Substantial differences were also present between various manufacturers' products. The current guidelines and the published evidence on the proper use of serological tests for celiac disease have been slow to be applied in clinical practice; more intensive education campaigns and change in reimbursement systems could improve the situation. Nevertheless, more clinicians in Latvia are checking patients for celiac disease; this suggests an overall increased awareness.

  12. Celiac crisis: a rare or rarely recognized disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, N.; Cheema, H.A.; Suleman, H.; Fayyaz, Z.; Mushtaq, I.

    2017-01-01

    Celiac crisis is a serious life threatening complication of celiac disease characterized by profuse diarrhoea, severe dehydration and metabolic disturbances leading to neuromuscular weakness, cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. It has been described as rare condition and not well documented in the literature. To improve awareness and facilitate diagnosis of this condition, we studied risk factors, pattern of presentation and management plans of celiac crisis. Methods: It was a descriptive cross sectional study. Patients presenting in emergency room(ER) with profuse diarrhoea leading to severe dehydration, neuromuscular weakness, and metabolic acidosis and electrolyte abnormalities enrolled in the studies after positive serology and small bowel biopsy suggestive of celiac disease. Results: Total 126 patients out of 350 fulfilled the criteria including 54 (42.8 percent) male and 71 (56.3 percent) female. The mean age at presentation was 5.25+-1.18 years. Risk factors were poor social status (97.60 percent), consanguinity (96.77 percent), early weaning with gluten contained diet (93.54 percent), and Presenting complaints were loose motion (100 percent), loss of neck holding (96.77 percent), dehydration (96.77 percent), polyuria (95.96 percent), inability to walk (67.74 percent), abdominal distension (85.86 percent). Electrolytes imbalances were hypokalaemia (2.4+-0.55), hypocalcaemia (7.29+-0.66), hypomagnesaemia (1.89+-0.50), hypophosphatemia (2.8+-0.68), hypoalbuminemia (3.05+-0.48) and metabolic acidosis (96 percent). One hundred and twenty patients were stabilized with GFD and correction of dehydration, acidosis and electrolyte imbalance. Six patients needed parenteral steroids ant total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Recovery time from crisis was mean 5.4+-2.73 days (range 3-20 days). Conclusion: Celiac crisis is a common but under recognized problem in developing countries. Commonest presenting feature is neuromuscular paralysis and biochemical abnormality is

  13. Correlation between antibodies and histology in celiac disease: Incidence of celiac disease is higher than expected in the pediatric population

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Makovický, P.; Rimárová, K.; Boor, A.; Makovický, P.; Vodička, Pavel; Samasca, G.; Kruzliak, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), s. 1079-1083 ISSN 1791-2997 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13424 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : celiac disease * autoimmune disease * enterobiopsy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.484, year: 2013

  14. Is it worth investigating splenic function in patients with celiac disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sabatino, Antonio; Brunetti, Laura; Carnevale Maffè, Gabriella; Giuffrida, Paolo; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease, an immune-mediated enteropathy induced in genetically susceptible individuals by the ingestion of gluten, is the most frequent disorder associated with splenic hypofunction or atrophy. Defective splenic function affects more than one-third of adult patients with celiac disease, and it may predispose to a higher risk of infections by encapsulated bacteria and thromboembolic and autoimmune complications, particularly when celiac patients have concomitant pre-malignant and malignant complications (refractory celiac disease, ulcerative jejunoileitis and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma). However, the clinical management of patients with celiac disease does not take into account the evaluation of splenic function, and in patients with high degree of hyposplenism or splenic atrophy the prophylactic immunization with specific vaccines against the polysaccharide antigens of encapsulated bacteria is not currently recommended. We critically re-evaluate clinical and diagnostic aspects of spleen dysfunction in celiac disease, and highlight new perspectives in the prophylactic management of infections in this condition. PMID:23613624

  15. Meta-analysis on anxiety and depression in adult celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, D F; Gerdes, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We used meta-analysis to test hypotheses concerning whether adult celiac disease is reliably linked with anxiety and/or depression. METHOD: We examined published reports on anxiety and depression in adult celiac disease. RESULTS: Eighteen studies on depression and eleven studies...... on anxiety in adult celiac disease met selection criteria. They show that depression is reliably more common and/or more severe in adults with celiac disease than in healthy adults (overall meta-analysis effect size: 0.97). The fail-safe margin of unpublished reports that would be required to negate...... the finding exceeds 8000. Adults with celiac disease do not, however, differ reliably in terms of depression from adults with other physical illnesses, nor do they differ reliably from healthy adults or adults with other physical illnesses in terms of anxiety. CONCLUSION: Depression is common in adult celiac...

  16. ALLERGIC PATHOLOGY AND CELIAC DISEASE — MECHANISM OF COMMUNITY AND DIFFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Revnova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the differentiation of allergic diseases and celiac in children. It covers in detail the mechanisms of the pathogenesis of immune inflammation in celiac disease, clinical picture with the main and additional symptoms and markers of this pathology. In the article the author shares data of her own experience and provides the own diagnostic algorithm.Key words: allergic pathology, celiac disease, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(1:76-80

  17. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Children with Autoimmune Hepatitis and vice versa

    OpenAIRE

    Najafi, Mehri; Sadjadei, Nooshin; Eftekhari, Kambiz; Khodadad, Ahmad; Motamed, Farzaneh; Fallahi, Gholam-Hossain; Farahmand, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which the risk of autoimmune liver disease is high. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic and progressive entity and the risk of its being associated with other autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease is high also. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and vice versa. Methods: In a cross-sectional study children with autoimmune hepatitis underwent serological screenin...

  18. Clinical Aspects of Screening Detected Celiac Disease among 12-year-olds

    OpenAIRE

    van Gilse van der Pals, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sweden experienced an epidemic (1984-96) of celiac disease in children, partly attributed to changes in infant feed- ing. Our aim was to compare the total prevalence of celiac disease in two birth cohorts of 12-year-olds and relate the findings to each cohort’s ascertained infant feeding. Furthermore, we compared the growth parameters in the children with screening-detected celiac disease with their healthy peers. We also investigated the association of thyroid auto- immunity and ...

  19. HELICOBACTER PYLORI PREVALENCE IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: results from a cross-sectional study

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    Juan LASA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Some previously published studies have suggested an inverse relationship between celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori, raising the possibility of the protective role Helicobacter pylori could have against celiac disease development. Nevertheless, this association is inconclusive. Objectives To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in celiac subjects. Methods Between January 2013 and June 2014, patients over 18 years old undergoing upper endoscopy who required both gastric and duodenal biopsies were included for analysis. Enrolled subjects were divided in two groups: those with a diagnosis of celiac disease and those without a celiac disease diagnosis. Helicobacter pylori infection prevalence was compared between groups. Among celiac patients, endoscopic markers of villous atrophy as well as histological damage severity were compared between those with and without Helicobacter pylori infection. Results Overall, 312 patients were enrolled. Seventy two of them had a diagnosis of celiac disease. Helicobacter pylori infection prevalence among celiac disease patients was 12.5%, compared to 30% in non-celiac patients [OR=0.33 (0.15-0.71]. There was not a significant difference in terms of the severity of villous atrophy in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection compared to those without it. There was a slight increase in the prevalence of endoscopic markers in those Helicobacter pylori-negative celiac subjects. Conclusion Helicobacter pylori infection seems to be less frequent in celiac patients; among those celiac subjects with concomitant Helicobacter pylori infection, histological damage degree and presence of endoscopic markers suggesting villous atrophy seem to be similar to those without Helicobacter pylori infection.

  20. Psychosis and Silent Celiac Disease in a Down Syndrome Adolescent: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Morant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an autoimmune systemic disorder. It presents gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal manifestations as well as associated conditions. We report a 16-year-old Down syndrome girl who presented psychosis symptomatology, and she was diagnosed as having silent celiac disease. Olanzapine treatment and gluten-free diet were satisfactory. It is necessary to consider celiac disease in Down syndrome patients with psychiatric symptoms, mainly psychotic symptomatology.

  1. Celiac Disease in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM): A Hospital Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniwal, Neetu; Ameta, Gaurav; Chahar, Chandra Kumar

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and clinical features of Celiac disease among children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). This prospective observational study was conducted in PBM Children Hospital, Bikaner from July 2012 through December 2013. All consecutively admitted children with SAM were recruited. All subjects were screened for Celiac disease by serological test for IgA-anti tissue Transglutaminase (IgA tTG) antibodies. All seropositive children underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for small bowel biopsy for the confirmation. Clinical features of patients with and without celiac disease were compared. The sero-prevalence (IgA tTg positivity) of Celiac disease was found to be 15.38% while prevalence of biopsy confirmed Celiac disease was 14.42% among SAM children. Abdominal distension, diarrhea, anorexia, constipation, pain in abdomen, vitamin deficiencies, edema, clubbing and mouth ulcers were more common in patients of Celiac disease compared to patients without Celiac disease but the difference was statistically significant only for abdominal distension and pain abdomen. There is a high prevalence of Celiac disease in SAM. Screening for Celiac disease (especially in presence of pain abdomen and abdominal distension) should be an essential part of work-up in all children with SAM.

  2. L-Carnitine in the treatment of fatigue in adult celiac disease patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciacci, C; Peluso, G; Iannoni, E; Siniscalchi, M; Iovino, P; Rispo, A; Tortora, R; Bucci, C; Zingone, F; Margarucci, S; Calvani, M

    2007-10-01

    Fatigue is common in celiac disease. L-Carnitine blood levels are low in untreated celiac disease. L-Carnitine therapy was shown to improve muscular fatigue in several diseases. To evaluate the effect of L-carnitine treatment in fatigue in adult celiac patients. Randomised double-blind versus placebo parallel study. Thirty celiac disease patients received 2 g daily, 180 days (L-carnitine group) and 30 were assigned to the placebo group (P group). The patients underwent clinical investigation and questionnaires (Scott-Huskisson Visual Analogue Scale for Asthenia, Verbal Scale for Asthenia, Zung Depression Scale, SF-36 Health Status Survey, EuroQoL). OCTN2 levels, the specific carnitine transporter, were detected in intestinal tissue. Fatigue measured by Scott-Huskisson Visual Analogue Scale for Asthenia was significantly reduced in the L-carnitine group compared with the placebo group (p=0.0021). OCTN2 was decreased in celiac patients when compared to normal subjects (-134.67% in jejunum), and increased after diet in both celiac disease treatments. The other scales used did not show any significant difference between the two celiac disease treatment groups. L-Carnitine therapy is safe and effective in ameliorating fatigue in celiac disease. Since L-carnitine is involved in muscle energy production its decreased absorption due to OCTN2 reduction might explain muscular symptoms in celiac disease patients. The diet-induced OCTN2 increase, improving carnitine absorption, might explain the L-carnitine treatment efficacy.

  3. Screening for Celiac Disease: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Barry, Michael J; Davidson, Karina W; Doubeni, Chyke A; Ebell, Mark; Epling, John W; Herzstein, Jessica; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phipps, Maureen G; Silverstein, Michael; Simon, Melissa A; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2017-03-28

    Celiac disease is caused by an immune response in persons who are genetically susceptible to dietary gluten, a protein complex found in wheat, rye, and barley. Ingestion of gluten by persons with celiac disease causes immune-mediated inflammatory damage to the small intestine. To issue a new US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for celiac disease. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy of screening in asymptomatic adults, adolescents, and children; the potential benefits and harms of screening vs not screening and targeted vs universal screening; and the benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected celiac disease. The USPSTF also reviewed contextual information on the prevalence of celiac disease among patients without obvious symptoms and the natural history of subclinical celiac disease. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence on the accuracy of screening for celiac disease, the potential benefits and harms of screening vs not screening or targeted vs universal screening, and the potential benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected celiac disease. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic persons. (I statement).

  4. Arterial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    In many major metropolitan areas, the freeway system is : functioning at or beyond the capacity for which it was : designed. Many drivers are choosing to use arterial streets : instead. The resulting stress on the arterial systems creates : gridlock ...

  5. Empirical description of bronchial and nonbronchial arteries with MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Hong, E-mail: yuhong.2002@hotmail.co [Department of Imageology, Changzheng hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Liu Shiyuan, E-mail: cjr.liushiyuan@vip.163.co [Department of Imageology, Changzheng hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Li Huimin, E-mail: yuhongphd@163.co [Department of Imageology, Changzheng hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Xiao Xiangsheng, E-mail: cjr.xxsh@vip.163.co [Department of Imageology, Changzheng hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Dong Weihua, E-mail: dongweihua2000@163.co [Department of Imageology, Changzheng hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: We aimed to retrospectively evaluate bronchial and nonbronchial systemic arteries using multi-detector row helical computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography in patients with pulmonary disorders. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine patients (24 men, 15 women; mean age, 63.4 years; range, 20-82 years) with congenital and acquired pulmonary disorders of the bronchial and nonbronchial systemic arteries underwent multi-detector row helical computed tomographic angiography of the thorax using a 16-detector row scanner. Each of these patients had experienced an episode of hemoptysis. Computed tomographic angiogram data, which included maximum intensity projections, multiplanar reconstruction, and three-dimensional volume-rendered images, were used to retrospectively analyse the characteristics of the bronchial and nonbronchial systemic arteries. Results: We identified a total of 128 bronchial arteries (76 on the right side and 52 on the left) in 39 patients. We detected 42 nonbronchial systemic artery branches, including 19 internal mammary artery branches, 8 subclavian artery branches, 8 inferior phrenic artery branches, 5 intercostal artery branches, 1 thyrocervical trunk branch, and 1 celiac trunk branch. Thirty-five dilated and tortuous nonbronchial systemic arteries entered into the lung parenchyma and extended down to the lesions. Every case, except the one case of sequestration, was associated with pleural thickening where the vascular structures passed through the extrapleural fat. Conclusions: The variations in both the bronchial artery anatomy and the location and type of the nonbronchial arteries were great. Nonbronchial arteries may be a significant source of hemoptysis. MDCT angiography can be used to detect detailed anatomical information about the origins and courses of bronchial and nonbronchial systemic arteries and their pathophysiologic features.

  6. Vitamin B6 nutriture of children with acute celiac disease, celiac disease in remission, and of children with normal duodenal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinken, L; Zieglauer, H; Berger, H

    1976-07-01

    Patients with adult celiac disease excrete abnormal amounts of tryptophan metabolites after loading with this amino acid, suggesting vitamin B6 deficienty in these patients, In fact, the excretion of tryptophan metabolites returns to normal after administration of vitamin B6. The vitamin B6 nutriture was measured by means of determination of pyridoxal phosphate and activity of pyridoxalkinase in serum and in duodenal mucosa of 14 children with acute celiac disease and of six children with celiac disease in clinical and biochemical remission. Ten children with normal duodenal mucosa were studied as controls. Children with celiac disease had significantly decreased pyridoxal phosphate in serum and in duodenal mucosa when compared both with children in remission and controls. Activity of pyridoxalkinase, however, was significantly increased in serum and in duodenal mucosa when compared with controls but not when compared with children in remission. These children had the same increase in pyridoxalkinase activity as children with acute celiac disease. These data provide a strong evidence for the occurrence of vitamin B6 deficienty in children with acute celiac disease. The children with celiac disease in remission still had an increased activity of pyridoxalkinase which seems to be a compensating mechanism in consequence of vitamin B6 deficiency prior to the gluten-free diet.

  7. Usefulness of four-dimensional flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate hemodynamics in the pancreaticoduodenal artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Yasushi; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Kitajima, Ryo; Furuhashi, Satoru; Kiuchi, Ryota; Takeda, Makoto; Hiraide, Takanori; Morita, Yoshifumi; Unno, Naoki; Takeuchi, Hiroya

    2018-03-05

    Pancreaticoduodenal artery (PDA) aneurysm associated with celiac axis compression by the median arcuate ligament (MAL) is a rare disorder, but may be lethal if ruptured. Therefore, prophylactic surgical treatments need to be considered when MAL compresses the celiac axis. We herein report the usefulness of an arterial flow analysis for objectively evaluating this pathophysiology under four-dimensional flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (4D-flow MRI). Celiac artery stenosis was incidentally found under contrast-enhanced CT in a 50-year-old woman with symptomatic solitary pancreatic insulinoma. Under 4D-flow MRI, retrograde blood flow and aberrant wall shear stress were detected in the pancreaticoduodenal artery arcade. After obtaining informed consent, enucleation for insulinoma concomitant with MAL dissection was performed. Hypoglycemic attack completely resolved immediately after surgery. One month after surgery, 4D-flow MRI revealed normalized vectorial flow and wall shear stress in the PDA arcade without hypoglycemic attack. 4D-flow MRI is a very useful and non-invasive modality for objectively evaluating visceral artery hemodynamics.

  8. Variable activation of immune response by quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) prolamins in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevallos, Victor F; Ellis, H Julia; Suligoj, Tanja; Herencia, L Irene; Ciclitira, Paul J

    2012-08-01

    Celiac disease is an enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten found in wheat, barley, and rye. The current treatment is a strict gluten-free diet. Quinoa is a highly nutritive plant from the Andes, with low concentrations of prolamins, that has been recommended as part of a gluten-free diet; however, few experimental data support this recommendation. We aimed to determine the amount of celiac-toxic prolamin epitopes in quinoa cultivars from different regions of the Andes and the ability of these epitopes to activate immune responses in patients with celiac disease. The concentration of celiac-toxic epitopes was measured by using murine monoclonal antibodies against gliadin and high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits. Immune response was assessed by proliferation assays of celiac small intestinal T cells/interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and production of IFN-γ/IL-15 after organ culture of celiac duodenal biopsy samples. Fifteen quinoa cultivars were tested: 4 cultivars had quantifiable concentrations of celiac-toxic epitopes, but they were below the maximum permitted for a gluten-free food. Cultivars Ayacuchana and Pasankalla stimulated T cell lines at levels similar to those for gliadin and caused secretion of cytokines from cultured biopsy samples at levels comparable with those for gliadin. Most quinoa cultivars do not possess quantifiable amounts of celiac-toxic epitopes. However, 2 cultivars had celiac-toxic epitopes that could activate the adaptive and innate immune responses in some patients with celiac disease. These findings require further investigation in the form of in vivo studies, because quinoa is an important source of nutrients for patients with celiac disease.

  9. A Case of Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Batur-Caglayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system (CNS. Since a correlation between gluten intake and incidence of MS had been reported, the relationship of antigliadin antibodies and MS was debated. Case Report. We report the case of a 45-year-old female MS patient who is under interferon treatment. After seven years of monitoring, during her routine gastroenterological assessment, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. Conclusion. Beside the neurological manifestations that have been demonstrated in about 10% of celiac disease (CD patients, white-matter abnormalities in brain MRI are uncommon and controversial. But in the literature, MS seems to be associated with CD as in our patient. We suggest that MS patients with gastroenterological complaints should undergo an assessment for CD.

  10. Understanding Celiac Disease From Genetics to the Future Diagnostic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Salazar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the permanent inflammation of the small bowel, triggered by the ingestion of gluten. It is associated with a number of symptoms, the most common being gastrointestinal. The prevalence of this illness worldwide is 1%. One of the main problems of CD is its difficulty to be diagnosed due to the various presentations of the disease. Besides, in many cases, CD is asymptomatic. Celiac disease is a multifactorial disease, HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 haplotypes are predisposition factors. Nowadays, molecular markers are being studied as diagnostic tools. In this review, we explore CD from its basic concept, manifestations, types, current and future methods of diagnosis, and associated disorders. Before addressing the therapeutic approaches, we also provide a brief overview of CD genetics and treatment.

  11. Ameliorative Effects of Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block on Stress and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jun Li1, Fu-Xiang Li2, Jian-Xiang Che3, Xiao-Hong Wei4, Qing-Ming Qiu3, Peng. Zha1, Shu-Rong Bai1, Xu-Dong ..... Establishment of model treated for neurolytic celiac plexus block percutaneously with anhydrous-alcohol in rat. Chin J. Pain Med 2008; 14:233-235. 15. Wang J, Zhao J, Li J, Wang F, Su Y. Time-course.

  12. Celiac disease: understanding the gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascuñán, Karla A; Vespa, María Catalina; Araya, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    The only effective and safe treatment of celiac disease (CD) continues being strict exclusion of gluten for life, the so-called gluten-free diet (GFD). Although this treatment is highly successful, following strict GFD poses difficulties to patients in family, social and working contexts, deteriorating his/her quality of life. We aimed to review main characteristics of GFD with special emphasis on factors that may interfere with adherence to it. We conducted a search of various databases, such as PubMed, Google Scholar, Embase, and Scielo, with focus on key words such as "gluten-free diet", "celiac disease", "gluten" and "gluten-free diet adherence". Available literature has not reached definitive conclusions on the exact amount of gluten that is harmless to celiac patients, although international agreements establish cutoff points for gluten-free products and advise the use of clinical assessment to tailor the diet according to individual needs. Following GFD must include eliminating gluten as ingredient as well as hidden component and potential cross contamination in foods. There are numerous grains to substitute wheat but composition of most gluten-free products tends to include only a small number of them, especially rice. The diet must be not only free of gluten but also healthy to avoid nutrient, vitamins and minerals deficiencies or excess. Overweight/obesity frequency has increased among celiac patients so weight gain deserves attention during follow up. Nutritional education by a trained nutritionist is of great relevance to achieve long-term satisfactory health status and good compliance. A balanced GFD should be based on a combination of naturally gluten-free foods and certified processed gluten-free products. How to measure and improve adherence to GFD is still controversial and deserves further study.

  13. Adult-onset celiac disease for the primary care physician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Naidoo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a common autoimmune condition with a prevalence of 1%–2%. In recent years there has been a paradigm shift in management from tertiary care into the community. With a wide array of manifestations, including nonspecific and extraintestinal symptoms, this disorder can be difficult to diagnose, prolonging morbidity for patients. This review article aims to augment the primary physician’s knowledge of the common presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow-up of this disease.

  14. Celiac Disease: Role of the Epithelial BarrierSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schumann

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD a T-cell–mediated response to gluten is mounted in genetically predisposed individuals, resulting in a malabsorptive enteropathy histologically highlighted by villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia. Recent data point to the epithelial layer as an under-rated hot spot in celiac pathophysiology to date. This overview summarizes current functional and genetic evidence on the role of the epithelial barrier in CD, consisting of the cell membranes and the apical junctional complex comprising sealing as well as ion and water channel-forming tight junction proteins and the adherens junction. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms are discussed, including apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, biology of intestinal stem cells, alterations in the apical junctional complex, transcytotic uptake of gluten peptides, and possible implications of a defective epithelial polarity. Current research is directed toward new treatment options for CD that are alternatives or complementary therapeutics to a gluten-free diet. Thus, strategies to target an altered epithelial barrier therapeutically also are discussed. Keywords: Celiac Sprue, Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy, Tight Junction, Epithelial Polarity, Partitioning-Defective Proteins, α-Gliadin 33mer

  15. The Spectrum of Differences between Childhood and Adulthood Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Kruzliak, Peter; Cangemi, Giuseppina C.; Pohanka, Miroslav; Betti, Elena; Lauret, Eugenia; Rodrigo, Luis

    2015-01-01

    An old saying states that ‘’children are not little adults” and this certainly holds true for celiac disease, as there are many peculiar aspects regarding its epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical presentations, associated diseases, and response to treatment in pediatric compared to adult populations, to such an extent that it merits a description of its own. In fact, contrary to the past when it was thought that celiac disease was a disorder predominantly affecting childhood and characterized by a malabsorption syndrome, nowadays it is well recognized that it affects also adult and elderly people with an impressive variability of clinical presentation. In general, the clinical guidelines for diagnosis recommend starting with specific serologic testing in all suspected subjects, including those suffering from extraintestinal related conditions, and performing upper endoscopy with appropriate biopsy sampling of duodenal mucosa in case of positivity. The latter may be omitted in young patients showing high titers of anti-transglutaminase antibodies. The subsequent management of a celiac patient differs substantially depending on the age at diagnosis and should be based on the important consideration that this is a lifelong condition. PMID:26506381

  16. Advances in Diagnosis and Management of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ciarán P.; Bai, Julio C.; Liu, Edwin; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder induced by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has a prevalence of ∼1% in many populations worldwide. New diagnoses have increased substantially, due to increased awareness, better diagnostic tools, and probable, real increases in incidence. The breadth of recognized clinical presentations continues to expand, making the disorder highly relevant to all physicians. Newer diagnostic tools, including serologic tests for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptide, greatly facilitate diagnosis. Tests for celiac-permissive HLA DQ2 and DQ8 molecules are useful in defined clinical situations. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsies. However, according to recent controversial guidelines, a diagnosis can be made without biopsy in certain circumstances, especially for children. Symptoms, mortality, and risk for malignancy can each be reduced by adherence to a gluten-free diet. This treatment is a challenge, however, as the diet is expensive, socially isolating, and not always effective in controlling symptoms or intestinal damage. Hence, there is increasing interest in developing non-dietary therapies. PMID:25662623

  17. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: Time for sifting the grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-07-21

    In the last few years, a new nomenclature has been proposed for the disease induced by the ingestion of gluten, a protein present in wheat, rice, barley and oats. Besides celiac disease and wheat allergy, the most studied forms of gluten-related disorders characterized by an evident immune mechanism (autoimmune in celiac disease and IgE-mediated in wheat allergy), a new entity has been included, apparently not driven by an aberrant immune response: the non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). NCGS is characterized by a heterogeneous clinical picture with intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms arising after gluten ingestion and rapidly improving after its withdrawal from the diet. The pathogenesis of NCGS is largely unknown, but a mixture of factors such as the stimulation of the innate immune system, the direct cytotoxic effects of gluten, and probably the synergy with other wheat molecules, are clues for the complicated puzzle. In addition, the diagnostic procedures still remain problematic due to the absence of efficient diagnostic markers; thus, diagnosis is based upon the symptomatic response to a gluten-free diet and the recurrence of symptoms after gluten reintroduction with the possibility of an important involvement of a placebo effect. The temporary withdrawal of gluten seems a reasonable therapy, but the timing of gluten reintroduction and the correct patient management approach are have not yet been determined.

  18. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: people without celiac disease avoiding gluten-is it due to histamine intolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnedl, Wolfgang J; Lackner, Sonja; Enko, Dietmar; Schenk, Michael; Mangge, Harald; Holasek, Sandra J

    2018-04-01

    Food intolerance/malabsorption is caused by food ingredients, carbohydrates (mainly lactose and fructose), proteins (gluten), and biogenic amines (histamine) which cause nonspecific gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms. Here we focus on possible etiologic factors of intolerance/malabsorption especially in people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) or the so-called people without celiac disease avoiding gluten (PWCDAG) and histamine intolerance. Recognizing the recently described symptoms of NCGS (PWCDAG) we review correlations and parallels to histamine intolerance (HIT). We show that intestinal and extra-intestinal NCGS (PWCDAG) symptoms are very similar to those which can be found in histamine intolerance. After a detailed diagnostic workup for all possible etiologic factors in every patient, a targeted dietary intervention for single or possibly combined intolerance/malabsorption might be more effective than a short-term diet low in fermentable oligo-, di- and monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) or the untargeted uncritical use of gluten-free diets.

  19. Reproductive life disorders in Italian celiac women. A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinelli Domenico

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to explore the association between celiac disease and menstrual cycle, gestation and puerperal disorders. Methods The association between celiac disease and menstrual cycle, gestation and puerperal disorders in a sample of 62 childbearing age women (15-49 age was assessed within an age and town of residence matched case-control study conducted in 2008. Main outcome measures were the presence of one or more disorders in menstrual cycle and the presence of one or more complication during pregnancy. Results 62 celiac women (median age: 31.5, range: 17-49 and 186 healthy control (median age: 32.5, range: 15-49 were interviewed. A higher percentage of menstrual cycle disorders has been observed in celiac women. 19.4% frequency of amenorrhea was reported among celiac women versus 2.2% among healthy controls (OR = 33, 95% CI = 7.17-151.8;, p = 0.000. An association has been observed between celiac disease and oligomenorrhea, hypomenorrhea, dysmenorrhea and metrorrhagia (p Conclusions The occurrence of a significant correlation between celiac disease and reproductive disorders could suggest to consider celiac disease diagnostic procedures (serological screening in women affected by these disorders.

  20. Flow cytometry of duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytes improves diagnosis of celiac disease in difficult cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Julio; Morgado, José Mario T; Ruiz-Martín, Juan; Guardiola, Antonio; Lopes-Nogueras, Miriam; García-Vela, Almudena; Martín-Sacristán, Beatriz; Sánchez-Muñoz, Laura

    2017-10-01

    Diagnosis of celiac disease is difficult when the combined results of serology and histology are inconclusive. Studies using flow cytometry of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) have found that celiac patients have increased numbers of γδ IELs, along with a decrease in CD3-CD103 + IELs. The objective of this article is to assess the role of flow cytometric analysis of IELs in the diagnosis of celiac disease in difficult cases. A total of 312 patients with suspicion of celiac disease were included in the study. Duodenal biopsy samples were used for histological assessment and for flow cytometric analysis of IELs. In 46 out of 312 cases (14.7%) the combination of serology and histology did not allow the confirmation or exclusion of celiac disease. HLA typing had been performed in 42 of these difficult cases. Taking into account HLA typing and the response to a gluten-free diet, celiac disease was excluded in 30 of these cases and confirmed in the remaining 12. Flow cytometric analysis of IELs allowed a correct diagnosis in 39 out of 42 difficult cases (92.8%) and had a sensitivity of 91.7% (95% CI: 61.5% to 99.8%) and a specificity of 93.3% (95% CI: 77.9% to 99.2%) for the diagnosis of celiac disease in this setting. Flow cytometric analysis of IELs is useful for the diagnosis of celiac disease in difficult cases.

  1. The surface-associated proteins of wheat starch granules: suitability of wheat starch for celiac patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat starch is used to make baked products for celiac patients in several European countries, but is avoided in the US because of uncertainty about the amounts of associated grain storage (gluten) proteins. People with celiac disease (CD) must avoid wheat, rye and barley proteins and products that...

  2. Neurohistopathologic findings after a neurolytic celiac plexus block with alcohol in patients with pancreatic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; Zuurmond, W. W. A.; van Kemenade, F. J.; Dzoljic, M.

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a very poor prognosis resulting in the death of 98% of patients. Pain may be severe and difficult to treat. Management of pain includes chemotherapy, radiotherapy, pharmacologic treatment, and neurolytic celiac plexus block. Recent reviews of the efficacy of neurolytic celiac

  3. The Relationship Between Child Mortality Rates and Prevalence of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Federico; Raiteri, Alberto; Schiepatti, Annalisa; Klersy, Catherine; Corazza, Gino R

    2018-02-01

    Some evidence suggests that prevalence of celiac disease in the general population is increasing over time. Because the prognosis of celiac disease was a dismal one before discovering the role of gluten, our aim was to investigate a possible relationship between children under-5 mortality rates and prevalence rates of celiac disease. Thanks to a literature review, we found 27 studies performed in 17 different countries describing the prevalence of celiac disease in schoolchildren; between 1995 and 2011, 4 studies were performed in Italy. A meta-analysis of prevalence rates was performed. Prevalence was compared between specific country under-5 mortality groups, publication year, and age. In the last decades, under-5 mortality rates have been decreasing all over the world. This reduction is paralleled by an increase of the prevalence of celiac disease. The Spearman correlation coefficient was -63%, 95% confidence interval -82% to -33% (P celiac disease in the general population. In the near future, the number of patients with celiac disease will increase, thanks to the better environmental conditions that nowadays allow a better survival of children with celiac disease.

  4. Autoimmune Disease in First-Degree Relatives and Spouses of Individuals With Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emilsson, Louise; Wijmenga, Cisca; Murray, Joseph A.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: First-degree relatives of individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk for this disorder, but little is known about their risk for other autoimmune diseases. We assessed the risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease in first-degree relatives and spouses of people with celiac

  5. Celiac lesion T cells recognize epitopes that cluster in regions of gliadins rich in proline residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentz-Hansen, Helene; McAdam, Stephen N; Molberg, Øyvind

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Celiac disease is a gluten-induced enteropathy that shows a strong association with HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8. Gluten-specific T cells, invariably restricted by DQ2 or DQ8, can be isolated from celiac lesions. Such gut-derived T cells have a preference for recognition of gluten that has...

  6. Asymptomatic Celiac Disease in Children with Trisomy 21 at 26 Months of Age or Less

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J. Roizen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of asymptomatic celiac disease identified in children with Down syndrome after being screened at around twenty-four months of age.  These cases raise the question as to what age is screening for celiac disease indicated in a child with Down syndrome and no symptoms.

  7. Positive Celiac Disease Serology and Reduced Bone Mineral Density in Adult Women

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    Donald R Duerksen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low bone density and osteoporosis have been demonstrated in celiac disease populations in Europe, South America and the United States. Serological testing with tissue transglutaminase (TTG and immunoglobulin A endomysial (EMA antibodies is highly specific for celiac disease, while antigliadin antibody (AGA testing is less specific.

  8. Enteroclysis in adult celiac disease: diagnostic value of specific radiographic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomoschitz, F.; Schima, W.; Schober, E.; Turetschek, K.; Kaider, A.; Vogelsang, H.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various radiographic findings at enteroclysis in adult patients with untreated celiac disease. Twenty-seven adult patients underwent enteroclysis because of unspecific intestinal symptoms before definitive biopsy proof of celiac disease. Enteroclysis of 123 subjects with similar clinical presentation, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, occult intestinal bleeding, and weight loss, who had a definitive diagnosis other than celiac disease, served as controls. The radiographic features previously described in the literature as indicative of adult celiac disease (i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds, increase of ileal folds, small bowel dilatation, flocculation) were evaluated in blinded fashion in all studies and the subjective likelihood of diagnosis of celiac disease was assessed. Assessing every finding separately, each feature proved to have a high specificity (78-100%) but low sensitivity (19-59%) for celiac disease. Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern was the single best feature (specificity 100%, 95% CI 97-100%; sensitivity 59%, 95% CI 40-78%); however, combination of criteria enables establishment of the diagnosis of celiac disease quite accurately (specificity 100%, 95% CI 98-100%; sensitivity 78%, 95% CI 58-91%). Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern as a single finding as well as combination at least three of the following features, i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds (''colonization''), increase of ileal folds (''jejunization''), dilatation, and flocculation, make enteroclysis an accurate tool for diagnosis of celiac disease in adult patients with suspected intestinal disease. (orig.)

  9. The MY09B gene is a strong risk factor for developing refractory Celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Victorien M.; Verbeek, Wieke H. M.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Onland-Moret, Charlotte; Schreurs, Marco W. J.; Monsuur, Alienke J.; Verduijn, Willem; Wijmenga, Cisca; Mulder, Chris J. J.

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims: Celiac disease (CD) is associated with HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 and has been linked to genetic variants in the MY09B gene on chromosome 19. HLA-DQ2 homozygosity is associated with complications of CD such as refractory celiac disease type II (RCD II) and enteropathy-associated T-cell

  10. Celiac symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Leiva, Juan Miguel; Carrasco, Jorge Luis Ordóñez; Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena P

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome associated with numerous somatic symptoms including gastrointestinal manifestations of nonspecific nature. Celiac disease and nongluten sensitivity frequently evolve in adults with gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms similar to those found among patients with fibromyalgia. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence of celiac-type symptoms among patients with fibromyalgia in comparison with healthy subjects and with those experienced by adult celiac patients and subjects with gluten sensitivity. A list of typical celiac-type symptoms was developed, comparing the frequency of presentation of these symptoms between patients with fibromyalgia (N = 178) and healthy subjects (N = 131), in addition to those of celiac patients and gluten-sensitive patients reported in the literature. The frequency of presentation of every celiac-type symptom, excepting anemia, was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to controls (p fibromyalgia, whereas the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms was higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to gluten-sensitive patients and was similar among patients with fibromyalgia and celiac disease patient. The symptomatological similarity of both pathologies, especially gastrointestinal symptoms, suggests that at least a subgroup of patients with fibromyalgia could experience subclinical celiac disease or nonceliac gluten intolerance.

  11. Is MYO9B the missing link between schizophrenia and celiac disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, Bart J.; Bakker, Steven C.; Monsuur, Alienke J.; Sinke, Richard J.; Kahn, Rene S.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2008-01-01

    There has long been discussion on the correlation between schizophrenia and autoimmune diseases (especially celiac disease), which makes the recently discovered celiac disease risk factor, MYO9B, an attractive functional and positional candidate gene for schizophrenia. To test this hypothesis we

  12. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF GASTROENTEROLOGY CLINICAL GUIDELINE: DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Hill, Ivor D; Kelly, Ciarán P; Calderwood, Audrey H; Murray, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with celiac disease. Celiac disease is an immune-based reaction to dietary gluten (storage protein for wheat, barley and rye) that primarily affects the small intestine in those with a genetic predisposition and resolves with exclusion of gluten from the diet. There has been a substantial increase in the prevalence of celiac disease over the last 50 years and an increase in the rate of diagnosis in the last 10 years. Celiac disease can present with many symptoms, including typical gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. diarrhea, steatorrhea, weight loss, bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain) and also non-gastrointestinal abnormalities (e.g. abnormal liver function tests, iron deficiency anemia, bone disease, skin disorders, and many other protean manifestations). Indeed, many individuals with celiac disease may have no symptoms at all. Celiac disease is usually detected by serologic testing of celiac-specific antibodies. The diagnosis is confirmed by duodenal mucosal biopsies. Both serology and biopsy should be performed on a gluten-containing diet. The treatment for celiac disease is primarily a gluten-free diet (GFD), which requires significant patient education, motivation, and follow-up. Non-responsive celiac disease occurs frequently, particularly in those diagnosed in adulthood. Persistent or recurring symptoms should lead to a review of the patient’s original diagnosis to exclude alternative diagnoses, a review of the GFD to ensure there is no obvious gluten contamination, and serologic testing to confirm adherence with the GFD. In addition, evaluation for disorders associated with celiac disease that could cause persistent symptoms, such as microscopic colitis, pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, and complications of celiac disease, such as enteropathy-associated lymphoma or refractory celiac disease, should be entertained. Newer therapeutic modalities are being studied in clinical

  13. Global Prevalence of Celiac Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant; Arora, Ananya; Strand, Tor A; Leffler, Daniel A; Catassi, Carlo; Green, Peter H; Kelly, Ciaran P; Ahuja, Vineet; Makharia, Govind K

    2018-03-15

    Celiac disease is a major public health problem worldwide. Although initially it was reported from countries with predominant Caucasian populations, it now has been reported from other parts of the world. The exact global prevalence of celiac disease is not known. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. We searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords celiac disease, celiac, celiac disease, tissue transglutaminase antibody, anti-endomysium antibody, endomysial antibody, and prevalence for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. Each article was cross-referenced with the words Asia, Europe, Africa, South America, North America, and Australia. The diagnosis of celiac disease was based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. Of 3843 articles, 96 articles were included in the final analysis. The pooled global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% (95% confidence interval, 1.1%-1.7%) in 275,818 individuals, based on positive results from tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies (called seroprevalence). The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% (95% confidence interval, 0.5%-0.9%) in 138,792 individuals. The prevalence values for celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was higher in female vs male individuals (0.6% vs 0.4%; P celiac disease was significantly greater in children than adults (0.9% vs 0.5%; P celiac disease to be reported worldwide. The prevalence of celiac disease based on serologic test results is 1.4% and based on biopsy results is 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. There is a need for population-based prevalence studies in many countries. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dermatomyositis Associated with Celiac Disease: Response to a Gluten-Free Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Soo Song

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between dermatomyositis and celiac disease in children has been well documented. In the adult population, however, the association has not been clearly established. A rare case of concomitant dermatomyositis and celiac disease in a 40-year-old woman is presented. After having been diagnosed with dermatomyositis and iron deficiency anemia, this patient was referred to the gastroenterology clinic to exclude a gastrointestinal malignancy. Blood tests revealed various vitamin deficiencies consistent with malabsorption. The results of gastroscopy with duodenal biopsy were consistent with celiac disease. After she was put on a strict gluten-free diet, both nutritional deficiencies and the dermatomyositis resolved. The patient’s human leukocyte antigen haplotype study was positive for DR3 and DQ2, which have been shown to be associated with both juvenile dermatomyositis and celiac disease. It is suggested that patients with newly diagnosed dermatomyositis be investigated for concomitant celiac disease even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.

  15. Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma as a complication of silent celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Dantas Brito

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which a genetic predisposition and the ingestion of wheat gluten triggers a deleterious immune response. This response is complex and may lead to manifestations other than enteropathyha: hepatitis, dermatitis and neuropathy. There is higher risk for neoplasia. We observed an atypical case, corresponding to a 69-year old female presenting with complicated celiac disease. The patient was referred following the histological examination of an enterectomy specimen, which unexpectedly revealed an enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma in a background of celiac disease. Patient’s previous medical history comprised several abdominal surgical procedures, without other prior symptoms suggestive of celiac disease. Indeed, the patient was obese and no signs of malabsortion were apparent. This case draws our attention to clinically silent celiac disease, which represents a diagnostic challenge. Thus, this should be kept in mind whenever a patient presents with abdominal relapsing complications, otherwise unexplained.

  16. Celiac disease diagnosed after uncomplicated pregnancy in a patient with history of bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milisavljević Nemanja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The association between celiac disease and eating disorders has been very rarely reported. This is the first report on celiac disease associated with bulimia in this part of Europe. Case report. An adult female patient with history of bulimia and one uncomplicated pregnancy was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department, due to long lasting dyspeptic symptoms, constipation, major weight loss and fatigue. After positive serological screening, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed with histopathology examination of duodenal biopsy specimen. Conclusion. Complicated interactions between celiac disease and bulimia can make them difficult to diagnose and treat. It is important to consider the presence of celiac disease in patients with bulimia and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  17. Validation of celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register using duodenal biopsies, celiac disease-specific antibodies, and human leukocyte-antigen genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Stine Dydensborg; Stordal, Ketil; Hansen, Tine Plato

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. To validate the diagnoses, we used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank) and information on celiac disease......-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes obtained from patient medical records. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included all the children who were born from 1995 to 2012 and who were registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. We reviewed all the pathology reports...... on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank and the information in the medical records on celiac disease-specific antibodies (ie, anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG) and HLA genotypes. RESULTS: We identified 2,247 children who were...

  18. Segmental embolization of the gastroduodenal artery in a case of a perforated pseudoaneurysm and gastrointestinal bleeding; Segmentembolisation der Arteria gastroduodenalis bei perforiertem Pseudoaneurysma und gastrointestinaler Massivblutung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie der Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Nuernberg-Erlangen (Germany); Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie der Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Cavallaro, A.; Bautz, W. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie der Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Nuernberg-Erlangen (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    We present the history of a woman suffering from an extensive gastrointestinal bleeding due to liver cirrhosis and chronic pancreatitis. Selective angiogram of the celiac artery revealed a pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery caused by inflammatory wall penetration. The life-threatening hemorrhage was completely stopped by embolization with three stainless steel coils after microcatheter engagement of the gastroduodenal artery. The particularity of this case is the restricted embolization of the aneurysm vessel segment, so the collateral circulation of the gastroduodenal and pancreaticoduodenal artery could be preserved. (orig.)

  19. Celiac disease in children from Madeira island and its prevalence in first degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Joana Raquel Henriques; Cabral, António Jorge; Ferreira, Elena; Capelinha, Filipa; Spínola, Hélder; Gonçalves, Rute

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that celiac disease is an immune-mediated systemic disorder highly prevalent among relatives of celiac patients. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in a group of first degree relatives of celiac children, and to access the frequency of human leukocyte antigen HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 in celiac disease patients and their affected relatives. A survey was conducted of 39 children with celiac disease with follow-up in the Pediatric outpatient's clinic of Dr. Nélio Mendonça Hospital, in Madeira Island, Portugal. Were invited 110 first degree relatives to undergo serological screen for celiac disease with IgA antibody to human recombinant tissue transglutaminase (IgA-TGG) quantification. In all seropositive relatives, small intestinal biopsy and HLA typing was recommended. HLA- typing was performed in 38 celiac patients, 28/74% DQ2 positive, 1/2% DQ8 positive and 9/24% incomplete DQ2. Positive IgA-TGG was found in five out of the 95 relatives, and CD was diagnosed in three of them. Three relatives had the presence of HLA-DQ2, two were DQ2 incomplete (DQB1*02). The prevalence of celiac disease among first degree celiac patients´ relatives was 3.1%, 4.5 times higher than the general Portuguese population (0,7%) witch reinforces the need of extensive diagnostic screening in this specific group. HLA-DQ2 typing may be a tool in the diagnostic approach.

  20. Successful Treatment of Acute on Chronic Mesenteric Ischaemia by Common Iliac to Inferior Mesenteric Artery Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Coakley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic mesenteric ischaemia is a rare and potentially fatal condition most commonly due to atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of two or more mesenteric arteries. Multivessel revascularisation of both primary mesenteric vessels, the celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery (SMA, is the current mainstay of treatment; however, in a certain cohort of patients, revascularisation one or both vessels may not be possible. Arteries may be technically unreconstructable or the patient may be surgically unfit for the prolonged aortic cross clamping times required. Here we present a case involving a 72-year-old woman with acute on chronic mesenteric ischaemia. She was a high risk surgical patient with severe unreconstructable stenotic disease of the SMA and celiac arteries. She was successfully treated with single vessel revascularisation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA via a common iliac to IMA reversed vein bypass. At two-year follow-up, the graft remains patent and the patient continues to be symptom-free and is maintaining her weight.

  1. Transcultural adaptation and validation of the Celiac Disease Quality of Life (CD-QOL survey, a specific questionnaire to measure quality of life in patients with celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Casellas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: celiac disease is a chronic condition that requires continued treatment, with the resultant impact on health-related quality of life (HRQOL of people who suffer it. Most studies in this field have used generic questionnaires to measure HRQOL in celiac patients. It was therefore decided to conduct a study to translate into Spanish and validate a specific questionnaire for celiac disease, the Celiac Disease Quality Of Life Survey (CD-QOL. Objectives: to translate and validate in Spanish the specific celiac disease questionnaire CD-QOL. Methods: a multicenter, prospective, observational study was designed consisting of two phases: In the first phase, the questionnaire was translated and adapted into Spanish using the translation/back translation procedure and an understandability study. In the second phase, internal consistency of the translated questionnaire was analyzed. For this, results of the CD-QOL were compared to those of EuroQol and the Daily Fatigue Impact Scale (D-FIS. Understandability of the translated and adapted questionnaire was tested in six patients, and the validation study was done in 298 celiac patients (201 treated with a gluten-free diet and 97 at diagnosis. Results: in both celiac groups, Cronbach's alpha coefficient was high (0.90, feasibility was excellent (99.2 % of patients completed all questions, and there were no ceiling and floor effects. Spearman correlation to EuroQol and D-FIS was statistically significant (p < 0.05. CD-QOL score was different depending on whether state of health was good, fair, or poor based on the EuroQol score. Conclusion: the Spanish version of the CD-QOL is a valid tool for measuring HRQOL in celiac patients.

  2. Increased Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Patients with Unexplained Infertility in the United States: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Wang, Jeffrey; Lee, Susie K.; Murray, Joseph A.; Sauer, Mark V.; Green, Peter H. R.

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder which can present with a variety of non-gastrointestinal manifestations. In women, it may manifest with an assortment of gynecologic or obstetric disorders. Some reports have linked female infertility with undiagnosed celiac disease. Though there are a number of studies from Europe and the Middle East, only two prior American studies have examined the prevalence of “silent” celiac disease in a female infertility population. We prospectively performed serologic screening for celiac disease in 188 infertile women (ages 25–39). While we did not demonstrate an increased prevalence of celiac disease in our overall infertile female population, we were able to detect a significantly increased prevalence (5.9%) of undiagnosed celiac disease among women presenting with unexplained infertility (n=51). Our findings suggest the importance of screening infertile female patients, particularly those with unexplained infertility, for celiac disease. PMID:21682114

  3. Intestinal T-cell responses in celiac disease - impact of celiac disease associated bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Sjöberg

    Full Text Available A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD, an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequently seen in patients with CD during the "Swedish CD epidemic" and bacterial candidates could later be isolated from patients born during the epidemic suggesting long-lasting changes in the gut microbiota. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A plays a role in both inflammation and anti-bacterial responses. In active CD IL-17A was produced by both CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 and CD4(+ T cells (Th17, with intraepithelial Tc17 cells being the dominant producers. Gluten peptides as well as CD associated bacteria induced IL-17A responses in ex vivo challenged biopsies from patients with inactive CD. The IL-17A response was suppressed in patients born during the epidemic when a mixture of CD associated bacteria was added to gluten, while the reverse was the case in patients born after the epidemic. Under these conditions Th17 cells were the dominant producers. Thus Tc17 and Th17 responses to gluten and bacteria seem to pave the way for the chronic disease with interferon-γ-production by intraepithelial Tc1 cells and lamina propria Th1 cells. The CD associated bacteria and the dysbiosis they might cause in the resident microbiota may be a risk factor for CD either by directly influencing the immune responses in the mucosa or by enhancing inflammatory responses to gluten.

  4. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Asymptomatic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this evidence-based analysis was to evaluate the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated in this report. The clinical utility was based on the effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) on outcomes specific to each of these conditions. The prevalence of celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals and one of these non-gastrointestinal conditions was also evaluated. Clinical Need and Target Population Celiac Disease Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic inflammatory state of the proximal small bowel mucosa accompanied by structural and functional changes. Technology Under Evaluation Serologic Tests for Celiac Disease There are a number of serologic tests for celiac disease available. Serologic tests are automated with the exception of the anti-endomysial antibody test, which is more time-consuming and operator-dependent than the other tests. Research Questions What is the prevalence of asymptomatic celiac disease in patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the effect of the gluten-free diet on condition-specific outcomes in patients with asymptomatic celiac disease presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? The clinical utility was defined as the impact of the GFD on disease specific outcomes. What is the risk of all-cause mortality and lymphoma in individuals with asymptomatic celiac disease? What is the budget impact of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic subjects presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? Research Methods Study Population The study population consisted of individuals with newly diagnosed celiac

  5. Nutritional status variation and intestinal and extra intestinal symptomatology in patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity given specialized dietary advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Vaz de Melo RIBEIRO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the nutritional status variation and symptomatology of patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity after specialized dietary advice Methods: This prospective study included 80 patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Clinical, metabolic, and nutritional variables were collected from medical records, and the symptomatology was investigated by the Metabolic Screening Questionnaire. The variables were assessed on two occasions (T1 - before dietary advice and T2 - after dietary advice with an interval of three months between T1 and T2 Results: The median age was 42 years. The prevalences of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity were 66.2% and 33.8%, respectively. Normal weight prevailed at T1 (58.8% and T2 (56.3%, but 30.0% of the patients at T1 and 34.9% of the patients at T2 had excess weight. The two conditions had similar symptomatology. The most frequent signs and symptoms on both occasions involved the gastrointestinal tract, followed by energy/activity and emotions. All symptoms decreased significantly after the introduction of a proper diet Conclusion: The patients were normal weight on both study occasions (T1 and T2, and the symptoms improved after dietary advice. Thus, we reinforce the importance of proper dietary management in both clinical conditions to make dietary adjustments that improve these individuals' symptomatology.

  6. Studies on blood supply of liver metastasis with DSA, CT and portal vein perfusion CT during superior mesenteric arterial portography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhigang; Shi Gaofeng; Huang Jingxiang; Li Shunzong; Liang Guoqing; Wang Hongguang; Han Pengyin; Wang Qi; Gu Tieshu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To probe the blood supply of liver metastasis by celiac artery, proper hepatic artery DSA, portal vein perfusion CT during superior mesenteric arterial portography (PCTAP). Methods: One hundred patients with liver metastases were examined prospectively by plain CT scan, multiphase enhanced CT scan, celiac arteriography and proper hepatic arteriography. Of them, 56 patients were examined by PCTAP. All primary lesions were confirmed by operation and (or) pathology examination. In order to investigate the blood supply of metastasis lesions, the software of Photoshop was used to obtain the time-attenuation curves (TDC) of tumor center, tumor edge, portal vein and normal liver parenchyma adjacent to the tumor to calculate liver perfusion for DSA image analysis, while a deconvolution model from CT perfusion software was designed for the dual blood supply. Results: DSA findings: TDC of proper hepatic arteriography showed: the mean peak concentration (K value) in tumor centers was (67 ± 12)%, and it was (76 ± 15)% for peritumor tissue, (51 ± 10)% in normal liver parenchyma. TDC of celiac arteriogaphy showed that the contrast concentration of tumor centers and tumor edge increased fast in early stage, then maintained a slight upward plateau, in the meanwhile, the contrast concentration of normal liver parenchyma kept increasing slowly. PCTAP findings: tumors exhibited no enhancement during 30 s continued scans. Conclusion: The blood supply of liver metastasis mainly comes from hepatic artery, but barely from portal vein. (authors)

  7. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Hwang, Mi Soo; Kim, Sun Yong; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan [College of Medicine, Yeungam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-06-15

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures.

  8. Arterial anomaly of crucial importance in resection of head of pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J M; Woldenberg, L S; Conover, S V

    1989-01-01

    In a patient with pancreatic cancer, an arterial anomaly was observed that apparently consisted of the congenital absence of the celiac axis and the replacement of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade by an anomalous vessel. The complete or near-complete arterial flow to the liver and spleen depended upon this anomalous prepancreatic vessel that arose from the superior mesenteric artery. The anomaly was demonstrated preoperatively by arteriography. At laparotomy, the anomalous artery was prominent, lying across the surface of the head of the pancreas. Unrecognized, its operative interruption might have threatened the life of the patient. Resection of the head of the pancreas would have required restoration of the arterial flow, preferably by vascular grafting. The anomaly appears to be different from those previously described.

  9. High Incidence of Celiac Disease in a Long-term Study of Adolescents With Susceptibility Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Edwin; Dong, Fran; Barón, Anna E; Taki, Iman; Norris, Jill M; Frohnert, Brigitte I; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Rewers, Marian

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the incidence of celiac disease in the general population of children in the United States. We aimed to estimate the cumulative incidence of celiac disease in adolescents born in the Denver metropolitan area. We collected data on HLA-DR, DQ genotypes of 31,766 infants, born from 1993 through 2004 at St. Joseph's Hospital in Denver, from the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young. Subjects with susceptibility genotypes for celiac disease and type 1 diabetes were followed up for up to 20 years for development of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). Outcomes were the development of celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA) or celiac disease. CDA was defined as persistence of tTGA for at least 3 months or development of celiac disease. Celiac disease was defined based on detection of Marsh 2 or greater lesions in biopsy specimens or persistent high levels of tTGA. For each genotype, the cumulative incidence of CDA and celiac disease were determined. To estimate the cumulative incidence in the Denver general population, outcomes by each genotype were weighted according to the frequency of each of these genotypes in the general population. Of 1339 subjects followed up, 66 developed CDA and met criteria for celiac disease and 46 developed only CDA. Seropositivity for tTGA resolved spontaneously, without treatment, in 21 of the 46 subjects with only CDA (46%). The estimated cumulative incidence for CDA in the Denver general population at 5, 10, and 15 years of age was 2.4%, 4.3%, and 5.1%, respectively, and incidence values for celiac disease were 1.6%, 2.8%, and 3.1%, respectively. In a 20-year prospective study of 1339 children with genetic risk factors for celiac disease, we found the cumulative incidence of CDA and celiac disease to be high within the first 10 years. Although more than 5% of children may experience a period of CDA, not all children develop celiac disease or require gluten-free diets. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published

  10. Increased Risk of Esophageal Eosinophilia and Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Patients With Active Celiac Disease on Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Elizabeth T; Eluri, Swathi; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Genta, Robert M; Dellon, Evan S

    2015-08-01

    The possible association between eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and celiac disease is controversial because prior results have been contradictory. We aimed to determine the relationship between EoE and celiac disease among patients with concomitant esophageal and duodenal biopsies. We conducted a cross-sectional study in a U.S. national pathology database by using data from January 2009 through June 2012. Our primary case definition was defined by the presence of esophageal eosinophilia with ≥15 eosinophils per high-power field. The crude and adjusted (for age and sex) odds of esophageal eosinophilia for patients with active celiac disease were compared with those without celiac disease. Sensitivity analyses were performed by using more stringent case definitions and by estimating the associations between celiac disease and reflux esophagitis and celiac disease and Barrett's esophagus. Of 292,621 patients in the source population, 88,517 with both esophageal and duodenal biopsies were studied. Four thousand one hundred one (4.6%) met criteria for EoE, and 1203 (1.4%) met criteria for celiac disease. Odds of EoE were 26% higher in patients with celiac disease than in patients without celiac disease (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98-1.60). The magnitude of association varied according to EoE case definition, but all definitions showed a weak positive association between the 2 conditions. There was no association between celiac disease and reflux esophagitis (aOR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.85-1.07) or Barrett's esophagus (aOR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.69-1.14) and celiac disease. There is a weak increase in EoE in patients with celiac disease. This association strengthened with increasingly stringent definitions of EoE and was not observed for other esophageal conditions. In patients with celiac disease, concomitant EoE should be considered in the correct clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  11. Risk of Pediatric Celiac Disease According to HLA Haplotype and Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Edwin; Lee, Hye-Seung; Aronsson, Carin A.; Hagopian, William A.; Koletzko, Sibylle; Rewers, Marian J.; Eisenbarth, George S.; Bingley, Polly J.; Bonifacio, Ezio; Simell, Ville; Agardh, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The presence of HLA haplotype DR3–DQ2 or DR4–DQ8 is associated with an increased risk of celiac disease. In addition, nearly all children with celiac disease have serum antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG). METHODS We studied 6403 children with HLA haplotype DR3–DQ2 or DR4–DQ8 prospectively from birth in the United States, Finland, Germany, and Sweden. The primary end point was the development of celiac disease autoimmunity, which was defined as the presence of tTG antibodies on two consecutive tests at least 3 months apart. The secondary end point was the development of celiac disease, which was defined for the purpose of this study as either a diagnosis on biopsy or persistently high levels of tTG antibodies. RESULTS The median follow-up was 60 months (interquartile range, 46 to 77). Celiac disease autoimmunity developed in 786 children (12%). Of the 350 children who underwent biopsy, 291 had confirmed celiac disease; an additional 21 children who did not undergo biopsy had persistently high levels of tTG antibodies. The risks of celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease by the age of 5 years were 11% and 3%, respectively, among children with a single DR3–DQ2 haplotype, and 26% and 11%, respectively, among those with two copies (DR3–DQ2 homozygosity). In the adjusted model, the hazard ratios for celiac disease autoimmunity were 2.09 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.70 to 2.56) among heterozygotes and 5.70 (95% CI, 4.66 to 6.97) among homozygotes, as compared with children who had the lowest-risk genotypes (DR4–DQ8 heterozygotes or homozygotes). Residence in Sweden was also independently associated with an increased risk of celiac disease autoimmunity (hazard ratio, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.61 to 2.25). CONCLUSIONS Children with the HLA haplotype DR3–DQ2, especially homozygotes, were found to be at high risk for celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease early in childhood. The higher risk in Sweden than in other countries

  12. Autoimmune Disease in First-Degree Relatives and Spouses of Individuals With Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilsson, Louise; Wijmenga, Cisca; Murray, Joseph A; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-07-01

    First-degree relatives of individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk for this disorder, but little is known about their risk for other autoimmune diseases. We assessed the risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease in first-degree relatives and spouses of people with celiac disease. We identified individuals with celiac disease by searching computerized duodenal and jejunal biopsies, collected from 1969 through 2008, at 28 pathology departments in Sweden. Celiac disease was identified based on biopsy reports of villous atrophy (equal to Marsh grade 3; n = 29,096). Individuals with celiac disease were matched with up to 5 controls (people without celiac disease) for sex, age, county, and calendar year (total, 144,522 controls). Through Swedish health care registries, we identified all first-degree relatives (fathers, mothers, siblings, and offspring) and spouses of individuals with celiac disease (n = 84,648) and controls (n = 430,942). We used Cox regression analysis to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for nonceliac autoimmune disease (Crohn's disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, sarcoidosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or ulcerative colitis) in these groups. During the follow-up period (median, 10.8 y), 3333 of the first-degree relatives of patients with celiac disease (3.9%) and 12,860 relatives of controls (3.0%) had an autoimmune disease other than celiac disease. First-degree relatives of people with celiac disease were at increased risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease, compared with controls (HR, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-1.33), as were spouses (HR, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.35). Risk estimates for nonceliac autoimmune disease did not differ between first-degree relatives and spouses of individuals with celiac disease (interaction test: P = .11). HRs for nonceliac autoimmune disease were highest in the first 2 years of follow-up evaluation. First-degree relatives and

  13. Risk of pediatric celiac disease according to HLA haplotype and country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Edwin; Lee, Hye-Seung; Aronsson, Carin A; Hagopian, William A; Koletzko, Sibylle; Rewers, Marian J; Eisenbarth, George S; Bingley, Polly J; Bonifacio, Ezio; Simell, Ville; Agardh, Daniel

    2014-07-03

    The presence of HLA haplotype DR3-DQ2 or DR4-DQ8 is associated with an increased risk of celiac disease. In addition, nearly all children with celiac disease have serum antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG). We studied 6403 children with HLA haplotype DR3-DQ2 or DR4-DQ8 prospectively from birth in the United States, Finland, Germany, and Sweden. The primary end point was the development of celiac disease autoimmunity, which was defined as the presence of tTG antibodies on two consecutive tests at least 3 months apart. The secondary end point was the development of celiac disease, which was defined for the purpose of this study as either a diagnosis on biopsy or persistently high levels of tTG antibodies. The median follow-up was 60 months (interquartile range, 46 to 77). Celiac disease autoimmunity developed in 786 children (12%). Of the 350 children who underwent biopsy, 291 had confirmed celiac disease; an additional 21 children who did not undergo biopsy had persistently high levels of tTG antibodies. The risks of celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease by the age of 5 years were 11% and 3%, respectively, among children with a single DR3-DQ2 haplotype, and 26% and 11%, respectively, among those with two copies (DR3-DQ2 homozygosity). In the adjusted model, the hazard ratios for celiac disease autoimmunity were 2.09 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.70 to 2.56) among heterozygotes and 5.70 (95% CI, 4.66 to 6.97) among homozygotes, as compared with children who had the lowest-risk genotypes (DR4-DQ8 heterozygotes or homozygotes). Residence in Sweden was also independently associated with an increased risk of celiac disease autoimmunity (hazard ratio, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.61 to 2.25). Children with the HLA haplotype DR3-DQ2, especially homozygotes, were found to be at high risk for celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease early in childhood. The higher risk in Sweden than in other countries highlights the importance of studying environmental

  14. Suppression of food intake by GI fatty acid infusions: roles of celiac vagal afferents and cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, James E; Kelm, Gary R; Meller, Stephen T; Randich, Alan

    2004-08-01

    We have found that jejunal infusions of long-chain fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA) and oleic acid (OA), and gastric infusions of a fatty acid ethyl ester, ethyl oleate (EO), produce long-lasting suppression of total caloric intake. This effect is not seen in response to jejunal infusions of medium-chain fatty acids or medium- or long-chain triglycerides. Multiunit recordings have shown that intestinal infusions of LA or OA strongly activate celiac vagal afferents. Truncal vagotomy (TVX) and selective celiac-branch vagotomy (CVX) are equally effective in attenuating, but not eliminating, suppression of food intake by LA and EO. These outcomes suggest that intraintestinal fatty acids reduce intake by activation of vagal mechanisms, critically involving afferent fibers within the celiac branches, as well as unidentified nonvagal mechanisms. The role of cholecystokinin (CCK) in mediating the activation of celiac vagal afferents is suggested by studies showing that (1) inhibition of food intake by CCK-8 administration is attenuated after CVX but robust after celiac-spared vagotomy (CSV), (2) multiunit activity of celiac vagal afferents is increased by CCK-8 administration, and (3) activation of celiac fibers by intestinal LA infusion is severely attenuated by the CCK(A) antagonist lorglumide.

  15. From menarche to menopause: the fertile life span of celiac women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santonicola, Antonella; Iovino, Paola; Cappello, Carmelina; Capone, Pietro; Andreozzi, Paolo; Ciacci, Carolina

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated menopause-associated disorders and fertile life span in women with celiac disease (CD) under untreated conditions and after long-term treatment with a gluten-free diet. The participants were 33 women with CD after menopause (untreated CD group), 25 celiac women consuming a gluten-free diet at least 10 years before menopause (treated CD group), and 45 healthy volunteers (control group). The Menopause Rating Scale questionnaire was used to gather information on menopause-associated disorders. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to acquire information on physical activity. Untreated celiac women had a shorter duration of fertile life span than did the control women because of an older age of menarche and a younger age of menopause (P menopause causes a shorter fertile period in untreated celiac women compared with control women. A gluten-free diet that started at least 10 years before menopause prolongs the fertile life span of celiac women. The perception of intensity of hot flushes and irritability is more severe in untreated celiac women than in controls. Low physical exercise and/or poorer quality of life frequently reported by untreated celiac women might be the cause of reduced discomfort tolerance, thus increasing the subjective perception of menopausal symptoms.

  16. Celiac disease in Saudi children. Evaluation of clinical features and diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjum Saeed

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To characterize the clinical presentations and diagnosis including serological tests and histopathological findings in children with celiac disease. Methods: All children (less than 18 years with confirmed celiac disease diagnosed over a 6 year period at a private tertiary care health care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia were studied retrospectively. Information collected included demographics, clinical presentation and diagnostic modalities with serology and small intestinal histology reported by Marsh grading. Results: A total of 59 children had confirmed celiac disease. Thirty (50.8% were male. Median age was 8 years (range 1 to 16 years. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 2.3 (±1.5 years. Classical disease was present only in 30.5%, whereas 69.5% had either non-classical presentations or belonged to high risk groups for celiac disease such as those with type-1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis, Down syndrome and siblings. Failure to thrive was the most common presentation followed by short stature, abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody was positive in 91.5%, and titers were no different between those with classical and non-classical disease. All had Marsh-graded biopsy findings consistent with celiac disease. Conclusion: Children with celiac disease usually present with non-classical features. A high index of suspicion needs to be maintained to consider this disorder in the diagnostic workup of pediatric patients. High risk group should be screened early to avoid complications associated with untreated celiac disease.

  17. Interleukin-10 haplotypes in Celiac Disease in the Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Concepción; Alecsandru, Diana; Varadé, Jezabel; Polanco, Isabel; Maluenda, Carlos; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; de la Concha, Emilio G; Urcelay, Elena; Martínez, Alfonso

    2006-03-31

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic disorder characterized by a pathological inflammatory response after exposure to gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The HLA complex accounts for less than half of the genetic component of the disease, and additional genes must be implicated. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an important regulator of mucosal immunity, and several reports have described alterations of IL-10 levels in celiac patients. The IL-10 gene is located on chromosome 1, and its promoter carries several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and microsatellites which have been associated to production levels. Our aim was to study the role of those polymorphisms in susceptibility to CD in our population. A case-control and a familial study were performed. Positions -1082, -819 and -592 of the IL-10 promoter were typed by TaqMan and allele specific PCR. IL10R and IL10G microsatellites were amplified with labelled primers, and they were subsequently run on an automatic sequencer. In this study 446 patients and 573 controls were included, all of them white Spaniards. Extended haplotypes encompassing microsatellites and SNPs were obtained in families and estimated in controls by the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. No significant associations after Bonferroni correction were observed in the SNPs or any of the microsatellites. Stratification by HLA-DQ2 (DQA1*0501-DQB1*02) status did not alter the results. When extended haplotypes were analyzed, no differences were apparent either. The IL-10 polymorphisms studied are not associated with celiac disease. Our data suggest that the IL-10 alteration seen in patients may be more consequence than cause of the disease.

  18. Interleukin-10 haplotypes in Celiac Disease in the Spanish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Arquero Miguel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD is a chronic disorder characterized by a pathological inflammatory response after exposure to gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The HLA complex accounts for less than half of the genetic component of the disease, and additional genes must be implicated. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is an important regulator of mucosal immunity, and several reports have described alterations of IL-10 levels in celiac patients. The IL-10 gene is located on chromosome 1, and its promoter carries several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and microsatellites which have been associated to production levels. Our aim was to study the role of those polymorphisms in susceptibility to CD in our population. Methods A case-control and a familial study were performed. Positions -1082, -819 and -592 of the IL-10 promoter were typed by TaqMan and allele specific PCR. IL10R and IL10G microsatellites were amplified with labelled primers, and they were subsequently run on an automatic sequencer. In this study 446 patients and 573 controls were included, all of them white Spaniards. Extended haplotypes encompassing microsatellites and SNPs were obtained in families and estimated in controls by the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. Results No significant associations after Bonferroni correction were observed in the SNPs or any of the microsatellites. Stratification by HLA-DQ2 (DQA1*0501-DQB1*02 status did not alter the results. When extended haplotypes were analyzed, no differences were apparent either. Conclusion The IL-10 polymorphisms studied are not associated with celiac disease. Our data suggest that the IL-10 alteration seen in patients may be more consequence than cause of the disease.

  19. Anterior celiac plexus block for interventional biliary procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benenati, J.F.; Widlus, D.M.; Venbrux, A.C.; Lynch-Nyhan, A.; Osterman, F.A.; Taylor, D.R.; Tewes, P.A.; Cassidy, F.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports temporary celiac ganglion block for pain relief during biliary procedures performed without complication in 65 patients. The block was given from an anterior approach, with 30 mL of bupivacaine injected over the right T-12 pedicle. Fluoroscopy was used to guide the needle 2 cm anterior to the spine. Patients were assigned to one of three groups based on degree of anesthesia. In group 1, there was no benefit (20%); in group 2, moderate regional anesthesia (22%); and in group 3, excellent anesthesia (58%). The procedure may be performed at the start of or any time during the examination and provides satisfactory regional anesthesia in 80% of patients

  20. [The relationship between celiac disease (CD) and dental problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Davidi, M

    2011-10-01

    With a prevalence of 1% in western populations, Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common inflammatory disorders of the small intestine. CD is often assumed to have its onset in childhood, but it has recently been suggested that adults can also develop CD. Clinical manifestations vary according to age group: infants and young children present with diarrhea, abdominal distention, and failure to thrive, whereas adults that develop CD not only present with diarrhea, but also with silent manifestations such as anemia, osteoporosis, or neurological symptoms. In the small intestine of celiac disease patients, dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins in barley and rye trigger an inflammatory response. While strict adherence to a gluten-free diet induces full recovery in most patients, a small percentage of patients fail to recover. In a subset of these refractory celiac disease patients, an (aberrant) oligoclonal intraepithelial lymphocyte population develops into overt lymphoma. Celiac disease is strongly associated with HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8, as both genotypes predispose for disease development. mmunohistochemistry of the small intestine of patients shows villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia, and elevated levels of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). The only therapy until now is a gluten-free diet, which will normalize the clinical and histological manifestations and allows the patients to live an otherwise normal life. part of the symptoms are oral manifestations as dental enamel defects, aphthous ulcers and Atrophic Glossitis. The prevalence of caries in CD patiens is law as compared to the healthy population and in some cases the normal eruption sequence of the teeth was damaged. Part of the undiagnosed CD patients are among our patients and the enamel defects they present are misdiagnosed as tetracycline pigmentation or white spot lesions it is the practitioners responsibility to add CD as a possible cause to the findings and refer the patient to further

  1. Ganglion block. Celiac plexus neurolysis; Ganglienblockade. Neurolyse des Plexus coeliacus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, S.C.; Seifarth, H. [Klinikum Esslingen gGmbH, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Esslingen (Germany); Meier, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Ulm (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Pain originating from the organs of the upper abdomen, especially in patients suffering from inoperable carcinoma of the pancreas or advanced inflammatory conditions, is difficult to treat in a significant number of patients. Computed tomography (CT) guided neurolysis is the most commonly used technique for neurolysis of the celiac plexus. Ethanol is used to destroy the nociceptive fibers passing through the plexus and provides an effective means of diminishing pain arising from the upper abdomen. Using either an anterior or posterior approach, a 22 G Chiba needle is advanced to the antecrural space and neurolysis is achieved by injecting a volume of 20-50 ml of ethanol together with a local anesthetic and contrast medium. In up to 80 % of patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen, CT-guided celiac plexus neurolysis diminishes pain or allows a reduction of analgesic medication; however, in some patients the effect may only be temporary necessitating a second intervention. In inflammatory conditions, celiac neurolysis is often less effective in reducing abdominal pain. The CT-guided procedure for neurolysis of the celiac plexus is safe and effective in diminishing pain especially in patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen. The procedure can be repeated if the effect is only temporary. (orig.) [German] Therapierefraktaere und schwere rezidivierende Schmerzen im Oberbauch stellen insbesondere beim nicht operablen Pankreaskarzinom, aber auch bei fortgeschrittenen entzuendlichen Erkrankungen eine Herausforderung dar. Die CT-gesteuerte Neurolyse/Blockade des Plexus coeliacus schaltet durch eine gezielte Zerstoerung der afferenten und efferenten Nervenfasern mit Alkohol die Schmerzweiterleitung aus. Mittels unterschiedlicher Zugaenge von ventral oder dorsal wird eine 22-G-Chiba-Nadel CT-durchleuchtungsgesteuert nach prae- und/oder paraaortal auf Hoehe des Truncus coeliacus vorgebracht. An der entsprechenden Lokalisation erfolgt die Injektion von 20

  2. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    MCMANUS, ROSS; KELLEHER, DERMOT

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED We performed a second-generation genome-wide association study of 4,533 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 10,750 control subjects. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with P(GWAS) < 10(-4) and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions reached genome-wide significance (P(combined) < 5 x 10(-8)); most contain genes with immune functions (BACH2, CCR4, CD80, CIITA-SOCS1-CLEC16A, ICOSLG and ZMIZ1), with ETS1, RUNX3, THEMI...

  3. Non‐celiac gluten sensitivity : a real disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Inês Cristina Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Trabalho Final do Curso de Mestrado Integrado em Medicina, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Lisboa, 2016 The past years have seen an increase in the use of a gluten-­‐free diet (GFD) outside a diagnosis of coeliac disease (CD) or wheat allergy (WA). This trend has led to the identification of a new clinical entity termed non-­‐celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), which has clinical features that overlap with those two previously mentioned. The onset of symptoms in patients with NCGS can...

  4. Celiac Disease and Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Malorie; Scott-Sheldon, Lori A J; Risech-Neyman, Yesenia; Moss, Steven F; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H R

    2018-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with hyposplenism, and multiple case reports link celiac disease and pneumococcal infections; however, increased risk of pneumococcal infection in celiac disease has not been confirmed. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review to determine the risk of pneumococcal infections in celiac disease. Relevant studies were identified using electronic bibliographic searches of PubMed, OVID, Medline, and EMBASE (1980 to February 2017) and reviewing abstracts from major conferences in gastroenterology. Using number of events in celiac patients and referent patients, we calculated a summary relative risk of pneumococcal infections. All analyses were conducted in Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software using random-effects assumptions. Of a total of 156 articles, 3, representing 3 large databases (the Swedish National Inpatient Register; the Oxford Record Linkage Study; and the English National Hospital Episode Statistics) were included. Each compared patients with celiac disease and confirmed pneumococcal infection to a specific reference group: inpatients and/or the general population. Overall, the odds of pneumococcal infection were higher among hospitalized celiac patients compared with controls (odds ratio 1.66; 95% confidence interval 1.43-1.92). There was no evidence of heterogeneity (Q[1] = 1.17, P = .56, I 2  = 0%). Celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of pneumococcal infection. Preventive pneumococcal vaccination should be considered for those with celiac disease, with special attention to those aged 15-64 years who have not received the scheduled pneumococcal vaccination series as a child. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The molecular basis for oat intolerance in patients with celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Arentz-Hansen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is a small intestinal inflammatory disorder characterized by malabsorption, nutrient deficiency, and a range of clinical manifestations. It is caused by an inappropriate immune response to dietary gluten and is treated with a gluten-free diet. Recent feeding studies have indicated oats to be safe for celiac disease patients, and oats are now often included in the celiac disease diet. This study aimed to investigate whether oat intolerance exists in celiac disease and to characterize the cells and processes underlying this intolerance. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We selected for study nine adults with celiac disease who had a history of oats exposure. Four of the patients had clinical symptoms on an oats-containing diet, and three of these four patients had intestinal inflammation typical of celiac disease at the time of oats exposure. We established oats-avenin-specific and -reactive intestinal T-cell lines from these three patients, as well as from two other patients who appeared to tolerate oats. The avenin-reactive T-cell lines recognized avenin peptides in the context of HLA-DQ2. These peptides have sequences rich in proline and glutamine residues closely resembling wheat gluten epitopes. Deamidation (glutamine-->glutamic acid conversion by tissue transglutaminase was involved in the avenin epitope formation. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that some celiac disease patients have avenin-reactive mucosal T-cells that can cause mucosal inflammation. Oat intolerance may be a reason for villous atrophy and inflammation in patients with celiac disease who are eating oats but otherwise are adhering to a strict gluten-free diet. Clinical follow-up of celiac disease patients eating oats is advisable.

  6. Idiopathic infantile arterial calcification in a 12-year-old girl presenting as chronic mesenteric ischemia: imaging findings and angioplasty results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Edwin; Owen, Richard [University of Alberta, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton (Canada); Bruce, Garth [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Pediatrics, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon (Canada); Wiebe, Sheldon [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    We report an unusual case of chronic mesenteric ischemia presenting in a 12-year-old girl with idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis (IIAC). This is the first reported case in the literature of chronic mesenteric ischemia in the setting of IIAC. The girl presented with a classical history of postprandial abdominal pain. Imaging demonstrated significant stenoses of the celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA). Angioplasty of the celiac axis and SMA was attempted, with successful dilation of the SMA only. At 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-ups, the child's symptoms had almost resolved. This case report has three important ramifications: chronic mesenteric ischemia is a possible clinical presentation in children with IACC, pre-angioplasty imaging is important in guiding treatment approach, and angioplasty was effective in this case of chronic mesenteric ischemia and offers hope for other similarly affected children. (orig.)

  7. Celiac disease biodetection using lossy-mode resonances generated in tapered single-mode optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, A. B.; Corres, J. M.; Del Villar, I.; Matias, I. R.; Arregui, F. J.

    2014-05-01

    This work presents the development and test of an anti-gliadin antibodies biosensor based on lossy mode resonances (LMRs) to detect celiac disease. Several polyelectrolites were used to perform layer-by-layer assembly processes in order to generate the LMR and to fabricate a gliadin-embedded thin-film. The LMR shifted 20 nm when immersed in a 5 ppm anti-gliadin antibodies-PBS solution, what makes this bioprobe suitable for detecting celiac disease. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that LMRs are used to detect celiac disease and these results suppose promising prospects on the use of such phenomena as biological detectors.

  8. Analysis of Body Composition and Food Habits of Spanish Celiac Women

    OpenAIRE

    Churruca, Itziar; Miranda, Jonatan; Lasa, Arrate; Bustamante, Mar?a ?.; Larretxi, Idoia; Simon, Edurne

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was both to analyze composition of Spanish celiac women and to study the food habits and gluten-free diet of these celiac patients, in order to determine whether they achieve a balanced and healthy diet as well as to highlight nutritional qualitative and/or quantitative differences. 54 adult celiac women (34 +/- 13 years) took part in the six-month study. Height, weight and body composition were measured. An analysis of energy consumption and of the macronutrie...

  9. CT guided celiac plexus and splanchnic nerve neurolysis : the modified anterior approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Mi Suk; Ym, Seong Hee; Lee, Jin Hee

    1997-01-01

    Since it was first described by Kappis, celiac plexus neurolysis (CPN) has been performed under fluoroscopic guidance by anesthetists or surgeons for the relief of intractable pain caused by upper abdominal malignancy. Recently, however, several groups have reported a computed tomography (CT)-guided technique that increased the safety of the blocking procedure and improved its results. The authors present a new technique CT-guided celiac plexus and splanchic nerve block, to be used simultaneously with a modified anterior approach. Using CT to guide needle tip placement, an anterior approach that permitted direct neurolysis of the celiac ganglia and splanchnic nerve was developed

  10. Screening for Celiac Disease: Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Roger; Bougatsos, Christina; Blazina, Ian; Mackey, Katherine; Grusing, Sara; Selph, Shelley

    2017-03-28

    Silent or subclinical celiac disease may result in potentially avoidable adverse health consequences. To review the evidence on benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic adults, adolescents, and children 3 years and older for the US Preventive Services Task Force. Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, searched to June 14, 2016. Randomized clinical trials and cohort or case-control studies on clinical benefits and harms of screening vs no screening for celiac disease or treatment vs no treatment for screen-detected celiac disease; studies on diagnostic accuracy of serologic tests for celiac disease. One investigator abstracted data, a second checked data for accuracy, and 2 investigators independently assessed study quality using predefined criteria. Cancer incidence, gastrointestinal outcomes, psychological outcomes, child growth outcomes, health outcomes resulting from nutritional deficiencies, quality of life, mortality, and harms of screening. No meta-analytic pooling was done. One systematic review and 3 primary studies met inclusion criteria. No trials of screening for celiac disease were identified. One recent, good-quality systematic review of 56 original studies and 12 previous systematic reviews (sample sizes of primary studies ranging from 62 to more than 12 000 participants) found IgA tissue transglutaminase was associated with high accuracy (sensitivity and specificity both >90%) for diagnosing celiac disease. IgA endomysial antibodies tests were associated with high specificity. Only 2 studies of serologic tests for celiac disease involving 62 and 158 patients were conducted in asymptomatic populations and reported lower sensitivity (57% and 71%). One fair-quality, small (n = 40) Finnish treatment trial of asymptomatic adults with screen-detected celiac disease based on positive serologic findings found initiation of a gluten-free diet associated with

  11. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Justin; Leonard Puppa, Elaine; Greenwald, Bruce; Goldberg, Eric; Guerrerio, Anthony; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intestinal exposure to gliadin leads to zonulin upregulation and consequent disassembly of intercellular tight junctions and increased intestinal permeability. We aimed to study response to gliadin exposure, in terms of barrier function and cytokine secretion, using intestinal biopsies obtained from four groups: celiac patients with active disease (ACD), celiac patients in remission (RCD), non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity (GS) and non-celiac controls (NC). Methods: Ex-vivo human duodenal biopsies were mounted in microsnapwells and luminally incubated with either gliadin or media alone. Changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were monitored over 120 min. Media was subsequently collected and cytokines quantified. Results: Intestinal explants from all groups (ACD (n = 6), RCD (n = 6), GS (n = 6), and NC (n = 5)) demonstrated a greater increase in permeability when exposed to gliadin vs. media alone. The increase in permeability in the ACD group was greater than in the RCD and NC groups. There was a greater increase in permeability in the GS group compared to the RCD group. There was no difference in permeability between the ACD and GS groups, between the RCD and NC groups, or between the NC and GS groups. IL-10 was significantly greater in the media of the NC group compared to the RCD and GS groups. Conclusions: Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals. Following gliadin exposure, both patients with gluten sensitivity and those with active celiac disease demonstrate a greater increase in intestinal permeability than celiacs in disease remission. A higher concentration of IL-10 was measured in the media exposed to control explants compared to celiac disease in remission or gluten sensitivity. PMID:25734566

  12. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

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    Justin Hollon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal exposure to gliadin leads to zonulin upregulation and consequent disassembly of intercellular tight junctions and increased intestinal permeability. We aimed to study response to gliadin exposure, in terms of barrier function and cytokine secretion, using intestinal biopsies obtained from four groups: celiac patients with active disease (ACD, celiac patients in remission (RCD, non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity (GS and non-celiac controls (NC. Methods: Ex-vivo human duodenal biopsies were mounted in microsnapwells and luminally incubated with either gliadin or media alone. Changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were monitored over 120 min. Media was subsequently collected and cytokines quantified. Results: Intestinal explants from all groups (ACD (n = 6, RCD (n = 6, GS (n = 6, and NC (n = 5 demonstrated a greater increase in permeability when exposed to gliadin vs. media alone. The increase in permeability in the ACD group was greater than in the RCD and NC groups. There was a greater increase in permeability in the GS group compared to the RCD group. There was no difference in permeability between the ACD and GS groups, between the RCD and NC groups, or between the NC and GS groups. IL-10 was significantly greater in the media of the NC group compared to the RCD and GS groups. Conclusions: Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals. Following gliadin exposure, both patients with gluten sensitivity and those with active celiac disease demonstrate a greater increase in intestinal permeability than celiacs in disease remission. A higher concentration of IL-10 was measured in the media exposed to control explants compared to celiac disease in remission or gluten sensitivity.

  13. Skepticism Regarding Vaccine and Gluten-Free Food Safety Among Patients with Celiac Disease and Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Loren G; Zylberberg, Haley M; Levinovitz, Alan; Stockwell, Melissa S; Green, Peter H R; Lebwohl, Benjamin

    2017-12-14

    There has been a marked increase in the adoption of the gluten-free (GF) diet. To query individuals with celiac disease (CD) and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) on their beliefs toward the health effects of gluten, and safety of vaccines and GF food products. We distributed a Web-based survey to individuals with CD and NCGS on a CD center e-mail list. We used univariate and multivariate analysis to compare responses of respondents with CD and NCGS. The overall response rate was 27% (NCGS n = 217, CD n = 1291). Subjects with NCGS were more likely than those with CD to disagree with the statement that "vaccines are safe for people with celiac disease" (NCGS 41.3% vs. CD 26.4% (p < 0.0001), and were more likely to decline vaccination when offered (30.9 vs. 24.2%, p = 0.007). After adjusting for age and gender, NCGS subjects were more likely than CD subjects to avoid genetically modified (GMO) foods (aOR 2.30; 95% CI 1.71-3.10), eat only organic products (aOR 2.87; 95% CI 2.04-4.03), believe that the FDA is an unreliable source of information (aOR 1.82, 95% CI 1.26-2.64), and believe a GF diet improves energy and concentration (aOR 2.52; 95% CI 1.86-3.43). Subjects with NCGS were more likely than those with CD to have doubts about vaccine safety and believe in the value of non-GMO and organic foods. Our findings suggest that the lack of reliable information on gluten and its content in food and medications may reinforce beliefs that result in a detriment to public health.

  14. Gliadin, zonulin and gut permeability: Effects on celiac and non-celiac intestinal mucosa and intestinal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Sandro; El Asmar, Ramzi; Di Pierro, Mariarosaria; Grazia Clemente, Maria; Tripathi, Amit; Sapone, Anna; Thakar, Manjusha; Iacono, Giuseppe; Carroccio, Antonio; D'Agate, Cinzia; Not, Tarcisio; Zampini, Lucia; Catassi, Carlo; Fasano, Alessio

    2006-04-01

    Little is known about the interaction of gliadin with intestinal epithelial cells and the mechanism(s) through which gliadin crosses the intestinal epithelial barrier. We investigated whether gliadin has any immediate effect on zonulin release and signaling. Both ex vivo human small intestines and intestinal cell monolayers were exposed to gliadin, and zonulin release and changes in paracellular permeability were monitored in the presence and absence of zonulin antagonism. Zonulin binding, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) redistribution were evaluated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Tight junction occludin and ZO-1 gene expression was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). When exposed to gliadin, zonulin receptor-positive IEC6 and Caco2 cells released zonulin in the cell medium with subsequent zonulin binding to the cell surface, rearrangement of the cell cytoskeleton, loss of occludin-ZO1 protein-protein interaction, and increased monolayer permeability. Pretreatment with the zonulin antagonist FZI/0 blocked these changes without affecting zonulin release. When exposed to luminal gliadin, intestinal biopsies from celiac patients in remission expressed a sustained luminal zonulin release and increase in intestinal permeability that was blocked by FZI/0 pretreatment. Conversely, biopsies from non-celiac patients demonstrated a limited, transient zonulin release which was paralleled by an increase in intestinal permeability that never reached the level of permeability seen in celiac disease (CD) tissues. Chronic gliadin exposure caused down-regulation of both ZO-1 and occludin gene expression. Based on our results, we concluded that gliadin activates zonulin signaling irrespective of the genetic expression of autoimmunity, leading to increased intestinal permeability to macromolecules.

  15. Arterial stick

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to breathing problems or problems with the body's metabolism . Sometimes arterial sticks are done to get blood ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Bacterial Infections Read more Blood Read more Blood Disorders ...

  16. Splenic infarction complicating percutaneous transluminal coeliac artery stenting for chronic mesenteric ischaemia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, John A; Riordan, Stephen M

    2008-08-06

    Chronic mesenteric ischaemia is an important cause of abdominal pain, especially in older patients with risk factors for vascular disease. Until recently, surgical revascularization procedures such as endarterectomy and aorto-coeliac or aorto-mesenteric bypass grafting were the only available treatment options for patients with chronic mesenteric ischaemia. Percutaneous angioplasty and stenting have recently been shown to be effective and safe alternatives to surgical revascularization in high-risk patients with chronic mesenteric ischaemia. We report an 84-year-old woman with symptoms of chronic mesenteric ischaemia, including post-prandial abdominal pain and weight loss. Investigations demonstrated calcific stenoses at the origins of the celiac, superior mesenteric and inferior mesenteric arteries, along with nonocclusive calcification in the mid-splenic artery. Coeliac artery angioplasty and stenting was performed, resulting in excellent arterial dilatation at the stenotic point and distal filling of the coeliac and superior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Within hours of successful stenting of the coeliac artery, the patient developed severe left upper quadrant pain. Progress imaging demonstrated splenic infarction, likely as a result of calcific emboli dislodged from the calcified plaque at the origin of the celiac artery at the time of angioplasty and stenting. The left upper quadrant pain resolved after 8 days and the patient remains asymptomatic 2 years post-procedure. This is the first reported case of splenic infarction complicating otherwise successful coeliac artery stenting, presumably as a consequence of distal embolization of disrupted calcific plaque. This complication, occurring on a background of non-occlusive splenic arterial calcification, represents a novel cause of abdominal pain post-procedure.

  17. Splenic infarction complicating percutaneous transluminal coeliac artery stenting for chronic mesenteric ischaemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida John A

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chronic mesenteric ischaemia is an important cause of abdominal pain, especially in older patients with risk factors for vascular disease. Until recently, surgical revascularization procedures such as endarterectomy and aorto-coeliac or aorto-mesenteric bypass grafting were the only available treatment options for patients with chronic mesenteric ischaemia. Percutaneous angioplasty and stenting have recently been shown to be effective and safe alternatives to surgical revascularization in high-risk patients with chronic mesenteric ischaemia. Case Presentation We report an 84-year-old woman with symptoms of chronic mesenteric ischaemia, including post-prandial abdominal pain and weight loss. Investigations demonstrated calcific stenoses at the origins of the celiac, superior mesenteric and inferior mesenteric arteries, along with nonocclusive calcification in the mid-splenic artery. Coeliac artery angioplasty and stenting was performed, resulting in excellent arterial dilatation at the stenotic point and distal filling of the coeliac and superior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Within hours of successful stenting of the coeliac artery, the patient developed severe left upper quadrant pain. Progress imaging demonstrated splenic infarction, likely as a result of calcific emboli dislodged from the calcified plaque at the origin of the celiac artery at the time of angioplasty and stenting. The left upper quadrant pain resolved after 8 days and the patient remains asymptomatic 2 years post-procedure. Conclusion This is the first reported case of splenic infarction complicating otherwise successful coeliac artery stenting, presumably as a consequence of distal embolization of disrupted calcific plaque. This complication, occurring on a background of non-occlusive splenic arterial calcification, represents a novel cause of abdominal pain post-procedure.

  18. Enzymatic Strategies to Detoxify Gluten: Implications for Celiac Disease

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    Ivana Caputo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a permanent intolerance to the gliadin fraction of wheat gluten and to similar barley and rye proteins that occurs in genetically susceptible subjects. After ingestion, degraded gluten proteins reach the small intestine and trigger an inappropriate T cell-mediated immune response, which can result in intestinal mucosal inflammation and extraintestinal manifestations. To date, no pharmacological treatment is available to gluten-intolerant patients, and a strict, life-long gluten-free diet is the only safe and efficient treatment available. Inevitably, this may produce considerable psychological, emotional, and economic stress. Therefore, the scientific community is very interested in establishing alternative or adjunctive treatments. Attractive and novel forms of therapy include strategies to eliminate detrimental gluten peptides from the celiac diet so that the immunogenic effect of the gluten epitopes can be neutralized, as well as strategies to block the gluten-induced inflammatory response. In the present paper, we review recent developments in the use of enzymes as additives or as processing aids in the food biotechnology industry to detoxify gluten.

  19. Celiac Disease: What Do We Know in 2017

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    Jorge Amil Dias

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is one of the most prevalent digestive conditions. Diagnosis requires that strict criteria are used so that a life-long gluten-free diet may be correctly prescribed. Although genetic susceptibility has been known for a long time, there have been elusive environmental factors that lead to the occurrence of clinical disease. Many studies have addressed the identification of environmental modifiers, and different lines of research have been tried with variable success and even contradictory results. Infections and age of gluten introduction into the diet in the first few months of life have been evaluated, but a firm relationship could not be established. A recent paper addresses a fascinating hypothesis that could explain how some infectious agents might modulate the immune system and modify response to dietary antigens. Subsequently, animal models with genetic susceptibility were tested, and, indeed, there was abnormal response to gluten. These observations still do not provide final answers about the pathophysiology of celiac disease but certainly lead to progress in the knowledge of gluten sensitization and the role of some environmental factors.

  20. Celiac Disease, Inflammation and Oxidative Damage: A Nutrigenetic Approach

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    Letizia Saturni

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD, a common heritable chronic inflammatory condition of the small intestine caused by permanent intolerance to gluten/gliadin (prolamin, is characterized by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Developments in proteomics have provided an important contribution to the understanding of the biochemical and immunological aspects of the disease and the mechanisms involved in toxicity of prolamins. It has been demonstrated that some gliadin peptides resistant to complete proteolytic digestion may directly affect intestinal cell structure and functions by modulating gene expression and oxidative stress. In recent years, the creation of the two research fields Nutrigenomics and Nutrigenetics, has enabled the elucidation of some interactions between diet, nutrients and genes. Various dietary components including long chain ω-3 fatty acids, plant flavonoids, and carotenoids have been demonstrated to modulate oxidative stress, gene expression and production of inflammatory mediators. Therefore their adoption could preserve intestinal barrier integrity, play a protective role against toxicity of gliadin peptides and have a role in nutritional therapy of celiac disease.

  1. Is Dietitian Use Associated with Celiac Disease Outcomes?

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    Peter H. R. Green

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A gluten-free diet (GFD is the treatment for celiac disease (CD, but due to its complexity, dietitian referral is uniformly recommended. We surveyed patients with CD to determine if dietitian use is associated with quality of life, symptom severity, or GFD adherence. The survey utilized three validated CD-specific instruments: the CD quality of life (CD-QOL, CD symptom index (CSI and CD adherence test (CDAT. Four hundred and thirteen patients with biopsy-proven CD were eligible for inclusion. The majority (77% were female and mean BMI was 24.1. Over three-quarters of patients (326, 79% had seen a dietitian, however, 161 (39% had seen a dietitian only once. Age, sex, and education level were not associated with dietitian use; nor was BMI (24.6 vs. 24.0, p = 0.45. On multivariate analysis, adjusting for age gender, education, duration of disease, and body mass index, dietitian use was not associated with CD-QOL, CSI, or CDAT scores. Our survey did not show an association between dietitian use and symptom severity, adherence, or quality of life. Delay in diagnosis was associated with poorer outcomes. This is a preliminary study with several limitations, and further prospective analysis is needed to evaluate the benefits and cost-effectiveness of dietitian-referral in the care of celiac disease patients.

  2. Prevalence of Celiac Disease and its Effects on Pregnancy

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    E Nazemalhosseini-Mojarad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the coeliac disease(CD symptoms is infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Furthermore, we are not cognizant of any CD reports in pregnancy in Iran. Therefore, this study aims to prospectively estimate the prevalence of undiagnosed CD in a population of pregnant women as well as its complications in pregnancy. Methods: 796 pregnant women with mean age of 26 years(SD= 26 and mean pregnancy duration of 5.4 months participated in this descriptive study from 2007 to 2008. Total IgA test and antitissue transglutaminase(tTGA antibodies were measured. Those with positive TGA underwent histological biopsy specimens according to modified Marsh classification. Results: A positive CD serology for tTGA was obderved in 17(2.1% out of 796 pregnant women. Out of the 17 seropositive patients, 10 had abnormal histology compatible with CD(Marsh I-IIIc symptoms. Two pregnant women had already experienced miscarriage. Moreover, 3 patients had born low birth weight babies. Conclusion: In this study, there was no significant relationship between CD and high incidence of adverse outcomes. Overall, 1 out of 66 pregnant women(1.5% rate of prevalence suffered from CD. Celiac disease shows different severity in different individuals. In other words, not every celiac patient is at high risk for its complications. This may propose that gluten free diet could be avoided in the patients who have a normal pregnancy

  3. Placement of Endovascular Stent across the Branching Arteries: Long-term Serial Evaluation of Stent-tissue Responses Overlying the Arterial Orifices in an Experimental Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Il; Chung, Jin Wook, E-mail: chungjw@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Beom [National Cancer Center of Korea, Department of Radiology and Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jeong Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Jae, Hwan Jun; Lee, Whal [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to investigate the effects of stenting across the branching arteries on the patency and stent-tissue responses over the branching arterial orifices. Methods: Thirteen dogs were observed after placing aortic stents across the celiac arteries (CA), superior mesenteric arteries (SMA), and renal arteries (RA). The animals were grouped according to stent types: large-cell group (n = 6) and small-cell group (n = 7). Angiography was performed to evaluate the branching artery patency at 2, 6, and 12 months after stent insertion, and the stent-tissue responses covering the orifices were evaluated on histopathologic examination. Results: All branching arteries were patent on follow-up angiography; however, three patterns of stent-tissue responses over the orifices were observed: neointimal layering, bridging septa, and papillary hyperplasia. Although neointimal layering and bridging septa were evenly observed, severe papillary hyperplasia was more frequent at SMA and CA than RA. Four RA showed less than 50% ostial patency, and localized infarct was observed in six kidneys (24%). The ostial patency tended to decrease with small-cell stent during the follow-up period. Conclusions: Various stent-tissue responses over the branching artery orifices are induced by the aortic stent covering the branching arteries and may not be easily detected by conventional angiography. Subclinical renal infarct also may occur despite patent renal angiography.

  4. The roles of MHC class II genes and post-translational modification in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollid, Ludvig M

    2017-08-01

    Our increasing understanding of the etiology of celiac disease, previously considered a simple food hypersensitivity disorder caused by an immune response to cereal gluten proteins, challenges established concepts of autoimmunity. HLA is a chief genetic determinant, and certain HLA-DQ allotypes predispose to the disease by presenting posttranslationally modified (deamidated) gluten peptides to CD4 + T cells. The deamidation of gluten peptides is mediated by transglutaminase 2. Strikingly, celiac disease patients generate highly disease-specific autoantibodies to the transglutaminase 2 enzyme. The dual role of transglutaminase 2 in celiac disease is hardly coincidental. This paper reviews the genetic mapping and involvement of MHC class II genes in disease pathogenesis, and discusses the evidence that MHC class II genes, via the involvement of transglutaminase 2, influence the generation of celiac disease-specific autoantibodies.

  5. Osteomalacia can still be a point of attention to celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebari, Maryam; Sigari, Sara Yousefi; Heidari, Hossein; Biglarian, Omid

    2011-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption syndrome with a genetic base, is a consequence of hypersensitivity to GLUTEN-containing foods. CD can manifest with classic symptoms; however, some unusual features like osteomalacia that has become more and more rare, may be the presenting symptom. We describe here a case of osteomalacia secondary to delayed diagnosis of celiac disease. This patient complained about progressive limping, weakness, short stature, and skeletal deformities. Radiological and laboratory findings were all in favor of osteomalacia. Celiac disease was mentioned according to the history of subtle intermittent diarrhea, abdominal discomfort and confirmed with intestinal biopsy and detection of specific autoantibodies. Improvement of patient's weakness and laboratory abnormalities was obvious after treatment with gluten free diet, vitamin D, calcium and other trace elements. In conclusion, this case affirms that chronic celiac disease especially untreated one, can lead to irreversible complications like skeletal deformities and short stature.

  6. Toxicity mechanisms of wheat and other cereals in celiac disease and related enteropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auricchio, S; De Ritis, G; De Vincenzi, M; Silano, V

    1985-12-01

    This paper is a critical appraisal of current theories on the mechanisms of toxicity of wheat and other cereals in celiac disease and some related enteropathies. The "peptidase deficiency," "primary immune defect," and "gluten-lectin" theories on celiac disease are examined and critically discussed on the basis of the relevant data available in 88 references. Special attention has been paid in this review to the nature of the cereal components triggering the appearance of toxic symptoms and signs in celiac disease as well as to underlying action mechanisms. The gluten-lectin theory is the one best able to explain, in addition to celiac disease, some secondary intolerances that may occur in temporarily predisposed individuals as a consequence of several causes, including viral hepatitis and intestinal infections, as well as the occurrence of intestinal lesions in healthy subjects administered very high amounts of gluten.

  7. First Identified Case in Literature: Association of Achalasia and Celiac Diseases

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    Ibrahim Bucak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease has been shown to cause problems related to gastrointestinal system motility such as reduction of the esophageal sphincter pressure and prolongation of gastric emptying time. Achalasia disease is a motor disorder that is charac¬terized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis and by incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Association of achalasia and celiac diseases has not been reported yet. Our patient with growth and developmental retardation had vomiting effects which lasted for 3 years. Celiac disease was diagnosed serologically and histopathologically in our patient; we determined achalasia disease with esophagoscopic examination, upper gastrointestinal system contrast study, and esophageal manometer. Esophageal balloon dilatation was applied. This case is presented because of the interesting association between celiac disease and achalasia disease.

  8. [Simultaneous presentation of autoimmune thyroiditis and celiac disease in an adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubiella, J; Bustamante, J; Sans, M; Ramírez, A; Feu, F; Piqué, J M

    1998-11-01

    Celiac disease may be associated with other underlying autoimmune diseases. Among these, thyroid disease has been described in around 10% of the cases with hypothyroidism being the most frequently reported. Clinical suspicion of thyroid involvement in patients with celiac disease is difficult since the symptomatology is scarce or is masked by the picture of malabsorption. Nonetheless, its detection is important since it is not solved by gluten free diet and its correction requires specific treatment. Thyroid function studies, in addition to determination of antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies, should be considered in celiac patients refractory to conventional dietetic treatment. We herein present the case of a 65-year-old woman who consulted for a malabsorption syndrome in whom celiac disease of the adult was simultaneously presented with hyperthyroidism secondary to autoimmune thyroiditis.

  9. Neutrophil recruitment and barrier impairment in celiac disease : A genomic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diosdado, Begona; Van Bakel, Harm; Strengman, Eric; Franke, Lude; Van Oort, Erica; Mulder, Chris J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wapenaar, Martin C.

    Background & Aims: Celiac disease is an enteropathy featuring villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia, and lymphocytosis. Tissue remodeling is driven by an inflammatory reaction to gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The adaptive pathway is considered the major immune response but recent

  10. Arterial stiffness

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    Ursula Quinn

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of biomechanical properties of arteries have become an important surrogate outcome used in epidemiological and interventional cardiovascular research. Structural and functional differences of vessels in the arterial tree result in a dampening of pulsatility and smoothing of blood flow as it progresses to capillary level. A loss of arterial elastic properties results a range of linked pathophysiological changes within the circulation including increased pulse pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy, subendocardial ischaemia, vessel endothelial dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis. With increased arterial stiffness, the microvasculature of brain and kidneys are exposed to wider pressure fluctuations and may lead to increased risk of stroke and renal failure. Stiffening of the aorta, as measured by the gold-standard technique of aortic Pulse Wave Velocity (aPWV, is independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes across many different patient groups and in the general population. Therefore, use of aPWV has been proposed for early detection of vascular damage and individual cardiovascular risk evaluation and it seems certain that measurement of arterial stiffness will become increasingly important in future clinical care. In this review we will consider some of the pathophysiological processes that result from arterial stiffening, how it is measured and factors that may drive it as well as potential avenues for therapy. In the face of an ageing population where mortality from atheromatous cardiovascular disease is falling, pathology associated with arterial stiffening will assume ever greater importance. Therefore, understanding these concepts for all clinicians involved in care of patients with cardiovascular disease will become vital.

  11. Intestinal parameters of oxidative imbalance in celiac adults with extraintestinal manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatek-Guziewicz, Agnieszka; Ptak-Belowska, Agata; Przybylska-Felus, Magdalena; Pasko, Pawel; Zagrodzki, Pawel; Brzozowski, Tomasz; Mach, Tomasz; Zwolinska-Wcislo, Malgorzata

    2017-11-28

    To evaluate selected intestinal parameters of oxidative stress, and antioxidant capacity in adult celiac disease patients with extraintestinal manifestations. The study involved 85 adult patients divided into the following subgroups: (1) patients with newly diagnosed celiac disease (CD) ( n = 7); (2) celiac patients not adhering to a gluten-free diet (GFD) ( n = 22); (3) patients with CD on the GFD ( n = 31); and (4) patients with functional disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, serving as controls ( n = 25). Celiac patients presented with non-classic symptoms or extraintestinal manifestations. Standard blood tests including serum antioxidant levels (uric acid, bilirubin, and vitamin D), celiac antibody levels, and histopathological status of duodenal biopsy specimens have been determined. The expression of mRNA for tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 10 (IL-10), superoxide dismutase (SOD), heat-shock protein 70 (HSP-70), hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α), and BAX in the duodenal mucosa of patients was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The mean plasma uric acid level in patients with active CD (newly diagnosed and nonadherent patients) and treated celiac patients was significantly higher than in controls (260.17 ± 53.65 vs 190.8 ± 22.98, P celiac patients was significantly lower than in controls (8.23 ± 5.04 vs 10.48 ± 4.08, P celiac patients than in treated celiac patients and controls (19.37 ± 9.03 vs 25.15 ± 11.2, P celiac groups regardless of the diet when compared with controls. Patients on the GFD presented a significantly lower mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-10 than in newly diagnosed and nonadherent patients ( P celiac patients compared with controls ( P < 0.05), with a significant difference between treated and untreated patients ( P < 0.05). The expression of HIF-1α mRNA and BAX mRNA was significantly higher in patients with active CD compared with controls and patients on GFD

  12. Diagnostic Yield of Isolated Deamidated Gliadin Peptide Antibody Elevation for Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerter, Nicholas A; Shannahan, Sarah E; Suarez, Jorge; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H R; Leffler, Daniel A; Lebwohl, Benjamin

    2017-05-01

    Serologic testing for celiac disease includes tissue transglutaminase and endomysial antibodies. In addition to these tools, assays for deamidated gliadin peptide antibodies have been shown to have sensitivity and specificity that are comparable to tissue transglutaminase testing, and are increasingly being used for celiac disease testing. The goal of this study is to evaluate the utility of deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP) testing in the setting of a negative tissue transglutaminase (TTG) IgA test. We reviewed the records of all patients seen at two U.S. celiac disease referral centers and identified those who had an elevated DGP IgA and/or IgG in the setting of a negative TTG IgA. Of these patients, those who underwent duodenal biopsy while on a gluten-containing diet were included. Patients with prior biopsy-proven celiac disease or prior TTG IgA positivity were excluded. The results of the biopsy were used as the gold standard for celiac disease diagnosis, and patients with villous atrophy (Marsh class 3) on duodenal biopsy were considered to have celiac disease. Between the two institutions, 84 patients were identified with negative TTG IgA and positive DGP IgA or IgG who also had duodenal biopsies performed while maintaining a gluten-containing diet. Of these patients, 13 patients (15.5%; 95% CI 8.5-25.0%) were found to have celiac disease on duodenal biopsy. DGP antibody testing can identify cases of celiac disease in TTG-negative individuals, although the low positive predictive value suggests that the yield may be low.

  13. ASSOCIATION OF POTENTIAL CELIAC DISEASE AND REFRACTORY IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Mahdi; Honar, Naser; Yousefi, Ali; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2018-01-01

    Celiac disease is an enteropathy caused by dietary gluten. The combination of serologic, genetic and histologic data has led to description of other categories of this disease. There are a number of patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) that do not respond to iron treatment and may be repeated for many times, Therefore, we aimed to investigate celiac disease in this group. In this cross sectional transverse prospective study from August 2011 to February 2013, in a Pediatric care clinic affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 184 children including 92 IDA patients who responded to treatment using iron supplement, 45 non-responding iron deficient patients, and 47 healthy individuals, with the maximum age of 18 years, with written consent from their parents, participated in serologic screening (with Anti-TTG antibody and anti-Endomysial antibody) for celiac disease. Patients with at least one positive serology test underwent multiple mucosal biopsy from bulb and duodenum. Among 184 participants, 19 (10.3%) subjects had positive serologic test for celiac disease, including 13 (28.9%) patients in the group with refractory IDA, 5 (5.4%) patients in the group with treated IDA, and 1 patient in the healthy group. The frequency of positive serologic test in the group with IDA resistant to treatment was prominently higher than the other two groups (Pceliac test who underwent endoscopy and biopsy, no histologic evidence of celiac disease was seen. They were diagnosed as potential celiac disease. Frequency of potential celiac disease in patients with refractory IDA was higher than control the subjects. Therefore, we recommend serologic screening for early detection and minimizing the complications of celiac disease and repeated iron therapy for this group.

  14. Reduced Bone Mineral Density in Children With Screening-detected Celiac Disease.

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    Björck, Sara; Brundin, Charlotte; Karlsson, Magnus; Agardh, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether bone mass and metabolism are impaired in genetically at-risk children with screening-detected celiac disease. Included were 71 children with screening-detected celiac disease diagnosed at 10.0 ± 0.7 (mean ± standard deviation) years and 142 matched controls and 30 children with screening-detected celiac disease diagnosed at 3.3 ± 0.4 years of age presently on a gluten-free diet for 6.9 ± 1.1 years and 60 matched controls. All participants were assessed for bone mineral density (BMD) of total body and spine by dual x-ray absorptiometry, serum 25(OH) vitamin D3, parathyroid hormone (PTH), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-15, interferon gamma, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. At diagnosis, screening-detected celiac disease children as compared to controls had a mean -0.03 g/cm reduced BMD of both total body and spine (P = 0.009 and P = 0.005, respectively), a mean -11.4 nmol/L lower level of 25(OH) vitamin D3 (P celiac disease as compared to controls (P celiac disease have reduced BMD, lower levels of vitamin D3, higher levels of PTH, and signs of systemic inflammation compared with controls. These differences were not found in celiac disease children on a gluten-free diet, indicating that children with screening-detected celiac disease benefit from an early diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Symptomatic Secondary Selective IgM Immunodeficiency in Adult Man with Undiagnosed Celiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Magen, Eli; Feldman, Viktor; Joseph, Mishal; Israel, Hadari

    2012-01-01

    Selective IgM immunodeficiency (SIgMID) is a heterogeneous disorder with no known genetic background and may occur as a primary or a secondary condition. Celiac disease has been reported in association with several humeral immunodeficiencies, including isolated severe selective IgA deficiency, panhypogammaglobulinemia, and isolated combined IgA and IgM deficiency. There are only few reported cases of pediatric and adult patients with SIgMID and celiac disease. In this paper, we describe an ad...

  16. Enteroclysis in adult celiac disease: diagnostic value of specific radiographic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomoschitz, F.; Schima, W.; Schober, E.; Turetschek, K. [Department of Radiology and Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Radiologic Research, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kaider, A. [Department of Medical Computer Sciences, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Vogelsang, H. [Department of Internal Medicine IV, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various radiographic findings at enteroclysis in adult patients with untreated celiac disease. Twenty-seven adult patients underwent enteroclysis because of unspecific intestinal symptoms before definitive biopsy proof of celiac disease. Enteroclysis of 123 subjects with similar clinical presentation, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, occult intestinal bleeding, and weight loss, who had a definitive diagnosis other than celiac disease, served as controls. The radiographic features previously described in the literature as indicative of adult celiac disease (i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds, increase of ileal folds, small bowel dilatation, flocculation) were evaluated in blinded fashion in all studies and the subjective likelihood of diagnosis of celiac disease was assessed. Assessing every finding separately, each feature proved to have a high specificity (78-100%) but low sensitivity (19-59%) for celiac disease. Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern was the single best feature (specificity 100%, 95% CI 97-100%; sensitivity 59%, 95% CI 40-78%); however, combination of criteria enables establishment of the diagnosis of celiac disease quite accurately (specificity 100%, 95% CI 98-100%; sensitivity 78%, 95% CI 58-91%). Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern as a single finding as well as combination at least three of the following features, i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds (''colonization''), increase of ileal folds (''jejunization''), dilatation, and flocculation, make enteroclysis an accurate tool for diagnosis of celiac disease in adult patients with suspected intestinal disease. (orig.)

  17. The Gluten-Free Diet: Testing Alternative Cereals Tolerated by Celiac Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Comino, Isabel; de Lourdes Moreno, Mar?a; Real, Ana; Rodr?guez-Herrera, Alfonso; Barro, Francisco; Sousa, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    A strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only currently available therapeutic treatment for patients with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with a permanent intolerance to gluten proteins. The complete elimination of gluten proteins contained in cereals from the diet is the key to celiac disease management. However, this generates numerous social and economic repercussions due to the ubiquity of gluten in foods. The research presented in this review focuse...

  18. Risk of colorectal adenomas in patients with celiac disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, J; Rausch, A; Zubiaurre, I

    2018-02-05

    Whether celiac disease increases the risk of presenting with colorectal adenoma or not, has not been extensively evaluated. This question becomes relevant when considering early screening methods in patients with the disease. The aim of our article was to determine the risk of colorectal adenomas in celiac disease patients. A computer-assisted search of the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar databases was carried out, encompassing the time frame of 1966 to December 2016. The search strategy consisted of the following MESH terms: 'celiac disease' OR 'celiac sprue' AND 'colorectal' OR 'colorectal neoplasia' OR 'colorectal adenoma'. A fixed-effect model was used for the analyses. The first analysis dealt with the prevalence of all presentations of colorectal adenoma in patients with celiac disease and the second was on the prevalence of advanced adenomas. The outcomes were described as odds ratios (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals. The search identified 480 bibliographic citations, 17 of which were chosen for evaluation. Fourteen of those studies were rejected, leaving a final total of three for the analysis. Those studies included 367 cases of celiac disease and 682 controls. No significant heterogeneity was observed (I 2 =26%). There was no increased prevalence of colorectal adenomas in the celiac disease patients, when compared with the controls (OR: 0.94 [0.65-1.38]), and no significant difference was observed when assessing the prevalence of advanced adenomas (OR: 0.97 [0.48-1.97]). Celiac disease was not associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas. However, due to the limited evidence available, more studies are necessary to determine whether there is an actual association. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. In vitro gliadin challenge: diagnostic accuracy and utility for the difficult diagnosis of celiac disease.

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    Tortora, Raffaella; Russo, Ilaria; De Palma, Giovanni D; Luciani, Alessandro; Rispo, Antonio; Zingone, Fabiana; Iovino, Paola; Capone, Pietro; Ciacci, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of celiac disease is difficult when treatment with gluten-free diet (GFD) is started before diagnosis and/or when the results of tests are inconsistent. The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro gliadin challenge. The study cohort included patients without celiac disease (negative controls, n=57), patients with celiac disease (positive controls, n=166 untreated and n=55 on GFD), and patients with difficult diagnosis (n=59). All patients underwent endoscopy for collection of duodenal samples, which served for the diagnosis of celiac disease and for the in vitro evaluation of the gliadin-induced mucosal expression of seven inflammatory markers: PY99, ICAM-1 (intercellular cell adhesion molecule), HLA-DR, CD3, CD25, CD69, and transglutaminase 2 IgA. Diagnostic work-up for celiac disease included the search of specific serum antibodies. Patients of the difficult diagnosis group were asked to stop GFD for repeated search of these antibodies under untreated conditions. The area under the receptor-operated curve (ROC) was used for statistical analyses on accuracy. HLA-DR had the highest accuracy for celiac disease diagnosis in analyses on negative controls and positive controls also excluding patients on GFD (area under ROC=0.99). Accuracy of test did not increase combining data of HLA-DR with data of other markers. Findings were similar in the 39 patients of the difficult diagnosis group undergoing the search celiac disease-specific antibodies under untreated conditions. The in vitro response of mucosal HLA-DR to gliadin is an accurate tool for the diagnosis of celiac disease also in patients with difficult diagnosis.

  20. LOWER BIFIDOBACTERIA COUNTS IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE ON A GLUTEN-FREE DIET

    OpenAIRE

    GOLFETTO, Lisléia; SENNA, Fernanda Duarte de; HERMES, Julia; BESERRA, Bruna Teles Soares; FRANÇA, Franciane da Silva; MARTINELLO, Flávia

    2014-01-01

    ContextThe ingestion of gluten is responsible for the symptoms of Celiac disease, but other environmental factors can also influence. Strains of theBifidobacterium genus have been shown to afford protection against the inflammatory response and mucosal damage caused by gliadin peptides in vitro.ObjectivesThis study was designed to compare the concentration of fecal bifidobacteria and pH of patients with celiac disease on gluten-free diet and control subjects in order to identify if the imbala...

  1. Classification of videocapsule endoscopy image patterns: comparative analysis between patients with celiac disease and normal individuals

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    Ciaccio Edward J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative disease markers were developed to assess videocapsule images acquired from celiac disease patients with villous atrophy, and from control patients. Method Capsule endoscopy videoclip images (576 × 576 pixels were acquired at 2/second frame rate (11 celiacs, 10 controls at regions: 1. bulb, 2. duodenum, 3. jejunum, 4. ileum and 5. distal ileum. Each of 200 images per videoclip (= 100s were subdivided into 10 × 10 pixel subimages for which mean grayscale brightness level and its standard deviation (texture were calculated. Pooled subimage values were grouped into low, intermediate, and high texture bands, and mean brightness, texture, and number of subimages in each band (nine features in all were used for quantifying regions 1-5, and to determine the three best features for threshold and incremental learning classification. Classifiers were developed using 6 celiac and 5 control patients' data as exemplars, and tested on 5 celiacs and 5 controls. Results Pooled from all regions, the threshold classifier had 80% sensitivity and 96% specificity and the incremental classifier had 88% sensitivity and 80% specificity for predicting celiac versus control videoclips in the test set. Trends of increasing texture from regions 1 to 5 occurred in the low and high texture bands in celiacs, and the number of subimages in the low texture band diminished (r2 > 0.5. No trends occurred in controls. Conclusions Celiac videocapsule images have textural properties that vary linearly along the small intestine. Quantitative markers can assist in screening for celiac disease and localize extent and degree of pathology throughout the small intestine.

  2. The immunopathogenesis of celiac disease reveals possible therapies beyond the gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Christopher S; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2012-07-01

    Celiac disease is a T cell-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the small intestine that is activated by gluten. The diagnosis of celiac disease is challenging as patients display a wide range of symptoms and some are asymptomatic. A lifelong gluten-free diet is the only currently approved treatment of celiac disease. Although the diet is safe and effective, the compliance rates and patient acceptance vary. Furthermore, many patients treated with a gluten-free diet continue to be mildly to severely symptomatic with persistent histological abnormalities, and a small number of patients develop refractory celiac disease. New therapeutic adjuncts and potential alternatives to the gluten-free diet could improve the treatment options for these patients. Advances in understanding the immunopathogenesis of celiac disease have suggested several types of therapeutic strategies that may augment or supplant the gluten-free diet. Some of these strategies attempt to decrease the immunogenicity of gluten-containing grains by manipulating the grain itself or by using oral enzymes to break down immunogenic peptides that normally remain intact during digestion. Other strategies focus on preventing the absorption of these peptides, preventing tissue transglutaminase from rendering gluten peptides more immunogenic, or inhibiting their binding to celiac disease-specific antigen-presenting molecules. Strategies that limit T cell migration to the small intestine or that reestablish mucosal homeostasis and tolerance to gluten antigens are also being explored. Additionally, it is vital to develop new therapeutic options for refractory celiac disease patients. This review highlights therapeutic strategies that may ultimately improve the health and well-being of individuals with celiac disease.

  3. Hepatic Arterial Configuration in Relation to the Segmental Anatomy of the Liver; Observations on MDCT and DSA Relevant to Radioembolization Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoven, Andor F. van den, E-mail: a.f.vandenhoven@umcutrecht.nl; Leeuwen, Maarten S. van, E-mail: m.s.vanleeuwen@umcutrecht.nl; Lam, Marnix G. E. H., E-mail: m.lam@umcutrecht.nl; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den, E-mail: mbosch@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeCurrent anatomical classifications do not include all variants relevant for radioembolization (RE). The purpose of this study was to assess the individual hepatic arterial configuration and segmental vascularization pattern and to develop an individualized RE treatment strategy based on an extended classification.MethodsThe hepatic vascular anatomy was assessed on MDCT and DSA in patients who received a workup for RE between February 2009 and November 2012. Reconstructed MDCT studies were assessed to determine the hepatic arterial configuration (origin of every hepatic arterial branch, branching pattern and anatomical course) and the hepatic segmental vascularization territory of all branches. Aberrant hepatic arteries were defined as hepatic arterial branches that did not originate from the celiac axis/CHA/PHA. Early branching patterns were defined as hepatic arterial branches originating from the celiac axis/CHA.ResultsThe hepatic arterial configuration and segmental vascularization pattern could be assessed in 110 of 133 patients. In 59 patients (54 %), no aberrant hepatic arteries or early branching was observed. Fourteen patients without aberrant hepatic arteries (13 %) had an early branching pattern. In the 37 patients (34 %) with aberrant hepatic arteries, five also had an early branching pattern. Sixteen different hepatic arterial segmental vascularization patterns were identified and described, differing by the presence of aberrant hepatic arteries, their respective vascular territory, and origin of the artery vascularizing segment four.ConclusionsThe hepatic arterial configuration and segmental vascularization pattern show marked individual variability beyond well-known classifications of anatomical variants. We developed an individualized RE treatment strategy based on an extended anatomical classification.

  4. How to manage a case of aymptomatic thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm with occluded mesenteric arteries

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    Abhisekh Mohanty

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a unique case of a 57-year-old male having a suprarenal thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm which is extending till the origin of superior mesenteric artery (SMA. The origins of celiac artery and SMA were totally occluded and filled retrogradely through dense collateral vessels arising from the inferior mesenteric artery. Surprisingly, the patient was not having any symptoms related to mesenteric ischemia. We decided to use a conventional aortic aneurysm stent graft to repair it without revascularizing the occluded mesenteric arteries. After 1 month, CT aortogram was repeated which revealed a well-apposed stent graft with no endoleaks. He did not have any clinical signs and symptoms attributable to mesenteric ischemia.

  5. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  6. The present and the future in the diagnosis and management of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Natalia E.; Theethira, Thimmaiah G.; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. In celiac disease, adaptive and innate immune activation results in intestinal damage and a wide range of clinical manifestations. In the past, celiac disease was thought to result in signs and symptoms solely related to the gastrointestinal tract. Now, more than half of the adult population presents with extra-intestinal manifestations that can also be expected to improve on a gluten-free diet. For this reason, it is recommended that physicians have a low threshold of suspicion for celiac disease. Current knowledge of the immune pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease has served as a catalyst for the development of novel diagnostic tools and therapeutics. Over the years, highly sensitive and specific serological assays, in addition to genetic markers, have been found to target specific steps in the cascade pathway of celiac disease. Also the advent of the gluten challenge has enabled experts to design diagnostic algorithms and monitor clinical responses in clinical trials. The gluten challenge has provided substantial benefit in the advance of novel therapeutics as an adjuvant treatment to the gluten free diet. Generally, a strict gluten-free diet is highly burdensome to patients and can be limited in its efficacy. Alternative therapies—including gluten modification, modulation of intestinal permeability and immune response—could be central to the future treatment of celiac disease. PMID:25326000

  7. Celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection in children: Is there any Association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Manish; Puri, Amarender Singh; Sachdeva, Sanjeev; Singh, Jatinderpal; Kumar, Ajay; Saran, Ravindra K

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection can influence the inflammatory and immune responses in the gut and may therefore play a role in the development of gluten-related enteropathy in genetically susceptible individuals. Our objective was to assess the relationship between celiac disease and HP infection in children. Children (1-18 years) diagnosed as celiac disease (CD) (n = 324) with submission of gastric and duodenal biopsies and duodenal histology having Marsh grade III features were eligible for the study. Non-celiac patients referred for endoscopy were selected as controls. We studied proportion of HP prevalence in children with confirmed CD as compared with HP prevalence in reference group comprising non-celiac children referred for endoscopy. We also evaluated predictors of HP infection in children with celiac disease. Of the 324 participants with CD, gastric HP was seen in 37 (11.4%) patients. The prevalence of HP in patients without CD (50%, P Celiac disease and gastric HP infection have inverse relationship that raises the question whether development of HP infection confers protection against CD. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Altered Expression of Type-1 and Type-2 Cannabinoid Receptors in Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tommaso, Monia; Biancheri, Paolo; Rapino, Cinzia; Giuffrida, Paolo; Papadia, Cinzia; Montana, Chiara; Pasini, Alessandra; Vanoli, Alessandro; Lanzarotto, Francesco; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Anandamide (AEA) is the prominent member of the endocannabinoid family and its biological action is mediated through the binding to both type-1 (CB1) and type-2 (CB2) cannabinoid receptors (CBR). The presence of AEA and CBR in the gastrointestinal tract highlighted their pathophysiological role in several gut diseases, including celiac disease. Here, we aimed to investigate the expression of CBR at transcriptional and translational levels in the duodenal mucosa of untreated celiac patients, celiac patients on a gluten-free diet for at least 12 months and control subjects. Also biopsies from treated celiac patients cultured ex vivo with peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin were investigated. Our data show higher levels of both CB1 and CB2 receptors during active disease and normal CBR levels in treated celiac patients. In conclusion, we demonstrate an up-regulation of CB1 and CB2 mRNA and protein expression, that points to the therapeutic potential of targeting CBR in patients with celiac disease. PMID:23620805

  9. [Presence of Helicobacter pylori in gastric biopsies and feces of pediatric patients with celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, M G; Medina, M L; Martín, G T; Dikstein, B C; Picón, S O; Gorodner, J O; Merino, L A

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main etiologic agent of chronic gastritis and it is an important cause of gastric damage. The celiac disease can affect the morphology and the function of the gastrointestinal tract from the stomach to the colon and it is frequently associated with chronic gastritis. to assess the presence of H. pylori in gastric biopsies and in feces of pediatric patients with celiac disease and to relate it with the symptoms. Pediatric patients with celiac disease attending the Gastroenterology Service at the "Avelino Castelán" Hospital in Resistencia (Argentina) were included in the study. Gastric biopsies samples were obtained by endoscopy for histological studies, the symptoms and socio-epidemiological characteristics were recorded and the polimerase chain reaction(PCR) was applied in feces in order to detect the presence of H. pylori. Thirty one patients with celiac disease were studied (16 female and 15 male; age range:1-14 years; median 6.7 years); 14 (45.2%) were positive for H. pylori in gastric biopsy and among them, only 2 (14.2%) were positive for H. pylori in stool samples. There were not significant differences between symptoms between H. pylori positive and negative patients. 45.2% of the patients with celiac disease were infected by H. pylori. There was no correlation between the frequencies of bacterial detection in feces and in gastric biopsies. The clinical manifestations of celiac disease did not increase in children infected with H. pylori.

  10. Celiac disease prevalence is not increased in patients with functional dyspepsia

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    Juan LASA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Previous evidence trying to assess the risk of celiac disease among dyspeptic patients has been inconclusive, showing in some cases notorious discrepancies. OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with dyspepsia compared to healthy controls without dyspepsia. METHODS Adult patients under evaluation for dyspepsia were invited to participate. These patients were offered an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. On the other hand, asymptomatic adult volunteers who performed a preventive visit to their primary care physician were invited to participate and agreed to undertake an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsies as well. Those patients with histologic signs of villous atrophy were furtherly evaluated and serological tests were performed in order to determine celiac disease diagnosis. Celiac disease prevalence was compared between groups. RESULTS Overall, 320 patients with dyspepsia and 320 healthy controls were recruited. There were no significant differences in terms of gender or age between groups. Celiac disease diagnosis was made in 1.25% (4/320 of patients in the dyspepsia group versus 0.62% (2/320 in the control group. CONCLUSION Patients with dyspepsia who underwent routine duodenal biopsies did not show an increased risk for celiac disease when compared to healthy individuals.

  11. Iron-deficiency anemia as a subclinical celiac disease presentation in an Argentinian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, J S; Olivera, P; Soifer, L; Moore, R

    There is a wide heterogeneity in the reports of celiac disease prevalence in iron-deficiency anemia patients. To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Adult patients with a diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia were enrolled for upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. Healthy volunteers that underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled as controls. A total of 135 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and 133 controls were enrolled. Celiac disease prevalence was higher in the iron-deficiency anemia group [11.11 vs. 1.51%, OR: 8.18 (1.83-36.55), P=.001). Of the celiac disease patients in the iron-deficiency anemia group, 73.3% had at least one endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy, whereas 100% of the celiac disease patients in the control group presented with at least one endoscopic sign. Patients with iron-deficiency anemia have an increased risk for celiac disease. Up to 25% of these patients may not present any endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Increasing prevalence and high incidence of celiac disease in elderly people: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilppula, Anitta; Kaukinen, Katri; Luostarinen, Liisa; Krekelä, Ilkka; Patrikainen, Heikki; Valve, Raisa; Mäki, Markku; Collin, Pekka

    2009-06-29

    Celiac disease may emerge at any age, but little is known of its appearance in elderly people. We evaluated the prevalence of the condition in individuals over 55 years of age, and determined the incidence of biopsy-proven celiac disease (CDb) and celiac disease including seropositive subjects for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (CDb+s). The study based on prevalence figures in 2815 randomly selected subjects who had undergone a clinical examination and serologic screening for celiac disease in 2002. A second screening in the same population was carried out in 2005, comprising now 2216 individuals. Positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies were confirmed with small bowel biopsy. Within three years the prevalence of CDb increased from 2.13 to 2.34%, and that of CDb+s from 2.45 to 2.70%. Five new cases were found among patients previously seronegative; two had minor abdominal symptoms and three were asymptomatic. The incidence of celiac disease in 2002-2005 was 0.23%, giving an annual incidence of 0.08% in this population. The prevalence of celiac disease was high in elderly people, but the symptoms were subtle. Repeated screening detected five biopsy-proven cases in three years, indicating that the disorder may develop even in the elderly. Increased alertness to the disorder is therefore warranted.

  13. Increasing prevalence and high incidence of celiac disease in elderly people: A population-based study

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    Vilppula Anitta

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease may emerge at any age, but little is known of its appearance in elderly people. We evaluated the prevalence of the condition in individuals over 55 years of age, and determined the incidence of biopsy-proven celiac disease (CDb and celiac disease including seropositive subjects for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (CDb+s. Methods The study based on prevalence figures in 2815 randomly selected subjects who had undergone a clinical examination and serologic screening for celiac disease in 2002. A second screening in the same population was carried out in 2005, comprising now 2216 individuals. Positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies were confirmed with small bowel biopsy. Results Within three years the prevalence of CDb increased from 2.13 to 2.34%, and that of CDb+s from 2.45 to 2.70%. Five new cases were found among patients previously seronegative; two had minor abdominal symptoms and three were asymptomatic. The incidence of celiac disease in 2002–2005 was 0.23%, giving an annual incidence of 0.08% in this population. Conclusion The prevalence of celiac disease was high in elderly people, but the symptoms were subtle. Repeated screening detected five biopsy-proven cases in three years, indicating that the disorder may develop even in the elderly. Increased alertness to the disorder is therefore warranted.

  14. Beta-cell autoimmunity in pediatric celiac disease: the case for routine screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Annunzio, Giuseppe; Giannattasio, Alessandro; Poggi, Elena; Castellano, Emanuela; Calvi, Angela; Pistorio, Angela; Barabino, Arrigo; Lorini, Renata

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of beta-cell autoimmunity and the usefulness of a type 1 diabetes screening in patients with celiac disease. We measured GAD antibodies (GADAs), insulinoma-associated protein 2 antigens (IA-2As), and insulin autoantibodies (IAAs) in 188 young Italian patients with celiac disease (66 male [35.1%]). Mean age at celiac disease diagnosis was 5.4 years (0.5-17.1), and mean celiac disease duration was 4.2 years (0-28.8). Celiac disease was diagnosed by jejunal biopsy after positivity for endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibody was confirmed. GADAs were positive in seven patients (3.7%), and IA-2As were positive in two patients. IAAs were negative in all cases. Metabolic evaluation was normal, and no patients developed diabetes during follow-up. There was no significant association among beta-cell autoimmunity and sex, age, pubertal stage, family history, or coexistence of other autoimmune disorders; compliance to a gluten-free diet was confirmed. Our results showed a low prevalence of beta-cell autoimmunity and do not support a precocious screening for beta-cell autoimmunity in young celiac disease patients.

  15. Increased Mercury Levels in Patients with Celiac Disease following a Gluten-Free Regimen

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    Luca Elli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Although mercury is involved in several immunological diseases, nothing is known about its implication in celiac disease. Our aim was to evaluate blood and urinary levels of mercury in celiac patients. Methods. We prospectively enrolled 30 celiac patients (20 treated with normal duodenal mucosa and 10 untreated with duodenal atrophy and 20 healthy controls from the same geographic area. Blood and urinary mercury concentrations were measured by means of flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Enrolled patients underwent dental chart for amalgam fillings and completed a food-frequency questionnaire to evaluate diet and fish intake. Results. Mercury blood/urinary levels were 2.4±2.3/1.0±1.4, 10.2±6.7/2.2±3.0 and 3.7±2.7/1.3±1.2 in untreated CD, treated CD, and healthy controls, respectively. Resulting mercury levels were significantly higher in celiac patients following a gluten-free diet. No differences were found regarding fish intake and number of amalgam fillings. No demographic or clinical data were significantly associated with mercury levels in biologic samples. Conclusion. Data demonstrate a fourfold increase of mercury blood levels in celiac patients following a gluten-free diet. Further studies are needed to clarify its role in celiac mechanism.

  16. Symptoms of Functional Intestinal Disorders Are Common in Patients with Celiac Disease Following Transition to a Gluten-Free Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvester, Jocelyn A; Graff, Lesley A; Rigaux, Lisa; Bernstein, Charles N; Leffler, Daniel A; Kelly, Ciarán P; Walker, John R; Duerksen, Donald R

    2017-09-01

    Celiac disease and functional intestinal disorders may overlap, yet the natural history of functional symptoms in patients with celiac disease is unknown. To investigate the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia (FD), and functional bloating (FB) symptoms among patients with celiac disease at diagnosis and during the first year of a gluten-free diet. Adults with a new diagnosis of celiac disease were surveyed at baseline, 6 months and 1 year using standardized measures for intestinal symptoms [Rome III diagnostic questionnaire and celiac symptom index (CSI)] and gluten-free diet adherence [gluten-free eating assessment tool (GF-EAT) and celiac diet adherence test]. At diagnosis, two-thirds fulfilled Rome III diagnostic questionnaire symptom criteria for IBS (52%), functional dyspepsia (27%), and/or functional bloating (9%). One year post-diagnosis, there was high adherence to a gluten-free diet as 93% reported gluten exposure less than once per month on the GF-EAT and only 8% had ongoing celiac disease symptoms (CSI score >45). The rates of those meeting IBS (22%) and functional dyspepsia (8%) symptom criteria both decreased significantly on a gluten-free diet. The prevalence of functional symptoms (any of IBS, FD or FB) at 1 year was 47%. Long-term follow-up of patients with celiac disease is necessary because many patients with celiac disease who are adherent to a gluten-free diet have persistent gastrointestinal symptoms.

  17. Validation of Antibody-Based Strategies for Diagnosis of Pediatric Celiac Disease Without Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Johannes; Petroff, David; Richter, Thomas; Auth, Marcus K H; Uhlig, Holm H; Laass, Martin W; Lauenstein, Peter; Krahl, Andreas; Händel, Norman; de Laffolie, Jan; Hauer, Almuthe C; Kehler, Thomas; Flemming, Gunter; Schmidt, Frank; Rodrigues, Astor; Hasenclever, Dirk; Mothes, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    A diagnosis of celiac disease is made based on clinical, genetic, serologic, and duodenal morphology features. Recent pediatric guidelines, based largely on retrospective data, propose omitting biopsy analysis for patients with concentrations of IgA against tissue transglutaminase (IgA-TTG) >10-fold the upper limit of normal (ULN) and if further criteria are met. A retrospective study concluded that measurements of IgA-TTG and total IgA, or IgA-TTG and IgG against deamidated gliadin (IgG-DGL) could identify patients with and without celiac disease. Patients were assigned to categories of no celiac disease, celiac disease, or biopsy required, based entirely on antibody assays. We aimed to validate the positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) of these diagnostic procedures. We performed a prospective study of 898 children undergoing duodenal biopsy analysis to confirm or rule out celiac disease at 13 centers in Europe. We compared findings from serologic analysis with findings from biopsy analyses, follow-up data, and diagnoses made by the pediatric gastroenterologists (celiac disease, no celiac disease, or no final diagnosis). Assays to measure IgA-TTG, IgG-DGL, and endomysium antibodies were performed by blinded researchers, and tissue sections were analyzed by local and blinded reference pathologists. We validated 2 procedures for diagnosis: total-IgA and IgA-TTG (the TTG-IgA procedure), as well as IgG-DGL with IgA-TTG (TTG-DGL procedure). Patients were assigned to categories of no celiac disease if all assays found antibody concentrations celiac disease if at least 1 assay measured antibody concentrations >10-fold the ULN. All other cases were considered to require biopsy analysis. ULN values were calculated using the cutoff levels suggested by the test kit manufacturers. HLA typing was performed for 449 participants. We used models that considered how specificity values change with prevalence to extrapolate the PPV and NPV to populations with lower

  18. Effect of clinical and laboratory parameters on quality of life in celiac patients using celiac disease-specific quality of life scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungmin; Clarke, Kofi

    2017-11-01

    Health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) in patients with celiac disease is reduced compared to the general population. We investigated the association between HR-QOL and clinical, laboratory findings using the previously validated CD-QOL (celiac disease-specific quality of life) instrument in patients with celiac disease. To our knowledge, no study has previously explored the relationship between HR-QOL and clinical, laboratory parameters in celiac patients. Patients who received care at the Allegheny Health Network Celiac Center, Pittsburgh, PA were asked to complete the CD-QOL questionnaire. A cross sectional study with predetermined clinical and laboratory parameters was performed. Data collected included IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibody titers, iron studies, calcium, vitamin A, B12, 25 OH vitamin D, and E levels. Correlation between clinical findings and CD-QOL was also assessed. Seventy-eight out of 124 patients who completed the questionnaire was included in the analysis. Patients with concomitant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) had significantly reduced HR-QOL with CD-QOL score of 52.4 ± 11.3 vs. 44.6 ± 12.9 in those without IBS (p = .009). There was no difference in HR-QOL in relation to IgA tTG titers or vitamin D levels. Of note, there was a trend towards correlation between higher level of vitamin E and better QOL (r = -0.236, p = .074). Celiac patients with concomitant IBS have reduced HR-QOL. There was no statistically significant association between HR-QOL and laboratory parameters or levels of micronutrients.

  19. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

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    Caraceni, M.P.; Molteni, N.; Bardella, M.T.; Ortolani, S.; Nogara, A.; Bianchi, P.A.

    1988-03-01

    Bone mineral density (/sup 125/I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups.

  20. Gliadin peptides activate blood monocytes from patients with celiac disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cinová, Jana; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Smythies, L.; Černá, M.; Pecharová, Barbara; Dvořák, M.; Fruhauf, P.; Tlaskalová, Helena; Smith, P.; Tučková, Ludmila

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2007), s. 201-209 ISSN 0271-9142 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/05/2245; GA ČR GD310/03/H147; GA AV ČR IAA5020210; GA AV ČR IAA5020205; GA AV ČR 1QS500200572; GA AV ČR KJB5020407; GA MZe 1B53002 Grant - others:US(US) DK-064400; US(US) DK-47322; US(US) DK-54495; US(US) HD-41361; US(US) DK-064400 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Source of funding: N - neverejné zdroje ; N - neverejné zdroje ; N - neverejné zdroje ; N - neverejné zdroje ; N - neverejné zdroje Keywords : celiac disease * innate immunity * blood monocytes Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.886, year: 2007

  1. Regression of conjunctival tumor during dietary treatment of celiac disease

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    Tuncer Samuray

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old girl presented with a hemorrhagic conjunctival lesion in the right eye. The medical history revealed premature cessation of breast feeding, intolerance to the ingestion of baby foods, anorexia, and abdominal distention. Prior to her referral, endoscopic small intestinal biopsy had been carried out under general anesthesia with a possible diagnosis of Celiac Disease (CD. Her parents did not want their child to undergo general anesthesia for the second time for the excisional biopsy. We decided to follow the patient until all systemic investigations were concluded. In evaluation, the case was diagnosed with CD and the conjunctival tumor showed complete regression during gluten-free dietary treatment. The clinical fleshy appearance of the lesion with spider-like vascular extensions and subconjunctival hemorrhagic spots, possible association with an acquired immune system dysfunction due to CD, and spontaneous regression by a gluten-free diet led us to make a presumed diagnosis of conjunctival Kaposi sarcoma.

  2. Celiac disease: progress towards diagnosis and definition of pathogenic mechanisms.

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    Rossi, Mauro; Bot, Adrian

    2011-08-01

    The current issue of the International Reviews of Immunology is dedicated entirely to Celiac Disease (CD). Recent development of additional biomarkers and diagnostics resulted in a sharp revision of the prevalence of this condition, with a previously unrecognized subclinical occurrence in the adult population. This was paralleled by groundbreaking progress in understanding its molecular pathogenesis: while gluten-derived peptides activate the innate immunity, post-translationally modified gluten elicits an adaptive immunity. These arms amplify each other, resulting in a self- perpetuating autoimmune condition, influenced by disturbances of the gut flora and mucus chemistry. The process evolves dramatically in a subset of patients with vulnerable immune homeostasis (eg. Treg cells) explaining the progressive, aggravating syndrome in the clinically overt version of CD. In depth understanding of the pathogenesis of CD thus creates the premises of developing novel, more accurate animal models that should support a rationale development of new prophylactic and therapeutic interventions.

  3. Nutritional profile of adult patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abenavoli, L; Delibasic, M; Peta, V; Turkulov, V; De Lorenzo, A; Medić-Stojanoska, M

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated gluten dependent enteropathy induced by ingestion of gluten, characterized by intestinal malabsorption and subtotals or total atrophy of intestinal villi. The predominant consequence of CD in untreated patients, is malnutrition as a result of malabsorption. Moreover, several and increasing extra-intestinal clinical manifestations have been described in the CD patients. Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves nutritional status, inducing an increase in fat and bone compartments, but does not completely normalize body composition and nutritional deficiencies. An early and accurate evaluation of nutritional status can be of the pivotal step in the clinical management of the adult CD patients. The aim of this review is to present the most important and recent data on nutritional and metabolic features in the CD adult patients, the related implications and the effects of the GFD on these conditions.

  4. Celiac disease treatment: gluten-free diet and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki, Markku

    2014-07-01

    The basis for celiac disease (CD) treatment is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. On the diet, the small intestinal mucosal injury heals and gluten-induced symptoms and signs disappear. The mucosal healing is a prerequisite for sustaining health and is also obtained with a diet containing oats and trace amounts of gluten, industrially purified wheat starch-based gluten-free products. The small intestinal mucosa does not heal in noncompliant people, nor when a patient is inadvertently ingesting gluten. Development of adjunctive or alternative therapies is on its way. There are several novel treatment pipelines within academy and industry. Examples are the ideas of using glutenases as a drug to degrade the ingested gluten, polymers to bind and sequester the gluten to the feces, and also vaccine development for an immunotherapy to induce tolerance towards gluten. Clinical drug trials are to be foreseen in CD, soon also in children.

  5. Prevalence of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity Among Adolescents and Young Adults in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Juanli; Zhou, Chunyan; Gao, Jinyan; Li, Jingjing; Yu, Fenglian; Lu, Jun; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiaozhong; Tong, Ping; Wu, Zhihua; Yang, Anshu; Yao, Yonghong; Nadif, Sarah; Shu, Heng; Jiang, Xu; Wu, Yujie; Gilissen, Luud; Chen, Hongbing

    2017-10-01

    In China, epidemiologic information on celiac disease autoimmunity is scarce and fragmented. We investigated the prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in the general Chinese population. In a cross-sectional prospective study, 19,778 undiagnosed Chinese adolescents and young adults (age, 16-25 y) were recruited from consecutive new students who underwent routine physical examinations at 2 universities in Jiangxi, China, from September 2010 through October 2013; the students were from 27 geographic regions in China. All subjects were tested for serum IgG, IgG against deamidated gliadin peptides (IgG anti-DGP), and IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA anti-tTG). We also analyzed HLA genotypes in subgroups of participants with different results from tests for serum markers of celiac disease. A total of 434 students (2.19%) tested positive for serum markers for celiac disease (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.99%-2.41%), 0.36% of the students tested positive for anti-tTG IgA (95% CI, 0.28%-0.46%), and 1.88% tested positive for anti-DGP IgG (95% CI, 1.70%-2.09%). The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity (positive results in assays for anti-tTG IgA and anti-DGP-IgG) was 0.06% (95% CI, 0.03%-0.10%). Celiac disease autoimmunity was associated with the consumption of wheat and female sex. The prevalence in the Shandong province in north China, where wheat is a staple in the diet, was 0.76% (95% CI, 0.21%-1.95%). The frequencies of the HLA-DQ2/-DQ8 genotypes associated with celiac disease were higher in subjects with celiac disease autoimmunity, based on detection of both serum markers, than in subjects with positive results from a single test (P celiac disease. The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in the Shandong province in north China, where wheat is a staple in the diet, was 0.76%. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease after diagnosis of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Norelle R; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Green, Peter H R; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a common cause of chronic liver disease. Celiac disease alters intestinal permeability and treatment with a gluten-free diet often causes weight gain, but so far there are few reports of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with celiac disease. Population-based cohort study. We compared the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease diagnosed from 1997 to 2009 in individuals with celiac disease (n = 26,816) to matched reference individuals (n = 130,051). Patients with any liver disease prior to celiac disease were excluded, as were individuals with a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol-related disorder to minimize misclassification of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Cox regression estimated hazard ratios for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were determined. During 246,559 person-years of follow-up, 53 individuals with celiac disease had a diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (21/100,000 person-years). In comparison, we identified 85 reference individuals diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease during 1,488,413 person-years (6/100,000 person-years). This corresponded to a hazard ratio of 2.8 (95% CI 2.0-3.8), with the highest risk estimates seen in children (HR = 4.6; 95% CI 2.3-9.1). The risk increase in the first year after celiac disease diagnosis was 13.3 (95% CI 3.5-50.3) but remained significantly elevated even beyond 15 years after the diagnosis of celiac disease (HR = 2.5; 95% CI 1.0-5.9). Individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease compared to the general population. Excess risks were highest in the first year after celiac disease diagnosis, but persisted through 15 years after diagnosis with celiac disease. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors That Increase Risk of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity After a Gastrointestinal Infection in Early Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, Kaisa M; Lynch, Kristian F; Liu, Edwin; Lönnrot, Maria; Simell, Ville; Briese, Thomas; Koletzko, Sibylle; Hagopian, William; Rewers, Marian; She, Jin-Xiong; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Ziegler, Anette-G; Akolkar, Beena; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Lernmark, Åke; Hyöty, Heikki; Triplett, Eric W; Agardh, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of gluten immunogenicity in patients with celiac disease. We studied temporal associations between infections and the development of celiac disease autoimmunity, and examined effects of HLA alleles, rotavirus vaccination status, and infant feeding. We monitored 6327 children in the United States and Europe carrying HLA risk genotypes for celiac disease from 1 to 4 years of age for presence of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (the definition of celiac disease autoimmunity), until March 31, 2015. Parental reports of gastrointestinal and respiratory infections were collected every third month from birth. We analyzed time-varying relationships among reported infections, rotavirus vaccination status, time to first introduction of gluten, breastfeeding, and risk of celiac disease autoimmunity using proportional hazard models. We identified 13,881 gastrointestinal infectious episodes (GIE) and 79,816 respiratory infectious episodes. During the follow-up period, 732 of 6327 (11.6%) children developed celiac disease autoimmunity. A GIE increased the risk of celiac disease autoimmunity within the following 3 months by 33% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-1.59). This risk increased 2-fold among children born in winter and introduced to gluten before age 6 months (HR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.46-2.98), and increased 10-fold among children without HLA-DQ2 alleles and breastfed for fewer than 4 months (HR, 9.76; 95% CI, 3.87-24.8). Risk of celiac disease autoimmunity was reduced in children vaccinated against rotavirus and introduced to gluten before age 6 months (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.36-0.88). Gastrointestinal infections increase the risk of celiac disease autoimmunity in children with genetic susceptibility to this autoimmune disorder. The risk is modified by HLA genotype, infant gluten consumption, breastfeeding, and rotavirus vaccination, indicating complex interactions among infections, genetic factors

  8. Clinical utility of celiac disease associated HLA testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallav, Kumar; Kabbani, Toufic; Tariq, Sohaib; Vanga, Rohini; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Negative predictive value (NPV) of Celiac Disease (CD) related human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DQ2 and DQ8 approaches 100% in individual patients. However, studies evaluating its exclusionary utility in patient groups are lacking. Aim We aim to assess the performance of HLA testing when applied to patient groups with varying characteristics and propose evidence-based recommendations for its clinical use. Methods Demographic and clinical information was recorded in patients undergoing HLA testing. Using predetermined criteria, patients were classified as CD, Non CD or indeterminate. Diagnostic yield of HLA testing was defined as the percentage of patients in whom CD could be excluded based on negative HLA test. Results 256 patients underwent testing for CD related HLA DQ2 and DQ8. 102 (100 Non CD, 2 CD) patients tested HLA negative for a 98% NPV and 39% diagnostic yield. Diagnostic yield was highest (60%) in patients with intraepithelial lymphocytosis plus normal IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody (IgA-tTG) and lowest in patients with positive IgA-tTG plus villous atrophy (0%). CD was diagnosed in 2 HLA negative patients, who carried half of DQ2.5 trans genotype. Conclusions Diagnostic yield of CD related HLA testing varies widely depending on clinical indication. HLA testing is a practical and valuable test for most patients in whom initial evaluation for CD is inconclusive. A negative HLA result usually obviates the need for further celiac testing including endoscopy and gluten challenge. Rarely, in patients reported as HLA negative, half of HLA DQ2.5 (cis or trans) is sufficient for development of CD. PMID:24705698

  9. Neurophysiology of the "Celiac Brain": Disentangling Gut-Brain Connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Manuela; Bramanti, Alessia; Cantone, Mariagiovanna; Pennisi, Giovanni; Bella, Rita; Lanza, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) can be considered a complex multi-organ disorder with highly variable extra-intestinal, including neurological, involvement. Cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, seizures, headache, cognitive impairment, and neuropsychiatric diseases are complications frequently reported. These manifestations may be present at the onset of the typical disease or become clinically evident during its course. However, CD subjects with subclinical neurological involvement have also been described, as well as patients with clear central and/or peripheral nervous system and intestinal histopathological disease features in the absence of typical CD manifestations. Based on these considerations, a sensitive and specific diagnostic method that is able to detect early disease process, progression, and complications is desirable. In this context, neurophysiological techniques play a crucial role in the non-invasive assessment of central nervous system (CNS) excitability and conductivity. Moreover, some of these tools are known for their valuable role in early diagnosis and follow-up of several neurological diseases or systemic disorders, such as CD with nervous system involvement, even at the subclinical level. This review provides an up-to-date summary of the neurophysiological basis of CD using electroencephalography (EEG), multimodal evoked potentials, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The evidence examined here seems to converge on an overall profile of "hyperexcitable celiac brain," which partially recovers after institution of a gluten-free diet (GFD). The main translational correlate is that in case of subclinical neurological involvement or overt unexplained symptoms, neurophysiology could contribute to the diagnosis, assessment, and monitoring of a potentially underlying CD.

  10. [Psychological alterations in patients with adult celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Cerezo, Francisco J; Castillejo, Gemma; Guillen, Núria; Morente, Vanessa; Simó, Josep M; Tena, Francisco J; Marsal, Joan; Pascual, Domingo

    2014-04-01

    Patients with recently-diagnosed adult celiac disease were evaluated with the Gastrointestinal Symptom rating Scale (GSRS) and Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI) to evaluate their psychological alterations, the association between any alterations and gastrointestinal symptoms, and their outcome after starting a gluten-free diet. The patients underwent nutritional assessment and then started a gluten-free diet; they were reassessed 6 months later. Quantitative variables are expressed as the median and 25th-75th percentiles. We included 21 patients, 17 women and 4 mena, with a mean age of 43 years (31-47). The results of histological analysis were compatible with Marsh I lesions in 6 patients, Marsh IIIa in 6 and Marsh IIIb in 9. At baseline, 8 patients showed severe psychological distress, 4 showed moderate distress and 9 showed no distress. The GSRS score was 34 (17-43) and the PGWBI was 64 (48-87), with a significant correlation between the 2 indexes (rho=-.58, P=.006). At 6 months, 3 patients had severe psychological distress, 5 had moderate distress, 9 showed no distress and 4 showed psychological well-being. The GSRS score at 6 months was 13 (8-17) and the PGWBI was 83 (68-95) (P<.05 compared with baseline data for the 3 indicators). The 6 axes of the PGWBI showed significant improvement. At 6 months, no correlation was found between the GSRS and PGWBI. Patients with celiac disease have psychological alterations whose intensity is related to gastrointestinal symptoms. These symptoms improve after the start of a gluten-free diet. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  11. Why Oats Are Safe and Healthy for Celiac Disease Patients

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    Luud J. W. J. Gilissen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The water-insoluble storage proteins of cereals (prolamins are called “gluten” in wheat, barley, and rye, and “avenins” in oat. Gluten can provoke celiac disease (CD in genetically susceptible individuals (those with human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 serotypes. Avenins are present at a lower concentration (10%–15% of total protein content in oat as compared to gluten in wheat (80%–85%. The avenins in the genus Avena (cultivated oat as well as various wild species of which gene bank accessions were analyzed are free of the known CD immunogenic epitopes from wheat, barley, and rye. T cells that recognize avenin-specific epitopes have been found very rarely in CD patients. CD patients that consume oats daily do not show significantly increased levels of intraepithelial lymphocyte (EIL cells. The safety and the positive health effects of the long-term inclusion of oats in the gluten-free diet have been confirmed in long-term studies. Since 2009 (EC 41/2009 and 2013 (FDA oat products may be sold as gluten-free in several countries provided a gluten contamination level below 20 ppm. Introduction of oats in the gluten-free diet of celiac patients is advised after the recovery of the intestine. Health effects of oat consumption are reflected in European Food Safety Authority (EFSA- and Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved health claims. Oats can form a healthy, nutritious, fiber-rich, and safe complement to the gluten-free diet.

  12. Thyroid disorders in Brazilian patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Kotze, Lorete Maria; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori; da Rosa Utiyama, Shirley Ramos; Piovezan, Gislaine Custodio; Kotze, Luiz Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) can develop a gluten related autoimmune disorder that affects not only the small intestine but other tissues as well. An increased prevalence of autoimmune diseases has been reported, particularly autoimmune thyroiditis. The aim of this study was to characterize thyroid disorders in patients with CD. Fifty-two patients with CD (43 female, 9 male; mean age, 41.1 years) were studied. Nine were on a gluten-free diet (GFD). They were divided into four groups: Group 1, without thyroid involvement (n=30); Groups 2A-C, with thyroid involvement (n=22); Group 2A, subclinical hypothyroidism (n=11); Group 2B, clinical hypothyroidism (n=10); and Group 2C, other thyroid disorders (n=1). CD was confirmed by serologic and histologic criteria. Thyroid involvement was detected by measurement of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO). Increased levels of TSH and/or anti-TPO levels were detected in Groups 2A (21.1%) and 2B (19.2%). The patients of Group 2B presented clinical symptoms of hypothyroidism before the diagnosis of CD, and 5 of these patients were receiving levothyroxine. One woman (Group 2C; 1.92%) had a medullary carcinoma. There was statistical significance between the age when thyroid disease was diagnosed (current age) and the age of CD diagnosis between Groups 1 and 2B. Patients with thyroid involvement presented associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus (2), Down's syndrome (2), ulcerative colitis (1), and dermatitis herpetiformis (2). Our findings demonstrated an increased prevalence of thyroid disorders (hypothyroidism, 19.2%; and subclinical hypothyroidism, 21.2%), and other associated diseases in celiac patients, even on a GFD, increasing with the age of the patients. Screening for associated diseases is recommended for patients with CD, independent of age at diagnosis or treatment duration.

  13. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach

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    Isaac DM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Migliarese Isaac,1 Jessica Wu,2 Diana R Mager,3,4 Justine M Turner1 1Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta; 2Alberta Health Services–Child Health Nutrition Services, Stollery Children’s Hospital; 3Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutritional Science; 4Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD. Keywords: celiac disease

  14. THE PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE AMONG PATIENTS WITH FAMILIAL MEDITERRANEAN FEVER

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    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Familial Mediterranean Fever and celiac disease are both related to auto-inflammation and/or auto-immunity and they share some common clinical features such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating and flatulence. Objectives We aimed to determine the association of these two diseases, if present. Methods Totally 112 patients diagnosed with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 cases as healthy control were included in the study. All participants were examined for the evidence of celiac disease, with serum tissue transglutaminase IgA levels (tTG IgA. Results Totally 144 cases, 112 with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 healthy control cases were included in the study. tTG IgA positivity was determined in three cases with Familial Mediterranean Fever and in one case in control group. In that aspect there was no significant difference regarding the tTG IgA positivity between groups (P=0.81. Duodenum biopsy was performed to the tTG IgA positive cases and revealed Marsh Type 3b in two Familial Mediterranean Fever cases and Marsh Type 3c in the other one while the biopsy results were of the only tTG IgA positive case in control group was Marsh Type 3b. In HLA evaluation of the celiac cases; HLA DQ2 was present in two celiac cases of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group and in the only celiac case of the control group while HLA DQ8 was present in one celiac case of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group. Conclusions We did not determine an association of Familial Mediterranean Fever with celiac disease. Larger studies with subgroup analysis are warranted to determine the relationship of these two diseases.

  15. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce phosphoproteome modification in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Paolella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2 activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins, three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here

  16. B vitamins related to homocysteine metabolism in adults celiac disease patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Flávia Xavier; Campos, Tatiana do Nascimento; Moraes, Luís Fernando de Sousa; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana Miranda; Cardoso, Leandro de Morais; Pinheiro-Sant'Ana, Helena Maria; Gilberti, Flávio Augusto Barros; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo Gouveia

    2015-10-20

    The only treatment for celiac disease is the gluten-free diet. Few studies have assessed the nutritional adequacy of this diet, especially of B vitamins related to homocysteine metabolism. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional status and serum concentrations of B vitamins involved in homocysteine metabolism, and to determine whether the dietary intake of these vitamins are meeting Dietary Reference Intakes in celiac patients. A cross-sectional study enrolled a total of 20 celiac patients (36.3 ± 13.7 years old; 65% women), following strict gluten-free diet (GFD) and 39 healthy controls matched by sex and age. The dietary intake was assessed by 3-day food records, and serum concentrations of homocysteine and vitamins B6, B12, and folate were determined after overnight fasting. Comparisons between the two groups were performed by Student's t test or Mann-Whitney U-test, for continuous variables. Pearson's chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was used for categorical variables. An alpha level of 5% were considered significant. Celiac patients had lower serum folate concentrations (7.7 ± 3.5 ng/mL, P < 0.05) than controls. All celiac patients had folate intake below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) (130.8 ± 53.6 μg/d). However, only a small proportion of celiac patients had hyperhomocysteinemia. Celiac patients treated with GFD presented inadequacy of dietary folate intake and low-serum concentrations of folate, suggesting that more attention should be given to the quality of the nutrients offered by the GFD, as it constitutes a lifelong treatment.

  17. Delay in Diagnosis of Celiac Disease in Patients Without Gastrointestinal Complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Marco A; Gramelspacher, Anna Maria; Sinacore, James; Winterfield, Laura; Venu, Mukund

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of our study is to investigate the delay in diagnosis of patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease in those who present with gastrointestinal complaints vs nongastrointestinal complaints at our tertiary care center. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide. Celiac disease can have variable clinical presentations; it can be characterized by predominately gastrointestinal symptoms, or it may present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 687 adult patients who carried the diagnosis of celiac disease. Patients included had biopsy-proven celiac disease and were categorized based on presence or absence of gastrointestinal symptoms prior to their diagnosis. There were 101 patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease that met inclusion criteria. Fifty-two patients presented with gastrointestinal symptoms and 49 had nongastrointestinal complaints. Results from Mann-Whitney statistical analysis showed a median delay in diagnosis of 2.3 months for the gastrointestinal symptoms group and 42 months for the nongastrointestinal group (P symptoms had abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone, as opposed to 15.5% in the gastrointestinal symptom group (P = .004). Of patients with nongastrointestinal symptoms, 69.4% had anemia, compared with 11.5% of the gastrointestinal symptom group (P symptom group, 68%, were noted to have abnormal bone density scans, compared with 41% in the gastrointestinal symptom group. No sex differences were noted on chi-squared analysis between the 2 groups (P = .997). Although there is growing awareness of celiac disease, the delay in diagnosis for patients without gastrointestinal symptoms remains prolonged, with an average delay of 3.5 years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Accuracy in celiac disease diagnostics by controlling the small-bowel biopsy process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Charlotta; Halvarsson, Britta; Norström, Fredrik; Myléus, Anna; Carlsson, Annelie; Danielsson, Lars; Högberg, Lotta; Ivarsson, Anneli; Karlsson, Eva; Stenhammar, Lars; Sandström, Olof

    2011-05-01

    In a Swedish celiac disease screening study (Exploring the Iceberg of Celiacs in Sweden), we systematically reviewed the clinical diagnostic procedures with the aim to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and to take advantage of lessons learned for improving diagnostic routines. A school-based celiac disease screening study involving 5 Swedish centers, with 10,041 invited 12-year-olds with 7567 consenting participation. All 192 children with elevated serological markers were recommended to undergo small-bowel biopsy, performed and evaluated according to local clinical routines. All of the mucosal specimens were reevaluated by 1 and, when needed, 2 expert pathologists to reach diagnostic consensus. Small-bowel biopsies were performed in 184 children: 130 by endoscopy and 54 by suction capsule. Endoscopic biopsies were inconclusive in 0.6%, compared with 7.4% of biopsies by suction capsule. A patchy enteropathy was found in 9.1%. Reevaluation by the expert pathologist resulted in 6 additional cases with celiac disease and 1 cleared. Sixteen children with normal or inconclusive biopsies, 4 after endoscopy, and 12 after suction capsule were endoscopically rebiopsied, resulting in another 8 cases. The celiac disease prevalence of 30 of 1000 (95% confidence interval 26-34) was not statistically different from that previously reported. The present review revealed the importance of controlling each step of the diagnostic procedure. Several cases would have been missed by relying only on local routines. To improve the quality of childhood celiac disease diagnostics, we recommend multiple endoscopic biopsies from both proximal and distal duodenum and standardized evaluation by a pathologist with good knowledge of celiac disease.

  19. LOWER BIFIDOBACTERIA COUNTS IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE ON A GLUTEN-FREE DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisléia GOLFETTO

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context The ingestion of gluten is responsible for the symptoms of Celiac disease, but other environmental factors can also influence. Strains of the Bifidobacterium genus have been shown to afford protection against the inflammatory response and mucosal damage caused by gliadin peptides in vitro. Objectives This study was designed to compare the concentration of fecal bifidobacteria and pH of patients with celiac disease on gluten-free diet and control subjects in order to identify if the imbalance on fecal microbiota still remain during the treatment of celiac disease and identify the necessity of dietary supplementation with pre- or probiotics. Methods It was analyzed the feces of 42 healthy subjects and 14 celiac patients. The bifidobacteria count in feces was done in selective medium BIM-25. Microscopic analysis of the colonies was performed by Gram stain. The identification of the genus Bifidobacterium was performed by determination of fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase. Fecal pH was measured using a pH meter. Results The concentration of bifidobacteria per gram of feces was significantly higher in healthy subjects (controls (1.5 ± 0.63 x108 CFU/g when compared to celiac patients (2.5 ± 1.5 x107 CFU/g. The fecal pH was not different between celiac patients (7.19 ± 0.521 and controls (7.18 ± 0.522. Conclusions These results suggest that with lower levels of bifidobacteria, celiac patients have an imbalance in the intestinal microbiota, regardless of pH, even while on a gluten-free diet. This fact could favor the pathological process of the disorder.

  20. Dietary Patterns After the Weaning and Lactation Period Associate with Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Monica; Beth, Sytske A; Voortman, Trudy; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; van Zelm, Menno C; Moll, Henriette A; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C

    2018-02-23

    There have been many studies of associations between infant feeding practices and development of celiac disease during childhood, but few studies have focused on overall diets of young children following the weaning period. We aimed to examine the association between common dietary patterns in infants and the occurrence of celiac disease autoimmunity during childhood. We performed a prospective analysis of data from the Generation R Study that comprised 1997 children born from April 2002 through January 2006 in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Food consumption around 1 year of age was assessed with a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Dietary data were examined using a priori (based on existing guidelines) and a posteriori (Principal Component Analysis and Reduced Rank Regression) dietary pattern analyses. Five dietary patterns were compared. Celiac disease autoimmunity, determined based on serum concentration of transglutaminase-2 autoantibody (TG2A) below or above 7 U/mL, was evaluated at 6 years. Associations between dietary pattern adherence scores and celiac disease autoimmunity were examined using multivariable logistic regression models. Higher adherence to the a posteriori-derived prudent dietary pattern (high intake of vegetables, vegetable oils, pasta, and grains and low consumption of refined cereals and sweet beverages) at 1 year was significantly associated with lower odds of celiac disease autoimmunity at 6 years (odds ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54-0.84). No significant associations were found for other 4 dietary patterns. In a prospective study of dietary patterns of young children in the Netherlands, we associated a diet with high consumption of vegetables and grains, and low consumption of refined cereals and sweet beverages, with lower odds of celiac disease autoimmunity. Early-life dietary patterns might therefore be involved in the development of celiac disease during childhood. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. From genome-wide association studies to disease mechanisms : celiac disease as a model for autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Wijmenga, Cisca; Withoff, Sebo

    Celiac disease is characterized by a chronic inflammatory reaction in the intestine and is triggered by gluten, a constituent derived from grains which is present in the common daily diet in the Western world. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms behind celiac disease etiology are still not

  2. Screening detected celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus : Effect on the clinical course - (A case control study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rami, B; Sumnik, Z; Schober, E; Waldhor, T; Battelino, T; Bratanic, N; Kurti, K; Lebl, J; Limbert, C; Madacsy, L; Odink, RJH; Paskova, M; Soltesz, G

    Objective: To investigate clinical and metabolic characteristics of diabetic children with screening detected celiac disease in a multicenter case-control study. Methods: Cases: 98 diabetic patients were diagnosed as having silent celiac disease by screening with endomysial antibodies and subsequent

  3. Celiac disease on YouTube - a study of the Polish content available on the popular video-sharing website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiedrowski, Mirosław; Mróz, Andrzej; Gajewska, Danuta; Nurzyński, Paweł; Deptała, Andrzej

    2017-10-23

    Celiac disease affects about 1% of the population. Since most Polish households have a broadband Internet connection, a lot of people use web resources to learn about health and disease. YouTube service (www.youtube.com) offers a lot of videos concerning celiac disease. However, the credibility of the Polish videos available on YouTube and concerning celiac disease has never been analyzed. The aim of the study was to determine whether the YouTube service offers valuable content for Polish people affected by celiac disease. One hundred and fifty-four unique videos devoted to celiac disease and available in the Polish language were identified and critically assessed. Each video was categorized due to its topic(s), and evaluated for its credibility by two independent researchers. In general, 127 (82.5%) videos were found to be credible. The most credible categories of content presented organizations and events related to celiac disease/celiac society, followed by culinary recipes (100.0, 100.0, and 95.6% of credible videos, respectively). The least trustworthy categories were devoted to pathobiology and advertisements (55.6 and 54.3% of credible videos, respectively). YouTube service can serve as a supplementary source of knowledge for people affected by celiac disease, after careful selection of trustworthy content.

  4. Osteoporosis reversibility in a patient with celiac disease and primary autoimmune hypothyroidism on gluten free diet: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kovačev-Zavišić Branka; Ičin Tijana; Novaković-Paro Jovanka; Medić-Stojanoska Milica; Bajkin Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Secondary osteoporosis occurs in many diseases. Celiac disease-induced osteoporosis is the consequence of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Biochemical bone markers show predominance of bone resorption, thus making the bisphosphonates the first line therapy option. Intestinal mucosal changes are reversible on gluten-free diet. Osteoporosis reversibility is also possible, provided postmenopausal osteoporosis risk factors independent from celiac di...

  5. Gluten-Free Diet Does Not Appear to Induce Endoscopic Remission of Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children with Coexistent Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease and eosinophilic esophagitis are usually considered to be separate gastrointestinal diseases; however, it appears that they may coexist more often than would be expected. It is unknown whether eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with celiac disease responds to a gluten-free diet.

  6. Celiac disease, iron deficiency anaemia, grave's disease, osteopenia and short stature in single patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radaideh, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an intestinal immune mediated disorder, triggered by ingestion of gluten-containing diet in genetically susceptible individuals. The genetic pre-disposition is related to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, especially HLA-DQ2 positive patients. The prevalence of celiac disease in high worldwide and it has been estimated to be 1-26% in Western countries. Many auto-immune diseases can be associated with celiac disease including auto-immune thyroid disease; hashimoto thyroiditis and grave's disease. The opposite also appears to be true, celiac disease is found on persons with auto-immune thyroid disorders at high rates than the general population. Celiac disease is also associated with other extraintestinal diseases other the auto-immune diseases like anemia, short stature, metabolic bone disease and others. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with auto-immune thyroid disease, anemia, short stature and metabolic bone disease. The life-long adherence to gluten-free diet is the only cure in celiac disease and can improve the quality of patients life and prevent future complications. This report describes a case of Grave's disease, Iron deficiency anemia, Short stature, Osteopenia, diagnosed to have Celiac disease. (author)

  7. Focus on Inclusive Education: The Educational and Social Challenges of Children with Celiac Disease: What Educators Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chick, Kay A.

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disease in which gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and contaminated oats, attacks the lining of the small intestine. Children with this disease must eliminate gluten from their diet. This article provides educators with essential information on celiac disease and the federal laws that protect the…

  8. The prognostic significance of celiac lymph node metastasis in patients with locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma receiving curative concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Hao; Lu, Hung-I; Wang, Yu-Ming; Lo, Chien-Ming; Chou, Shang-Yu; Huang, Cheng-Hua; Shih, Li-Hsueh; Chen, Su-Wei; Li, Shau-Hsuan

    2017-11-10

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of celiac lymph node (LN) metastasis in patients with locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving curative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). A total of 375 stage III ESCC patients were identified, including 51 patients with celiac LN metastasis and 324 patients without celiac LN metastasis. Among these 324 patients without celiac LN metastasis, 51 were matched with the 51 patients with celiac LN metastasis using the propensity score matching method. Overall, the celiac LN metastasis group had worse progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) than the non-celiac LN metastasis group and the matched non-celiac LN metastasis group. For the ESCC patients with celiac LN metastasis, lower third ESCC was significantly associated with superior PFS and OS. For patients with upper/middle third ESCC, the celiac LN metastasis group had worse PFS and OS than the non-celiac LN metastasis group and the matched non-celiac LN metastasis group. For patients with lower third ESCC, there were no significant differences in PFS and OS between these groups. Our study suggests celiac LN metastasis is a poor prognostic factor for locally advanced ESCC patients receiving curative CCRT. Among these ESCC patients with celiac LN metastasis, tumor location is a strongly prognostic factor, indicating patients with lower third ESCC have better PFS and OS than those with upper/middle third ESCC. The 6 th American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system seems more favorable than 7 th edition in the definition of celiac LNs for those patients.

  9. Carpal spasm in a girl as initial presentation of celiac disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramosaj-Morina, Atifete; Keka-Sylaj, A; Hasbahta, V; Baloku-Zejnullahu, A; Azemi, M; Zunec, R

    2017-09-04

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder elicited by ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible persons. This disorder is characterized by specific histological changes of the small intestine mucosa resulting in malabsorption. This case was written up as it was an unusual and dramatic presentation of celiac disease. We report the case of a 3-year-old Albanian girl who presented at our clinic with carpal spasms and hand paresthesia. A physical examination at admission revealed a relatively good general condition and body weight of 10.5 kg (10 percentile). Carpal spasms and paresthesias of her extremities were present. Neuromuscular irritability was demonstrated by positive Chvostek and Trousseau signs. Blood tests showed severe hypocalcemia with a total serum calcium of 1.2 mmol/L (normal range 2.12 to 2.55 mmol/L), ionized calcium of 0.87 (normal range 1.11 to 1.30 mmol/L), and 24-hour urine calcium excretion of 9.16 mmol (normal range female celiac disease was performed: antigliadin immunoglobulin A, anti-tissue transglutaminase, and anti-endomysial immunoglobulin A antibodies were positive. A duodenal biopsy revealed lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy compatible with celiac disease grade IIIb according to the Marsh classification. Following the diagnosis of celiac disease, human leukocyte antigen typing was performed, giving a definite diagnosis of celiac disease. She was started on a gluten-free diet. Due to failure to follow a gluten-free diet, episodes of carpal spasms appeared again. Unfortunately, at the age of 7 years she presents with delayed psychophysical development. Although hypocalcemia is a common finding in celiac disease, hypocalcemic carpal spasm is a rare initial manifestation of the disease. Therefore, the possibility of celiac disease should be considered in patients with repeated carpal spasms that seem unduly difficult to treat. This should be evaluated even in the absence of gastrointestinal

  10. Isolated short stature as a presentation of celiac disease in Saudi children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asaad Mohamed Assiri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of isolated short stature as a clinical presentation of celiac disease in Saudi Arab children and whether some of the routine labora-tory tests performed to determine the cause of short stature could suggest the diagnosis of celiac disease. A total of 91 children with short stature were included in the study. Extensive endocrine and biochemical assessments, including total protein, serum albumin, calcium phosphate and alkaline phosphatase assays; renal function tests; coagulation profile; anti-endomysial antibodies and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody, growth hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, free-thyroxin (FT4 assays; stool tests for giardiasis; bone age; and endoscopic intestinal biopsies, were done for all children. Ten of the 91 children had positive intestinal biopsies in the form of total villous atrophy, an increase in crypt height, and an increase in intra-epithelial lymphocyte (IEL numbers up to >40 IEL/100 EC (Type 3C according to the Oberhuber classification, confirming the diagnosis of celiac disease. Five children had mild villous atrophy according to this classification (Type 3A, and they were considered to have potential celiac disease. Seventy-six children had normal intestinal biopsies. Therefore, the prevalence of celiac disease among Saudi children with short stature was 10.9%, and 4.3% of the children were diagnosed as having potential celiac disease. After confirming the diagnosis of celiac disease, all children were kept on a gluten-free diet and all of them showed improvement in their growth rate. We concluded that celiac disease is a very important cause of short stature in children without gastrointestinal complaints in Saudi Arabia. We highly recommend anti-tissue transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibody screening tests, and a small bowel biopsy to confirm the diagnosis of celiac disease irrespective of the results of the antibody assays, in children with

  11. Association of Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody Titer with Duodenal Histological Changes in Children with Celiac Disease

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    Hasan Hawamdeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is usually diagnosed by demonstrating gluten enteropathy in small bowel biopsy. Celiac specific antibodies are used as an initial screening test. The goal of this study is to test the relationship of the anti-tTG titer and severity of histological changes in Jordanian children with celiac disease. Method. The medical records of 81 children who had elevated anti-tTG titer and had duodenal biopsies available were retrospectively reviewed. Result. Assessing the association of anti-tTG titer with duodenal histopathological changes, 94% of those with high anti-tTG titer (≥180 U/mL had histological evidence of celiac disease. There was statistically significant positive association between high anti-tTG titer and Marsh grading as 82% of patients with Marsh III had high anti-tTG titer (Chi2 18.5; P value 0.00; Odds Ratio 8.5. The fraction of patients with Marsh III who were correctly identified as positive by anti-tTG titer ≥ 180 U/mL was high (sensitivity = 81.6. Moreover, the fraction of patients with anti-tTG titer ≥ 180 U/mL who had Marsh III was also high (positive predictive value = 78.4. Conclusion. Anti-tTG titer ≥ 180 U/mL had significant positive association with Marsh III histopathological changes of celiac disease.

  12. Association of LPP and TAGAP Polymorphisms with Celiac Disease Risk: A Meta-Analysis

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    Shi-Qi Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lipoma preferred partner (LPP and T-cell activation Rho GTPase activating protein (TAGAP polymorphisms might influence the susceptibility to celiac disease. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis by identifying relevant studies to estimate the risks of these polymorphisms on celiac disease. Methods: The PubMed, Web of Science and Embase databases were searched (up to October 2016 for LPP rs1464510 and TAGAP rs1738074 polymorphisms. Results: This meta-analysis included the same 7 studies for LPP rs1464510 and TAGAP rs1738074. The minor risk A allele at both rs1464510 and rs1738074 carried risks (odds ratios of 1.26 (95% CI: 1.22–1.30 and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.14–1.21, respectively, which contributed to increased risks in all celiac disease patients by 10.72% and 6.59%, respectively. The estimated lambdas were 0.512 and 0.496, respectively, suggesting that a co-dominant model would be suitable for both gene effects. Conclusions: This meta-analysis provides robust estimates that polymorphisms in LPP and TAGAP genes are potential risk factors for celiac disease in European and American. Prospective studies and more genome-wide association studies (GWAS are needed to confirm these findings, and some corresponding molecular biology experiments should be carried out to clarify the pathogenic mechanisms of celiac disease.

  13. [Prevalence of celiac disease in children with chronic diarrhea in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-qiong; Liu, Wei; Xu, Jun-jie; Mei, Hong; Peng, Han-ming; Gao, Yuan; Yuan, Lan; Xu, Chun-di

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease in children with chronic diarrhea in China. Inpatients of the pediatric hospitals in Shanghai, Jinan, Wuhan and Chengdu who were diagnosed as chronic diarrhea were recruited from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2008. Their clinical history, physical examination and laboratory data were collected. The SPSS version 11.5 statistical package for Microsoft Windows was used for statistical analysis. Data of 199 patients and finally enrolled 118 hospitalized chronic diarrhea inpatients during the observation period were collected and 14 (12%) of the chronic diarrhea patients were suspected as having celiac disease and in one the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed. Gluten-free diet (GFD) treatment was effective. M/F: 12/2, the age ranged from 6 months to 12 years; 43% (6/14) had malnutrition, 29% (4/14) had anemia, villous atrophy was found in 4 patients by endoscopy. Duodenal biopsies revealed stage I in 1, stage II in 2, stage IIIa in 7, stage IIIb in 3 and stage IIIc in 1 patient according to the modified Marsh classification. This study was the first time to report the research of celiac disease in children with chronic diarrhea in China. The percentage of suspicious celiac disease patients was 12% (14/118) in children and one was confirmed. CD exists in China. Chinese pediatricians should pay attention to the disease.

  14. The interaction between eating disorders and celiac disease: an exploration of 10 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Daniel A; Dennis, Melinda; Edwards George, Jessica B; Kelly, Ciaran P

    2007-03-01

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory disorder in which certain peptides from wheat and related grains trigger and maintain an immune reaction in the small intestine. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are eating disorders that are morbid and, at times, life-threatening forms of psychopathology. Despite a large body of evidence describing the detrimental effects of eating disorders on the gastrointestinal system, information on the role of the gastrointestinal system in causing or mimicking eating disorders is scarce. To date, eating disorders, as a comorbid condition affecting individuals with celiac disease, has received surprisingly little attention with only a single report found in peer-reviewed literature. In this report, we describe a series of 10 individuals with both celiac disease and eating disorders. These cases demonstrate the complex ways in which celiac disease and eating disorders interact with important clinical implications for the diagnosis and treatment of both illnesses. Our findings suggest that clinicians treating patients with eating disorders or celiac disease should be aware of both conditions to provide optimum care.

  15. Prevalence and clinical features of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Aline; Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Shiozawa, Maria Beatriz Cacese; Dantas-Corrêa, Esther Buzaglo; Canalli, Maria Heloisa Busi da Silva; Schiavon, Leonardo de Lucca; Narciso-Schiavon, Janaína Luz

    2014-12-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder with an average prevalence of 1% in Europe and the United States. Because of strong European ancestry in southern Brazil, this study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of celiac disease among autoimmune thyroiditis patients. Cross-sectional study in a public university hospital. This cross-sectional prevalence study included autoimmune thyroiditis patients who were tested for anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies between August 2010 and July 2011. Fifty-three patients with autoimmune thyroiditis were included; 92.5% were women, with mean age of 49.0 ± 13.5 years. Five patients (9.3%) were serologically positive for celiac disease: three of them (5.6%) were reactive for anti-endomysial antibodies and two (3.7%) for anti-transglutaminase. None of them exhibited anemia and one presented diarrhea. Endoscopy was performed on two patients: one with normal histology and the other with lymphocytic infiltrate and villous atrophy. The prevalence of celiac disease among patients with autoimmune thyroid disease was 9.3%; one patient complained of diarrhea and none presented anemia. Among at-risk populations, like autoimmune thyroiditis patients, the presence of diarrhea or anemia should not be used as a criterion for indicating celiac disease investigation. This must be done for all autoimmune thyroiditis patients because of its high prevalence.

  16. Celiac disease and its impact on the oral health status - review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzywicka, Barbara; Herman, Katarzyna; Kowalczyk-Zając, Małgorzata; Pytrus, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the most recent reports on celiac disease, especially its manifestations within the oral cavity. Particular attention should be paid to typical dental enamel defects with a various degree of advancement: discolorations, horizontal groves and pits, and even significant structural destruction causing the change of the dental crown. Symmetric location of defects within all dentition sections, and within the same anatomic groups of teeth (the most frequently: incisors and first permanent molars), is specific for celiac disease. The changes described above may be the only manifestation of celiac disease; therefore, in the case of their occurrence further studies towards gluten intolerance are recommended even when other symptoms are not present. In celiac patients, recurrent aphthae and other disorders of the oral mucosa such as ulceration, erythema, atrophic glossitis, as well as dryness and a burning sensation (particularly of the tongue) may be present, which may be caused by malnutrition. Delayed tooth eruption may also be a consequence of alimentary deficiency in celiac disease.

  17. Is Celiac Disease an Etiological Factor in Children with Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Taner; Balcı, Oya; Özçay, Figen; Bayraktar, Nilufer; Alehan, Füsun

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with nonsyndromic intellectual disability, we investigated serum levels of tissue transglutaminase antibody and total IgA from 232 children with nonsyndromic intellectual disability and in a healthy control group of 239 children. Study participants who were positive for tissue transglutaminase antibody underwent a duodenal biopsy. A total of 3 patients in the nonsyndromic intellectual disability group (5.45%) and 1 in the control group (0.41%) had positive serum tissue transglutaminase antibody (P > .05). Duodenal biopsy confirmed celiac disease in only 1 patient who had nonsyndromic intellectual disability. In this present study, children with nonsyndromic intellectual disability did not exhibit a higher celiac disease prevalence rate compared with healthy controls. Therefore, we suggest that screening test for celiac disease should not be necessary as a part of the management of mild and moderate nonsyndromic intellectual disability. However, cases of severe nonsyndromic intellectual disability could be examined for celiac disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Translation, cultural adaptation, and validation of the celiac disease DUX (CDDUX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Manuela Torres Camara; Tassitano, Rafael Miranda; Brandt, Kátia Galeão; Antunes, Margarida Maria de Castro; Silva, Giselia Alves Pontes da

    2015-01-01

    To translate, cross-culturally adapt, and validate a specific questionnaire for the evaluation of celiac children and adolescents, the celiac disease DUX (CDDUX). The steps suggested by Reichenheim and Moraes (2007) were followed to obtain conceptual, item, semantic, operational, and measurement equivalences. Four pediatric gastroenterologists; a researcher with tool validation background; three English teachers; and 33 celiac patients, aged 8-18 years, and their caregivers participated in the study. The scores of celiac patients and those obtained from their caregivers were compared. Among the patients, the scores were compared in relation to gender and age. All items were considered relevant to the construct and good semantic equivalence of the version was acquired. During measurement equivalence, the exploratory factor analysis showed appropriate weight of all items and good internal consistency, with Cronbach's α of 0.81. Significant difference was found among the final scores of children and their caregivers. There was no difference among the final scores in relation to gender or age. The questionnaire was translated and adapted according to all the proposed steps, with all equivalences adequately met. It is a valid tool to access the QoL of celiac children and adolescents in the translated language. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence of celiac disease in children with idiopathic epilepsy in southeast Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işıkay, Sedat; Kocamaz, Halil

    2014-05-01

    We examined the prevalence of celiac disease in children with idiopathic epilepsy. Patients were screened for celiac disease using the immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and small intestinal biopsy were offered to all antibody-positive patients. The control group consisted of 400 healthy children. A total of 600 patients (332 boys, 268 girls; 8 months-15 years; 9.40 ± 4.09 years) were studied. In 38 patients, the diagnosis was childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms. Six of the 38 patients with childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms (15.7%) had positive immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. The frequency of biopsy-proven celiac disease was 15.7% (6/38) among children with childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms. None of the control patients had positive immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody results. These findings suggest that the prevalence of celiac disease in children with partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms may be higher than with other types of epilepsies. It may be reasonable to screen individuals with this type of epilepsy for celiac disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence and clinical features of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ventura

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder with an average prevalence of 1% in Europe and the United States. Because of strong European ancestry in southern Brazil, this study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of celiac disease among autoimmune thyroiditis patients.DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study in a public university hospital.METHODS: This cross-sectional prevalence study included autoimmune thyroiditis patients who were tested for anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies between August 2010 and July 2011.RESULTS: Fifty-three patients with autoimmune thyroiditis were included; 92.5% were women, with mean age of 49.0 ± 13.5 years. Five patients (9.3% were serologically positive for celiac disease: three of them (5.6% were reactive for anti-endomysial antibodies and two (3.7% for anti-transglutaminase. None of them exhibited anemia and one presented diarrhea. Endoscopy was performed on two patients: one with normal histology and the other with lymphocytic infiltrate and villous atrophy.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of celiac disease among patients with autoimmune thyroid disease was 9.3%; one patient complained of diarrhea and none presented anemia. Among at-risk populations, like autoimmune thyroiditis patients, the presence of diarrhea or anemia should not be used as a criterion for indicating celiac disease investigation. This must be done for all autoimmune thyroiditis patients because of its high prevalence.